Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project

Student Guide

Sun Microsystems, Inc. ,

Part No: 819–5580–10 March, 2006

Copyright 2006 Sun Microsystems, Inc.

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All rights reserved.

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Contents

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What is the OpenSolaris Project? .................................................................................................... 7 Web Resources for OpenSolaris ...................................................................................................... 10 Discussions .........................................................................................................................................11 Communities ......................................................................................................................................11 Projects ................................................................................................................................................11 OpenGrok .......................................................................................................................................... 12

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Planning the OpenSolaris Environment ...................................................................................... 15 Development Environment Configuration ................................................................................... 17 Networking ........................................................................................................................................ 18

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OpenSolaris Policies ........................................................................................................................ 21 Development Process and Coding Style ......................................................................................... 23

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Features of the OpenSolaris Project ............................................................................................. 25 Overview ............................................................................................................................................ 26 Security Technology: Least Privilege ............................................................................................... 26 Predictive Self-Healing ..................................................................................................................... 26 Zones .................................................................................................................................................. 28 Branded Zones (BrandZ) ................................................................................................................. 28 Zettabyte Filesystem (ZFS) .............................................................................................................. 29 Dynamic Tracing (DTrace) .............................................................................................................. 29 Modular Debugger (MDB) .............................................................................................................. 30

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....................................... 87 DTracing a Process Running in a Zone .. 58 8 Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace ....................... 47 Listing Traceable Probes .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 43 6 Getting Started With DTrace .............................................................................................................. 38 Kernel Overview ................................................................................................................ 71 Software Memory Management ......................................... 49 Programming in D ......................................................... 45 Enabling Simple DTrace Probes ........... 74 10 Observing Processes in Zones With DTrace ............................................................................................................................................................ 41 Process Debugging ................................................. 55 Enabling User Mode Probes .......................................Contents 5 Programming Concepts .......................................................................................................... 93 4 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.......................................................................................................... 89 Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems .............. 2006 ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 92 Creating a Filesystem and /home Directories ........................... 91 Creating Mirrored Storage Pools ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 73 Using DTrace and MDB to Examine Virtual Memory .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 36 CPU Scheduling ............................................ 33 Threaded Programming ...................... 85 Global and Non-Global Zones ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88 11 Configuring Filesystems With ZFS ........................................................................................................ 52 7 Debugging Applications With DTrace .................................................... 62 9 Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB ........................ 61 Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program ............................... 31 Process and System Management ............ 57 DTracing Applications ......................................

...........................................................................................................125 13 Debugging Drivers With DTrace ................................... 110 Writing the Driver Data Structures .....123 Removing the Template Driver .............................................131 Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS .............................132 ..........120 Building and Installing the Template Driver ................94 12 Writing a Template Character Device Driver ................................................................98 Writing the Loadable Module Configuration Entry Points ...........122 Adding the Template Driver .......................121 Testing the Template Driver .............................................................................................................................124 Dummy Driver Source .........................................................................................................................................................................................Configuring RAID-Z ...........................................................................................................................................................................................98 Writing the Autoconfiguration Entry Points .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................102 Writing the User Context Entry Points ...................... 113 Writing the Device Configuration File ....................................................................................................122 Reading and Writing the Device .....................................................................95 Overview of the Template Driver Example .................................................97 Writing the Template Driver ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

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1 Objectives M O D U L E 1 What is the OpenSolaris Project? The objective of this course is to learn about operating system computing by using the Solaris™ Operating System source code that is freely available through the OpenSolaris project. Then. and source browser for the OpenSolaris project. we’ll work through the following labs which are designed to demonstrate typical operating system issues by using OpenSolaris: I Process Debugging I I I I Enabling Simple DTrace Probes Listing Traceable Probes Programming in D Enabling User Mode DTrace Probes I Application Debugging I I DTracing Applications Using DTrace to Profile and Debug a C++ Program I Memory Management I Using DTrace and MDB to Examine Virtual Memory I Observing Processes I DTracing a Process Running in a Zone I Configuring Filesystems I I Creating Mirrored ZFS Storage Pools Creating a Filesystem and /home Directories 7 . communities. projects. discussions. we’ll briefly describe how the features and documentation enable straightforward configuration of a development environment and initiation into the development process. We’ll start by showing you where to go to access the code. Finally.

2006 .What is the OpenSolaris Project? I I Configuring RAID-Z Device Drivers I I Writing a Template Character Device Driver Debugging a Device Driver with DTrace 8 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.

x86 and AMD x64 architectures Leadership on 64–bit computing $0. Inc. including being the basis for future versions of the Solaris OS product. over 12.What is the OpenSolaris Project? Relevance The OpenSolaris project was launched on June 14. third-party products and distributions of interest to the community. innovative. In the first eight months. It is a nexus for a community development effort where contributors from Sun and elsewhere can collaborate on developing and improving operating system technology.00 for infinite right-to-use Free. and end users of the Solaris Operating System. other operating system projects. The OpenSolaris project is currently sponsored by Sun Microsystems.000 participants have become registered members. Teaching with the OpenSolaris project provides the following advantages over instructional operating systems: I I Access to code for the revolutionary technologies in the Solaris 10 operating system Access to code for a commercial OS that is used in many environments and that scales to large systems Hardware platform support including SPARC. and rock-solid code base Availability under the OSI-approved Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL) allows royalty-free use. complete. seamless. The OpenSolaris source code will find a variety of uses. system administrators. The engineering community is continually growing and changing to meet the needs of developers. and derived works I I I I I Module 1 • What is the OpenSolaris Project? 9 . modification. exciting. 2005 to create a community development effort using the Solaris OS code as a starting point.

as shown in the upper-left of the graphic. and source browser resources as shown in the following graphic. In addition.org/os/downloads. projects. The icons in the upper-right of the OpenSolaris web pages link you to discussions. the OpenSolaris web site provides search across all of the site content and aggregated blogs.opensolaris. view the license terms and access instructions for building source and installing the pre-built archives at: http://www. 2006 .Web Resources for OpenSolaris Web Resources for OpenSolaris You can download the OpenSolaris source. communities. 10 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. downloads.

Web Resources for OpenSolaris Discussions Discussions provide you with access to the experts who are working on new open source technologies. support. See http://www.org/os/projects for the current list of new projects.org/os/community/os_user_groups Academic and Research DTrace ZFS Zones Documentation Device Drivers Tools User Groups These are only a few of over 30 communities actively working on OpenSolaris. Module 1 • What is the OpenSolaris Project? 11 . or joint-authored products.org/os/community/zones http://www.org/os/community/tools http://www.opensolaris.org/os/community/dtrace http://www.opensolaris. graphics. technologies. for example: http://www.opensolaris.opensolaris. Communities Communities provide connections to other participants with similar interests in the OpenSolaris project. See http://opensolaris.opensolaris.org/os/communities for the complete list. and user groups.org/os/community/edu http://www.org/os/community/device_drivers http://www.opensolaris. New projects are initiated by participants by request on the discussions. See http://www. Discussions also provide an archive of previous conversations that you can reference for answers to your questions. Projects have code repositories and committers and may live within a community or independently. tools. Communities form around interest groups. Projects Projects hosted on the opensolaris.org web site are collaborative efforts that produce objects such as code changes.org/os/community/zfs http://www.org/os/discussions for the complete list of forums to which you can subscribe.org/os/community/documentation http://www.opensolaris.opensolaris.opensolaris. documents. Projects that are submitted and accepted by at least one other interested participant are given space on the projects page to get started.opensolaris.

you can download the complete codebase. OpenGrok understands various program file formats and version control histories like SCCS. extensively commented code that reads like a book. The following graphic shows the results of an OpenGrok file path search on fbt. so that you can better understand the open source.org/source to try it out! The first project to be hosted on opensolaris.Web Resources for OpenSolaris OpenGrok OpenGrok™ is the fast and usable source code search and cross reference engine used in OpenSolaris. If you’re interested in working on an OpenSolaris project.org was OpenGrok. 2006 .opensolaris. If you just need to know how some features work in the Solaris OS.opensolaris. 12 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.org/os/project/opengrok to find out about the ongoing development project. See http://cvs. See http://www. RCS. the source code browser provides a convenient alternative. and CVS. Take an online tour of the source and you’ll discover cleanly written.

Web Resources for OpenSolaris Module 1 • What is the OpenSolaris Project? 13 .

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support information and documentation available for the OpenSolaris project installation and configuration. 15 .M O D U L E Planning the OpenSolaris Environment 2 2 Objectives The objective of this module is to understand the system requirements.

html I 16 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.. Sun Microsystems. Sun Microsystems. Inc. Resources for Running Solaris OS on a Laptop: http://www.com/bigadmin/features/articles/laptop_resources. 2005.sun.. Click Sun Studio 11 Collection to see Sun Studio books about dbx. Inc. 2005.Planning the OpenSolaris Environment Additional Resources I I Solaris 10 Installation Guide: Basic Installations. Sun Studio 11: C User’s Guide. and other software development topics. 2006 . dmake. Performance Analyzer.

Pre-built OpenSolaris distributions are limited to the Solaris Express: Community Release [DVD Version].opensolaris.Development Environment Configuration Development Environment Configuration There is no substitute for hands-on experience with operating system code and direct access to kernel modules. and Xeon EM64T.PLATFORM.org/gswiki/Download-form. Consider the following features of OpenSolaris as you plan your development environment: TABLE 2–1 Configurable Lab Component Support Configurable Component Support From the OpenSolaris Project Hardware OpenSolaris supports systems that use the SPARC® and x86 families of processor architectures: UltraSPARC®. The SUNWonbld-DATE.PLATFORM.org/os/downloads for detailed instructions about how how to build from source. See http://www. AMD64.bz2 file is provided if you build from source.bz2 file is provided if you are installing from pre-built archives. For the OpenSolaris kernel with the GNU user environment. see the Solaris OS Hardware Compatibility List at http://www. and documentation provided for the OpenSolaris project. forums. Build 32 or newer. The unique challenges of kernel development and access to root privileges for a system are made simpler by the tools.sun. try http://www. Build tools Module 2 • Planning the OpenSolaris Environment 17 . SPARC64.gnusolaris. Pentium. Source files Install images BFU archives The on-bfu-DATE.tar.com/bigadmin/hcl.tar. For supported systems.

OpenSolaris is also a VMWare™ guest.opensolaris. I Memory/Disk Requirements I Memory requirement: 256M minimum. allowing one or more processes to run in isolation from other activity on the system. See http://www. OpenSolaris supports Xen. 2006 .org/ os/community/tools/sun_studio_tools/ for instructions about how to download and install the latest versions. See http://www.opensolaris. I Speeds application performance by about 50 percent by using an enhanced TCP/IP stack 18 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.org/ os/community/xen/ for details and links to the Xen project.org/os/project/content/articles/vmware for draft version of a recent article describing how to get started. Also. 1GB recommended Disk space requirement: 350M bytes Virtual OS environments Zones and Branded Zones in OpenSolaris provide protected and virtualized operating system environments within an instance of Solaris. Refer to Module 2 for more information about how Zones and Branded Zones enable kernel and user mode development of Solaris and Linux applications without impacting developers in separate zones.opensolaris. Networking The OpenSolaris project meets future networking challenges by radically improving your network performance without requiring changes to your existing applications. refer to http://www. see http://opensolaris.org/ os/community/tools/gcc for the gcc community.Development Environment Configuration TABLE 2–1 Configurable Lab Component Support Configurable Component (Continued) Support From the OpenSolaris Project Compilers and tools Sun Studio 10 compilers and tools are freely available for use by OpenSolaris developers. an open-source virtual machine monitor developed by the Xen team at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory.

wireless networking. such as 10 Gigabit Ethernet. and Voice over IP (VoIP) networking features through extended routing and protocol support Supports current IPv6 specifications I I Find out more about ongoing networking developments in the OpenSolaris project here: http://opensolaris.Development Environment Configuration I Supports many of the latest networking technologies. empowered to update it yourself. Participation in the OpenSolaris project can improve overall performance across your network with the latest technologies. Module 2 • Planning the OpenSolaris Environment 19 . Your lab environment becomes self-sustaining when hosted on OpenSolaris because you are always running the latest and greatest environment. streaming. and hardware offloading Accommodates high-availability.org/os/community/networking/.

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M O D U L E OpenSolaris Policies 3 3 Objectives The objective of this module is to understand at a high-level the development process steps and the coding style that is used in the OpenSolaris project. 21 .

http://www.opensolaris. http://www.opensolaris.org/os/community/documentation/getting_started_docs/ I 22 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.org/os/community/onnv/os_dev_process/ C Style and Coding Standards for SunOS. 2006 .OpenSolaris Policies Additional Resources I OpenSolaris Development Process.

which means conducting reviews for code.org web page. complete the following next steps: I I I I Identify design and architectural reviewers Write a design document Write a test plan Conduct design reviews and get the appropriate approvals 3. If a formal review is needed. Next.Development Process and Coding Style Development Process and Coding Style The development process for the OpenSolaris project follows the following high-level steps: 1. if needed Identifying code reviewers in preparation for integration 4. Integration Integration happens after all reviews have been completed and permission to integrate has been granted.org/os/community/documentation/getting_started_docs/ I I I I Writing the test suites Passing various unit and pre-integration tests Writing or updating the user documentation. Design The Design phase determines whether or not a formal design review is even needed.opensolaris. someone has an idea for an enhancement or has a gripe about a defect. The announcement has the following benefits: I I I I Precipitate discussion of the change or enhancement Determine the complexity of the proposed change(s) Gauge community interest Identify potential team members 2.opensolaris. and completeness. Module 3 • OpenSolaris Policies 23 . announce it to other developers on the appropriate E-mail list. Idea First. Search for an existing bug or file a new bug or request for enhancement (RFE) by using the http://bugs. The Integration phase is to make sure everything that was supposed to be done has in fact been done. Implementation The Implementation phase consists of the following: I Writing of the actual code in accordance with policies and standards Download C Style and Coding Standards for SunOS here:http://www. documentation.

Maintainability – OpenSolaris must be architected so that common subroutines are combined into libraries or kernel modules that can be used by an arbitrary number of consumers.org/os/community/onnv/os_dev_process/ for more detailed information about the process that is used for collaborative development of OpenSolaris code. OpenSolaris enforces a coding style on contributed code. That document also details the following design principles and core values that are to be applied to source code development for the OpenSolaris project: I Reliability – OpenSolaris must perform correctly. I I I I I I I I Refer to http://www. regardless of its source. Availability – Services must be designed to be restartable in the event of an application failure and OpenSolaris itself must be able to recover from non-fatal hardware failures. Security – OpenSolaris security must be designed into the operating system. Performance – The performance of OpenSolaris must be second to none when compared to other operating systems running on identical environments. Manageability – It must allow for the management of individual components. with flow charts that illustrate the development phases. These tools are cstyle(1) for verifying compliance of C code with most style guidelines.Development Process and Coding Style The formal process document for OpenSolaris describes the previous steps in greater detail. Compatibility – New subsystems and interfaces must be extensible and versioned in order to allow for future enhancements and changes without sacrificing compatibility. automate the diagnosis.org/os/community/onnv/. Serviceability – It must be possible to diagnose both fatal and transient issues and wherever possible. with mechanisms in place in order to audit changes done to the system and by whom. providing accurate results with no data loss or corruption. Platform Neutrality – OpenSolaris must continue to be platform neutral and lower level abstractions must be designed with multiple and future platforms in mind. in a consistent and straightforward manner. 2006 . Like many projects. Two tools for checking many elements of the coding style are available as part of the OpenSolaris distribution.opensolaris. software or hardware. 24 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. and hdrchk(1) for checking the style of C and C++ headers. This style is described in detail at http://opensolaris.

25 .M O D U L E Features of the OpenSolaris Project 4 4 Objectives The objective of this module is to describe the major features of the OpenSolaris project and how the features have fundamentally changed operating system computing.

the UltraSPARC 26 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. 2006 . Predictive Self-Healing Predictive self-healing was implemented in two ways in the Solaris 10 OS.Overview Overview Now that you have considered the components. including the CPU and Memory error handling for UltraSPARC III and IV. This section describes the new Fault Management Architecture and Services Management Facility that make up the self-healing technology. participate in research. FMA. let’s briefly talk about the following features of the operating environment: I I I I I I I Security Technology: Least Privilege Services Management Facility (SMF) Zones Branded Zones (BrandZ) Zetabyte File System (ZFS) Dynamic Tracing Facility (DTrace) Modular Debugger (MDB) Security Technology: Least Privilege UNIX® has historically had an all-or-nothing privilege model that imposes the following restrictions: I I I I No way to limit root user privileges No way for non-root users to perform privileged operations Applications needing only a few privileged operations must run as root Very few are trusted with root privileges and virtually no students are so trusted In the Solaris OS we’ve developed fine-grained privileges. for building resilient error handlers. The least privilege allows students to be granted the privileges that they need to complete their course work. Many parts of Solaris are already participating in FMA. processes. error telemetry. automated diagnosis software. response agents. and a consistent model of system failures for a management stack. and guidelines for OpenSolaris development. Fine-grained privileges allows applications and users to run with just the privileges they need. Fault Management Architecture (FMA) The Solaris OS provides a new architecture. and maintain a portion of the campus or department infrastructure.

Module 4 • Features of the OpenSolaris Project 27 . Opteron support is scheduled for build 34.org/os/community/smf/scfdot to see a graph of the SMF services and their dependencies on an x86 system freshly installed with the Solaris OS Nevada build 24. A variety of projects are underway. When a subsystem is converted to participate in Fault Management.org/os/community/fm for information about how to participate in the Fault Management community or to download the Fault Management MIB that is currently in development. The Fault Management tools and architecture enable development of self-healing content for software and hardware failures. and more. Beyond consistent error handling. for both microscopic and macroscopic system resources. and telemetry events are produced that drive automated diagnosis and response. including full support for CPU. and observation Access to service-based resource management Simplified boot-process debugging I I I See http://opensolaris. Services Management Facility (SMF) SMF creates a supported. Memory. software bugs. The sophisticated resource management facilities of zones addresss the unique challenges of application development and testing in shared environments. The smf(5) framework replaces (in a compatible manner) the existing init. In addition to service-level management improvements. error handling is made resilient so that the system can continue to operate despite some underlying failure. the OpenSolaris project provides application-level features and functionality to create separate and protected run-time environments. and I/O faults on Opteron. and integration with various management stacks. promoting the service to a first-class operating system object. conversion of key device drivers. unified model for management of an enormous number of services. and remote command execution in the OpenSolaris project. all with a unified. ftp requests. simple view for administrators and system management software.Overview PCI HBAs. See http://opensolaris.d(4) startup mechanism and includes an enhanced inetd(1M) . SMF gives developers the following: I Automated restart of services in dependency order due to administrative errors. configuration. or uncorrectable hardware errors A single API for service management. such as email delivery.

org/os/community/brandz/install/ for the installation requirements and instructions. The applications are protected from each other to provide software fault isolation. 2006 . The lx brand enables Linux binary applications to run unmodified on Solaris. using BrandZ. for example. the OpenSolaris project takes zones a step further and provides separate and protected run-time environments. only 32-bit Linux applications are able to run. A branded zone may be as simple as an environment where the standard Solaris utilities are replaced by their GNU equivalents. or as complex as a complete Linux user space. they co-exist within one operating system instance. Branded Zones (BrandZ) BrandZ is a framework that extends the zones infrastructure to create Branded Zones. The OpenSolaris project addresses the unique challenges of operating system development and testing for application performance using features like zones. for Linux applications. zones and resource management are often referred to as containers. within zones that are running a complete Linux user space. Zones can be combined with the resource management facilities which are present in OpenSolaris to provide more complete.org/os/community/zones/faq/ for answers to a large number of common questions about zones and links to the latest administration documentation. which are zones that contain non-native operating environments. porting to SPARC might be an interesting community project because BrandZ lx is still very much a work in progress. and are usually managed as one entity. Additionally. To ease the labor of managing multiple applications and their environments. While the zone supplies the security. and includes the tools necessary to install a CentOS or Red Hat Enterprise Linux distribution inside a zone on a Solaris system. name space and fault isolation. Zones provide protected environments for Solaris applications. The lx brand enables user-level Linux software to run on a machine with a OpenSolaris kernel.Overview Zones A zone is a virtual operating system abstraction that provides a protected environment in which applications run. isolated environments. filesystem partitioning for kernel development is simplified by the ZFS code in the OpenSolaris project. The lx brand will run on x86/x64 systems booted with either a 32-bit or 64-bit kernel. However. 28 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. See http://opensolaris. Regardless of the underlying kernel. This feature is only available for x86 and AMD x64 architectures at this time. the resource management facilities can be used to prevent processes in one zone from using too much of a system resource or to guarantee them a certain service level. Refer to http://opensolaris. Together.

DTrace enables you to do the following: I I I I I I Dynamically enable and manage thousands of probes Dynamically associate predicates and actions with probes Dynamically manage trace buffers and probe overhead Examine trace data from a live system or from a system crash dump Implement new trace data providers that plug into DTrace Implement trace data consumers that provide data display 29 Module 4 • Features of the OpenSolaris Project . ZFS presents a pooled storage model that eliminates the concept of volumes and the associated problems of partitions. ZFS uses variable-width RAID stripes so that all writes are full-stripe writes. which describe the layout of physical storage and its fault characteristics. Dynamic Tracing (DTrace) DTrace provides a powerful infrastructure to permit administrators. In RAID-Z. In addition to pooled storage.opensolaris. and stranded storage. so they can be created easily and quickly like directories. See http://www. and service personnel to concisely answer arbitrary questions about the behavior of the operating system and user programs. wasted bandwidth. This is only possible because ZFS integrates filesystem and device management in such a way that the filesystem’s metadata has enough information about the underlying data replication model to handle variable-width RAID stripes. They grow automatically within the space allocated to the storage pool. RAID-Z is a virtual device that stores data and parity on multiple disks. a demonstration of administering mirrored pools with ZFS. similar to RAID-5. The combined I/O bandwidth of all devices in the pool is available to all filesystems at all times. RAID-Z is the world’s first software-only solution to the RAID-5 write hole.org/os/community/zfs/demos/basics/ for 100 Mirrored Filesystems in 5 Minutes.Overview Zettabyte Filesystem (ZFS) ZFS filesystems are not constrained to specific devices. provisioning. the code made available in the OpenSolaris project provides a sophisticated dynamic tracing facility (DTrace) for debugging kernel and application behavior. developers. In addition to enhanced configuration and administration features that simplify and support developer requirements. Each storage pool is comprised of one or more virtual devices. ZFS provides RAID-Z data redundancy configuration.

the OpenSolaris project provides debugging facilities for low-level types of development. 2006 . user process core files. kernel crash dumps. Generally. where you can ask the experts or review previous conversations and common questions. There is an active community for MDB.opensolaris. device driver development. and knowledge of assembly language to diagnose and correct. examination of core files.org/os/community/mdb 30 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. MDB is available as two commands that share common features: mdb and kmdb.org/os/community/dtrace. the live operating system. In addition to DTrace. Modular Debugger (MDB) MDB is a debugger designed to facilitate analysis of problems that require low-level debugging facilities. See http://www.Overview I Implement tools that configure DTrace probes Find the DTrace community pages here http://www. object files. You can use the kmdb command to debug the live operating system kernel and device drivers when you also need to control and halt the execution of the kernel.opensolaris. kernel and device developers rely on mdb to determine why and where their code went wrong. You can use the mdb command interactively or in scripts to debug live user processes. for example. and other files.

as follows: Threaded Programming Kernel Overview CPU Scheduling Process Debugging 31 .M O D U L E Programming Concepts 5 I I I I 5 Objectives This module provides a high-level description of the fundamental concepts of the OpenSolaris programming environment.

. Sun Microsystems. I I I I 32 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. Prentice Hall PTR (August 19. Inc. 2005. STREAMS Programming Guide.Programming Concepts Additional Resources I Solaris Internals (2nd Edition). Inc. 2006 . Prentice Hall PTR (May 12. Sun Microsystems. by Rich Teer Multithreaded Programming Guide. 2005. 2005. 2006) by Jim Mauro and Richard McDougall Solaris Systems Programming. 2004). Solaris 64-bit Developer’s Guide... Inc. Sun Microsystems.

By default. Processes may be bound to pools that have non-empty resource sets.Process and System Management Process and System Management The basic unit of workload is the process. Also. and are bound to the same resource sets associated with the resource pool of that process. When the pools facility is enabled. pool_default.c. either all processes in a given task or a project will be bound to a new pool. The following picture shows one possible pool configuration with three pools and three processor sets. each user is assigned by the system administrator to a project. If we search OpenGrok for pool. or (in case of an error) they will be all left bound to the old pool. A task contains the login process as well as subsequent child processes. Each successful login to a project creates a new task. Process IDs (PIDs) are numbered sequentially throughout the system. Note that processor set "foo" is not associated with any pools and therefore cannot have any processes bound to it. note that processes in Task 2 are bound to different pools. grouped. we find that the code comments provide a graphical representation of these relationships: 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * The operation that binds tasks and projects to pools is atomic. That is. which is a network-wide administrative identifier. and processor sets are managed through the pset() system call. New pools can be created and associated with processor sets. Module 5 • Programming Concepts 33 . which is a grouping mechanism for processes. processor sets must be managed by using the pools facility. When the pools facility is disabled. Two pools (default and foo) are associated with the same processor set (default). Threads or LWPs of the same process do not have pool bindings. The resource pools facility brings together process-bindable resources into a common abstraction called a pool. Processor sets and other entities are configured. all processes belong to the same pool. and labelled such that workload components are associated with a subset of a system’s total resources. Processes in a given task or a given project can only be bound to different pools if they were rebound individually one by one as single processes.

...... projects...|.... often for security purposes...d|..... pools...... Zones are setup by system administrators. 34 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March...|.........|.... and processor sets.....::........| p | : : +---+ :: +---+ +---+ +---+ :: +---+ +---+ : :... in order to isolate groups of users or processes from one another......... Processes can be optionally be run inside a zone... 2006 ........ tasks... : | :: | | | :: | | : : +---+ :: +---+ +---+ +---+ :: +---+ +---+ : Processes : | p | :: | p | | p | | p | :: | p |........|. A zone can be thought of as a container in which one or more applications run isolated from all other applications on the system.::.: Task 1 Task 2 Task N | | | | | | | +-----------+ | +-----------+ +--| Project 1 |--+ | Project N | +-----------+ +-----------+ This is just an illustration of relationships between processes.Process and System Management 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Processor Sets +---------+ +--------------+========================> | default | a| | +---------+ s| | || s| | +---------+ o| | | foo | c| | +---------+ i| | || a| | +---------+ t| | +------> | bar | e| | | +---------+ d| | | | | +---------+ +---------+ +---------+ Pools | default |======| foo |======| bar | +---------+ +---------+ +---------+ @ @ @ @ @ @ b| | | | | | o| | | | | | u| +-----+ | +-------+ | +---+ n| | | | | | . New types of resource sets will be added in the future.....|....

and performs no other I/O. An example might be the ability to change the system’s time-of-day clock. I I I Module 5 • Programming Concepts 35 . The few applications which fall into this category may need applications to run properly inside a zone or in some cases. a brand may choose to supplement or replace the standard behavior of the Solaris OS. thread creation path. For example. I I BrandZ provides a set of interposition points in the kernel: I These points are found in the syscall path. Each brand may provide pre-boot and post-boot scripts that allow us to do any final boot-time setup or configuration. Fundamentally different brands may require new interposition points. I I BrandZ extends the Zones infrastructure in user space in the following ways: I I A brand is an attribute of a zone. etc. Applications which require direct access to certain devices. The zonecfg and zoneadm tools can set and report a zone’s brand type. Applications should instead use one of the many IP services. A small number of applications which are normally run as root or with certain privileges may not run inside a zone if they rely on being able to access or change some global resource. /dev/kmem. or a network device. in some cases this may increase security risks. will usually work if the zone is configured correctly. should continue to be used within the global zone.Process and System Management Most software that runs on OpenSolaris will run unmodified in a zone. for example. process loading path. Here are some guidelines: I An application which accesses the network and files. These interposition points are only applied to processes in a branded zone. Applications which require direct access to these devices may need to be modified to work correctly. However. should work correctly. recompiling an application is not necessary in order to run it inside a zone. a disk partition. which allows us to install an arbitrary collection of software in the branded zone. Since zones do not change the OpenSolaris Application Programming Interface (APIs) or Application Binary Interface (ABI). At each of these points. set at zone configuration time. Each brand provides its own installation routine.

Communication between the threads of one process is simple because the threads share everything. void*(*start_routine)(void *). so programming with multiple processes is programming with multiple threads. The four synchronization objects are mutex locks. Thread synchronization enables you to control program flow and access to shared data for concurrently executing threads. I Mutex locks allow only one thread at a time to execute a specific section of code. The libraries are libpthread for POSIX threads. a thread must first acquire the exclusive write lock. inlcuding a common address space and open file descriptors. resource pools. 2006 . zones. Use pthread_create(3C) to add a new thread of control to the current process. the thread exits with the exit status set to the value returned by start_routine. projects. void *arg). I I I 36 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. To modify a resource. let’s discuss processes in the context of threads. When start_routine returns. The pthread_create() function is called with attr that has the necessary state behavior. Go to /on/usr/src/lib/libc/spec/threads. and creating a process involves creating a new address space. and libthread for OpenSolaris threads. When the count is reached.Process and System Management Threaded Programming Now that we’ve learned about processes in the context of tasks. data produced by one thread is immediately available to all the other threads. Traditional UNIX already supports the concept of threads. Multithreading provides flexibility by decoupling kernel-level and user-level resources. Read/write locks permit concurrent reads and exclusive writes to a protected shared resource. and semaphores. In OpenSolaris. The count is the limit on how many threads can have access to a semaphore. the thread that is trying to access the resource blocks. So. const pthread_attr_t *tattr. int pthread_create(pthread_t *tid. Condition variables block threads until a particular condition is true. a process is also an address space. or to access specific data. An exclusive write lock is not permitted until all read locks have been released. start_routine is the function with which the new thread begins execution. condition variables. But. Counting semaphores typically coordinate access to resources. Each process contains a single thread. and branded zones. read/write locks. Any other return value indicates that an error occurred.spec in OpenGrok for the complete list of pthread functions and declarations. pthread_create() returns zero when the call completes successfully. multithreading support for both sets of interfaces is provided by the standard C library.

. The threads can communicate with each other even though the threads in different processes are generally invisible to each other.. Synchronization objects can also be placed in files. The use of mutexes over reader/writer locks also enables the use of condition variables for controlling thread concurrency (allows access to objects only after their . through which we vector all rt_mutex_lock/rt_mutex_unlock calls. Two models are supported: TI_VERSION == 1 Under this model libthread provides rw_rwlock/rw_unlock.Process and System Management Synchronization Synchronization objects are variables in memory that you access just like data. Under lib/libthread these interfaces provided _sigon/_sigoff (unlike lwp/libthread that provided signal blocking via bind_guard/bind_clear. When called via _ld_concurrency() from libthread these vectors are reassigned to real threads interfaces.init has completed). The synchronization objects can have lifetimes beyond the life of the creating process. In a non-threaded environment all thread interfaces are vectored to noops. Threads in different processes can communicate with each other through synchronization objects that are placed in threads-controlled shared memory. Code comments in the mutex. This removes recursive problems encountered when obtaining locking interfaces from libthread.1 and libthread.c file reveal the following: 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 . Module 5 • Programming Concepts 37 . Lower level locking is derived from internally bound _lwp_ interfaces.so. Both libthreads block signals under the bind_guard/bind_clear interfaces. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Implementation of all threads interfaces between ld. TI_VERSION == 2 Under this model only libthreads bind_guard/bind_clear and thr_self interfaces are used.

Process and System Management

OpenGrok results for a full search on POSIX reveal the POSIX.pod file that includes the module, as described in the following comments:
POSIX 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 ... Perl interface to IEEE Std 1003.1 =head1 SYNOPSIS use POSIX; use POSIX qw(setsid); use POSIX qw(:errno_h :fcntl_h); printf "EINTR is %d\n", EINTR; $sess_id = POSIX::setsid(); $fd = POSIX::open($path, O_CREAT|O_EXCL|O_WRONLY, 0644); # note: that’s a filedescriptor, *NOT* a filehandle =head1 DESCRIPTION The POSIX module permits you to access all (or nearly all) the standard POSIX 1003.1 identifiers. Many of these identifiers have been given Perl-ish interfaces. Things which are C<#defines> in C, like EINTR or O_NDELAY, are automatically exported into your namespace. All functions are only exported if you ask for them explicitly. Most likely people will prefer to use the fully-qualified function names. This document gives a condensed list of the features available in the POSIX module.

Now that you understand a bit about how synchronization objects are defined in multi-threaded programming, let’s learn how these objects are managed by using scheduling classes.

CPU Scheduling
Processes run in a scheduling class with a separate scheduling policy applied to each class, as follows:
I

Realtime (RT) – The highest-priority scheduling class provides a policy for those processes that require fast response and absolute user or application control of scheduling priorities. RT scheduling can be applied to a whole process or to one or more lightweight processes (LWPs) in a process. You must have the proc_priocntl privilege to use the Realtime class. See the privileges(5) man page for details.

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Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March, 2006

Process and System Management

I

System (SYS) – The middle-priority scheduling class, the system class cannot be applied to a user process. Timeshare (TS) – The lowest-priority scheduling class is TS ,which is also the default class. The TS policy distributes the processing resource fairly among processes with varying CPU consumption characteristics. Other parts of the kernel can monopolize the processor for short intervals without degrading the response time seen by the user. Inter-Active (IA) – The IA policy distributes the processing resource fairly among processes with varying CPU consumption characteristics, while also providing good responsiveness for user interaction. Fair Share (FSS) – The FSS policy distributes the processing resource fairly among projects, independent of the number of processes they own by specifying shares to control the process entitlement to CPU resources. Resource usage is remembered over time, so that entitlement is reduced for heavy usage and increased for light usage with respect to other projects. Fixed-Priority (FX) – The FX policy provides a fixed priority preemptive scheduling policy for those processes requiring that the scheduling priorities do not get dynamically adjusted by the system and that the user or application have control of the scheduling priorities. This class is a useful starting point for affecting CPU allocation policies.

I

I

I

I

A scheduling class is maintained for each lightweight process (LWP). Threads have the scheduling class and priority of their underlying LWPs. Each LWP in a process can have a unique scheduling class and priority that are visible to the kernel. Thread priorities regulate contention for synchronization objects. The RT and TS scheduling classes both call priocntl(2) to set the priority level of processes or LWPs within a process. Using OpenGrok to search the code base for priocntl, we find the variables that are used in the RT and TS scheduling classes in the rtsched.c file as follows:
27 #pragma ident "@(#)rtsched.c 1.10 05/06/08 SMI" 28 29 #include "lint.h" 30 #include "thr_uberdata.h" 31 #include <sched.h> 32 #include <sys/priocntl.h> 33 #include <sys/rtpriocntl.h> 34 #include <sys/tspriocntl.h> 35 #include <sys/rt.h> 36 #include <sys/ts.h> 37 38 /* 39 * The following variables are used for caching information 40 * for priocntl TS and RT scheduling classs. 41 */

Module 5 • Programming Concepts

39

Process and System Management

42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 ...

struct pcclass ts_class, rt_class; static static static static static static static rtdpent_t *rt_dptbl; int rt_rrmin; int rt_rrmax; int rt_fifomin; int rt_fifomax; int rt_othermin; int rt_othermax; /* RT class parameter table */

Typing the man priocntl command in a terminal window shows the details of each scheduling class and describes attributes and usage. For example:
% man priocntl Reformatting page. Please Wait... done User Commands NAME priocntl - display or set scheduling parameters of specified process(es) SYNOPSIS priocntl -l priocntl -d [-i idtype] [idlist] priocntl -s [-c class] [ class-specific i idtype] [idlist] priocntl -e [-c class] [ class-specific [argument(s)] options] [priocntl(1)

options] command

DESCRIPTION The priocntl command displays or sets scheduling parameters of the specified process(es). It can also be used to display the current configuration information for the system’s process scheduler or execute a command with specified scheduling parameters. Processes fall into distinct classes with a separate scheduling policy applied to each class. The process classes currently supported are the real-time class, time-sharing class, interactive class, fair-share class, and the fixed

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Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March, 2006

Fair-Share Class. Kernel space and user space have their own memory address spaces. 41 I I Module 5 • Programming Concepts . Schedules and switches threads. Kernel modules have higher execution privilege. The Solaris kernel does the following: I I Manages the system resources. A user program typically executes sequentially and performs a single task from beginning to end. A module runs in kernel space. Code that runs in kernel space has greater privilege than code that runs in user space. TimeSharing Class. Provides applications with system services such as I/O management. Assigns priorities. and Fixed-Priority Class. pages memory. the --More--(4%) Kernel Overview Now that you have a high-level understanding of processes. services resource requests. Kernel modules do not execute sequentially. including file systems. and swaps processes. A kernel module does not execute sequentially. and physical devices. and services hardware interrupts and exceptions. virtual memory. processes. A kernel module registers itself in order to serve future requests. and scheduling. and scheduling. An application runs in user space. Execution Differences Between Kernel Modules and User Programs The following characteristics of kernel modules highlight important differences between the execution of kernel modules and the execution of user programs: I Kernel modules have separate address space. I I I The following section discusses several important differences between kernel modules and user programs. The characteristics of these classes and the class-specific options they accept are described below in the USAGE section under the headings Real-Time Class. let’s discuss the kernel and how kernel modules are different from user programs. threads. With appropriate permissions. Inter-Active Class. System software is protected from user programs.Process and System Management priority class. Coordinates interactions of all user processes and system resources.

Kernel modules use different header files. Design your driver assuming your driver might be preempted. As much as possible. Instead. Design your driver data structures carefully to keep multiple threads of execution separate. Kernel modules should avoid global variables. The required header files are listed in the man page for each function. Different threads of an application program need not share data. a kernel module is a collection of subroutines and data. You can also have customized libraries as well. something which OpenSolaris has for some of the more recent x86/x64 and UltraSPARC platforms. have no main() routine. Kernel modules do not link in the same libraries that user programs link in. Kernel modules are linked only to the kernel. declare symbols as static. The only functions a kernel module can call are functions that are exported by the kernel. otherwise customized code can be written for both kernel and user/libraries. give them a prefix that is unique within the kernel. I I I I 42 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. including device drivers. the data structures and routines that constitute a driver are shared by all threads that use the driver. By contrast. while the kernel can dedicate certain registers to certain roles.Process and System Management I Kernel modules can be interrupted. Kernel modules. For example. Kernel code can be optimized for a specific processor. When you must use global symbols. In a symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) system. an interrupt handler can request your driver at the same time that your driver is serving a system call. Kernel modules can share data. Avoiding global variables in kernel modules is even more important than avoiding global variables in user programs. I I Structural Differences Between Kernel Modules and User Programs The following characteristics of kernel modules highlight important differences between the structure of kernel modules and the structure of user programs: I Kernel modules do not define a main program. Kernel modules must be preemptable. So. You cannot assume that your driver code is safe just because your driver code does not block. Kernel modules can include header files that are shared by user programs if the user and kernel interfaces within such shared header files are defined conditionally using the _KERNEL macro. Kernel modules can dedicate process registers to specific roles. Using this prefix for private symbols within the module also is a good practice. your driver could be executing concurrently on more than one CPU. Your driver must be able to handle contention issues that result from multiple requests. Kernel modules can be customized for hardware. Kernel modules require a different set of header files than user programs require. 2006 . More than one process can request your driver at the same time.

This might happen if you were looking at two multi-threaded 45 * user processes inside of a crash dump. Process Debugging Debugging processes at all levels of the development stack is a key part of writing kernel modules.Process and System Management I Kernel modules can be loaded and unloaded on demand. and if it is 49 * not already open. 50 * and fill in an ops vector which we return to the caller. so we 38 * must be prepared to switch modes on-the-fly. instead. To meet these requirements. look up the symbols we need to reference. the proc target must be 33 * able to query and modify information such as a thread’s register set using 34 * either the native LWP services provided by libproc (if the process is not 35 * linked with libthread).so and 46 * the other using /usr/lib/lwp/libthread. we 47 * implement a libthread_db "cache" in this file. so we could even have *both* libthread_db’s open at 44 * the same time. You can add functionality to the kernel while the system is up and running.c file that describe the connection between multi-threaded debugging and how mdb works: #pragma ident "@(#)mdb_tdb.4 05/06/08 SMI" 28 29 /* 30 * libthread_db (tdb) cache 31 * 32 * In order to properly debug multi-threaded programs. reveals the following code comments in the mdb_tdb. a process may begin 37 * life as a single-threaded process and then later dlopen() libthread. You can test new versions of your driver without rebooting your system. Finally. mdb is designed so that multiple targets can be 43 * active simultaneously. Once an object is 51 * loaded.so the victim 42 * process has open. The collection of subroutines and data that constitute a device driver can be compiled into a single loadable module of object code. This mechanism also has the nice property that we don’t bother 53 * loading libthread_db until we need it. one using /usr/lib/libthread. so the debugger starts up faster.so. This loadable module can then be statically or dynamically linked into the kernel and unlinked from the kernel. 54 */ Module 5 • Programming Concepts 43 .c 1. A full search for libthread in OpenGrok. we dlopen() it. we don’t bother unloading it unless the entire cache is explicitly 52 * flushed. There are also two possible 39 * libthread implementations (one in /usr/lib and one in /usr/lib/lwp) so we 40 * cannot link mdb against libthread_db directly. The proc target calls 48 * mdb_tdb_load() with the pathname of a libthread_db to load. Additionally. we must dlopen the 41 * appropriate libthread_db on-the-fly based on which libthread. or using the services provided by libthread_db (if 36 * the process is linked with libthread).

These commands to set conditional breakpoints are often useful. ::release Releases the previously attached process or core file. addr ::delete [id | all] Delete the event specifiers with the given ID number.Process and System Management The following mdb commands can be used to access the LWPs of a multi-threaded program: I I I I $l Prints the LWP ID of the representative thread if the target is a user process. The process can subsequently be continued by prun(1) or it can be resumed by applying MDB or another debugger. or process ID. 44 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. $L Prints the LWP IDs of each LWP in the target if the target is a user process.. pid::attach Attaches to process by using the pid. [ addr ] ::bp [+/-dDestT] [-c cmd] [-n count] sym . Set a breakpoint at the specified locations. address::context Context switch to the specified process. We’ll start the hands-on lab exercises with DTrace and then add MDB when the debugging becomes more complex. I I I DTrace probes are constructed in a manner similar to MDB queries.. 2006 .

M O D U L E Getting Started With DTrace 6 6 Objectives The objective of this lab is to introduce you to DTrace using a probe script for a system call using DTrace. 45 .

2005. Inc. Sun Microsystems. 46 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.Getting Started With DTrace Additional Resources I Solaris Dynamic Tracing Guide.. 2006 .

Once you see this output. In this example. You can use the dtrace(1M) utility’s -n option to enable a probe using its string name. We’re going to start learning DTrace by building some very simple requests using the probe named BEGIN. the integer name of the CPU on which this probe fired is displayed. you will see dtrace tell you that one probe was enabled and you will see a line of output indicating that the BEGIN probe fired.Getting Started With DTrace Enabling Simple DTrace Probes Completion of the lab exercise will result in basic understanding of DTrace probes. the CPU column indicates that the dtrace command was executing on CPU 0 when the probe fired. are printed. dtrace remains paused waiting for other probes to fire. press Control-C in your shell to exit dtrace and return to your shell prompt: 3 Return to your shell prompt by pressing Control-C: # dtrace -n BEGIN dtrace: description ’BEGIN’ matched 1 probe CPU ID FUNCTION:NAME 0 1 :BEGIN ^C # The output tells you that the probe named BEGIN fired once and both its name and integer ID. Enable the probe: # dtrace -n BEGIN After a brief pause. 1 2 Open a terminal window. Since you haven’t enabled any other probes and BEGIN only fires once. Module 6 • Getting Started With DTrace 47 . Notice that by default. 1. which fires once each time you start a new tracing request.

Let’s create a simple request using two probes by adding the END probe to the previous example command. As you can see. 48 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. pressing Control-C to exit DTrace triggers the END probe. The END probe fires once when tracing is completed. 2006 . DTrace reports this probe firing before exiting. 4 Add the END probe: # dtrace -n BEGIN -n END dtrace: description ’BEGIN’ matched 1 probe dtrace: description ’END’ matched 1 probe CPU ID FUNCTION:NAME 0 ^C 0 2 :END # 1 :BEGIN The END probe fires once when tracing is completed.Getting Started With DTrace You can construct DTrace requests using arbitrary numbers of probes and actions.

Name .Getting Started With DTrace Listing Traceable Probes The objective of this lab is to explore probes in more detail and to show you how to list the probes on a system. Module . But where did these probes come from? DTrace probes come from a set of kernel modules called providers.The name of the Unix module or application library of the probe.Name of the Provider.Internal ID of the probe listed. Type the following command: # dtrace The dtrace command options are printed to the output.The name of the probe. each of which performs a particular kind of instrumentation to create probes. 1 2 Open a terminal window. When you use DTrace. Provider . 3 Type the dtrace command with the -l option: # dtrace -l | more ID PROVIDER 1 dtrace 2 dtrace 3 dtrace 4 lockstat 5 lockstat 6 lockstat 7 lockstat --More-MODULE FUNCTION NAME BEGIN END ERROR mutex_enter adaptive-acquire mutex_enter adaptive-block mutex_enter adaptive-spin mutex_exit adaptive-release genunix genunix genunix genunix The probes that are available on your system are listed with the following five pieces of data: I I ID . Providers are used to classify the probes.The name of the function in which the probe exists. the syscall provider provides probes in every system call and the fbt provider provides probes into every function in the kernel. For example. This is also the method of instrumentation. Function . 49 I I I Module 6 • Getting Started With DTrace . In the preceding examples. you learned to use two simple probes named BEGIN and END. each provider is given an opportunity to publish the probes it can provide to the DTrace framework. You can then enable and bind your tracing actions to any of the probes that have been published.

# dtrace -l -n start ID PROVIDER 506 proc 2766 io 2768 io 5909 io MODULE unix genunix genunix nfs FUNCTION lwp_rtt_initial default_physio aphysio nfs4_bio NAME start start start start 50 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. # dtrace -l -m ufs ID PROVIDER 15 sysinfo 16 sysinfo 356 fbt MODULE FUNCTION NAME ufs ufs_idle_free ufsinopage ufs ufs_iget_internal ufsiget ufs allocg entry Only the probes that are in the UFS module are listed in the output. # dtrace -l -f open ID PROVIDER 4 syscall 5 syscall 116 fbt 117 fbt MODULE FUNCTION open open open open NAME entry return entry return genunix genunix Only the probes with the function name open are listed. The number will vary depending on your system type.Getting Started With DTrace 4 Pipe the previous command to wc to find the total number of probes in your system: # dtrace -l | wc -l 30122 The number of probes that your system is currently aware of is listed in the output. 2006 . 5 Add one of the following options to filter the list: I I I I -P for provider -m for module -f for function -n for name Consider the following examples: # dtrace -l -P lockstat ID PROVIDER MODULE 4 lockstat genunix 5 lockstat genunix 6 lockstat genunix 7 lockstat genunix FUNCTION mutex_enter mutex_enter mutex_enter mutex_exit NAME adaptive-acquire adaptive-block adaptive-spin adaptive-release Only the probes that are available in the lockstat provider are listed in the output.

Module 6 • Getting Started With DTrace 51 .Getting Started With DTrace The above command lists all the probes that have the probe name start.

The second statement uses the function exit() to indicate that DTrace should cease tracing and exit the dtrace command. you did not have to wait and press Control-C. and an optional set of actions to perform when the probe fires. and then print it out. when the BEGIN probe fires. Let’s explore the structure of your D program in more detail in order to understand what happened.d.Getting Started With DTrace Programming in D Now that you understand a little bit about naming. 1 2 3 Open a terminal window.). exit(0). Each statement ends with a semicolon (. enabling. dtrace printed the same output as before followed by the text “hello. world # As you can see.d file.d. create a new file called hello." This lab demonstrates that. in addition to constructing DTrace experiments on the command line. Run the program by using the dtrace -s option: # dtrace -s hello. the string “hello. you can also write them in text files using the D programming language. Each D program consists of a series of clauses. each clause describing one or more probes to enable. In a text editor. The actions are listed as a series of statements enclosed in braces { } following the probe name. Your first statement uses the function trace() to indicate that DTrace should record the specified argument. } 4 5 Save the hello.d dtrace: script ’hello.d’ matched 1 probe CPU ID FUNCTION:NAME 0 1 :BEGIN hello. world"). Unlike the previous example. and listing probes. "Hello. world”. 2006 . These changes were the result of the actions you specified for your BEGIN probe in hello. World. 52 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. you’re ready to write the DTrace version of everyone’s first program. Type in your first D program: BEGIN { trace("hello. either. world”.

learning D is still very easy. you specify its name followed by a parenthesized list of arguments. let’s take a step back from language rules and learn more about how DTrace works. But first. To call a function. By now. if you’re familiar with the C programming language. D is derived from a large subset of C combined with a special set of functions and variables to help make tracing easy. and then we’ll return to learning how to build more interesting D programs. The complete set of D functions is described in Solaris Dynamic Tracing Guide. If you’ve written a C program before. Module 6 • Getting Started With DTrace 53 . you will be able to immediately transfer most of your knowledge to building tracing programs in D. you’ve probably realized from the name and our examples that DTrace’s D programming language is very similar to C and awk(1). Indeed.Getting Started With DTrace DTrace provides a set of useful functions like trace() and exit() for you to call in your D programs. If you’ve never written a C program before.

54 .

55 .M O D U L E Debugging Applications With DTrace 7 7 Objectives The objective of this module is to use DTrace to monitor application events.

2006 . 56 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. Inc. 2005.Debugging Applications With DTrace Additional Resources Application Packaging Developer’s Guide.. Sun Microsystems.

special flags. The user code does not need any recompilation. A probe description has the following syntax: pid:mod:function:name I I I I pid: mod: name: format pidprocessid (for example pid5234) name of the library or a.out(executable) name of the function entry for function entry return for function return function: Module 7 • Debugging Applications With DTrace 57 .Enabling User Mode Probes Enabling User Mode Probes DTrace allows you to dynamically add probes into user level functions. or even a restart. DTrace probes can be turned on just by calling the provider.

} d. create a new file called proc_func. 3 Follow the steps below to create a D-script that counts the number of times any function in the gcalctool is called. f. add an aggregate to count the number of times the function is called using the aggregate statement @[probefunc]=count(). Use pid$1:::entry as the probe-description. Run the script that you just wrote. a. In a text editor. leave the predicate part empty. 1 2 From the Application or Program menu. b. we will call it procid.Enabling User Mode Probes DTracing Applications In this exercise we will learn to use DTrace on user applications. $1 is the first argument that you will send to your script. In the action section. Press Control+C in the window where you ran the D-script. Perform a calculation on the calculator.d. Find the process ID of the process you just started # pgrep gcalctool 8198 This number is the process ID of the calc process. The steps increase in complexity to the end of the exercise. # dtrace -qs proc_func. start the calculator.d procid Replace procid with the process ID of your gcalctool e. 58 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. c. 2006 . pid$1:::entry { @[probefunc]=count(). increasing the amount and depth of information about the application behavior that is output. This lab builds on the use of a process ID in the probe description to trace the associated application.

Perform a calculation on the calculator.d file to the following: pid$1:libc::entry c. Write the second probe as follows: pid$1:::return d. Your new script should look like the following: pid$1:libc::entry { } 5 @[probefunc]=count(). DTrace will print it for you. a. Press Control+C in the window where you ran the D-script to see the output. b. If you do not need to print the aggregation you collected.d to proc_libc. Timestamp is a DTrace built-in that counts the number of nanoseconds from a point in the past. Create a file and name it func_time. In the action section of the first probe. Copy the proc_func. 6 Finally. Module 7 • Debugging Applications With DTrace 59 . save timestamp in variable ts. Now run the script.d procid Replace procid with the process ID of your gcalctool a. # dtrace -qs proc_libc.d. modify the script to only count functions from the libc library.d. 4 Now. a. b. We will use two probe descriptions in func_time. b. Modify the probe description in the proc_libc. Write the first probe as follows: pid$1:::entry c.d. modify the script to find how much time is spent in each function.Enabling User Mode Probes Note – The DTrace script collects data and waits for you to stop the collection by pressing Control+C.

2468 2998 3092 The left column shows you the name of the function and the right column shows you the amount of wall clock time that was spent in that function. Run the new func_time. b.d script should match the following: pid$1:::entry { } { } 7 ts = timestamp.ts) f.ts).. The time is in nanoseconds. Press Control+C in the window where you ran the D-script to see the output. The new func_time.d procid Replace procid with the process ID of your gcalctool a. Perform a calculation on the calculator. 60 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March..Enabling User Mode Probes e. 2006 . ^C gdk_xid__equal _XSetLastRequestRead _XDeq .d script: # dtrace -qs func_time. pid$1:::return /ts/ @[probefunc]=sum(timestamp . In the action section of the second probe calculate nanoseconds that have passed using the following aggregation: @[probefunc]=sum(timestamp .

M O D U L E Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace 8 8 Objectives The examples in this module demonstrate the use of DTrace to diagnose C++ application errors. These examples are also used to compare DTrace with other application debugging tools. 61 . including Sun Studio 10 software and mdb.

and c++filt. you have an additional choice for demangling your application -. If your C++ application was compiled with gcc/g++. destructors. From this output.. Note – Sun Studio 10 software is used here.Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program A sample program CCtest was created to demonstrate an error common to C++ applications -. or class functions. and to distinguish instances of the same name declared in different namespaces and classes. This name mangling is an implementation detail required for support of C++ function overloading. 2006 . and such is the case with the program contained in this module.. which recognizes both Sun Studio and 62 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. using nm to extract the symbol table from a sample program named CCtest produces the following output: # /usr/ccs/bin/nm .in addition to c++filt. a memory leak occurs when an object is created. dem. but you cannot readily determine whether these symbols are associated with constructors. to provide valid external names for C++ function names that include special characters. CCtest 53|FUNC 47|FUNC 37|FUNC 71|FUNC 37|FUNC 71|FUNC 16|OBJT 16|FUNC |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |GLOB |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 |0 |9 |9 |9 |9 |9 |9 |18 |9 |__1cJTestClass2T5B6M_v_ |__1cJTestClass2T6M_v_ |__1cJTestClass2t5B6M_v_ |__1cJTestClass2t5B6Mpc_v_ |__1cJTestClass2t6M_v_ |__1cJTestClass2t6Mpc_v_ |__1cJTestClassG__vtbl_ |__1cJTestClassJClassName6kM_pc_ Note – Source code and makefile for CCtest are included at the end of this module. you may notice that your compiler converts some C++ names into mangled. semi-intelligible strings of characters and digits. [61] | 134549248| [85] | 134549301| [76] | 134549136| [62] | 134549173| [64] | 134549136| [89] | 134549173| [80] | 134616000| [91] | 134549348| . but the examples were tested with both Sun Studio 9 and 10. When debugging a C++ program.. you may correctly assume that a number of these mangled symbols are associated with a class named TestClass.the memory leak. but never destroyed. For example. In many cases. The Sun Studio compiler includes the following three utilities that can be used to translate the mangled symbols to their C++ counterparts: nm -C..

. And finally.. CCtest | grep TestClass | c++filt | 134549280| 37|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass() | 134549352| 54|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass(int) | 134549317| 35|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass(char*) g++ symbols without gc++filt: [86] | 134550070| 41|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |_ZN9TestClassC1EPc [110] | 134550180| 68|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |_ZN9TestClassC1Ei [114] | 134549984| 43|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |_ZN9TestClassC1Ev . We can use the DTrace pid provider to enable probes associated with our mangled C++ symbols..Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program GNU mangled names. the open source gc++filt found in /usr/sfw/bin can be used to demangle the symbols contained in your g++ application. CCtest | grep TestClass | 134549280| 37|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |__1cJTestClass2t6M_v_ | 134549352| 54|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |__1cJTestClass2t6Mi_v_ | 134549317| 35|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |__1cJTestClass2t6Mpc_v_ Sun Studio symbols with c++filt: # nm [65] [56] [92] .. g++ symbols with gc++filt: # nm gCCtest | grep TestClass | gc++filt [86] | 134550070| 41|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |TestClass::TestClass(char*) [110] | 134550180| 68|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |TestClass::TestClass(int) [114] | 134549984| 43|FUNC |GLOB |0 |12 |TestClass::TestClass() .. displaying symbols with nm -C: [64] | 134549344| 71|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass() [__1cJTestClass2t6M_v_] [87] | 134549424| 70|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass(const char*) [__1cJTestClass2t6Mpkc_v_] [57] | 134549504| 95|FUNC |GLOB |0 |9 |TestClass::TestClass(int) [__1cJTestClass2t6Mi_v_] Let’s use this information to create a DTrace script to perform an aggregation on the object calls associated with our test program. To test our constructor/destructor theory.. Examples: Sun Studio symbols without c++filt: # nm [65] [56] [92] .. let’s start by counting the following: Module 8 • Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace 63 ..

Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program I I The number of objects created -. } pid$1::__1c2k6Fpv_v_: { @d[probefunc] = count(). 2006 . To display the output of this command. } END { printa(@n).d): #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s pid$1::__1c2n6FI_pv_: { @n[probefunc] = count()./CCagg. printa(@d). Caution – You can’t exit the DTrace script with a ^C as you would do normally because c++filt will be killed along with DTrace and you’re left with no output. with the following caution. }’‘ | egrep "new|delete" __1c2k6Fpv_v_ == void operator delete(void*) __1c2n6FI_pv_ == void*operator new(unsigned) The corresponding DTrace script is used to enable probes on new() and delete() (saved as CCagg.calls to new() The number of objects destroyed -.calls to delete() Use the following script to extract the symbols corresponding to the new() and delete() functions from the CCtest program: # dem ‘nm CCtest | awk -F\| ’{ print $NF.d ‘pgrep CCtest‘ | c++filt The DTrace output is piped through c++filt to demangle the C++ symbols. } Start the CCtest program in one window. then execute the script we just created in another window as follows: # dtrace -s . go to another window on your system and type: # pkill dtrace Use this sequence of steps for the rest of the exercises: 64 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.

probefunc. named CCaddr. arg1). we should see the same pointer value as arg0 in the call to delete(). arg0). } /* call to delete() */ pid$1::__1c2k6Fpv_v_:entry { printf("%s: %x\n". Since a pointer to the object is contained in the return value of new(). we now have the following script.Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program Window 1: # .d: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option quiet /* __1c2k6Fpv_v_ == void operator delete(void*) __1c2n6FI_pv_ == void*operator new(unsigned) */ /* return from new() */ pid$1::__1c2n6FI_pv_:return { printf("%s: %x\n". probefunc./CCaddr./CCtest Window 2: # dtrace -s scriptname | c++filt Window 3: # pkill dtrace The output of our aggregation script in window 2 should look like this: void*operator new(unsigned) void operator delete(void*) 12 8 So. we may be on the right track with the theory that we are creating more objects than we are deleting.d ‘pgrep CCtest‘ | c++filt Module 8 • Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace 65 . Let’s check the memory addresses of our objects and attempt to match the instances of new() and delete(). With a slight modification to our initial script. } Execute this script: # dtrace -s . The DTrace argument variables are used to display the addresses associated with our objects.

} Execute CCstack. probefunc.Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program Wait for a bit. We still do not know what type of class is associated with the object created at address 809e480.d in Window 2. a pattern emerges. probefunc. At this point we have identified the source of the memory leak! Let’s continue with DTrace and see what else we can learn from this information. Including a call to ustack() on entry to new() provides a hint. 2006 . } pid$1::__1c2k6Fpv_v_:entry { printf("%s: %x\n". It seems that the first new() of the repeating pattern does not have a corresponding call to delete(). arg1). renamed CCstack.d: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option quiet /* __1c2k6Fpv_v_ == void operator delete(void*) __1c2n6FI_pv_ == void*operator new(unsigned) */ pid$1::__1c2n6FI_pv_:entry { ustack(). } pid$1::__1c2n6FI_pv_:return { printf("%s: %x\n". arg0). Here’s the modification to our previous script. then type pkill dtrace in Window 3 to print the following output: 66 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. then type this in window 3: # pkill dtrace Our output looks like a repeating pattern of three calls to new() and two calls to delete(): void*operator void*operator void*operator void operator void operator new(unsigned): new(unsigned): new(unsigned): delete(void*): delete(void*): 809e480 8068a70 809e4a0 8068a70 809e4a0 As you inspect the repeating output.

-0x2c(%ebp) main+9: movl %ebx.so.so.1‘void*operator new(unsigned) CCtest‘main+0x19 CCtest‘0x8050cda void*operator new(unsigned): 80a2bd0 libCrun.%ebp main+3: subl $0x38.1‘void*operator new(unsigned) CCtest‘main+0x57 CCtest‘0x8050cda void*operator new(unsigned): 8068a70 libCrun. we can use mdb as follows: # gcore ‘pgrep CCtest‘ gcore: core. Module 8 • Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace 67 .1478 dumped # mdb core.so.d ‘pgrep CCtest‘ | c++filt libCrun. main+0x57.-0x10(%ebp) main+0x1f: movl -0x10(%ebp). and main+0x9a -we’re interested in the object associated with the first call to new().%eax main+0x22: pushl %eax main+0x23: call +0x1d5 <__1cJTestClass2t5B6M_v_> . at main+0x19.-0x38(%ebp) main+0x12: pushl $0x8 main+0x14: call -0x2e4 <PLT=libCrun.-0x30(%ebp) main+0xc: movl %esi.1 ] > main::dis main: pushl %ebp main+1: movl %esp.-0x34(%ebp) main+0xf: movl %edi. To determine the type of constructor called at main+0x19.%esp main+6: movl %esp.so.1‘__1c2n6FI_pv_> main+0x19: addl $0x4.1478 Loading modules: [ libc.1‘void*operator new(unsigned) CCtest‘main+0x9a CCtest‘0x8050cda void*operator new(unsigned): 80a2bf0 void operator delete(void*): 8068a70 void operator delete(void*): 80a2bf0 The ustack() data tells us that new() is called from main+0x19.1 ld..so.so.Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program # dtrace -s .%esp main+0x1c: movl %eax../CCstack.

tt = new TestClass((const char *)"Goodbye.").. delete(tt). a call to new TestClass() at main+0x19 is the cause of the memory leak."). is overwritten by the second use: t = new TestClass((const char *)"Hello. It’s clear that the first use of the variable t = new TestClass(). we have identified a call to the constructor __1cJTestClass2t5B6M_v_ that is never destroyed. 68 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.. delete(t).. displaying function arguments and return values. This example is intended to model the DTrace approach to interactive process debugging. cout << t->ClassName().Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program Our constructor is called after the call to new. cout << t->ClassName().. t = new TestClass((const char *)"Hello. So. t = new TestClass(). and viewing the user call stack. virtual char *ClassName() const. TestClass(const char *name). Source files created for this example: EXAMPLE 8–1 TestClass. virtual ~TestClass().h class TestClass { public: TestClass(). 2006 ."). The dem and c++filt commands in Sun Studio software and the gc++filt in gcc were used to extract the function probes from the program symbol table and display the DTrace output in a source-compatible format. cout << tt->ClassName(). DTrace features used in this example include: aggregations..cc source file reveals: . The memory leak has been identified and a fix can be implemented. at offset main+0x23. . TestClass(int i). Examining the CCtest. The DTrace pid provider allows you to enable a probe at any instruction associated with a process that is being examined. Using dem to demangle this symbol produces: # dem __1cJTestClass2t5B6M_v_ __1cJTestClass2t5B6M_v_ == TestClass::TestClass #Nvariant 1() Thus.

h> <unistd.h> <stdlib.h> <stdlib.h> <unistd.h> <stdio. sprintf(str.h" TestClass::TestClass() { str=strdup("empty."). TestClass. i). } EXAMPLE 8–2 CCtest.h" int main(int argc. } char *TestClass::ClassName() const { return str.cc: #include #include #include #include #include <stdio.h> <string. } TestClass::TestClass(int i) { str=(char *)malloc(128). } TestClass::TestClass(const char *name) { str=strdup(name).h (Continued) private: char *str.h> "TestClass.cc #include #include #include #include #include <iostream.h> "TestClass. "Integer = %d". }.Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program EXAMPLE 8–1 TestClass. } TestClass::~TestClass() { if ( str ) free(str). char **argv) Module 8 • Debugging C++ Applications With DTrace 69 .

" clean: rm $(OBJS) $(PROGS) CCtest: $(OBJS) $(CC) -o CCtest $(OBJS) .").o TestClass. TestClass *tt. } } EXAMPLE 8–3 Makefile OBJS=CCtest. sleep(1). tt = new TestClass((const char *)"Goodbye."). t = new TestClass((const char *)"Hello. 2006 .Using DTrace to Profile and Debug A C++ Program EXAMPLE 8–2 CCtest.o PROGS=CCtest CC=CC all: $(PROGS) echo "Done.cc (Continued) { TestClass *t. delete(t). delete(tt).cc.o: $(CC) $(CFLAGS) -c $< 70 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. cout << t->ClassName(). while (1) { t = new TestClass(). cout << tt->ClassName(). cout << t->ClassName().

we’ll incorporate low-level debugging with MDB to find the problem in the code. Then. 71 .M O D U L E Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 9 9 Objectives This module will build on what we’ve learned about using DTrace to observe processes by examining a page fault.

Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB Additional Resources Solaris Modular Debugger Guide. 2005.. Sun Microsystems. Inc. 72 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. 2006 .

In this module.Software Memory Management Software Memory Management OpenSolaris memory management uses software constructs called segments to manage virtual memory of processes as well as the kernel itself. Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 73 . Most of the data structures involved in the software side of memory management are defined in /usr/include/vm/*. we’ll examine the code and data structures used to handle page faults.h.

Look for the <----symbol to find associated text in the output. 1 2 Open a terminal window. we’ve added text to the extensive code output to guide the exercise.d with the following script: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option flowindent pagefault:entry /execname == $$1/ { printf("fault occurred on address = %p\n". We’ll use the output of the script to determine what source code needs to be examined for more detail. } entry /self->in == 1/ { } return /self->in == 1/ { } 74 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. self->in = 1. Note – In this module. 2006 . } pagefault:return /self->in == 1/ { self->in = 0. We’ll start with a DTrace script to trace the actions of a single page fault for a given process. Create a file called pagefault.Software Memory Management Using DTrace and MDB to Examine Virtual Memory The objective of this lab is to examine a page fault using DTrace and MDB. The script prints the user virtual address that caused the fault. args[0]). exit(0). and then traces every function that is called from the time of the fault until the page fault handler returns.

page tables are hashed on x86 -> htable_getpte <-. which is only used with ASSERT().i86pc/vm/htable.segment containing fault is found./pagefault.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.as_segcompar <. for instance./pagefault.search segments for segment <. as mozilla is not an exact match with the name.segments are in AVL tree -> as_segcompar <-.c <. # .c or sun4/vm/vm_dep.look for page table entry for page <-.generic address space fault common/vm/vm_as.c -> htable_getpage <-.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.c -> hat_probe <-. Also.containing fault address -> as_segcompar <-.avl_find <.c -> as_segat -> avl_find <-.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.htable_va2entry Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 75 . assertions are turned on. Assertions are turned on only for debug kernels.common/vm/vm_as.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.c -> as_fault <-.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.htable_lookup -> htable_va2entry <.c or sfmmu/vm/hat_sfmmu. so you’ll see various calls to mutex_owner().c -> htable_lookup <.i86pc/vm/hat_i86.Software Memory Management 3 Run the script on Mozilla.as_segcompar <-. Note – You need to specify mozilla-bin as the executable name.i86pc/vm/vm_machdep.d’ matched 42626 probes CPU FUNCTION 0 -> pagefault fault occurred on address = fb985ea2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 | pagefault:entry <-.as_segat -> segvn_fault <-.as_segcompar -> as_segcompar <.d mozilla-bin dtrace: script ’.common/vm/seg_vn. (not SEGV) <-.

logged ufs read -> bdev_strategy <-.getblk_common <.hat_kpm_pfn2va <.c <. 2006 .create some pages <.hat_probe -> fop_getpage <-.x86pte_release_pagetable <.page wasn’t in memory -> bmap_read <-.direct attached disk (dad(7D)) <-.cmdkstrategy 76 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.page_lookup_create <-.check for sparse file <.page_create_va -> segvn_kluster <.pageio_setup -> lufs_read_strategy <-.read some pages (common/vm/vm_pvn.common/io/dktp/disk/cmdk.file is in ufs fs (common/fs/ufs/ufs_vnops.read block device (disk) common/os/driver.check for page already in memory -> page_lookup_create <-.create page if needed <.bread_common <.get block number of page from inode -> bread_common -> getblk_common <.c -> dadk_strategy <-.htable_getpte <.segvn_kluster <.pvn_read_kluster -> pageio_setup <-.Software Memory Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -> x86pte_get <-.return a page table entry -> x86pte_access_pagetable -> hat_kpm_pfn2va <.x86pte_access_pagetable -> x86pte_release_pagetable <.x86pte_get <.c) -> page_create_va &lt-.c) <-.file operation to retrieve page(s) -> ufs_getpage <-.driver sets up dma and starts page in <.common/vm/vm_page.c) -> bmap_has_holes <-.setup page(s) for io common/os/bio.page_lookup -> ufs_getpage_miss <-.c -> cmdkstrategy <-.used for ide disks (common/io/dktp/dcdev/dadk.htable_getpage -> htable_release <.bmap_read -> pvn_read_kluster &lt-.common disk driver (cmdk(7D)) <-.htable_release <.c <.dadk_strategy <.bmap_has_holes -> page_lookup <-.

swtch <.fop_getpage -> segvn_faultpage <-.someone else is running here.x86pte_release_pagetable <.ufs_getpage <.savectx <-.ufs_getpage_miss <-.sema_p <.hment_prepare -> x86pte_set <-.fill in pte into page table -> x86pte_access_pagetable -> hat_kpm_pfn2va <. -> restorectx <-.biowait -> pageio_done <-.restore context (we’ve been awakened) <.restorectx <.hat_kpm_pfn2va <.build page table entry <.c -> sema_p <-.x86_hm_enter -> hment_prepare <.let someone else run (common/disp/disp.x86pte_set -> hment_assign <.Software Memory Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 <.disp -> resume <-.locate entry in page table -> x86_hm_enter <.wakeup via sema_v from completion interrupt -> swtch <-.hati_mkpte -> hati_pte_map <-.dispatch to next thread to run <.s -> savectx <-.get page frame number <.hment_assign Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 77 .c) -> disp <-.resume <..x86pte_access_pagetable -> x86pte_release_pagetable <.page_pptonum -> hati_mkpte <-.s or sun4/ml/swtch.page is in memory <.save old context <.undo pageio_setup <.actual switching occurs here <-.pageio_done -> pvn_plist_init <..intel/ia32/ml/swtch.bdev_strategy -> biowait <-.call hat to load pte(s) for page(s) -> hat_memload -> page_pptonum <-.wait for pagein to complete common/os/bio.pvn_plist_init <.

At a high level. Then we call a device driver strategy routine. When the paging I/O has completed. segvn_fault() then calls segvn_faultpage(). a segment specific fault handler is called. ufs_getpage() finds the block number(s) of the page(s) within the file system by calling bmap_read(). as_fault() walks an AVL tree of seg structures looking for a segment containing the faulting address. The pagefault() routine calls as_fault() to handle faults on a given address space. I I I I I I I I I I 78 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. we need to page it in. the instruction causing the page fault will be retried and should now complete successfully. so we call ufs_getpage().e.segvn_faultpage <. If the page does not already exist. For most segments. the page is not already in memory. While the page is being read. the following has happened on the page fault: I I I The pagefault() routine is called to handle page faults. the thread causing the page fault blocks (i.Software Memory Management 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 # -> x86_hm_exit <. If no such segment is found.hati_pte_map <. the disk driver interrupt handler wakes up the blocked mozilla-bin thread.as_fault <. switches out) via a call to swtch(). If the segment is found. segvn_faultpage() calls the HAT (Hardware Address Translation) layer to load the page table entry(s) (PTE)s for the page. it is "reclaimed" off the free list. When pagefault() returns.x86_hm_exit <. see strategy(9E) for an overview of what the strategy routine is supposed to do.. Here. the process is sent a SIGSEGV (segmentation violation) signal. If the page already exists (but has been freed).pagefault Remember that the above output has been shortened. 2006 . The disk driver returns through the file system code out to segvn_fault(). At this point. At this point.segvn_fault <. this is segvn_fault() segvn_fault() looks for the faulting page already in memory. the virtual address that caused the page fault should now be mapped to a valid physical page. other threads will run.hat_memload <.

greater/equal to base and < base+size s_szc = 0 s_flags = 0 s_as = 0xffffffff828b61d0 s_tree = { avl_child = [ 0xffffffff82fa7920. Note – If you want to follow along. 0xffffffff82fa7c80 ] avl_pcb = 0xffffffff82fa796d } s_ops = segvn_ops s_data = 0xffffffff82d85070 } Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 79 . b. you can just run mdb within an editor buffer. --> { s_base = 0xfb800000 <-. See calls to as_segcompar in the DTrace output above. # mdb -k Loading modules: [ unix krtld genunix specfs dtrace ufs ip sctp usba random fctl s1394 nca lofs crypto nfs audiosup sppp cpc fcip ptm ipc ] > ::ps !grep mozilla-bin <-. Note – The search for the segment containing the fault address found the correct segment after 8 segments. Open a terminal window.Software Memory Management 4 Use mdb to examine the kernel data structures and locate the page of physical memory that corresponds to the fault as follows: a.Lots of output has been omitted.this is the seg we want. Using an AVL tree shortens the search! c. you may want to use: ::log /tmp/logfile in mdb and then !vi /tmp/logfile to search. Find the number of segments used by mozilla by using pmap as follows: # pmap -x ‘pgrep mozilla-bin‘ | wc 368 2730 23105 # The output shows that there are approximately 368 segments. Use mdb to locate the segment containing the fault address.. fault addr (fb985ea2) s_size = 0x561000 <-. Or..find the mozilla-bin process R 933 919 887 885 100 0x42014000 ffffffff81d6a040 mozilla-bin > ffffffff81d6a040::print proc_t p_as | ::walk seg | ::print struct seg <-.

(not all are necessarily valid) > ffffffff82f9e480::walk page | ::print page_t <-.we’ll look at anonymous space later vpage = 0xffffffff82552000 cred = 0xffffffff81f95018 swresv = 0 advice = 0 pageadvice = 0x1 flags = 0x490 softlockcnt = 0 policy_info = { mem_policy = 0x1 mem_reserved = 0 } } > ffffffff82f9e480::print vnode_t v_path v_path = 0xffffffff82f71090 "/usr/sfw/lib/mozilla/components/libgklayout. 2006 .from s_data { lock = { _opaque = [ 0 ] } segp_slock = { _opaque = [ 0 ] } pageprot = 0x1 prot = 0xd maxprot = 0xf type = 0x2 offset = 0 vp = 0xffffffff82f9e480 <-.walk list of pages on vnode_t 1236 1236 21012 <-.offset within segment 185ea2 <-.walk page list on vnode <-.rounding down to page boundary gives 185000 (4kpage size) > ffffffff82f9e480::walk page !wc <-.so" > fb985ea2-fb800000=K <-.points to a vnode_t anon_index = 0 amp = 0 <-.Software Memory Management <-.here is matching page p_vnode = 0xffffffff82f9e480 80 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.1236 pages.and lots more output omitted --> > ffffffff82d85070::print segvn_data_t <-.lots of pages omitted in output --> { p_offset = 0x185000 <-.

here is physical address of page > bd62000+ea2.dump 16 64-bit hex values at physical address 0xbd62ea2: 2ccec81ec8b55 e8575653f0e48300 32c3815b00000000 5d89d46589003ea7 840ff6850c758be0 e445c7000007df 1216e8000000 dbe850e4458d5650 7d830cc483ffeeea 791840f00e4 c085e8458904468b 500c498b088b2474 8b17eb04c483d1ff e8458de05d8bd465 c483ffeeeac8e850 458b0000074ce904 Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 81 .and lots more output omitted --> > bd62*1000=K <-.10/K <-.multiple page frame number time page size (hex) bd62000 <-.Software Memory Management p_selock = 0 p_selockpad = 0 p_hash = 0xfffffffffae21c00 p_vpnext = 0xfffffffffaca9760 p_vpprev = 0xfffffffffb3467f8 p_next = 0xfffffffffad8f800 p_prev = 0xfffffffffad8f800 p_lckcnt = 0 p_cowcnt = 0 p_cv = { _opaque = 0 } p_io_cv = { _opaque = 0 } p_iolock_state = 0 p_szc = 0 p_fsdata = 0 p_state = 0 p_nrm = 0x2 p_embed = 0x1 p_index = 0 p_toxic = 0 p_mapping = 0xffffffff82d265f0 p_pagenum = 0xbd62 <-.the page frame number of page p_share = 0 p_sharepad = 0 p_msresv_1 = 0 p_mlentry = 0x185 p_msresv_2 = 0 } <-.

get as for mozilla-bin 82 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.%esp 0xfb985eab: andl $0xfffffff0.%ebx 0xbd62ebd: movl %esp.%esp 0xfb985eae: pushq %rbx 0xfb985eaf: pushq %rsi 0xfb985eb0: pushq %rdi 0xfb985eb1: call +0x5 <0xfb985eb6> 0xfb985eb6: popq %rbx 0xfb985eb7: addl $0x3ea732.change context from kernel to mozilla-bin debugger context set to proc ffffffff81d6a040. the address of the process > fb985ea2.%esp 0xbd62eae: pushq %rbx 0xbd62eaf: pushq %rsi 0xbd62eb0: pushq %rdi 0xbd62eb1: call +0x5 <0xbd62eb6> 0xbd62eb6: popq %rbx 0xbd62eb7: addl $0x3ea732.Software Memory Management > bd62000+ea2.%ebp 0xbd62ea5: subl $0x2cc.and dump from faulting virtual address 0xfb985ea2: 0xfb985ea2: pushq %rbp <-.%esp 0xbd62eab: andl $0xfffffff0.-0x20(%rbp) 0xbd62ec3: movl 0xc(%rbp).%esi 0xfb985ec8: je +0x7e5 <0xfb9866ad> 0xfb985ece: movl $0x0.-0x1c(%rbp) > ffffffff81d6a040::context <-.-0x1c(%rbp) > 0::context debugger context set to kernel > ffffffff81d6a040::print proc_t p_as <-.data looks like code.%ebp 0xfb985ea5: subl $0x2cc.%ebx 0xfb985ebd: movl %esp.-0x20(%rbp) 0xfb985ec3: movl 0xc(%rbp).%esi 0xfb985ec6: testl %esi.%esi 0xbd62ec6: testl %esi. 2006 .-0x2c(%rbp) 0xbd62ec0: movl %ebx.10/ai <-.-0x2c(%rbp) 0xfb985ec0: movl %ebx.10/ai <-.looks like a match 0xfb985ea3: movl %esp. let’s try dumping as code 0xbd62ea2: 0xbd62ea2: pushq %rbp 0xbd62ea3: movl %esp.%esi 0xbd62ec8: je +0x7e5 <0xbd636ad> 0xbd62ece: movl $0x0.

We locate the page corresponding to the offset within the segment.Software Memory Management p_as = 0xffffffff828b61d0 > fb985ea2::vtop -a ffffffff828b61d0 <-. we have the page frame number. Module 9 • Managing Memory with DTrace and MDB 83 . It turns out this data is code.physical address matches Once the segment is found. we print the segvn_data structure.check our work virtual fb985ea2 mapped to physical bd62ea2 <-. Once the page_t is located. a vnode_t maps the segment data. In this segment. We then convert the page frame number to a physical address and examine some of the data at the address. The vnode_t contains a list of pages that "belong to" the vnode_t. We then check the physical address by using the vtop (virtual-to-physical) mdb command.

84 .

85 .10 M O D U L E 1 0 Observing Processes in Zones With DTrace Objectives The objective of this module is to build on knowledge of DTrace to observe processes that run inside a zone.

Observing Processes in Zones With DTrace Additional Resources I System Administration Guide: Solaris Containers-Resource Management and Solaris Zones 86 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. 2006 .

The scheduling class for a non-global zone is set to the scheduling class for the system. You can also set the scheduling class for a zone through the dynamic resource pools facility. The global zone has a dual function. By default. The global zone is both the default zone for the system and the zone used for system-wide administrative control. let’s work on debugging applications that run in zones. If the zone is associated with a pool that has its pool. Percentage of the CPU the zone is entitled to is the ratio of its shares and the total number of shares for all zones bound to a particular resource pool.scheduler property set to a valid scheduling class. The sparse root zone model optimizes the sharing of objects.Global and Non-Global Zones Global and Non-Global Zones Now that we have some knowledge of debugging applications. The global administrator can log in to the installed zone by using the zlogin command. who uses the zone administration command zoneadm to install software at the package level into the file system hierarchy established for the zone. a single zone can be bound to a specific pool. Every OpenSolaris system contains a global zone. The global administrator uses the zonecfg command to configure a zone by specifying various parameters for the zone’s virtual platform and application environment. There are two types of non-global zone root file system models: sparse and whole root. the internal configuration for the zone is completed. The zone is then installed by the global administrator. all zones including the global zone have one (1) fair share scheduler share assigned to them. Multiple zones can share a resource pool or in order to meet service guarantees. At first login. The zoneadm command is then used to boot the zone. Module 10 • Observing Processes in Zones With DTrace 87 . The whole root zone model provides the maximum file system configurability. then processes running in the zone run in that scheduling class by default.

2006 . From the global zone. DTrace may be used from the global zone and supports a zonename variable and the pr_zoneid field in psinfo_t for use with the proc provider.Global and Non-Global Zones DTracing a Process Running in a Zone This lab will focus on observing processes running in a zone. process tools like prstat(1M). Log into the global zone: % zlogin password: # 3 Count the number of I/O operations per zone: # dtrace -n io:::start{@[zonename] = count()} 88 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. 1 2 Open a terminal window. ps(1) and truss(1) can be used to observe processes in other zones.

89 .11 M O D U L E 1 1 Configuring Filesystems With ZFS Objectives The objective of this lesson is to provide an introduction to ZFS by showing you how to create a simple ZFS pool with a mirrored filesystem.

2006 .org/os/community/zfs/docs/ 90 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.Configuring Filesystems With ZFS Additional Resources ZFS Administration Guide and man pages: http://opensolaris.

This can be any block device of at least 128 Mbytes in size. In traditional storage configurations which use partitions or volumes. we’ll start by learning about mirrored storage pool configuration. which describe the layout of physical storage and its fault characteristics. in which case the disk does not need to be specially formatted. ZFS uses pooled storage to eliminate the management problems associated with volumes and to enable all storage to be shared.Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems Each storage pool is comprised of one or more virtual devices. this is a hard drive that is visible to the system in the /dev/dsk directory. The most basic building block for a storage pool is a piece of physical storage. The recommended mode of operation is to use an entire disk. large slice. In this module. Typically. Then we’ll show you how to configure RAID-Z. the storage is fragmented across disks. ZFS formats the disk using an EFI label to contain a single. Module 11 • Configuring Filesystems With ZFS 91 . A storage device can be a whole disk (c0t0d0) or an individual slice (c0t0d0s7). The value of shared storage is the ability to repair damaged data.

ZFS is easy.3G AVAIL 47.7G CAP HEALTH 28% ONLINE ALTROOT - 4 Create a mirror of tank: # zpool create tank mirror c1t2d0 c2t2d0 The storage pool is mirrored on c2t2d0. 92 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. Create a single-disk storage pool named tank: # zpool create tank c1t2d0 You now have a single-disk storage pool named tank. 3 Validate that the pool was created: # zpool list NAME tank SIZE 80. 2006 . with a single filesystem mounted at /tank.Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems Creating Mirrored Storage Pools The objective of this lab exercise is to create and list a mirrored storage pool using the zpool command.0G USED 22. so let’s get on with it! It’s time to create your first pool: 1 2 Open a terminal window.

Create the /var/mail filesystem: # zfs create tank/mail 3 Set the mount point for the /var/mail filesystem: # zfs set mountpoint=/var/mail tank/mail 4 Create the home directory: # zfs create tank/home 5 Then. tank/home/developer1 is automatically mounted at /export/home/developer1 because tank/home is mounted at /export/home. 1 2 Open a terminal window. we’ll use the zfs command to create a filesystem and set its mountpoint.Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems Creating a Filesystem and /home Directories The objective of this lab exercise is to learn how to set up a filesystem with several /home directories. create home directories for all of your developers: # zfs create tank/home/developer1 # zfs create tank/home/developer2 # zfs create tank/home/developer3 # zfs create tank/home/developer4 The mountpoint property is inherited as a pathname prefix. That is. set the mount point for the home directory: # zfs set mountpoint=/export/home tank/home 6 Finally. In this lab. Module 11 • Configuring Filesystems With ZFS 93 .

/dev/dsk/c0t0d4s0 is identical to c0t0d4s0 by itself. Create a pool with a single RAID-Z device consisting of 5 disk slices: # zpool create tank raidz c0t0d0s0 c0t0d1s0 c0t0d2s0 c0t0d3s0 c0t0d4s0 In the above example. 1 2 Open a terminal window. Other than that. You need at least two disks for a RAID-Z configuration. 2006 .Creating Pools With Mounted Filesystems Configuring RAID-Z The objective of this lab exercise is to introduce you to the RAID-Z configuration. You might want to configure RAID-Z instead of mirrored pools for greater redundancy. 94 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. the disk must have been pre-formatted to have an appropriately sized slice zero. Creating a RAID-Z pool is identical to a mirrored pool. The above command is just an example of using disk slices in a storage pool. Note that there is no requirement to use disk slices in a RAID-Z configuration. except that the raidz keyword is used instead of mirror. no special hardware is required to create a RAID-Z configuration. Disks can be specified using their full path.

compile the driver. and test the driver. This driver demonstrates the minimum functionality that any character driver must implement. This module explains how to write the driver and configuration file. You can use this driver as a template for building a complex driver. working driver.12 M O D U L E 1 2 Writing a Template Character Device Driver Objectives This module shows you how to develop a very simple. 95 . The driver that is shown in this module is a pseudo device driver that merely writes a message to a system log every time an entry point is entered. load the driver.

Writing a Template Character Device Driver Additional Resources I I Writing Device Drivers.. 2005. Sun Microsystems. 96 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. Inc. 2005.. Sun Microsystems. Inc. 2006 . Solaris Modular Debugger Guide.

detach(9E). 8. and prop_op(9E). Test the driver by loading the driver.conf. and unloading the driver. 6. Write the entry points for autoconfiguration: attach(9E). 4. getinfo(9E). 3. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 97 .c. and _fini(9E). Define the data structures: the character and block operations structure cb_ops(9S). Create the driver configuration file dummy.Overview of the Template Driver Example Overview of the Template Driver Example This example guides you through the following steps: 1. the device operations structure dev_ops(9S). read(9E). Build and install the driver. 2. close(9E). and write(9E). 7. and the module linkage structures modldrv(9S) and modlinkage(9S). Write the entry points for loadable module configuration: _init(9E). 5. Write the entry points for user context: open(9E). _info(9E). Create a directory where you can develop your driver and open a new text file named dummy. reading from and writing to the device node.

This driver is named dummy because this driver does not do any real work. When mod_remove(9F) is successful. The _info(9E) routine returns information about a loadable module. open a new text file named dummy. The _info(9E) routine must at least call the mod_info(9F) function and return the value that is returned by mod_info(9F). the following code is added to the dummy.Writing the Template Driver Writing the Template Driver This section describes the entry points and data structures that are included in this driver and shows you how to define them. 2006 . mod_info(9F).c. All of these data structures and almost all of these entry points are required for any character device driver. The _fini(9E) routine must at least call the mod_remove(9F) function and return the success or failure value that is returned by mod_remove(9F). Writing the Loadable Module Configuration Entry Points Every kernel module of any type must define at least the following three loadable module configuration entry points: I The _init(9E) routine initializes a loadable module. You do not need to investigate what the values of the arguments of these functions should be. the _fini(9E) routine must undo everything that the _init(9E) routine did. create a directory where you can develop your driver. and mod_remove(9F) functions are used in exactly the same way in every driver. This section describes the following entry points and data structures: I I I I I I Loadable module configuration entry points Autoconfiguration entry points User context entry points Character and block operations structure Device operations structure Module linkage structures First. regardless of the functionality of the driver. Next. You can copy these function calls from this example and paste them into every driver you write. I I The mod_install(9F). In this section. The _fini(9E) routine prepares a loadable module for unloading.c source file: 98 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. The _init(9E) routine must at least call the mod_install(9F) function and return the success or failure value that is returned by mod_install(9F).

and the sunddi.h header file. The first Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 99 . The cmn_err(9F) function also is useful for debugging in the same way that you might use print statements in a user program. The mod_install(9F) function takes an argument that is a modlinkage(9S) structure. } Declaring the Loadable Module Configuration Entry Points The _init(9E).c. "Inside _init"). return(mod_info(&ml. The cmn_err(9F) function usually is used to report an error condition. You customize the behavior of these routines when you define them in your module.h header file. but the names of these routines are not unique. Do not declare these three routines in dummy. and _fini(9E) routine names are not unique to any particular kernel module. return(mod_install(&ml)). Defining the Module Initialization Entry Point The _init(9E) routine returns type int and takes no arguments.c file. These three routines are declared in the modctl. _info(9E). "Inside _info"). The _init(9E) routine must call the mod_install(9F) function and return the success or failure value that is returned by mod_install(9F). "Inside _fini"). This driver is supposed to write a message each time an entry point is entered. Use the cmn_err(9F) function to write a message to a system log. the ddi. modinfop)). } int _fini(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. return(mod_remove(&ml)). You need to include the modctl. The cmn_err(9F) function requires you to include the cmn_err.h header file. } int _info(struct modinfo *modinfop) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE.h header file.h header file in your dummy. The cmn_err(9F) function takes two arguments.Writing the Template Driver /* Loadable module configuration entry points */ int _init(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE.

return(mod_info(&ml. The _fini(9E) routine must call the mod_remove(9F) function and return the success or failure value that is returned by mod_remove(9F). 100 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. The mod_info(9F) function returns the module information or returns zero if an error occurs. The following code is the _init(9E) routine that you should enter into your dummy. return(mod_install(&ml)). } Defining the Module Unload Entry Point The _fini(9E) routine returns type int and takes no arguments. modinfop)). The message written by this driver is not an error message but is simply a test message.Writing the Template Driver argument is a constant that indicates the severity of the error message.c file. int _init(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. The modinfop argument is a pointer to an opaque structure that the system uses to pass module information. The ml structure is the modlinkage(9S) structure. The following code is the _info(9E) routine that you should enter into your dummy. The _info(9E) routine must return the value that is returned by the mod_info(9F) function. Use the cmn_err(9F) function to write a message to the system log in the same way that you used the cmn_err(9F) function in your _init(9E) entry point. The first argument to mod_info(9F) is a modlinkage(9S) structure. 2006 .c file. Use CE_NOTE for the value of this severity constant. int _info(struct modinfo *modinfop) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "Inside _init"). The second argument to mod_info(9F) is the same modinfo structure pointer that is the argument to the _info(9E) routine. } Defining the Module Information Entry Point The _info(9E) routine returns type int and takes an argument that is a pointer to an opaque modinfo structure. The second argument the cmn_err(9F) function takes is a string message. "Inside _info"). The mod_info(9F) function takes two arguments.

Another module that depends on this driver is open. The _fini(9E) routine must deallocate anything that was allocated. } Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 101 . I I If the driver is busy. A module depends on this driver if the module was linked using the -N option with this driver named as the argument to that -N option. The _fini(9E) routine must call mod_remove(9F) because the _init(9E) routine called mod_install(9F). The following actions take place when mod_remove(9F) is called: I The kernel checks whether this driver is busy. The mod_remove(9F) function takes an argument that is a modlinkage(9S) structure. then mod_remove(9F) succeeds. The _fini(9E) routine can be called at any time when a module is loaded. "Inside _fini").Writing the Template Driver When mod_remove(9F) is successful. int _fini(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. and _fini(9E) continues its cleanup work. I I If detach(9E) fails. and the module can be unloaded. If mod_remove(9F) fails. the module determines that devices were detached. See the ld(1) man page for more information. Use the cmn_err(9F) function to write a message to the system log in the same way that you used the cmn_err(9F) function in your _init(9E) entry point. This behavior is normal because the kernel allows the module to determine whether the module can be unloaded. and destroy anything that was created in the _init(9E) routine. then mod_remove(9F) fails and _fini(9E) fails. In normal operation. return(mod_remove(&ml)). the _fini(9E) routine must undo everything that the _init(9E) routine did. then mod_remove(9F) fails and _fini(9E) fails. If mod_remove(9F) is successful.c file. the module determines that devices were not detached. then the kernel calls the detach(9E) entry point of the driver. and the module cannot be unloaded. If the driver is not busy. This driver is busy if one of the following conditions is true: I I A device node that is managed by this driver is open. If detach(9E) succeeds. close anything that was opened. the _fini(9E) routine often fails. The following code is the _fini(9E) routine that you should enter into your dummy.

h header file.h header file. the following code is added: /* Device autoconfiguration entry points */ static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. "Inside dummy_attach"). _fini */ all entry points for this driver */ all entry points for this driver */ all entry points for this driver */ Writing the Autoconfiguration Entry Points Every character driver must define at least the following autoconfiguration entry points. The cmn_err(9F) function requires you to include the cmn_err. the ddi. The detach(9E) routine must call ddi_remove_minor_node(9F) to deallocate everything that was allocated by ddi_create_minor_node(9F).h> <sys/cmn_err.h header file. and the sunddi. and mod_install(9F) functions require you to include the modctl. Include this code near the top of your dummy. ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. The ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function provides the information the system needs to create the device files. 2006 . The detach(9E) routine must undo everything that the attach(9E) routine did.h> /* /* /* /* used used used used by by by by _init.Writing the Template Driver Including Loadable Module Configuration Header Files The _init(9E). I I I In this section. _fini(9E). The following header files are required by the three loadable module configuration routines that you have written in this section. You can call the ddi_prop_op(9F) function instead of writing your own prop_op(9E) entry point. The prop_op(9E) routine returns requested device driver property information through a pointer.h> <sys/ddi. _info.0) 102 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. if (ddi_create_minor_node(dip. switch(cmd) { case DDI_ATTACH: dummy_dip = dip. I The attach(9E) routine must call ddi_create_minor_node(9F). Use the prop_op(9E) entry point to customize the behavior of the ddi_prop_op(9F) function. S_IFCHR.h header file. _info(9E). The kernel calls these routines when the device driver is loaded. ddi_get_instance(dip).h> <sys/sunddi.c file. The getinfo(9E) routine returns requested device driver information through one of its arguments. #include #include #include #include <sys/modctl. "0". DDI_PSEUDO.

ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "Inside dummy_getinfo"). default: return DDI_FAILURE. } else return DDI_SUCCESS. } } static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip. "%s%d: attach: could not add character node. return(DDI_FAILURE). default: return DDI_FAILURE. return DDI_SUCCESS. case DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE: *resultp = 0. 0).". } } static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. "dummy". Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 103 . return DDI_SUCCESS. default: return DDI_FAILURE. void *arg. switch(cmd) { case DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO: *resultp = dummy_dip. dev_info_t *dip. ddi_info_cmd_t cmd. NULL). "Inside dummy_detach"). void **resultp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. switch(cmd) { case DDI_DETACH: dummy_dip = 0. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op. ddi_remove_minor_node(dip. } } static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev.Writing the Template Driver != DDI_SUCCESS) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. return DDI_SUCCESS.

This practice makes debugging much easier. ddi_info_cmd_t cmd.flags. The first argument is a pointer to the dev_info structure for this driver. dummy_ is used for the prefix to each function and data name that is unique to this example. static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. void **resultp).dip. Every attach(9E) routine must define behavior for at least DDI_ATTACH. ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd). void *arg. dev_info_t *dip. caddr_t valuep.h. The second argument is a constant that specifies the attach type. The DDI_ATTACH code must initialize a device instance. Note that each of these functions is declared static.Writing the Template Driver int flags. In a realistic driver. Choose a prefix to use with each entry point routine. The value that is passed through this second argument is either DDI_ATTACH or DDI_RESUME. Defining the Device Attach Entry Point The attach(9E) routine returns type int. } Declaring the Autoconfiguration Entry Points The attach(9E). The following declarations are the autoconfiguration entry point declarations you should have in your dummy. Note – By convention.c file.lengthp)). All of the autoconfiguration entry point routines except for prop_op(9E) return either DDI_SUCCESS or DDI_FAILURE.name. the prefix used for function and data names that are unique to this driver is either the name of this driver or an abbreviation of the name of this driver. int flags. and prop_op(9E) entry point routines need to be uniquely named for this driver.prop_op. char *name. 2006 . getinfo(9E). you define and manage multiple instances of the driver by using a state structure and the ddi_soft_state(9F) functions. int *lengthp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. In the example shown in this module. All of the autoconfiguration entry point routines take a dev_info argument. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op. return(ddi_prop_op(dev. char *name. static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip. Use the same prefix throughout the driver.valuep. The attach(9E) routine takes two arguments. These two constants are defined in sunddi. ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd). int *lengthp). "Inside dummy_prop_op"). Each instance of the driver has its own copy of the state 104 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. detach(9E). The attach(9E) routine must return either DDI_SUCCESS or DDI_FAILURE. static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. caddr_t valuep. static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev.

"Inside dummy_attach"). The device instance pointer and the instance number both are used by ddi_create_minor_node(9F) to create a new device node. Each instance of the device driver is represented by a separate device file in /devices. the device instance pointer is used by the ddi_get_instance(9F) function to return the instance number. Within the DDI_ATTACH code. ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 105 . "dummy". This driver still must declare a device instance pointer and initialize the pointer value in the attach(9E) routine.c file. } else return DDI_SUCCESS. } } First. 0). Then provide DDI_ATTACH behavior.Writing the Template Driver structure that holds data specific to that instance. use cmn_err(9F) to write a message to the system log. Each device instance file is pointed to by a separate device instance pointer.". One of the pieces of data that is specific to each instance is the device instance pointer. "0". static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. if (ddi_create_minor_node(dip. DDI_PSEUDO. /* keep track of one instance */ The following code is the dummy_attach() routine that you should enter into your dummy. return(DDI_FAILURE). Enter the following code near the beginning of dummy. You need to save this pointer value in the global variable so that you can use this pointer to get information about this instance from dummy_getinfo() and detach this instance in dummy_detach().0) != DDI_SUCCESS) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "%s%d: attach: could not add character node. this driver does not use a state structure. switch(cmd) { case DDI_ATTACH: dummy_dip = dip. as you did in your _init(9E) entry point. In this dummy_attach() routine. ddi_get_instance(dip). S_IFCHR. This dummy driver allows only one instance. Because this driver allows only one instance.c to declare a device instance pointer for this driver: dev_info_t *dummy_dip. first assign the device instance pointer from the dummy_attach() argument to the dummy_dip variable that you declared above. default: return DDI_FAILURE.

The following code is the dummy_detach() routine that you should enter into your dummy. The ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function takes six arguments. This is not a clone device. The ddi_create_minor_node(9F) man page lists the possible node types. If the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) call is not successful. ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. The first argument is a pointer to the dev_info structure for this driver. This dummy driver is a character driver. return DDI_SUCCESS. return DDI_FAILURE. you saved the address of a new dev_info structure and you called the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function to create a new node.c file. "Inside dummy_detach"). static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. The DDI_PSEUDO node type is for pseudo devices. In the DDI_DETACH code in this detach(9E) routine. close anything that was opened. The detach(9E) routine must deallocate anything that was allocated. You also need to call the ddi_remove_minor_node(9F) function to remove this node. The fourth argument to the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function is the minor number of this minor device. The second argument is a constant that specifies the detach type. The fifth argument to the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function is the node type. The value that is passed through this second argument is either DDI_DETACH or DDI_SUSPEND. If the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) call is successful. This dummy driver uses the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function to create a device node. Every detach(9E) routine must define behavior for at least DDI_DETACH. This number is also called the instance number. Defining the Device Detach Entry Point The detach(9E) routine takes two arguments. write a message to the system log and return DDI_FAILURE. The sixth argument to the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function specifies whether this is a clone device. The DDI_DETACH code must undo everything that the DDI_ATTACH code did. so set this argument value to 0. The first argument to the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function is the device instance pointer that points to the dev_info structure of this device. The second argument is the name of this minor node. The third argument is S_IFCHR if this device is a character minor device or is S_IFBLK if this device is a block minor device. and destroy anything that was created in the attach(9E) routine. you need to reset the variable that pointed to the dev_info structure for this node.Writing the Template Driver A realistic driver probably would use the ddi_soft_state(9F) functions to create and manage a device node. 2006 . In the DDI_ATTACH code in your attach(9E) routine. switch(cmd) { case DDI_DETACH: 106 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. The ddi_get_instance(9F) function returns this instance number. If this dummy_attach() routine receives any cmd other than DDI_ATTACH.

The first argument is a pointer to the dev_info structure for this driver.Writing the Template Driver dummy_dip = 0. this dummy driver supports only one instance. as you did in your _init(9E) entry point. You cannot reset this device instance pointer unless you remove all instances of the device. ddi_remove_minor_node(dip. The second argument to the getinfo(9E) routine is a constant that specifies what information the getinfo(9E) routine must return. default: return DDI_FAILURE. Within the DDI_DETACH code. The value of this second argument is either DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO or DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE. The second argument is the name of the minor node you want to remove. NULL). Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 107 . first reset the dummy_dip variable that you set in dummy_attach() above. Because the DDI_DETACH code of this driver always removes all instances. The return value of the getinfo(9E) routine is DDI_SUCCESS or DDI_FAILURE. use cmn_err(9F) to write a message to the system log. call the ddi_remove_minor_node(9F) function to remove this device node. Then provide DDI_DETACH behavior. return DDI_FAILURE. Next. The ddi_remove_minor_node(9F) function takes two arguments. } } First. return DDI_SUCCESS. If the value of the cmd argument to this dummy_detach() routine is DDI_DETACH. This dummy driver supports only one instance. This dev_info structure argument is obsolete and is no longer used by the getinfo(9E) routine. remove all instances of this device and return DDI_SUCCESS. The pointer or instance number requested from the getinfo(9E) routine is returned through a pointer argument. The getinfo(9E) routine takes four arguments. The fourth argument is a pointer to the place where the getinfo(9E) routine must store the requested information. The third argument to the getinfo(9E) routine is a pointer to a device number. The information stored at this location depends on the value you passed in the second argument to the getinfo(9E) routine. Defining the Get Driver Information Entry Point The getinfo(9E) routine takes a pointer to a device number and returns a pointer to a device information structure or returns a device instance number. If this dummy_detach() routine receives any cmd other than DDI_DETACH. The first argument is the device instance pointer that points to the dev_info structure of this device. If the value of the minor node argument is NULL. then ddi_remove_minor_node(9F) removes all instances of this device.

switch(cmd) { case DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO: *resultp = dummy_dip. A realistic driver would then call the ddi_get_soft_state(9F) function and return the device information structure pointer from that state structure. case DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE: *resultp = 0. return DDI_SUCCESS. 108 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. A realistic driver would use arg to get the instance number of this device node. } } First. This dummy driver supports only one instance and does not use a state structure. return DDI_SUCCESS. as you did in your _init(9E) entry point. simply return 0. "Inside dummy_getinfo"). Within the DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE code. Next. default: return DDI_FAILURE. 2006 . In the DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO code of this dummy_getinfo() routine. ddi_info_cmd_t cmd.c file. The instance number of that one instance is 0.Writing the Template Driver The following table describes the relationship between the second and fourth arguments to the getinfo(9E) routine. provide DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE behavior. Then provide DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO behavior. void **resultp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. simply return the one device information structure pointer that the dummy_attach() routine saved. use cmn_err(9F) to write a message to the system log. TABLE 12–1 Get Driver Information Entry Point Arguments cmd arg resultp DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE Device number Device number Device information structure pointer Device instance number The following code is the dummy_getinfo() routine that you should enter into your dummy. void *arg. This dummy driver supports only one instance. static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip.

h> /* used by prop_op. char *name.c file. int *lengthp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. These arguments are not discussed here because this dummy driver does not create and manage its own properties. The prop_op(9E) entry point and the ddi_prop_op(9F) function both require that you include the types.flags.name. See the prop_op(9E) man page to learn about the prop_op(9E) arguments. caddr_t valuep. int flags. _fini */ #include <sys/types. The dummy_attach() routine calls the ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function. The following code is the dummy_prop_op() routine that you should enter into your dummy. use cmn_err(9F) to write a message to the system log. You already included these two header files for the cmn_err(9F) function. Including Autoconfiguration Header Files All of the autoconfiguration entry point routines and all of the user context entry point routines require that you include the ddi. Drivers that create and manage their own properties need a custom prop_op(9E) routine. This dummy driver uses a prop_op(9E) routine to call cmn_err(9F) before calling the ddi_prop_op(9F) function. } First. _info.Writing the Template Driver Defining the Report Driver Property Information Entry Point The prop_op(9E) entry point is required for every driver. static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev.c file for the four autoconfiguration routines you have written in this section and the three loadable module configuration routines you wrote in the previous section. The following code is the list of header files that you now should have included in your dummy.h> /* used by _init.h> /* defines S_IFCHR used by ddi_create_minor_node */ Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 109 . ddi_prop_op */ #include <sys/stat. return(ddi_prop_op(dev.prop_op.h header file. If your driver does not need to customize the behavior of the prop_op(9E) entry point. The prop_op(9E) and the ddi_prop_op(9F) functions require the types.h header files. The prop_op(9E) entry point and the ddi_prop_op(9F) function both take the same seven arguments. The ddi_create_minor_node(9F) function requires the stat. #include <sys/modctl.valuep. then your driver can use the ddi_prop_op(9F) function for the prop_op(9E) entry point.h header file. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op.lengthp)). "Inside dummy_prop_op"). dev_info_t *dip.dip. Then call the ddi_prop_op(9F) function with exactly the same arguments as the dummy_prop_op() function.h header file. as you did in your _init(9E) entry point.h and sunddi.

then the open(9E) routine in the driver for that device is called. the following code is added: /* Use context entry points */ static int dummy_open(dev_t *devp. struct uio *uiop. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. I I In this section. and ddi_prop_op */ Writing the User Context Entry Points User context entry points correspond closely to system calls. "Inside dummy_open").Writing the Template Driver #include <sys/cmn_err. int otyp. 2006 . } static int dummy_close(dev_t dev. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. int flag. The close(9E). return DDI_SUCCESS. */ ddi_get_instance. I I The open(9E) routine gains access to the device. read(9E). The close(9E) routine must undo everything that the open(9E) routine did. the open(9E) routine can be nulldev(9F). return DDI_SUCCESS. ddi_prop_op */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by ddi_create_minor_node. The write(9E) routine writes data to the device node. The read(9E) routine reads data from the device node. cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "Inside dummy_close").h> /* #include <sys/ddi. } static int dummy_read(dev_t dev. 110 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.h> /* /* #include <sys/sunddi. and write(9E) user context routines are optional. int flag. However.h> /* /* /* used by all entry points for this driver */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by ddi_get_instance. "Inside dummy_read"). The close(9E) routine relinquishes access to the device. When a system call opens a device file. int otyp. All character and block drivers must define the open(9E) user context entry point.

Use the same prefix for each of the user context entry points that you used for each of the autoconfiguration entry point routines. "Inside dummy_open"). cred_t *credp). static int dummy_read(dev_t dev. cred_t *credp). The open(9E) routine should return either DDI_SUCCESS or the appropriate error number. Defining the Open Device Entry Point The open(9E) routine returns type int. static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev. int otyp. static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. } static int dummy_write(dev_t dev. This dummy driver is so simple that this dummy_open() routine does not use any of the open(9E) arguments. caddr_t valuep. struct uio *uiop. static int dummy_write(dev_t dev. ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd). ddi_info_cmd_t cmd. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op. The following code is the dummy_open() routine that you should enter into your dummy. void *arg. int otyp. cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. static int dummy_open(dev_t *devp. int otyp. int flags. char *name. } Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 111 . The following declarations are the entry point declarations you should have in your dummy. return DDI_SUCCESS. dev_info_t *dip. void **resultp). cred_t *cred).Writing the Template Driver return DDI_SUCCESS. static int dummy_open(dev_t *devp. int flag.c file: static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. static int dummy_close(dev_t dev. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. cred_t *cred). int flag. } Declaring the User Context Entry Points The user context entry point routines need to be uniquely named for this driver. "Inside dummy_write").c file. return DDI_SUCCESS. int flag. struct uio *uiop. struct uio *uiop. Write a message to the system log and return success. static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip. The open(9E) routine takes four arguments. ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd). int *lengthp).

int otyp.Writing the Template Driver Defining the Close Device Entry Point The close(9E) routine returns type int. The read(9E) routine takes three arguments. struct uio *uiop. static int dummy_read(dev_t dev. 112 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. Write a message to the system log and return success. "Inside dummy_read"). int flag. and destroy anything that was created in the open(9E) routine. close anything that was opened. } Defining the Write Device Entry Point The write(9E) routine returns type int. The close(9E) routine should return either DDI_SUCCESS or the appropriate error number. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. The following code is the dummy_close() routine that you should enter into your dummy. The write(9E) routine takes three arguments. static int dummy_close(dev_t dev. The following code is the dummy_read() routine that you should enter into your dummy. cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. This dummy driver is so simple that this dummy_close() routine does not use any of the close(9E) arguments. The close(9E) routine must deallocate anything that was allocated. "Inside dummy_close").c file. This dummy driver is so simple that this dummy_write() routine does not use any of the write(9E) arguments.c file. The close(9E) routine must undo everything that the open(9E) routine did. Write a message to the system log and return success. In this dummy driver. The close(9E) routine takes four arguments. The read(9E) routine should return either DDI_SUCCESS or the appropriate error number. 2006 . the open(9E) routine is so simple that nothing needs to be reclaimed or undone in the close(9E) routine. return DDI_SUCCESS. The write(9E) routine should return either DDI_SUCCESS or the appropriate error number. This dummy driver is so simple that this dummy_read() routine does not use any of the read(9E) arguments. } Defining the Read Device Entry Point The read(9E) routine returns type int. return DDI_SUCCESS.

h> /* #include <sys/open. static int dummy_write(dev_t dev.h.h. and uio.h> /* /* /* #include <sys/sunddi. "Inside dummy_write"). read. close.h> /* #include <sys/errno. All drivers must define a dev_ops(9S) device operations structure. cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. Write a message to the system log and return success.h header files. read.Writing the Template Driver The following code is the dummy_write() routine that you should enter into your dummy. modldrv. close. prop_op. You need to include the file. write.h> /* #include <sys/cmn_err.c file. and the sunddi.h> /* #include <sys/cred. write */ used by open. close. */ and _fini */ used by open.h> /* #include <sys/uio.h> /* #include <sys/stat. cred. */ and ddi_prop_op */ used by open. Because the dev_ops(9S) structure includes a pointer to the cb_ops(9S) character and block operations structure. write */ used by open.h.h> /* /* /* used by modlinkage.h header file. and ddi_prop_op */ Writing the Driver Data Structures All of the data structures described in this section are required for every device driver. _init.c file for all the entry points you have written in this section and the previous two sections: #include <sys/modctl. _info.h> /* /* #include <sys/file. read */ used by read */ defines S_IFCHR used by ddi_create_minor_node */ used by all entry points for this driver */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by ddi_get_instance and */ ddi_prop_op */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by ddi_create_minor_node. close */ used by open.h> /* /* #include <sys/types. struct uio *uiop. } Including User Context Header Files The four user context entry point routines require your module to include several header files.h header file. errno. open. You already have included the types. read. return DDI_SUCCESS. The modldrv(9S) linkage structure for loadable Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 113 .h> /* #include <sys/ddi. you must define the cb_ops(9S) structure first. the ddi.h. The following code is the list of header files that you now should have included in your dummy.h header file. */ ddi_get_instance. close.

dummy_close. dummy_write. /* no dump */ dummy_read. /* streamtab struct. /* returns ENXIO for non-pollable devices */ dummy_prop_op. 0.nodev returns ENXIO */ nodev.h */ CB_REV. Some optional entry points and other related data also are initialized in these data structures. Except for the loadable module configuration entry points. /* no probe */ dummy_attach. /* no aread */ nodev /* no awrite */ }. /* no segmap */ nochpoll. all above */ /* fields are ignored */ D_NEW | D_MP. /* no strategy . nodev. nodev. /* no ioctl */ nodev.Writing the Template Driver drivers includes a pointer to the dev_ops(9S) structure. 114 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. and _fini(9E) entry points are required for all kernel modules and are not specific to device driver modules. Initializing the entry points in these data structures enables the driver to be dynamically loaded. The loadable module configuration entry points are not initialized in driver data structures. /* no mmap */ nodev. nulldev. /* dev_ops structure */ static struct dev_ops dummy_dev_ops = { DEVO_REV. 2006 . In this section.nulldev returns 0 */ nulldev. if not NULL. /* cb_ops revision number */ nodev. the following code is added: /* cb_ops structure */ static struct cb_ops dummy_cb_ops = { dummy_open. /* no print */ nodev. The modlinkage(9S) module linkage structure includes a pointer to the modldrv(9S) structure. /* reference count */ dummy_getinfo. /* no devmap */ nodev. /* no identify . _info(9E). /* compatibility flags: see conf. NULL. The _init(9E). all of the required entry points for a driver are initialized in the character and block operations structure or in the device operations structure.

/* Name of the module. nodev. When you name this structure. */ &dummy_dev_ops }. /* no reset .Writing the Template Driver dummy_detach. /* keep track of one instance */ Defining the Character and Block Operations Structure The cb_ops(9S) structure initializes standard character and block interfaces. Prepend the static type modifier to the declaration. */ "dummy driver". dummy_close. /* no dump */ dummy_read. NULL }. This dummy driver does not use all of the elements in the cb_ops(9S) structure. nodev /* no power */ }. /* dev_info structure */ dev_info_t *dummy_dip. The following code is the cb_ops(9S) structure that you should enter into your dummy. See the cb_ops(9S) man page to learn what each element is and what the value of each element should be. (struct bus_ops *)NULL.c file: static struct cb_ops dummy_cb_ops = { dummy_open. See the description that follows the code sample. &md.nodev returns ENXIO */ nodev. /* Type of module. /* no print */ nodev. nodev. /* modlinkage structure */ static struct modlinkage ml = { MODREV_1. This is a driver.nodev returns ENXIO */ &dummy_cb_ops. dummy_write. /* no strategy . /* modldrv structure */ static struct modldrv md = { &mod_driverops. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 115 . use the same dummy_ prefix that you used for the names of the autoconfiguration routines and the names of the user context routines.

Initialize all of these unused function elements to nodev(9F). nodev. nodev. This driver does not define devmap(9E). nochpoll. All drivers must be multithreaded-safe. This dummy driver does not define these three routines because this driver is a character driver. if not NULL.h */ cb_ops revision number */ no aread */ no awrite */ Enter the names of the open(9E) and close(9E) entry points for this driver as the values of the first two elements of this structure. /* /* /* /* /* /* /* /* /* /* /* no ioctl */ no devmap */ no mmap */ no segmap */ returns ENXIO for non-pollable devices */ streamtab struct.Writing the Template Driver nodev. nodev. The D_NEW flag means this driver is a new-style driver.h header file. Specify the nochpoll(9F) function for the chpoll(9E) element of the cb_ops(9S) structure because this driver is not for a pollable device. and must specify this D_MP flag. The D_MP flag means this driver safely allows multiple threads of execution. and dump(9E) routines are for block drivers only. dummy_prop_op. CB_REV. This driver does not define an ioctl(9E) entry point because this driver does not use I/O control commands. D_NEW | D_MP. The CB_REV element of the cb_ops(9S) structure is the cb_ops(9S) revision number. Specify NULL for the streamtab(9S) STREAMS entity declaration structure because this driver is not a STREAMS driver. The nodev(9F) function returns the ENXIO error code.h header file for more compatibility flags. all above */ fields are ignored */ compatibility flags: see conf. Enter the name of the prop_op(9E) entry point for this driver as the value of the thirteenth element in this structure. Enter the names of the read(9E) and write(9E) entry points for this driver as the values of the sixth and seventh elements of this structure. The D_64BIT flag means this driver supports 64-bit offsets and block numbers. NULL. print(9E). nodev }. CB_REV is defined in the devops. This driver does not does not define aread(9E) or awrite(9E) entry points because this driver does not perform any asynchronous reads or writes. See the conf. 2006 . The strategy(9E). nodev.h header file. 116 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. or segmap(9E) entry points because this driver does not support memory mapping. mmap(9E). The compatibility flags are defined in the conf.

detach(9E). The reset() function is obsolete. Initialize the reset() function to nodev(9F). /* no reset . (struct bus_ops *)NULL. See the dev_ops(9S) man page to learn what each element is and what the value of each element should be. This dummy driver is not a nexus driver. nodev /* no power */ }. nodev. Prepend the static type modifier to the declaration. This dummy driver does not use all of the elements in the dev_ops(9S) structure. dummy_detach. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 117 . /* no identify . /* no probe */ dummy_attach. Only nexus drivers have bus operations structures. The nulldev(9F) function returns success. nulldev.Writing the Template Driver Defining the Device Operations Structure The dev_ops(9S) structure initializes interfaces that are used for operations such as attaching and detaching the driver. Initialize this structure element to nulldev. use the same dummy_ prefix that you used for the names of the autoconfiguration routines and the names of the user context routines. The following code is the dev_ops(9S) structure that you should enter into your dummy. The identify(9E) function is obsolete. DEVO_REV is defined in the devops. /* reference count */ dummy_getinfo. Set this value to NULL because this driver is a leaf driver. attach(9E). The probe(9E) function determines whether the corresponding device exists and is valid. probe(9E). identify(9E). See the description that follows the code sample.nulldev returns 0 */ nulldev. The driver reference count is the number of instances of this driver that are currently open. 0.c file: static struct dev_ops dummy_dev_ops = { DEVO_REV. The DEVO_REV element of the dev_ops(9S) structure is the driver build version. When you name this structure. Initialize this structure element to nulldev(9F). Enter &dummy_cb_ops for the value of the pointer to the cb_ops(9S) structure.h header file. The next element of the dev_ops(9S) structure is a pointer to the cb_ops(9S) structure for this driver. The next element of the dev_ops(9S) structure is a pointer to the bus operations structure. Initialize this value to zero.nodev returns ENXIO */ &dummy_cb_ops. This dummy driver does not define a probe(9E) function. The second element in this structure is the driver reference count. The next six elements of the dev_ops(9S) structure are the names of the getinfo(9E). The driver cannot be unloaded if any instances of the driver are still open. and reset() functions for this particular driver.

h header file. Driver modules have only one linkage structure. The power(9E) routine operates on a hardware device. Usually this string contains the name of this module and the version number of this module. The mod_driverops structure tells the kernel that the dummy. Enter the address of the md structure for the value of this element of the modlinkage(9S) structure. remove. NULL }. 2006 . and retrieve information from a module. The second element in the modldrv(9S) structure is a string that describes this module. and _fini(9E) routines to install. Set this value to the address of the mod_driverops structure. /* Type of module. See the man pages for each structure to learn what each element is and what the value of each element should be. &md. The first element in the modlinkage(9S) structure is the revision number of the loadable modules system. Set the value of this structure element to nodev. */ &dummy_dev_ops }. Defining the Module Linkage Structures Two other module loading structures are required for every driver. The modlinkage(9S) module linkage structure is used by the _init(9E).c file. The mod_driverops structure is defined in the modctl.c source file. This driver does not drive a hardware device. The mod_driverops structure is declared in the modctl. 118 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. This is a driver. Set this value to MODREV_1. Enter the value NULL to terminate this list of linkage structures. so do not declare the mod_driverops structure in dummy.c. _info(9E).h header file in your dummy.Writing the Template Driver The last element of the dev_ops(9S) structure is the name of the power(9E) routine for this driver. static struct modlinkage ml = { MODREV_1. The modldrv(9S) linkage structure for loadable drivers exports driver-specific information to the kernel. The last element of the modldrv(9S) structure is a pointer to the dev_ops(9S) structure for this driver. You already included the modctl. /* Name of the module.c module is a loadable driver module. The following code defines the modldrv(9S) and modlinkage(9S) structures for the driver shown in this module: static struct modldrv md = { &mod_driverops. The next element of the modlinkage(9S) structure is the address of a null-terminated array of pointers to linkage structures. The first element in the modldrv(9S) structure is a pointer to a structure that tells the kernel what kind of module this is. */ "dummy driver".

c file: #include <sys/devops. ddi_get_instance.h> /* used by open.h> /* used by all entry points for this driver */ #include <sys/ddi.h and devops. and */ /* ddi_prop_op */ #include <sys/sunddi. read. prop_op.h> /* used by modlinkage.h header file for the loadable module configuration entry points. write */ #include <sys/cred.h> /* used by open. */ /* and _fini */ #include <sys/types.Writing the Template Driver Including Data Structures Header Files The cb_ops(9S) and dev_ops(9S) structures require you to include the conf. close */ #include <sys/errno. and ddi_prop_op */ Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 119 .h> /* used by all entry points for this driver */ /* also used by cb_ops. _info. write. You already included the modctl. modldrv. read. */ /* ddi_get_instance.h> /* used by open.h header file. close. */ /* and ddi_prop_op */ #include <sys/file. close. close. write */ #include <sys/open. The following code is the complete list of header files that you now should have included in your dummy.h> /* used by dev_ops and cb_ops */ #include <sys/modctl.h> /* used by read */ #include <sys/stat.h> /* used by open. ddi_create_minor_node.h> /* used by all entry points for this driver */ /* also used by cb_ops.h header files. _init.h> /* used by dev_ops */ #include <sys/conf.h> /* used by open. read */ #include <sys/uio.h> /* defines S_IFCHR used by ddi_create_minor_node */ #include <sys/cmn_err. close. The modlinkage(9S) and modldrv(9S) structures require you to include the modctl. read.

Writing the Device Configuration File

Writing the Device Configuration File
This driver requires a configuration file. The minimum information that a configuration file must contain is the name of the device node and the name or type of the device’s parent. In this simple example, the node name of the device is the same as the file name of the driver. Create a file named dummy.conf in your working directory. Put the following single line of information into dummy.conf:
name="dummy" parent="pseudo";

120

Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March, 2006

Building and Installing the Template Driver

Building and Installing the Template Driver
This section shows you how to build and install the driver for a 32-bit platform. Compile and link the driver. Use the -D_KERNEL option to indicate that this code defines a kernel module. The following example shows compiling and linking for a 32-bit architecture using the Sun Studio C compiler:
% cc -D_KERNEL -c dummy.c % ld -r -o dummy dummy.o

Make sure you are user root when you install the driver. Install drivers in the /tmp directory until you are finished modifying and testing the _info(), _init(), and attach() routines. Copy the driver binary to the /tmp directory. Link to the driver from the kernel driver directory.
# cp dummy /tmp

Link to the following directory for a 32-bit architecture:
# ln -s /tmp/dummy /usr/kernel/drv/dummy

Copy the configuration file to the kernel driver area of the system.
# cp dummy.conf /usr/kernel/drv

Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver

121

Testing the Template Driver

Testing the Template Driver
This dummy driver merely writes a message to a system log each time an entry point routine is entered. To test this driver, watch for these messages to confirm that each entry point routine is successfully entered. The cmn_err(9F) function writes low priority messages such as the messages defined in this dummy driver to /dev/log. The syslogd(1M) daemon reads messages from /dev/log and writes low priority messages to /var/adm/messages. In a separate window, enter the following command and monitor the output as you perform the tests described in the remainder of this section:
% tail -f /var/adm/messages

Adding the Template Driver
Make sure you are user root when you add the driver. Use the add_drv(1M) command to add the driver:
# add_drv dummy

You should see the following messages in the window where you are viewing /var/adm/messages:
date time machine dummy: [ID 513080 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside _info date time machine dummy: [ID 874762 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside _init date time machine dummy: [ID 678704 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside dummy_attach

The _info(9E), _init(9E), and attach(9E) entry points are called in that order when you add a driver. The dummy driver has been added to the /devices directory:
% ls -l /devices/pseudo | grep dummy drwxr-xr-x 2 root sys 512 date time dummy@0 crw------- 1 root sys 92, 0 date time dummy@0:0

The dummy driver also is the most recent module listed by modinfo(1M):
% modinfo Id Loadaddr 180 ed192b70 Size Info Rev Module Name 544 92 1 dummy (dummy driver)

The module name, dummy driver, is the value you entered for the second member of the modldrv(9S) structure. The value 92 is the major number of this module.
122 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March, 2006

Testing the Template Driver

% grep dummy /etc/name_to_major dummy 92

The Loadaddr address of ed192b70 is the address of the first instruction in the dummy driver. This address might be useful, for example, in debugging.
% mdb -k > dummy‘_init $m BASE LIMIT ed192b70 ed192ff0 > $q

SIZE NAME 480 dummy

The dummy driver also is the most recent module listed by prtconf(1M) in the pseudo device section:
% prtconf -P pseudo, instance #0 dummy, instance #0 (driver not attached)

A driver is automatically loaded when a device that the driver manages is accessed. A driver might be automatically unloaded when the driver is not in use. If your driver is in the /devices directory but modinfo(1M) does not list your driver, you can use either of the following methods to load your driver:
I I

Use the modload(1M) command. Access the device. The driver is loaded automatically when a device that the driver manages is accessed. The following section describes how to access the dummy device.

Reading and Writing the Device
Make sure you are user root when you perform the tests described in this section. If you are not user root, you will receive “Permission denied” error messages when you try to access the /devices/pseudo/dummy@0:0 special file. Test reading from the device. Your dummy device probably is named /devices/pseudo/dummy@0:0. The following command reads from your dummy device even if it has a slightly different name:
# cat /devices/pseudo/dummy*

You should see the following messages in the window where you are viewing /var/adm/messages:
date time machine dummy: [ID 136952 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside dummy_open date time machine dummy: [ID 623947 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside dummy_getinfo date time machine dummy: [ID 891851 kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside dummy_prop_op

Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver

123

notice] NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: Inside Inside Inside Inside Inside dummy_getinfo dummy_prop_op dummy_getinfo dummy_read dummy_close Test writing to the device: # echo hello > ‘ls /devices/pseudo/dummy*‘ You should see the following messages in the window where you are viewing /var/adm/messages: date date date date date date date date time time time time time time time time machine machine machine machine machine machine machine machine dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: [ID [ID [ID [ID [ID [ID [ID [ID 136952 623947 891851 623947 891851 623947 672780 550206 kern.notice] kern. Using the echo(1) command causes the kernel to access the write(9E) entry point of the driver.Testing the Template Driver date date date date date time time time time time machine machine machine machine machine dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: dummy: [ID [ID [ID [ID [ID 623947 891851 623947 709590 550206 kern.notice] kern. 2006 .notice] NOTICE: Inside _info date time machine dummy: [ID 617648 kern. Use the rem_drv(1M) command to unload the driver and remove the device from the /devices directory: # rem_drv dummy You should see the following messages in the window where you are viewing /var/adm/messages: date time machine dummy: [ID 513080 kern.notice] kern. Removing the Template Driver Make sure you are user root when you unload the driver.notice] kern.notice] kern. The text argument that you give to echo(1) is ignored because this driver does not do anything with that data.notice] kern.notice] kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside dummy_detach date time machine dummy: [ID 812373 kern. Using the cat(1) command causes the kernel to access the read(9E) entry point of the driver.notice] kern.notice] kern. The only difference is in the seventh line of the output.notice] kern. this output from the write test is almost identical to the output you saw from the read test.notice] kern.notice] NOTICE: Inside _fini The dummy device is no longer in the /devices directory: # ls /devices/pseudo/dummy* /devices/pseudo/dummy*: No such file or directory 124 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.notice] NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: NOTICE: Inside Inside Inside Inside Inside Inside Inside Inside dummy_open dummy_getinfo dummy_prop_op dummy_getinfo dummy_prop_op dummy_getinfo dummy_write dummy_close As you can see.

close */ #include <sys/errno. */ /* and _fini */ #include <sys/types. you must load the driver again using add_drv(1M). */ /* and ddi_prop_op */ #include <sys/file. read. close. write. write */ #include <sys/open.h> /* used by open.h> /* used by dev_ops */ #include <sys/conf. * * Build the driver: * cc -D_KERNEL -c dummy.c * ld -r -o dummy dummy. read.conf /usr/kernel/drv * cp dummy /tmp * ln -s /tmp/dummy /usr/kernel/drv/dummy * Add the driver: * add_drv dummy * Test (1) read from driver (2) write to driver: * cat /devices/pseudo/dummy@* * echo hello > ‘ls /devices/pseudo/dummy@*‘ * Verify the tests in another window: * tail -f /var/adm/messages * Remove the driver: * rem_drv dummy */ #include <sys/devops. Dummy Driver Source The following code is the complete source for the dummy driver described in this module: /* * Minimalist pseudo-device. modldrv.h> /* used by open. _init. _info. write */ Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 125 .Testing the Template Driver The next time you want to read from or write to the dummy device. the driver is automatically loaded. close.o * Copy the driver and the configuration file to /usr/kernel/drv: * cp dummy. close.h> /* used by modlinkage.h> /* used by dev_ops and cb_ops */ #include <sys/modctl. prop_op. read. Then the next time you read from or write to the dummy device.h> /* used by open. You can use the modunload(1M) command to unload the driver but not remove the device from /devices. Press Control-C to stop tailing the /var/adm/messages messages.h> /* used by open. * Writes a message whenever a routine is entered.

int flag. int *lengthp). static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev. nodev.h> /* /* /* <sys/cred. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op. and */ ddi_prop_op */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by cb_ops. all above */ /* fields are ignored */ D_NEW | D_MP. dummy_close.h> used by open.nodev returns ENXIO */ nodev.h> <sys/uio. /* no ioctl */ nodev. static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip. 126 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. /* no segmap */ nochpoll. /* no dump */ dummy_read.h> <sys/stat. NULL. int flags. static int dummy_close(dev_t dev. caddr_t valuep. /* no print */ nodev. cred_t *credp). read */ used by read */ defines S_IFCHR used by ddi_create_minor_node */ used by all entry points for this driver */ used by all entry points for this driver */ also used by cb_ops. 2006 .h> <sys/ddi. dummy_write. int flag.Testing the Template Driver #include #include #include #include #include /* /* /* /* /* /* /* #include <sys/sunddi. ddi_get_instance. and ddi_prop_op */ static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. /* returns ENXIO for non-pollable devices */ dummy_prop_op. static int dummy_open(dev_t *devp. char *name. /* no mmap */ nodev. static int dummy_write(dev_t dev. /* cb_ops revision number */ nodev. void **resultp). int otyp. close. struct uio *uiop. /* no strategy .h> <sys/cmn_err. ddi_info_cmd_t cmd. /* streamtab struct.h */ CB_REV. */ ddi_get_instance. nodev. int otyp. dev_info_t *dip. cred_t *credp). /* no devmap */ nodev. if not NULL. ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd). ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd). /* no aread */ nodev /* no awrite */ }. cred_t *cred). /* cb_ops structure */ static struct cb_ops dummy_cb_ops = { dummy_open. struct uio *uiop. void *arg. static int dummy_read(dev_t dev. cred_t *cred). ddi_create_minor_node. /* compatibility flags: see conf.

nodev /* no power */ }. dummy_detach. /* Name of the module. "Inside _info"). /* Type of module. */ &dummy_dev_ops }. This is a driver.Testing the Template Driver /* dev_ops structure */ static struct dev_ops dummy_dev_ops = { DEVO_REV. NULL }.nulldev returns 0 */ nulldev. */ "dummy driver".nodev returns ENXIO */ &dummy_cb_ops. &md. 0. /* no probe */ dummy_attach. /* modldrv structure */ static struct modldrv md = { &mod_driverops. (struct bus_ops *)NULL. /* reference count */ dummy_getinfo. /* modlinkage structure */ static struct modlinkage ml = { MODREV_1. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 127 . "Inside _init"). /* keep track of one instance */ /* Loadable module configuration entry points */ int _init(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. /* dev_info structure */ dev_info_t *dummy_dip. nodev. return(mod_install(&ml)). /* no reset . /* no identify . } int _info(struct modinfo *modinfop) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. nulldev.

DDI_PSEUDO. default: return DDI_FAILURE. } } 128 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. if (ddi_create_minor_node(dip. NULL). modinfop)).0) != DDI_SUCCESS) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE.".Testing the Template Driver return(mod_info(&ml. ddi_remove_minor_node(dip. "dummy". default: return DDI_FAILURE. ddi_detach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "%s%d: attach: could not add character node. 0). 2006 . ddi_attach_cmd_t cmd) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. } /* Device configuration entry points */ static int dummy_attach(dev_info_t *dip. "Inside dummy_detach"). "0". switch(cmd) { case DDI_DETACH: dummy_dip = 0. "Inside dummy_attach"). return(DDI_FAILURE). return DDI_SUCCESS. ddi_get_instance(dip). } } static int dummy_detach(dev_info_t *dip. switch(cmd) { case DDI_ATTACH: dummy_dip = dip. } int _fini(void) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. S_IFCHR. } else return DDI_SUCCESS. "Inside _fini"). return(mod_remove(&ml)).

prop_op. return DDI_SUCCESS. cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "Inside dummy_close").dip. int *lengthp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. dev_info_t *dip. return DDI_SUCCESS. char *name. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. "Inside dummy_read").name. } static int dummy_open(dev_t *devp.lengthp)).Testing the Template Driver static int dummy_getinfo(dev_info_t *dip. void *arg. int otyp. default: return DDI_FAILURE.valuep. int otyp. int flag. } static int dummy_read(dev_t dev. struct uio *uiop. return DDI_SUCCESS. "Inside dummy_prop_op"). "Inside dummy_open"). int flags. case DDI_INFO_DEVT2INSTANCE: *resultp = 0. int flag.flags. Module 12 • Writing a Template Character Device Driver 129 . } } /* Main entry points */ static int dummy_prop_op(dev_t dev. cred_t *cred) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. ddi_prop_op_t prop_op. return DDI_SUCCESS. } static int dummy_close(dev_t dev. switch(cmd) { case DDI_INFO_DEVT2DEVINFO: *resultp = dummy_dip. return(ddi_prop_op(dev. "Inside dummy_getinfo"). void **resultp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. caddr_t valuep. ddi_info_cmd_t cmd.

cred_t *credp) { cmn_err(CE_NOTE. struct uio *uiop. 2006 . "Inside dummy_write").Testing the Template Driver return DDI_SUCCESS. } static int dummy_write(dev_t dev. } 130 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. return DDI_SUCCESS.

13 M O D U L E 1 3 Debugging Drivers With DTrace Objectives The objective of this module is to learn about how you can use DTrace to debug your driver development projects by reviewing a case study. 131 .

here’s a simple DTrace script to enable all entry and return events in the fbt (Function Boundary Tracing) provider once mod_getsynum() is entered.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS This case study focuses on leveraging the DTrace capability for device driver development.warning] WARNING: system call missing from bind file Searching for the system call missing message. debugging a device driver required that a developer use function calls like cmn_err() to log diagnostic information to the /var/adm/messages file. DTrace can be used to capture information on only the events that you as a developer wish to view. on a failed call to mod_getsysnum. Historically. First copy the prototype driver to /usr/kernel/fs and attempt to modload it by hand: # modload /usr/kernel/fs/smbfs can’t load module: Out of memory or no room in system tables And the /var/adm/messages file contains: genunix: [ID 104096 kern. create an smbfs driver template based on Sun’s nfs driver. test that the driver can be loaded and unloaded successfully. Instead of manually searching the flow of mod_getsysnum() from source file to source file. 2006 . historical approaches to kernel development and debugging are quite time-consuming. This cumbersome process requires guesswork. After the driver compiles successfully. First. } fbt::mod_getsysnum:return { 132 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. re-compilation. and system reboots to uncover software coding errors. Developers with a talent for assembly language can use adb and create custom modules in C for mdb to diagnose software errors. reveals it is in the function mod_getsysent() in the file modconf. Instead of sifting through the /var/adm/messages file or pages of truss output. The magnitude of the benefit provided by DTrace can best be provided through a few simple examples. #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option flowindent fbt::mod_getsysnum:entry /execname == "modload"/ { self->follow = 1.c. However. DTrace provides a diagnostic short-cut.

/mod_getsysnum. Let’s use DTrace to display the contents of the search string and hash table.d’ matched 35750 probes CPU FUNCTION 0 -> mod_getsysnum 0 -> find_mbind 0 -> nm_hash 0 <.c. trace(arg1).nm_hash 0 -> strcmp 0 <. To view the contents of the search string we add a strcmp() trace to our previous mod_getsysnum. } Note – trace(arg1) displays the function’s return value./mod_getsysnum.strcmp 0 -> strcmp 0 <.find_mbind 0 <.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS self->follow = 0. reveals that we’re searching for a char string in a hash table. Executing this script and running the modload command in another window produces the following output: # .d script: Module 13 • Debugging Drivers With DTrace 133 . } fbt:::entry /self->follow/ { } fbt:::return /self->follow/ { trace(arg1).mod_getsysnum 41 4294967295 7 0 4294967295 Thus either find_mbind() returning ’0’. Viewing the source to find_mbind() in /usr/src/uts/common/os/modsubr.d dtrace: script ’. A quick look at find_mbind() reveals that a return value of 0 indicates an error state. or nm_hash() returning ’41’ is the culprit.strcmp 0 <.

It looks like we forgot to include a configuration entry for my driver. which takes as its arguments a config file.mod_getsysnum 4294967295 So we’re looking for smbfs in a hash table. 2006 . A quick search of the source code reveals that sb_hashtab is initialized with a call to read_binding_file(). hash:%s". } Here are the results of our next attempt to load our driver: # . stringof(arg0). ’smbfs 177’ (read_binding_file() is read once at boot time. hash:lwp_sema_post 0 <. and it’s not present. hash:timer_getoverrun 0 <.strcmp 4294967295 0 -> strcmp 0 | strcmp:entry name:smbfs.c.d dtrace: script ’. and a function pointer.find_mbind 0 0 <.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS fbt::strcmp:entry { printf("name:%s.) After rebooting the driver can be loaded successfully./mod_getsysnum. A few more clicks on our source code browser reveal the contents of the config file to be defined as /etc/name_to_sysnum in the file /usr/src/uts/common/os/modctl.strcmp 7 0 <. the hash table. How does smbfs get into this hash table? Let’s return to find_mbind() and observe that the hash table variable sb_hashtab is passed to the failing nm_hash() function./mod_getsysnum.nm_hash 41 0 -> strcmp 0 | strcmp:entry name:smbfs. # modload /usr/kernel/fs/smbfs Verify that the driver is loaded with the modinfo command: 134 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. stringof(arg1)). Add the following to the /etc/name_to_sysnum file and reboot.d’ matched 35751 probes CPU FUNCTION 0 -> mod_getsysnum 0 -> find_mbind 0 -> nm_hash 0 <.

These 1002 function handles allow us to debug my work without a special ’instrumented code’ version of the driver! Let’s monitor all smbfs calls when modunload is called. let’s use DTrace to look at modunload with this script: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option flowindent fbt::modunload:entry Module 13 • Debugging Drivers With DTrace 135 . client. we have access to all of the smbfs functions: # dtrace -l fbt:smbfs:: | wc -l 1002 This is amazing! Without any special coding. } It seems that the smbfs code is not being accessed by modunload. and comm) (network filesystem) (network filesystem version 2) (network filesystem version 3) Note – Remember that this driver was based on an nfs template. we now have access to 1002 entry and return events contained in the driver. Let’s make sure we can also unload the module: # modunload -i 160 can’t unload the module: Device busy This is most likely due to an EBUSY errno return value. which explains this output. since the smbfs driver is a loaded module. But now. So.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS # modinfo | grep 160 feb21a58 160 feb21a58 160 feb21a58 160 feb21a58 smbfs 351ac 351ac 351ac 351ac 177 24 25 26 1 1 1 1 smbfs smbfs smbfs smbfs (SMBFS syscall. using this simple DTrace script: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option flowindent fbt:smbfs::entry { } fbt:smbfs::return { trace(arg1).

Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS { self->follow = 1.moduninstall 16 0 -> mod_release_mod 0 -> mod_release 0 <.mod_release 3602566648 0 <./modunload. 2006 .mod_hold_by_id 3602566648 0 -> moduninstall 0 <. } fbt::modunload:return { self->follow = 0.d dtrace: script ’.mod_circdep 0 0 -> mod_hold_by_modctl 0 <.d’ matched 36695 probes CPU FUNCTION 0 -> modunload modunload 160 0 | modunload:entry 0 -> mod_hold_by_id 0 -> mod_circdep 0 <.mod_release_mod 3602566648 0 <. trace(execname).modunload 16 136 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March.mod_hold_by_modctl 0 0 <. trace(arg0)./modunload. } fbt:::entry /self->follow/ { } fbt:::return /self->follow/ { trace(arg1). trace(arg1). } Here’s the output of this script: # .

Let’s take a look at the source code for moduninstall. A failed call to smbfs _fini() routine We can’t directly access all of these possibilities. moduninstall returns EBUSY in a few locations. so let’s look at the following possibilities: 1. 3. } fbt::kobj_lookup:entry /self->follow/ { } fbt::kobj_lookup:return /self->follow/ { trace(arg1). ((struct modctl *)arg0)->mod_loadflags). printf("mod_nenabled:%d\n". ((struct modctl *)arg0)->mod_prim). printf("mod_prim:%d\n". but let’s approach them from a process of elimination. } fbt::moduninstall:return { self->follow = 0. trace(arg1). if (mp->mod_prim || mp->mod_ref || mp->mod_nenabled != 0) return (EBUSY). if ( detach_driver(mp->mod_modname) != 0 ) return (EBUSY). We’ll use the following script to display the contents of the various structures and return values in moduninstall: #!/usr/sbin/dtrace -s #pragma D option flowindent fbt::moduninstall:entry { self->follow = 1. printf("mod_ref:%d\n". ((struct modctl *)arg0)->mod_nenabled). "_fini") == NULL ) 4. Module 13 • Debugging Drivers With DTrace 137 . printf("mod_loadflags:%d\n". 2. ((struct modctl *)arg0)->mod_ref). if ( kobj_lookup(mp->mod_mp.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS Observe that the EBUSY return value ’16’ is coming from moduninstall.

Thus.kobj_lookup 0 <. We’ve used the Function Boundary Tracing provider exclusively in these examples. } This script produces the following output: # .d’ matched 6 probes CPU FUNCTION 0 -> moduninstall mod_prim:0 mod_ref:0 mod_nenabled:0 mod_loadflags:1 0 -> detach_driver 0 <. 2006 . Note that fbt is only one of DTrace’s many providers./moduninstall.moduninstall 0 4273103456 16 Comparing this output to the code tells us that the failure is not due to the mp structure values or the return values from detach_driver() of kobj_lookup(). thus we have completed the objectives of this exercise./moduninstall. which calls the smbfs _fini() routine.detach_driver 0 -> kobj_lookup 0 <. And here’s what the smbfs _fini() routine contains: int _fini(void) { /* don’t allow module to be unloaded */ return (EBUSY). 138 Introduction to Operating Systems: A Hands-On Approach Using the OpenSolaris Project • March. by a process of elimination.Porting the smbfs Driver from Linux to the Solaris OS } fbt::detach_driver:entry /self->follow/ { } fbt::detach_driver:return /self->follow/ { trace(arg1). } Changing the return value to ’0’ and recompiling the code results in a driver that we can now load and unload. it must be the status returned via the status = (*func)(). call.d dtrace: script ’.

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