3 1977

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W?W<3

A

MIDDLE ENGLISH

W

VOCABULARY
BY
J.

<%.

<%.

TOLKIEN

'Designedfor use with

SISAM'S Fourteenth Century

Verse

& Prose

OXFORD
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS
M DCCCC XXII

Printed In Englund

t'lS"

ABBREVIATIONS
AFr.
allit.
ci.

Anglo-French.
alliterative
in

(in) alliterative verse, &c. etymologies indicates uncertain or indirect relation.
;

constr.

constructed with

;

construction.

Du.
E.
;

Dutch.

Mn.E. (Modem) English. E.D.D. The English Dialect Dictionary.
Fr.
Fris.

French.

(Modern) Frisian
is

(dialects).

from
G. Goth.
Icel.
;

prefixed to etymologies when the word illustrated additional suffixes, &c., not present in the etymon.
,

has

German.
Gothic.
;

(Modern) Icelandic. Kt. OKt. Kentish Kentish dialect of Old English. L. Med.L. Latin; Mediaeval Latin. MDu. Middle Dutch.
;

Middle English. Middle High German. Middle Low German. N.E.D. The Oxford (New) English Dictionnry. Nth ONth. Northumbrian Northumbrian dialect of Old English. N\VM. North West Midland. OE. Old English. Old French. OFr. OFris. Old Frisian. OMG. Old High German.

ME.

MHG.
MLG.
;

;

Olr.

ON.
ONFr.
OS.
prec. red.

Old Irish. Old Norse,

especially

Old Icelandic.

Northern dialects of Old French. Old Saxon (Old Low German), preceding word,
reduced reduction. Swedish.
;

Swed.
;

WS O VVS.
*

West Saxon

(dialect of

Old English).
is

+

is prefixed where forms are theoretically reconstructed. between the elements shows that a compound or derivative first recorded in Middle English,

SCARBOROUGH

COLLEGE
I

IRPAQV

NOTE
THIS glossary does not aim at completeness, and it is not good working primarily a glossary of rare or 'hard' words. knowledge of Middle English depends less on the possession of an abstruse vocabulary than on familiarity with the ordinary machinery of expression with the precise forms and meanings that common words may assume ; with the uses of such innocent-looking little words as the prepositions of and for; with idiomatic phrases, some fresh-minted and some worn thin, but all likely to recur again and again in an age whose authors took no pains to avoid usual or hackneyed turns of expression. These are the features of the older

A

language which an English reader is predisposed to pass over, and space seldom permits of their satisfied with a half-recognition adequate treatment in a compendious general dictionary or the So in making a glossary for use with word-list to a single text. a book itself designed to be a preparation for the reading of complete texts, I have given exceptionally full treatment to what may rightly be called the backbone of the language. Brief indications of the etymology of each word are given, with references in difficult cases to the Oxford English Dictionary (N.E.D.}. Apart from their usefulness as a basis for exercises in phonology and the analysis of vocabulary, these will serve to differ:

entiate

words

distinct in origin

which coincide

in

some

of their

forms or spellings. The Old English or Old French forms cited are those that best illustrate the Middle English in consequence the Old English forms frequently differ from normal West-baxon, and the Old French forms are especially those of the French current
;

in England (Anglo-French is rarely specified). Old Norse words have usually been cited in the normal spelling (e.g. of Zoega's Old Icelandic Dictionary}, Accordingly, long vowels in Old Norse words are marked as in brdj)-r. In Old English words stable long vowels are marked as in brad] uncertain quantity or probable shortening in Old English times is marked as in adrsedd; vowels that were lengthened in the Old English period (e.g. before Id, mb, nd) are marked as in cdld, climban, bindan. For the convenience of beginners the glossary is liberally supplied with cross references, and the prefixed Table summarizes the Particular attention should principal variations of form or spelling. be given to the following points of arrangement (i) 5 has a separate
:

cross-references to gh are not ; alphabetical place following has a separate alphabetical place following T; given : (ii) variation between / and th is disregarded, and initial Th is entered under J? are alternative forms of the same letter 17, (iii) is entered variation between them is disregarded, and initial under V: (iv) but medial or final initially has its usual place will be found in the alphabetical position of /.

p

G

:

V

U

;

Y

;

Y

J.

R. R. T.

PRINCIPAL VARIATIONS OF OR SPELLING
I.
;

FORM

a.

3.

a varies with o (before m, n) as land, lang, lamb lond, long, lomb; man, name (Westerns mon, nome. a (= a) varies in Northern texts with (i) ai, ay as (a) fare, /aw see 14. farest, fairest fayre (3) fayre (ii) wit A Southern o, oo as mayntene ai, ay varies with (i) ei, ey meyntene: (ii) a; see
;
:

;

;

2

:

(iii)

o,

oo

;

see 2.

4.

5.
ft.

be-, prefix varies
;

7.

8.

au (before m, n) varies -with a (chiefly in French words}; as daunce dance. with bi- as begynne biginne. c varies with k as bac, court bak, kort. as des-, disavanntage. des-, prefix varies with disas wel(e) e (= e) varies in Northern texts with ei, ey weill,
;
;

;

9. ei,

weyl ey varies with
;

stele

steill.

See
ai,

1

3,

20.
(cf.

(ii)

as weie, wey(e) way(e) hence in Northern texts with a ; as strat-ly streyte : (iii)
(i)

ay

3)

;

:

with e
10. er varies
11. f

;

see 8.

with later ar; as fer, hertely far, hartely. vanes with u (= v) (i) initially (Southern); as fader
:

nader:

12. ght
13.

14. 15.
1

6.

haue. finally (Northern); as haf(e) varies with jt, cht (Scottish), ht, st ; as nyght nijt, nycht, nyht, seuenist. i (vowe'~) varies with y, passim Northern i, y varies with (i) e as hider, liuen, myddel heder, leue, medill texts (ii) with e, Western u as hil, fyrst hell, uerst hul, furst. (South) hate : o, oo ( = 9) varies in Northern texts with (i) a ; as hot, hoot with ai (see 2) (iii) with oi, oy ; see next. (ii) hence also o, oo (= o) varies in Northern texts with (i) ou, u ; as god, good goud, gud(e) (ii) oi, oy ; as none, noon noyne. she we, ssewe; fle(s)3ch (s)sch varies with (s)sh, ss; as schewe
(ii)
' :

;

:

;

:

:

flessh.

varies with th, passim. 8. u (in au, eu, ou) varies with w, passim ; see ai. sonne; 19. u, v (= u) varies with o (esp. before m, n); as sun(ne) but bot(e); see also 15. ao. n, v (= ii) varies in Western texts with (i) e, eo; as erthe
1

7.

}>

1

Western) eor>e, vr}>e (ii) with i, y, e ; see 13. varies medially with gh, 3 (u) as owen, own oghne, ojene, as woundit voundit. initially (Scottish) with v 22. y (consonant) varies initially with 3; as ye 36 ; medially with i, as say, se(i)gh, se(i^e, saw. (i)gh, <i)? sadde. 23. single consonant varies with double; as sad brede, breadth ; wod 24. single vowel varies with double ; as breed
21.

w

(

:

;

oune

:

;

;

wood, mad.

GLOSSARY
A, pron.
he, 27, 47, 4$; they, Xlii a 13, b 22, 36, 39, 61, 64, 66. [Unaccented form of ME. ha. See Hare, Ham.]
v. inf. have,
I

xma

A,

127.

[Reduced

unaccented form of haue; see Habbe(n).] A(n), adj. one, IV b 34 ; indef. art. See a(n), i 22, via b 7, &c.

Abite, n. outward appearance, XI b 99. [OFr. (h}abit.'\ Able, adj. able, VI 239, XI b 92. SteVnable. .] Ab'one, adv. above, XVII 146. See Aboue(n).

Abosted, pa.

t.

sg.

threatened

Ane, On(e). A(n), /?<;/. on, in, &c. II 137, in introd., 22, villa 43, n, a MK&, with 19, 34, &c. a nyghfes, at blood, xv^- 1 6 night (OE. on niht, ni/ites],

xma

[ME. a+ Boste, q. v.] Aboue(n), Abovin, Abuf, adv. above, overhead, on top, v 149, vii 105, 135, IX 56, x 61 on
;

boastfully, villa 148.

;

;

VIII b 16

;

a/r,
Ato.

in three, Xlii b

vii 160 ; prep. higher than, xi b 182, XVII 83 ; quasi-sb. in be at here abone, get the upper hand of the
surface,

above,

49 (see Goddes
XII b 80.

half,

a God's sake, form of [Weakened

Atwynne)

;

for

them, x ilia 61. [OE. *on-bufan, See Abone. Aboueseyd, adj. aforesaid, IX 307.
abufan.~]

On, q.v. a in ill is possibly dialectal ; a is used only before following consonant.] See Ane.
;

Abandoune, sign, X 50.
OFr. Abate,

v. to abandon, re[OFr. abandouner."}

Abasshed, //.

perturbed, xvi 177 (note to xvi 59). [AFr.afoM.r-;
e(s)bair, e(s}baiss-.~] v. to lessen, xiv b

19

;

Vina 209 (imper. intr. xvn 445; Abatid pp. ceased, vn 104. [OFr.
reduce,
re.~\

sg^)\

(of),

[Free. +pp. of Seie.] Aboute(n),. Abowte, Obout (XIV a), (i) adv. about, round, on all sides, here and there, to and fro, i 233, V 165, viil a 297, XI b 270, xil a 143, b\\l, xiva 15, xv * 3, xvn 303, 351, &c. ; round about, vii 83, &c. round it, 11359; a ^ about e round, all round about, xn a 79 (ii) prep. about, round, &c. (often follow;

;

abat-

Abedde,
[OE.

adv. in bed, xil a 141. on bedde.~] See Bedd(e).
adj. abominable, [OFr. abominable.'}
v.
(i)

or pron.}, i 54,11 274, ing 284, v 95, xiv b 68, &c. ; on, XI b 236 in, xi b 293, 296 ;
.

;

Abhomynable,
XI b 90.

about al, in all directions, II 387 ; abonte with for to (vn-bynde},

xvi

7.

Abide, Abyde, Habide,
;

Abrod,
Abuf.
75.

adv. out wide,

[OE. onbiitan, dbfitan.\ xn a 176.

intr. to wait, remain, stay, II 84,

IX 197, xvn 531 tarry, II 348 imper. wait !, v 149 ; halt !, xvi
;

See Aboue.
v. to

Abugge,
Bigge.

213; (ii) trans, to await, xvn 334; withstand, endure, xiv 31; Abode, pa. t. xiv c 68, xvii 373; Abyde, pp. in ys
abyde,

159-

pay for (it), Vlli a [OE. a-bycgan^ See

has survived, [OE. d-bidan.~\ See Bide.

xm^o.

conj. but, II 56, in 34, vm 67, &c. [OE. of.] Acheue, v. achieve, vi 1 15. [OFr.

Ac,

afAever."]

See Cheue.
1

GLOSSARY
Acoordandly, adv. accordingly, IV b 33. [From pres. p. of
Acorde.]
I 3 6 , 283. Feld(e).

[OE.

onfelda."]

See

Aoord(e), Accord, VI 149, XI a 32 ;

agreement, concurrence, united will, xvn 30 ; made acorde of care and me, associated me with, caused me to know, care, vi n. [OFr. acord(e}.~\
.

Aferd(e), adj. afraid, I 4, 67, 262, via a 115, xvn 316, &c. [OE. a-fxred.'] See Ferde. Affaite, v. train, tame, villa 32
'

(note). [OFr. afait(i}er.~] Affeccyon, affection, (worldly)
.

Acorde(n),

v. trans.'to reconcile,

v

337 t acorde me with, to associate myself with, v 312 intr. agree, xi b 128, xn 145, xuib
;

desire, IV b 52, 71. [L. affection-em through OFr.] Af(f)erme, v. affirm, IX 77, xia 50; confirm, ix 305. [OFr.

52.

[OFr.

acorder.'] 6V<;

Corden.
of

aferm<r.~] Affie, v. to have (faith in),

xvi

29.

Acountes,
accounts,
acunt.']

n. pi.

settlement

vni a

83. [OFr. acont,

[OFr. after.'] Afforces (thame), pres. pi.
endeavour,

(rejl.}

IV b 20.

[OFr.
[OFr.

Acsede.

See Axe(n).

s'aff~orcer.~]

Actif, Actyf, adj. active, villa 245, xi b 74, 102. [OFr. actif,~\ Aday, adv. in dyne aday, eat at (mid-day) meal, vill a 303. [OE. on dsege, by day.]

Affray,

.

fear,

xn a

142.

Aflne, adv. to the end, n 277. [OFr. a fin.] Afore, adv. beforehand, xvil 164.

e(s]frai.~]

Ademand,

.

loadstone (magnetic

ironore), 1x123, 125, &c. [OFr. adamantem L. adema(u)nt,
'

(ace.),

properly

diamond

'.
'

' application to loadstone was due to false association with L. ail-amare. The mediaeval adamant' in consequence often combined the properties of

The

[OE. at-foran.'] Aforth, v. to afford, villa 192. to (late) [OE. ge-fortiian, manage.] Not afright, undeAfright, //. terred, xvn 541. [OE. d-fyrht.} After (-ir, -yr, -ur), adv. after, behind, II 378, vn 24, xvi 376,
&c.
;

diamond and loadstone.] Dyamand.

See
551.

VIII a

afterwards, then, VII 46, , 5, &c. ; be the ivhiche
. .

after, in

accordance with which

Admytte,

v. to

admit

xvn

[L. admittere.~\

Adoun, Adown, adv. down, n "3> 435, vma3i,&c. [OE.
-dune of

(mixed Fr. and E. constr.), ix 302 prep, after, next to, 1215, xi b 27, &c. according to, ix for 220, 291, XI b 189, &c.
; ;

;

Adrad, Adred, xvn
drxdd,
Drede(n).

See Doun(e). t attune.'] //. afraid, XII b 133 ;
201.

(after desire, ask, &c.), VII 20,

Vina

[OE.
pp.]

of-

ofdredd,

See

&c. ; conj. after, xvn 148. After pan, afterwards, II 597.
adv. afterwards, n 164, IV b 59, xi b 147, &c. Efterward, in 16, 35, 38, 48. [OE. mfttrweard (Kt. eftcr-\~] Agayn(e), Agaue, adv. back, again, iv b 83, xvi n, xvil 1 80, &A3ayn. 479, &c.
;

291,

xv h

5,

xvi 242,

Adreynt, //.

drowned,
;

n

397.

[OK after; xfterpam^ Afterward, Aftyrward(e), &c.,

[OE. a-drettcan, pp. d-drenct.~\ Adresced, //. therufon him hath adresced, has fastened himself to
it,

xn b

85.

.SV^Dresse.
adversaries,

[OFr.

adresser.']

Aduersouris,

n, pi.

144. [OFr. adversier with alteration of suffix.] Afelde, adv. to the fields, vni a

X

Agayne8,/r<r/. against, iv<5 18, 19. See Ajeines. [Free. + adv. -.]

GLOSSARY
against, xvi 280 to gaze on, xvi 92. [Extended from prec.] Agast, //. afraid, XIV c 51, XVII astonished, xvii 449. 184, 297

Agaynste, /TV/,
to lake a.,

;

Ays.

See Esc.

Aither, Ayjjer, Athir, Ey]>er, adj. and pron. both, vn 65 ; either, v 1 1 2 ; ey]>er oj>er, each
other,

;

xni b 57

[a-

+ OE.

gxsted,

afflicted.]

one

in

atAir othir in, ; the other, X22. [OE.

See Gastli.

Age,

. age, time of life, vi 52, xii introd. ; mature age, 1x22; old age, vii 6, xiv c 106, &c.

Sgfer, both; See Eu]>er.

a(w}}er, either.]

Ayther, Aper,

[OFr. age.]

ayther . . 477. [As prec.]
conj.

conj. or, vi 131 ; or, either . .or, xvii
.$"<?<

Or 2

;

Oj>er,

Ago,//, gone by, XII a
a-gdn.~\

34.

[OE.
as

Aywhere, adv. on
collectively,

all sides,

v

113.

Agrete, adv.
body, VI 200.

a

[OE. on + great.] Agreued (for], pp. weighed down (with), v 302 ; annoyed (by), I 88. [OFr. agrever.]

[OE. Aketh,

fghvner.'} pres. pi. ache,

vin a 253
acan.] 136.

(see Wombe). [OE. Akyng, n. aching, xi b

A}ayn, adv.
257, 332
i
; ;

again, back,
;

V

53,

Aje, xiil a 8
230,

Ajein,
11

Ajeyn, &c. A^en, IX 132

vin a 44,
;

xii a 28,

O;ain,

141,162. [OE. ongen, ongegnJ] Ajayn, Ajen, Ajein, Aye, O3ain,

Al, adj. all, I 120, n 114, in 6, &c.; Alle, I 19, &c.; //. in 55, &c.;a/(/)a(),a whole, vii 183, villa 253,xnia32,44,xiVf 4; al(le) maner(e\ all kinds of, II 589, XI a 12 (cf. Alkyn) ;
al(le~]ping(e},seeYmg\ all way, weys, see Alway, Way ; all it all of it (them, us), (J>ei, we}, xv g 16, ix 104, xvii 456, &c. here names of alle, the names of
;

prep, against, III 58, v 48, ix 19 ; towards (of time), n 497, xii b 1 8. [As prec.] See Agayn.

A:}eines,/7r/. against, contrary to, 309, 311, 315; A3enes, 17 ; Ajens, i 261, 264, vin b 78 ; A^enus, XI a 29. [Prec. + adv. -es.] See Agaynes.

them

all, I

37

;

of al and sum,
in full,

in general

and particular,

Ajenst,//?/. against, 1x92, 315, XI b 43, 46, 97. [Extended from
prec.]

vi 224 ; as sb. all, xvi 303, &c. ; every one (with sg. verb), VI 87. [OE. /(/).] See Algate, Alkyn, Alsaume, &c.

A^le},

adj.

See Agaynste. without fear,

v

Al, All(e), adv. entirely, quite,
267.
very, I 108, II 76, V 304, a 138, &c. ; in comb, with
ll

vin
To-

See [ON. agi + OE. -leas.'] Awe. A-hungrye, adj. hungry, xvii 499. [a- + OE. hungrig.'] Ai, Ay, adv. always, ever, iv a I, 14, vii 1 8, x 6 1, xv a 10, 17, &c.; for ay, for ever, xvn 26. [ON.

81, 106, 262, iv a 78, vil 147 ; with For-, II 398, xv*- 29. Al aivay, quite away, iva 75; al
one, alone, al oon, all

v 87, XII a 131, 15 one (and the same al to, up to (the number of), in 56 ; all be (were}
thing), XI a 41
it pat,
;

;

Ay,

M. fear,
II

mfor loue or ay, in any
571.

event,

[OE.

ege.}

312

;

all

although, IX 50, 171, 302, if, although, XVII 231.
/(/).]

Aye. See Ajayn. Ayenbyte, n. remorse. See in introd. [OE. ongen + bite.'] Ayere, Aire, n. air, i\ b 5, vii
107,
1

[OE
43>

Al, All(e),
5J>

n. all, everything,

in

10.
.

[OFr.

Aire,

heir,

vin

air.] b 62.

[OFr.

&c.; about al, in all directions, II 387 ; ouer al, everywhere, II 208 (OE. ofer all}. [OE. fl /(/).] Aldai, Al day, adv. all day, v

1*

GLOSSARY
1

66,

xn

introd.

[OE.

alne

xn a

dseg.']

94, &c. Lofte.

[ON.

Aloft."]

See

Aide. See Olde. Alepy, adj. (a) single,
Algate, adv. by
all

1

159.

[OE.

Alod, //. See Allowe. Alone, adj. alone, xvil 489;
Al, adv. Als, adv. also, as well,

see

means, at any rate, I 107,11 231. [C/.ON.0//a See gotu, all along, always.]

Gate, *. Algatis, adv. continually, xi a 38.
[Prec.

+ adv. -.]
.

Aliens,

//.

foreigners,

xm

292, 0148, x 8, ii, xvu 126, 127. [Reduced form of Also, q.v.~\ Als, Alss, conj. as (e sp. in als .. as, as as), like, IV a 2, 63, 84, b 86, vin a 37, &c. ; as for
. .

v

vm

61. [OFr. a/w.] Ali}t, Alihte, v. to alight, n 377, xii a 76. [OE. a-hhtan^ See
Lijt,
legs),
.

Aliri, adv.\ across one another (of

villa

1

16.

[?

Related to

Lyre,*.'] Alia, v. See EyleJ>.

like, xvi 306, 308, while, IV b 43, XV a 4 ; so . . that, ix 151 ; als b(i}liue, as quickly (as possible), straightway, II 531, 584. [As prec.] See As. Alsaume, adv. (all) together, 1 98. See [Cf. ON. allir saman.]

instance,

311;

as,

ah

..fiat,

Alyue,
on
70.

adj. living, VI 85. adj. of all kinds,

[OE.
VIII a

life.'}

Alkyn,
Kyn.

Sam(e), adv. Also, Alsua (x), adv. also, as well, 135, ii 144, x 33, &c.; conj. also blitie, also spac like, II 508
;

,

[OE. *a/ra

cynna.~\

See

Alias, inter}, alas!

n

also swij>e, as quickly (as possible), straightway, II 142, 343,

107, &c.

[OFr.aAw.]
Alleg(g)e(n), . to cite (in support of a contention), xi3 56, xvi 277 ; to contend, xi b 79. [OFr. esligier, aligier, associated with unrelated L. allegdre.'] AUowe, v. approve, receive with
approval, xvi 330 Alod, //. XVII 56 (note). [OFr. alouer, from L. allauddreJ] Allpough, Althogh, conj. (even) though, ix no, xn b 196, &c. [Al, adv. + J>ogh, q.v.~\ Allweldand, adj. almighty, XVII
;

574. As.

[OE. at-swa.]

See Als,

Al(l)way,-wey, adv. always, (for) ever, continually, xin a 3, b 63, xvi 150, 168, &c in any case, certainly, xvi 164. [OE. alne
;

weg.~\

See Algate(s).
sg.

Am,
in

i

pres. ind.

am, V 90,

&c. ; coalescing with prec. pron. Icham, Ycham (q.v.~). [OE. am.} See Ar, Art, Js, &c.

[Cf. OE. alwdldende.] Almes(se), n. sg. an act, or works,

494.

Amaistrien, v. to master, control, vin a 205. [OFr. amaistrier.'] Amaiig, adv. in the meanwhile, XVII 247 Emang, at times, from time to time, xvi 262,
;

301.

[OE.

on-(ge}id>ig.~]

See

of

charity,

charitable

gift

or

Amonge.

offering, villa 121, 140, XI b 2, 163, 270, &c. Elmesses//.
;

Ame,
I

v. to

guess
1

;

guess,

45.
v.

y kan ame, [OFr. aesmert
as

(OKt.

elmessati),

in

17.

[OE.

amerl}

x/messe.']

Amend(e),
almighty, VI 138.

to

make

better,

Almyat.

culj.

[OE. Kl-miht^

reform, set right, vin a 268, IX 338, xi a 48, xvil 256. [OFr.
atnender.~\

Almyty, -myghty, adj. almighty, vin b 105, xv *ia. [OE. */mihtig.~\

See Mend(e).
.

Amendement,
cure,
I

improvement,

238,

ii

200, villa 132.

Alofte, adv. in the

air,

aloft, V

220,

[OFr. amendementJ]

GLOSSARY
Amercy,
11

v.

to

fine,

vm a
middle

40.
of,

Angwys,

n. grief, IV b 28.

[OFr.

[OFr. amercier.]

Amidde, prep,
355-

in the

Amiddes,

C on-middan.'} adv. in the midst, xila

OE

anguisse.~\ Ani, Any, adj. any, I 2, 18, &c. [OE. xnig.'] See

n 528,
Eny,
[OFr.

Ony.

Amys,
in

170; prep, (from) among, [Free. + adv. -es.~] adv. amiss, vill a
miss.]
w.

II

191.

Animal,
Anodir.

n. animal, II 364.

animal. ~]
322.

[ON. a

Amoner,
16.

See Mysse. almoner, alms-giver, [OFr. au-nioner.'}
;

See Ano}>ire. Anoynt, v. to smear, XVII 127. [Formed on OFr. enoint pp. of
enoiniire.~\

Among(e), prep, among, II 220, via a 89, &c. Eraaug, Emong,
XVII 112
400.
;

Anon(e),rt</z>. at once, straight way, next, 385, 499, VI 224,

n

xvn

[OE.

(follows noun) on-(ge}nidng.]

xvn

See

Amang, Mong. Amonges, prep, amongst,

II 306, vii 37, &c. [Free. + adv. -.] adv. on the next day, II 181, 497. [OE. on morgene.'] An, And, Ant, conj. and, I 254, a 205, xi a i, xv b 1 i, d 2, e6,g 25, 26,*5,&c.; ante, and the, xv e 19 ; if, n 43, vi 200, 238, VIII a 250, xin a 44, b 39,

490, 526, &c. ; Onone, vii 149, xvil 275. [OE on an.'] Anothire, Anoper, adj. zn&prott. another, iv^ 3, 34, ix 37, &c. ; Anopur, xiv<r 27; Anouper,
i 140 Anodir, xvi an + o]>er. ]
;

Amorwe,

87.

[OE.

vm
xiv

Anrm j, See Yno3. *Anowrned, //. adorned,
?

II

363

(MS. anowed). [OFr. aourner a- to an- on anal, of E. alterna-

tion a-, an-.]

c 14, 103,

xvi 208 (even

if),

Ansuer(e),

XVII 297, 502.

On

ment of and
to xii a 26.

in

Gower

postponesee note

Answere, v. to answer, in 5, 25, ix 178, xni 76 ; Andzuerede, pa. t. in 33.
[OE.
an(if)swerian.~\
1

[OE. and.]
[OE. ancraJ]
;

Ancres,

n. pi. anchorites, religions

Answar,

recluses,viila 139.

Andzuerede. See Ansuere. Ane, indef. art. a, x 5, 16, 31, &c.

n. answer, vi an(d}swaru,~] Apt. See An, conj.

58.

[OE.

older inflected representing forms, III ii (first), 13, 49 ; one, a single, iv a 58, x 157 adj. (predicatively) one, united, iv a 56 ; pron. one, iv b i, 43 ; a certain person, iv a 69, X 169. See A(n), On(e). Ane, prep, on ane his IhorJes haf, on his master's behalf, III
; ;

Antifeners, n pi. antiphonaries, xi b 229 (note). [OFr. antiphonier^

Apayed,

//.

pleased,

satisfied,

villa 102, 189.
See Paie.

\Qi.apaier.\
past, vi 180.

Apassed,//. zsprep.

[OFr. apasser.] Ap(p)ere, Appiere, v. to appear, vi 45, xn a 132, xvi 368, xvn
173.

n. [From OE. on,
of in, inne.]

an, on anal,

[OFr. aper-;
v.

apareir.~]

Ap(pjeyre,
b Si.

Anely, adv. only, iv
an/if, adj.]

[OE.
2 2.

See Onely.

Anewe, adv. once more, xv a [a- + OE. neowe.~]
Angelis.
See Aungel.
n.
grief,

Anger,
angr,

v

276.

[ON.
187.

grief.]

do harm to, villa 126, 164, 212, XIII b 14; Apeyryng, impairing, xin b 15. [OFr. emSee Empeyre. peirer.] Apert, adj. plain, v 324 adv. openly, plainly, I 200, vi 229 ; for all to see, n 586. [OFr.
to
injure, impair,
.

;

Angr6, adj. angry, [From prec.]

XVII

apert.]

Apon.

See Vpon.

GLOSSARY
Aposede, pa.
t.

put a (hard)

GLOSSARY
inquire,
I

axian.\
observe,

132, IX 176. See Axe(n).
v.

[OE.
detect,

At, prep,

at,

113, 74, &c.

;

in,

Aspien, Asspye,
vili a

to

123, 217, XI a Ill 42. [OFr. See Spie. espier."\ . test, trial; at Assai, Assay, assai, when put to the test,

60

;

Aspide,/a.

t.

5 ; set in, till, hard(e) assay, place in sore straits, x 62, 1 88. 170, [OFr. essai, assai.] Assaie, Assay(e), Asay, v. to

xiv e

VII 66, vin a 63; ix 253; at wordes, in words, n 139 ; (of time) v 23, 100, ix 284, XI a 12; to, v 108, vn 13; with innn. (at do\ see Do ; according to, I 82, ii 271, xiv b 56, xvi 258, xvn 4, 322 ; at the value of, vin a 162, b 101, xvn 364; at the hands of, from, I 239, 240,
345, II 179, III 4, 31 (see Atte). on, at one, In accord, vi 18 ; at pe full, completely XI b 198 ; hatie at pe, see Habbe(n). [OE. See Atte ; fare. set.] At, rel. particle; pat at, that

At

452, prove, 568, v 294, ix 61, loa, 121, xiv c 66, xvn 219, 249, 433; to endeavour, vin a 24, xu b 81. [OFr. essayer.] See Saye.
test,

make

trial, II

which,

what, vi
at, see
is

176

Assaylle,

As(s)ale,

Assa(i)l;}e

quhar
pat at

Whar.

[ON.

(note); at ;
(cf.

(X),z>. to assail, attack,

IX 88,x

4,

12,43,114, 132, 144, xvil 295, &c. Assaling, w. assault, x 41, 60. [OFr. as(s)ail/ir.] Asse, ass, xv/5, &c. [OE.
; .

possibly for pat tat Atte, J>ou, &c.).] Ate. See Atte.

Atempree,

adj. temperate, ix 29.

assa.]

Assemblid
(at),

(to),

pa.

t.

assembled

[OFr. atemprt.} Aper, Athir. See Aither, Ayther. At-hold, v. to restrain, II 88.

VII 85.
.

[OFr. assembler.']
joining of battle,

Assembly,
VII 57.

[OE. set- + hdldan.] Atire, n. apparel, n 299.
next.]

[From

[OFr. assemble.]
v. to ascend,
for,

Assende,

xvi

32.

Atire,

v.

;

[OFr. ascendre.~\

Assent, pp. sent
See Of-sende.
.

xn
;

208.

II 158. Tired.

Atird, pp. equipped, [OFr. atir(i}er.~\ See
t.

Atled, pa.

intended,

V
II

195. 135,

comAs(s)ente, agreement of pare assente, pliance, vi 31 of like mind with them, xvi 310.
;

[ON.
IX

At/a."]

Ato, adv. in two, apart,

[OFr. asente.] Assent(e), v. to agree, vni a 39, [OFr. 57 //. xvi 170.
;

140; Atwo, vin a 97. [OE. on twd.] See A(n) prep. ;

Tuo. Atour,

asentir.~\

XI 25.

n. apparatus, equipment,

[OFr.

atour(n}.~]
II

Assoylled, pp. absolved, IX 286. [OFr.
assoillir.~]
_

Atourned, //. equipped,

291.

See Aspien. . estate, (high) rank, As(s)tate, VI 33> 'SQj VI1 3I [OFr. See State. es(at.~] Astrangled, //. choked, II 396.

Asspye.

[OFr. atourner.] Atrete, adv. straight out, plainly, xiv c 78. [OFr. a trait.'] Atslyke, v. to slip away ; atslyke), is spent, vi 215. [OE. at-

+ sltcan.]
Atte, Ate, at the, II 232, 379, in 4, villa 96, 6 29; of the,

[OFr. estranglerC\

Asunder,

-yr, adv. apart, I 224 [OE. pleon. with/arfc, i 103. on-sundran.~\ See Soncler.
(note), H
adj. in a

;

Aswon(o),

swoon,

119$
,

in 31 in fixed expressions where Mn. E. has at ', as : atte chirche, villa 50; at(t)t
;

'

549.
;

See Falle(n)

\QR.geswogen. Swone.

firste,

last^e), mete, set Laste, Mete; atte nale

=

Furste,
atte

GLOSSARY
(OE. Ki pani)

vin a

109.

ale, over the ale, See At.

Aunter,

Atteynte, v. to convict, prove guilty, XVI 278. [From ateint, convicted, pp. of OFr. ateindre.
See next.]
reach, yi 188. [OFr. ateign-, stem of ateindre.'] Atwynne, adv. in two, I 189, 191. [OE. on + twinn.~\ Atwo, Avay. See Ato, Awai. Avayll, Avale, v. to be of use to, xvil 154; */ avails you, (it) is your best course, xvn 296.

. chance, event, vil 5, 67, 155[As Auentur ; but due to older and more popular bor-

rowing.]

Auter(e),
auter.~\

n. altar, I 74, 76.

[OFr.

Atteny,

v.

to

Autours.
AuJ>er.

See Auctour. See O}>er, adv. and conj.

Awai, Awei(e), Away(e), Awey(e), adv. away, vin a xii b 132, &c. Avay, 184,
;

+ OFr. vail-, valeir.~] Avale, Availl (x), v. intr. to
[a-

descend, IX 195

;

trans, to let

down, X
35, 36.

28.
.

[OFr. avaler.]
advantage, XIII b

Avauntage,

[OFr. avantage.~\
au(c)torite.~\

Auctorite", n. authority, XI b 61.

[OFr.

192, 261, 329 ; (in rime), II 96, 491, 561 don awei, abolished, XI b 206 ; wan tie awaye, rescued, xvi 171 predic., gone, over, n 59 (away), xvn 537. [OE. on-weg, aweg ; ? with- owy , cf. rare OE. wig.~\ Awake, v. intr. to be aroused, wake up, II 77, VIII a 318, b i, &c. ; trans, to wake, n 73
58, 187;

X

Oway, n

Owy
;

;

;

Auctour,

n.

original authority,

author, IX 304 ; Autours, //. XI a 23. [OFr. autoztr, and (from 1 4th c.) auctoiir, &c.] . formal hearing, Audience, audience, XII b 209. [OFr.

//. wakened, xv g 14. [OE. a-wxcnan, str. ; a-wacian, wk. ; both intr.] See Forwake,

Awake,

Wackenet, Wake.

Awangelys,
listis.

n. pi. gospels,

xv i 6.

Qi.evangelium.~\

See Euaunge-

Aue

audience.^

Maria, an Ave, Hail Mary,

IX 3 2 3[First two words of Latin prayer.]

Awe. Awe,

See Owe, v.
n. fear
;

for Crystys awe,
I

for

Auentur(e),
chance,
feat,

Auentour,
18, 32,

n.
risk,

fear of Christ, See A;le3.

83.

[ON.

agi.'\

H

(notable)
15,

occurrence,

&c.

;

Awede, v. go Awedde, //.
II

mad,
(gone)

n

87

;

mad,
See

x 118; an attenture, (as conj!) in case, vin a 43 at anentur,
;

400.

[OE.
adj.

d-wedan^\

Wode,

chance directed, recklessly, 34. [OFr. aventure7\ See Aunter. Aueril, [OFr. April, XV c I.
s

Aweyward,

xiv c

.

adv. (turned) in the opposite direction, xin a 35. [OE. onweg +adv. -ward^] Awen, Awne. See Owen, adj.

avril.~\

Awenden, pa.
Owe,
v.

t.

pi. thought,

xv^See

Aujt.

See
.

17.

[a-

+ OE. wenan.']

Avys,
[OFr.

deliberation, IX 295, 297.
;

Wene(n).

avis.']

Avised,/^.
xii b 217.

wel avised, judicious,
[OFr.
;

aviser.~\

Awharf, pa. t. sg: turned aside, v 152. [OE. d-hweorfan.~\ Aworthe. See Yworth.

Aungel(l),
23>

n. angel,

XVI 339, 389

iva 46, XI Angel, XI b

Awreke
J

(of), v. to avenge (on), Villa 166; Awroke,//. villa

152, &c. [OFr. ()<?*/.] Aunsetris, n. pi. ancestors, men of former days, vil 5. [OFr. ancestre, nom. sg.]

95
.

[OE. d-wrecanJ]
axe,

See

Wreke.

Ax,

v

155,

xiv

e i, Sec.

[OE. aw.]

GLOSSARY

GLOSSARY
Barres, //. bars, xvi 190. [OFr. barre ] Barste. See Brest(e). Bastardes, n. pi. bastards; as adj., VIII 3 75. [OFr. bastard.'} Baston, n. stave, stanza, Introduction xv. [OFr. baston.] Bataill, Batayl, Batail(e), embattled host, Batel(l),
.

93, 242, xn a 99, &c. ; dot. sg. in to bedde, to bed, a 93, XII b 105 ; J>e bedeo/blysse,1\he

vm

joyful bridal bed (of Christ and the soul), iv a 1 1. [OE. bedd.~]

See Abedde. Bedes, //. prayers,
.

1

16.

[OE.

ge-bed.~\

.

Bedeyn.
.

See Bidene.

XIV b 52;

battle,

VII 56, 91,

*xi 154, xiv b 31, xvi 131, &c. [OFr. bataille.'] Bataild, adj. embattled, with battlements, II 360. [Modelled on OFr. bataille:.'] Bath. See BoJ*. Batis, //. boats x 123. [OE. Mr.] Bape, v. to bathe (trans, and
.

Bedele, herald, one who delivers the message of an authority, XI b 48. [OE. bydel; OFr. bedel.']

Bedreden,

.

Vina
reda.~]

185,

//. the bedridden, b 21. [OE. bedd-

Bee, Bees.
Beest.

See Ben. See Best(e),
;

.

Befalle, v. to ix 129, &c.

happen, chance, to befall, xvn

intr.), 11585, xiil

a

25.
/

[OE.
hire

bapian.']

Baundoun,

.

control

;

banndotm, at her disposal, xv c 8. [OFr. bandnn.'} Be, *w*/'. by the time (that), X 157.
Cf. bi)at.

t. sg. Befell(e), vu Bevil, Bifel, it 155 ; II 57, III 41 Bechanced, falle^), //. II 21, IX 194. [OE. be-fallan.'] See Falle(n). Begge, to beg, villa 186, 233,

514; pa.

67,

;

See next.

b 29, &c.

[1

OE.

bedecian

;

see

Be, Beo (xiv

c 44), prep, by (way of), IX 179, 192, 198 ; through,

IX 112, 136, 137; (of time) by, at, in, VI 163, IX 204, 339, xil a 117, 131, xv i 15, 20; by (means of), through, in 22, vu 23, ix 67, 130, xn a 23, b 199, xvi 355, &c. ; by (of agent}, in 30, ix 112 (first), 298, 305, XII b 217, &c. ; by (in XII 45, oaths, &c.), 164. Counted. beo, set value on, xiv c 44 for idiomatic expressions see the nouns. [OE. fe.] SeeEL
. ;

beggar, n 483, 499, Begger(e), a 188, 197, &c. [See
.

NE.D.']

vm

N.E.D.-}

Begyn(ne),

Bigin(ce),

By-

gyn(ne), &c., v. to begin, act, do, come about, I 69, iv^57, vi 187, vina 160, xiv// 25, ^83, xvi 268, 280, xvn 267, &c. ; begyn of, b. with, xvn 253 ; Be-, Bi-, Bygan, pa. t. sg: began, I 154, &c. ; did, xv a 77 came to pass, II 598 ; made (it) in the beginning,
XVII 29
;

Be-. See also Bi-, By-. See Bicome. Beclipte, fa. t. embraced, XII a 178 Byclypped, //. en-

Bygan,/a.

/.//.

I

72

;

Becam, Becomen.
;

circled,

XIII a
-

21.

[OE.

be-

Bygonne, vi 189; Begouth, X94; Begonne, //. ix 171; iv Be-, Bygynnyng^e), b 58, IX 334, xin 69. [OE be.

giimon

;

begouth
;

is

due

to con;

Bede, v. to bid, offer, v 254, XIV a 9 Bede, pa. t. sg. (bade), v 22 offered, 180, 284. [OE. beodan,
;

fusion of gait with can (coupe)

;

Gan Can, anxil.~\ Begynnar, Bygynner,
See
ner,

early confused with See Bidde, Forbede.

biddan.~]

causer,

beginvi 76, XVII 406.
.

Bed(e). See Bidde. Bedd(e), Bede (iv),

[From prec.] Begon, //. adorned, xiia
i
.

54.

bed,

II

[OE.

be-gan.-]

GLOSSARY
Begonne.Begouth. ^Begynne. Be}onde, adv. beyond, further on, IX 263, 280. [OE. be-geondanl} Be^onde, Be^ounde (l), Bi}onde (v),//. across, beyond,
i

vin a

199,

xv/ 5
&c.
;

;

i, 6, 10, 13,

pres. subj.,

252,

v

132, ix 8, 76, 135, &c.

;

165, 433, xivc 98, fl?3,&c.; Ben, xi 73, 218, &c.; Be(o), imper. 2 j^. xv^- io,/7, &c.; 3 sg. iv a 55; pi. \nia
1 18,

n

BuJ, Xlli a Be(e), Beo,

see See.

[As
.

prec.]
b.,

xiv d

ii (first)

;

Behald(e). See Bihold. behalf on Goddes Behalue,
;

in

be prep,

God's name, I 78. [Originally and halfe dat. sg. ; cf.
.

Half.]

Ben, II 103, vi96, &c. Bene, V275, XVI 40 Beyn, xvn 445, 532 Ybe, XIII a 16; Beyng, pres. p. in
192,
;
; ; ;

xvn

195,

vin

b 74, xi

a 44,

Be, //. I xn a 20,

&c.

promise, XII b 196. See Heste. [OE. (late) Behete. See Bihote.

Beheste,

Mte]

Behevin,//. hewn down, x [OE. be-heawan.~\

in hytself beyng, inherent, VI 86. Ben (drepit, &c.), have been ; be(e} (smitten, &c.), VII 9,

n

163.

war, see War(e)
cease from,
II

;

lete ben,

&c.,

114, xvi 234.

Behielde, -helde. See Bihold. Behihtest. See Bihote.

[OE. &c.

be-on.-]

See Ar(e), Es,

Was,
;

Behynd, prep, behind, x 85 as sb., xvii 331. [OE. be-klndan.~] Behufit. See Bihoue. Beie. See Bigge, v.
;

Bend, v. x 90, 98, xvn 253 Bende, pa. t. xil a 58, *l 1 88 (MS. banned); Bende,//. v 47, 156 Bendit, x 80. The
;

Beyn, Beyng.
Beytter,
n.
.

See Be(n).
healer,
2
.

xvn

311.

divergent senses are all derived from the original one of stringing, bending, a bow : ! to bind, *I 1 88 (note) ; to set ready for

[From Bete, ] Belamy, Bellamy,
(ironically), bel ami.]

good friend xvi 213, 338. [OFr.

ix 289. [OE. ge-leafa, with change of prefix.] Beleue, Bileue, v. to believe, I 89, vina 82, ix 120, xv g 9.

Beleeve,

n. belief,

discharging, x 80, 90, 98; to make curve, bend, v 156, XII a 58, XVII 253; ?to make bow, bring low, beat down, in hatj. . . on bent much baret bende, ? has upon the field overcome much
strife

[OE.

g<-lefan,

(late)

be-lffan.}

(many opponents), v
pleasantly,

47.

See Lene,

.; Ylefde.

[OE.
at

bendan.-}

Belyue, adv. quickly,
straightway,

vn

once, 161, xvi 211 ;

Bene, Bene,

adv.
.

v

334.

[Not known.]

Belife.xvn 192 Bilyue, V3; Blyue, IX 18; Bliue, in also
;

531, 584, as quickly as possible, immediately. [OE. *be life.'} Bellewys, n. pi. bellows, xv h 6.

bliue, II

142, a Is bliue ,

II

bean, 175, 188, 209, 278, 288, 298, ix 54; as something of no value (cf. pees},
bless

vm

XIV c 43. [OE, bean.-} Banedicite (L. imper. //.)
(me,
us)
;

as

exclamation

of

[OE.

Ben,

belgas, pi.] v. to be, II 207,

vin a
7,

&c.;

Be(e),
II

i

Buen, xvc 18; future,
Beat,
35, //.

4,

xvi

96, &c.;

amazement, xvn 163. Benethe(n), Beneyth
;

2 j-.

xvn

Be, v 43, XVI 331 fres.pl. Be(n), are, II 3, 4, 12, &c. Beo, xiv c 5 BeoJ>, xiv c 103 Beth, BeJ), II 59, no, 273, 582,
; ;
; ;

173; 3 sg. Bees, iva 373, Betj, vi 251 ;

adv. underneath, IX 56, xvn 137 in the lower part, IX 247.

(xvn),

[OE.
Bent,

beneolan.-}

Benome.
.

See Binam.
grass-slope, field, v 165 ; on bent, on

esp. in the allit. tag

the field (of battle), or (as variant of vpon groundt, &c.)

GLOSSARY
47, 80, VI I 91 ; on pis dent, here, v 270. [Perhaps a special use of bent, bent-grass,
earth,

On

V

OE.

beonet.'}

Beo, Beop.
585,

See Ben

;

Berd(e), n. beard,

n

Beo, prep.
265, 507,

v

See Bysy(nes). See Bisyde. Beso(u)ghte. See Biseche. Best.e), adj. superl. best, \\ a 84, vill a 197, ix 42, &c. ; as sb., best (food), vin a 295 ; do pi

Besy(nes).

Besyde.

160.

[OE. biard^
wear,
lift,

(doj>

jour}

best, see

Don
;

;

toyth

Ber(e),

v, to bear, carry,

take; to hold, possess, keep ; to give birth to, produce ; v 83, Viii a 136, 1x69, 109, xn a 197, XIII a 51, xvn 318, &c. ; 2 sg.
subf. vi 106 ind. XII a 81
;

Berth, 3 sg.pres.
Bar(e),/0.
t.

pe beste, among the best (people), with the saints, IV a 4 adv. best, most readily, most, VIII a 81, 107, xvn 472, &c. pe best, vin 022. [OE. deist.'] Best, v. See Ben.
;

;

sg.

I

Best(e),

93, xiv c 23, 59, xv i 3; Ber, v 193, vi 66; Baren, Bere, n 307 Bore, pi. ix 148 //. I 85, ii 210 Born(e), n 41, v 252, 326, xiv b 12, &c.; Ybore, Ii 546 Yborn, Ii 174. Bar pe flour, see Flour b. pe felajschip, keep thee company, v 83 the depnes ...we here, the depth (of water) we draw, XVII 434, 460 born open, laid open, v 2 (cf. OE. beran up). [OE.

I46,vm a

animal, creature, n 214, 280, vin a 134, ix 88, XII a 78, &c. ; Beest, xvn 3,
.

;

;

1

35, &c.
1

[OFr.

beste.}
.

;

Beswyke, Byswyke, v
iv a
3,
;

to cheat,

;

vi 208. [Q.fo*tt<fta*.] Bet, adv. compar. predic. in he

;

;

;

heron.]

See Forbere.
I 75, [OE. ge-b&re'.] byre, cattle-stall, xv/4.

Bere,
Bere,

n. 1 clamour, outcry,

II 78,
.

XVI 214.
2

[OE. byre.] Bere-bag, bag-carrier, a contemptuous nickname for Scots, Xiv a 20 (note). [Stem of Bere v. + ON. baggi.~\ See Bagge. mound, v 104, no. Ber3(e), [OE. be(o}rg.-]
.

was pe bet, he was better off on that account, vill b 100. [OE. bet."] See Best(e), Betre. Bete, v. 1 to beat, I 6, vin a 73, XVII 407 betes the stretes, frequents the streets, xiv a 25 ; Bette, pa. t. sg. villa 171; Byete, pa. t. subj. sg. in 40 (OE. bcote}; Bet,//, xvn 413 Betin, Betyn, xiv a 8, xvii 381. [OE. bSatan.'] See For;
;

bette.

Bete,
77,

f.

2

vni a

to assuage, remedy, IV a 233, xiv a 28, 29.

[OE
[be-

betan.]

.

Betj, Betidde.

See Beytter. See Ben, Bitide.

Betraied, pp. betrayed, xvi 331.

Ber}e, v. to protect, III inlrod. [OE. be(p)rgan.~\ Berien, n. pi. berries, n 258 (note). [OE. beri(g)e.-\ Beringe, n. birth, in introd.

+ Qr.

trair.~]

Bet(e)re, Better(e), Bettre, adj. compar. better, ii 40, XI. b 37, XIII a 60, XV c 33, &c. ; him were betre, it would be b. for

[From

Bere,

z>.]

him, XII b 101
for

Berking, pres. p. barking, II 286. [OE. be(o}rcan.'] Bernakes, n. pi. barnacle-geese
IX 147 (note).

32

; pat -war better, it would be b., xiv a adv. better, XI b 275, xiv d 14, &c.; rather, XI b 288; pe

whom

;

[Anglo-L. ber-

better, all the better (for it),

v

28,

tiaca, OFr. bernaqueJ] Bernes, n. pi. barns, villa 177. [OE. ber(e]n.1 Berth. See Bere, v.

XVI1 353

as conj., so that . . . (the) better, vill a 46, XVII 175.
I

[OE.
Bette.

betera, bet(t}ra, adj.] See Bete, v. 1
v.
?

Besele*, adv. earnestly,

xvn

240.

Betweche,
tection of

to

commit
1

(to pro<

[OE.

bisig

+

-lice.'}

See Bysy.

God), xv*'

8.

Only

GLOSSARY
in this passage ; perhaps an error for becweihe (bequeath, commit),

Pan),

n
;

v 84
as
294.

or beteche (see Bitaiste).

con/'.,

553; bipat, thereupon, by that time, VIII a 285 by the time that, villa
;

Betwen(e),

Bytuene (xv), Bytwene/r/. between, among, IX 162, 166, xn a 68, b 89, xv c
i,

&c.

;

vil 91.

(follows case), v 174, [OE. betweon(an).~\

Betwix, Bitwixe, 'prep, between,
xi a 32, xvn 185. [Q\L.be-twix.~\ Beth. See Ben. See Befalle. Beuore. See Bifor.
Be]),

[OE.*?.] See Be. By. See Bigge. See Be-. Bi-, By-. Bible, n. bible, 227, xi b 230, &c. [OFr. bible.} Bycause (of), prep, because (of), XIII b 16 ; bycausc, because pat,

vma

(conj.) because,

Bevil.

.

1x114,226.

b 61, 62, [Be, Bi + Cause,

xm

Beweile,
32. \be~

v. refi. to

lament, xil a

?..] Biche, n. bitch, xiv b 78.
bicce.]

+ ON.

[OE.

*veila; ci.veilan,

lamentation.]

Bewycche, v. to bewitch, IX 86. [OE. be + wiccian.'} Bewounde,//. it hath b., wound
;

Byclypped. See Beclipte. Bicome, Become, v. to arrive; become; befit hyt bycomep for, it befits, vin b 65 Becam,/a.
; ;

(itself)

about
.

it,

xil b 72.

[OE.
[OFr.

t.

sg.

xil b 13

;

Bewty,
By, adv.

beauty, XVII 20.

IX 148; Bicome, n 288; Bicome,//. n 194 wherschewas
;

Becomen,

pi.

beaut e.~\
at the side,

bicome, ivhider pai bicome, u'her

by

;

alongside

(without coming on board), xvil 373 ; /a/ ... by, by which, ix
300.

[OE.

bi.~]

See J*r(e).

Bi, By,//. (i) On, at, by, II 156, 470, vin a 167, xv^ 16, xvn 75, &c. ; bi... side, beside, n 66,

he becam, what had become (became) of her (them, him), n 194, 288, xn b 13. [OE. be-cuman.\ Bidde, Bydde, Bid, v. to pray, beg, VIII a 233 ; to bid, I 265, vi 160, 210, xi 3 79, xn a

vma

v 76 by (way of), over, through, i 62, v 10, 16, 52, 93, x u,
;

XVII 477

;

along (with), beside,

II 280, 308, V 9, vin a 4, &c. ; (following its case) n 301, V 21, xvil 18; against, touching, v 242 past, II 252, 290, v 36, 39. (ii) In, on, for (of time), II 8, 15, vin a 95. 274, xv a 24, &c. see Dai, While, (iii) Measured
; ;

xiv a" 3, xvi 118, xvn 418, Bad(de), pa. t. sg. bade, xn a 46, xv i 16, xvi 201, xvn 309, &c. bad to, bade, XII b 87; Bed, prayed to, III 46 (OKt. bed) Bad,//, n 88, 137; Bede, pp xn a 42 (prayed), 101 (commanded). [OE. biildan ; the
48,

&c.

;

;

;

confusion with btodan began in

OE.] A*Bede. Bidderes, n. pi. beggars, mendicants,
dere.~]

by,
to,

compared with, according
&c.,
5,

VIII a

197.

[OE.

bid-

vma
xi b

v

28,
(iv)
II

35, 58,

158, 296, 159, 248,

297, 57,
of),

&c.

By (means

through, &c.,

a 284, &c., live on, n 257, b 26 ; by (of agent), XI a 59, &c. (v) By (in oaths, &c.), II 316, V 54, &c. Bi al ping, by every token, n 321, 375; by so, provided that, VIII b 40 ; bi pan, thereby, or thereupon (cf after

by

virtue of,

408, VII 6, &c. ; XI b 20 ; lyue by,

vm

Byd(d)yng, Bidding, commands, I 86, xvi 257, xvn 76, 121, 375. [From Bidde.] Bide, Byde, v. to abide (intr.
xvi

n. bidding,

remain, trans, await, face, endure), V 2 24, vi 39, xiv c 21,47, 23, 207, &c. [OE. bldan.~]

See Abide.

Bidene, Bydene, Bedeyn (xvn),
adv.
forthwith, withal (often meaningless), vil 79, 127, xiv*

GLOSSARY
74, ii.

XVH

442 ; al bident, [See N.E.D.}
See Bigge, Bete, v. 1
See Befalle.

Bye, Byete.
Bifel.

Bifor(e), Byforn, Befor(e), Beuore, &c., adv. before (hand), II 147, VII 121, &c ; eir befor, X 140; as s6., XVII 331 ; prep. before, in presence of, &c., II 42, in 58, v 4, ix 126, &c. (of time) VI 238, XI b 48, &c. ; bifore pat, before (conj.), xi b
;

Behelde, pa. t. sg. VII 64; Biheld, II 101, 320, 323, 530; Behielde, //. xna 164; Bihold, -holde(n\//. ii 409,417, xn b 116. [OE. be-hdldan.]
See Holde(n). Bihote, Byhote, vow, villa 227
v. to promise, byhote God, I

vow

to

God,
2 sg.

vm a
pa.

;

273;

Be;

hihtest,

t.

XII b 43

Behete, //. XV a 20. [OE.
Hote.

xvn

430; Bihot,
See

be-hdtan.'}

195

;

Byfore,
1

conj. (with snbj.),

before, vi

70.

[OE.

be-foran.]

Bihoue,

v.

to need

;

impers. in

Big, Bigge, v. to take up one's abode ; to big his boure, to
establish his dwelling, xiv 26; bigges him settles himself, XI V b
.

me bihoues, I must, it is time for me to, v 228; pers. in Bus,
2 sg. pres. J>ou bus be, you ought to be, xvi 338 ; Behufit, had need (to), X 156. t. [OE. be-hofian with the reduced form bus cf. has, hast, &c.]
;

24.

\QN.byggja.~]

Bigsn, Began, Sec. Bigge, Bygge, adj. strong, lusty, big, iv a 51, v 33, vi 14, vn
Bigge,
for,

S*fBiging. See Begynne.

pa.

;

a 207. [See N.E.D.'} v. to buy, purchase, pay redeem, villa 275; Beie, XII b 24; By(e), iv a 65, IX "3; Byye, vi 118; Bugge, XV 3 ; pa. t. Boght, iv 38 ; a 201 ; Bouhte, Bou^te, vmZ> 100 Boght,//. iva 80, XII* 153, XVII 373; Bought(e), XVI 8, 275 Iboust, xv,f 26 (see
139,

vm

Byye. See Bigge. Bying, redemption, XVI 12. [From By, to buy. See Bigge,
.

Biis, n. fine linen,
bysse.']

II

242.
z>.

[OFr.

vm
; ;

B iknowe, Byknowe,
V 317 (Ib.yow, I

to confess,

vm b

confess to you),

96

;

Beknowen,
'

//.

in
,

POU V 323.

art

b. of,

you have confessed [OE. be-cndwan, only

E bycgan, (Kt.) [ See Abugge. Byggynge, n. buying, IX 90. [From prec.] See Bying. Bigile, Bygyle, v. to deceive, v 345, 348, 359, xiv b 44. [OE. be- + OFr. gutter..] See Gile.
XVII 373becgan.~\

p. 278) ; it bees boght full dere, you will pay for it dearly,

App.

recorded in sense Bile, Bill (xvn),

know '.]
.

beak, xila 182, xvn 508. [OE. bile.} Byled, pa. t. boiled, bubbled, v 14 Boyled, //. v 106.
;

Biging, n. dwelling, XIV a

20.

[From Big, Bygonne, &c.

.]

See Begynne.
sg.pres. grumbles

Bylyue, food, vm b 21, 29. [OE. bl-leofa.'] Bylongeth, v. impers. it belongs to, befits, vm b 70. [Be- +
.

[OFr. boillir\ for similar development of vowel in v, see Nye, Disstryej.]

Bigruccheth, 3

a 69. [OE. be- + OFr. at, See Grucche. groucher.~\ Byje, .ring, VI 106. [OE. beg.~\ Bihold, Behald(e), v. to behold,

vm

Longe,

2
.

]

Bilow, v. to humble, villa 223. [Formed on Lowe adj.'] Bilt, n. dwelling, *ll 483 (MS.
ybilt,
is

look, ii 387, 502, iv a 81, xvn 509, 534, &c. ; bihold on, behold to, look at, n 367, xvii 343; Beholdes, imper.pl., XVI 195 ;

to

ME. N.E.D ^

unexampled).

' but required sense lodged' [Obscurely rel. see bilden, build;

Binam, pa.

t.

sg in

b.

\hym~\ his

GLOSSARY
tnnam, deprived him of his vin a 237 ; Benome, pp. ane petty, deprived the poor of a penny, in 13. [OE. be-niman.~\ See Nyme.
talent,

near,

xin a
II

10

;

(following

in b.Jiepoure

281. [As prec.] Bysy(e), Bysie, Besy (aboute), adj. busy, occupied (with, in), XI b 252, 287, 289, 293, 297.

pron.)

Bynde, v. to bind, unite, iva 54, XVI 97 Bond, pa. t. sg. xn b 1 20 (but sb. = trosse is possible
;
;

[OE. bisig.~] Bysynes(se), Besynes
restlessness, IV b 28
;

(iv), n. industry,

see
II

Bonde,
394.

.);

Ybounde,
b'mdan.']

[OE.

//. See

Vnbynde. Biqueste, n. (bequest), will, villa 79. [OE. *be-cwiss, related to
be-cweban, bequeath; cf. Heste.] Bir, Byr, Bur (v), n. a following wind, vii 126; speed (in with a byr, speedily) xvn 371 ; violence, v 254; strength, v 193.

worldly b. attention to worldly affairs, XI b 2, 309 ; b. of worldly occupation, preoccupation- with w. affairs, XI b
;

XIH

b 24

251.

[OE.
.

bisig+-nes.~\

Bis(s)chop, Bysshop(p)e , Bissoppe, bishop, i 246, in 58 (dat. sg.~), VIII a 143, b 74, xi 66, &c. [OE. biscop.}

[ON. byr-r.} Byrd. See Bricl(d).
Bireue,
v. to

Byswykej. Biswynke,
Bitaiste
trusted,

See Beswyke.
v. to earn with toil,

deprive;

I

VIII a 207.

wil

it

(=

[OE. be-swincan.~] bitaihte), pa. t. en2
1
.

hym
it,

b.,

I will deprive

him of

vin a

xv g

242.

[OE.
1

be-reafian,

pa.

t.

bet&hte\

[OE. bctxcan, on spelling see
229
220.
;

be-refan.-}

Byrye,
144.

v. to

bury,

137, 140, 142,

App. p. 278.] Byte, v. to bite,
the bone shal to the bone,
bitan.'}

xvn

apon

[OE. byrigan.} Byrne, Burne, v. trans, and intr. to burn, x 2 1 (rime with in requires Bryn, q. v.}, x 181, &c. Byrnand, pres.p. IV a 26, x 27, 30. [OE. dirnan, byrnan, &c.,
;

it byte, it

shall cut

xvn

[OE.
;

Bitide, Bytyde, &cc.,v. tohappen to happen to, befall, vi 37 pres. subj. v 1 27, 315, 341, xiv
13
;
;

;

See Bren, Brin. Byrthen, burden, IV a
intr.]
.

49.
v. to

[OE.

tyrjett.]

Betidde,//. xvi 100 tide wat bitide, come what may, II See 339. [OE. fe + ///.]
Tide.

Biseche, Bysech, Beseche,
;

implore, n 113, 453, vi 30, ix 269, 328, Ml a 38 Besoghta, pa. t. xii 026; Besoughte, ix
294.

Bityme, adv.
time,
i

in

all bilyme, in

XIV b
time;

27.
cf.

food i tyine,
timan."\

in

[From OE. to

[OE. be + secan.'] .SteSeche. Biseme}, v. impers. it suits, v 1 23.
[Be-

I

|

+ .Seme,

q.v.'}

See Tyme. Bitte, Bytte, n. cutting edge, V 242 ; blade V 156. [ON. bit,
cutting edge ; OE. bite, a cut.] Bittir, Bytter, adj. bitter, IV* 37 ; salt (of water), IX 244 ;
grievous, xivc 68, xvi 207, &c. [OE. bitter.'] Bytuene. See Betwene. Bytwyste, prep, between (following its noun), vi 104. [A form

Bisyde, Besyde, adv.

at the side, at one's side, hard by, I 209, v 20, 162, XII b 125. [OE. be sldan, at the side.]

Biside(n), Be-, Bysyde,/>r/>. beside, XI b 57 ; (following its case)
I

243,

n

303,

v

197,

xiv b

28,

&c. See prec. Bisides, Bisydej, adv. at the side(s), round about, II 401,
96. [Prec. + adv. -.] Bisides, Bysydes, prep, beside,

of

ME.

be-twixt(e],
q.v.~\

extended
357.
be-

from Betwix,

V

Biwyled, //. deluded, V be + wiglian cf. [! OE.
;

GLOSSARY
wijeiicn,

Layamon

969.]

See

Wiles.

Blabre, v. to babble, XI b 248. [Echoic cf. Babelynge, Blubre.] Blac, Blak, adj. black, II 265, IX 23, XII a 99 rowe and bloc, with shaggy black hair, II 459 Blake, oblique and //. IX 4, XII a 137, xv c 14. [OE. blsecj\ Blame, . blame; scolding, xvil 399 ; v. to blame, V 300, ix 374 (mistranslation see note), to blame, in the wrong, &c. XIV b 85. [OFr. bla(s}me;
; ; ; ; ;

(note); cled in Sta/ord biew, beaten black and blue; cf. clot'he here well yn Stafford bleiae, Rel.

Ant,

I,

p.

39.
pi.

[OFr.

bleu.']

See Blwe.

Blynde, adj. XI* 79 as
;

blind, deluded, sb., the blind, villa

115,185.

[OE.Mw?.]
sg.

Blyndip, 3
deludes,

xi b

7,

pres. (blinds), 107. [OE.
blind,

bltndan infl. See Blended.

by

adj.]

bla(s)mer.~]

Blan.

See Blynne.
(to),

Blyndnesse, n. blindness, xi b 221. [OE. blindnes.'] Blyn(ne) (of}, v. to cease (from), iv a 39, v 354, xvi 16, 336,
XVII
1

Blasphemye
femie.}

n.

blasphemy
[OFr. bias-

10 (or
;

I blyn = without
t.

(against), XI b

1 1 o.

stopping)

Blan, pa.
.

pi.

I

73.

Blawene. See Blowe. Ble, Bleo (xv), n. hue, complexion, in brijt on ble, fair of face, II 455 ; radiance, xv b 16.

Blis(se), Blys(se), happiness, joy, iv a II, 40, VI 12, xiv b XV b 3, &c. ; ashaue Iblys, 19, so may I have (eternal) joy,

[OE. bleo.~] Blede, v. to bleed, xiv Bled(de), pa. t. \ 119, [OE. bledan.]
Blefte.

c
II

13

;

80.

XVII 402. [OE. bliss.~\ Bliss(e), Blesse, v. to bless, I introd., VI 76, XVI 400, 404, XVII 174, 256, 300, 467; bless with sign of the cross, V 3, XII b 86 XVII 514. j Blist, //.

See Bleue.
in blende in

Blende,/^. /. mingled,
his face,
;

rose

to his

cheeks,

v 303 Blent,//,
blyssc,
set

in blent . ..in amidst joy, VI 25. blenden obscurely related [ME. to OE. bldndan, or ON. blanda.~] See Vnblendyde.

[OE. blstsian, already infl. by blitsian, blissian, to gladden.] Blisseful, Blysful, adj. joyous, II 41 2, 438, vi 49; as ^..blissful one, VI 61 *Blissefulest(MS.
;

Blended, //. deluded, V 351. [OE. bltndan.] See Blyndi)>. Blenk, v. to gleam, v 247. [OE.
*blencan, possibly identical with recorded blencan, to cheat ; for

blifulest), superl. bliss +//.]

n

527.

[OE

Blissing, -yng, 401, xvii 178. See Blis(se).

n. blessing,

xvi [OE. towing."]

ME. blenchen,
gleam, look
blench, cheat.
Glyfte.]

blenken, &c.
at,

=

to

glance aside,
Glent,

Compare

Blipe, Blype, Blith (xiv b\ adj. ha PPy g lad v 2 53> XIV b 49 J blipe of, glad at, II 573 patow be blipe o/hir, that you may have
;

Blent, Bleo. See Blende, Ble. Blepeliche, adv. gladly, III 53. alteration of OE. [? Obscure
blipeiice.']

joy of her, II 471. [OE. bllfe.] Blypely, happily, VI 25. [OE. See BleJ>eliche. blipelice.'] Bliue, Blyue. See Belyne. Bio, adj. black and blue, XVII
413.

Bleue,

v. to
;

remain

;

pres. subj.
t.

[ON.

bld-r.]
n.

Ill introd.

Blefte, pa.

Ill 18.

Blod(e), Bloode,

blood,

I 1

19,

[OE. belxfan.'] See Leue, Bleuj, Blew. See Blowe.

v. 1

Blew,

.

blue

(stuff),

xvn

200

141, XV g 16, XVI creature, xn 12, &c. 220; byndes blade and bam, keeps the

V 246, IX
;

GLOSSARY
body
together, iv a 54.

[OE.

GLOSSARY
104, 132, 149, Xiv b
20.

[ON.

GLOSSARY
[From ME. braggen, of unknown
origin.]

Brekynge,

n. breaking ; smate b., breaking a long note into a

Braid. See Erode. Braide, Brayd, Brade, n. a sudden movement ; in a brade, in a trice, XVII 21 ; bittirbraide, grievous onslaught, xiv c 68, xvi 207. [OE. bragd}

number of short ones, fine trilling, XI b 138. [OE. brccung.} Brem(e), adj. fierce, violent, v
132, VII 139, 152, &c. ; threatening, wild, V 77; passionate, vii 104; glorious, II 61 ; adv. xv b 27. gloriously, [OE.
bretne, adj. and adv.] Brem(e)ly, adv. fiercely, violently, v 251, vn 1 06; exceedingly,

Brayde,
threw,

v.

to

move quickly
;

;

draw, v 251; Brayde, pa. t. v 309 Brayde, //. in brayJe dcnvn, lowered, v i.

[OE. bregdan.} Brayn, n. brain, xv h 6 (distrib. see Hert). sg. [OE. brxgn} Brak. See Breke(n).
;

V 165. [From prec.] Bren, Bran, n, bran, Villa 175,
278.

Bren, v. to burn
152, 159;
fervent, xi b n. burning,

[OFr. bren.} Brent, //. vii
;

Brandis, //. pieces of burnt wood, X 113. [OE. brdnd.} Bras, brass, xvi 196. [OE.dr&s.']
. .

Brennynge, pres.p. Brennynge, 67 IX 10. [ON.
;

Brast.

See Brest (e).
;/.

brenna.}
branch,
I

See Byrne, Brin.

Braunche, Branch, 121, v 109, xvn
branche.~\

511.

[OFr.

Brent, adj. steep, V 97. [Cf. OE. brant} Bren-waterys, //. xv h 22,
.

Bre, n. foaming [App. a curious

sea,

allit.

VII 152. use of

'

water-burners', e. blacksmiths (from the hiss of the hot iron
>'.

OE.
131,

briiv, *breo, broth.]

Bred(e),

. bread, 18, 129, 207, 298; as euer etc I brede = so may I live, on my life, XVI1 395 hors bred, houndes bred, bread of beans, bran, &c., for the food of horses and dogs, VIII a 208. [OE. bread.}

vm

when plunged

in water).

Com-

pare burn-the-ivind, a nickname [Bren, v. + Waiter.]
for blacksmiths.

Brere, n.

briar,

n

276.

[OE.
[OE.

brier, brer.}

Brest, n. breast,
breast.}

v

303.

Bred-corne,

n. grain for bread,

Vina 64. [Prec.+OE. corn} Brede, Breed, n. breadth, XVI I
126; of breed, in breadth,
259.

Breat(e), Brast (xvn), v. trans. and tntt.to burst, iva 81, xv h
6,

xvn

xvn

vili a 171

264; Barste,/a. /. sg. Brosten, //. xvi
;

[OE. brxdu}
z>.

Brede,

intr. (to expand),

grow,

VI 55. [OE. bradan.} Bredes, n.pl. planks, v 3.
bred.}

[OE.

196. [OE. berslan ; ON. bresia.} Bretfull, adj. full to the brim, VII 164. [OE., ME. brerdJull, prob. with substitution of ON. cognate form *bredd- ; cf.

Breff, adj. brief, meagre, VII 74.
break, violate, Breke(n), villa 31, 1x46, xi b 187, xvi
;

v.

to

intr. II 257, xvn 387, &c. 338, ix 118 ; Brak, pa. t. sg. X 106; Broke, pa. t.pl. v 14 ; Broke, pp. injured, vili b 34 (set Broke-legged, villa 130); Brokynne, broken, xvi 195. [OE. brecan.}

Swed. brdddfull} Brether(en). See Broker. Breue, v. to set down in writing ; Breuyt, pa. t. sg. vn 65 //. vii 14. [Med. L. breviare, OE. brefan} Brid(d), Byrd (xvn), n. young bird, xn a 196 ; (small) bird, I 1 3O5> vii 104, xn a 169, 172, xvii 514, &c. [OE.Mt/d, young
;

bird (late Nth. pi. birdas}.}

GLOSSARY
Brydel, n.
bridel.~\

bridle,
.

v

84.

[OE.

Broght(e),BroJt(e).

.

Broke,

n.

brook, stream,

V

14,

(draw) bridge, V i. See Draw-brig. [OE. brycg.~\ Bryght(e), Brijt, Bry3t, Briht (xn), Bryht (xv), &c., adj. and adv. bright, II 152, 269, 455. iv a 72, 66, v 158, xn

Brygge,

132, VIII a 129.

[OE.

broc.~\

Broke, Brokynne. Set Breke(n). brokenBroke-legged, adj. legged, crippled, villa 130.

Brood.
Brope,

130,

xv

26,

xvn 9,

&c.

[OE.
15,

Brosten.

See Breke(n), Legges. See Erode. See Brest(e).
adj. fierce,

berht, byrht.}

v

165.

[ON.

Brightnes, n. splendour, XVII 20. [OE. berht-nes.]

brd6-r.]

Bropely,

adv.

fiercely,

v

309.

Brimme, Brymme, edge, V 104; brink,

. water's xil 32.

[OE. brymme.'] Brin, Bryn, v. trans, to burn, X 21 (implied by rime) Brynt, Briflt, pa. t. x 113; //. x 32, 165. [ON. brinna.]
;

Broper, n. brother, I 210, xna 6; Brother, gen. sg. xil a 18 Brother, //. XVII 318, 320 (see note) ; Breperen, brethren, villa 201, XI b 243, &c. [OE.
;

[ON.

brdt-liga.-}

brffor

;

ON.
n.

brxtir, pi.]

See Bren, Byrne.

Broucb,
v. to bring,
broche.']

trinket,

XIII b

23

Bring(e), Bryng(e),
take, escort
;

(translates l^.crepundid).

[OFr.

cause to be ; iv a 7, 46, villa 64, ix 60, x 17, XI a 3 (adduce), xiirt 193,

xiv b 68, &c. Broght(e), Bro3t(e),Brought,Brou3t(e), fa. t. I 123, ii 93, in ii, villa 288, xn a 25, b 47 (ntbj.\ xvi 161, &c. ; pp. v 77, vn 9o,xiv 72, &c. Ybroujt, II 389, 563 bryng it to an ende, accomplish
; ; ;

Brou3t(e), &c. See Bring(e). Broun(e), Browne, adj. brown, a 301, xv 14 dull-hued, 1x38,98; dark, vi 177. [OE.

vm

<:

;

briin.}

Browe,

n. pi. eyebrows,

xv

c 14;

forehead, v 238. Buen. See Ben.

[OE.

bru.}

Buerne(s).

IX 169; bringen forlh t bring forth, produce, IX 60, XII a 193 ; to (hay bryng, until they bring (something), XVII 499 ; broughte outt of, rescued from, xvi 161 ;
it,

Bugge.
Bugles,

See Borne, Burne. See Bigge, v. pi. bullocks, IX 256.
.

[OFr. bugle.]

brought it so breff, made it so meagre, VII 74; broght dede, brought to death, I 213. [OE.
bringan.]

Bur. See Bir. Burde, pa. t. subj. impers. (it would befit) in me burde, I had
better,

ought

to,

V
.

210, 360.
//.

[OE. ge-byrian.'] Burgase, Buriays,

bur65.

n 16. [OFr. Breton L. Brit(f)onem, Briton.] Britoner, Brytonere, n. a man of Brittany, VI 1 1 a 148, 169.
;

Brynstane, n. sulphur, X 20. [OE. bryn-stan] Brytouns, //. men of Brittany,
.

gesses, citizens, II 504,

XIV

[OFr. burgeis, sg. and pi.] Buriel, Buryel, n. tomb, XIII a 46. [OK. byrgels.]

Burne. Burne,

See Byrne.
n. warrior, knight, man,

v

[From

prec.]

a 31. Brookes, n.pl. badgers, [OE. brocc.~\ Erode, adj. broad, V I, 165, VII 106, XV^ 5 Brood, XIII a 39 ; Braid, X 24. [OE. brad]
;

vm

3, 21, 210, 247, 252, 270, vi 37 ; voc. sir (knight), v

309, 216,

254

;

Buernes,

//. VI I 90, 91.

[OE. btom^ Burnist, //. polished, n 368. [OFr. burnir, l/urniss-.~\ native speech, Burp-tonge,
.

GLOSSARY
XIII b
1

6,

43.

[OE. byrp- +

185,

208;

Conne, VI
116, xill

161

;

Conne J>, via a
Bus. See Bihoue. Busk, v. (to prepare
oneself);

a

17,

22, 38 (know) ; Cunne, XI vc 101 ; Kan(e), iv b 21, 41,

make
J>e,

haste, hasten,

v 216

;

refl. in
;

busk

44,

86

;

Konne,

VIII

a

70

;

(prepare),
.

xiv a 22 make, v 180.

trans.

[ON.

biia-sk, refl.]

See Boune.

pres. subj. Conne, vm a 143 Kun(ne), xiv b 90, vm a 250;

Kunnen,

xi<J 153 (know), 275

;

;

bushel (a measure of Busshel, volume varying very greatly at different times and places), vin a 64. [OFr. buissiel.~\ But. See Bot(e). Butras, n. (?//.) buttress, n 361. [? OFr. bottterez, nom. sg., or
of bouteret.'} See Ben. BuJ>.
pi.,

pa.

t.

introd., b 200, cowjte) (2 sg.) with double vi 1 24 (note); pa. t. subj. constr.,

v

Coupe, Cowpe,

I

introd.,

115, 205,
;

xn

&c.

could,

might
;

xi b 271, v 276, 353
;

xvn

Buzome,
VIII

a

1

adj. obedient, willing, 88. [Stem of OE. bugan

Can no other red, xnb 102, see Red how / can of, what I can do in the way of, xvn 250. It
difficult to distinguish this verb from the next at v 205, VI 1 39, XVII 468). (e.g. [OE. can, con ; cti]>e.~\ Can, Con, v. 3 auxil. used with infin. as equivalent of simple
is

(have), Coude, 286 Coupe, Cowth, xvn 473.
;

sometimes

+ -JMW.]

See Boje.

Caas. See Cas(e). Cagge(n), v. to tie up, VI 152. [Not known ; only allit.] Cayre, v. to ride, v 52. [ON.
keyra.~]

pa.

t.

(con calle

=

called,

v 144),
prec.,

and also, by confusion with
.

Calabre, calaber (a squirrel fur), villa 265. [OFr. Calabre,

Calde.

Calabria.] See Colde. Call(e), v. to call (cry, summon, name), I 32, iv b 47, vi 182, X 70, xvi 126, xvii 432, &c. subj. sg. XVI 141 ; Cald, //. named, vn 70, xvn 513. [OE.
;

(con dresse = present brings about, VI 135) ; i, 3 sg. Con, v 167, 227, vi 51, 77, 93, 181,221, 223, &c. ; 3sg. Cone?, VI 122 pi. Can, x 50, 66, 10$, 112; Con, VI 149, 191 pa. t. did, ? v 205 (see prec.). [Due to confusion in form, and partly also in sense, between Gan (q.v.}

of

a

;

;

(late) ceallian, from ON. Cam. See Com. Cammede, adj. XV h 5
;

kalla.]
?

snub-

nosed (cf. Reeve's Tale, 14) ; ? crooked better, (fits context but see etym.). [Cf. OFr., ME. cataus, snub-nosed ; cammed, bent (from Welsh cai), is not else recorded till later.]

and prec. cf. begouth (s.v. Begynne).] Canell, n. cinnamon, IX 158. [OFr. canelle.] Caple, horse, v 107. [Cf. ON.
; .

kapall; see

N.E.D.]

Can,
II

v. 1

I

can.

Pres. ind.

know, know how to, 1 Can, 3 sg.
,
;

Cardinales, n.pl. cardinals, xiv b 40, 41. [OFr. cardinal.] Care, Kare, n. woe, misery, iv a
18, 44, 60, ^'316, vi ir, &c.; care (of}, anxiety (concerning), [OE. cant.] Care, v. to have sorrow, xiv b i. [OE. canan.~\ Carie, v. to carry, xil b 27.

xin b 38 (knows), &c. Con, v 70, 215, xvc 26 Kan(ne), I 45, iv a n, 90, xvi
22, 437,
;

V3ii.

xvn
vin
3

74;

2 sg.

Can(ne), xvi 100,

Con, vi

229 ; Cans tow (see J>ou), 12; pi. Can, ix 208; 21 ; Conen, know, IX

[ONFr.

carter.'}

Caroigne, Caryori,
carrion, VIII a

n.

85,

dead body, xvii 502.

GLOSSARY
[ONFr.
caroigtu;

the

phono-

GLOSSARY
52. important matter, [OFr. charge^ See next. Charge(n), v. to burden, iv b 51 ; charge(tf) with, to burden with, to impose as an obligation, XI b 150, 198, 199, &c. ; to enjoin,

Xiv

c

chance,

xn

b

18,

57.
v.

[OFr.
to alter,

ch(e~)aii(-e.}

Chaunge, Change,

order (a person), xi* 15, 31, 71, 120, 193; to attach weight, importance, to, XI b 104, 106, 184, 1 88, 225. [OFr. charger:] Charious, adj. burdensome, XI b 204. [OFr. chargeous, char*
jous.]

change, trans, and intr., iv a 2, 42, xn a 125, xin a 4, 56, xv a 22, &c.; Chayngede, pa. t. xni b 28; Yohaunged, //.

vin
his

b 85, XIII b 27. Chaunged cher, v 101, see Chere.
; chaingier.} n. vicissitudes, vii

[OFr. changier

Chaungyng,
16;
ch.

Charit^,
fellows),

Charyte",

n.

charity,

oj -wit, alteration of sense, mistranslation, XI a 47. Chees. See Chese, v.

Christian love (for

God

or one's
xi/> 25,

Cheyne,

n. chain,

x

31.

[OFr.
;

iv3is, vi no,

chaine.~\

out ofch. t not in a state of ; ch., XI* 26, 89; I will kept ch., I will not lose my temper, xvn 2 35 Par charite,for ch.,for of saynte ch., (formulce used in

&c.

Chekes, n. pi. cheeks, vni a 169 maugri Medes (thf) chekes, in
Meed's (thy) despite, vin a 41,
151
;

>

see Maugre'.

[OE.

ceace,

clce.-}

or requests), in the name prayers, of (holy) charity, VIII a 250, xv d 5, xvil 165, 174; amen for ch., a formula of conclusion, xvn 558. [OFr. charite; (de) par (sainte) charitel\ Charke, v. to creak, 70.

Chekke,
eschec,

n. ill-luck,

v

1

27.

[OFr.

checkmate.]

xna

[OE. cearcian,~\ Charnel, n. cemetery, vin a

50.

[OFr. charnel.'} Chaste, v. to rebuke, punish, vin a 53. 3 J 8. [OFr. hastier.} Chastice, Chastis(e), Chastyse,
v. to

Chelde, adj. cold, xv e 16. [OE. (WS.) ctald.~\ See Colde. Ckenes, n. pi. fissures, XIII a 8. [OE. cine, cion-.~\ a 294. Chepynge, n. market, [OE. ceping.'] Cher(e), Chiere (xn), n. face, xvc 15 looks, XII a 120; demeanour, VI 47 mery chere,

vm

;

;

70,

d

punish, chastise, curb, xiv c 5, xvil 398, 403. [OFr.

(rare) chastiser.}

gladness, xvn 463. Chaunged his cher, v 101 ; ? altered the direction in which he faced, turned this way and that (cf. Sir Gaw., 711); but the

Chaud(e), adj. hot, vin a 306; (Fr. word indicating affectation of manners above labourers'
station.)

phrase elsewhere always refers to colour or expression of face.

[OFr. chiere, chere.]

Cherehe, Chirche, Churche, n.
church, Church,
I 3, ai, villa 12,50, 12, 63 (note), XI a 62, b 178, &c. [OE. cirice, circe.\

Chaumber, Chambre (xvn), n. room (usually a smaller private room or bedroom), n 100, 196,
584, xvil 129, 281 (set Cbes,

See Kirke.

and note), &c. [OFr. chambre.}

Cherche3erd,
66,

Chaunce, Chance,

n.

chance, forI

22, 25, tune, adventure, event, 28, 135, 221, v 331, vn 16 ;for
ch.

churchyard, I 3, 263; Cherche porche, church porch, i 77. [Prec. +
.

}at mayfalle, whatever may he cheuej fat happen, v 64 chaunce, he contrives that event,
;

brings

it

to

pass,

v 35; per

OE. gfard; OFr. porche.'} Cherles. See Chorle. Cheruelles, n. pi. chervils (a garden pot-herb), vin a 289. [OE. cerfille.-}

GLOSSARY
Ches, Chese (MS.
chefe),
.

in

GLOSSARY
aoi, ill 12, 24, ix 27, xn a 76, b 16 ; Cleped, Clept, //. n 49,

1x3,
52,

xn a 6,
1

&c.

in

7,

32.

Ycleped, II [OE. deopian.']
;

Clere, adj. clear, bright, glorious, fair, ii 269, 358, v 283, vil 107, 123, xvi 128, 389; free (from guilt), *xvi 356 (MS. clene) adv. clearly, VII77; Clerlych, adv. clearly, xni a 12. [OFr.
;

predic. adj.} close, near,vil 137. [OFr. ebfA Close, v. to close, enclose, IX 172, XI b 39 ; Yclosed, pp. xni a 24,40. [Fromprec.] See Enclose. Clot, clod, xv a 8 (see Clingge) ; Clottes, //. lumps, Xlila 5.
.

[OE.

dott.~\
.

Clop, villa
175,

a cloth,

xv/

8

;

cloth,

14;
I

der.-]

clothes,
.

Clerematyn,
ing')
flour,

(? lit.

'

fine

morn-

vin

&c., //. 165, 236, 11408, vn b 18, xi ^ 257, xni a

dopes,

appar. name of a fine or bread made from it,

[? OFr. cler mating Clerk(e), n. one in holy orders, ' ecclesiastic lay '), (opp. to

vili a 29$.

scholar,

writer,

n

9, &c. [OE. dap.'} 2. Cloped, //. clothed, [OE. (late) clafian.] ? mare-clothers Clope-merys, n.pl. reference to (1 contemptuous

vm

2,

vil

53,

vin*

56, 58, xi a 36, 59, 55, 177, xvi 283, &c.; Clerkus,//. vin b 65. [OE. cler(i)c; OFr.
.

blacksmiths as fashioning pieces of horse-armour; for similar

compound

see Brenwaterys),

xv

clerc.~]

h 21. [Free. + OE. mere.'] Cloude, w. 1 clod of earth under
;

Clete,

cleat,

shaped) noujt a
for,

piece
cl.

of

small (wedgeof wood jaf cared not a rap
;

doude, in the ground, xv 31. [OE. dud. mass of earth, or
rock.]

xiv

c 54.

OHG.
Cleue,
Clyff,
.

[OE.

*cleat;

cf.

cAlfff,

MDu.
V

cloot.~]

Cloud(e), Clowde, w. cloud, vn I0 7 '37> xii a 137. [Prob. same
a

v. to split,
cliff,

133.

[OE.
133.

as prec.]

deofan.~\

Clout, n. piece of cloth,
rock,

v

10,

n.

xv/8,

[OE.
v.

diit.']

[OE.

clif.-]

Cloute,

Clingge,

v. xv a 8 ; the dot him clingge t ma.y the earth of the grave to him (or waste him ; cf. cling alpaj oure corses in dottej dynge,

doule more it, xi b 200 go doute thi shone, go and cobble run away and your shoes, Yclouted, play ', xvil 353
to patch ; to, stick more on to
'

;

;

Yclongen, //. 857); withered, II 508. [OE. dingan, shrivel, shrink.] See Clengej. Clipte,/a. t. sg. clasped, xn b 62. [OE. dyppan.~] Cloise. See Clos.
. Cloistre, monastery, in introd., villa 141. [OFr. doislre.~]

Pearl

//. patched,

vin a

61.

[OE.

due tan.']

Clowe

;

clowe gylofres, cloves, ix

[OFr. dou (nail) degirofle
-

Clustre,
Cnistes.

.

bunch, IX 153,

160.

[OE. cluster^
See Knyght(e). Cnowe. See Knowe. Coc, Cok, cock, xii a 77, xv^.

Cloke, [OFr.

.

cloak,
t.pl.
;

vili a

265.

c/oyue.']

Clomben,/.

climbed,
;

v

10.

33.

[OE.

cocc.~\

[OE. dimban

pa.t. pi. ditnibon."]

Cloos, n. enclosure in doos, enclosed, ix 191. [OFr. dos.~\ Clos, Cloise (oi = o, cf. Coyll),
adj. closed secluded, forbidden, VII 179; close, vi 152 (man hit
;

Coffes, n.pl. mittens, gloves, villa 62. [Unknown ; cf. Prompt. PaT\.,'cufte, glove or meteyne'.]

Coyll, n.

lit. cabbage pottage, cabbage or vegetable soup, xvi I 389. [OE. cal; oy = o (see the
;

d.,

make

it

secure); adv. (or

rimes).]

See Koleplantes.

GLOSSARY
Coke,
v.

VIII b 13.
cocke,
.

to pnt hay into cocks, [From (obscure) ME.
;

gon,

hay-cock see N.E.D.] a labourer (at hayCoker,

making or harvest), vill b 13. [From prec. cf. Cath. Angl.,
; ' coker, autumnarius '.] Cokeres, pi. leggings, VIII a 62. [OE. cocor, quiver cf. Prompt.
.

came, xv^- 18 in him com . came (walking) in (cf. OE. com inn gdri), XV g 24; him com, in 19. Comen of, descended from, ii 29. [OE. cuman, com',
; .

;

OMMML] Coma(u)nde, Comawnde, Commaund, v. to command, I 105, villa 16, xi b 66, xv * i, xvi
341, xvn 118, &c. ; with to, to commend, v 343 ; ; to entrust, give, xi b 2 2 2. [OFr. cotnander^] Com(m)aundement,&c., n. commandment, iv b i$, xi b 63,

Parv.,

'

cocur, cothurnus

'.]

Coket, very fine flour next in grade to the finest (-was/ell), VIII a 299. [Pant's de coket
.

XI b 40

occurs in

1

4th

c.

legal Latin
this

;

connexion

between

and

AFr.

cokkette,

Anglo-L.

coketa,

cocket, seal of King's Customhouse, has been suggested, but not proved.] Cold(e), adj. cold, I 119, vil 115, &c.; Calde, iva 82. [OE.
cdld.-]

86, 226; gaf in comm., commanded, xvil 32. [OFr. comanSee Maundement. dctnentJ\

Comenci

(n), Comae (vin), v. to begin, vill a 34, 309 pres. subj. II 247 (note to 1. 57). [OFr. comencer.'] See Comes;

Cold(e), n. cold, I 163, 1x31, xv./ * 3 J or c lde of, to keep the cold from (see For, prep?), Villa 62. See [OE. cdld.'} Chelde. Col(e), n. live coal, iv a 13 ; coal,

sing.

f

Comendacion, w. Commendation
'

XV A 5. [OE. col, live coal.] Coloppes, n. pi. collops ', eggs fried on bacon, vin a 280. [See N.E.D., s.v. Collop, and Cock'

of Souls ', an oflfice for the dead (made a part of daily office) which originally ended with the prayer Tibi, Domine, commendamus, xi 132.

Comessing,

n.

beginning,

II

57.

See Comenci.

ney.']

Colour, n. colour, IX 34, xn a 55, &c. outward appearance, XI b
;

217.

[OFr. colour^

Com, Come(n),
come,
I

(x), v. to 80, 176, ii 137, V 4 3, 241, &c. ; Comest, 2 sg. wilt come, XV

Cum

X

45,
;

173,

xvn

Comford, &c. See Conforte, v. Comyng(e), n. coming, advent, xiio 35, xvi 315, 363, &c. horn comynge, homecoming, IX 285. See Com. Comyn(s). See Com, Comnn. Comly(ch), adj. fair, beautiful, v 343, xvn 71. [OE. cymlic,
;

influ. in

ME. by
.

assoc. with be-

g 5 Commys,
Cam, pa.
&c.

3 sg.

t. I 77, II 294, &c.; Com(e), I 32, II 91, III3, VIO?, VI 222, VII 83,
;

xvil 507 153, villa
;

cotnen.~\

Comlyng,
XI II b 45.

stranger, foreigner,

[OE. cuma +
See

'ling.]

Commys.
XIII b 12.

Com.
.

&c.),

pa. vi 214, 238,

t.

subj. (should come,

Commyxstion,

Vina

108,
;

intermingling, [L. commixtionem.\

x
i

29,

xv g
ii

30

;

Come(n), //.
;

161,

29, 181, ix 314, &c.

Comyn,
IV a 23
;

vil 40, 102

Conine,

Ycome(n), n
422, 478, 592. pron. in foret
:

Cumen, xiv
With

b 8, 87 ; 203, 319, 404,
dat. refl. com, forth

Comne. See Com. Comounly, adv. usually, IX 51 ; in common, ix 60. See Comun. Compayni, company, II 462
.

;

Company(e), vn

150, 1x312,

hym

&c.; Cumpany(e), x 147, &c. ; in cumpanye, in the society of

GLOSSARY
men,
I introd.,

ix 288.

[OFr.
;

Conig,

rabbit, conin, coning.]
.

XIV b

75.

[OFr.

Comparison, n. comparison

wij>-

oute comparison, xt b 237. [OFr. cotnparaison, -csonl\ Compelle, v. to compel, xifi 51,

Conne, ConneJ>, &c. 1
v.
.

See Can,

Connynge, intelligence, iv 56, 79. [From citnn-y old inlin.
stem of Can,
&. ]
1

xin b

1

8.

[OFr.

compeller.~]

Compilet, //. compiled, put together, VII 53. [OFr. compiler.] Comprehended, pa. t. sg. comprised, embraced, ix 300.

Conquerour,
92.

w. conqueror,

xiv

c

[OFr. conquerour?\
the (Norman) ConXIII b 32. [OFr. con.

Conquest,
quest,
questel\

[L.

comprehendere.~\

Compunccion,
1

w. repentance, xi b

Consaile

(-sale, -seyl, -seille),

[OFr. compunction^ Comse. See Comenci.

80.

Counsail(le), (-sayle, -sayll),
n. counsel, deliberation, advice,
II 179, vni a 309, x 1 5, xiv b 40, 43, xvi 114, 163, xvn 157 ; iv b 56, 57, 61 prudence, a 312, IX 296, 298. council, [OFr. conseil,c(o}nseil, counsel,

Comun(e), adj. common
XI v^ 67; as
sb.,

(people),

the
;

nity, VIII b 20, 79

commuComunes,

the common pi. the Commons (as an estate of the realm), xiv b 67, c 73 ; lay men.xi a 39, 59. [OFr. coniun and direct from L. com-

Comyns,
;

vm

;

people

council.]

;

munis.~\ Con (en),

See Can, .' Cone}. and z/. 2 conConcyens, Conscience,
.

a 14 ; Couseille, to advise, Counsell, imper. sg. XVII 472. [OFr. conseillier.'] Consente, v. to agree ; consented to o wyl, was agreed, I 49. [OFr.
consent ir.~\

vm

b 87, &c. ; science, iv b 15, (personified) VIII b 6, &c. [OFr.
conscience.]

vm

Condicioun,
xii a
1

20.

Confederat,

quality, [OFr. condidon.~\ adj. allied, XIII b 5.

n. nature,

Consider, v. to reflect, xvn 291. [OFr. considercr^\ b 56, Constreyne, v. to force, xi b 248. [OFr. constreign-, stem of constreindre.'} Construction, construing,

vm

.

[L. con-fctderatus.~} Confesse, v. to confess, xi b 143 ; confessed dene, made clean by confession, v 323. [OFr. confesser.~\

xin

b 28.

[L. constructionem
v.

;

see next.]

Constru(w)e,

to

construe,

Conforme, self), make

v. (;r/7.),to suit

(one-

(oneself)
.

suitable,

interpret, xin b 18, 34; pres. subj. pi. in jif je c. wel pis clause, if you see the point of what I say, xiv c u. [L. construere.']

a 184. [OFr. conformer.~\ Confort, Coumforde, support,
b comfort, consolation, vi 9, 79, xu a 151. [OFr. con-, ctinfort.-}

xu

vm

Conteyne,
XIII a 20.

v. to contain, ix 337,

[OFr. contenir, conteign-, stem of subj.]

Conforte, Com-,

v. to comfort, a succour, support, IV a 15, 214; Comford, pa. t. pi. vil 173. [OFr. conforter.~\ Confusyun, n. putting to shame,

vm

Contemplacio(u)n, Contemplacyone, contemplation (of God), iv b 51, xi b u, 308.
.

[OFr. conteiplacion.~\

Contemplatyf,

-if, adj. contemplative, devoted to prayer and

I

203.

[OFr. confusion.~\
v.

Congele,

to

congeal, ix

64.

a contemplation of God, 245, xi b 1,8, &c. [OFr. conteiiiplatif.]

vm

[OFr. congeler.]

GLOSSARY
Continue,
40,
v. to persevere,

vm b

Cortaysye,

Cortayse",

Cour-

[OFr. continuer.~] adj. continual, IX 32. [OFr. continued} Contray (xi n), Centre, -ee,-ey, (IX), Countr6 (xvn), Cuntray

no.

Contynuell,

taysye, n. courtesy, grace, vi 72, 84, 96, 109, 121 (of cortaysye
prob.
tayse, adj.)

only equivalent to cor; of courtaysye, by

(ii), Cuntr6 (i), Cuntrey (xi), w. country, land, region, I 253, ii 351, ix 4, 9, 26, 134, 138,

cortaysye, &c. vi 97, 108,

by especial
1

20.

[OFr.

favour, cor-

teisie, curteisie.']

xla

41, 63, xvii 487 (see Sere), &c., as adj. in conlray hugage, language of the land, xin b 13. [OFr. conlre'e, c(p)un35i
tre'e.~]

xin a

Cortaysly, Curteisly, -lich, adv. a 34, courteously, vi 21,

vm

157.

See Cortays.
.

//. kisses, v Cossej, Cosses, 283,292. [OE.coss.] SeeKy&se. 1 Cost, Costes, border, ix 192
. ;

Contrarie

(to), adj.

opposed

(to),

//. coasts, regions,
.

vu

83, 146.

xi b 54. [OFr. contra.} Contrefetes, //. imitations, ix 117. [OFr. contrefet, pp., made See Counterfete, v. like.]
.

[OFr. coste.] 2 Cost, expenditure, cost, xi b 169 ;? means (to meet expense), XI 141. [OFr. cost.']

Cop, M. top, xin (745. [OE.o?//.] Cope, n. long cloak, xn a 53 esp. the out-door cloak of an a 182. [OE. ecclesiastic, *cape, from MecLL. capal\ Cope, v. to provide with copes ', villa 141. [From prec.] Copuls, 3 sg. pres. links, iv a 1 2 Coppled, //. linked (in rime), Introduction xv; see Kowe.
;

vm

Costen (j), v. to expend (on), xi b 234. [OFr. coster.~\ Costes, n.pl. manners, disposition,

v 292. [OE. ON. kost-r.~\
Costy,
ailj.

(Nth.) cost from
234.

'

costly, XI b 228,
2
.

[From Cost,

]

;

1 Cote, n. cot, mean dwelling, II b 2. 489, [OE. cot.} 2 Cote, coat; here a tunic (</.

vm
.

[OFr.

copier..]
.

See Couple,

.

Corage,
gallantry,

heart,

xn a

ii

;

'waistcoat') worn beneath the outer gown, xvii 262. [OFr.
cote.}
. Goth, pestilence, xvii 417. [OE. cafu.-] Cou, Cow, n. cow, in 49, 52, 54, villa 282; //. Ken, in 56; Kyjn, ix 256; Kyn(e), vnia 134, b 1 8. [OE. cu\ pi. cy (Kt.

XIV c

108.

[OFr.

yap.j

Corde,

.

cord, xil
;

53, 60, &c.
into on, agree

[OFr. corde^ Corde(n), v. cordcn
together,

xv
.

t

6.

[Shortened

from Acorde,

^z'.]

cormorant, n 310. [OFr. cormoranl\ Coround(e), pa. t. crowned, vi 55.' PP- n 593. vi I2 [OFr. See Crouned(e). corouner.~} Coroune}, //. crowns, vi 91. [OFr. coroutie.~] See Croun(e). Corsed(est). See Curse. shrine of a saint, Corseynt,

Cormeraut,

*ce).-\

Couaytyng,

Coueytynge,
;

n.

-

coveting, ix 90 object of coveting (cf. louyng, &o.), IV a 23.

.

[From OFr. coveit(i)er.~\ Couaytise (in), Coueitise (xi), Couetyse, (v), Coueteis(xvn),
n. covetousness, avarice, ill 22, V 306, 312, xi b 55, 256, xvii
52.

.

I

239.

[OFr. cars saint, holy

[OFr.
.

coveitise.}

body.] Cortays(e), Curteys (n), adj. gracious, II 28, vi 73; as sl>., [OFr. gracious lady, v 343. See Kort. corteis, curteis.~\

Couche,
couche.}

bed,

xn a

89.

[OFr.

Coude. See Can, v. Coueyne, n. band (of conspirators),
I

41.

[OFr.

cov(a}ine.~}

GLOSSARY
Coueitous.rt^'. covetous, XI b 196.

GLOSSARY
Crie(n), Crye(n), Cry, to
cry

GLOSSARY
this dai, (for) this day, vni a 274; but an oath at xva 24,
;

XVII 386 ; on a day, one day, n 303 ]>is othir daye, the other day, XVI 148; J>is endre dai, a day or two ago (see Endre), xv a 4. [OE. dseg.}

Date, n. date, used in VI in various senses, some strained point of
;

time, hour, vi 169, 181 ; season, 144 (see Dere), 145 ; limit (beginning or end), 133, 156, *57 J 68, 180; to dere a date,
1

too soon,

1

32

(cf.

126). [OFr.
I

Dayesejes, n, pi. daisies, \\ b 4. [OE. dmges tage.} Dalf; Dalt. See Delnen Delen. Dam(e :, n. dame, lady, queen, II 63, 113, 322, villa 72, xvii 298, &c. ; mother, villa 73, XVII
;

date.']

Daunce, Dance,
dance, daunce.~\

n. dance,

134,

"7 \fa Plight, xiv b 73.
Daunce, Daunse,
I 21,

[OFr.

72, 87,

ii
.

324. [OFr. dame.'] Daraisel, Damysel(le), n. damsel
(esp.
ii

Daunsynge,
139.

v. to dance, 298, xvo* 6; dancing, XI b

[OFr.
n.

dancer."]
fool,

young

90,

lady-in-waiting), 144, VI I, 129. [OFr.

Daw,
247.

(jackdaw),

xvii

damisele.']

Dampne,

v. to damn, condemn, XI b 197, 306 Dampnet, pa. t. pi. VII 50; Darupned,//. XVI 272 ; as sb. xvi 377. [OFr.
;

*dawe.~] Dawing, Dawyng, n. daybreak, first signs of dawn, IV a 94, X 42.

[OE.

[OE. dagung.] De. See Deye.

dam(p}ner.~]

Deaw, Dew, n. pi. dew, IX 59, XV b 28, &c.; May dew, dew
gathered in May (believed to have medicinal and magical properties) ix 63. [OE. dfaw.]
,

Dan(e), Dan^, Master, Dom, an
honourable
orders,
I

title esp.

names of members of
introd.,

prefixed to religious Ill introd.
t
;

[OFr.

Dan

(nom.

Danz Dans}

Debate, n. parleying, wrangling, v 1 80, xvi 142 ivythouten
;

Danes,

L. Dom(i}mts.~] n. pi. Danes, Dani. [Med. L.
Danir).~]

debate, putting aside contention,

xm<J
(cf.

13.

vi 30.

ON.

Debate, v. to contend, xn3 225; Debatande, pres. p. debating,

[OFr. debat.]

Dang.

See Dynge(n).
;

vni.

[OFr.
v.

Dar, v. dare, I sg. pres. II 336, villa 263, &c. 3 sg. IX 88, XVI &c. ; Dare, pres. pi. 145 ; Dore(n), xi b 36, 199 Dorst(e),/a. /. sg. dared, xii b Durst, n 140, 109, xiv c 21
; ;

Declare,
clarer.']

to

debat-re.~] set out, declare,

VII 77, XII b

210.

[OFr. de;

Declyne,
ment

v. (to decline), fall

con

d. into acorde,
(cf.

^2; pi. n 73, 84, x 130; Durst, pa. t. subj. (would) dare, XVII 479. [OE. dearr, durron ;
427,
dorste.~]

came to an agreeME.//// at (or of)
149.

accorde),
cliner.~\

VI

[OFr. de~

Ded(e), adj. dead, i 195, 209, n 1 08, &c. used as pp. of slay ',
'
;

Dare,
pa.

v. to
t.

sg.

cower, V 190 ; ? Dard, VI 249 (see note). [OE.

dumbfounded, xvii 314. [OE. *dasian; d.darian, and ON. dasa-sk.~] Dastard, n. wretch, vile fellow, xvi 1 80, 203. [Perhaps formed with Fr. suffix -ard from dased,
Dase,
dast, pp. of prec.]

darian.~\ v. to be

xvi 148; was broght dede, was brought to death, died, i 213. [OE. dead.~\ See next, and DcJ). 1 Ded(e), n. death, I 212, iva 48, b 71, x 51, 77, 118, xvi 317,
VII 92,
193, 543. [A variant, usually Northern, of De}>, q.v.] w. 2 deed, act, feat, event, Ded(e),
III

xvn

45, vil 38, 88, ix 312, xi b

GLOSSARY
255, xvi 24, &c. ; as obj. to do, 79, 9, xiia in ; beway of acting, iva 62, XI 62 ; Dedis ofApostlis, Acts of the Apostles, XI b 285 ; in dede, in the actual performance, vil 23, xvi 72 ; to fre of dede, too lavish in its action, vi 121 ;
I

\mb

t.sg.

haviour,

do

1215; Dy3ede,xivc 106; Deyden, pa. t. pi. \\\\b 41 deye,garre dye, kill, vin
; . .
. .

a 269, xvi 164. [ON. deyja.] Deill, Deyll. See Dele, .

Deyned,/a.
303.
n.

/.

//. deigned,

vin a
254.

[OFr. deigner.]

and

in dede andpojte, in performance intention, vi 164. [O E. <//.]
n.

Deynte", delicacy, [OFr. deinte]

n

Bed-day,
inlrod.

death-day,

vm

Delaiement,

.

delay, XII b 152.
.

[OE. deaf-dag; see Dede

(death), but here assimilation of

dd is possible.] Ded(e), Deden, v. See Don.
)>d to

Dedir,
[Cf.

v. to

tremble,
dither.]

xvn

314.

MnE.

Dedly, adj. mortal, XI b 208, 209, 211. [OE. de Defaced, //. effaced, erased, in
36. [OFr. de(s)facier, defacer.~\ Defaute, n. defect, xia 43, 44, 57 ; lack, in for defaute of, for lack of, VIII a 200, XI b 250.

[OFr. delaiement] Dele, Deill, DeyU, part, quantity, in a grete dele, a great deal, xvil 450; ich a deyll, all, XVII 299 ylk a dele, ilke deill, altogether, IV a 27, X 75. [OE. d&l] .& Eueiydel, Halvendel, Somdel, &c.
;

Dele(n), v. to divide, distribute, deal, mete out, perform, v 124, 217, vi 246, vnia 91, xi ^ 270,
272; Dalt, pa. t. sg. v 350; Deled,//, xin b 49 dele with, have to do with, xvi 63 with
;

;

[OFr. defaute]

Defence, Defens

(of), n. defence

cognate obj. dele penny doyll, XVII 390 (see Doyll) delen ato,
;

(against), IX 332, X 64, 135 ; of noble defetis, nobly fortified, II

part

(intr.\

II

125.

[OE.

[OFr. defense.] Defend(e), v. to defend, v 49, villa 82, X 52, &c. ; to make
48.

dxlan.] Dele. See Deuel.
Delit(e), Delyte, n. delight, IV b 39, XII a 88, xvi 63 ; delytes of, delight in, IV b 62. [OFr. delit]
Delitabill, adj. delightful,

make dedefence, X 61, 191 fence against, ward off, vil 85 Defending, n. defence, x 194.
;

;

X /-

[OFr. defend-re] Defensouris, n. pi. defenders, X 153. [OFr. defensour] Deffle, v. to defy, xvi 158. [OFr.
de(s}fier.]

trod. [OFr. delitable] Delytte, v. in delyttes paym (in), 3//. refi., take delight (in), iv b

Degiselich, adj. strange, wonderful, II

42. [OFr. delit(i)er] Deliuer, adj. nimble, v 275; Deliuerly, adv. nimbly, quickly, X 58, 89. [OFr. de(s]livre. ]

360.

[From OFr.
See Gisely.

de(s}-

guis(i)f.]

Degrade (rime-form
degraded, degrader]

of), pa.t.sg.

Deliverance, n. deliverance, Xll 1 7. [OFr. delivrance] Deluen, v. to dig to bury vin a
; ;

XVII
.

20.

[OFr.

Degr6, Degree,
VIII b 71, XVII

position, rank, 21, 489; state

1 35 Dalf,/to. t. sg. XI v introd. Doluen, pa. t. pi. villa 184; Doluen,//. (dead and) buried,
;
;

[OFr. (of preparedness), X 40. degre.] Deye (vin), De (x), Dye(n), v. to die, II 189, vin a 269, 325, ix 150, x 73, &c. ; Deye,/;w. subj. vin a 92, 114; Deyd,/a.

Vlii a 1 73. [OE. delfan.] Delueres, n. pi. diggers, vin a 10 1. [OE. delfere.] Deluynge, n. digguig, villa 244.

[OE.

delfing.]
v. to judge, sen-

Deme, Dieme,

tence, XII b 216,

xvi 34

;

criti-

GLOSSARY
cize, vili

a 75

;

consider, deem,

Dere, v to
.

afflict,

xiv b

10.

[OE.

XI b

190,

209,

211

;

ne deme
speak,

derian.~\

See prec.
;

thow non
different,

other, imagine nothing

Vili a

173;

Dere, adv. dearly, at great cost, iv a 80, vin a 75, xvn 373 a*

115 (note), VI i; with cognate obj. domes for te deme,
say, to tell their tales,

V

me
VIII

dere liketh, to my liking, a 286. [OE. deore.']
adj.

xv b

30.

[OE.

Derffe,

doughty,

deman^\

[ON.

djarf-r,

VII 84. older, *deatf-.] VII
167.

Den,

cave, xillo 41, 42, 43. [OE. denn.] Den. See Dynne.
.

See Deruely. Derke, n. darkness,

Dene},

Dene) ax, an axe with a long blade and usually
adj.

Danish

;

[OE. de(o)rc, adj.] See perk. Derlyng, n. darling, iv a 54. [OE.
deor-ling.]

without a spike at the back, v 155 (note). [OE. denisc ; OFr.
daneis.~\

Derne,

adj. secret,

XV b

29 (note).

[OE. deme.]
See Dere, adj. Derthe, . dearth, famine (personified), via a 324. [OE. deorfoi] See Dere adj. Deruely, adv. boldly, V 266. [ON. djatf-Kga.] See Derffe.

Derrist.

Deop.

See Dep. Deores, n. pi. wild animals, xv b 29. [OE. dear.] Departed(e), Depertid, pa. t.
separated,

VI
;

18

(intr.),
i.

vn

145 (trans.}
de(s)partir.]

departed, IX 308,

320; //. divided, IX

[OFr.

seat, throne, xvii Des, [OFr. deis\ see N.E.D.,
.

17.
s.v.

Dais.]
adj. deep,

Dep(e),
xil b
so.,

Deop (xm),

1 1, xin a 39, xvi 377 ; as the deep (sea), vn 154, xn a 1 60 ; adv. deeply, vi 46. [OE. adv. deope.] deop Depely, adv. deeply, greatly, vn
;

Des-, Dis-avauntage, advantage, xui 35, 37.
desavantage.]

.

dis-

[OFr.

114. [OE. deop-ttce.] Depertid. See Departed. Depnes, n. depth, XVI I 434, 460, 520. [OE. deop-nes.] Depriue, -pryue, v. to deprive, VI 89, XVI 175. [OFr. depriver.] Dere, adj. dear; prized, I 258; beloved, I 125, VI 8, villa 91, xiv c i, xv/ i, xvn 172, 190,

n. descant, XI b 137 (note). [OFr. deschant.] Desert, adj. uncultivated and desolate, IX 200; n. desert, uninhabited land, IX 179, XI* 24.

Deschaunt,

[OFr.

desert.]
v. to deserve, vili a to earn, VIII a- an,

Deserue(n),
43> b 32 b 43, 47.
Serue(n).
;

[OFr. deservir.]

See

Desyre,

n. desire, IV

a

5,

XI b 295.

419, 527;

my

dere,

my

friend,

villa 251; pleasing, VI 40; good, &c. (vaguely applied in allit poems), vi 132, 144, vn
; Derrist, super!, best, vii [OE. deore ; d?orra, corn39. par, (whence also stem of ME. superl.).] Dere, . harm, I 166, xvn 317 ; maken J>e worlde dere, do injury to mankind (? or ' make the ' world dear to live in ; but cf,

61

[OFr. desir.] See Dissiret. Desplaid, //. unfurled, II 294. [OFr. despleier.] Desport, n. amusement, IX 276; do desport, play, make merry, xn a 174. \Qifi.ekspfrt.] Desserte, n. deserts, merit, vi 235. [OFr. desserte]

Desspendoure,
moner,
doiir.]
ill

n.

steward,

al-

21.

[OFr. despen;

See Spendere.

Destine", n.

166), Vina 154. [OE. influenced by derian.~\

daw,

fate, V 217 Fate, villa 269. [OFr. destinee] Destresse, n. distress, II 514. [OFr. destresse]

3

GLOSSARY
Dot,
//.
.

debt, xvii 222; Dettes,
dette.~]

Dye(n).

vin a 92. [OFr. Determynable, adj.
authoritative,
determinable.']

Diemed.
v.

See Deye. See Deme.

decisive,

VI 234.

[OFr.

Diete, refl. to diet (oneself). villa 263. [From OFr. diete, n.]

Determination,
XI b decision, determ inacion , ]
DeJ>, v.

n. authoritative

263.

[OFr.

See Don.

Dep(e), Deth, n. death, n 332, v 37. vii 9, vin a 324 (the Plague), &c. [OE. d^.\ See Ded(e), adj. and w. Deuel(l), Deuelle, Deuyl(l),

Diffynen, /;*. //. determine, fix, IX 315. [OFr. defitir.~] Digge, Dyggen, v. to dig, II 255, IX 231 Digged, pa. t. pi. V 1 1 a I o r . [? OFr. diguer; see
;
1

N.E.D.~]

Dyggynge,
Dignyt6,
dignete.~\

n. digging, ix 201. n. dignity; of dignyte,

worshipful,

xvii

166.

[OFr.

Dele

devil, Devil, iv b (v), 20, 26, v 120, vnia 56, 114,
.

Dy;ede.
v. to
1

See Deye.
arrange, prepare,
I S5.

xi b 105, xv h i6,xvi 341, 399, &c. what deuel, what the devil,
;

Dijte, Dighte, Dyjte, Dyghte,

make,
dijte,

3> v

vnia 286;
xiv

xvi 223.

[OE.
;

di'ofol.']

Deuelway
s.v.

in]>c d., in the Devil's

arrayed battle, 34 ; dyght to dede, put to death, XVil
543. [OE. dihtan.] Diken, Dyken, v. to dig, VIII a !35> J 84. [OE. dfcian.] Dyker, n. digger, Diker(e), ditcher, villa 101, 325. [OE.

for

b

name, xvi 133. [See N.E.D., Devil 19.] Deuere, duty, xvii 319. [OFr.
.

deveir^

Devyded

(in), pp. divided (into),

IX 28. [L. dlvidere^ Deuise, -yse, Devise, v. to desto describe, relate, cry, II 312 1x267,268,371. [OFr. deviser
; ;

difere.] Dykynge, digging, ditching,
244.
191.

villa

[OE.

dieting.']

Diligently, adv. watchfully,

IX

see N.E.D., s.v. Devise.] Deuocio(un), Deuocyun,

[From OFr.

diligent.']

.

de-

Dim,

votion, devoutness, pious practice, I 18, v 124, xi b no, 120, XII a 14, &c. [OFr. devotion.}

adj. faint, II 285 ; Dimme, adv. faintly, b 31. [OE.

xn

dimm. ]

Dymes,
Dimuir,

n. pi.

tithes,

xi b 300.

Deuote,
VI 46,
dcvot.]

Deuout,
XI b
58,

adj.

devout,

&c.

[OFr.

[OFr. di(s}me, from L. decima \ xiv c 37. adj. calm, [OFr. *detneur, in demeuremcnt.
soberly.] v. trans, to eat (at dinner), VIII a 303 2 sg.pres. subj. villa
;

Deuoutnes, n. devoutness, Xiv c 79. [From prec.] Dew, Dewly, See Du, Duly. Dyaene, n. deacon, in 9, 12; Diaknen, dat.pl., in 5. [OE.
diacon,

Dyne,
2 57

;

dinner,

Dyned, //. intr. had VIII a 274. [OFr.
n.

OFr.

diacne.~]

See
dia-

di(s}ner.~\

Archidekenes.

Dyner,
n.

dinner,

VIII a

286.

Dyamand, Dyamaund,
mond, ix
;

diamant, mant see Ademand.] Diche, Dyche, n. moat, dike,

33, 36, &c. [OFr. altered form of ade-

n

[OFr. dinner.] Dynge(n), v. to strike, smite, beat, V 37 (MS. dynnej), vin a 135, xvi 1 80, 203 Dang, pa. t. pi. X 54. [OE. *dingan ; cf. dencgan,
;

361, vi 247; notion in VI appar. releasing of water pent up by a

dam.

[OE.

die.]

ON. dengfa.'} Dynne, n. noise, xvi Den, XV h 2. [OE.
Dynt,
n. stroke, blow,

234, 284
dyne.']

;

Dyd, Dide(n).

See Do(n).

v

48, 155,

GLOSSARY
196, XV h 2 dynt of honde, a blow (with a weapon), v 37, VII 92. [OE. dynt.'}
;

Dysturble,

v.

to

disturb, I

16.

Diol.

See Dole. Dirige, w. (dirge), matins in the office for the dead, vin b 48, XI b 132 (note). [L. dirige.} Disceit, deception, wile, xi b
.

171, 311. [OFr. deceitt.~\ Disoeyue(n), v. to deceive, 1x112, xi b 92. [OFr. deceiv-re,
decev-eir.~]

[OFr. destorirbler.'} Ditees, n. pi. poems, xn introd. [OFr. </i#.] Diuers(e), Dyuers(e), adj. varying, divergent, Xin3 44; different, various, ix 16, 287, 289, XII a 55, &c. ; dyners maner(e}, different kinds of, XIII b 47, 48 ; ich matter diners animal, every kind of different animal, n 364.
[OFr. divers.'} Dyuersitees, -eei}, n.pl. (strange) varieties, ix 266, 280. [OFr.
diversite.}

Discende, pa.
77.

t.

descended, xvi

[OFr. descend-re,~] Disciple, n. disciple, XI b 15, XII introd. [OFr. disciple.} Discord, n. discord without dis;

Do(n), Doo,

cord, in peace (or incontestably
cf.

;

Distance),

xvn

31.
?

[OFr.

discord.'}

Discrecyone
(from), iv b cretion^

(of), n.

separation
dis-

69.

[OFr.

v. I 219, IV b 65, ix 169, &c. to do ; to done (OE. to donne), villa 104, 197, IX 160; 2 sg. Dos, xvn 196; Doste, vin a 75 ; Dot}, vi 196 ; 3 sg. De]> (OE. dep\ in 60 Dose, iv a 57, &c. ; Dot}, v
;

143;

Do)>,
;

n

112,

&c.

;

//.
;

Discre(e)t, adj. judicious, discerning, vni b 88, ix 295. [OFr.
discret^\

Don(e), II 2, vino 220, &c. Dos, I 157 Do]) (MS. doh), *xv b 22 imper. pi. Dot}, vi
;

Disour(e)s,
vili a 56.

n. pi. professional story-tellers, jesters, I introd.,

[OFr.

disour.~}

Dispisen, v. to despise, xi3 93, 179. [OFr. despire, despis-.} Dysplesej, Displeases, v. 3 sg. pres. displeases, vi 95, xvn 85 imper. pi. (intr.} be dis;

&c.; //. Dedefn), n 32, xvz 13; Diden, xi b 247. Pres. p. Doande, IV b 9 ; //. Do, XI b &c. ; 271, xila 107,

161, 176; Dop, I 82, II 218. Pa. t. sg. Ded(e), I 176, II 232, Hi 17, &c. Dyd, I 166, &c. Did(e),xi 13, xvnii (isg.),
;

;

pleased, vi 62.
>.]

[OFr. desplais27.

Dysseuer,

v.

depart, XVII
t.

Doyne, xvn 139; Don(e), ix Ydo, n 326, xiva 24, &c. 381 Ydone, 11 76. (i) To act,
; ;

[OFr. dessevrer.}
Dissiret, pa.
desired, VII 114.

[OFr. desirer.} See Desyre. Disstrye}. See Distroie. Distance, quarrelling -without distance, indisputably, xvil 57. [OFr. destance.-}
.

do, make, perform, work, II 32, ill 17, ivb 9, 25, vi 161, xiv^38, &c.; to exert, xi b 6 ; representing any verb understood, I 157, II
is

;

112, &c. ; be to done, es to doo, to be done, IV b 65, vin a 197 ; dob at, act according to,

Distreynen,

v. to afflict,

ix 315.

I

[OFr. destreindre, destreign-.} Distroie, -oy(e), Destroye, v. to destroy, vn 28, ix 2 15, xi b 215,

82 ; don gret pyne, toil hard, VI 151 ; don himfelaschipe, bear
;

93; Disstryej, pres. pi. v So?. [OFr. destrui-re with disstrye) cf. Byled, Nye.] Distroiynge, n. destruction, XI b
;

xvn

get on as best you can, n made hymself to done, set himself to work, vili a 104. (ii) To make, cause to, III 60, vi
best, 1 26 ;

him company, XII a 24 do} jour do pi best, do your best, n 218
;

loo.

[From

prec.]

196

;

ded come, fetched,

I

176;

GLOSSARY
do deye,
kill,

me

drede,

vin a 269 dot) makes me afraid, v
;

grief, misery, II 198, xiv b 10, xvi 347.
doel, deal, dial,

vni a
[OFr.

114,
dot,

do(n) to tvyte, to vnderstande, give (one) to understand, a 56 ; followed inform, II 3, by infin. (without expressed as did it wryte, had it snbj.,

143;

vm

&c.] Dol(e)ful, adj. doleful, xiv b 72, xvAi6. [Free. + ->/.] Doluen. See Delucn.

Dome,

I introd., 218, Vina 79 (note), and (merging into mere auxil. as in Mn.E.) i 167, xvi 203,

written),

xvn 326, &c. (cf.
put,
I

Gar),

(iii)

To

judgement, XVI 319 173; award, VI 220; domes for te deme, to converse, xv b 30 (see Deme). [OE. domf\
n.
;

doom,

I

Domesday (e),

Domysday,

.

219, VI 6 ; dede on (upon), n 343, xil a 53 ; don awei, set aside, abolished, XI b 206. (iv) Refl. in dede him out,

donned,

48, Doomsday, iva 35, xi xvii 25. [OE. domes daeg.~] n. dung, manure, VIII a Donge,
283. [OE. dung.-} "Dovfoefy, pres.pl. moisten,
;
.

went

out, 232, 474. (v) Pp. finished, I 68, 139 ; at an

n

xv3

28.

xvn

end, xiv a 24;

past, over,

n

76,

[Unknown cf. Mn.E. dank.] door, XII a Dore, Doore (xvn),
[OE. 70, XVII 137, 280, 376. duru dor.~\ Dore(n), Derate. See Dar. Dosnyt,//. dazed, stunned, X 129.
;

VII 167, XVII 148 ; haue done, (get it done), be quick, xvn 316, 352, 480. / haue at do, I have something to do, xvn 235 (see At) ; do way !, enough !, II 226.

[OK dm;
.

dyde (dede, dw.ie),

Dote,
[]

[Obscure.] n. dotard, fool, XVII 265.

pa. t.; see Morsbach, ME. Gram., See Vndo. 130, 6.]

From

next.]

Docke,
57.

v. to curtail, mutilate,

XI a

[Obscure.]
.

Doctours, Church),
doctour."]

//. doctors (of the xi a 27. [OFr.

Dojty, Doughty, Douhti,
doughty, 106; as
dohtig.-]

v

196,

vn

adj.

XVII 367. ? OFr. redoter.~] Dot3, Dop. See Do(n). Doubill, Double, adj. double, X introd., xna 162. [OFr. double^ Doufe ; Doujter ; Douhti. See

Dote,

v. to talk folly,

[Cf. MDu. doten ;

sb.,

v

84, 266.

xivr
[OE.

Dowue; Dojtyr;

Dojty.
b 175.

Doumbe,
Doun, [ON.
I

adj.

dumb, XI

[OE. dumb.']
n.

Dojtyr, Doghter, -yr, Doujter (vm), Dowhter (xn), n. daughter, I 44, 47, 215, villa 14,73, Xlla 192, &c. Doghtyr, gen. sg. I 1 36 [OE. dol:tor.~]
;
;

down

(feathers), XII a 95.

<-.]
194,

Doun(e), Down(e), adv. down,
76,

n

69,

X

101, &c.
28.

See Adoun.

Doyne.
Doyll,

See Do(n).

Dounes, n.pl. hills, xv b
dun.']

[OE.
69.

n. dole, what is distributed in charity ; fenny doyll, masspenny, the offering for a mass for the soul of one dead, xvi I 390:

Dousour,

n.

sweetness,

vi

[OE.

Doynge,

See Dele(n). (ge-}ddir\ n.; d. awaye of, putting
;

[OFr. dousur.'] Dout(e), n. fear, I 147, XII a 144, xiv a 14 (fear of) danger, X 38,
;

[OFr.

dmite.']

away, IV b 61 doyngis, XI b 290. [OE. doling.]

affairs,

Doute, v.

to fear,

vn

114; Dutte,

Bold,

xvn 266. stupid, [ Related (as dulled to dull} to
adj.

pa. t.sg. V 189. [OFr. douterf] Dowhter. See Dojtyr. Dowid, //. endowed, XI b 140.

OE.

dol.~]

See Dull.

[OFr.

do(u)er.~\

Dole, Diol (n), n. lamentation,

Dowue, Dowfe, Doufe,

n. dove,

GLOSSARY
xvi 78, xvii 484, 505, 514. [OE. ? *dufe ON. </>.] Drad, Dradde. See Drede(n). Dragounes, n. pi. dragons, IX
;

afraid,

XI a 61, XilJ 67, 108

203. [OFr. drag-on."] Dray(e), n. commotion, XIV b xvi 146. [OFr. de(s)rai.']

(dradde him unto, was afraid of). Dradde, pa. t. xn<5 67, 108; Dredde, i 145, xiv c 30, 62 Drad,//. xiv c 19. [OE. (on);

34,

Draught,

n. (a move in chess), an artful trick, XVI 399 (see Drawe).

[OE. *drxht, related to next.] Draw(e), v. trans, to draw, drag,
&c.,iv 19, ix 124, xin a 33, xvi 319; to villa 283; intr. move, proceed, &c., xvii, 245 ; Drogh, pa. t. sg. xv a 1 2 Drou, xv g 16 ; Drouh, Drowh, xil a
pnll, bring,

dredan, -dr%dan.~] See Adrad. Dredles, Dreid(les), adj. fearless, V 266; (parenthetic) without doubt, x 88. [From Drede, .] Dreed, pp. endured, xvii 533. [OE. dreogan, str. v.]

Dregh, Dre}, adj. heavy
iv a 12
;

;

tedious,

x

82,

cart,

V

195.

adv. heavily, forcibly, [ON. drjug-r, older

*dreog-C\

;

Dreie.

See Druyse.

J 55>
t.

b 73. I2 4!

Droghe, pa.
;

pi.

vn

88; Drew, x 58;
XII b 90,

xnia 35 Drawyn, x 124; Ydrawe, n
Drawe,//.
295.

Dreynte, pa. t. drowned (intr.), xil a 135 ; Dreinte, //. xn a 167. [OE. drencan, drencte.~] Dreme, noise, \v A 16. [OE.
.

dream."]

thou citest, XVI 279 no draught, make
against ns, play (a chess metaphor
droti
;

ftou drawes to wittenesse, drawe vs ;

us

no move no trick
Chaucer,

Dremys, n. pi. dreams, XI b 73. [ON. draum-r, appar. identified in form with OE. dream, noise,
music ; see prec.] Drepit, //. smitten, vii
9.

cf.

[OE.

Bk. Duchesse, 682), xvi 399;
hymselue bi J>e top, tore his 16 drawe to, toward, hair, XV approach, ~x.nl> 124, xili a 57 draweth (to) colottr lyke, ap; ;

drepan] Dresse, Dres,

to ; arrange, ordain, vi 135 ; to set (up), X 1 6 ; / -will dres me to, I will get ready to, xvii 238.
v.

(to direct)

proaches the colour
(note)
;

of,

ix 34

[OFr. dresser.]
Drife, Dryfe.
See Dryue.

drawe

resemble,
dragan.~]
.

xin

after, take after, b 6. [OE.

Dry5tyn,
dry/iten.']

.

God, V

70.

[OE.
.

See Vp-, With-drawe. Draw-brig, drawbridge, x 165. See [Free. + ON. bryggja]

Drink,
drink,

Drynk(e),

Dryng,

Brygge.

and
(infill), n.

14, 15; esp. in te drink, &c., see

xv*

mete
;

M

//.

Drawynge
iv* 63. Drede, n.
doubt
(ff.

coming (to),

potions,
next.]

vni a

269.

[From

fear, I 147, 211, &c. ; Dredles), in I puit jou
d., I

Drynke(n),
&c.
;

,

assure you, xiv c 1 2 ; ensample and drede a fearful caution against, ajens, I 261 for drede, in fear, V 190,
;

holly out of

v. to drink, ix 6. 256, drink strong drink, via a *tf\fig> P-iy the penalty, pay for it, XVII 380 (or drown ; but
cf.

N.E.D.,

s.v.

Drink

16)

;

Drank, pa.
ken,//.
get drunk, vill a 274.

xvii
fear

212; in spite of their (of me), XVI 146. [From
.

t. pi. I 158 ; Dronin ben lyghtly d., easily

IX

14

;

Ydronke,

next.]

Drede(n), Dred,

trans, to fear,

Dryue,

Driue

[OE. drincan.~] Dryfe, Drife
;

iv b 85, v 287, xi 141, xvii 47, 55; intr. to be afraid, iva 31 (with of), 6 1, v 143 ; rejl. to be

(XVII), z>. trans, to drive, Vina 128, 184, b 19, xv h 2, xvii 273 ; intr. to hasten, 1171, xvii

GLOSSARY
193
;

as

}ai mljt driue,

as fast

GLOSSARY
xi b 25, 241, 246, xvi 305, &c.
;

GLOSSARY
Engendren,
IX 59.
origin,
v. to

beget offspring,
n.

Entent(e),

.

purpose,

vn

27

;

to

[OFr. engtndrer.~\

what
1

e.,

for

what reason, XII b

Engendroure,
engendrure.~\

vm a
.

parentage,

228.

[OFr.

68; to pat e. to, to fat e. and ende pat, in order to, that, ix
120, 280; mind, x 184; will, desire, IV a 2 2 ; with all thare e., with their whole minds,

Engynys,

//. machines,

X

33.

See Gyn(e). Engynour, n. engineer (contriver of machines), X 71, 89. [OFr. See Gynour. engigneor.~\

[OFr. engin^\

xvn

1 13. [OFr. entent, entente^ Enterlac6, adj. interlaced, (verse) with alternate rime, Introduc-

Engli^sch, n. English (language), XI a 30, 37, 64, 65 Englysch, XIII b 29, 34, &c.; English, XI a 2 Englis(s), III introd. Englysshe, VII introd. Inglis, I introd. [OE. englisc.'] Englijsch, adj. English, xi a 34 Englisch,xiv<r 17; Englyssh, I introd. Inglis, x 43, xiv a
;

tion xv.

Entyrludes,

[OFr. entrelace.} n.pl. comic dramatic

;

;

pieces, farces, I 5. [AFr. Centrelude, Anglo-L. interludium.]

Entysyd, pa.
[OFr.

t.

enticed,

xvn

37.

enticier.']

;

Entre, Entere,

v. to enter,

xvi

;

270, 282 ; entered in inspired Judas, xvi 165.
entrer.~\

Judas,

[OFr.

[OE. englisc !\ EnglyschEngli3sch(e)men,

26, b 10.
.

Entrike,

v. to deceive, XII

a

1

16.

men,
Eny,

//. Englishmen, XI a 28, 40, 52, xin b 9, 43, &c. [OE. englisc + mann.~\

[OFr. entriquer.'}

adj. any, III 5,

vm

Enveremyt, pa. t. surrounded, X 46. [OFr. environner the
;

a 251,

forms enverom- &c.

first

appear

XIII 0-48 of time,

eny uyle, any length b 25 in eny -weie, by any means, XI I a 16 Enes cunnes, xv^- 22, Eny kyns, VIII b 20, of any kind, any kind

vm

;

in English in I4th c.]

;

Enuy,
envie.~\

.

envy, XVII 51.
;

[OFr.

;

Eorne,

run 23, 37. 54, 62 ;
v. to
;

to flow,

xin a
;

of (OE. *sentges cynnes}.
.

[OE.

ran, ill 43

Yarn, pa. t. sg. Ourn, //. II 85
\

&mg, Kt. eni(g}.~] See Ani, Ony. Enmy, Enemy(e), enemy, IV a 92, v 338, vm b 78, ix 81, &c.
Enogh.
[OFr. enemi.'] See Ynoj, Ynow.
n. pi.

[OE. iomau pa. t. tarn, tlrnon.~\ See Ryn. Eorpe. See Erth(e). Erbeg, Herbes, n. pi. (green) plants, V 122, XII a 82. [OFr.

Vrn,

ii

89.

Enquestes,

inquests

(in-

(h}erbe.-\

quiries into matters of public or b 59. [OFr. state interest),

vm
n.

Erde,

. own dwelling-place, land, VIII a 194; in tag in erJe

enqueste.']

Ensa(u)mple,
I

example,

in;.

it

202, XI b 298, 301 stance, cautionary instance, warning, I 261 (see Drede ; cf. next). [AFr. ensample altered, by confusion of prefixes, from OFr. essample.~\ See Sample.

among men), v 348, perh. a form of Erth(e). The frequent ME. <!ard. [OE.
(on earth,
is

may,
cf.

(Northern) form erd(e), earth, in part, be due to this ; but

Ensamplen,
he

v. refi.\ -wherof

\lie~]

Dede .] Er(e), Eir (x), adv. before, V 209, xil b 113; ere now, xvn 328; earlier (with formerly, vi 12
;

may ensamplen him, from which may take warning, XII b 223
(cf. prec.).

befor*)

with

X 1 40 ; conj. before (usual ly subj.), II 190, 256, V 152,

[From

prec.]

Entaille, n. fashion, [OFr. entaille.]

xila 64.

204, 223, XII a 104, b 19 ; prep. before (in time), a 140. [OE. *r.] See Ar, Are, Or.

vm

GLOSSARY
Er(e),/m.
iv a 60, b
1 2, 1 8,

ind.pl. are,
8, 53, 54,

I

introd.,
6, 7,

him

is ays,

xiv a

85, &c.
ear,

[ON. eru.] See

Ar(e), Es, &c.

Ere,

.

n

xn a
159.

528,

vin a

263,

104,

32; Eris, //. xi

earls, n 202, 503, vn 84. [OE. tori, infl. in sense by cognate GN.jarl.] Erliche, adv. early, vuib 15;

[OE. eare.] Erie, Erye, z>. to plough, vin a 4> 5> 67, ioo, 1 10. [OE. erian.]

239 at ese, comfortable, vill a 144 ; well off, xvn 388. [OFr. aise, eise.] See Malais, Missays. Esely, Esily, adv. without discomfort, XII b 91 easily, IX 119. [From E. ese, OFr. aide
or comfort,
; ;

n

gives

him pleasure

M

(related to prec.).]

Erles, Erls, n. pi.

Est(e), Best (xvn), east adj. ix 2 ; adv. XVI 333; n. IX 73, XIII b 5 1, xvi 1 453. [OE. east, adv.,
;

taste, n.]

Erly, VI 146
all times,

;

e.

and

late,

at

VI 32. [OE. eer-lice.] See Er(e), Ar. w. the business (on which Ernde, one has come), v 235. [OE.

message ; ON. erinde, &c. message, business.] Erre, v. to err, xi b 14. [OFr.
terende,
errer.]

Ete(n), v. to eat, vin a 1 29, 258, 298, ix 142, 242, xv g 25, xvn 395 (see Bred), &c. ; Eet, pa. t. sg. VIII a 291 ; Ete, pa. t. pi. I 158, n 396 Eten, //. vin a Etin, xiv b 74, 261, ix 144
; ;

[OE. etan.] Euaungelistis, n. pi. evangelists, xi b 306. [L. evangelista.] See
76, 77.

Errour,
;

error, falsehood, heretical opinion, VII 46, XI b 44, 77,
.

Awangelys.
Euel(l).
See Yuel.
n.

215 speke errour, say what is mistaken, vi 62. [OFr. errour ^\ Ert. See Art.

Euen, Eve,

Vina
see

178,

xn

evening, III 54, b xvn 205;
iS,_

Erth(e),

EorJ>e

(xm, xiv

c),

Morwe. [OE. s,fen, efen.] Euen(e), Euyn, Evin, adv.
equally, exactly, just, quite, indeed, I introd., vn 27, XII b 49, xvn 125, 290, 379, 462, &c. ; also, too, VII 51, 154; evin (till), just opposite, x 8 1 ; euene ryjt,

4, (vi), n. earth, soil, iv 12 the ground, iv* 36, V 161, IX 149, a 8, 15 the world, vi 82, xi a 8, xva 180; in erth(e), on earth, in the world, iv a 47, ix 332, xvi 363, xvn in eorpe, XIV c no; 42, &c. vpon erthe, v 30 in erlh (sc. lufe in erth}, earthly (love), IV a 10. [OE. eorfe, e"orj>e.] See Erde. Erth(e)ly, adj. earthly, iv a 29, b 12, 29, xvi 134, &c. [OE.

Vrpe
;

xm

;

;

;

a 47 euen exactly, by, GO. a level with Him, xvn 18 ; ful(f] euen, equally, as well, quite, xvi 280, XVII 10, 344.
;

xm

Hym

eorf-lic.]

[OE. efen, efne.] Euenly, adv. exactly, XVII [OE. efen- lice.] Euensong(e), evensong,
.

258.

Erytage, Herytage,
tance, vi 57, 83.
tage.]

.

inheri(Ii)eri-

vespers, vi 169, xi b 131, 189, 224,

[OFr.
is, I

241.

[OE. efen-sang, -song.]
n. evening,

Euentyde,
ind.
7,

VI 222.

Es, 3

sg. prts.

*I28
65,

(note), IV a i, 5, 10, &c., XIV a 5, 20, b 8, 9, xv a 9.

[OE. efen-tid.] Euer(e), adv. ever ; always, conI 94, vn 2, 271. b ioo, &c. ; at any v 57, ix 327, &c. ; time, 42, added to indef. relatives (?..), i 2, xvn 210, &c. [OE. &fre.]

[A

tinually, for ever,

Northern form. ON. es.] See Is, &c. Eschue, Eschuie, v. to avoid, escape, vin a 55, xn b 8. [OFr.

vni a

n

Ese, Ays,

eschiwer, eschuer.] n. comfort, pleasure, in

Euerich,

Euerych(e),
I

Eueri,
60, 517,

adj. every, each,

9,

n

GLOSSARY
580, ix 63,

xin a

22,

26, &c.

;

GLOSSARY
Fairi, -y, Feyre", Paierie (xn),

GLOSSARY
178.

[Shortened

from

OFr.

en/a(u]nt.~]

Pauour(e), n. grace, beauty, VI 68,
xvii 79. [OFr. favour.'] Fautlest, adj. superl, in on fe /.,
the (one) most faultless, V 295. [Error for, or red. of, faullesest ;

OFr./awfc + OE. -leas.] Fautours, M. //. supporters, xi a
i,

49.

Fawty, [From ME., OYr.faute, 1
Fe.
See Fee, n.

[L.fautor.'] adj. faulty, V 314, 318.
n.]

Feith, Fayth, Fath (xvn), &c ,. faith, xi b 13, 1 7 1, xvi 364, &c. plighted word, troth, v 216; **' my feith, in (god} fayth, &c., upon my word, V 297, Vina 266, xvn 228, 330, &c. [OFr. feid, later/**.] See Fai. a 247 Feythful, adj. honest, Feithfulliche, adv. honestly, villa 71; Faithfully, accurately, vn 78. [Prec.+OE.
;

vm

;

-ful.}

Fel. vi
19,

See Falle(n).

Feaw, Few(e), adj. 212, vn 52, xin b
[OE. feawe.} Fecche, v. to fetch,
&c.

pi. few,

Felajschip,

Felaschipe
(i),

(xn),

50,

xv a

Felaushepe

Felowship

See Fone.

a 287, Fette(n), fa. t. XII b 150, xvi 382 ; Yfet, //. II 170. [OE.feftan,/euan.] a. Fede, v. to feed, 247, xi b 281 ; Fedde, pa. 1. a 292,

vma vm

150;

(xvn), n. community, I introd. ; company, in here, don /. (with dat.pron.}, keep (one) company, v 83, xn a 24; friendship, xvn
363. [Next + OE. -sape.] Felawe, Felowe, fellow, I introd., xiv 0*7, 1 6 (contemptuous), XVI 284. [OE. feo-laga,
.

vm
;

vm

;

xi

/;

278, &c.

;

TJedde,

subj.

would

feed, III 8

Fedde, //.

iv b 39.

[OE.
.

/&.]

Fedynge,

feeding, xi b 258.
.

feeding ; inf. of, for [QE.fcding.~]

1 Fee, Fe, goods, xvn 309, 326. [OE. fe(o}k, feo-.~\ Dis-

from ON.fe-Iagt.'] Feld(e), Filde, Fylde, n. field, II 60, Vina 134, 232 field of battle, vn 45, 93; Feeldes, //. xiil a 19. [OE. /W.] See
;

Afelde.

tinguish next.

Fele, Feele (xvi),

FeiU

(x),

a term of venery, Fee, the share given to the dog, some small gain falcon, &c.) in their hunting, xvii 490.
rc.

2

fee (as

;

TJele (in), adj. many, II 401, 2, v 349, vi 79, vn 29, 522, x 55, 63, 141, xv b 10, xvi 61,

m

[OFr. feu,fe, &c.]

&c. [OE.feIa, adv.] Fele, Feele, v. to feel, perceive,
experience, iva 25, b 45, VI25, xiil a 26, xvi 346 (see Fitte), xvn 121, &c. ; 2 sg. subj. v 204 Felte, pa. t. I 156, 163. [OE.
;

Feeldes Feere

;

Feele
Feest.
;

;

Feende
'

; ;

;

See Feld(e)
2

Fele, adj. Fest.

1 Fende; Fere M.

;

Feghtande. See Fight. Feye, adj. doomed to die, XV c

fe!an.~]

20.

Fell,

v. to fell

;

to destroy,

iva

47.

[OE.y^.]
Feill.

[OE. fellan.}
Fell(e), Fellen. See Falle(n). Fell(e), adj. deadly, cruel, v 154, VI 7, VII 82, 109, XIV b 33; Felly, Fellyche (i), adv. cruelly,

See Fele, adj. Feynd(is). See Fend(e).

Feyne(n), Fayne (vn),
XI b
i,
;

v.

to

41, 8 1, &c. feyned hem, pretended to be, villa 115; to falsify, VII 34; Feynit, //. false, VII 1 8 ; feynitfare, deceit, VII 44. [OFr. feindre, feign- .]

feign, pretend, invent, vil

terribly,
.

V2 34

I 130; [OFr.//.]

fiercely,

Felloune,
115, 192.

adj.

grim, deadly,
(ix),

X

[QT?T.feloun.'\

Femayll,

Femele

adj.

Feyre"; Feyre(st).
Faire.

See

Fairi;

female, IX 58, XVII 152. Jemelle.]

[OFr.

GLOSSARY
125, Fend(e), viii a 82, ix 93, xi b 3, 220, xvi 340, &c. ; Feende, xvi 9,
.

devil, Devil,

V

Ferforth,

adv.

far,

xn b

190.

[OE. feorr + forj>^ See Fer. Perked, pa. t. sg. flowed, v 105.
[OE.fer(e')i:taii, go.]

14, &c.

;

Feynd, xvn

35, 43.

[OE.

Fende,
Fenyl,

feond.~] v. to defend,
n. fennel,

Perly,

adj. wonderful, II

4 (note)

;

xvi
18.

30.

adv.

[Shortened from Defende,

q.v.~]

wondrously, extremely, I xv b 10. [OE. fier-ltce,

xv b

[OE.

Fenyx,

n. Phoenix, VI 70.

[OE.

Ferly,

fenix, L. pJunnix.]

Per, Perre, Par, adj. and adv. far, IV b 36, v 24, XIII a 27, xv-5,xvii439, &c. as/eras, in so far as, ix 293 (vn]to the
;

ON. ly, prob. infl. by ferliga monstrously ; see next.] n. a marvel, v 346, x 1 34 ; Farleis, Ferlies, pi. vu 95, xvi 6r. \OE. f&r-lic, sudden, prob. infl. by ON. ferliki (ME. See prec. ferlike) monster.]
See Fer.
;f. wes,

;

Perre.

fer(re) ende, to the very end,
78, 95.

VH

Ferry it, pp.

had farrowed,

Per(re), Pyrre

(v, vi),

X

109.
;

compar. farther,
;

v

83,

xiv

18

;

ferry
pig-]

[Formed on farrow, OE. fxrh, ferh, young
fierce,

away, XVI 156, 336; further, vu 97 moreover, v 53, vi 184; fyrre pen, beyond, vi 203. [OE. feorr feorr, firr compar.] See
;

Pers(e), adj.

bold,

II

293,

Ferforth, Fyr}>er.

Perde,
fear,

n.

fear,

in

for ferde,
xvil

in

xiv b 33, xvi 131. [Or./er-s, nom. sg.] See Fuersly. Persoh, adj. fresh, xin a 29, 49. [OE. fersc.'] See Fresch.
Perste, Uerst.
See Furst.

v

62,
false

204,

[Prob. fer(e)d, pp., terrified ; OE. */orfxran, -feranj] See next. Ferd(e), //. afraid, v 314, XIV b 93, XVII 102 ; at xvi 209 rime requires fiaide (see Flay and f
note). [OE.faeran,j eran.'] Perd(e), pa. t. fared, xn a 43, 145 ferd with, dealt with, X
;

division

315. of for-

Peruent,

adj. hot, IX 10 ; burning bright, xvil 8 ; eager, xvil 77.

Pest,

\OYi.fervent.~] Feest (xvil), n. feast, festival, v 333, xvn 454 (?with topical allusion to the Corpus
Christi festivities).

[OFr./te.]

Feste-dayes,
Church),
prec.]

.

vin

feast-days (of the b 30. [From
fast,
t.

172.

[OE./mz.]
;

See Fare, v.

Fere, Peere (xvi ), n? companion, xv/ 5 wife, v 343, xvi 352.
[OE./2nz.] Pere, Feore,
.*

Fest(e), v.
fixed,

make

confirm,

xvi 340; pa.

made

fast,

v 279; //. iva i, 82,
;

company,

in in

fere, &c., all together, collec[OE. tively, xvi 126, 364, 385.

but this use is prob. developed from ME. y-fere(n\ OE. ge-Jeran, pi., (as) companions.] See Yfere.
ge-fere;

xvi 335, 337. [OE. fmtan on the vowel see Cast.] Pestnyt, pp. fastened, x 124. [OE. fsestnian see prec.]
;

partly

Fet(e).
94.

See Fote.
n. feather-bed,

Pethre-bed,
Pette(n).

xn a

(QE..feper-l>edd.~]

Fere, n?

fear,

villa 177, 292.
appearance,

Sue Fecche, Fote.

Fere,

4
.

outward

vu

Peurpe, adj. fourth, xin a 18. See [OE. feor}a, feower]>a.~\
Fowre. See Feaw. Pioht. See Fight. Fift, Fyft, adj. fifth, VII 129, x t, yt,

1

8.

[Shortened from OFr.

afe(i}re.~\

Fewe.
;

Fere-flunderys, n.pl. fiery sparks, XV A 12. [See Fyr cf. Mn.E. and &\o\. flinders, splinters.]

a.

2.

[OE./ry?a.]

GLOSSARY
Pyfteyn
;

Uyf-, Vif-, Vyftene

GLOSSARY
Pitte,
.

;

felt ]>i fitte, undergo

GLOSSARY
Plume,
n.
;

flume fordanne, River

GLOSSARY
II

37,

X

143, &c.

(iv)

Equiva-

GLOSSARY
Forpered,//. furthered, advanced,
xi b 231.
(partial
transl.

of
241.

[From

prec.

;

cf.

OE.

vair tfgris}>

n
.

fyrj>r(i}an, forfian.'] Forpi (-J>y, -thi, -thy), adv. and conj. wherefore, and so, therefore, II 461, iv b 35, v 42, 50, VIII a 79, 88, b 86, xil introd., b 170, xv c 22 ; because, iv b

Fowheles,

Fowle(s),

ME., OFr. [OK/^f.] Fowll.

See Foul(e),

Fowre, Four(e), adj. four, I 233, v 33, 157, xin a 37, &c. [OE.
feower.']

Fra.

[OE. for-pi, for-pi J>e.~\ Forwake,//. worn out with lying awake, xv<: 29. [OE. for- +
wacen, pp.
of waecnan.']
.

26.

Fray,

n. strife,

See Feur]>e, Fourty. See Fro, prep. xvn 1 84. [Shortq.v.~\

ened from Affray,

See

Awake. Forward(e),

Frayne, v. to inquire, [OE. Wfragnian.-] Fraist, Frast (xvil), v.
tion,

vn

97.

to ques-

agreement, cove-

inquire
of,

of,

xvn
VI I

183

;

nant, v 279, vnia 36, xvi 5, 1 66, 238. [OE.fore-vueard, n.] a 98. Forwes, //. furrows,
.

fraist

investigate,

07.

vm

_

Fote, Foot(e), Fut v 248 (see Spenne),
collect, (dot.) sg. in

(x), n. foot,
;

on 57

foot,
;

V 295

;

IX 17, &c. on fate (fief), on their legs, X
c

-under fote,

xiv

85

;

foot's

366 Feet, Fet(e), pi. n 79, 441 ix 255, &c. Fette, iv b 4 Fote, Foot, orig. gen. pi. in two fote long, &c., v 157, ix 155, xili a 38, &c. orig. dat.pl.,
;
,

length,

v

83, villa 2,

xvn

263,
;

;

See From. Franche, adj. French, xiv 33, Frensche, xiv c 101 46 Frankys, n. French language, I introd.; Freynsch, xi a 27, XIII b 19, &c. Frenach, xin b 34, &c. [OE. frencisc; the forms show in fl. of OE. Francan OFr. France, &c.] Franklens, n. pi. franklins (men
;
; ;

Fram Uram.

[QN.freista.-]

;

%

;

on his, to (my) fote, V 161, 208, vil 1 74. [OE./JA] a 32, Foul(e), n. bird, n 68, xv b 6, 10, c 3, &c. ; Fowhel(e), iv b 33 ; Fowle, iv b 47, xvn
in

vm

free, but not noble birth, holding land by freehold), VIII b [OFr. /rar Frast. See Fraist. Fraunchyse, n. privilege, or liberality, vi 249 ; the interpretation depends on that of Dard,

of

68.

/.]

Rescoghe

(q.v

.

and

note).

3, 487, &c. Foull, //.

;

Fowll,

xvn

[OFr.

xvn

156.

472 [OE.

;

franchise^

Fredom,

fngol.~]

freedom, xi b 150, 205, 206, &c. [QE.Jre+<faK.]
n.

adj. foul, loathsome, bad, a 320, xvi 464, vn 1 80, 337, &c. ; TJoul, III introd. adv., in fotile mot hitjalle, evilly may it fare, v 310. [OE./w/.] Founde, v. to hasten, v 62, 161.
II

Foule,

vm

;

b 68, Free, Fre, adj. free, xvi 295; lavish, vi 121 noble, good, xvi 5, xvil 327; as sb., noble one, xvn 310 Freest, super!, noblest, V 354. [OE.
; ;
-

vm

[OE. fundian.']

Freend.
Freike(s).

Founde (n), &c. See Fynde(n). Fourme, Forme, n. manner,
fashion,

See Frende. See Freke.

v

62, IX

305.

[OFr.

Freynsch. See Franche. Freke, n. man, knight, v

fo(u)rme] Fourth(e). See Fourty, Forty,

vm a

ForJ>(e).

57, 206, 212, &c. ; Freike, vil 160, 172. [OE.freca.']

adj. forty,

XVII

148, 445, &c. \QE.Jeowertig.~] Fowe, adj. streaked or variegated
(fur),

Freles, adj. without reproach, VI 71. [ON./r# + OE. -/.] Frely, adj. pleasant, II 4 (note).
*.

vair,

in

fowe and

grits

GLOSSARY
Prely, adv.
freely,

ix 90, xi b 201,

GLOSSARY
furst and'last, throughout, xiv
c

GLOSSARY
gentle,

graceful,

&c.,

II

305

;

GLOSSARY
to wear, IX 109.
giasd-lice.']

[OE. gfad,
mirth, 34, 267, iv a
n.

for),

Goaude,
(l,

Gle,

Glow

iv),

walk, v 146, ix
. .

&c.; Ygo,ll349,54i (ago); To pres. p. v 146. 1 8, xiv a 25 ; in

pleasure, play, II 44, 72, xvu 529; (skill in) making music, minstrelsy, n 383, 434. 444, 529, &c. made hem glew, directed their singing, I 39. [OE. gleo(w).~] Gleme, radiance, xvi 43. [OE.
; .

him com . gon (OE. com inn gan), came walking in, XV 24 ; to be (alive), v 41 ; gon on bodi and bones, see Bodi ; to go, n
'9, 345>xv^i2,&c. ;gon(be\
travel (about), IX
1 1 2 ; go hunte, &c., go and hunt, &c., viii a 30, 32 ; go slepe, go to sleep, viii a 296 ; hadde go, had gone on, I 222 hou it ge]>, what is the (inevitable) course of things, II
;

Glent,/<r. /. started aside, v 224. [Obscure ; ME. glenten (mod. glint} has same senses as Blenk,

?] Glew.
126.

55 1
See Gle.
to glide, v 198, XII b ' [OE. gKdan.'] (<?), pa. t. glanced sidev.

J

*s

X

g(n}i & c., went,
xn b
176;
it,

II

196,

176,

Glyde,
Glyfte ways

gane, were

in

war tharin X 1 28 to come,
;

get, IX 164, 186, &c.; gotj(goth} out, issues, vi 5, ix 1 78. [OE.
gan.~]

ME.
same Olode,

VI 13; on glode,
of on bent

197. [Obscure; gZiffen, and gliften, with senses as Blenk, e/.v.'] n. ? glade, open space,
(at),

V

See 3ede.
w. small share,
gobet.-}
.

Gobet,
[OYr.

vmi

106.

God,
;

God,

I

89,

v

81, VI 241,

appar. a variant

on earth, where he stood, V 198. [Unknown.] Glorius, -ous, adj. glorious, XVI
(q.v.),

&c.; Godd(e), I 78, v 51, 137, &c. Godys (MS. God; see XVII 88, note), gen. sg. XVI 241
;

Godes, Goddes,

//. gods, II

42,xviii66. [OFr. &/'(*)***] Qlotyny, Olotony, n. gluttony,
XVI1 37, 5 2
-

[OFr. gloutonie^]

31, vii 45, 176, 181, &c.; gef hyin Cod and goud day, wished him Godspeed and good day, V
5. [OE. god.'] See Goddes. God(e), adj. good, I 9, n 35, v 281, &c. Good(e), vilii 71, xi* 121, &c.; Goud(e), V 50, 202, vi 208 ; Gud(e), iv b 15, X Guod, in 59 47, xiv a 14, &c.
; ;

Glotoun, n. Glutton (personified), viii a 296. [OFr. glouton^] Oloue, glove, viii a 147.
.

Gnacchen,

xv A
next.]

9.

gnash the teeth, [Echoic, on model of
v. to

Gnauen, to gnaw, grind the xv h 9. [OE. gnagan.~\
Go(n),
v. viii
;

teeth,

goud
god.']

(gtiode, wk., Ill 30, 31, day, see God.

&c.);

[OE.

a 296, xv^ 24, &c. Goo, XI b 41, &c. Ga, x 168 pres. 2 sg. Gost, n 129; 3^. Gase, iv a u, xiv a 25 Ge)>
; ; ;

(OE. gmf), n 238, 551 Got?, vi 5; Goth, ix 178, &c. //. Gaa, iv b 43; Goo, Go(n), ix 18, 177, xi* 15, &c.; Got?, vi
; ;

God(e), Good(e), Guode (ill), Gude (iv, xiv b}, n. sg. good, iv* 9, v 59, xn a 149; good collective, goods, thing, n 230 wealth, in 8 (dat.\ iv* 81, vina 225, xn * 35, xiv c 75,
;

&c.;

Godes

(and

forms

as

150

;

Go)),

xni
;

b 64, 65

;

subj.

Go, vi 170, xvi 156; imper.pl. Gos, vi 161 Got?, V 51, 175 //. Gane, x 84, 100, &c. Go, I
; ;

above)//., goods, III r, vn 122, viii a 218, xi* 272, 48, xi v * 1 1 , &c. [OE. god, n.]

xn*

Goddesse,

n. goddess,
-esse.~]

xn a

44.

161, 196; Gon(e), 492 (ago), VI 1 6, xvu 408 (done 222,

II

I

n

[OE god+OYr.
uesse,
n.

Godenisse, God(e)nesse, Goodgoodness, bounty,

n

GLOSSARY
55, vi 133,

vina 132,1x329,

GLOSSARY
I

51

;

to grant, VII 3, VIII a 326,

GLOSSARY
52
;

land,

xvn

465

;

foundation,

GLOSSARY
44, &c. ; Yeare (daf.~), introd.; Yer(e), III 44, 12, 99, xiv e 2, xvir 57; I introd., II 3er(e),//. 264,492, 541, VI 123, villa 319, b 36, XVI 39. 3545 Seres, I introd.
III

xin a

to now, even

xn a
vin*

vn

196,

now, xi * 243, xiv c 84, xvi 373,
;

XVI1 359> &c.
(n]euere,
II

103,

strengthening 147,' vi 89,

ger, gear.} See Tojere. 3ef, Yef; 3if, 3yf, conj. (usually with subj.) if, 1 17, II 169, ill 13, 28, v 230, vi 122, Vina 163, xni a 35, 48, xv* 34, &c.;

[OE.

still, once more, in addition, moreover, II 464, VI 14, VIII a 38, 250, IX 40, 200, xn * 75, &c. all

41,

xvi 136;

;

whether, I 17, in 5, &c. ; Hyf, VIII b 43; If(f), Vina 123, XVI 331, &c. ; lif, V 275 ; Yf,

IV* 24; Yiif.xva 23 ; )if(ij) fat, if, iv a 24, 88, IX 219, 271, XII a 1 6 , * 46, xi v c 69 ; whether, XII a 1 84 ; all if, although, xvil 231 ; see also Bote. [OE. gef,
-

3eit.

See 3et(e), adv.

3elde(n), v. to yield, give (back), pay, repay, V 155, 257, villa 44, IX 189 ; Yelde, in 50 ; 3elde, subj. (imper.) in j. hit jow, requite you for it, V 342 ;
j.

the same, none the less, I 225, II 174, v 151, vi 83, vni* 98, XI* 1 1 9, xv -3 r, xvn I2,&c. ; conj. and yet, but, XVII 17, 197 ; acjete, but jit, botyit (jeit), &c., and yet, II 191, IX 99, X 95, XI* 239, xvil 35, &c. [OE. get(a), gett, gi(e\t, gyt, ftc.] no waning 3ete, v. to grant, give / wyl fie jete, I wish to give you no curtailment (of what is due), VI 198. [OE. (late) geatan, prob. modelled on ON._/a/a.] 3eue, Yeue (in), v. to give, grant, in 7, ix 79, 293, xi * 162, &c. ; 3iue(n), n 454, vni a 121 (5M/y.), xn * 35, 42, &c. ; 3yue, XI * 300 ; 3ifth, 3 sg. prcs. XII a
;

jow

(of),

vili a

121

;

reward you (for), 3olden, //. sur-

87.

3af,

44,

vnia

Yaf, pa.

t.

sg.

in

rendered,

xiv* 89; Yyolde,

Yeaf, in

restored, in 58 (see the French). [OE. ge'ldan.'] See Forjelde. 5emen, //. yeomen, hired vi labourers, 175. [? OE. geong-man, ME. jengman, jemsee N.E.D., s.v. fttan, jeman;
.

//. n 20 ; Yeaue,/a. subj. in 21, 51. 3ouen, pp. ix 90, xi *

; 192, 238, xi a 10, 22, 52 ; 3af,/a.A

n

39,

264
for,

;

Yeue, in
xiv
c

III 25,

Y-yeue, 7, 14 29; jafof, gave (cared)
;

54.

[OE. gefan,
See Giffe, For-

giefan, gj'fan]
jeue.

Yeoman.'] 3eply, adv. cunningly; (allit.only) quickly, promptly, v 1 76. [OE.
gcap-licel]

3b.ernyng. See 3erne, v. See 3ef 3eue. 3if (3yf) 3ifth. 3iftis, //. gifts, vni a 42, xi *
; ; .

See 3eer. 3ern(e), adv. eagerly, readily, n vni a 103, 292. [OE. 323, ~
3er(e).

265.

[OE. gift; see N.E.D.,

3erne,

v.

to

desire,

long

for

;

See Gyfte. s.v. Gift.'] Yit. See 3et(e), adv. 3iue(n), 3yue. See 3eue. 3oked, //. yoked, IX 253. [OE.
3it(t), 3yt,

Y^yrned,//. xv c 32 (the relative before ychabbe is omitted) ; Bhernyng, n. (the object of)
desire, IV a 22 (cf. Couaytyng, Lnfyng). \QE..g{ornan,g(rnan;

geocian} 3olden. See 3elde(n). Yule, Christmas; jolt 3ole, nyjt, Christmas night, I 187.
.

gforning.~\
3et.

[OE. geol\ cf. ON. J6l, n. pi. Yule j6la-ndtt, Yule-night.]
;

See

3ate.

3et(e), 3eit (x),

Yet
b)
;

;

3it(t), 3yt,

Yit; 3ut (vni

adv. yet;

up

3on. See Yone. 3ong(e), Yong (xvn),a^'. young, vi 52, 114, 175, vin* 36, IX 2i,

GLOSSARY
397 old or jong, any one, 221 ; jong and aide, every one, iv a 49. \QK.geong.-\ See 3e, pron. 3or. 3ore, adv. (since long ago), a long while, n 559, v 46, vi 226, XVf
;

xvn

subj.
ii

II

n 573, 249, 253.
(i. e.

v

326.

Yhad,//).

have

let

Haf\kaue} at pe, me get) at thee,

32.

[OE.
.SV<f

geara.~]

220, xvil 219 ; haue done, be quick, XVII 316, 352, 480; his lyf hade, preserved his life, vn 163. [OE. habban.~\

V

5ou, 3our(e), 3ow(re).

See 3e.

3ouen.
3ut.

3eue.
aofc.

See 3et(e),

Habide. See Abide. H abundant, adj. abundant, IX 330. [OFr. abundant] Hacches, n. pi. hatches of a
;

Haade. See next. Habbe(n), w. to have,
get, take, put,

buttery, or kitchen,

vinJ

29;

I 59, 60, xv 127; Haf(e), IV a 64, v 150, &c. Half, xvn 286; Han, xiv c 6; XV h 22 Haue n), I 107, vill a 74,xn a 66,&c. Hawe,x introd. Haf, Haue, i sg. pres. v 23, ix see Ichabbe, Ichaue 289, &c.
; ; ; ; ;

and 23; A,

possess, auxil., xni a

of a ship, fott.1

vii

147.

[OE.
;

Hade, see Habbe(n), Hened Hadestow, see Habbe(n).
Haf(e).

Hafyng, [From

See Habbe(n), Half. . possession, vi 90. stem of Habben ; cf. OE.

Has(e), 430, &c.

2

j. xvi 243,

xvn

; Hast(e), I 131, xvi 223, &c ; Hat;, v 173, 228, 273, 324; Hauest, VIII* 26; Habbe;, 3 sg. *v 271 (note) ; Hase, iv a 39, xvn 550, &c. ; HaJ>, Hath, I n, xvi 356, &c. ; Hat;, v 46, 1 26, 340 ;

n. hay, xvil 159 ; mowing grass, iv a 33. [OE. keg.] Half. See Habbe(n). Hayle, n. hail, i 162. [OE.

**/.]

Hay(e),

-

Hayroun,
II

n.

(collective},

herons,

310.

Haithill.

[OFr. hairon.} See Ha)>el.
.

Haywarde,

hay ward (who had

Haues, xv a 20 Haue)), vni b 98; Habbep, //. ill 2, Xllla 15, &c. Haf(e) (with pron.},
;

charge of fences, enclosures, &c., and was sometimes keeper of
the cattle on the common land), vni b 1 6 (see note). [OE. hagweard.~]

;

iv b

16,

vi

Han
71,

159,

x

16,

&c.;

commonest form), n 21, v 25, &c. ; Has(e) (sep. from pron.}, iva 2, x 52, xiv*
(the

Hald(e),&c.
;

See Holde(n).
vp, main-

Haue,/m. 95, &c. subj. v 219, villa 114, 261; as hatie I (than}, so may I (yon) have, xvn 237, 333, 402. Haf, Haue, imper. sg. v 75, I 124,
&c.

xvn

Haldynge, w. haldyngt

taining, XI b 1 68. See Holde(n). Hale, . to draw, pull, XII b 87 ; Halt, //. in vp halt, uplifted, * kalian V n.

high, [OE. (OFris. halia}, or OFr. haler.~\
.

Haueth, //. XIV d 13. Hadde, /a. t. I 100, II 51, XI b 265, &c. Had(e), I 116, v 13, XI* 202, &c. Hedde, in 5, Hadde, 42, &c. (OKt. hefde} 2 sg. xvi 219; Hadestow, II
; ;
;

;

Half, Halue, Haf (in), side, X 198 vpon bojie halue, on both sides, v 2, 97 ; o this half, on this side (of the world), ix 250 ; . behalf, in one Ao/"(with intervening gen.} on behalf of, III 1 1 ;
;
.

.

533
1

(

POU)

;

Hadyn,
t.

//. vii

26.

Haade, pa.

subj. had,
;

would (should) have, XI b 270 Hadde, Had(e), n 559, I 195, v 196, &c. Hed(d)e, in 13, 30, &c. Hade;, Hadest, 2 sg.
; ;

halite, a (on} name, God's sake, V 51,81, xia is,, XII* 80; adj. and adv. half, IX 241, XII b 35, 79, &c. [OE.

(vp}on

Goddej

Godiies half, &c., in God's

for

half.]

See Behalue.

GLOSSARY
Halses,
n. pi. saints, -

V

54.

[OE.

Hongep,
Heng(e),
hon
intr.

3 sg.pres.

pa.

t. sg.

Haly.

.SfeHoli.
.

Yhonged, //.
(pa.
;

xm a

n 506, n 344,
14.

507 ; 500;

[OE.

Halydam,

halidom, holy thing (such as relics of the saints, but frequent coupling with God,

t.

heng)i\.\z.'tos.\hangian,

and help, seems to show word to imply the saints as a body ; cf. prec. line),v 55. [OE. halig-

ON. hanga (str.) intr.j Hap, Happ, chance, fortune, xil b 8, \\f 9; Happes, //.
cf.
.

happenings, [ON. happ.}
;

n

8, xill a See Myshap.

62.

Hall(e),

.

n

mansion, hall, home,

219, v 261, xvi 136, xvn 67, 348, 516, &c. [OE. hall.-]

Happe, v. impers. happen, villa 47 Happed, Happit, pa. t. it befell, vn 117, vm 99. [From
prec.]

Halme,
Halpeny,

.

shaft,
cf.

V

156.

[OE.

Happene, Happyn,
-

v. to
;

halm, stalk;
.

Stele.]

halfpenny in halpeny ale, ale at a halfpenny a gallon, small beer, 300. [OE. See Pene. half-penig."]

ix 47, 207, xvn 481 3 SS- P res XI1 ^ 6.

happen,

Hapneth,
[Extended

vma

from prec.]

Hard.

Hals, n. neck,
hals."]

vm a

63.

[OE.

Halsed, pa. t. embraced, greeted, XVI 64. [OE. h(e)ahian, 'embrace, implore, usually confused with next. Cf. ON. heiha ( =
next), greet
;

See Here, v. Hard(e), adj. hard, harsh, cruel, I 28, 135, n 243, &c. ; strong, immovable, IV a 48 ; as si>., what is hard, VI 246 ; adv. hard, V 85,

hdlsa, embrace.]
interpret (dream),

Halsen,

v. to

[OEJix/sian,/ta/sian, interpret omens, &c.] Halt, see Hale ; Halue, see Half.

xna 148.

xv ^ J 35 grievously, VII 117; x 150, xvi 151. [OE. heard ; hearde^\ Hardely, Hardily, Hardiliche, a 30, xvi 143 ; adv. boldly,
closely,

vm

Halue-acre, Half-acre, //. halfa 4, 5, 100, acre, small plot, 1 10. [OE. Iialf+ Kcer."] Halvendel, half, XII b 49, 218. [OE. halfan dxl, accus.] See

vm

.

(parenthetic), certainly, 1 may say, V 322, xvil 522. [From next.] Hardi, Hardy, adj. bold, II 27, a 1 79, &c. [OFr. hardi.~\ Hardyment, . (act of) daring, X 183. [OFr. hardement."]

vm

Hardynesae,
ness, ix 79.
cf.

Dele.

n. hardihood, bold[OFr. hardi + -ness ;

Halwid, pp.
[OE.
Holi.

consecrated, XI b 29. See Haljej halgian.~\

OFr. hardiesse.-] Hardis, n. pi. hards (coarser part of flax), X 20. [OE. heordan,
pi.]

Ham, Hamsylf.
Harue.

See K\,pron.pl. See Horn, adv.

Hamerya, Hamers, n. pi. hammers, xv // 10, 13. [OE. humor."]
See Homered.

Hare. See Hi pron. pi. andfew. Harkena, &c. See Herkne.
,

,

Harlot,
low,
harlot.']

.

rascal, scurrilous

fel-

vin

54, [xvi 185].

[OFr.

Hamese, n. pi. alleged oriental name for diamonds, IX 37 (so in

Harm(e),
vi 28,
26,

n. grief, misfortune, in1

Han,
see

French original). see Habbe(n)

jury, detriment,
;

Hand(e),

xn a

162,

xm b 39, xiv a
[OE. hearing 19, 231, &c.
II

147, V204, 209,

Hond.

xvi 323, &c.
n.

wielded, XV A 13. [OE. handlian.-} Hange, v. to hang {trans, and intr.}, I 219, VIII a 63, XVI 307 ;

Handled, pp.

Harp,
[OE.

harp,

II

Aearf."]
v. to harp, hearpian.}

Harpe,

37, 271, &c.

[OE

GLOSSARY
Harpour(e), Harper,
minstrel,
II

n. harper,

Hauer-cake,
277.

.

35, 40, 513,

522,

[ON.

oat-cake, villa Aafrt + ME. cake

&c.

[OE. hearpere ;

OFr. har-

pour.'}

Harpyng,

"

3, 43,

. harping, minstrelsy, 277, &c. [OE. hearp-

ung.~]

(cf. Icel., Swed. kaka}] Haukin, n. ; on hankin, a-hawking, n 308. [OE. hafoc, ON. hauk-r, a hawk.] haunch ; app. =* Haunche,
.

Harryng,
[Echoic.]

n.

snarling, Xlllff 15.
interj,

shoulder,

I

120.

[OFr. hanche.']

Haunt,

.

H-irrowe,

Herrowe,

a

cry for help, xvi 185, 343; as sb., uproar, xvi 98. [OFr.
harou.~\

haunt, [OFr. hant, from next.]

frequentation ; welgode great plenty, II 309.
-i.sg.pres. frequents, I 3.

Haunteb,
[OFr.

hanter.-}
I

Harrowincr, n. despoiling, XVI title. [OE. hergung.~\ Hartely. See Hertely.

Hawe.
He,
&c.
;

See Habbe(n). pron. 3 sg. masc. he,
;
;

Harwen, [Cf. ON.
[OE.

v. to

harrow, VIII b 19.

27, &c.

hcrfl,
.

OSwed. harva,

vina

Hee, xvi 185 A, xm a (see A) indef. one,

4, 10,

a harrow.] Hasell-note,

hazel-nut, IX 55.

130, 131, 211 ; as he which, as (being) one who, xn a 23 (note), 3 37, &c. Him,
II 51,
I

haesel-hnutu.'}

Hast(e), n. violence, haste, 291, XVII 411, &c; an
III

Vina
haste,

22, 43, 47 ; 150, villa 167,

xvn

in hast(e\

V

158, 293,
.

447, immediately. speedily, 2 [OFr. haste cf. Heste, ] Hast(e), v. intr. and refl. to hasten, Vina 317, XVII 182; hastis hemselue to hange, rashly
;

ace. and dat. I 63, ; refl. (for) himself, 70, II 344, 485, iv b v 191, vi 118, xvi 78, 80, 126 ; often pleonastic (dat.} with verbs of bodily action, n

Hym(e),
10,

&c.

esp.

XIV

289 (note), xv b 7 (note), g 33 of motion, in 19, v 86, c 61, xv g 18, 24 (note), 27, 29, 30; orig. refl. accus. n 475,
;

(precipitately)

hang themselves,

xvi 307.
Hast(e)ly,
109.
hsestlice.~]

[OFr. haster.~] aoz>. speedily,
n.
;

xvn
cf.

39,

Himself, Hymself(e), 501. -selue(n), -seluyn, -sylf, now. himself, iv 82, v 41, vn 69,

[From Haste,
See Hoot.
.

OE.

XI* 225, himself, n
refl.

xm a
37,

27,

&c.;
;

he
ace.

Hate. Hate,

hatred,

VI

103,

&c.
(you a 52.

[Stem of next.]

Hate, Hatie,

2 sg. pres. subj.

should) hate,

iva

47, VI II

[OE. hattan.~} Hatj, Hap, &c. See Habbe(n). Hatte, n. hat, V 13, XIV b 41. [OE. hsett.} Hatte, see Hole, v. Hatter, see Hoot. Hapel, Haithill (VH), adj. noble,
;

&c. Hiis./ftw. adj. (orig. gen.) xiv d 1 ; Hys, His, I 46, n 29, &c. b 60, Hysse, vi 58 Hus, 101, 102 Is, xv 7, 24, 29; b 106; Hise,//. xiia Us, 156, &c. as sb., his folk, I 135, XVI1 553 written for genitive
;

xib 223,

vn 161 xv^ 16,

vm

;

vm

;

;

5

inflexion,

xm a
he,

22 (see note),
;

b 23.

[OE.

nom.

his, gen.

;

VII 38

;

n. knight,

V

263, 340.

him, dat.] See Hi, Hit. H3, pron. fern, she, II 408, 446, xv c 7, 15, 17, &c. (see Hi,
pron. fern.'} ; //. they, Hi, pron. pi.}. [OE
II

[OE.
rior
;

mjeit, adj.,
see

and huh}, war-

185

(see

Bjorkman, Morte Arthure, 358 (note, and refs.).]
n. pi. harbours,

heo.~]

Hauenea,
68,

xm b

He. See Heigh(e). Hebenus, n. ebony, xn
ebenus.]

91.

[L.

xiv c 38.

[OE. hxfen'.fy}

GLOSSARY
see Habbe(n), Heued; Hedde(n), see Habbe(n). Hede, n. heed, notice, villa 15,

Hed(e),

xi vc 10; take hede, look you, XVII 424. [Stem of OE. hedan] Heder, -ir. See Hider. Hee. See He, masc, ; Heie, adv.

Vina 256, b 7, 10; restoration, XII a 18 ; salvation, xvi 38, 67, 106. [OE. hxlti] See Hol(e). Hele, v. to heal, vin a 186, IX
92. [OE. hxlan] See Heele. Helej. Holing, n. covering, X
6.

Heele,
//.

n, heel,
.

v8 5

xin b 39
.

;

Heles,

OE. hel(t}an]
Hell.
.

[From

[OK^/a.]
;

Heele.

See Hele,

Keep, Hep, n. host, vin a 181 an hep (without of), a host of, XII a 82. [OE. heap.']
Heere.
See Her(e), adv. and n. Heggen, v. to make and trim
hedges, *vni b 19 (MS. eggen).. [From next.] Hegges, //. hedges, via a 31.
.

SeeHil. hell, iv a 48, 64, Hell(e),Hel, VI 82, &c. ; originally gen., in helle pilte, the abyss of hell, XVI
348 ; fendis in XI b 216 (cf.

OK fond on helle}.
V
75, 129,

A.,

hell-fiends,

[OE. hell]

Helme,
&c.

n. 1 helm(et),

[OE. *hecg] Heght. twilight. Heie, Hye (x), Hyj(e), Hee (iv) ; adv. high, iva 9, vi 113, x 16, 124, xv ^ 12; loudly, v [OE. heh.] 144, x 86. Heigh(e), Hei}(e), Heih, adj.
II 26,205, 326, 356, vnia4,Xii 133, xivc 18, 100, 109, &c. also He, xvn 469 ; Hegh, vil 142 ; Heje, V 129 ; Hye, IX 196, xvn 553 ; 40, Hyje, v 19, vi 35, &c. ; High(e), Hygh, 1 13, vil
;

[OE. helm.] 2 Helm(e), w. helm (of rudder), xiv c 59, xvn 272, 420. [OE.
helma.]

Help(e),

high,noble; loud;

villa 240, x 180, &c. ; [OE. help] Helpe(n), Help(pe), v. to help, avail, II 1 16, v 141 (note), vin a 21, 241, &c. ;pres. subj. v 55, xvn 247 ; Holpyn, pa. t. pi. VIII a
3,

vn

n. help, reinforcements,

forces, xill b 65.

xma

100; Hulpen, vnia 1 10; Helping, n. X 1 8. [OE. helpan] Hemself, -selue. See Hi, //.

Hende,
II

101, IX 137, &c. ; Hihe, xn a 51 ; an hyj t on hegh, on high, vil 142, XIII a hyje gate, see Gate, n. 3 ; heigheprytne, full prime, the end of the period

sir,

adj. courteous, gracious, 563, xvi 45 ; as s&., good V 262 Hendely, adv. cour;

n;

teously, V 340. [OE. (ge-)htnde, convenient, at hand.] Hendy, adj. gracious, fair, XV c 9,

prime' (6-9 a.m.),vm a 106 hygh tymes, festivals, I 13 ; heigh way, highway, villa 4;
;

Henge. Hermes

Hyar, compar. [OE. heh]

taller,

X

10.

Heighlich, adv. at a high via a 307. [From prec.

rate,
;

&c. [Extended from prec.] See Hange. Hence, Hens (xvn), adv. from here, vin a 273, b 84, xvn 292, 507 from now, ago, vin b 36, xvii 25. [ME. henen(e), henne (OE. heonane)
37,
;
;

cf.

+ adv.
Hent(e),
receive,

-es]
v.
I

OE.

tea-life.]
.

to catch, seize, get,

Helping,
haste,
II
;
;

haste

137.
;

an heijing, in [From Hy, v]
;

112,

v

249, vi

28
; ; ;

(pres. sttbj.},

villa 167, 181

Heiste Hote Helde,
;

Heite

Held(e).
;

See

hent

to,

lay hold of,
24,

xvn 420
209, 255

Hete, n.

Holde(n).

v. intr. to incline, turn,

V

Hent,//. IV a Yhent, xv<: 9,
hentan.]

v

37, &c.

[OE.
Hi, //.

263 Heldand,/Vw./. inclined, IV a 28. [OE. heUan]

Hep Heore.
;

See

Heep

;

Hele, Heele

(xvi),

.

health,

Her(e),

Heere, Hier(e), (in,

GLOSSARY
XII), adv. here, at
this

point,

GLOSSARY
Heaven, iva
9,

vn

137, 153,

xin

Heuene},

//. the

b 10, v n, b 52, &c.; heavens, vi

v

353,

vn

24, 35, &c.
I

;

reft, (to,

for) themselves,

63, 8 1 ; Crysles (J>e Lordes, CyY/) lone of heuene, love of Christ (&c.) in heaven, vin a 19, 214,

200, II 69, VI 69, 181, 182, y.lb 40, xv A 10, &c.; pleonastic (dat.\ xi a 61 ; cf. He. Ham191,

vn

33,

vin a

xiv d
[OE.

10.

Houenly,

[OE. heofon.'] adj. heavenly, XI b 291.

heofon-lic.']

sylf (xill); Hemself, -selue, nom. themselves, XI b 190; ace. and dot., XI b 198 ; (refl.} vin a 144, XI b 93, 109, xill b 24, XVI

Heuenryche, Heuenryke, n. Heaven, iva 15 vnder hettenryche, on earth, v 355. [OE.
;

307

;

of hemself, by themselves,
Pass. adj. (orig. gen!)
;

XI b 73.

heofon rice.~] See Ryche. Heuy, adj. heavy, xv h 13 ; heuy in, laden with, IV b 29. [OE.

Heuynes, Hevynesse,
ness, iv b 35
;

heavisorrow, XII a 10.
.

Hare, their, in introd. Heore, xiv c 7, 45, &c.; Her(e) (the most usual form), I 39, ii i6,&c.; Hire, ix 165, 185, &c. Hor, v 345? VI 1 8, 181, &c. Huere, xv b 8,11, 29; Hure, vuib 50;
; ;

Hew(e), Heu

[OE.

heflg-nes.']

(xv), n. hue,

plexion, beauty, I 165, 69, XV c 13; shade (of colour),

com237, IV a

all

(pronom.) here, theirs, XI b 129 ; here names ofalle, the names of of them, I 37 ; at here abone,

see

xn

a

55.

[OE.

htow.~\

Hi, pron. 3 sg. fern, she, III 32, 33, 55t 6 (it, ref. to/em, noun.}, &c. ; Hy(e), n 81, 337, in 45; He, II 408, 446, xv c 7,
15, 17;

Aboue(n). [OE. hi, hie (he, &c., nom., ace. ; heora, hira, &c. gen. ; heom, him, dat. The vowel of a, hate, ham, is prob. due to infl. of OE. jba,
heo),

fira, jam.-}

See

}>ai,

His(e).

Ho,

vi 68, 77, 83, 84,

Hy, Hyj
371
;

94, 96.

Hare, ace. and dat. in 55; Her(e), I 53, n 92; Hir(e) (the most usual form), n 73, vi 68, x 30, xn a 27, 44,
107, 145,

(v), Hie, v. to hasten ; intr. XI b 274, XII b 104, XVII
refl.

v

53,

xvn 289,312
[OE.
Jrigian.~]

(i //. imfer.').

Hy(e),
haste,

n. haste, in
swiftly,

in hy(e), in

xv c

17

(refl.~),

&c.

;

67, 70; Hure, vni Pass. adj. (orig.^w.) Hare, in 33, 35. 45; Her(e), I 210, Hir(e) (the most 243, ii 565 usual form), II 56, \\ b 6, &c. ; Hyr(e), i\ b 4, vi 69, xv c 4,

Hyr, VI
53.

46, 82, xvi 367, &c. ; in (full) gi-et hy, x 80, 90, &c. Cf. Heijing. [From
;

x

;

See Heie, Heigh(e) pron. fern, and pi. See Heis(e). Hyar.

Hy(e).

Hi,

&c.
184.
hire,

ace. herself,

Hereself, Hirself, refl. XI b 57, XII a 32,

Hide,
57
ii

[OE. heo (hed), also he,
;

nom. and ace. heore, On &c., gen. and dat. vowel of hare see next.] in 58 Hy(e), Hi.pron. 3//. they, II 91, xill a \l,b 9, n; Hii, vin a 15 also He, n 185, in 13, &c. 57 (second); A, Ace. and dat. Ham (to, (see A). them, in introd., xin a 23, for) b 39 ; Hem (the most usual form), I 39, II 88, &c. ; Horn,
hie, hi,
;

v. to hide, keep secret, XI a XIV b 22 ; Hidde,/a. t. ; refl. 268, xvi 249 (intr.)j Hidd, pp. xii b 187. [OE. hydan.~\ Hyde, n. skin, v 244 ; hide, xv h

II.

[OE.y&X]

;

xma

Hydel. See Ydel. Hider, adv. hither, II 422, v 33, Xiv c 47, &c. Heder, xvn 290 Hedir, to me, xvn 291. [OE. hider.~\
; ;

Hiderward,

adv. hither, vin a [OE. hiderweard.~] 317. Hidoui, Hidua, adj. awful, xvn

GLOSSARY
bly,
terri101,417; Hydously, xvi 138. [OFr. hidous.-}

adv.

title

and

introd.

[OFr. his-

torialJ}

Iliere,

Hyerof,
see 3ef ;
;

see

Her(e),

ailv,

;

Hyf,

Hy$(e),
v.

see Heie,

Heigh(e)
.

Hy,

Hight, Hy$t

(vi),

Heght

fxvii),

height, XVII 260 ; of h. t in height, XVII 125 ; on h., on high, above, up, vi 141, xvi 88, 235, XVII 136. [OE. hchpu.^

Hit, pron. 3 sg. neut. (tiom. and ace.) it, ill 27, IV a 52, &c. ; Hyt, I 19, xin a 12, &c. ; It, II 132, &c. j pleonastic, xn a 56 ; as anticipated subject, it is (ere), there is (are), I introd., H 55 2 ; if (with pi. verb, ref. to
prec. or following plural), they, villa 56, b 62, IX 139, Xlll'a

See Heigh(e).

HijtCe) (Hyght, Hihte, &c.) Hihe. See Hole, v.; Heigh(e). Hiis, see He, Hii, see Hi, //.
;

;

masc.

them, vni a 43, 44. Dat. (to) it, IX 124, 127 ; It, IV a ID, II 20 (indef. or //.). Pass. adj. His, Hys, IX 130,
1 1
;

Him,
132,
self,

Hyle,

v. to protect, I 184.

[ON.
hill,

xin a
refl.

61,

xiv c 59
VI
86.

;

Hyt[OE.

hylja.~}

itself,

Hil, Hill(e), Hyll(e), n.

n

hit,

him, his^

354, v 13, 131, xvn 337.44 2 . 466, &c. ; Hell, xn a 65, 79,

Hitte, v. to strike, to hit (a mark), V 228 ; Hit, Hyt, pa. t. v 85,

Hul (Hulles, //.), xin a 45 by hylle ne be vale, nowhere, under no circumstances,
86
1
;

X

103, 127
(late)

;

8,

;

[OE.
hitta.}

hittan

Hitte,//. v 219. from ON.

v

203.

Him, Hym(e).
Himself
;

[OE. hytt (Kt. hell}.'} See He, masc. Hit.
;

Ho, Hoc,
next),

Hymself,

interj. call a pause, v 7

-selue,

xiv a
!]

ho !, esp. used to 262 (or imper. of 13, xvil 229. [Cf.

-sylf, &c.

See He, masc.

OFr. ho
232.

Hyndrid, pp.

hindered, [OE. hindrian.}

xio

Ho, v. to
prec.]

pause,
;

xvn 411. [From
see

Hyne, n. servant, VIII a 125 ; //. labourers, vi 145. [OE. htga,
gen. pi. hlgna.~\

Ho,

pron. she
:

Hi, fern.

Hobbe

familiar form of Robert

Hypped,

fa.

t.

hopped, V 164.
;

(used contemptuously), XI b 176; Hobbe pc Robbere, xiv d 6 (see
note).

[OE. *hyppan
See Hoppit. Hir(e), Hyr(e).

cf.

hoppian.}

Hode,

See Hi, prons. Hyre, Hire, Huyre (vni), n. hire, pay, reward, VI 163, 223, vni a 133, 189, 192, &c. ; (in

n. hood, n 229, VIII a 264. [OE. hod.}
n. pi. hogs,

v

229, 174.

Hogges,
.

vni a

[OE

hogg.}

bad sense) xiv 66, xvi 167, 260. [OE. hyr.~]

Hyre,
//.

v. to hire, VI

147

;

Huyred,
[OE.

Vina

108,

307.

hyr(i]an.-]

Hirself.

Hya,
Hit
;

See Hi, pron. fern. His(e). See He, masc.;
Is.

Hia(e),/rc.
32, 53
;

sg.fem. her, in them, in 7, 8, 38 (see note). [See N.E.D., t.v. His.} Hysse. See He, masc. Hystoriale, adj. historical, VII
ace.

80; Hoylle, xvn 388 Holle, v 228. [OE. hdl.] See v. Hele, Hold(e), n. stronghold, xn a 98 captivity, xvi 151. [OE. (ge-)
61, ix
;
;

See Hol(e), adj. Hoyne ( = hone), v. to delay, XVI I 319. [? Related to Ho, v.~} Hol(e), adj. whole, sound, entire, (a)mended, V 322, vi 46, villa

Hoylle.

ace. pi.

Adtd.]

Holde, adv.
holdc.-}

loyally,

v

61.

[OE.

Holde(n),
trans,

Hold,

to

Hald(e), v. hold, keep, guard

;

5

GLOSSARY
possess,

have

;

regard as, think

;

GLOSSARY
honour).

IX 311.

[OFr. hon-

GLOSSARY
&c.

[OE. hunger.]
(to), v.

See

A-

hungrye.

76; in impers. constr. (where Mn.E. has 'I'), n 177, iva 10,

Hunt(e)
II

to hunt (after),

xv b 34
II

;

me

is

wo,

woe

is

me,
dat.

284, vnirt

n. XII b 5.
tung.~\

30; Huntinge, [OE. kuntian ; him-

33 1

fl. ace. myself,

IX 279,

xvi 325, xvii 238, &c.;

Hure. Hurt,

See Hi, pron.fem. and pi. trans, to hurt, V 223; //. and pa. t. V 243, X 56. [OFr. hurter.} HUB. See He, masc.; We. Hw-. See Wh-.
v.

xv a
124,

(pleonastic with verb of motion) Mi, poss. adj. 1 1 120, 4.

&c.

;

My,
126,
ii,

passim-.

Myn(e),

i

n

Min,

I.

See Ich

;

In, prep.

lacke, lak.

wr

Jack, xi b 176

;

70*
336.

*'//,

nobody,
&c.,
'.]
'

xvn

31, ; (my property, people, &c.), vi 206, vill a 142, xvi 217, 312, xvii 236(5J>at,/r0.). Miself(f)e, Myselue(n), noni. myself, n 566, V 293, Vina 80, ix 292, &c. ; I myself, vin a 252, xvi 67,

XV g

&c.

205,' as sb.

vin a

[ME.
laies,
/<"']

lakke,

pet-name
[OFr.
309.

312

;

ace.

and

dat.

(me) myself

assoc. with

John

b 249. ./>/. jays, xi
.

(not TV/?.), ic, me", mitt,
Self.

vin a 28, 131. [OE. me selfan, &c.] See

langle, [OFr. lape, w.

to quarrel,

vm a

jangler]
trick, delusion, XI b 137, 29, b 66. [Not known.]

xn a
;

1

Iboust. SeeEigge,v. Ic least. See Ich, pron.\ Cast. Ich, adj. 1 (after ^/.r or /a/), same, very, n 63, 455, 540; Yche,
I

Ichabbe, i sg. pres. ind. I have, xv c 9 ; Ychabbe, XV c 32 ; Ichaue, 11 209, 516. [OE. ic hxbbe (hafo, but not WS.).] See Habbe. Icham, i sg. pres. ind. I am, n

Ycham, XV*
am.~]

137, 382, 513,

xv c
23.

8,

29,

d

i

;

[OE.

ic

208,

216.
1

[OE. ilca]

See

Ilk(e), adj.

Ich, Yohe,

adj.* each, every,

n

364 (see Manere), xvii 151 (see Kinde), Vch, v 13, vi 243, XV* 6; ifA a, every, II 187, 276 (not 307) each, xvii 273

vn

179,

254,

19,

Ichil, i sg. pres. ind. I will, intend to, II 132, 212, 341, 451 ; (with ellipse of verb of motion) I will go, ii 129, 316 Ichulle,
;

170, &c.;

XV c

19;
II

ichil

you be,

471.

latow [OE.
v.

be, may ic wile,

;

;

vch

a,

VI 15, 76, 101, XIV c 20,
deyll,

Ichim =
Ichon,

wylle.~\

^Wille,

99 ; ich a
Dele, n.
;

ylk a

dele, see

Wise
II
ylc.~\

;

in ich ways, see Way, Ich, pron. each (one),
307.
;

184, 292, 295,

[OE.
;

See
;

Eche

Euerich

Ich him (ace.'), II 428. Vchon (vi, vin), pron. each one, every one, II 161, vi 90, Vina 202, &c. ; in apposition with pi. noun, xvn 279. See Ich, adj. 1 ; .] [OE. ylc +

Ichon like, adj. 2 ]>e. Ich, pron. i sg. I, II 113, in 2, i, xv (-5, </4,/6,&c.; Ic, xv^-26, 3i;Icche,xva 2,11; I, Y, passim coalescing with foil. word in Ichabbe, Icham, Ichaue, Ichil, Ichim, Ichot, Ichulle, q.v. Me, ace. and dot. (to, for) me, V 13 8 >I45>VI 205, xv a 20,^10,31 Mee, (see Reue), and passim
;

Echone, Euedchon, Ilkane. Ichot, i sg. pres. ind. I know,

xv*

23, c 10.

[OE.

ic

u-at]

See Wite(n). Ichulle. See Ichil.

Icnowe,

v.

to

know, xv g 32.

lentilman. leu, lewe,

;

[OE.ge-cnawan.~\ AKnowe(n). See Gentil. n. Jew, ix 163, xi * 201, xv 18, xvi 147, &c.
-

XVI 274;

ethic dat. (I beg),

v

[OFr.^'w, older >(>.]

GLOSSARY
If(f),

Yf,

lif.

See

let.

GLOSSARY
lohan, lohon.
6,
9,
1

John, xiv d 2,

3,
cf.

lustice,

.

justice,

vnifl 324.

[L. lohannes't OYi.Jehan] See lacke.
loie,
.

6.

Ioy(e), joy, II 6, 45, IV b 54, XII a 175, &c. ; makes ioie, rejoice, xvi 383. [OFr.
adj.

[OFr. justice^ Iwis, Iwysse, indeed (often,

certainly, in rime, /. practically meaningless), v 121, 172, vi 34, xiv b 17, xvii 550.
;

aafr.

/fit.']

lolif,

gay, joyons,
riotous mirth, 129, 182.
;

II

305.

[OE. ge-wiss, adj. gewisse.]
K-.

cf.

mid

(to)

lolitS,

.

levity,

xi

1

1

6,

[OFr.

Kache,

joli(ve*}ti]

loparde,
242.

of, there is

hazard lys no ioparde no question of, vi [OFr./M (//) parti, even
.

See also C. v. to chase, catch ; kache) his caple, urges on his horse, v 107 ; Ka;t (to\ pa. t. took hold
(of),

V 308

;

xii a

161.

Cawht.//. caught, [ONFr. cachitr,
on
.

game, doubtful chance.] lourneyes, . //. day's journeys,
IX 259.
\OVr.joitrttee.]
.

conjugated
la(f]chen. ]

anal,

of

ME.

Kaies, Kayes,
36, b 88, 89. Kalf, w. calf,
calf.}

//. keys,

xiv a
[OE.

Ipotayne,
240.
at) for

hippopotamus, IX

[Ipotaine, mistake (in for

Vina

[OE. cSg.\
282.

Qr.yfotame, convenient corruption of L. hippopotamus.,] s Ire. .S Yre, Irnebandis, //. iron bands, 7
. .

Kanel,M.(wind-pipe1,neck, V23O. [ONFr. cartel.] See Chanel.
Karol(l)e,
v. to
I

X

perform a
;

'

carol

'

24.

[OE.
1
.

f;y

+ ON. tawo
See Bond

; ;

(see next),

54, 83, &c.

Karol-

cf.

OE.

iren-bend.].

Yre,
Is,
is, I

lyng, Karolle,

Ys, His

(xi), 3 sg.pres. ind. 105, XI b 256, 9, 19, vill

I 55. [OFr. carol(l)er.] a carol, a dance accompanied with song (often used with ref. to song only),
.

.

&c. ; exists, 1x146; (without pron.) it is, I 253, 254, V 121, 2 sg. art, XV I 360 ; pi. are, &c. vni b 48, x 124, xvii 10, &c. rime requires Es (q.v.*) at I 128 (note), xvii 10. [OE. is] See
; ;

I I,

14,

&c.

[OFr. carolle.]
.

Kauelacion,
cavillacion.]

cavilling,

quib-

bling objection,

v

207.

[OFr.

Es, Nis.
Is,
?*t.

sg.

See He.
See Se(n).
198, 235.

Keyng(es). See Kyng. Kele, Keill, Keyle, v. to cool, IV a 26 (intr^) to kele (keitt) cares, to assuage sorrows, xvi
;

Ise;e, -seye, -sei^e. Isold. S,* Selle(n).

84, xvii

300; with person as

Issue, [OFr.
1st,
;

.

way

out, IX

dir. obj. ,from cares the to keyle, to preserve thee from grief, xvi I
1 1

issNe.~\ is it, xvii

8.

[OE. celan]
v. to

It Itake. lueler,
.

517. See Is. See Hit Take(n).
;

Ken, Kenne,

jeweller,
//. jewels,

xn3

150.

vn 25 (see note); to vina 14, 22, 24, xiv b
Crede), xvi 50, &c.
;

make known,
teach,
to

[OFr./<f/(r.]
luelis,
. .

4 (see know,

XI b 283.

in

daw

to ken, to

be known for

[OFr./*?.] to judge, xvi 320. [OFr. luge,

Inggement, judgement, xn3 207. [OFr./w^v/j/.] luntly, oo'o. close, x 97. [From
.

JHgier.]

a fool, xvii 248; will je it ken, you will recognize the fact, XIV b 8 understand, I inlrod. ; //. (well) known x I v b 9. [OE. cennan, prob. infl. by senses of
if
;
,

ON.
Ken.

OFr. joint, jnint, pp.]

kenna.] Cf. Knowe(n). See Cou, Kyn.

GLOSSARY
Kene, adj. keen, bold,eager, xiv a bitter (enemy), v 2, b 9, 76
;

body or mind), kind, iva 41, 44 (see note), V 312, vin a 157,
IX 56, xii a 8, kinde, in her
1

3*8.

Kepo,

.

[OE. fate.-] heed in tok no kepe
;

25, &c.

;

in hir
b

of,

own way, XI I

XII a 159.

[From

next.]

Kepe,
85
:

v. to guard, preserve, keep,

128; species, in ich kynd (without of), every kind of, xvn 151 ;

tend, II 208,

v

34

I

53

80, 230, vin a IX 2o6 XI <* *4 6 >
;

Charite), &c. kepe seynte-warie, minister in the sanctuary, VIII l> 83 ; to care to,

xvii 235

Kyndis, pi. characteristics, IV b i. [OE. (ge-]c}nd.-\

(see

Kynde,

adj. inborn, naturally belonging to one, VIII a 243, b 58 ; to his kynde name, as his

in J>e lette I ne kepe, no wish to stop you,

I

have

v 74

;

Kepynge,
cepanJ]

.

xi

70.

[OE.

Kertel.

See Vnkept. See Kirtel.
v. to
' '

Kerue(n),
.

cut,

vin a 98;

proper name, VII 70; Kynde Witt, natural intelligence, common sense, VIII a 243 (personil.). [OE. (ge-~)cynde.'\ See Vnkinde. Kynd(e)ly, adv. kindly, vi 9, VII 173, &c. [From prec. in

prune, VI 152. a cast Kest,
;

[OE.

ceorfan.'] (see Cast, .) ;
'

developed sense
feeling';

'

having natural
ge-cynde-Kce,
;

OE.

a blow, V 230 plot, treachery, V 345 used as treacherous
; '

naturally.] Kindel, v. to

kindle

trans, to

thing

(cf.

Falssyng),

v

308.

cause (sorrow),

xiva
from

10; intr.

[ON.

kast.-]

Kest(e).

See Cast, Kysse.

to begin, xiv a 19. Cf. Kele. [Rel. to ON. kynda (cf. kyndill,

Ketten. See Kntten. Keuer(e), v. to (re)gain, recover;
recover, survive, v 230 ; ' keuere), gets ', makes his way, V 153. [OE. a-cofrian, intr., and OFr. (re-}covrer, 3 sg. -keuvre, trans.] See Recoueren.
intr.

torch)

;

distinct

ME.

kind85.

Kyndom,
king,
i

len, beget.] n.

kingdom, VI
6Vtf

[OE. cyne-dom.~\
27,
ii

Kyngdome.
(iv), n. iv a 8, 66,

Kyng, King, Keyng
25,

v 207
&c.
;

Kidde, Kyd Kyend; Kyjn, See Ky}>e; Kinde; Kyn(e).
;

(note), xiv d 10 (note), Kynggis, //. XI b 284. n. king268, xvi 186; king&c. [OE. eyningn. church,

[OE. cyning, cyng, &c.]

Cou.
Kille, Kylle, v. to

Kyngdome, Kingdom,
vill a 32, *cyllan\ earliest
kill,
'

ship, XI

v

Kyn, Kynne, Ken

43. [?OE. ME. sense appar.

dom,
dom.'\

ii 206,

beat

'.]

(ill), n. sg.

Kirke, Kyrk,

Church,

kindred, relatives, III introii., vin b 8t, xvi 232 (see Ende) ; Cunnes, Kyns, kind, sort gen. sg. in enes cunnes, (of any kind), any sort of, xv.^22 ; eny kyns, vin b 20; nones cunnes, (of no kind), no sort of, XV 20 (with loss of inflexions) na kyn, X 59 (see J>ing) ; nor no kyn,
: ; .
. .

v

vin

128, vin a 85; see note to b 63. [ON. kirkja.~\ See

Cherche.
Kirtel(l), Kertel (in), n. kirtle (a short coat reaching about to the knees, worn under an outer

garment), II 229, in 39, xiv 6 1. [OE. eyrie/, Kt. *certel.~\

Kysse,
2

v.

to
t.

kiss
;

;

. any (sort of), xvi i 138; Alkyn, Wolues-kynnes. [OE. See Eny, fynn (Kt. ).] No(ne).

nor

.

.

sg.pa.

v 283

Kyssedes, Keste, 3 sg.

cf.

xi i a 178.
cessan}.]

[OE. cyssa(Ki.
See Cossej. n. country, people,
;

Kip, Kyth,
Ky])e, v. to

Kinde, Kynd(e), Kyend
.

(iv), nature, natural character (of

V52,xivc92. [OE. cyj>]>u.~] make known, reveal

GLOSSARY
"Kyjje; (MS. lyj**), imper.pl. show, vi 9 Kidde,//. revealed,
;

GLOSSARY
281.

[OE.

cdl+plante.']

See

GLOSSARY
(see note). [L. lapiddriutn, ] Lappe, . loose end, or fold, of a garment, villa 288, xv/ n. [OE. Ixppa.} Large, adj. generous, II 28
;

stones, IX 75

XVII 442
times, VI

;

erly

and late,

at all

noive late, just 162, 329. lately, [OE. See Laste. late.}

32

;

xvi

Lateyri, Latyn(e), n. and adj. Latin, I 58, 96, XI a 18, &c.

ample, VI 249 broad, large, v 157, IX 18, 155, 254 &c. Largelich, adv. generously, II 451. [OFr. large.} . Larges, generosity, v 313. [OFr. largesse.} Lascheth, 3 sg. pres. ? belabours, xv A 17. [See N.E.D., s.v.
; ;

[OFr. latin.} Latte. See Lete.
LaJ>ed,/ta. lafian.}
t.

invited,

V

335.

[OE.

Laude
384.

(of}, v. to praise (for),

XVI

[L. lauddre.}
v. trans,

Laue,

and

inlr. to pour,

vi 247, XV,- 16.

[OE. lafan.}

Lash.-}

Launce,
adj.
lance.}

.

lance,

V
t.

129.

[OFr.

Lasse, Les(se\

compar. less, smaller, iva 92, v 158, vi 131, IX 29, 48, xni b 36, &c. ; quasisf>., less, vi 241, &c. ; ? a smaller piece, xv h \ 7 ]>e lasse in werke, those who have worked less, vi
;

Launchet,
VII
135,

-it, pa.

darted, leapt,

153
vil
.

;

launchet
163.

to,

reached, lane her.}

[ONFr.

See Lance.
glade, grassy space, 103, 265. [OFr.
.

Ijaunde,

239, 240 more and
see

(see

Longe,

adv.)

;

V

78,

86,

les(se}, les
;

More

vina

adv. 161, xi a 58, &c.

and more, less, v 300,
;

la(tt)nde.}

neuer

shore, vil 170. Laund-syde, [OE. land* side.} See Lond (e).

fe lesse, nevertheless, I fi. Leest, Lo.ste, superl. least, IV b 85 both the most and the leest,
;

Law.
XI a

See Lowe, adj.
n. 1 law,
22,
2,
;

Law(e),
&c.

vma

159, 313,

xiv b 63, xvi 313,

all,

xvn
;

452.

[OE.

liessa (lies,

adv.)

l&st.}
lest,

Last, Lest, conj.

xi b 242,

xv

c

31,

xvn

55.

[OE.

]>e

customary behaviour, in doj> at Crystyn mennys I., behave as Christians, I 82. [OE. lagu, from ON.]
practice,

I&s-J>e.}

Lawe,
107.
;

2
.

mound,
to

knoll,

v

103,

Last(e), superl. adj. last, vi 187, 211, &c. quasi-sb. in at J>e,
atte, ate las((e), at last, in

Lawse,

the

end,
at

II

93,

\\i\b
in

99 (MS.
the end,

loose(n), undo, v 308 ; Lowsyd, pa. t. delivered, XVII 209. [From ME. laus,
v.
lotts,

[OE. hlaw.}

latiste),

XII a 105, b 188, &c.;
ende,

pe

laste

vni

b loi.

[OE.

latest, Isetest.}

Leche, [OE.

adj. ; ON. laus-s.} n. physician, vni

a 268.

/ace.]
.

See Atte, Late, Fnrst. Last(e), v. to endure, last, extend, iva 1,25, ix 199, xvi 66, xvii
265, dec.
pres. II
;

Lechecraft, VIII a 251. Lechery(e),
137,

(art of) medicine,

[OE.
.

lx,ce-crxft.}

sensuality, villa

Last (OE.
;

Afc*), 3 sg.

xvn

vn
58

;

335 Last, pa. t. sg. 56; be lastand, endure, iva euer to last, everlasting,

VII 2; Lastynge, n. endurance, perseverance, IV b 73, XI b 122. [OE. l&stan.} Lat(e). See Lete. Late, adv. late, I 108, VI 178,

Ledderis, ladders, x 53. [OE. hl&dder.} 1 Lede, n. man, knight, V 27, VII voc. my good man, vi 62, 75
;

53. n. pi.

[OFr. lecherie}

182

;

Leyde, XVII

48, in every

lijfyng /., everybody ; Leudo, v 265, 321, 353. [OE. (allit.)
lead, prince.]

xiv

i 91,

&c.

;

lately, recently,

Lede, Leede,

w. 2 people, country,

GLOSSARY
infurgh land and lede, over the in leede, on earth, earth, I 227
;

Leymonde.

See Leme.

70, 135. [OE. libde, pi., and lead, fem.] Lede(n), Ledyn, Leyd (xvil),
v. to lead, bring,

xvi

Lele, Leel, adj. lawful, VIII 6 109; faithful, xvi 65 ; according to covenant, xvn 446. [OFr.
lee!.-]

XVI 391
32,
II

;

I 153, IX 214, guide, direct, XI a 55

;

Lelly, adv. loyally, faithfully, V 56, 60, xvi 403. [From prec.]

topass.lead

(life),

xv h

20,

xvn
;

393.
I

iva 49,63^1 Ledys,
t.

pres.pl. IV b 55

Ladde,/.
63,

Leme, v. to shine, flash, v 158 Leymonde, pres. p. VH 153. [OE. *leomian ON. Ij6ma^
;

;

584; Ledde,
pp.
.

HI 55;
202.

Lemes.
[OE.

See Lym(e).
n.
lover,

Led,

treated,

xvil

Lemman,
leofrnott.]

xv<*

20.

[OE. Isbdan.-] at his /., under his Ledeing, control, XIV b 54. [From prec,] Leder. See Ly'fer. Loders, //. leaders, xiv b 94.
;
.

*/S>f.man;
v.
'

early

ME.
to

Lende,
'

trans,

and
(on),

intr.

land

;

lende

to
;

come,
lendes

fall
(ill)

(upon), xvi 47, 54
brings
(into),
t.

[From Lede(n).] Leede. See Lede,
Leef, Lef,
.

IV a

44

;

w. 2

Lended, pa.
45
;
. .

leaf; item (with ref.

Lent, //.

. to books), villa 251 ; sctle at a lef, made light of, vin b 1 01 Leues, Leves,//. II 244, ; vn 103, ix 1*4, xv 6 14. [OE.

away, xv<:

n,

remained, xiv * gone, taken 39 ; Ylent (on},

come

[OE. (upon), xv c 24. lendan, go, arrive; the ME.
sense development
is

obscured
1
"]

leaf.-]

Leel

Lere. Leere. See Lele Lpes, Lese, n. falsehood ivithxvi 1 27, out(en) lees, &c., truly,
; ; ;

by confusion with Lene, v. Lene, adj. lean, n 459. [OE.
hlsene.'] Lene, v. 1 iene,

xvn
Leest
Lef,

390. Lesing.
;

[OE.
;

leas.]

See
See

to grant, give, vin 017, (absolutely} villa 215; Lante, t. v 182 ; pa. Lent,//, iv a 21.
;

Leet
;

Leeue.
Leue, v*
adj. dear,

Lasse

Lete

;

Leof (xiv),
;

n

102,

*4o6

eager,

xiv

c

(auk. in

zw.),
/.

xv^
-were
;

6 Leue 10; as sb.,
;

[OE. l&nan.'} Lene, v.* to lean lened (with), lened (to), inclined, V 187: leant (on), V 264. [OE. hleo)iian.~\

par, in

Leuer, cornto, I would Leueste, most rather, II 177 pleasing (to God), vin b 89. [OE. leaf.}

dear one, VI 58.

Leng; Lengar,
adv.

-er.

.S><r

Long(e),

me

Lenghe,
lengttj]

n. length,

vi 56.

[OE.

Lef,
see

see Leef; 1 Leue, v.
.

Lef(f)e, Lefte,

Lent. See Lende, Lene. f. 1 Lenten, n. spring, xv b i ; Lenten-tyde, Lent, I 242. [OE.
lencten, lencten-lTd.']

Leggaunce,

(performance of)

duty to his liege lord, xiv c 67. [OFr. legiance.} Legg, n. leg, vi 99, v 160, vin a
1 6. [ON. legg-r.] Legge, Lei, Ley(e),
1

Lenpe,
Leof.

length,

Lennthe, Lenght, n. v 248, xvil 123, 2^7. [OE. /<?/.]
See Lef.
;

&c.

See

Lepe,

Lay, v, Leid(e), Leyd(e). See Lay, v. ; Lede, Lede(n). See Leue, Leif(f), Leyf, Leyue.
. ;

v. to leap, run lepej hym, gallops, V 86 ; Lepte, pa. t. leapt, XII a 160. [OE. hl'eapan,
.

str.]

Lepys,
Icpys,

//. leaps

;

wyth sttndyr
separately,
I

f.

1

and v?

?

dancing

GLOSSARY
2^4 (but
see

Sender, and note).

cease, stop,
let be,
left
(ii)

Lere,

.

face,

VI 38.

[OE.
to

hleor.']

To

See Lyre.

88,
v. trans,

vm

n 114, xvi 234; unheeded, XI I 94. give up, abandon, iv a a 266, xiv c 6; lose,
II

Lere, Leere,
instruct,

vm a
39'
!

teach,

II

177; cease,

279; neglect
(iii)
;

251,

xvi

55,
;

(to),

xiv c

70.
if,

Lette as,
lete lijte

12 7>

33>
17,

intr. to learn,
(t. e.

behaved as
of, little

V 189

iva

xiv b 57, xvi 313, 321

make (made)

light of, give

Lerid,//. educated

clergy),

XI a 38. [OE. txran, teach.] Lerne(n), v. to learn, II 39, vn 20, &c. Imrne(n), 29, 34, 36. [OE. leornian.'} Lernyng(e), learning, xi b 169 instruction, in for I. of us, for our instruction, vn 32 knowledge, xvi 85. [OE. Uornung,

xm

a 161, thought to, ; lytel ylete by, held small esteem, *vill b 3. [OE. forms with a laetan, lelan ; xiv c 63
in

vm

perhaps due partly to
(? orig. in

ON.

Idta,

.

;

and partly to early shortening
imper. sg.).] Lette, n. hindrance, obstacle, XII a 72 ; delay, xn a 154. [From
next.]
.SteYlet.

;

intr.]

Les(e).

See Lasse, Lees.
1

Lette(n),
hinder,
;

Lose,

v.

to

lose, II

vn 148, b 99 ; Ylore, 209, 545. [OE. (be-, for.} -loren ; cf. losian, leosan, pp. be lost.] See Forlorn. 2 a 68. [OE. Lose, w. to glean,
Lost,
II

IX 130; Lose, //. XII a 187 ;

vm

178, V 74, xvn 363 Lore, Lome, xvi 198
;

Let (of, fro), v. to prevent, keep (from), 235. xi a 41,* 3, 155, 179, XVII 341 (subj.}, 470; Let,//, xn* 10 ; Lettid, xi b 181 ; lette to sue (studie), prevent
v?4.
from following (studying), xi a 41 b 112. [OE. lettan.'} Dis,

vm

tinguish. Lete.

lesan.~\

Lettynge, -ing

(to}, n.

hindering
26, b 307
7,
;

Losing, w. a lie, 1 1 465; Lesyngis,
XI b 39 ; lesyngis on, lies against, XI b 98. [OE. leasing.'] See Lees. Lesse. See Lasse. Lesso(u)n, M. lesson, villa 272, XIII b 19. [OFr. leco(u)n.'] See Lasse Last, conj. Lest(e).
//.
;

(from), hindrance,

xia

delay, interruption, 80. [OE. letting.]

vm a

xi b

Lete, Lette (iv a 88), v. to let, &c.; Lat(e), iv b 41, x 30; a Lat(e), Latte, imper. sg. 40, 262, xvi 194, &c. Let(e), ii 114, v 140, &c. Letej,//. v 319. Leet,/a. t. sg. IX 223, 332 Let(e), ii 386, in 34, &c. Lette, v 189; Lete, pi. ii 74; Ylete,//. in 32, *\\ub

Lettres, n. pi. letters, in introd. ; Letturs, writings, vil 26, 59. [OFr. Icttn.} I' e J)e 3i 3 SS- f res - softens, is assuaged, vi 17. [OE. (ge-) lijriattf -leopian, distinct fiom
tipian.]

vm

;

Leude. Leue,

.

See Lede, . J permission, villa 68;

;

leave, in tok his leve,

xn a

31.

;

[OE. leaf, fern.] 1 Leue(n), v. to leave (alone, behind, off), abandon, neglect, cease (to), V 86, xi b 10, go, 301, xni a 56, XVI 284, &c. ; Lef(f)e, iv b 66, xvi 376 Leif(f), X 156, 198; Leuep, imper. pi. stop, I 265. Left(e), 74, vn pa. t. and pp. I 71, iv 26,xi 261, XII b 179, xvi 314,
;

;

74, iv b 41, &c. ; bequcathe, ill 32, 34; cause to (as leet make, caused men to make, had it made), ix 223, 232, xil 192 let untrusse, unloaded, XII b 52
3.
(i)

To

let,

allow,

n

;

;

forming periphrastic XI v 90; lete ben,

imper.,
latte
be,

&c.;
VII

Leuid,
74,

126,

X

Leuyt, Levit, 159, xiv b 78;

GLOSSARY
Tleft, //.

xni

b 8, 41.

For

to

hue Jor
to,
I 21
;

to,

that

you may cease
be
left

to lefe, to

undone,
laefan.}

avoided, IV b 66. See Blene.

[OE.
2

II 124, &c. ; living being, iva 43, XII a 117, 121 ; lef lit/, beloved (one), 102, *4o6. Lyfes, gen. sg. ix 328 Lyue},

n

;

vi 117
to grant, in

(see

Leue(n), Leeue,

z>.

Liue, Lyue,

Crist leue, Christ grant, XIV c 8 7>95- [QE. If/an.] SeeLeue, n. Leue(n), v? to believe, V 60, 353, vi 65, 109, vino 84; Leyf,

(being still 168 ; bi my lyue, during my life, Viil a 95 ; yn ]>ys lyue, in this

Longe, adv.}, 218; dot. sg. \\ 583 alive), in 16, xn a

world,
(lede

Leyue,

iniper.,

vin3

3,

24.

I 170; vpon fyue, alive vpon I. = man), V 27.

[OE. (ge-yefan.] Ylefde.

See Beleue,
See Leef, Lef,
I

Leue, Leu-, &c.
Liue(n).

[OE. lif.~\ See Liue(n). holiness of life, Lyf-holynesse, b 84. [OE. lif+Miignes.]
.

vm

Lyflich, adj.
62.

active,

xivt

93.

Leued,
Leef.]

adj. leafy,
.

[From

[OE.

Itf-lic.']

Liflode, Lyflode, n. (means of)
lady, mistress, II 53,
;

Leuedi,
89.

living, sustenance, food,

347. 455, xv c 23, &c. ; XII a 50, 144, &c. Lady, gen. sg. in cure Lady day,

Ladi,
I

Levyn, n. lightning, xvn 346. [? OE. *lefn- <*lau(h}mni- (cf.
Goth. lauhmnni).~]

242.

[OE.

hlxfdige.~]

b 17, 230,267, 284,3 43, 47, 25. [OE. ttf-lad.-} left (hand, Lift, Lyfte, Left, adj. &c.), v 78, ix 69, xin b 39, &c.

vnia xn

[OE.

fyft.-]

Levyr,
[OE.

n. liver

;

/.

and long,

allit.

elaboration of hert, XVII 390.
lifer.-]

Lift, n. sky, x 100. [OE. lyft.'} See Loft(e). Lyfte, v. to raise, iva 15, V 241 ; Lyft(e), /A iva 9, vi 207 (see
Lyj>er). [ON. /,//.] Lyf-tyme, n. lifetime, vni a [OE. Rf+tttHa.'] Ligge(n), Lygge, Lig, v. to

Lew.

See Lo.

27.
lie

Lewed(e),
VIII b
lerid

adj. lay, ignorant, uneducated, 1 1 1 introd,,
4,

Lewid,
3,

xi a

xn

b 144;

(down,

idle, &c.),

be (lodged,
16,

and lewid,

XI a 38.

[OE.

situated, &c.), II 74, Vlll

l& we de.~\ LewtS, n. loyalty, fidelity, V 298, 313. [OFr. /()/*.] SeeLele. Lhord, &c. See Louerd. Lyand. See Ligge(n). Libben, v. to live, xva 10;

XIII a 53
list), 2

Lye, vn 172,1x19; List(OE.
3 sg.
is
; pres. LyeJ>, to the point, is admissible,

(snbj.),

xvn

409

;

sg.

XV/2

Libbe,
beth,
20,

XV c 5 LibLybbeth./m.//- villa
i

sg.

pres.

;

.

71.

[OE.

libban,

libbe,

IibbaJ>.~]

See Liue(n). See

Liggeth, lies idle, villa 156; Ligis, xvn 84; Lys, exists, VI 242 Li)) (OE. ii 243, xii a 95; Ligge{>, lip-), pi. II 441. Vina 15; Lyse, iv a 61. Lay, pa. t. sg. I 181,
;

VIII b 93

;

Lich(e); Lyckend.
Likne.

Lyk

;

n 133, ix 286, &c. //. II 394, 399, X i (were encamped), &c.;
;

Lie,

v. to tell

lies,

vni a

227.

[OE. le\o-)gan.-} Lye. See Ligge(n).
Lif,

Lyfe (obi. stem Lif-, and Lyu- &c.), n. life, manner of life, lifetime, I 199, v 44, vi 32,
Viil a 170, xi a 57, b 40, xvn 398, &c. ; Liffe, xvi 66 Liif,
;

Lay;, subj. xi a 52. Lyand, pres. p. X 55 Ligand,xiv3 71 Liggeand, II 388 (see note) Lyggyng % i 139. Liggenoute, be abroad, out of doors, VIII b 1 6. [OE. licgan the^) forms
; ; ; ;

in

i,

xiv

b,

xvn

prob. represent
Kggja.']

dial.

Kg

from ON.

GLOSSARY
Lightnes,
n. 1 splendour,

xvn

16.

GLOSSARY
VIII a 359, xi b 84, XII a

181,

&c. Lyre,

[OE.
w. 1
2
.

lippa.} face, xvi
flesh,

119.

[ON.

hlyr.}

See Lere.
calves,

Lyre, [OE.

v

160.

lira.'}

See Ligge(n). Iiys(e), List. List(e), Lyst(e), v. impers.
desire,

to

wish (as me list, I desire), iv a 77, v 65, 74, xvi 68, 277 piob.pers. at ix 302, xvi 313 pat hym list after, what he has a desire for, vn 20; List, fa. t.
; ;

168, vi 117, 70, &c. ; Lif(fe), Lyf(e), ivo 17, 73, xvi 68, 70, xvn 4, 58, 145, &c. ; Leue, xvi 243, 322, 353, &c. ; Lyfed, 2 sg.pa. t. vi 1 23 pres.p. living, (while) alive, iv b 31, xn a 171, xvi 55, xvn 47, 48, 73, &c. ; lyuc men, let men live, xi a 46 linen bi, &c., live on, II 257, VIII b 26 (but lyue on, VIII b 46, (fee.) ; lyue (leue) with, live by, vin b 44, xvi 160. [OE. lijian, leofian.} See Lib; ;

vma

VII 166.

[OE.

lystan.}

ben, Lif.

Lyste, n. joy, vi 107. [Alteration of Lust, under infl. of prec. ;
or

Lo, Loo,

interj. lo

!

II

xvn

ON.

lyst.}

Lystens, imper. pi. listen, XIV b [OE. *htysnan (ONth. 57. lysna) infl. by hlystan.~\
Lite, adv. little ; hot gode but little worth, II 258.
lyt.}
lite,

Lew, xvn 507 we loo, ahs V 140 (see We, interj.}. [OE. Id ME. vowel and usage show
;

239; look, see,

n

381, 556, 505, 507;
!

;

infl.

of

Lode,
lad.}

of Loken.] n. load? xii b 26.
I

[OE.
[Cf.

[OE.
delay, to
hlita,

Lyte,

n. waiting

;

on

lyte, in

Lodesman, n. leader, OE. ldd-mann.~\
Lofers,
n, pi.

39.

V

235.

[From ME.

liten,

lovers,

IV a 50.

expect, await, tarry; to trust.]

ON.

[From Louye.]
Lofte,

Litel,

-ill,

Lytill.Littel, Lyttel,
c),

v

Lutel (xv

&c., adj.

little,

. air, in on lofte, aloft, 193. [ON. loft, a loft.} See Alofte, Lyft.

small, slight, unimportant, iv b ' 45, vi 214 (or adv. little time there'), 244, IX 14, 21, 141, XV a 6, c 3, &c. ; quasi-sb. in a lityl(l),

Logede, pa.

t.

dwelt, VII

62.

[OFr. logier.'} Lo}e, Lob, See Louj.
Lofce, //. locked, i 101. [OE. See VnlokIfuan, pp. locen.} ynne. Loke(n), Look, v. to look, i 124, xvn 129, &c. ; Lokyt, pa. t. vn 36 ; Yloked, pp. in 58.
Intr.
II
(i)

&c., a little, v 298, ix 62 ; ? a small piece, XV h \ 7 ; somewhat
(adv.),
little

507

;

xvn
wyth

v 199, ix 103, no; a -way (adv.), V 78, 103, XVII for litill, for little cause, 187 ; Htelor noujt, little or
lyttel,

to look, gaze,

I

124,
;

nothing, xi

188 (adv.), 258; with little result (or

?soon), VI 215; Litel, Litle, Lyttill, adv. little, IV b 24, vn 36, vili* 3, XI b 253, &c. [OE. lylel, adj.] See Lite. Lib, Lyth, n. limb, vi 38, xiv c
93.
Li]>,

ni, in 34, v 78, &c. ; have an expression, vin a 315 appear, vin a 170; loken (apf)on, look at, 179, xib 175; on lusti to loke, read, VI I 75

vma
;

pleasant to read, vn 15 ; lake agaynste, gaze (straight) at, XVI

[OE./#.]
Lith.
See Ligge(n).
;

92
to
sluggish,
evil, II

;

loke

to,

look

at,

V 265

;

(ii)

make

Lyper, Leder, adj. bad

(iii)

investigations, VII 36 ; to see to it, take care ; foil,
subj.,

xva

289; as
? is

sb., in

to lyper is

by pat and
152,
129.

n

165,
7,

xvi

lyfte,

turned towards

211

;

without conj.,
39,

iva

VI 207. [OE. lyj>re.~] Liue(n), Lyue(n), v. to

19, 46,
live,

vin a

xiv d

xvn

Trans, to watch over, in

GLOSSARY
God fe mot
you
loke,

in his keeping,

may God have v 171 ; ad-

the the

judicate, III 58 ; ordain, decree, VIII a 31 3. Lake what, consider

argument) the less (work) more (pay), VI 240 Longer, XVII 531. [OE. longe, Idnge; compar. ling (adv.), lengra
;

what

(i.e.

whatever, interrog.*),

(adj.).]

VI 103
indef.).

(cf.

OE.

loc(a)

hwxt,
VII 26.

Long(e),

v. 1 to

long,

vn

113;

[OE.

locian.}

Langand, /w./. in langandes,
longs, iv a 91.

Lokyng, n. examination, [From prec.]
Lokke},
160.

[OE. longian,

n. //. locks (of hair),

v

Long(e),

ldngian,~\ v.*

;

longe to (into), to

[OE.

locc.']

Lollare,-ere, n. idler, vagabond, VIII b 2, 4 ; Lollareue, gen. pi.

VIII* 31. to lounge ;
143
53.
;

see Piers PI.

[From ME. fallen, 0x215.]
n.

v 313, xivt Longande, pres. p. that belongs, VI 102. [From ME. (t)long, adj. OE. ge-ldng
belong 2 5> 53
(to), befit,
5

;

(on),

dependent

(on).]
n. longing,

See

Lomb(e), Lamb,

lamb, IX used of Our Lord, vi 47,
.

Bylongeth.

Longinge, -yng,

vn

[OE. 16mb, Idmb.'] tool, weapon, V 241, vin b 47. [OE. lotna.] Lond(e), Land(e), n. land,

Lome,

119, xv c 24; Langyng (til), [OE. longing (for), iva 93. langtmg, Idngung.'] See Lcue-

country, soil, I 25, n 208, 355, vil 163, Vina 267, ix 179, XIV b 63, &c. ; in land(e) t on earth, xvi 68, 314, xvn 145;

longinge.

Loiigith, 3 sg. pres. lengthens, ? beats out long, XV h 1 7. [From

Long, adj.~\ Lording, -yng,

n.

man

burgh land and

lede,

I

227

(see

Long,
399.

Lede, *.). [OE. n. lung (see Levyr),

I6nd, land.-]

xvn

[OE.

hingen.-]

rank, n 26, 520 ; sir (as a polite address, esp. of minstrel to his audience), n 23, 204. [OE. See Louercl. hlafording.~\

of high

See Langage. Long(e), adj. long, II 506, IX 1 52, 155, &c. ; longe clothes, clerical garb, Vin b 42 ; tall, vin b 24 ;

Lougage.

Lordischipes, -is,
estates,

ti.pl.

lordships,

XI b

97,

141.
of)

[OE.

hlaford-scipe.'] Lore, n. (method

teaching,

lasting long,

I

203,

vin a

7

;

home, your eternal home I 207 (OE. long ham) for long jore a long while, VI 226 pe long day, the I. night ouer, al pe woke I., all day (&c.) long, VI 237, Vil 166, xill a 28 tedious, IX 267. [OE. (cf. next)
long
(after death),
; ,

py

XI a 39, xili b 28. [OE. ldr.~] 1 Lore, Lome, //. of Lese, v.
Lorel(l)is,.//. good-for-nothings, wastrels, xi 140, 161, 173. [Prob. from prec.] See Loseles.

;

Los,

n. fame,

xiv

c

in.

[OFr.

/OS.']

;

Loseles, n.
1 1

pi.

wastrels,

vni a
lose(n),

Idng, ting.-}

6.

[Prob. from

ME.

Long(e), Lang, adv. a long while,
VIIIa 9, b 8 4> XV 19, XVII 244, &c. after an advb, gen,, in hys lyuej longe, fise dayej longe, all his life (this day) long, VI 1 1 7, I73((/". prec.); Leng, compar. longer, II 84 ; Lenger(e), Lengar, I 79, II 330, V 235, xi* 130, xn b 146, xvi 68, 193 ; euer pe lengerpe lasse
335,
332>
J
;

variant of lore(n~) pp. of Lese,
z;.

v

1

]

See Lorel(l)is.
n. lying flattery (of

Losengerye,
a
parasite),
losengerie.]

vin a

137.

[OFr.

Lossom, Lossum. See Louesum. Lost, n. loss, vni b 101. [Rel. to 1 cf. OE., ME. /.] Lese, v. Lote, n. noise, V 143. [ON. Idt
;

(pi.),

behaviour, noise

;

cf.

Bere,

fe more, the further (you pursue

K. 1 ]

GLOSSARY
Tio\>,

Lothe, adj. hateful, loath, unwilling, xiv c 6.
la},, adj.]
.

I

9

;

(note).

[OE.
n. 1

lah-lic.']
1

See
;

[OE.
lab,

Lawe,

Louyng, Lufyng,
vi
1

tt.

love

be-

Lope,
n.]

grief,

7.

[OE.

loved (one), iv a 5 (note), 56. [From Louye.] Distinguish
next.

Lopli, Loplich, o#. horrible, n 78 unpleasing, II 461. [OE.
;

Louyng,
405.
prec.

2
.

praise, iv
lofung.'}

a 24, xvi

ld}-lic.']

Loud(e),

adj. loud,

n

[OE.
n.

Distinguish

511, XII a
all cir-

138 ; loud or still, under cumstances, XIV b 54.

Loupe,
which

any jewel of imperfect
(fsp. sapphire, with often joined), IX 116.

[OE.

brilliance
it is

Mud.} Loue, n. love, Louue, xv a
trod., iv

II 2
1
;

*I2,

55, &c. ; Luf(e), I in-

[OFr.
109.

loupe.']

Lowable, adj. praiseworthy,
[OFr.
louable.']

VIII b

xvii 82; with object, gen. (as mi lordes hue, love for my master), 11 518 (note), villa 19, 214 ;// loue, love of thee, 027; for lone
a
i,

5,

Low(e), Law,

vm

oray, in any event, II 571. [OE. //.] See Louye.

adj. low, vil 102, 137, XVII 21 ; near the bottom, ; lowly, vni a 223, &c. ; heije and lou>e, all men, xiv c TOO ; adv. low, v 168, xil b 11, &c. ; thus low, here below, in so

X

vi 187

Louely,

adj. gracious, beautiful,

lowly a place,
lag-r.~\

xvn

173.

[ON.

vni o 10, 272, xvi 119. [OE. luf(e}lic.-\ See Luflyly. Lou(u)e- longinge, n. unsatisfied love, xv a 9, c 5. [OE. lufu +
pleasant,

Low(e),
159.

.

flame,
logi.~\

vn

136, 152,

[ON.
v.

Lowe,
cf.

to

longung.]

See Longinge.
lord, (the)

praiseworthy,

to /owe, praise ; II 12 (MS. Harl.);

Louerd,

n.

Lord,
I,
1 1
,

Sir

Gaw.

1399,

an<i

(f r

master, husband, xv g &c. ; Lhord, ill introd.,

n,
29,

46; Lord(e),
19, 272,
hlaford.-]

n

120, 518, villa

idiom) Wale. [OFr. Allowe. Lowsyd. See Lawse.

loner.'}

See

xn

a 157, &c.;
77.

Lor[OE.

Lowte,

v. to

dene, gen. pi. vni

pat, rel.)

bow trans, (but see bow before, reverence,
;

Loues,
[OE.

.

hlaf.]

//. loaves, VIII a 278. See Pese-lof.

xvz' 4; Lutte,/a. /. sg. bowed, V 187 ; refl. v 168. [OE. lutan,
str.]

Louesum, -som, adj. beautiful, lovely, II in, 460; Lossom, -sum, xv b 17,^15; Lufsoum,
as sb., lovely one, vi 38.

Lud, n., in on hyre lud, own language, xv c 4.
Lufe,

Tin her
[?

OE.
XVII
;

[OE.
;

leaden, lyden, language.] n. palm of the hand,

Lou}, pa. t. sg. laughed, II 314 Lo}e, V 321 Loh (on} smiled
;
,

462. Luf(f)-.

[ON. /#.]
See
1
.

Loue-

;

Louy(e)

15. \QE..hl&hhan, (upon), pa. t. hloh.~\

xv c

Louyng,

Luflyly, adv. courteously, in seemly manner, v 108.
Louely.]

v 321

;

[From
re-

Louy(e), Louie,

v. to love, like,
;

v

27, 31, vni a 202 Loue(n), IX 100, 101, XII a 5, &c. Luf(e), Luffe, iv a 4, b 7, v 300, xvi 403, xvn 47, &c. ;
II 34,
;

Lunatyk,

adj. suffering

from

current fits of insanity (thought to depend on the changes of the

Yloued, pp.
lufan.~\

II

123.

[OE.
vi

moon), ix 93. Lurdans, n. pi.

[L. lunaft'cus.] rascals, XVI 102.

Louyly,

adj.

?

lawful,

205

[OFr. lourdein, lazy fellow.] Lurnede, Lurnep. See Lerne

GLOSSARY
Lust, 59
. ;

lust,

pleasure, desire, iv b 17, ix 277.

iva

16,

perties),

IX 63. [OFr. mai.J

See.

[OE.

Dea\v.

/5/.]

Lustful,
256.

SeeL-yste. adj. pleasure-loving, XI b

Maid(e).
virgin,
I

^Make(n).
.

Mayde(n), Maiden,
41,
11

[OE.

lust-ful.']
1

64,

vm 0/323,,
58,,

maiden.,

Lusti, adj. pleasant, vil
Lust.]

5.

[From
Lowte.

xv

i 7,

&c.

[OE. ma>gden:\
adj. male, ix

Mayll, Male,
See Litel
;

Lutel Lutte.
;

xvn
Mayn,

152.

[OFr. ma{s}ls:~] n. might, xvil 310. [OE..
See

Ma.

See Make(n), Fai.

Maad(e),
Make(n).

Mad(e),

&c.

See

Mais; Maister.
Mister.

Makefu.)

;;

Madde,
Madde,
[From

adj.
.

mad, xvi 247.

[OE.

Maysterful,

adj. arrogant, VI 43,.

(ge-}miedd, pp.] to act madly,

v

346.

[From Maistre

prec.] Mageste". n. majesty,

vn

next.] .. (-er, -ur), Mayster, lord, Lord, 11413, vi 102, viii,.

i.

[OFr.

majeste.]

Magre".

Ma;tyly v 194,

,

See Maugre", prep. adv. powerfully, forcibly,
222.

xiu a 3; master, v 22, vina' 4'> 3 36, 314, XV A 17; maysterofgi-amere, a title, xiu b 37 (seenote). [OFr. maistre; OE..
nise-gester,]

\Q?Lmmktig-Ita.]

See Myst(e). Mai, v.i St. zpres. (ind. and subj.}, am able to, can, may, may well, have reason to, &c., iv a 31, XII a 66, xiv c i, &c. May(e),
;

iv a 6, 36, &c. May(e), 2 sg. iv a 20, xvi 173, &c. Meist = meiht ; see Appendix, p. (
; ;

Maistrie, Maystrie, mastery, VIII a 323 ; for the maystrie (OFr. pour la maistrie), to the utmost possible degree, ix 233 ; pi. (partly due to OFr. maistrise, sg.) in make maistries, do a
.

6; 278), Myjtfe), 452, vill a 217, b 35. Mai, 61, ix 213, &c. ; Moun, vi 176 Mowe, I 115, VIII a 40, IX 164, &c. Micht, Mycht, pa. t. (ind. and subj.\ was able to, could, might, &c.,
II

xv g

Mi 3 t,

wonderful, mighty (here masterful, high handed) deed, xvi 116, 202, 2 1 6, 2 1 7. [OFr. maistrie.\

Make,

.

mate,

xv3

20, c 18,

31,,

May,//, iv a

;

xvn 139. [OE. Make^n), Mak, v.

(gi)iHaco.] to make, do

;

X

&c.; Mihte, Myhte, xna 16, Mo3t(e), vi 75, XIV c 36, &c. 67, 115, 119, Moghte, \\ b 31.
;

17,139, &c.,Mi3t(e),My;t(e), I 16, n 221, Vina 133, xia 44, b 283, &c. Myjtte, xi b 30, 103 ; Myght(e), I 184, ix 276,
;

(with or without to) cause, compel; villa 205, 280, IX 120, 206, xiv b 87, &c. ; Ma, x 14, 167? Mass, 3 sg. iv a 15 ; Mat;, vt

'

(ineaht, miht, 2 sg.) ; [OE. late pi. mugon, subj. muge\ pa. t. tnihte (late muhte).'} 1 -Mai, May, n. maiden, vi 75,xva

mxg

6,

16,

c

28,

Introduction

xii. cf.

mx-r, gen. meyj-ar;

May,

May

g)N.mxg, woman (in verse).] E. z May, II 57, iv a 57 dew, dew gathered in May
.

;

^thought

to

have special pro-

Mad,. 383. 1 39, n 20, vi Maid(e), x 5, xvn 3 (2 sg.) 28, &c. Maked, u 329, 498, &c. Maadfe), //. XI b 101, 196, &c.; Mad, vi 126, vin b 74, &c. Maid(e), X 3, xvn 73, &c. Ymad, in introd.\ Ymaked, villa 180. Mad snmoun, caused (men) to summon (them), vi 179; makes ioie, rejoice, xvi 383 it maketh, brings it about (that), villa 199;
179, &c.
; t
; ; ; :

vin a

350 Mais,//. X 72 Man, VI is2; Mase, xiv 34, xvi 116; Makes, Maketh, ittipet. pL
;
;

14, xvi Made(n), pa. 1.

GLOSSARY
made of, I summed up Mn. E. idiom), vm b 5;
ich also (as
see

fashion,

vnia
17,

431,

XHl

104; custom, n 26; kind, sort,

Qvvart, Ylet, &c. [OE. macian ; with the reduced

Dere,
cf.

IX 102,

forms

Taken.]
75.
;

139, &c. ; any (ich) matter, any (every) kind of, II a 213 ; with sg. form 364,

vm

Makele?, adj. matchless, VI [OE. ge-maca + leas.']

after al(le),

meny, and numerals
II

Maker,

maker, causer, I 204 Creator, VII i, XVI a, XVII I.
.

(usually without of], introd., VIII a 20,
9,

xm a 37, b
the

302, III
i,

&c.

[From Maken.] Makyng(J), . building, work, I 183; making, XI b 230. [OE.
macung.~\ Malais, hardship, II 240. [OFr. See Ese. malaise.']
.

(of),

denyse, describe,
;

tell,

maner

Manere},

264, 268; * vi 22 //. courtesy,

IX

Malice, Mails, n.
ill-will,

evil

vn

purpose,
119,
1

(MS.marerej). [OFr. man(i)ere.'] Manes(se). See Man(e). Manfully, adv. manfully, X 117. [From OE. maun + -full.'] Manhode, n. virility, ix 80. [OE.

177, ix

xvi

mann + had."]

302. [OFr. malice.'] Malt, pa. t. sg. melted, v

Mani(e), Many(e),
2.

[OE.

meltan, pa. t. malt.] Man. See Make(n).

Man(e), Manne,

;/.

man, mani

i 133, n 294, in 41, vni'a loo, &c. Meny(e), vin^36, xnia Moni, Mony, v 201, 6, &c. vi 212, &c. ; mani (tnoni) a,
; ;

adj.

many,

kind, (any) body, one,

102,1127,
;

ivai2,62,xvii236,&c Mon, V32, 170, 271 (note), vi 160,
&c. Gen. sg. (often generic,equiv. to 'human', &c.), Manes(se), II 552, xvi 16; Mamies, -is, a 234 -ys, -us, in 54, (note), XI b 113, 114, XII b Mans, in 139, xvi 246, &c. mans wonder, monster, XVII

&c., many a, II 432, XIV c 68, 92, &c. ; (without a), i 157 (note), n 520, xvn 355, 436 ; many . . .fold(e\ see Fold(e).

[OE. manig,

mettig,

tnonig'.~\

vm

Manyere.

See Maner(e).
multi-

Many fold, adj. many times
plied, great, XII b 154.

[OE.

;

manig-fdld.']

See Fold.

Mankyu,

.

mankind, xvi I 71.
.

Manne, dat. sg. in 19. Men(e), //. i 32, iv b 9, &c. Men(ne), Mene, <?.//. men's,
408.
;

[OE. man-cyn(n).~\ manMaukunde, Mankyu de, kind, xni a 2, xvi 15. [OE. mann + cynd; cf. prec.] Mansed. See Mannus, &c.
;

people's, &c., iv b 69 (footnote), VIII b 29, XIII b 20; Mennes, a 96, XI b -ys, -us, I 82, 119, 192; Mens, iv b 50, *6g

vm

Man(e); Manaced.

Mappa Mundi,

n.

map, or de-

Manaced, pa. t. threatened, vm a 163; Mansed, v 277. [OFr.
manecier, manasser;
cf.

(footnote). mon(n}.'] See

[OE. man(tt}, Men, Noman.

scriptive geography, of the world, IX 301. [Latin; also appears in ME. in Fr. form mappe-

monnde.~]

Comsed,
[OFr.

Mar, Marre,
xvi
1

v. to

hinder, stop,
(su/>j.')
;

for the reduction.] Manans, n. threat, X 72.

16,

XVII 129

marre

..to, prevent from,

nianafe,vt\th confusion of suffix.] Mandep, 3 sg. fres. sends forth, XV b 16, 25. [OFr. mander.']

destroy,

xvi 173 ; to v 194, xvi 208. [OE.

(in), n. (a) Maner(e), manner, way, I 80, x 103, XI a xni b 30 (without foil, of}, n, &c. ; in his manere, after his

Many ere

merran, hinder, spoil.] n. merchant, XII b 166. [OFr. marchand.] Marohaundise, n. commercial

Marchant,

dealings, XI b 290.
c/iandise.~\

[OFr. mar-

GLOSSARY
Marches,
IX 273.
.//. (frontiers), regions,

Magre*,

X

197

;

m. Medes (}t)

[OFr. marche.~\ Marche, v. marcheth (to, upon), borders on, IX 193, XII a 61. [OFr. marchir, from prec.] Mare. See Mor(e).
;

chekes, in spite of

Meed

(you),

villa 41, 151 (an extension of ME. maugre fin, his, &c. where
fill) &c., are orig.
niaiigrf.']

?.).

[OFr.

Maryage,
mariagt.']

.

marriage
vi

;

to

Hys m.,
[OFr.

Maulardes,
duck,

as His spouse,
n.

54.

n

n. pi. mallards, wild-

310.

[OFr. mallart.}
n. pi.

Maundementis,
ment.~]

command-

a mark (about f of a Mark, pound, 13*. 4^.), xi b 162. [OE. a borrowed word of dismarc, puted origin.]

ments, xi b 184.

[OFr. mande-

Marked, market-place, vi 153. [Late OE. marcet, from ONFr.
.

pp. eaten, VIII a 255. [OFr. mangier] Mawe, n. belly, via a 167, 306

Maunged,

market^

(//. or distrib. sg. [OE. maga.']

;

see Herte).

Martyrdome, n. martyrdom,
[OE. martyr-dom.} Mase. See Make(n). Mased, adj. bewildered, xvi
[Cf.

I

34.

Me.

See

Men

;

and

Ich, pron.

Measse, n. mess, portion

xvn

(of food),

389.
.

[OFr. mes.]

247.

OE.
n. 1

a-masod.']

Masse,
i 37,

Mass, villa 88, Xi3

See Mekill, adj. reward ; Laidy Meed Mede, (personif. of bribery, &c.), vin a
41 ; to mede, in payment, as reward, iva 64, xiv b 2, xvn 122 ; qwite hym his m.,pay him out, XVII 216. [OE. med.] Medeful, adj. profitable, XI b 247.

Meoull.

131, &c.;

&c.

Messe, 8, [OE. m&sse,
I

69, vi
tiiesse
;

OFr. messe.) Masse, n? conglomerate mass, IX
44, 46. [OFr. triasse."] Masse-prast, n. (secular) priest, v 40. [OE. musse-preost.'] Mast. See More, Mor(e).

[From prec.j Meiycyne, n. cure, I
medicine.]

244.

[OFr.

mast, X 123, xivr 49, &c. [OE. nix st.] Mate, adj. dejected, vi 26. [OFr.

Mast,

n.

Medill-erd.

See Myddel-erde.

Medyn,
(such a
this

!

n. pi.
if

'

iat, orig.

mated

'

Mater (e), Matiere,

in chess.] n. matter,

pi. text,

meadows, xv i 14 form is remarkable in
genuine).

[OE.

a subject, vil 35, 98, ix 1 1 1, 45, XIV c 14. [OFr. mat(i}ere^\

xn

m&d, med.~\ Meditacioun
tacionJ] Meete, n,

(of), n. meditation

(upon), xi b 295.

[OFr. medi-

Matyn(n>s,
(first

-ys,

n. pi.
'

of the canonical

matins hours ',

measure (ment),
.

xm a

47.

[OE. ge-ntet.}

^Meteth.
company,

properly recited at midnight or before daybreak), v 120, xi b 131, 189, &c. ; applied to all

Meyny,
vi

household, body (of

servants, &c.), retinue,

182;
22.

morning office preceding t public Mass, I 6S, xi b 208 matyncs of 0^^re Lady, matins proper to Our Lady (made a part of daily morning office), XI b 132. [OFr. matines."} Maugre", n. displeasure, ill-will, VIII a 2 36. [OFr. fnaugrl] Maugre" (-ee), Mawgree,/r<r/. in spite of, villa 69, ix 197, 314;
;

the

xvn

Menjhe, X 39

Meneye, xvn 290; Menye, vn 37,
;

[OFr. mai(s]nee.']
v. to

Meyntene(n), Mayntene,
XIV

maintain, defend, support, keep up, vni a 37, xi b 43, 55, 166,
c 76; subj., xiv c 100 ; n. upholding, XI b 170. [OFr. niaintenir.~] Meist. See Mai, v. Meke, adj. meek, humble, sub-

Meyntenynge,

GLOSSARY
missive, IV a
74, vi 44,

vma

GLOSSARY
Mercii, n. pi. Mercians, men of the Midlands, b 54. [Med.L. Mercii; OE. Merce.]

xm

Mete)>, ^sg.pres. measures, xnio 46. [OE. melan.~\ See Meete. Mothles, adj. immoderate, violent,

Mery.
3.

Meridionall,

See Miri(e). adj. Southern, IX

2,

[L. meridionalis."]
.

v 38. [OE. mxf-leas.'] Mette, pa. t. dreamt, xn a 139, 153. [OE. m&tan, impers.]

Merke(nes). .S^Mirke,Myrknes. Mersh, March, xvc i. [AFr.,

Meue, Moue,
(inspire),

v. to

move
;

;

trans.

ONFr. Merpe.

march(e}.~]

See Mirthe.

Meruayl(l)e, -uail(e), -ueyl(l)e, &c. (of\ n. amazement, wonder (at), I 21 1, IX 151, 226; marvel, II 409, 598, ix 143, 146, 292, &c a marvel (without a), I 115, 205, ix 18 ; no meniayle ]>a) (with subj.\ no wonder (if),
;

XI a 66, b 246; intr, proceed, pass on, vii 98 Meuyt, pa. t. passed, VI I 30; Mevid, //. carried away, xvn 542. [OFr. moveir; accented stem
moev-,
tiieuv-,

&c.j

Mezeyse. See Missays. Mi, My. See Ich, pron. Miche, Myche, adj. great, much,
II

v

239.

[OFr.

mervcille.']
cufj.

[OE.
Micht,

278, 523, 560, VII 41, 122. See miccl.-] Mekill,

Merueyl(l)ous,

marvellous,

Mochel, More.

I 247, IX 145 ; Merv\3ilous, XII a 64; Mervelus, xvii 12, 164. [OFr. inerveillous.~\ Meschaunce Meschief. See
;

Mycht.

See

Mai,

v.\

Mid, Midde
mid.']

My 5 t(e).

(xv),/nr/. with, in

introd., 9, 51, 55,

xva

19.

[OE.

Myschance Myschefe. Mese, moss, n 248.
;
.

See >cr(e).

[OE.

Myddel,

ineos.']

Message,

message,

M. errand, xil a 52, 102; xil introd. [OFr.

adj. central, Midland, XIII b 10, 54. [OE. middel.~] Middel, Myddel, n. middle, XIII b ii ; waist, xv c 16. [OE.

message!}

middel.]
;

Messagere, n. messenger, xil a 46 Messengere, xvi 362. [OFr.
messager.] Messais. See Missays. Messe. See Masse, n. 1

Myddel-erde,

Medill-erd,

.
.

Mesurable, adj. moderate, reasonable, VIII a 192.
able.~\

[OFr. mcsur-

Mesure,
mesure.~]

.

moderation,

capacity, XI b 113; xvi 302. [OFr.

the world, v 32, xvn 100, 234. [Altered by assoc. with prec. from OE. middan-(g)eard.~] Mydyng, midden, dunghill, xvii 376. [Cf. Danish tnfodynge, mbdding (ON. *7ityk(i}dyngjd) muck-heap.] Mydnyat, n. midnight, v 119.
.
'

Mesurit, pp. measured, X 25. [OFr. mesurer.~\ a 133, ix 15, food, Mete, xv<! 7> "3> xvn 1 6o, &c. Mette, xvi 230 esf. joined
.

[OE. mid-niht.-} Myghtfull, adj. mighty, XVII [OE. miht + -//.]
;

I.

vm

;

Mighty, Myghty, adj. mighty, vii 177, &c. was so myghfy to, had the power to, XVI 91
;

;

a with drink, I 158, n 254, 20, XI b 257, xvii 197 ; at(te) mete, at table, II 519, villa 55,
Mete(n),z>. to meet, II 510, v 138, 167, VI 20, XIV a 27; Mette, a 163, b 6. [OE. pa. t.,

vm

quasi-sb.
1 1

8.

mighty princes, [OE. militig.'}

vii

xv ^ 2 4-

[

E

-

mete.']

vm

My}t(e),. might, power, strength, capacity, I 84, 186, via a 195, XI b 1 14 Mycht, X 48, 65, &c. Myght, IX 197, xvi 233, &c. Miste, Myste (tee App. p. 278),
;

;

;

xv g 29;
102
;

metan.~\

See Imete.

pi.

of myste, mighty, VI deeds of power, xvi

GLOSSARY
T741 fo
S (<*#) all in his power,

M

my3( & c
>

-

do
;

x 79, xi b 6 with thair mychtis all, with all their might, X 95 ; at my myght,

as far as I can,

xvn

Miracle, n. miracle, XI b 280'. [OFr. miracle.} Mire, Myre, mire fig. a desperate situation, xiv 71, xvi 256.
;

322.

[OE.

miht.}

[ON. myr-r.} Miri(e), Myrle,
otts,

adj. merry, joy-

Mijte, Mihte, &c.

See Mai, v.

gay,

Myke},
(note)

n. pi.
;

favourites, vi 212 see Mike, n. in N.E.D.
?

XV a u,
69,

xvn 463
;

[Unknown.] Milde, Mylde, adj. gentle, kindly, iv a 74, b 75, xv^ 2,&c. [OE.
mild.']

vi 75

vin a 151, Mery, vin a Myryest, superl. Muryly, adv. pleasantly,
II

58, 436,

16,

&c.
;

;

fully,

v

E'
ON.

.

myrge.}

268, 277. 227, See Mirth(e),

gel>.

Mile, Myle,

.

mile

;

sg. for //.

Mirke, Merke,
n. darkness,

adj. dark,

vn

108

;

after numerals, II 350,

xiv l> 42
t

;

xvi

53.

[OE. myrce,
;

ivd a four grete myle fully (a distance of) four ' long miles ', ix 200 (see note). [OE. mil.'] ? read Miles, 1 n. pi. xv b 20
;

myrk-r, adj.]

Myrknes, n. darkness, iv a 64 Merkenes, vn 131. [From
prec.]

meles murge (wi}p, call lovingly to ; see Mele, v.

Mirth(e), Myrth, joy, mirth, iv a 44, xiv b 3, xvi 79, &c. ;
.

Myn,

adj. smaller, in

more and

myn, all, xvn 112, 278. [ON. minni ; meiri ok minni.}

Merpe, n

6.

[OE. myrgp.'}
;

Myn, Mynne,
recall,

v.

to

mention,
of,

vn

remember, 30, 37 ;
of,

Mys. See Misse, Mysse. Mysbede, v. to ill-use, vin a 46 Mysboden, //. V 271. [OE.
mis-beodan.}

myn(ne)
223,

be mindful

vi

xvn
;
.

Myschance,
disaster,

551.

[ON. mittna,

misfortune,
30.

Meschaunce, n. v 127, IX
[OFr.
.

minna-sk, remember.] Min, Myn(e). See Ich, pron. mind, memory, vii Mynd(e), take 10, II, 30, IX 319, xvi 2 in i., recollect, xna 194, b 223.
;

remind

87,

xiv b

mesdis-

cha(u}nce.} Myschefe, -cheif, -chief, tress, damage, misfortune,

I

175,

Villa 199,
chief,

X

[OE. (ge-^nynd.}

xn b

136,
14.

178; Mes[OFr.
mes-

Myne,
mine.']

.

ore, ix 46, 52.
v. to

[OFr.

Myne(n),
222,

224,

231,
.

mine, tunnel, ix x 8. [OFr.

Misdede, n. wrong-doing, xiv b 7. [OE. mis-de'd.} See Miself(f>, Myselue(n).
Ich, pron.

miner.}

Mynestres,
63.

//. servants,
.

vin

b

Myserecorde,

[OFr. ministre.} Ministre, Mynstre, monastery, vin b 95, xin a 50. [OE.
mynster.}

n. mercy, vi 6. [OFr. misericorde.}
.

Myshap,
Myslyke,
is

accident,

vin

b 35.

[OE. mis- + Hap,
v.

q. v.}
it displeases, subj. iv b 58,

Mynget,
I3I
;

-it,

PP-

vn

pa. t. mingled, vn IQ 8. [OE. min.

impers.
;

unpleasant to
239.

gan.}

Mynt, Munt,

aim

tence at a blow, [From next.]
;

v

pre277, 282, 284.
;

feint,

[OE. miS'lician.} Missays, Mossais, hardship, suffering, n 262,325 Mezeyae, in 42. [OFr. mesaise, -eise.}
.
;

v

See Ese.

Mynte, v. to aim, swing (an axe), V 222 Mynte, Munt, pa, t. sg. V 194, 206. [OE. myntan.}

Mysse, Mys,
vi

4;

(sense of) loss, misery, xvn 551;
.

Mysses,

pi. offences,

faults,

V

GLOSSARY
323.

[OE.

miss,

and

mis-

GLOSSARY
Mor(e),

Mare

(iv, xiv), adv. corn-

Mote,
mot. ]

n. a whit,
v.

v

141.
'

[OE.
(see

par, more, vi 193, &c. ; forming compar.) vi 239, ix 248, xn<$ 130, &c. ; longer, further, in the future, again, &c. (esp. in no
more, na mare, &c.), I 83, 144, iv a 58, xiv b 3 (or at//.}, &c. ;

Mote,

to argue,

xvi 256

note).

[OE.

motian.']
.

moreover, vi 205 ; nojt . . more, not . . . either, vi 228 ; no more
.

Mournen, v. to mourn, XV c 34; Mournjng, mourning, sorrow, iv a 72 Murning, xiv b 2 Mornynge, xi b 118, 125,
; ;

none the more except that, Mast (iv), Moost, 243. Most(e), superI. most(ly), for the most part, a 12, 33 (see Ony), iv a 77, vn 10, xia 20, &c. forming super/., ix 42, &c.
hot,

V

[OE. murnan.~] See Mai, v. Mountayne, mountain, ix 161,

1

30, &c.

Moun.

.

Moun tej, n.pl. hills, v
;

162, &c.

[OFr. mtmtai(g]ne.i
12.

[OE.

;

[As

prec.

;

for older

compar.
;

munt OFr. munt.'} Mouthed, pa. t. uttered, 234. [From next.]
;

vm a

adv. see Mo.]

See Mekill, &c.

Nomore.

Moreyn,

plague ; pe furste moreyn, the Black Death (1349), xin b 26. [OFr. marine.'} Morn(e), n. morning, morrow,
I

n.

Moujje, n. (dat. sg.) mouth, II 465 be moutke, by word of m., xn b 199. [OE. mup.'} Mowe. See Mai, v,

Mowe(n),
(first).

v. 1 to

mow,

vm b

14

[OE. mdwan.']

137,

sg.]

v 282. [OE. morne See Morwc.
adj.

dat.

Mowe(n), v?

vm b

mows), 14 (second). [OE. rnuga,

to stack (in

Mornyf,

mournful, vi

26.
-if;

[Stem of Mournen + OFr. cf. OFr. morni.~]

muwa, a mow, heap.] Mowres, n.pl. Moors, ix 5. [OFr.
Maure, More."] Much(e). ^Moche(l). Muged, pa. t. drizzled, was damp, v is. Norw. mugga, [Cf. drizzle, and Mug* in E.D.D.]

Mornyng,
Mornynge.
Morter,
n.

.

morning, xvil 498.
See Mournen.

[From Morne.]
mortar,
.

vnia

136.

[OFr. mortier.'}

Morthererea, //. murderers, vill a 268. [Cf. OE. myrlra, OFr. mordreour.']

Muk, Mukke, dung, vm a xvn 62. [Cf. ON. myki.]
.

1

36,
9.

Mullere, [OE. *mylnere.~]
.

Miller, Xivo*

3,

Morwe,
all

morrow, b 176, &c.

fram in. til even, a 178, (reversed for day, rime) xvn 205. [OE. morgen.~\ See Morn(e).
;

vm a vm

Morow,

n.

morning,

Mulne,
crease
;

n.

mill,

v

135.

[OE.

140,

Xlia 152,

mylen.~\

Multiplye(n),
;

Most(e),&c. -$Mor(e), and next. Mot(e), v. may, II 532, v 52, XI b 115, xiv c 87, &c. ; must, n 125, 248, villa 284, xi a 38, &c. Most (to), 2 sg.pres. must
;

323 [OFr. multiplier.'} Multitude, . multitude, XI b 228. [OFr. multitude.'}

v. to multiply, intrans, ill 120, intr. IX 60, xvn 31, 179.

i,vma

Mun,
2.

v. auxil. will

(fut.\ XIV *

[ON. munu.~\

Munt.

go

(to),

xv g

3

;

Most(e),/a.
;

/.

See Mynt(e). Murge}>, pres.pl. gladden,
(see Miles).

xv

20

must, is might, II 233, 330 (was) bound to, n 468, IX 197, 287, xi/J 205 ; Must(e),xvi 274, xvn 1 30 (2 sg."\ ; impers. in must vs, we mustjXvi i 292,334. [OE. mot, pa. t. moste,"}

[OE. (d-)myrgian.']

See Miri(e).

Muryly. See Miri(e). Murning. See Mournen. Mused, pa. t. mused existed, V 356 (characteristic were,
;

GLOSSARY
of homo rationales ' standing for verb 'to be ; cf. flaje, VI 71). [OFr. muser.']
action
'
'

Namely,

-liche,

adv.

Muster, -ir, v. to show, manifest, xvi 86, 104, 174. [OFr.
moustrer."]

Namore

especially, I 264, 253. [OE. nama

vm a 55, XI b
+
-ltce^\

namely,

Nane. Non(e),/r0.
;

See

Nomore ;

Nar(e), pres. ind.pl. are not (with
neg.), II 390,

v

24.

[OE.

naron.']

See Ne.

Na. See No, Non(e\ Nabbe, i sg. pres. ind. have not, xv/ 8, 1 1 Nade, pa. t. had
;

adj. narrow, mean (dwelling), n 483. [OE. nearu.~\ Nas, Nes (m),/<z. t. sg. (usually

Narwe,

not (with another neg.), 11 392. See [OE. nabban, nafJe.']

Habbe, Ne. Nacion, race, nation,
.

xm

4,

with neg.) was not, II 98, 150, 28; Nere,//. 354, in 42, xv II 123; subj. would be, n 457. [OE. nxs (Kt. nes] ; nxron,
nxre.]

17.

by night, Najt, by the time night has come, vi See Nyght. 163. [OE. /*/.} Najt, pron. nothing (with neg. adv.), HI 18; Najt, Nau}te, a 43 (with neg. adv. not,

nation.'] n. night ; be najt,

[OFr.

Nat,

vm b
Najt,

neg. adv. not,

I

12, 97, 132,

93.
q.v.~\

[Reduced form of
See Nojjelcs.

Natheles.

vm

Nature,
Nau^te. Nau^ty,

.

nature,

xna

113.

;

[OFr. nature."}
See Najt.
adj.

verb) in 42. [OE. nd-wiht, nd(u)ht. See Nat, Nojt. Nay(e), adv. nay, II 131, in 26, xvi 335, &c. as sb., in withoutten nay, undeniably, XVII 2
;

penniless,
ndht-lic.']

vm 3218.
6-Nast.
navy,

(worth

nought),
[Cf.

OE.
143.

Nauy,
[OFr.

n.

VII III,

.] [ON. Nail^e), Nayle, Naill(e), Nayll,

(cf.

No).

navif.'}

Naule, n.

finger-nail, vi 99. [ON.
nx,gl,

n. nail,

xvii 119, 273, 277;
I

finger-nail,

164, 236, II 106,

nagl, or OE. See Naile.

*naglas.~]

Vina
Naule.

62.

[OE.

n&gel.~\

See

Nau per, Nawper,
;
;

v, vi

;

Noper,

Nayled,//.

nailed, IV

a 86.

[OE.

Nale

atte nale = atten ale, at ; the ale, over their ale, villa 109. [OE. a/H.] See Atte.
I

I, VIII, xin Noujier, -ur, \ivc; Nowder,xvil;NowJ>er, Nowther, xiv b Nowthir, xvi; adv. neither, either (after a neg.),

v

299;

conj. neither (foil,
I

ne, nor),

Nam, nam
Nam. Name,
be

sg. pres.

ind.

am

not;

78, c 57, 62,

by nS, v 306, xiv* 75, xvi 287, xvii 534,
;

hot,

am

only, II 430.

[OE.

na?n.~\

See Ne. See Mnam,
.

Nyme.
37,

name,

I

vn

60,

XV i

&c. ; (foil, by then) xvii 535 nor, XIII a 13, 37. [OE. ndhivxpcr, no-hivxfrer, nd(w)for,
nffj>er,

&c.] See Neyther, Noi)>er,

10, &c. ; XI b 257;

good name,

Nome, vn
i

praise, introd.;
in-

name (name), by name,
introd., 46,

Nawhere. See Nowhar(e). Ne, adv. not (preceding verb) r i 73. v 74, vm a 138, 172, &c.;
(usually with another neg., esp. I 71, 156, III 1 8, ; coalescing with auxil. verbs, see Nabbe. Nam, Nar(e), Nas, Nil, Nis, Not ; conj. nor, . . i 118, 160, iv a 2, &c. ; ne ne, neither . . . nor, nor . . . nor,
nojt, &c.),

dividually,

by

name,

37; especially, xvi 190;

vn

(oath), II 316. [OE. nama, noma.~\ Nameles, adj. (as a name) Nameless,

bi Codes

name

vi 2,&c.

Nobody, xivrf

2.

[OE.

.

nama + -leas.~\

GLOSSARY
I 158, IX 201 ; (foil, by another neg.) and, I 12, 153, vill a 280, ix 181, &c. [OE. *.] Nede, Neid (x), n. need, iv b 67, X 18, xi b 259, xvil 426; at

Vina 171, xvil 412; prep. near (to), vi 44, vin a 294, x 67 Nest, superl. next, 1215; Next(e), nearest, vn 13; next, I 138, &c. [OE. near(a), com;

nede, in time of need,
//. wants, business,
tied.'}

vin a
148.

1

13

;

V

[OE.

par. (cf. ON. n&r, compar. and See pos.); nest(a), next(a}.~\

Ny3.

Nedes, adv.
nedes.]

needs, of necessity, 11468, 1x288, XI b 205. [OE.
pres. (impers) is necessary, villa 240, hem nedeth, they have

Nere, Nes. See Nas. Nesch, adj. quasi-sb. (what is) soft, pleasant, vi 246. [OE,
;

Nedeth, Nudejj,
sg.
(it)

hnesce.~\

Nest.

See Ner(e).

b

20; need, villa 203;

Neyd,

with
;

mixed constr. in neydthowe, you need, xvi 242. [OE. neodian
cf.

Nest(e), n. nest, iv b 36, IX 252, xin a 22. [OE. nest.] Neuen(e), v. to name, mention, I introd., XVII 12. [ON. ne/na.}

next.]
t.

Nedid, pa.

compelled, xi b 75

;

//. XI b 9, 35. [OE. nedan.~\ Nedeful(l), Nedfull, adj. neces1
-

[OE

-

a Neuer(e), adv. never, 1 152, not at all, I introd., 23 &c. xvil 313; neuer sa, so, no matter how, iva 75, v 61, vi 2 1 1 ; neuer J>e lesse, nevertheless,
;

vm

i

71.

[OE. M&Jre.]
(,v,vi), aay'.new,

Nedy,
405.

adj. needy, in want, vin a 15, 218; as jocular name, XVII

New(e), Nw(e)

n

217,
;

[OE. neadig-, *nedig.]

vin a

v 176, 294, &c.

;

332, vi 167, quasi-sb. IX

Nedle, n. needle (of compass), 1x124, &c. [OE. nedl.~] Nee. See Nyj. Negh. (iiere), v. intr. to approach, xvi 224; Nyghys, 3 sg. pres. xvil 370; Neighed, pa. t. villa 294. [From Ny3, q.vl\ Neid Neyd Neise Neir. 6V? Nede Nedeth Nyj; Ner(e). Neyther, NeiJ>er, adv. ne ncyt/ier, and neither, vin a 276;
;

na new, no new thing, 275 iv a 42; for new, in exchange
for

new

(ones),

vn

anew,
just

n

593; newly,
nit

now newe (OE.
lately,

xvi

13; adv. v 155 ; niowan}, 314. [OE.
;

niotve.']

;

;

;

;

;

Next Nye. See Ner(e) Noy(e). Nyghys. See Negh. Nyght, Ni;t, Ny;t; Nycht (x);
;

Nyht
ii

. neiper xi b 190,
. .

tte,

neither . 386. [OE.
ndkivaej>er.~\

.

.

nor,

370,

vn

(xii); 127,

.

x

night, i 29, 197, xn a68,

Kgler;

cf.

See

Nek,

Nau}>er, Noijjer. n. neck, V 187, 242.
hnecca."]

&c.; be nyjt, nyhte (dat.), at night, xn a 117, 131, xv tig; on nyght, at night, xvA 22 see
;

[OE.

next.

[OE. niht.]

See Najt.

Nyghtes, Nihtes, Nytes (xv),
at, by, night, xv c 2 1 ; with prep., a nyghtes, be nytes, vin b 16, XV i 20. [OE. niktes.~] Nyght-rest, n. rest at night, iv a

Neltow. See Nil. Nemeled, pp. named, mentioned, xv i 10. [OE. nemnan, with
inn

adv.

> #*/.]

Nempned,

pa.

t.

named,

[OE. nemnan.']

II 600. See Ncucn(e).

83. Ryste.

[OE.

niht +
n.

rest.]

See

Ner(o), Neir (x), compar. adj. and adv. nearer, I 255 as fos., near, x 77, xn b 114, XVI 43, 224, xvil 370; adv. nearly,
;

Nygromansye,
;

necromancy, black magic (used vaguely as) XI a 5. [OFr. impious nonsense, ~

i

GLOSSARY
Ny}, Nyh, Nee
(iv),

Nei^e

(11),

GLOSSARY
ani;
with

Nye compare

Byled,

GLOSSARY
see Late,

New(e)

;

conj, since,

GLOSSARY
III 39, &c.; ofte(n) tyme(s}, IX 61, 129, xvi 370. [OE. oft.'] Oftesithes, Oft(e)sythes, a^. often, iv ^ 27, vn 182, ix 63. [OE. <? oft-sipas.} See Sithes.

Onderuonge, //. received, III 28. [OE. under-fan, pp. underOn(e); Oon(e), xia 41, xvii 2, &c. Oo, I 180, 231 O, I 49,
; ; ; adj. one, a single, ii 306, 83, vi 170, ix 17, xi a 45, Xin b 45, xivrfS, xvn 136, &c.; one (and the same), I 49, 231,

fdngen.}

See Fonge.

Oghne. ^ Owen(e). Oght(e), Ojt, Ought, Ou}t,/w.

&c.

v

anything, IV b 45, V 147, xn b 99, 107, xvi 100 ; adv. in any way, at all, XIV c 69. [OE. 5(wi)ht.} Oghte. See Owe. O;ain ; 030 ; Ojene. See Ajayn ;

ii

95

(see Cri)

;

one

(indivisible),
2,

vii
(as

2,

ix 334,

xvn

169

;

one
180,
o,

opposed ix 1 80, &c.
certain,

to 'other'),
(see J>e,

I
;

Owen(e). oil, ix 35 ;/-. Oyl(l)e, 46. [OFr. /.]
;
.

Owe,

v.

xvn
ac.}

a II 308 ; oont or two, one or two, some, xvn 133, 484;

Ton)

quasi-sb.

Ok,

.

oak, xiv<r 57.

[OE.

XV i

6

;

in into on, together, at on, at one, in har-

Old(e), Aide, oy. old, v 114, VII 5, XII introd. (see Dai), as sb., in old or jong, jong &c.
;

mony, vi 18 ; al con, (all) one and the same thing, xia 41. See A(n), Ane, [OE. an.}
One. On(e), pron. one (thing or person), v 348, vi 197, ix 24, xi b 223,

and

aide, any one, every one, II 221, iv a 49; of aide, of old, VII 26, 182. [OE. did.}
.

Olif-tre,

olive-tree,

xvn

510.

xm a

24,

xv*
;

23,

34,

&c.
'

;

[OFr. o/mr+Tre.] On, artV. on, II 343 (see Do) ; (still) V 232 (with infin. or relative), upon, at, in, I 89, II 367,
;

Oone, xvn 209 Onen, dat. sg. HI 4 one (opposed to an;

other'), ix 53,

xm b

16; bole

vn
;

15,

xv/"

9,

10,

xvi 179.

On O, vn 106, ix 250, xva 5, g 28 prep. on. (i) On, upon,
;

[OE.

on.']

See per(e).

fht on and fat oper, both, v 344 ; see )>e, Ton (some) one, a certain person, v 149, vn 54 (with name). [As prec.]
;

One,
54,
al,

adj. alone, only,

v
v

6, vili b

92, 194, II 303, XV c 24 (following pron.), &c. on him seije, saw he had, 11325; on my frenship, as you value my f., xvn
I
;

v

xiv b 61 ; strengthened with 87, Xlia 131, b 15 ; a . .
. .

one, one

.

.

only,
.

181,^277

>

cure one, by ourselves,
(note)
;

At, v 1 12 (first), xv c 15, h 3, 22, xvii 137, &c. ; (in) In, I 99, xiv* 79, xv a 5, XVII 422, &c. see Bodi, Lyte, Lud, &c. after 'believe', I 89, vi 65 ; with manere, wise, I So, v 1 24. vn 65, 77, xi a ii, xiv b 95, &c. ; (reference) 455, 362.
(ii)
; ;

Ut

v 177

. .

one, leave alone,

avoid (cf. OE. dn-forlvtari), V 50. [OE. ana.} Onehed, n. unity, or ? simplicity
;

n

onehed of wit, the uniformity of men's understanding (interpretation) of the Bible, or ? the ease
understanding it, XI a 32. [OE. an + *-h*du.} Onely, adj. in onely alepy, a single solitary, I 159; Oon(e)ly, adv. only, xvn 288, 307. [OE.
of
an-lic, adj.]

xv

13, &c. ; on tunge, into English,
c
(iv)

Englyssh
I
I

introd.

Of (after 'think')

221, &c.

A, in on a day, a day, VI 1 50 (OE. on dseg). (vi) A-, on (in adv. expressions), as on haukin, a- hawking, II 308; JBehalue, Fote, Lofte, Slep, &c. [OE. on.} Seek.-; A.(n),prep.; Vpon.
(v)

See Anely.
(v),

Ones, Onej

Ouys

(xvn),

adv. once, on a single occasion, I lS2, II 122, V 212, XII* 92 ; formerly, v 150, villa 203; at

GLOSSARY
some
(future) time or other,

xvn

Ordynal(e),

207, 389.

[OE.

anes.~]

Onest, adj trustworthy, VII 48. [OFr. honcste.} Ony, adj. any, IX 85, 245, xi b 300, &c. ; most of ony ping, above all things, more than anything, II 33 ; 'pron. any, ix 326, XI b 147. [OE. xnig, infl. by
an.']

-alle, n. a book setting out the order and manner of church services and ceremonies, XI* i, 183, 186. [Med.L. or-

dinale.}

Ordenaunse,

Ordynaunce,
. . .

.

Oiione.

See Ani, Eny. See Anon(e).

See On(e), &c. Oostr6, n. inn, lodging, XVII 329.

Oo, [OE. .] Oo, Oon(e), &c.
[OFr.

adv. ever, continually,

xv*

7.

ordinance, decree, law, xia 15, * 100, &c. ; preie oure ordynannce, say the prayers we have appointed, XI * 38. [OFr. ordenance. ] Ordre, Order, -yre, n. order,

host(e)rie.~]

Opan, Opon. See Vpon. Opyn, Open, adj. open, v
XVII 344;

vin a 159, XI* 20; //. religious orders, Xla6i; the (nine) orders of angels, xvi I 10 ; moderation, in holde )>e ordyre of, keep the rule of, observe
rank,

2,

moderation
ordre.~\

in,

IV*

22.

[OFr.

Opynly,
52;

manifest, XI b 42. adv. manifestly, xi* publicly, xi<5 62. [OE.
z>.

Orgon, n. diaphony; singing in two parts, XI* 138 (note). [OE.
organ, song, from L. orgamtm.~\ praying yn orysun, at prayer, 117. [OFr. oreisoun.'] Oritore, . oratory, chapel, v 122.

open, open-Ike'.]

Opynne, Oppen,
122,194.

to open, xvi

Orysun,

.

;

[OE.

openian.'}
;

Oplondysch.
Or,

See Vplondysch.

1 or ... or, tonj. or, I i, &c. either ... or, VIII a 244. [Reduced form of OJ>er, conj.'] /.* before, ere (usually with Or, subj.), vina 79, x 2, xvi 154 (see Ware), a#. 156, 278, xvn no (see Blyn), 153, 263, &c. (postponed) xvn 130; lest, xiv</ii. [A* next.] Or, //*/. before, ere, XVI 224, xvn 317, 481. [?OE. &>; pos. and compar. (once late Nth. ar) infl. See by ON. ar, pos.]
;

[OFr. oratour,

infl.

by

Orpedly,

actively, ~
.

v

prec.] 164. [OE.

Ost, Host,

(armed) host, army,

II 290, X 43, 45 ; multitude, XIII a 32. [OFr. (h)ost, army.] Obea, Othes, n. pi. oaths, v 55,

xn* 44. [OE. #.] 0)>er(e), Other(e), -ir(e), -yre;
xvn 160; OuJ>er, i, (i) Adj. other, another, other kinds
Oder,
,

of,

i

18, 258,

IV*

16, 45,

v

Ar(e), Er(e). Orchard, w. garden, orchard, n 66, 91, 163; Orchard-side, n 134.

1x227, XI1 * I 7i xvn 2 9 8 ("* Garn),&c.; Othre, //. XII a 82, 1 36 many oferfolde, see Folde
; ;

274,

[OE. ort-geard, orceard.~\ Ordayn(e), Ordainy, v.

othere gude, (thing), IV * 9
other, II
]>is of Air

some other good
;
;

o]>er

mani, many
;

to de-

496

pat

o]>er, see J?e

cree, establish, appoint, direct,

daye, the

other

day,

arrange, contrive, fashion, &c., II 205, xvii 309 ; Ordand, XVII 1 19, 468 Ordeigne, XII /'
;

XVI 148. (ii) Pron. sg. another, some one (something) else, the
other,
sg.
i

101, II 324, vi 89,

x

22

316;

Ordeyn(e),

I

55,

148,
;

VIH* 57, XI* 125, 132, &c. Ordand, Ordanit, pa. t. x u,
34, xvi 25, 226; ordaynede to, destined to, IV * 54. [OFr.

(see Aither), &c. ; Ojjerej, vi 90 ; if Aon other, each

gen.

man
112;

to

his

neighbour,

XVII

ordener, 3 sg. ordei(g)ne, -aineJ]

non other, nothing different (from what has been said), vil 42, VIII inlfod.j a 173; oj>er ofler,

GLOSSARY
J>at o}er, see next

and f>e ; //. (uninflected), others, i an, iv b v 355, vn 48, x 154, &c. ; Othre, //. XII introd., a 41 ; Opren, dat. pi. in 53 ; derrist
67, 78,
'

iv<*5. [Ouer, adv.

+ lML.hei)en

from Heigh.] Ouerlaide, pp. covered over, submerged, xvn 306. [OE. oferlecgan.~]

See Lay.
adj.

of other, most excellent of (illogically for more worthy than ')
all others,

Ouermoche,

and

n. too

vine

vn

255, xi b 219; cf

much, ivb 23.

39.

[OE.

oj>er.]

See Anojrire, To}>er.

Oper, Other; Auper, v 225; Ouper, Outhire, Owthyre, IV b 8, 23, IX 276 adv. and conj. or, i 3, ii 350, v 39, vili a 305, &c. oper o)>er, or any one else,
;

;

V

or,

. . . opct, either . . . ; ojier . . . or, I 197, 23, IX 276; introducing alternative questions, vili b 34,

34; oper

V 148

iv8,
35
;

o)>er

adv. in or ojter, or else, I 6 ; . . au]>er, or else, v 225.
.

[OE. ofer-mycel.~] See Mochel. Ouerraght, pa. t. revised, vil 69. [OE. ofer + ? riecan ? reccan.} Ouersen, v. to supervise, villa [OE. ofer-seon.'] 107. Ouerset, pp. overthrown, defeated, XIII a 59. [OE. ofer + settan.~\ Ouertake, v. to (re)gain, V 319 [OE. ofer + ON. taka.] (note). Ouerte, adj. open, plain to see, vi 233. [OFr. overt.'] Ouerturnyt, //. overturned, vil 148. [OE. ofer + ttirnian (see
Turhe).]

[OE.

a-hwxper,

See Or 8, h-w&per, owperl\ Ayther, Eujier. Oj)er-while, Other- while, OJjerwyle (vili), adv. on another occasion, XVII 213; at other
times, 289, 297 again, vili b 52 ; other while . . other while, sometimes . . . sometimes, xn a 128. [O)>er,
; .

a(w)per;

o-

Ought, Oust, Ouhte. Owe. Oune. See Owen. Oure, n. hour, time,
VI
I

See Oght,

I
;

188, 189,

n

170,

191,

&c.

Houra,

now and

[OFr. (h}oure.\ Our(e); Our(e),Ous,&c.; Ourn.
; ;

190, vi 195.

adj.

+ While.]
See
3e.

Ou.
i

Ouer(e),
177,

over, prep, iia, &c. ; over and above, XI b 150; (of time} through, vil 166 (following noun); adv. over, II 578,

Our(e),
246,

v

x

84,

See Ouer(e) We Eorne. Out(e), Owt(e), adv. out, I 50, b 3, xi b 26 (see Charite), iv xvi 18, &c. abroad, out of doors, vni b 16; as exclam. of &c., XVI 185, 195, anger, dismay, 343 out(e] apon the, fie on thee, xvii 229, 408. [OE. iit, u(e.']
; ;

Outguoinge,
of,

164, &c. ; all . . . ouer, all over, in all parts, vn 134 (cf. next); too, I 130, ivt> 23, 24, vi 113, vn 36, &c. [OE. ofer.~\

V

on

[From OE.
Ou)>er,
adj. and Outraye,

n. ate outguoinge departing from, III 4. ut-gdn.~] See Go(n). Outhire. See Oj>er(e),
conj. v. to
is

Oueral, adv. everywhere,
ao8, xii introd., b 184.
ofer all.}

II

62,

transgress,

xivc

[OE.

69 (oujt
reier.']

adv.).

[OFr. mit-

Ouercast, //. overcast, clouded,

vn

107, xvii 353.

[OE.

ofer-

Oway. See Awai. Owe, Owyn, Oje,
;

Ouercomi,
iv a 68.

3

5^-.

pres. overcomes,

v. to have to have (to), be bound (to), ought, XI b 6, XV * 4 with mixed pers.
;

[OE. ofer-cuman.]

and impers.

constr., in
;

vus

oje,

Ouergrowen, pp. overgrown, v 113, 122. [OE. ofer + growen,
PP-]

we
183

ought, vi 192
;

to owe, vi

Awe,

a sg.pres.

xvii 171

;

Ouerhoghede.//.

raised too high,

Oghte, pa. t. possessed, XII b 48 ; Ouhte, ought to, VIII b 73 7
;

GLOSSARY
Au;t, was bound
to,
II

555.

GLOSSARY
I

sol, xi b 97.

[OFr. faroche,

paroisse.~]

(safely), V 3, VII 116, 171, IX 308, xili b 39, dec, ; to surpass,

Farlement,
cil,

H

n. parliament, coun-

216.
.

[Q$r.parlement.~\

Parloures, //. parlours, living rooms, xvn 133. [OFr. parlour^ Part, . part, share, VI 313, IX 31, more be an 325, xi b 57, &c. hundred part, more (by) a hundred times, ix 301 (lit. more by the hundredth part the use seems modelled on that of ME.
;
:

VI 68; passynge, exceeding(ly), IX n, 232 ; to pass (time), in 44. Passed, Passit,//. v&prep. past, VI 1 68, x a. Cf. Apassed. [OFr. passer.] the ' Our Pater, Pater-noster Father *, Lord's prayer, vi 1 25, vill b 48, 91, ix 323, xi a 33, 35.
,

.

Patrones, n. //. patrons, those holding advowson, or right of
presentation to benefices (earliest use in E.), vill b 8a. [OFr.
patron."]

dele

;

see

N.E.D.,

s.v.

Deal,

i *).

part.'] Part(e), v. to divide, share, xii b

[OFr.
201
;

Fauement,
.

103 ; refl. in . with, part with, leave, vn 96 Fartinge, -yng, n. distribution, XI b 275 separation, IV a 31. [OFr. partir.] Partener(e), n. sharer, ix 325 ; parteners of fe endes, sharers
separate,
.
.

I

part me

n. pavement, I 194. [OYr. pavement.] a 304, ix 46. Pece, piece,

vm
.

;

;

with the extremes,
.

(in their linguistic peculiarities) xin b 55.

[Qt.*er&n({)er,tafL by Part.] Party, Partie, part, IX i, a, x 156, xin* 52, &c. ; side, IX 72; party (in legal proceeding), XII b 215; most party, most (part) of, xvii 49. [OFr.
parti,

Pees, Fesse, peace, xivrf 15, xvi 66, 396. [OFr./<j,/.] Pees. See Pese. Feiere, v. to impair, damage, XI b 250; peierid imperfect, XI* 26. from [Shortened Ap(p)eyre, Empeyre.]

Peyne. See Payn(e), Peynen, v. refl. to take

'.

pains, en-

deavour, ix 272. [OFr. sepener, See Payne, w. 1 3 sg. peine.]

partie.}
;

a 300. [OFr./a-r.] Passage, n. passage, pass, ix 205, 206. [OFr. passage.']
adv.}, with skilful steps,
;

Pas, n. pace, gait

queynt pas (as

Peler, n. robber, xiva 15. [From ME.pe/en, OFr.peler, rob.] Pelrinage. See Pilgrimage.

Fenaunce,

. penance, vi 117, villa 78,^88.

V

324,

[OFr.
.

pen(e}ance.]

Pen6

(vi),

Peny, Penny,

Passe(n), Pas, Pasi (in), v. Passed, -it, Past(e),/a. /. and //. (i) Intr. to pass, proceed, go, get, iv b 34, vn 125, villa 78, xvi 296, &c. go one's way,
;

(a silver coin, a twelfth of the shilling), HI 13, vi 150, 186, vill a 275, &c. ; penny doyll, see

penny

depart, pass on, V 61, vn 112, vill a 196, xvi 66, 96, 152, 194,

Dele, Doyll; Pans,//, pence, III 6, 10, &c. (tf. ME. paneyes, OFris. panning}. [OE. peni(n}g, pxJi{n')ing.'] See Hal-

and

&c.

;

pass away, xi a 9

;

passe
;

peny.

bi (be), pass (by), V 36, &c. go over (through), ix 8, 137, &c. passe the see, go abroad, ix 308, xili b 39 was past to, had
;
;

Feny-ale, n.

ale at a penny a gallon, thin ale, vill a 304 (cf.

Fennes,

Halpeny-ale). [Prec.+OE.a/w.] n.pl. quills, barrels of the

reached, VII 100 ; //. past, gone by, over ,vil 9, ix 317, xvi 105, XVII 181, &c. (ii) Trans, to cross, go over (through), pass

[OFr. penned] Feopull, People, n. people, vn 16, 82, XIII* i, &c. Peple, VIII a 387, ix 165, XI b 19, &c. ;
;

feathers, IX 257.

7

*

GLOSSARY
Pepul(l),

vu

145, xvi 194;

GLOSSARY
Pyne,
[OE.
v. to torment,

xvi

4, 219.

Plente", -ee,
II

.

plenty, abundance,

ptnian.~\
.

253,

via a
;

Pypynge,
pipes,
I

6.

piping, playing on [OE. *plpiau, from
hole, 29, &c. ;
K.

XVI 392

156, xin a 63, quasi-adv. in plettfe,

abundantly,

xvi I

146;

more

pipe, pipe.]

plentee, in greater abundance, .ix
9,

Pyt, Pitte, Pet (xn),
pit, I 143,

xn b

n,

pit

(of

hell),

xvi
.

271,

348.

[OE.#(Kt. /*//).]
Pite', Pyte",

Pet6,

compassion,

pity, ii 101, iv b 57, 75, 193; es . . . pyte, is pitiful,

vma
iva

245. [OFr. plent^.'] Plcnteuous, adj. abundant, XI b 265. [OFr. plentivous, -evous.~] Plese, v. to please, vi 124, villa Pie105, 290, b 89, ix 321 in to pi. of, so as to synge,
;
.

please, *x I b

1

08.

[OFr. plaisir,

87. [OFr. /itf.] Piteuous, adj. full of pity, in 39 ; Pytosly, adv. compassionately, vi 10. [OFr. pitous pitenons is due to anal, of words like
;

Plesance,
327,

.

pleasure, liking, ix

x

introd.', do the plesance,

Plentenous,

q.v.~\

Pip,

.

pith,
n.

xiv

c

90.

[OE.

/>.]
Vespers of the Dead, vin b 48, XI b 131 (see note). Play(e), Pley, n. mirth, rejoicing, iv a 59, xvi 392 (dramatic) play, xi a 34. \O\L.plega.']

Placebo,

perform the pleasant office, XII a 1 85. [OFr. plaisance, pies-,'] Plesant, adj. pleasant, IX 278. [OFr. plaisant, pies-.} Plete, v. to sue for; claim, vi 203. [OFr. plaitier, pleder, &c.] See
Plee.

;

v 325. Ply^t, (liability), offence, [OE./AVJ/.] Plijte, v. to plight, pledge, vin a
.

Play(e), Pleie,
oneself, XII b 159
;

n 66, xin b

v. to play,

amuse
rejoice,

35.

[OE.
n.

plihtan.~\
;

22

;
.

Plom,
the

plummet

as adj. verti-

Playinge, disport, xv a 5. [OE. //<(*).] Plain, Playne, a<fj. flat, level, 11 353 plain, clear, xvi 48 Playnly, Pleynly, adv. plainly, XI b 43, 47, xvi 267, clearly,
;

cal, straight

down (measured by

plumb-line),

xvn

520.

Plouman, Plou^man, Plowman,

326.
v.

[OFr.

//.]

Playni.Pleigne.Pleyne, Pleny,
to complain, III 19, vi 189; refl. in pleyned Jiym, made complaint, 152; to sue (at law), XII b 215. [QVr.plaindre,

w. ploughman, vma 3, 147, 152, xiv d 5. [Next + OE. mann.~\ Plow(e), plough, villa 96, 99, 156, &c. ; Plogh, xvn 534;
.

Plowgh, ix
.

vma

254. (a land-measure) ;

[OE. plog

ON. pldg-r.}

a stave supporting Plow-fote, the plough-beam and regulating
furrow's depth, but here appar. = ' plough-staff' (c/. other readings plou-l>at'}, a staff ending in a small spade for clearing earth, &c., from mould-board,
'

plaign-.~]

Planettis, n.pl. planets, xvn 345. See Stame. [L. plane/a.'] Plas, Place, n. place, I 155, n 40, x 152, &c. [OFr. place!\

Platen, n. pi. (plates), pieces of (silver) money, xv^- 4, 15, 21,
23

(&

'plates'

in

\Viclifite

version,

Matt,

xxvi

15,

&c.).

[OFr. plate.'} Plee, n. (plea, lawsuit), quarrel, IX 8 1. [OFr. plai(d), plait,
plef,

vin a 97. [Prec. + OE. _/?.] Plus, adv. (in French phrase) a 306. See Chaude. more, Poeple. See Peopull. n. poetry, poem, Xlia i, Poesie, 62. [OFr./ttts&j

vm

&c.]

See Plete.

Poeuere. See Pouer(e). Poyet, Poete, n. poet, vn

Pleigne, Pleny.

See Playni.

xu

33, 47,

introd.

[OFr. //*.]

GLOSSARY
Poynt(e), Point,
n. (i) (sharp)

GLOSSARY
xvn
Praid, Preide, 242, Sec. Preyd(e), pa. t. \ 89, n 224, VIII a 1 1 7, XII b 69 ; pray, pray to, vi 1 24, preye of, beg for, vni a 38, 117 preye to, pray (to), IX Preiynge, n. in p. of 320. 322
;

ficence,

iv a 59, * 14,

xi*

55,

xvii

543,

&c.

;

of

pryde,

;

proud, xvi 182. See Proude. Priis. See Prys.

[OE. prydo]

;

Prike,
141,

v. to

spur
1

;

intr. gallop, II

lippes,

XI b 89.
l?reiere,

prayer with lips (only), [OFr. preier.]

xiv a

5.

[OE. prician, to

prick.]

Preyer(e), Pre3er (Xiv c), n. prayer, vni a 244,

Pryme,

b 88,

XI*

36,

xiv c

78, &.c.',

preiere in lippis, p. with the lips [OFr. preiere.'] (only), XI b 90. Preise(n), Preyse, Prayse, v. to

*

praise, esteem, v 4, 31, XI* 176, 182.

vma

102,

n. prime, first division of the day according to the sun (varying with the season), or a fixed period 6-9 a.m. ; height pryme, fully prime, end of the period of prime, about 9 a.m., villa 106. [OE.prTm, from L.
.

[OFr.
Prys,

preis(t)er]
Prist.

See

Prese,

prwia (hora)] devotional manual, Prymer,

vm*
name

48

Preostes.
Pres(s).

See Prest(e), . See Prece, Prees.

doubtful

(note). [Origin of see M.E.D] ;

Prese, n. praise, great worth, vi 59. [Stem of Preise(n) with AFr. monophthongization.] Presence, presence, ix 94, xil * 127, &c. [OFr. presence]
.

Primerole, . primrose, xv 9, 10, 13. \OYr.primerole] Prynce, Prince, n. prince, v 4 (i.e. Sir Gawayne), xiv c 59, xvi
1 82 &c. [OFr. prince] Princypall, Principal!, adj. and chief, IX i, 28, xvi in ; Principaly, adv. in the first
, .

Present(e), adj. present, IX 128, 336 ; as sb. in in your presente, in your presence, vi 29. [OFr.
present.']

Present, n. present, gift, I 123, VIII a 42, 290. [OFr. present.] Presente, v. to give gifts to, ix 24. [OFr. presenter] Prest, adj. prompt, quick, vina 190, xiv * 67 ; Prestly, adv. [OFr. promptly, villa 87.
prest.]

Pryour,

place, xi * 96. [O'?!. principal, or L. principalis] n. priory, 95.

vm*
.

[OFr.priorie
the suffix
cf.

;

with this form of
(11),

Oritore.]

Prys, Prise, Priis

worth,

excellence, v 296, vi 59 ; of priis, &c., worthy, excellent, noble, II 51, 64, 249, V 330, vii

47.

[OFr. pris, earlier prieis]

Prest(e), n. priest, I 8, 9, in 49 (Jat.'), 53, &c.; Preost, xi* 291. [OE. preoit] Presthod, priesthood, XI * 47.
.

See Preise(n), Prist.

Prisoune, Prison, n. prison, XI* 126, xvi 220 (or rtz.& prisounes,
prisoners
;

see

note).

[OFr.

[OE. preost-had.] Pretermynable, adj. who predetermines, fore-ordains, vi 236.

Frist,//, esteemed, vn 33. [OFr. pris(i}er] See Preise(n).
. Frocessioun, pomp, II 587.

[Appar. invented for rhyme from pre + terminable used actively.] Freua, Preeue, v. to prove, show, vn 47, ix 298 ; to test, ix 297 to approve, IX 305. [OFr. preuv-, proev-, &c. accented stem of prover] See Preef,
;

procession

;

[OFr. prov.

cession]

Proferi, Profre,
434,

to offer,

n

Proue.

Pryde, Pride,

.

pride,

magni-

v 278, vni a 25, xn* 122, &c. \Qt. pro/rir ; proferer.] Profession, n. declaration ; vows (on entering religious order), in singular prof., special vows,

GLOSSARY
as opposed to the regular

vows

GLOSSARY
put vnt payn, set in torment, xvn 547 ; putte wryten, set in writing, ix 318. [OE. putian,
Quite, Quyte.
See Whyyt.

Quo(m); Quod. 6"Who; QuaJ>. Qwake, v. to tremble, iva 61.
[OE. cwacian.]

Wan, potian
Qu(h>.

;

see N.E.D.~\

Qwart,
See also Wh-.
heals,

health mase in qwari, iv a 15. [ON. kvirt,
.

;

Qualitoe, n. degree (of goodness), question of how good, IX 335. [OFr. qualitt.-}

(neut. adj.) untroubled.]

QwUes.

See Whiles.
.

Quantytee, Quantity
tion

.

limita-

Bace, Base,
XVII 429 blow, v 8.
;

headlong course,
violent
infl.

of greatness,

great, IX 336 ; capacity, quantity, X 26. [OFr. quant iti.] Quarell, n. cross-bow bolt, ix

how

question of

onslaught, [ON. rds

by

senses of related

OE.

rajj.]
;

258.

[OFr.

quar(r}el.'\

Bajt, Baid. Bayle, v. to
[OFr.

See Reche
order, array,
rain,

Ride.
13.

xv#

Quap, Quath, pa. t. sg. quoth, said, n 127, vin b 26, &c. Quat}, vin a 3 Quod, v 58, vi6i,&c. [OE. cw&p.~} choir, vin b 63, xi b Queer,
; ;
.

retller.}

Bayn, v. to Benys, //.

xvn

147

;

xvn

351.
1
;

are rauiing down, [OE. regnian.]
rain,

172.

[OFr.

cuer.~]

Queynt,

adj. skilful, elegant,

n

Bayn(e), n. xvn 445 xin a 1 8.

vn

Beyn(e),

109, 132, I 162,

299, 300 (see Pas) ; Koyntly, adv. cunningly, v 345. [OFr. cointe, queinte, &c.] Quelle, Qwell, v. to kill, destroy, iv a 92, v 41. [OE. civellan.~\ Queme, <#'. pleasant, V 41. [OE. cweme.~]

Bayne, n?

rein, v 109. raigne, rainne, &c.]

[OE.ng.J
[OFr.

Baysede, //. uplifted, iv b 71. [ON. nisa.-] Bake, n. path, v 76, 92. [OE.
racu, water-course, or ON. rdk, streak (Norw. dial raak, path).] n. a term of abuse,

Quen.
&c.

See Whan(ne).
.

Bam-skyt,
queen,
II

Quen(e), Queen(e),
51, 71, vi 55, ix

xvii 217.
skita.}

[OE.

ra;w-fON.

ioo,xua

195,

[OE. Querele, n.
accusation,
querel(l}e.-\

0i.]
(legal)

xn b

complaint, [OFr. 209.

See Ryn. Bandoune, n. ; in a randoune, with a rush, x 102. [OFr. en

Ban(ne).

Questioun,

n. question, IX 178.

un ratidon.~] Banke, aiij. brave,

fine,

vn

122.

[OFr. questioun.~\

Quhedirand,

pres. p. whirling, or whirring, X 92. [Cf. Early ME. to-hwideren, -hwtSeren, whirl to pieces ; OE. hwaperian, make a rushing noise.]
.

[OE. ranc.'] Bapo,w.r/f. to hasten, Vina
;

112,

b 108. [ON. hrapa.1 Bapely, adv. hastily quickly, v 151; rashly vi 3. [ON. hrapalliga.-\

Quhelis, //. wheels, x 17. [OE. kwi(o)L\ Quhen Quhill. See \Vhan(ne),

WML

;

Quyk,
cwic.~\

adj.

alive,

v

41.

[OE.
;

Eapes Base. A^Ropis; Race. Bather, adv. earlier, vina 112. [OE. hraJ>or.-\ Bathly, adv. quickly, XIV b 6. [OE. krxp-lice.] Baton, rat, xvz 1,9, 18. [OFr.
;
.

Quyte
v. to

;

Qwyte, Qwite (xvn)

raton.~\

pay, repay, V 176, 256, VI 235, xvn 216, 228 ; Quitte,//. paid, vai a 92. [OFr. quiter.~]

Babeled, pp. entwined, v 226.
[See

N.E.D.

s.vv.

1 Raddle, v .,

Ratheled."}

GLOSSARY
Baue,
v. rave, talk foolishly,

vi

3.

[OFr. raver.}

Bavyn,

n. raven,

xvn

479, 499.

[OE. hrmfn.} Bauyache, v. to

carry off captive, carry away, iv a 16 ; Beuey(se)d, pp. ii 82. [OFr. ravir,
raviss-.}

to read trod., xu a 112, &c. ; aloud, i 14 ; to reckon, vin b 73 ; to think, xvn 427 ; hard red (inf.), heard read, XVII 46 ; Bet (OE. ratt, ret), 3 sg. pres. reads, III 3, 16 Bade,//, read,
;

xvi 317.
str.,

[OE. r&dan, redan,
reader, ix 321.
adj.

later wk.]
.

RawejRawJje.
real.}

Real, adj. royal,

<$V<rRowe;Reu)>e. II 356. [OFr.
l>

Bedere,
rsedere.}

[OE.

Bedi, Bedy,

prompt, ready

Beame, n. realm, kingdom, vin 78 Beume, xi a 25, 32, 52
;

Bem(e), vi 88, Boialme, ix
re(i)alme, roialme.}

xm b
261.

;

xu b

(to hand), ii 380, vi 231,

x

34,

119,

xvi 394; at

reify,

47, 48

;

[OFr.
;

re(a)ume

later

prompt(ly), xvi 120; Bedyly, adv. promptly, V 256. [Extended from OE. (ge-}rxde.}

Bedresse,
99.

v. to redress, set right,

Reasoune. See Reson. Rebalde, n. Rascal, xvi
[OFr. ribauld.}

XII b 206.

[OFr. re-dresser.}

Reformed

Bebuke, 86. [ONFr. rebuk(i)er.~\ Beceyue, v. to receive, take, VIII b 73 Bes(s)ayue, v 8, xvi 390
;
;

See Rybaudry. v. to rebuke, vi 7, via b

{of), pp. changed back to his proper form (from), XII a
82.

19. [OFr. reformer.} Befuseb, pres. pi. reject, vin b [OFr. refuser.}

Beghtewysnes,
See Ryghtwyse.

Beghtwysely.

Bespeyued,//.
receiv-re.}

xi

265. [OFr.
to reck, care,

Begioun,
13.

.

region, ix 161,

xu a
141.

Beche, Recche, v*

villa 114; me no reche, I care not (mixed pen. and intpers. constr.), II 342. [OE. reccan.} 2 Beche, v. to give, v 256 Ba^t, pa. t. v 229; Ba^te^, 2 sg. v 283. [OE. rxcan, rxhte, rakte.}
;

Begne,

[OFr. regioun} kingdom, [OFr. regne.}
.

vi

Begni, Begne, v. to
ix 339. XI a
4,

reign,

n

425,

[OFr.
XII a

Beherce, Beherse,

regtter.} v. to repeat,

103

;

Beher-

Reches,
[OFr.

.

sg.

riches,

iv 6 61.

ricAesse."]

Becorde,

v. to ponder, go over in one's mind, ix 317 ; record, XII introd. ,6 ill. [OFr. recorder^ v. to regain,
.

cyng(e), n. recounting, ix 274, 279. [OFr. re fiercer.} Bey 11, n. reel, xvi I 298 (see Garn). [OE. hreol.} Beynand. See Ren.

Beooueren,
[OFr.

ix 131.

Beyny,a<#. rainy.xna
regnig.}

53.

[OE.

recovrer.~\

Becuyell,
introd.

See Keuer(e). compilation, VII
recueil.~]

See Rayn(e), w. 1
;

n 107, xiv 41, red(e) gold, red gold, II 150, 362. [OE. read.} Bed^e), . advice, in 51 (dat.~);
Bed(e),
adj. red,
;

[OFr.

Bele, v. to reel, behave wildly, sway (in combat) rele as vs
like), let

XV e

19

please, v 178. lated to Reyll.]

we

us fight as fiercely as [Prob. re-

counsel, plan, in canno other red, sees nothing else for it, xn 102
(<-/. Wane, .). [OE. rsed, red.} Bed(e), Bedyn, Beede, v. to advise, counsel, iv a 45, v 43 (note), vin b 108, xiv c 97, xvii 341, &c. to read, n r, IV b 9, X in;

Belece, v. to release, v 274. [OFr. relaissier, relesser.} Belees, Beles, n. release, discharge, vni a 84, xvi 288, 290.
[OFr.
reles.}

Releif, Beleue,
relief to,

X

v. to relieve, give 151, 161, XI b 255.

[OFr. relever.}

GLOSSARY
Religioun,
order,
religion.']

vm a

n. religious

rule,

or

Repentance,
56.

.

repentance,

xvn
[OE.

145.

[OFr.

[OFr. repentance."]
.

Repereyue,

Kelikes, n.pl. heirlooms, precious things, vii 122. [OFr. relique.'}

vest-overseer,

vm*

head-reaper, har15.

Kem(e). See Reame. Remerabraunce, n.
tion,

rip, harvest (or stem of prec.) + See Reue, n. rjj/itz.]

recollec-

vm b

Repleye,
[Cf.

v.

xvi 380

(see note).

ii.

[OFr. remem-

OFr.

repley(i]er,

&c.

or

bra(t)nce.~\

Remene

(to}, v. to

compare
c 41.
[]

(to),

interpret (as),

XIV

OFr.

remener, bring back; senses seem dne to assoc. with Mene, z>.*]

Remisaioun
don,
sioun."]

vma

,

.

discharge,

par-

84.

[OFr. remisrefer (for

N.E.D. s.vv. replevir; see Kepledge, Rephvy, &c.] Repren6, v. to reprehend, find fault with, vi 184. [OFr. reprendre, preign-.~\ Repreue, Reprouen (of), v. to reprove (for), V 201, XI b 187.
[OFr.

Remytte,

v. to

hand on,
IX

Reprufe,

rej>ro(ii)ver, repreuv-J] n. disgrace, XVII 84.

consideration),
retniltere.']

296.

[L.

[OFr. repro(u}ve.']

Rerd, Rurde

Remnaunt,
remainder,
94.

Remenaunte, n. v 374, 333, vm a
afflicted,

v

(v), n. loud voice 230; noise, v 151 101. (see Rnsche), [OE.

269,

xvn

xvu

[OFr. remenantJ]
pp.

reord.}

Remorde,

VI

4.

Rert, //.
231.

?

(aroused),

ready, vi

[OFr. remord-re.}

Remwe,
to
see

v. to

take away, VI 67.
v. to run,

[OE. r&ran.} Res(s)ayue, Resceyued.
Receyue.

See

[OFr. remuerJ]

Ren, Renne,
flow,

IX

'Reynand,
Ryn.
.

179, pres. p.

xiv b 6 xn a 84;
;

xvn in

;

Rescowe, Rescoghe, v 240 mat) rescoghe, the rescue (cf. make
;

.

?

rescue, comes to

reschewes,

[ON.

retina."]

Renys.

Renk,

See Rayn, v. knight, man,

V

138 (see

Morte Arthure 433), vi 250 (see note). [Stem of ME. rescoueti, v., OFr. resconrre."]
Resette,
shelter,
.

[OE. n*e.] Renne-aboute, Gad-about, Vagaa 142. [From Ren.] bond,
note), 178, 269.

v

vm

Residue,
[OFr.

(place of) refuge, [OFr. rw*6] 96. residue, villa 94.
.

Renoun, Renowne,
glorious

n. renown,

residu.']

name,

in

of renoun,

Reson, Resoun(e), Reasoune,
n. reason, (good) sense,

(pi. in Fr. constr., with to several persons), I 248, ii 202, Xiv 6 Si. [OFr. renoun.'] Rent, //. torn, vn 147. [OE.

renouns
ref.

villa

xvn

311, xi a 30, 48, b 6, xn* 225, 501, &c. ; (personified) 5, &c. ; what is reason-

vm*
able,
!

rendan."]

rent-book, vino 84 [OFr. rental] Rentes, n. revenues from property, VIII b 77, XI b 96. [OFr. rente.'] Reparde, //. shut off, barred, vi 251. [O Fr. re- + E. parren. ] b 15. Repe, v. to reap, [OE.

Rental,

.

(see note).

xvi 263 ; reasoning, xvi 255 argument, saying, xvi 337; by reson, as a logical consequence, xvn 81 ; motive, in by patresoune, with that intent, xvi
248.
163.

M vm

[OFr. raison,

re(i)son."]

Resonabele,

adj. reasonable, vi
resonable.']

rfpan

;

on
s.v.

stem-vowel
Reap,}

see
Si,

[OFr. Vnresounable.

See

N.E.D.
91, 117.

Restay,

v. to stop

;

Repent(e),

v. to repent,

xvn

intr. to pause,

vi

77.
,

[OFr.

repenlii;~]

N.E.D.

[OFr. resteir-, s.v. Stay, v.]

see

GLOSSARY
Bestor(e), v. to restore, v 215, xvi 13, xvii 29; trwe mon trtvt restore, let an honest man
honestly restore (another's prov 286. [OFr. restorerl\ Bet. See Red(e), v. Beue, . reeve, manager of an estate, vi 182, XI b 288. [OE.
perty),
.

jesting, ii 9.

[OFr. ribauderie^\

See Rebalde.

Bibbes,
ril>t>.~]

.//. ribs, ix 257.
adj. of

[OE.

Biche, Byohe,
noble,
ii

high rank,

326, 446,
;

vm b

Beue,

v, to rob, steal, iv 20; constr. with dot. pron. of person deprived, iva 83, xvc 31.

xv^- 18, &c. wealthy, 52, &c. ; splendid, costly, rich, II 81, 161, 356, &c. ; high (feast), v 333; quasi-sb.-nxA&K (steed),

m

26,

V

109; adv.

(or predic. adj.)

richly,
riche.'}

n

362.

[OE.

rice

;

OFr.

[OE. rfafian.-] Beuey(se)d. See Rauysche. Beuel, v.. revel, v 333. [OFr.
reveler.]

Byche,. kingdom, vi
rice.~\

241.

[OE.

See Heuenryche.

Byched, //.

Beuerence,

at per., . reverence ; out of respect, V 138 ; do a r., make an obeisance, xii< 128.

directed; intended, 138. [OE. reccan, but form prob. due to confusion with ME. richen, rucken (OE. *ryccan),

V

[OFr. reverenced]

Beuerae, v. to reverse, countermand, XI a 15. [OFr. reverser."] Beuest, fa. t. (reft.) vested,
robed (himself),
revestir.~\
I

draw.] Bicht, Byoht.

See Right.

Bydde,

70.

[OFr.

separate (com178. [Blend of OE. hreddan, rescue, and ON. ryfy'a,
batants),

v.

to

v

rid.]

Beulis, n. pi. [OFr. reule.'}

rales,

XI b 203. See Rewle.

Bide, Byde,
(subj.), 347,

v. to

ride,

II

340
;

v

39, 76 (note), &c.,
;

Beume.
;

See Reame.

Baid, pa. t.sg x 1 49
;

Beupe, Bawpe.tt. (mental) pain, grief hedde r.Jierof, was grieved
at
that,
III

Bod(e) I 62, v 21, xva 4; him rod, sailed, \l\c6i Biden, //. II

20;
hear,

r.

to

here,
(cf.

grievous

to

v 136

Noy, Pine). [Extended with suffix -p from OE. hriow; cf.

308 ; Byden, pp. gone on military service (as knights), VIII b 78. [OE. rtdan.'] Bifild, pp. despoiled, xiv a j6,

ON. htygB.}

See Rewe(.ful).

Be-ward(e), n. regard, consideration, in take} r. of (to), give a thought (to), xiv c 105-7 reward, vi 244, xii b 42. [ONFr.
!

vn Bife, adj. plentiful, [Late OE. ryfe, *rlfe.'] Byfls. See Ryue.
Bigge,
.
;

17.

\OFt.

rt/ler.-]

122.

reward^

Bewardep,
Bewfe),
shall

reward, rewarder.^

vm b
it
it,

3

sg.

pres.

gives

back, II 500 Bugge, x\4. [OE. hrycg.-} Bight, Byght, Bihte (xn), adj.
right, proper, true, Xlla 124, xvi 255, xvii 471, &c. right (hand), IX 70. [OE. riht.'} Bight, Byght, BijtXe), Byjt, Biht (xn, xiv c) ; Bicht,
;

32.

[ONFr.

v. to rue, regret,
;

n

570,

XVII 202 hreowan,
piteous,

shal

him rtwe, he

rue

pers.
II

xva 23. [OE. and impers.]
(v), adj. rueful
;

Bycht
ii

Beweful, Buful

(x) 100, 186,

;

adv. straight, right,

v

94, &c.

;

ful

ri)t,

114; grievous, V 8. [OE. hreow+ful/.} Rewle, v. to guide, xvii 429.
[OFr. reuler.]

Bybaudry,

n.

ribaldry,

See Reuiis. coarse

(away), II 85, 191 ; ryght vprise (cf. Vpperight), rise Up, xvi 31 ; correctly, XVII 139 ; exactly, just, right, I 94, H 166, v 236, IX 64, X introci.,
straight

GLOSSARY
102, xii a 146, xvii 513, &c. ; richt evin, just, x 93 ; (with neg.) at all, vi 160, villa 145, b b6, xvii 524, &c. ; very, ix
150,

Bype, Bipe,
.

adj. ripe,

vni a 289,
[OE.

IX 140. [OE. rtpe.] Bis, leafy spray, II 305.
/iris.]

x

138,

xiv

c 10,

&c.
.

[OE.

Bise, Ryse,

v. to

rise,
;

\\

a

62,

rihte.]

v
t.
;

1

7,

xvi 394, &c.

Bos, pa.

Bight, Byght, Byjt, right, xiv b 37 justice, v 278, vi 136, 231 ; just cause, vni b 78 ; by to aske dome, J>e way of ryjt if they demand an award ace. to strict justice, vi 220; By3tes, Bijttis, //. duties, XI b 203; [OE. riht.] obligations, V 274. Bight, pa. t. corrected, vu 69. [OE. rihtan.~] Bightfull, adjust, ix 82 Bi;tfulleste, super!, xi b 193. [OE.
;

sg.
i
;

//.

VI 77, 146, 159 ; Byse, 208; Bysen, //. xva

Bysing, n. resurrection, 442 xvi 317. [OE. d-rtsan.] 10 ; Byste, n. repose, rest, iv Best(e), n 74, iv a 3, &c. [OE. rest; on y-form see N.E.D. s.v.
Rest.]

Byste, Best(e),
iv b 42,
20.

(late) riht-ful.]

Byue, v 222

v. to rest; intr. ; refl. iv b 38, ix restan see prec.] [OE. v. to tear (asunder), cleave,

v 263

;

(note)

;

Byghtfulnesse, n. Justice, vni b 32. [From prec.] Byghtwyse,tf<#. righteous, IV b 7 Beghtwysely, adv. righteously,
;

intr. is torn,

Byfis, 3 sg.prcs. xvii 399 ; Boue,

pa. t. v 278 .[ON.rJfa.]

;

Byue,#>.

i

121.

IV b

55

;

Beghtewysnes,

n.

[OE. righteousness, iv b 80. rihlwls (rehtwis), -foe, -nes.] Hi}tes ; alto rijtes, quite correctly, fittingly, II 136 ; to his rijtes, as he should
to
be, fittingly,
rijt,

n

292.
.),

Biueling, n. a rough shoe (as nickname for a Scot), xiva 19. [OE. rifeling.] Biuer(e), Byuer(e), n. river, n 160, 308, ix 1 3, xn a 85, xill a 16, &c. [Or. fivere.] Bo, n. peace, XVII 237. {OE.
row,
Ill

[Extension of to

according

ON.

ro.]
;

what

is

right (see Right,
-es.]
I

Bobbe,

with adv.

Byrne,

poem, pi. (trivial) popular poems, I 14; Byrne couwee, see Couwee. [OFr. rime. ]
;

n. riming

introd.

v. to rob Yrobbed,//. 18; Bobbing, n. XIV b 6. [OFr. robber.]
.

Bymys,

robber, xiva 6. Bobbere, [From prec. OFr. robbour.~\ Bobe, robe, n 81. [OFr.
;

.

Byn, pass swiftly, x 17, xvii 101,277, 305, 357;
Ban(ne), pa.
(note),
t.
;

v. to run, flow,
I

robe.]

Boc, Bokke,

n. rock,

155, iv a 9

XVrocc,

12.

[Cf.

OE.

v 76, 130, gloss stanro(f)<fue.]

x

107

Bunne,

//. in See

scopulus; OFr.
.

be

runne,

may have mounted

Boche,
21,22.

rock,
;

n

347,

v

131, IX

up, vi 163. [OE. rinnatt.'] Eorne, Ren(ne).

33, 62, &c.

Booch(e),

xm

[OFr. roche.]
rocky, v 226.

Binde,.bark,H26o. [OE.rtnd.] Byne, v. to touch, v 223 (see
note).

Boch6,
prec.]

adj.

[From

[OE. Annan.]
v. to

Bod(e).

See Ride.

Bynge,

ring, resound,
t.

12; Bonge, pa. Ry(n)kande, pres.

p.

XV b V 136; V 269
this

Bode, Bode,
107,

n. 1 rood, cross, villa 94,

xiv<:73.

[OE.
13.
;

rod.]
II

w. 2 rosy

hue, fair face,

(confus. of ng, nk, freq. in

xv b

[OE. rudu.]

poem).

[OE. hr'mgan, wk.]
ix 83.

Bof,

Byot,

n. strife, violence,
riot(e}.}

[OFr.

adj. rough grievous (with sore), or t n. gash, v 278 (note). [(i, As next with alteration of

GLOSSARY
final

spirant (cf. J>of), though this is not the usual form of

in

305.

a mass, tumultuously, XVII [OFr. route.]

'rough*

in this text,

(ii)

Re-

lated to Ryue, .] Ro}(e), adj. rough, rugged, V 94, 109, 130; Rouh, XIV c 37; Howe, ii 365, 459 (see Blac)
;

Bout, . a roar, loud noise, x 92. [Stem of OE. hrutan, or ON. rauta .w Rowtyn.]
;

Bouwed,/a.

/.

rowed, xiv<: 61.
.

Bu$e, V
riiw-.]

98.

[OE. ruA, rug-,

[OE. rowan, str.] Bo we, Bawe, row, vi 185; be rowe (rawe), on rawe, in
(due) order, in turn,

Boialme.
Royis, 2 xvi 99.

See Reame.
sg. pres. talkest

xvA

15,

folly,

xvi 3 1 7, 401.

[Unknown.]

Bok.w. distaff, xvil 338. [Cf.ON. rokk-r, MDu., MLG. rocke(n).] Rokke. See Roc. Bomayn, n. a Roman, vn 69.

Bowe. A<r Ro}(eX Bowtyn, pres. pi. they crash, beat, XV A 15. [OE. hrutan\
but see N.E.D. for various sources and senses of Rout. n.

[OE. raw.]

Bomauce,
Borne,

[OFr. remain.'] n. (French) romance, story, xiv b heading. [OFr.
romanz.~\

and

v.]

v. to wander, make one's way, V 130, VIII b n. [ME. forms point to OE. *rdmian.] See Roche. Booch(es). Booris, 2 sg. pres. roarest, XVI 99.

. eve of the feast of the (Exaltation of the) Cross, X 42. [OE. rod + teftn.'] See Rode, n.i Buful. See Reweful.

Bude-evyn,

Bugge Bu;e.
;

See Rigge; Ros(e).

Bugh-fute,. rough-footed, xiv a
19.

[OE.riih+jot.] SeeRo)(e),
pres. p.
of,

[OE. rarian]

Fote.
n. pi. ropes,

Roojmr.

See Ro}>ur.

Bopia, Bapes, 147, xiv b 68. [OE. rAp.} Boa. See Rise. Bose, rose, xv 13,^ 19. [OE. rose from L. rosa.] Bote, n> root, v 226, vi 60 (origin), VIII a 97, XIV c 82 Bote, pi. (or collect. SP.\ n 256,
.

vn

Buysand, r. hyme
credit

glorifying,
in,

in

glorying
ser.]

taking

to himself for, IV b 80.
;

Bunne Rurde.
Buache,
rushing noise,

[ON. krosa

v. to rush

See Ryn Rerd. make a loud v 136; rusched
; ;

;

on pat rurde,
that

went on with

260.
.

Bote, way, in bi rote, on the way, v 139. [OFr. rote.'] Boted, /a. /. rotted, I 236. [OE.
rotian.]

[ON./.] 2

noise, V rushing 151. [Echoic, but app. based on OFr.

r(e]usssr,

AFr.

rnss(/i]er.]

Sa, Saat.
n. rudder,

See So

;

Sitte(n).

Bopur, Boojrar,
25, 29, 36. 57;

xiv c

Boue Bouh. A* Ryue
Roun(e),

[OE.

rfffor.-]
;

Roj(e).

n. speech, voice, xv b 2, 29 (see note), c 36; [OE. run}
adj.

n. sacrament, XVI 316. [L. sacramentum.} Sacrifise, -ice, n. sacrifice XI b 202, xn a 15, 40. [OFr. sacri-

Sacramente,

fice.]

Bound,
aboitte

round; adv.
(as prep?)

in

al

round

xn

round,

Sacrylage, n. sacrilege, I [OFr. sacrilege, infl. by
-age.]

4, 19.
suffix

Boundnesae, n. 79; roundness, IX 67. [OFr. room/, round.]
Bout(e),
(great)

a

Sad(de), adj.

steadfast,

IX 92

;

n\

host,
II
;

company,
283,

hym

number,

X

176,

heavy, grievous, xvi 44; sette sadde, give him sorrow, xvi 204; Sadly, adv. sufficiently,

XII b 118, xiv a 16

an a route,

long enough,

v

341.

[OE.

saed,

GLOSSARY
sated, wearied ; ME. shows also senses ' heavy, firm ', &c.]

Sadel,
sadol.']

.

saddle,

v

42.

[OE.

Saf(e), see Saue ; Sagh, see Se(n) ; Say, Sai-, see Se(n), Sei(e). Saye, v. to make trial of, explore,

XIV
Sayf.

c

34.

[Shortened

from

[Shortened from OFr. See Ensample. sand, shore; bi see and bi sand, everywhere, XVII 75. [OE. sdnd.} See Santis. Sang, Song(e), Seynte. . Sap, [OE. sap, XIV c 90.

vi

139.-

essample.~\
.

Sand,

Assaie.] See Saue, prep. Sayl(l), Sail, n. sail,

vn

125,

xiv c 50, xvn 153, 271, &c. [OE. segl.} See Seile. Sayn, Say tz, see Sei(e) Saynte,
;

Saphire, sapphire, IX 115, no (see Loupe), 122. [OFr. safir.^\ Wisdom personif. Sapience, ' ' books of the sapiential (Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Can. .

s*p.-\

;

see Seynte.

Sake,
(i)

.

in

for

.

.

.

sake

(with
adj.},

Wisdom, vin a 231 (the
ticles,

Ecclesiasticus), ref. is to PJOV.

interven.

gen.
;

or pass,
(ii)
;

xx. 4).

[L. saptentia.~\

for (one's) sake, VIII

xil

introd.

account,
(note).

xv

c 23

a 96, (one's) (with loss of

Sare.

See Sore.

on

prec. inflexion)

i

177,

xvn

88

Sarri, adj. 1 vigorous, XIV ( 90. [OFr. serre ; see note.] See Certeyne; Sat. Sarteyne
;

[OE. sacu;

cf.

ON.
[OE.

fyrir sakir because of.] Sakke, . sack, vin a 9.
sacci\

Sitte(n). Sauce, n.

sauce,

vin a

259.

[OFr. sauced} Saue, Saf, adj. safe ; a saue, have
safe, save,
I

Sakles,

adj. innocent

(/. e.

whom you
xiv a
i.

against

127 (see Habben)

;

had no

just quarrel),

vochen
saf.

saf,

vin

b 51, see Vouche-

[OE.

sac-leas,

from

ON.

sak-latiss.']

Sale, n. in to the sale, for sale, xn b 148. [OE. *salu (once) sala.~\ See Schal. Sal(l), Saltou. Salt(e), adj. salt, vin a 279, ix 13, xn a 166, &c. ; n. xin a 30.

[OFr. sauf, sauve (fern.).] Saue, Saf, Sayf (xvn), prep. save, except, ix 174, 228, xvi i 106; saue bat (conj.), v 161.

[OFr. saurf

Saue, Safe (xvn),^. to preserve, keep safe, v 5 (subj,), 7 1, xv i 1 9,
XVII 309, 517, &c. rescue, bring to salvation, xi a 38, b 305, xvi
;

[OE. jfl/f, adj. and n.] Salvacioun, n. salvation, IX 333. [OFr. salvaciounJ\ Sam(e), Saruen, Somyn (vil), adv. together, vn 66, xvi 170, 239, XVII 316; brether sam, brothers both, xvn 320; al samen, all sam (togeder), (all) with together, xvn 292, 530 one accord, vi 158; .sr^Alsanme. xt sawne, somne; (late) [OE. somen cf. ON. allir saman.] Same, adj. same 1 188, &c.; pron. in fie (J>is) same, the very one (or thing), XII b 78, xvi 56, 71, &c. [ON. sam-r.-} Samon, salmon, XIII a 64.
; ;
.

io8,&c.

Sauynge,w. preserva-

tion, XI b 304. [OFr. sa(u}ve>:'] Saufly, adv. safely, XII b 174. [From Saue, adj^\ Saugh. See Se(n).

Saul(e), Saull, Sawl(e), Soule, n. soul, iv a 24, 32, 61, vin a 81, xvi 272, xvil 390, &c. distrib. sg. (see Herte), XI b 250
; ;

Soule, gen.
sdwol.\

sg.

I

212.

[OK.
;

Sauour
relish

(to*,

n. savour, IX 153

(for),

xi b 254.

[OFr.

savour.]

Sauoure,

[OFr. saumon.~\

Sample,

n.

illustration, parable,

v. to give a savour to, VIII a 259. [OFr. savourer.] the Psalter, Sauter, Sawter,
.

GLOSSARY
Book of Psalms, VI
246, b 49, xvi 187.
233, VIII a

[OFr. sau-

Pa. 63, 210, XI a 9, b 82, &c. t. (ind. and subj.}, was going
to,

/(*>.]

ought

to,

was (were)
;

to,

Sawe,

saying; aflir J>i saiue, according to thy word, xvi 397 ;
.

should,

would
II

Schold(e),
;

8aw(e).

proverb, xvi 281. See Se(n).
n.
assault,

[OE.

sagii.]

Sawte,

vn

57,

85.

467, VIII a 36, b 67, 80, ix 89, XII a in, &c. Schuld(e), Shuld(e), I 50, 69, 106, ii 44, 190, v 16, XI a 21,

Shold(e),

[Shortened from OFr. as(s)aut.~\ Saxon, adj. Saxon, xm b 49; Saxonlych, adv. in the Saxon
fashion, Scaffatis,

xm b 8.
n.

[OFr. saxon.'}
scaffoldings, structures

pi.

&c. ; Ssolde, Suld(e), 7 iv a 91, b 19, X 12, &c. 2 sg. Schulde, xvi 241 ; Schust, ii 420, 570, &c. Note ellipse of a foil, verb, as have ', xvn 227;
; ; '

m

temporary

wooden

freq.

for assailing walls,

x

9.

[Cf.

'go', 'come', IV a 91, v 16, 332.

ii

130,

Which
(at

OFr. escadaffiut,

eschaffaut.~]

slept schal, that

Scarslych, adv. scantily, scarcely,

xm b 50.
v
285,

[From ONFr. escars.]
n.

time) sleep, xn a 117 ; when schuld be, whenever it was,
370. [OE. scdUe, &c.]
sceal
;

may

any
it II
;

Scape, Skathe,

damage, injury,

sculon, scylon
n.

xv

*

13.

[ON.

skati.]

Scere, adj. bright, pure, in Sctrt fx>rsday,S}\eeT, Holy,or Maundy, Thursday.xv.fi. '[OE. *sc*re,
rel.

Schalk, Shalke,

304, VII 72, 89. servant, (in verse) man.]
;

man, V 200, [OE. scealc t

to 3cir\

cf.

ON.

skser-r,

skir-r,

and

ON.

Skiri-frirsdagr,

Scham(e), Scheme (v), Shame, n. shame, xiv c 13 disgrace,
XII b

QSwt&.Skfer(a)-l>orsdagher. See Schyre, Skyre.

V 304;
xiv a
301
;

224; disgraceful thing, ignominy, disaster, harm,
12, b 84,

Schadewe

(a)en), v. to screen (from), IX 19. [OE. sceadwian.~\ . Schaft, handle, v 264. [OE.
steaft.']

xvi'iS,

xvn
I

shameful things, [OE. scamu, sfomuJ]
//.

2.

n. shaw, small wood, v 93 (see Side). [OE. scaga.} Schakeled, pp. shackled; protected with greaves, xv h 12. [OK. sceacul, fetter.]

Soha^e,

Schamfully, adv. ignominiously, iv a 66. [OE. scamful-llce^ Sohank(e), n. leg (below the knee), XV h 12. [OE. scanca.~]
Schapellis. See Chapel(le). Schap(e), Schappe, Shappe, v. ; Schop, Shope, pa. t. v 260, vn 72; Schaped, pp. v 272; Schape(n).xna 130, 169, &c. ; a 45. Trans. Yschape, to fashion, make, v *26i, 272, VII 72, VIII b 18, ix 107; to a 45 turn (into), XII a 169,

Schal, Schall(e), Shall 1). Sali 1),
v. auxil.
to,
I

and 3 sg.

pres.

am (is)

must, shall, will, I 22, n 172, 307, iv a 7, 79, ix 69, xiv a 34, XV a 10, xvi 15, xvn 164, &c. ;
Shal(l), v 79, xvi 299, xvn &c. ; 121, 381, Schalt(e), Shalt, I 206, ii 130, vi 204, &c. ; suffixed (with pron.) Saltou, xiv a 23 ; Shallow, VHI a 223; pi. Sal(l), iv a 62, xiv i8,&c.; Serial, Schall(e), v 332, xvi 49, 192, &c.; b Schyn, V 333 ; Scholle,

xm

2f-.Sal(l),ivai7,4c;Schal(l),

xm

;

to contrive, bring (it) about, v 70, XII a 130; ordain, appoint,

V 260

;

schappe }ou

to,

appoint
;

for yourselves,

xiv d

7

refl.

in

xm

Sohull, 39 ; Shul(en), I 38,

vm

Schulle(n), a 140, ix

shappis hym, designs, intends, xvi 155 ; intr. to prepare, be about (to), X 14. [OE. sceppan, scop, ge-scapen.~] See Forschape. Schapp, shape, IX 248. [OE.
.

ge-sceap.]

GLOSSARY
Scharp(e), Sharp(e), adj. keen,

GLOSSARY

GLOSSARY
Sed
;

cf.

my

moder cf ivJwm 1
;

in

int>-ed.\
saint.']

Sent,
.

xv*

7,

n.

dede scde, Cov. Myst. 393) Ideede, died (from Deye, q.v.}.

[OFr.
83.

Seyntewarie,
Seyr,
see

sanctuary,

vm*

Seek; See(n); Seere. A^Sike;
Se(n)
;
.

[OFr. saintuaire."]

Ser(e).
,

Sege, siege. X i XIV b heading. [OFr. sftegr.-] n. man, V. 339. Segge, [OE.
**y-J

Ser(e); Seist, Seyt, SeiJ), &c., see Sei(e) ; Seke, see Sike ; SekeJ), see Seche. Selde(n), adv. seldom, vi 20,

Xiv
M.
pi.
I

c 8, 40,

&c.

[OE. st/dan.]

Seggers,

story-tellers,

(professional) introd. [From
;

ME.

segge(n} to tell (see Seie)

Sele, Seyll (xvn), n. happiness, prosperity, v 341 , 354 (see note), xvn 301. [OE. see/.']
Self's;,
(ill), adj. e > J>

cf. OE. secgend, and Disour.] Segh, Se3(e). See Se(n). Sei(e), Seye(n), Sein, Seyn(e),

v 79
selfe,

Selue, Seluen, Zelue same, very, II 341, turne seluen, Troy

&c. v. to say, tell, mention, I 254, 123, 279, ix 76, 134, xi a 34, b 8, xii a 27, xiv c 9, &c. herd seye, heard men relate, ix 221; Say(n), Sai'e), iv a

the knight himself,

Troy

vni a

;

74, vii 182,

169,

xvn
ill

xiv b heading, xvi 382, &c. ; Zigge, in
of,

V 309, vii 63 ; qitasi-sb. person, v 88, 233 ; J>e ilke zelue fet, the very one who, ill 27 (see note) ; see the personal prons. [OE. selfia}.~\
itself,
self,

Selle,

n.

prison-cell,

xvi

342.

yhyerde zigge
;

heard

it

said

[OFr.

celleJ]

Seist, 2 sg. pres. by, 49. vni a 226 Sais, Says, VI 49, xvi 60, &c. ; Seyt, 3 sg. II 556 SeiJ), &c., I 97, VIII a 246, &c. ; Sayt?, vi 97, 141 ; ZayJ, in
;

;

Selle(n), Sell, v. to sell, iv a 46, vnia 264, ix 113, &c. ; Sulle, xv g 19, 20, 22 ; Solde, pa. t.

xvi 147; Sold. Isold,//, in boght and soM, iboust ant isold,
XII b 153,
sale,
(late

48 Sais, //. xvi 108 Seith, imper. pi. xiv d 1 3. Seyd(e), Sayd(e), &c., pa. 1. i 78, II 1 88, &c. ; Zayde, Zede, Hi 12, 28; Seyd, Saide, //. I 108, ix 297 (aforesaid), &c.
; ;

xv g

26

;

to selle, for

villa 301. [OE. sel'an \VS. syllan).]

Selly, adj. strange, curious,

v

102.

[OE.
Seluer.

sel(d)-lic.']

See Siluer.
.

}at

is sone saide, that is easily said, easier said than done, xvi

Sembland, Seymland,

looks,

countenance, xiv b 79, xvii 211.

205.
seyde.

[OE. secgan
See

SKde."\

s&gde, Aboueseyd, For(segf)
;

Seigh,
Se(n).

Beise,
n.

Seih, &c.
saying,

See

[OFr. semblattt.] Seme(n), v. to beseem, suit, xv b 33 to seem fitting, xi a 6 ; to seem, appear, IV b 50, VIII 27. XI* 288, &c. [ON. s6ma
;

94^

Seiynge.

assertion,
r.

(samdi, pa.

t.

subj.)

;

cf.

XI*
Seile,

12, 222.

[From

vn 128, xn a 31, xiv c 33. [OE. seg!(i-an.~] See Sayll. See Sele; Seyll; Seymland. Sembland. Beynt(e), Saint, Saynt(e), adj.
holy, i 246, XV d 5 ; Saint, I 34, III introd^ 3, villa 3, xiv a* i, &c. ; saint, XI b 87, 95, &c.
.

Saile, Sayle,

Sei(e).] to sail,

Semly, XIV b

adj. seemly, fair, 411, 28, xv b 26 ; Semlokest. super 1. XV c 6. [ON. scem-r

n

next.]

+

OE. -lie, f&.l

-lucost; cf.

ON.

s&nii-

;

Bant,

xvn

555

;

Sauynt,

Sen. See Si}>en, Se(n). Sendal, n. a kind of thin rich silk, vni a 1 1. [OFr. waa/.] Sende, v. to send, I 51, vni a 132, &c.; Sende, /a. t. v 294; Sent sent (after], sent (for), II 424
;

8*

GLOSSARY
word, villa 321;

Zente, in

GLOSSARY
Sex, Six, adj. .six, ix 106 (see Squared), xvi 39, xvii 57, &c. ;
Sexti,
Sh-.
sixty, II

90, 304.

[OE.

Sih, Syh. See Se(n). Sike, adj. sick, ailing, morbid, xi b 242; Seek, xva a; Seke,

sex, sexlig.~]

xvn
Sykel,

61.
.

[OE.

seoc, sec.}

See Sen- (except as below). See Shaltow; Shop; Sheld. Schal Scheep Schylde.
; ;

sickle,

vin b
.

25.

[OE.

sicol.~]

Sikenesse,
disease,

Sheues, n.pl. sheaves, vin a 135, l>\4. [OE. seen/.] Shlepe. See Slep(e),
.

vm

sickness, Syke-, a 122, 254. [OE.
safe,

Shon(e), n.pl. shoes, vmb 18, XVI1 353 (see Clonte). [OE.
sc(e}o, late gen. pi. scedna.~\

Siker, Syker, adj.

sure,

secure, ii 35, vin b 40, xi a 238, xiv c 49, 55. [OE. sicor.~] Sikerlich, Securly, adv. certainly,
ii

Shotton

;

Showr.

See Schote

j

571,
.

xvn

38,

372.

Schour.

[From
n.

prec.]
security, XII b 40.

Shrewe,

a bad man, evil-doer,

vn

183,

screawa,

vin a 153. shrew - mouse

[OE.
;

Sikernesse, [As prec.]
Silke,
seolc
;
.

see

silk,

villa

ii.

[OE.

N.E.D.']

silcen, adj.]

Sybbe, adj. related, [OE. sibb.}
Sic; Sich(e); Sicht.

akin, i\ b 22.

Siluer, Syluer, Seiner, Zeluer
(in), n. silver,

^^Swilke;
.

in
&c.

5,

vina

money, 11.150,
76,

186,

xv g

4,

Swiche; Sight. side, Side, Syde (Siddis, //.), ii 156, v 112, ix 69, xvii 542 see See), &c. bi (af) (shore
;

[OE. seal/or, silfor, &c.] Symented,//. cemented, ix 233.

;

.

.

.

Symonye,

side, (orig.

with intervening^?//.) on the beside, II 66, V 76, 93 see syde, in the direction of the sea, IX 177 ; in (oil) no syde, in no direction, V 102, IX 164, 192 in on syde, in one respect, xni b 35 on alle siddis,^ in all respects, XI /> 238 ; quasi-cufj. lying on
; ; ;

[OFr. dmenter.~] simony, [OFr. simoitie.~]
.

XI b 98.

either
side.']

side,

XIII b

55.

[OE.

Sygh(e),

69, 85; trans, to lament, regret, iva 59. [Alteration of OE. slcan, ME.
siken, aided

f. to sigh,

iva

adj. simple, ignorant, XII b 95, xvn 173. [OFr. simple.] Syn(e). See Synn(e), Si]>en. Synder, adv. in in synder, asunder, xiv c 31. [OE. synder- ; see Sonder.] Syndry, adj. sundry, various, X 3, See 9, 152. [OE. syndrig.~] Sondri. Synful, Synffull, adj. sinful, xi b 10 5. I33> &c. ; synffull care, the

Symple, Simple,

by ME.
.

pa.

t.

sihte.~\

woe due

to sin,

xvi 292.

[OE.

Sight,

Si}t,
(x),

Syght(e),
sight, view,

334, iv 50, x 192, xvi 16, xvii 555, &c. ; at a syght, at one view,

Sicht

n

Sy3t,

synn-ful.~\

Synge(n), Sing(g)e,
i

14, 56,

n 68, VIM b
;

v. to sing,

b 6, &c.
thou,
pi.

xvii 469; be sight, by sight, xvi 229 to sight, to look upon, XVI 90 with sight, by looking
; ;

66,

(reading),
sihp, -siht.']

VII

24.

[OE. ge-

Songen, pa. t. vin a 109 Sung(g)e, I 57, 1 68 Songen, //. xi b 133, JSS, 143; Syngynge, n. I 5.
17.
;

xva
;

72, xv a 7, Sinkestou, singest

Signe,

Syngne (v),. sign, token, evidence, v 96, xi a 3, xvi 19,
4i,&c.
[OFr.
sigtie.]

[OE. s'ingan.~\ Synglerty, n. uniqueness, VI 69.
[OFr.
senglierte.']

Syngne.

Sije.

See Se(n).

See Signe. Singuler-j adi. individual

;

unusual,

GLOSSARY
irregular, XI b 101;

Singulerly,

GLOSSARY
Slang, pa.
t.

pi.

flung,

x

53;

drowsy, xil<z 106.

[OE. *slu~
sleep,

Slongyn, //. vil 165. [ON. slyngva.] Sle, adj. cunning, X 1 5 ; working in secret, iv a 10 (see note). [ON. stig-r.-] See Slyght.
Slep(e), Sleep, Shlepe, n. sleep, XI b 219, xn a 81, 88, xv,f 14, &c. (personified) xn 47, 89, &c. ; on slepe, asleep, II 72 ;
;

merian

;

cf.

sluma."}
.

Slomeryng,

slumber,

vn

6.

[As prec.]
sloth-

Slongyn. See Slang. Slowe, Slou5, adj. sluggish,
ful,

XI b 219

;

dull

Sluche,

slydyn vppon shlepe, fallen into oblivion, or fallen asleep, dead,

or spiritless), xiv slaw.] n. sludge, ooze, [Obscure.]
II 109,

(unfeeling c 103. [OE.

vu

165.
fine,

vn
XII

Smal(e), adj. small, slender,
&c.
II
;

6.

[OE.

Slepe(n),

slip, step.} v. to sleep, II 407,
;

456,

a 141, XV a 3, &c. refl. in sleppoupe, go to sleep, xv,- 13 ; go slepe, go to sleep, vm a 296 ; Slope, pa. t. n 75, 134, 402; Slepte, _i 159, 243. [OE. slepan, six-pan, str. and wk.J Slepi, adj. sleepy, drowsy, XI I a 91, 104, 109. [OE. in un-slepig.~\ Sleulhe, Sloth, n. sloth, vm a 137. xvn 53. [OE. j/*jj.]
See Slowe. Slewe. See Slo.

ix 46, xi b 138, xin a 30, adv. fine, in small pieces, 538, xi b 177, Xiv d 9, &c. [OE. smsel smale, adv.]
;

Smateryd,//. be-grimed, xv//
[Cf.

r.

ME.

smoter-lich,

bi-smo-

teren.]

Smekyd, (//.) adj. smoky, smokexv h i. blackened, [OE.
sme(o}can.']

Smertly, adv. suddenly,

swiftly,

X

83,
;

91,
cf.
.

168.

[ME. smert,

Slydyn,//. slipped ; fallen, VII 6. [OE. slidan.} Slyght, n. skill, xvn 137. [ON.
sJSgt^ See Sle. Slike, Slyke, adj. such, xiv 6 35
none
her,
slyke, (that)
;

Smebes, pi. smiths, xvA i. [OE. Smyle, v. to smile, xvn 215. [?OE. *sml/ian, rel. to MHG.

sharp

OE.

smeart.~]

m>]

XVII

233.

no one [ON.

(is) like

Smyte, Smytte, v 192, xvn 215,
XVI 338.

slik-r.~]

smielen, Svv. smila, &c.] v. to smite, 218, 220; to rebuke, IV b 76 ; Smytts, //.

See Swilke. Slip, v. ; slip this spyndill, strip, spin off all that is on this spindle,

[OE.

sinitan, smear.]
II

Smope,

adj. smooth, level,
(i),

353.

xvii 364.

[Cf.

MLG.

shppen;
untrust-

[OE. sniop.'] Snaw(e), Snogh
snow,
I
;

Snowe,
1

ON.
Sliper,

sleppa.~\

162,

v

20,

66,

247,

adj.

slippery,

worthy, xiv c 5. [OE. slipor^ Slyttyng, adj. harsh, piercing, XIII b 59. [OE. slitan, 1 slittan.] Slo, v. to slay, n 332; Slewe, pa. t. xvi 306; Slogh, xiv a 3 Slou}, II 313, xiv 45 Slayn, //. xvn 307, 546. [OE. slean
; <r ;

XVI 89 snowe-white, II 145. [OE. snaw; snaw-AwJt.']
v. to snow, II 247. [OE. smivan, *sneowan.~\ Snyrt, pa. t. touched, grazed,

Suewe,

v
So,

;

ON.
[Cf.

sla.']

Slober, n. slime, ooze,

vn 165. ME. slobere(n\ v., and similar forms in Du., Fris.] Sloken, v. to extinguish, iv a 6.
[ON. slokna, intr.] Slombrende, pres. p. slumbering,

244. [Cf. ON. snerta, str.] Soo (xvi), Sa (i v, x), adv. (i) Deinonstr. so, thus, in this (that) way, I 90, 150, IV a 20, xvi 206,

&c.

;

As)

(in adjurations, so, II 532, VI 127,

&c.

;

cf.
;

&c.

in

like manner, the same, v 213, xv b 22 (or as, rel.}, xvi 373,

xvn

391, &c. ; so, to such a degree, &c., II 39, IX II, 202,

GLOSSARY
XVI 99, xvn 357 adjs. and advs.")
;

(intensifying

I 28, vi 20, 133, &c. (before adjs. without ) such (a), II 148, 426, ix 159, x 47, &c. ; neuer sa, (n)ever so, IV a 75 ; (giving

X

Solitarie, adj. solitary, *xi 36 (MS. solarie). [L. solitdrius}

;

Solowe,
I

v.

to be soiled, sullied,

165,

237.

[OE. *solgian,

cf.

solian."]

Som(e),

indef. sense to relatives, q.v.") so
. till pat, so that, until, IX 223, 229, 231 ; so as, (in so far) Xlla 126, 174, 177, &c.; so }>at, so long as, provided, XI b 223. (ii) Relative as, II 112,

ever, so . .

n 340,

iva 71, vi 2o6,&c.;

as,

(in), adj. some, (a) v 51, VI 68, vil 33, IX 119, xvi 19, xvn 157, &c. ; pron. sg. one, I 135; some, (a) part, II 516, XI a 56, &c. ; //.
certain,

Zome

Somme,

Sum(me),

some, 9, &c.

II 5, III 2,
;

Sum time. Som tymo,

vi 148, villa

vin a
as ...

II 352 ; so b 34 ; by provided that, vi 1 1 b 40. [OE. swa.] See As(e), Swa. Sobre, adj. earnest, serious, VI 31, 172. [OFr. sobre.} SeeVnsober.

so,

215, 33, as ... as,

xv

<T3,<fi4;

May

be,

may

be,

vin

&c., adv. once (upon a time), II 31, XIII b 5, XIV c 17, 43, d i ; sometimes, VIII b 49, IX
47, 240, 13.

so,

xiv a

32.

[OE. sum.}

Somdel(l),

xin

adv. somewhat, ix b 27. [OE. sume
;

Socour(e), n. succour, help, xn$ 17, XVII 157, 254. [OFr. sttcitrs, infl. by related verb jSuccnr.]
;

dale.-}

Somer, n. summer, II 257, 352 Som our games, summer-games,
I I.

Sod,

n. sod, clod,
sode.}
.

xvn 58. [MLG.,

[OE.

sutnor."]

MDu.

Sodeinli, Sodonly. .S^Soudein. Soferan, sovereign lord, xvn Souereynes, superiors, 92 ; vin a 74. [OFr. soveraitt.~\ Softe, adj. soft, tender, gentle, VII 130, XII a 181 ; adv. softly, gently, xn a 93, b 89 ; Softly,
adv.
ii

Somyn. See Sam(e), adv. Somwhat, adv. somewhat, a little, vma 257, xin b 6. [OE. sum
+ fiivxt
Son.
I

indef.]

See Sonne.
ailv. at

Son(e),

once, straightway,

300.

[OE.

softe,

adj.

and adv.]
Sogat, adv. in this way, XIV b 96. 2 See pusgate. ] [So + Gate, Soght, Sojt Soyne. See Seche Sone, adv. 8oio(u)rne, v. to dwell, n 47, xvi 221 stay, V 341. [OFr. so. ;

XVI1 353> & c: soon, n 153, xvi205(^<rSeie),&c.; Soyn(e), X7o, xvn 21, 28, 189; Banner, compar. I 10 conj, as soon as, xv a ii (cf. sane so, xv g 14).
;

69, ii 71,

xiv b

7,

xv a

16,

;

See Eftsone(j). Soncler. Sundyr, Swudir, adv. in in sender, &c., asunder, X 106,

[OE.

jfcia.]

xvn

407

(cf.

ON.

i

suttdr)

;

;

journey."]

Solace,

Solas,

n.

consolation,
28, 41,

Sundyrlepys, adv. separately, (corruptly) in wyth s. /., I 234 (see Lepys, and note). [OE.
sundor,
2epes.~\

solace, ix 316,

xvi

enjoyment, vn 22, ix 276 solace make, amuse themselves, I introd. ; 'joy, xvi 387, 398, 407. [OFr. solas.} Solas, v. to delight, n 383. [OFr.
;

46;

on-sundran,

suitdor-

Sondre,

See Asunder, Synder. Sundir, v. to disperse,

Sondri,

solacier^]

Sole, n. (level) place, [OFr. sole.'}

xvn

391.

VII 143; intr. to separate, XVI 240. [OE. (a-^stindrian.] adj. (with sg.} sundry, XII introd., b 185. [OE. synunder influence of sunder.] drig

See Syndry.

Solempne,
XVI 355.

adj.

awe-inspiring,
solem(f~)ne.']

Sone,
&c.
;

n. son,

I

[OFr.

Sonne, xvi

46, VIII a 74, b 76, 241, xvn

GLOSSARY
141
;

Sun, xiv b

70, 92.

[OE.

GLOSSARY
in pat (this) space, then (now), VI XVII 78, 552. [OFr.
(e)space.'\
.

speaking,

conversing,
sp(r]ecan.'\

XI

121, 160.

[OE.

Spak(e)
Spere.

;

Spar, v. .&* Speke(n)

;

Spelle, n. tale, speech, talking, v 1 1 6 (see Deme), vi 3, xv A 8 ;
gospel, ill 50.

Spar,

piece of timber, xvn 130. [MLG., MDn. spar(re), OFr. esparre.} Spare, v. to abstain from ; trans. to spare, xvn 379; intr. to hesitate to, XIV b 13 ; to desist,
.

[OE.

spell.'}

Spelle, v. to

tell,

xv A

declare,

V

7.2,

8.

[OE.

spellian.'}

Spend(e),

Spard, pa. t. in stop, xiv b 23 no sp. noiper stub no ston (cf. spartde he neyj>er tos ne heles, Havelok 898), stopped for nothing, went as fast as he could,
;

xvi 28 ; to spend, vill b 28, 73; use (up), xvn 130; lose (life), v 45 ; spende aboute, spend on, xi b 236 Spent, Yspent, pp. ended, dead, n 199, 215. [OE.
v. to dispense,
;

spifndan.'}

Spenders,

.'

dispenser, steward,

ill 22, 24, 28.

[Shortened from
q.v.~]

II

346.

[OE.
n.

spartan.'}

Desspendoure,

Sparke,

spark, xii a 69.

OE.

Spendour,
thrift,

2
.

spender, spend-

spearca.~\

VIII b 28.

Spec. See Speke(n). Speche, n. speech, talk(ing), language, what is said, vi 40, vn 34, XII* 212, xin b 4, &c. [OE. sprite.-} Special 1\ adj. special, IX 296, XVI no; in special, especially, particularly, in detail, XII a no, 135, &c.; Specialych, Specyaly, Specially, especially, particularly, I 13, V 25, XI a 37,
XIII b 58.

Spenne,
?

v

[From Spende.]
;

248

1

spenne-folc,

with feet together (a standing jump). [ON. spenna, clasp +
Sper(e>,
n.

spear,

V

75,

x

138,

xiv b 13; spere lenfe, spear's length, v 248. [OE. spere.'] Spere, Spar, v. to bar, shut, xvi 1 39 out to spar, to keep out, xvn 1 28; Sperde, pp. shut up, xvi no. [OE. ge-sparrian;
;

[OFr. (especial.]

MDu.

spew-en.]
.

Spade,
sped.-]

n. prosperity; (cause of)

Sperhauke,

sparrowhawk,

success, asset, xiv<: 15.

[OE.
pros-

vin <z

190.

[OE. spear-hafoc.]

See Hankin.
v. intr. to succeed,

Spede,
per,

no, Vina 46; fare, I Spedde, pa. t. xui> 106; all ill mot pou spede curse you, xvi
,

Spices, n. pi. spices, ix 158. [OFr. tspice.-} Spie, Spy, v. to spy ; spyde with, detected in, xvn 544 to search,
;

139; trans, to speed, make prosperous, v 52, vi 127; to further, v 148 ; God specie, God speed thee (as greeting), XVII
190. [OE. spedan.} Speke(n), v. to speak,
say,
talk, tell,

enquire

(after),

v

25

(cf.

Sir

Gaw.

901).

[OFr.

(e]spier^

See Aspien. Spyll, Spill, v. to destroy, waste, iv a 32, xiv a 33. [OE. spillan.']

138, v 234, ix 212, xi b b 8, xvn 206 (as//.) &c. ; Spak(e),/<z. t. sg. \ 225, XII a 100, &c. ; als f spake, according to my word, xvi 28;
256,

n

xin

Spille-tyme, [Free. 4 OE.
.

.

idler,

vin

b 28.

tiia.~]

Spyndill, spindle, xvn 364. [OE. spinl; OFris., MDu.
spindel.'}

Spec,
II

xv g 2, 28, 29 ; Speke, 334, vi 78 ; Spak,//. I 200; Speke,//. xii b 99; Spoke(n),
100, ix 135, &c.;

Spyn(ne),
XVII

v.

to spin,

villa 13,
; ;

I

Spekynge,

238, 359, 361 pa. t. sg. xiv introd. //. XVII 337. [OE.

Span, Spon,

GLOSSARY
Spyryt, Spirit(e),
85,
.

XI b 39,

xni a

spirit, IX 2. [OFr.

Stabylnes,
stancy, iv

.

steadfastness, con-

a 42, b 46.
steadfast,

[From
vi
237,
;

next.]

Spyttyn, pres. pi. [OE. spitl(i}an.~] Bpitus, Spytus,
pered,

spit,

xv h

8.

Stable, adj.

xvn

adj. ill-tem416; cruel, xvil 455.

xi b 1 1 9. [OFr. (e}stable.~\ Stad, Sted(de), //. placed, set
stad,

[Shortened from QYr.despitous.] Spoke(n) ; Spon. See Speke(n) ; Spyn(ne). Spornande, pres. p. stumbling, VI 3. [OE. spornan.] Sprai, Spray, (leafy) spray, xv a i , c 2, &c. [? OE. *spr&g
.

hard put to it, sore bested, vn 156, X 145, XVII 199; stad with, furnished with, v 69; see note

stratly stadj

hard

sted,

XVI
.

40.

[ON.

stefl/a,

pp.

sladd-r.] staff, stick, XII b 55, XVII Staf,

(cf. spraec}.]

381 Staue ttmf]
;

(dat.),

v

69.

[OE.

Spraulyn,
in

[OE.

pres. pi. sprawl, ungainly fashion, xv A 8. spreawlian, move conv. to spread,

move

vulsively.]

Sprede(n),

intr. II 67,

pa. t. //. outspread,

unfold ; ix 217; Spradde, (trans.} xn a 1 76 ; Sprad,

Staffing, n. hitting (with a staff) ; [From prec.] beating, X 193. . Stage, stage; degree of advancement, vi 50 ; the hike stage, the high places (of the gods), xii a 5 1. [OFr. (e)stage.] Stalke, v. to stalk, stride, V 162.

xna

156.

[OE.

[OE.
tion,

sfradan.] Spring(e), Spryng, Sprinke, to spring; sprout, II 67, XV a I, b 9, c 2, &c. con spryng, was Sprang, pa. t. sg. born, VI 93 rose, broke (of day), VII 167 ; Yspronge, pp. scattered, XIII a
; ;

Stall, n. (distrib.

in be-stealcian, stealcung.'] sg.~) place, sta-

xvii 345.

[OE.
adj.

stall.]

See Stold.

Stalward, -worj>,
strong,

valiant,

[OE. sprlngan.] 19. sunrise, early morning, Spryng, iv a 94. [From prec. (cf. vn cf. OE. tip-spring.} 167) 6prit,/te. t. sprang, v 248. [? OE.
.

II 27, iv a 48, X 6; Stalworthly, adv. valiantly, xiv 86. [OE. stalu>yr}e.~\ Stande(n), Stant; Stane, &c. See Stonde ; Ston(e).

;

Stare-still, adj. perfectly silent, xiv a 32. [OE. stdn + stille.]

See Still(e), Ston(e).

spryttan, to

sprout;

cf.

senses

Stark, adj.
ded, hard,
stiff

stiff,

xvii 268

;

stark
31

of springan.~\

in death,

xiia 156;

Spurye, v. to enquire (after), 25. [OE. spyrian (after).] Square, adj. square; of regular
geometric shape, IX 51, 105; Squared, in six (CrV.) squared, with six (&c.) regular facets, IX 106 ; Squarenesse, geometric, crystalline, shape, IX 68. [OFr.
esyuar(rje, n. esquarrer, v.]
;

v

14; strong, Starkaat, superl. X 105.
.

XV h

X

;

[OE.

stearc.]

Starne, Sterne,
the

star, xvii 8 ; the Seven the Pleiades (cf. Stars, usually OE. seofon steorran, seofonbut here the seven stierre),

seven

starnes,

etquaii't, adj.

;

Squier,
Sserte,
Schert,

.

squire, II 86.

[OFr.
See

'planets' (Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Moon, Saturn, Sun, Venus), xvii 423 (cf. 345). [ON. stjarna,
earlier *stern-.]

(e}squier.]

Ssewejj, Ssolde. Schewe, Schal.

Start,
flinch,
1
1

Sterte(n), v. to start ; V 218 /a./.sprang,xiia
;

Stabyl,
27.

v. to

make

steadfast, IV a

[OFr.

(e)stablir.]

43) 5 2 *stertan.]

[OE. styrtan (once),

GLOSSARY
State, tt. state, position ; in a higher state, at a greater height, xvn 443. [OFr. estat; L. See As(s)tate. status.']
.

Steuen, Stevyn, w. voice, v 268, xvn 72. [OE. stefn, fern.] Steuen, n? tryst, appointed meeting, V 126, 145, 170. [OE.
1

Statut,
315,

n. decree,

ordinance^ VIII a xi b 105. [OFr. statut,
;

stefn, masc.,

time

;

ON.

stefna,

tryst]

L. statutum.~] Staue ; Sted. See Staf

Steward,
Stad.
1

n. steward,

master of

(king's) household, II 205, 495,

Sted(e),
place,

I

Stedde, Steed(e) tt. iv a 46, V 145, 15,
(see note),

&c.

;

cf.

x

36, 171.
1

[OE.
23.

(late

nth

c.) stl-ivard.'}

xvi 40
(other)

&c.

;

in

J>is

Stic, v. to mount, xi b
stigan.']

[OE.

stede,

here,
;

elsewhere,
(or disstead, stede of,
estates,

v

255,

xn b
mi

177

town
in
;

trib. sg. in in

posts),
stede,

X 117;
//.

Stif(fe), adj. unyielding, dauntless, v 31, 301. xivc 20. [OE.sti/.'] v. to control, Stijtel,

207, 161. Stude.
ii

II

vin a 63 [OE.
2

stede.'}

See

Stede,
sleda.}

.

steed,

n

Sty^tel, govern; stijtlej, is master, V 145 sturn . . to stijtel, ill to deal with {or harsh in his rule),
;

145.

[OE.

Stedfastly, adv. steadfastly, IV a 90. [OE. sicdejast, adj.]

; refl. in styjtel ]>e vpon, limit yourself to, V 184. [Cf. OE. stihtan.} Stik, v. to thrust through, xiv

v 69

Steem,

;/.

esteem (of men), Intro-

14.
Still,

[OE.
v.

stidan.~\

duction, xxxiii. [OFr. estime.~] Steke, v. to fasten, shut, &c. ;

to

quieten,

xvn

215;.

[OE.

stillan.~]
;

Stoken, //.

shut,

xvi

193

;

stoken vp, hidden away, VII 1 1 ; hat) stoken me pis stenen, has ' stuck me with this tryst, im'

StiU(e), Styll(e), Styl, adj. still motionless, I 196,11117^184; quiet, silent, I 265, n 443, 525,

xn a

83,

posed
in

it

on me,
;

v

xv g

126.

[OE.
s.v.

active, xi b

be-stecan
.'

see

N.E.D.

/wide

me

slille,

in10, 32, &c. 37; calm, 11 103; hold my peace,
;

Steek.}

IX 279

Stele,

v

162.

stem; shaft, handle, [OE. stela.']
122
;

; sty lie as pe ston, still as (a) stone, firm as a rock, V 225,

xvn
406
;

525

;

Stele,

trew
stele.'}

2 Steill, w. steel, x as stele, xvn 120.

adv.

perfectly quiet, quietly, xv b
;

xvn
i\
;

[OE.

Stele, v. to steal, xiv b \ 4 ; Stole, //. II 491. [OE. stelan.~\ Stelyd, pp. made of steel, xv/*

V 317? 567 perpetually, See ever, iva 42, xvi 168.
without
contention,
secretly,
II

Loud(e).

[OE.
;

stille.'}

Stynk,
until

v. to stink

to

[OE. steled.~] Stende, pa. t. subj. should
14.

you

stink,

thou slynk, XVII 381 ;

stone,

xv

8.

[OE.

stsenan.']

Stynkynge, pres. p. disgusting, XI b 99. [OE. stincan.']
Stynt,
v.

Stere, Steer(e), v. to steer, xivc 26, xvii 175. [OE. steoran.] Stereman, steersman, captain, xvn 427. [OE. steor-tnann.'] Steren. See Sturne.
.

X
II

65,

105

trans, to stop, check, ; Stint, //. ceased,

447. Stire(n),
trans,
1

[OE.

(d)-styntan.']

Stir(e),
intr. to

Styr(e),
stir,

v.

and

move,

Stere-tre,

n.

tiller,

xvn

433.
see

[OE. steor+treo.'] Steryd, see Stire(n); Sterne,
Starne,
Start.

197. xvii 366; to toss, vn 141; to rouse, incite, induce, xi b 39,

93,

129,

310,
t.

xvn
\

Sturne

;

Sterte(n), see

Steryd, pa.
styrian.]

37, &c. [OE. 197.
;

GLOSSARY
Stith(e), adj. stout, doughty, vii 7; violent, vii 141, 156; quasi-sb. doughty men, VII 21.
is

a

based on, consists of, these, xi I 127. [OE. stdndan, stondan.]
store, stock, in settis

Store, n.
store

no

[OE.

slip]

bi,

has

Stod(e); Stoken.
Steke.

See Stonde

;

xvn

no regard
(e)stor.]
.

for,

92.

[OFr.

Stoking,

.

stabbing,

X

193.

[OFr. estoqner; MLG. stoken.] Stok(ke), w. stem, tree-trunk, 1 121, Xiv c 82 block, xiv<? i
;

Storyis, Stories, //. stories, VII u, 21, X introd. [OFr.
(e)storie.]

Storke, n. stork, IV b 47
Strucyo.

;

see

;

[OE.
n.

store.]

anvil, XV h

14; by stokoperston, anywhere, VI 20; noitfinr stok
strete

(rime-substitute for nothing, xiv c 62 ; cf. Stub(be). [OE. stocc.] Stold, pp. fixed, xvn 525 (for *Stald; see note). [OE. stalstoti],

nor

Stounde, space of time ; in fat stounde, thereupon, II 550. [OE. st&nd.] Stoupe, v. to stoop, vin b 24.
[OE. stupian.]
Stour(e),
28,
.

conflict, battle,

vn

7,

xiv c

20,
adj.

xvi 130.
proud,
13,
II

[OFr.

Han.]
Stole. See Stele, v.

(e}stour]

Stout(e),
(x),
.

Ston(e),
stone,

Stoon, Stane

fierce,

n

i84,xiva

xvn

293

;

304,
;

rock, precious stone, II 151, IX 88, X 54, 83, XI b 40, XII b 130, XIII a 53, XV- 12, &c.; stone floor, ground, n 197^ v 1 62 ; treiv . . as ston in the wall, xvil 515; for other phr.
see Still(e), Stok(ke), Stub(be) [OE. stdn.~] cf. Stane-still.
;

Stony, adj. of stone, xni a 5. [OE. stain's.] Stonde, Stand(e), v. \ Stant,
3 sg. pres. xi I a 74, &c. II 556; Stod(e), pa. 11 39 1 , v 3 &C -J XIII a 32 Stude,
;

347 ; adv. stoutly, II 360 Stoutly, adv. boldly, X 60. [OFr. (/}stout.] Strak Straught (Strauhte). See Strok (e) Strecche. Strange, Straunge, adj. foreign, outlandish, strange, IX 274, 311, XII a 13, XIII b 14, 40, &c. ; Strangelych, adv. in a foreign
; ;

tongue,

xni

b

62.

[OFr.
xv';

(e)slrange.]

;

Stont,
t.
i

Strangere, Introduction
stranger, foreigner, as

!.
; ;

74,
;

name of
stanza

Stood,

(unknown) variety
t.

of

Standen, pp. VI
i

1

59.

X 196 To stand,

adj. conipar. stranger (metre

i.e.

than

'

rime couee ').

xn a 188, 221, xiv d 4; to stonde for, stand up for, xi a 66 ; stonde f>e a strok, stand a blow from you, V 218 to stand still,
;

184, vi 154, &c. ; up him stod, stood up, xv 27, 29 (see lie, ntasc.} ; to stand firm, endure, remain, iva 42, x 196,
8,

v

[OFr.
stratly

estrangier, or estrange]

Stratly, adv. straitly ; stad, hard put to it,

X 145;

ferd

.

.

sorely

stratly -with, pressed on, x 172. [From
.

Streyte.]

Strecche, Streche,

v. to stretch

;

64, 169; Vlii a 106

i

lete
;

.

.

stonde, left,

intr. extend, ix 30, 180; to direct one's course, go, II 341 ;

to be, XII

a 165,

Strauhte,
stranhte

xvn
how
;

pa.
to,

t.

(refi^

in

it

202 1 50 how so euer it standis, the whatever circumstances, XVII 210; to stonde in, consist of, XI a 55, 60 upon hem slant,
;
;

416; hou that it stod(e), had been settled, xn l> how matters stood, XII a

him
;

made

for, XII b

93

;

Streem,

strxhte, strehte.] n. stream, 17, 37, xv* 21. [OE. stream.]
;

VII streccan

Straught, //. departed, ii see Streght. [OE.

Strem,

xni a

GLOSSARY
8trght,
stregJit vp, adj. straight sheer, IX 197. [Pp. of Strecchc.] Streyt(e), adj. narrow, ix 205 ; adv. closely, ix 229. [OFr. See Stratly. (e)strcit.~\
;

vi 116

(see Enduir, and note); Strongly, adv. vigorously, ix 231. [OE. slrdng, strong;

strange, strdngltce, adv.]

Strenghe, n. strength, fortitude, IV ^56, 73. [OE. strengu] Strenght, Strengthe Strinth,
;

Strowed, //. strewn, [OE. streowian.']
Strucyo,
n. ostrich

xn

a 96.

Strynth
65

(x)

;

.

strength, force,

(wrongly explained as 'Storke'), iv 47. [L. struthio, ostrich, stork.]

IX 71, 199, X 187, 195, XIII b ; full strenght, ? in full measure, fully, xvii 261. [OE.
streng}(u}.]

Struye, v. to destroy, via a 29; Strye, v 1 26. [Shortened from OFr. destrui-re with vowel of See strye cf. Nye, Byled.]
;

Streny (hem},
(themselves),

v.

refi.

to exert

Distroie.

VI

191.

[OFr.

Strumpatis,
1

n. pi. harlots, XI b
.

Stret(e), n. street, n 509, xiva 35, <r6a (see Stokke), xv^- 5.

(e~}streindre, (e]streign-.~\

76.

[Obscure.]
tree-trunk,
;

Stub(be),

V 225
[OE. Stude,

noij>er

stub
(cf.

stump, no ston,
Stokke).

[OE. slret, street.] Streuyn. See Stryue. Strydej, 3 s. pres. strides, v [OE. strTdan.]

nothing,
164.

n

346

stybb, stubb.~] n. place,

xvg
.

28.

[OE.

styde.~\

See Sted(e).

Strye. See Struye. Strif, Stryf(fe), n. strife, quarrel, vn 28, ix 83, xvn 400 without e stryft unresisting, v 255.
;

Stude. See Stonde. Study, Studio, deep thought, V 301 ; study, XI b 227. [OFr.
(e}studie.~]

[OFr. (e}strif.~\ SttStrym. 8tryke(n), Strik(e),. trans, to strike, V 31, 237, x 139, xv/j intr. 14, XVII 231 (subj.\ &c.
;

to glide, flow, 252, strykej, shall come (/.

n

Studie, v. to study, XI b 112, 135, &c. ; sttbj. pi. let (many) study, XI a 46; Studiynge, &c.. n. XI b 230, 293, &c. [OFr.
(e)studier.~\

xv b
e.

21

;

See Vnstudied.
furnish, provision, refi. to gorge, glut
?

for his

Stuf,

v.

to

reward), vi 210. [OE. strlcan.'] Strinth, Strynth. See Strenght. StryJ>e, n. stance, firm position of the feet, V 337 (cf. sirylle, Sir

XVII 155;
(oneself),

xvn 85.
;

to furnish

infl.

by

[QPr.cstofcr, estoffer, to
;

choke.]

Gaw.
Stryue,

846).

[?

Cf.
v.

OE.
to

stride,

stride.]

Sturdy, adj. obstinate, X 194 Sturdely, adv. resolutely, x 45.
[OFr. (e]stonrdi.'] Sturn(e), adj. griro,v 31, 6S (see Steren, xiv a 13; Stijtel); a Sterneliche, adv. grimly,

Stryfe,

strive

;

rebel stryue ajeines, with, a 315, against, disobey, XVII 107; Streuyn,//. striven,

vm

vm

XIV b

86.

[OFr.

(e}striver.~\

Strok(e), Strak (x), n. blow, stroke, V 184, 255, x 105, XVII 382, &c. [OE. '*strac, rel. to
strtcan, Stryken.] Stronde, n. sea-shore, XII

[OE. Subieccioun
315.
(to),
tion,']

styrne, *st<!orne.~] (of), n. subjection

IX 218, 219.
J>at
s.

[OFr. subjec-

Substance,/;.:

God comaundid
lerof, of

a 134.

Himself

to

[OE. strand.}
Strong(e), adj. strong, valiant, vi 171, vn 7, ix 92, xvi 130, &c. violent, xni a 7, 42 ; adv. severely, severe, IX 204
;
;

God

}e

which
[OFr.

gave Himself to substance, XI b 223.
substance]

be the

Succur,

v. to bring help,

X

39.

[OFr. suaur-rt.] 5Socour(e).

GLOSSARY
Such(e) Swiche
Sue(n),
;

Suddan(d)ly.
;

See

Suth

;

Su]>the. vS"^Solh(e) SiJ>en
;

Soudein.
to follow,
;

Suthfast,

adj.
.

true.

X

introd.

-v.

vn

24, Xf a

[OE.

soj>-fzst.~]

See Soth(e).

38, b 65, &c.

Suiende,/w

/.

xn ^j

a 122
;#

;

Sewyngly,
go on

adv. in

Suthfastnes, truth, [OE. s$ffmst-*ts.~\

X
in

introd.

5.,

to tell you, ix

Swa, Zuo

Suete.

[OFr. suir, se~ivir.~\ See Swete, adj. Sufflse (to), v. to be sufficient IX 270; to be able, (for), capable, xn a 1 77 (with pleon.
134.

(in), adv. thus, so, in this way,

demonslr.
17, 39,

13; thereupon, III 28 therefore, III 36 ; in the same way, IV b 49 ; so mightily,
;

iv b 19, 45,

x

mat).
Suffire,

[OFr. wffire,
Suffer,
I

suffis-.']

X 144 swajiat, zuofet, so that, in 18, x 155, 157. [OE. swd.}
;

v.

to

endure,
let,

See So.

suffer, bear,

34, II 264, IV a
;

88,

ix

7,

&c.

permit,

Swage, grow

VHI a
suffrir."]

74,

174,

xvi
559.

Ysuffred, //.
Euffranca, VIII a 138.

n

378; [OFr.
God),

become assuaged to xiv c in. [Shortened from OFr. asojiagierJ]
v. to
;

less,

Swalprit, pa.
;

t.

floundered, vii
;

n. sufferance (of

cf. 162. [? Only recorded here Du. zwalpen G. (dial.) schwal-

[OFr

suffrancel\

pen.]

Suienda. See Sue(n). Suir, adj. sure, XIV c 39 ; Sure, adv. securely, well, xvn 282.
[OFr. *(0*f.] Suld(e); Sulle; Sum(me).
Schal
;

Swange. See Swynke. Swappit,/a./. let fly, x 83, 91,99. [? Altered form of OE. swapan.~] Swarte, adj. black, XV A I [OE.
.

See

sweart.~\

Selle(n)

;

Sorn(e).

Swat.
56

See Swete, v.
pres. p. swooning, X swonande). [Not a posform of Swone,
see

Summer,
Sumoun,

n. (main) beam, X 104. [OFr. som(i)er, sumer.] v.

Swavnand,
(v.r.

summon mad sumoun, made (men) summon
to
;

sible Scottish
q.v.

Perh. scribal corruption of
t Sweam.~] See Swiche. n. labour, vi 215. [OE.

(them). VI 179. [OFr. sumuntr.~\

swalmand, or swemand;

Sun; Sundir; Sung g)e; Sun(ne); Sunner. SeeSonc, n. Sonder; Synge(n) Sonne ; Sone, adv. Supplantore;, n. pi. usurpers,
; ;

&..>., s.w. Swalm
Swech. Bweng,

(ge-^swenc,
-s-ving.~\
ii

-s~uinc,

occas.
.

VI 80.

[OFr. sousplanteor, L.

See Swynke.
(v),

Suppos(e),

supplantator.'} v. to imagine, xvn 221 ; suppos that, even supposing that, X introd. [OFr. supsurfeit,

Swerd, Sworde

sword,

xvn

295, v 251, xiv b 13, 61, 103. [OE. sweord, switrd,
v. to swear, take one's 54, VIII b 59, XII b 165, 327, &c.; Swor, pa. t.

&c.]

poser.]

Swere,

Surfait, n.
sonified),

vni a
n.

excess (per262. [OFr.

oath,

V
b

xvn
XII

surfait

]

200

;

Sustenaunce,
liTelihood,

XI

b

sustenance, 297. [OFr.

Swore, pp. xn
swerian.~]

Swoir,
b 44.

X

73

;

[OE.

See Forsworn.

sustena\u] nee. ]

Swete,

Suster, n.

XV gl,
126.

sister, I 36 ; Soster, 10; Syster, -yr, I 112, [OE. s(iv)Mster, swoster;

ON.
tion,

ystir.-}
n.

adj. sweet, II 414, 442, IV a 73, V 169 (see Sire), i, &c. Suete, XV b 5 ; siuete wiHe, good pleasure, II 384 ; (/<*/) swete, (that) sweet one,
;

xv/

Sutelt6,

cunning, skill in inven-

iv a 78,
compar.

xv

X

/

7

;

Swetter*,

74.

[OFr.

s(o}utilt4.']

(ativ.)

vill

a

an;

GLOSSARY
Suetost, Swettest, super!, iv a 53,Introduction xii. [OE.swete; See Swote. cotnpar. swettra.}
with swete), villa 26, 122, 188, 210, ^59, xvii 195; Swange, pa. t. pi. VI 226. [OE. swincan, and occas. in same sense swingan.~\

Swete,
with

v. to sweat, 1x96 ; (joined allit. swynke or its translation trauayle), villa 26, 122, b 59, xiv c 94, xvii 195 ; Swat,
t.

Swire, Swyre,
(iHstrib. sg,
;

n. neck,

xiv

b

68
27.

see

Herte),

xv c

pa.
pa.

vi^226.

[OE. sw&tan,
.

t. swse.tte.'}

[OE. swira.] Swipe, Swype,
very,

sweetSwetnesse, Swettnes, ness, IV a 89, b 44. [OE.
swel*nes.~\

n

Swith,

adv.

118;

exceedingly,

Sweuene,
Swiche,

.

dream, ix 83, XII a

(very) quickly, I 106, 474, v 191, xiv b 51 ; also swipe, as swype, at once, I 1 1 1,

472

;

n n

49, 97, 127, 147.

[OE. swefn.} Swych(e), adj. such,
;

ii

574

(see

Also,

Ase).

[OE.

swipe.'}

12, 92, 11198, 317, &c. Swech, xv 7/3; Sich(e), xi a 4 1,^159, xvii 400, &c. Such(e), n 46, IX 227, &c. ; swych, such, such a, I 79, xii a 86 ; swiche a, . what a !, II 505 swech a, such a, XV h 1 6 JMC//^, of like kind, XII a 82 pron. pi. VIII a 33, 213; alle swyche
; ; .
.

Swndir; Swoir.
Swere.

See Sonder;
VII 12.

Swolowet, pp. swallowed,
[OE.

Swon,
Swone,
(note)

swe(o]lgan.'\ n. swan, xv c 27.

[OE.

;

;

swan, swonJ\ n. swoon, in fal swotie, fallen in a swoon,
;

yn a
I

195

(with sg. verb), everything of the
kind,
I

fallyn
(cf.

false analysis of aswone, fallen swooning orig.

9.

[OE.

sivelc,

swilc,

II

549).

[OE. ge-swogen,
See

swylc, swulc.\ See Swilke, Slike.

ME.

(f)swowen, &c., pp.]
11

Swyft, Swifte, adj. swift, VI 211, XIV c 65; Swiftenes, n.
swiftness, swift passing, VII 12. [OE. swift, swift-ties.] Swikele, adj. treacherous, xv,f 7.

Aswone.

Swone, v. to swoon, [ME. swo(w)nen, from

197. prec.]

[OE. swicol.] Swilke, Swylk(e), adj. kind, such, IV a 35, XVI
Sic, X
pi.

Swor(e). See Swere. Swot(e), adj. pleasant, sweet, xv a 13,- 1 8. [OE. swot.'} See
Swete, adj.

of

this

38, 116;

40, 66, 74,

1

03,
25.

1

35; pron.

such folk, IV b
.

[Northern

form of Swiche,

q.v.~\

Ta. See Take(n). Tabernacle, high-seat under a canopy, II 412. [OFr. taber.

Swym,
12.
Ta.eTO.die,

dimness, oblivion, VII
;

nacle.}

Swimrne,

[OE. swima, swoon.] to swim Swimpres. p.

Tabourer,

.

player on the tabour,

xn a 17,

172

;

Swam,
Swyn,

pa.

t.

vii 162.

[OE.
19.

II 521. [From next] Tabure, Tabour, n. tabour, small drum, I 6, II 301. [OFr.

swimman.}
n. pi.
.

swine, VIII b

Tache,
set,

tabour.'} v. to fasten,

V

108

;

fig.,

to

[OE. swin.]

implant, vi 104. [Shortened
atachier.~\

Swyngyng,
vii 162.

swinging, strokes,

from OFr.
Tajt.

[OE. swlngan.}
n. toil; in sudore (L.)

See Teche(n).

Swynke,

Tagyld, pp. entangled, encumbered, iv 62. [Obscure; appar. peculiar to Rolle.]

and swynke (var. on usual swete and swink}, Vlii a 229. [OE.

Swynke,

(ge-}su>inc.} *. to

See Sweng.
toil

Taile, n.
allit.

tail,

xvi 159

(see

Top).

(freq.

[OE.

txgl.}

GLOSSARY
Tayll. See Tale. Takelles, n. pi. tackle, gear,
148.
trans,

to hinder,

delay,

keep

vn

Take(n), Tak,

Ta (v, x), v. (i) to 121, IX 243, catch, capture, x 71, xni a 38, &c. ; seize, fall

[MLG.

takel.']

vn

(waiting), ix in, XVII 236; intr. for refi. to be troubled (or as next, but cf. Tene, .), xvu 210; to linger, tarry, xil b 28,

upon, vin a 138, 258; get, vi 192, vni a 133. &c.; take, n 74, v 289, ix 123, x 130 (see Hond), 143, xiv d 6, &c.; see also In(e), Mynde, Reward(e), &c.
pick
(up),
II

xvil 244, 497, 499; Taryy(i)ng, n. delay, xvil 377, 475. [OE. tergan, &c. annoy OFr. the sensetorment tarier,
; ;

;

550, XII b 136; 114; choose, VIII b 83, XI b 76, &c. ; accept, 268, xvi 331 ; (ii) receive, xi

development is curious.] Tas. See Take(n). Tasse, n. pile, xil b 33.
fas.']

[OFr.

assume,

xn

a

Tast(e),

v.

to

test;

to

sound

to

commit, entrust, see pp. ; (iii) to make, xvu 137, 272.

(water), xvil ence, xvi 358.

448; to experi[OFr. taster.']

Taterynge,

136; sg. pres. xn Tas, v 237; Totg, goes, VI 153 see note). Tok(e), (cf. Nyme Took, pa. t. I 136, II 19, 64, V XI b 2 73, xiv c 45, 175 &c. Take, //. xi b 271 hath take, has been stricken with, XII a 1 1 Takyne, x 7 Tane, X 19, XVI 172 (entrusted) hase has (got), iv a 53 Tone, tone, committed, v 91 (see vi 153,

Takth, 3

;

().
;

n. tearing (long notes) to fragments (cf. smale brekynge, 138), or babbling, singing without regard to the sense, XI b 159. [ME. tateren (i) to tear to rays ; cf. ON. tb'turr, tatters: (ii) to

;

babble; cf. babble.]

MDu. MLG. tateren,
<SV<r

1

;

Tau3t,e(n),Tauhte.

Teche(n).

;

Taxoure,

n. assessor,

vin a

40.

;

note);
38,

Itake, Ytake,
15.

xnia

xv

[ON.
.

taka.~]

Tald(e). See Telle. Tale, Tayll (xvu),
talk
;

tale, story word(s), what one has said, I 247, V 56. VI 230, XII b 88, xvi 273, xvn 315, &c. ; upon the tale, immed. after their talk, Xll 147; //. idle
;

[OFr. taxour.'] Te, prep, in for te (with infin.), to, xv b 30, c 1 8. [Unaccented reduction of To.] Te, v. to draw intr. to go, II 312, 290, 318; TeJ), pres. pi. draw near, II 274. [OE. teon.~\ Te. See J>e def. art. ; ]?ou.
;

Teche(n)

,

v. to teach,

show

(the

way), direct, *IV b 60 (see note), V 7, VIII a 6, 76, XI b 5, &c. ;

villa 52, 54; see Telle, and next. [OE. tain.'} Talk, v. to talk; speak of, V 304; with cognate obj. in talk
tales,
J>e tale,

Ta;t, pa. t. V 311 Tau3t(e), villa 202, 296, xi a 20, b 12, &c. Tauhte, vni b 5; Tau3t(e) , //. vnia 23, xi a 6, &c.
;
;

;

hold the converse, V 65.

Ytau3t, XIII b 21

;

Techinge,

[Prob.
prec.]

OE.

*talcian,

rel.

to

-ynge, n. teaching, xi a 56, b 121, Xlii b 30,&c. [OE.tsecan,
t&fite, tahte.~]

Talouna,
[OFr.

n. pi. talons,

IX 254.

taloun.~]

Teyn.

Tane. See Take(n). Tappe, n. tap, knock, V 289. [Echoic; cf. OFris. tap; OFr.
Targe,
taper, v.j n. (small) shield, XIV c 55.
v.

See Tene, n. and v. Tell(e), Tel, v. to enumerate, recount, n 263, 373, xv c 26; to account, consider, I 19 ; to tell,
relate,

mention

(foil,

by

dat.

[OFr. targe.'] Tary(e), Tarie,

to

harass;

without to), I 22, 58, II 1 15, V 62, xvil 164, &c. ; herd slike tales tell, heard such tales told,

9

GLOSSARY
Xiv* 35;
to
recite,

v

120.

GLOSSARY
changeable with

To

;

not with

Tyte, adv. quickly, xvi 332
tyte,
titt,

To-

prefix, as scribal error at

X

75), to, towards, into, up to, iv a 6, 18, 33, x 26, 81, xiv
72,
;

XVI 32, &c. (postponed) IV a 30, x 77, xvi 393; with
infin.
for,

as ; at once, xvn 219. [ON. neut. of tid-r.] See Tydely. tenth part, tithe, vin a Tythe, 86. [OE. ti(d]gopa, &c., tenth.]
.

Tythingis.

.

X 4, 14, &c. (and see For) IV a 93, b 25; until, I 185, II 75, IV a 35 &c.; till pat, tyl fiat, until (conj.\ VI 188, ix 224, 229, xiv c 98, &c.
; . .

To, adv.

too,

See Tiding. I 108, n 335,

V 232,

(rare Nth.) tit; See Intil, par(e). Tyl, v. to entice, I 50.
be-tillan,for-tyllan^\

[OE.

ON.
[Cf.

til.]

vi 121, Vina 260, b 23, 24, IX 267, XIV a 2, b 91. [OE. to; orig. same word as To, To, cotij. till, XVII 241, 381, 499 cf. Til. [From next ; cf. OE.
;

to-pass-f>e.~\

OE.

To, prep,

Tilye, v. to labour for, earn, vili a 229; to till, Vina 232. [OE.
tilian.]

to, I 9, &c.; (postponed) II 1 19, 51 7 ; to hint was, he had, xi b 285-6; (hunt) after, vino

30, 31
to

;

at, II

Tyme, Time, time, period, season,
occasion, I 142, vi 143, vn 19, vin b 106, xn a 27, &c. ; -whan tymc is, when it is (the) time,

vn 85, xvn 343 (see Biholde) my /lend, in, under, my hands,
; ;

441, 579,

V

265,
;

villa
I

27,

//.

any tyme,

vn 8, vin b 107, &c. periods, hours, VIII b 107 at any time, ivb 44
now, v

u,

72; (life)time,

day,
; ; ;

at J>is tyme, (for)

23,

ix 270 ; for pe tyme, for the time being, xi b 128; /ram tyme fatt from the time (conj.~) t xin b 21; in tyme, opportunely, XVI 149 ; many tyme, often, ix

XVII 255 in, according to, XVII 28 (turn) into, IV a 94, b 26 on, on to, II 549, v 264, vi 74, vn 174, villa 66, ix 182; up to, 11156; until, xi b 25; towards, with regard to, vi 108 (see Fare, f.); against, XI b in; for, n 485, vi 147, vin b 14, XI b 56, jou to, for 59, XVII 109, &c.
;

;

44; see Heigh, Ofte(n), Som(e), &c. [OE. tttna.']

Tymed, //.
prec.]

timed,

v

173.

[From
ill
\,

yourselves, xiv a* 7; to me (ix 100), see note; for, by way of, as, in, vii 70, ix 150, xi 223, XII a 3; see Mede; to plesynge (&c.) of, so as to please, &c., IX 333, xi b 108, &c. Adv. to it. on, XI b 200 ; go to, get along, XVII 236 ; pat ... to, to which,
i

Timliche, adj. temporal, 60. [OE. tint-lie^

33i

v

29

;

to

andfro, xvn in.

Tyne,

v. to lose, iva 52 for nothing, in vain,

;

totyne,

xvn

441

;

Tynde, Tynt, pp. vn VIII b 97. [ON. tyrta.]

103,

[OE. td.~] See Te, J>ar(e). To. See Tuo. To-breke, v. intr. to burst, break, iva 78 ; suly. sg. mpin herte pe
(dat.)

tobreke,

may your

heart
(or

Tyrantis, n. pi. tyrants, xvi 311. [OFr. tyrant^ Tired, pa. t. attired, II 586. [Shortened from Atire, g.v.~] Tyste, vi i oo. Usually interpreted nsty)te(see App., p. 278), tight,
close
;

be, stricken

with

remorse

literally break) within you, 10. [OE. to-brecan.}

xv.f
to-

To -chine,
to-cinan.]

pp.

cracked;
II

al

chine, all scarred,

262.

[OE.

this is not else recorded

until early Mn.E. (where it is obscure alteration of ME. pijt,

*-

To-dele, v. to divide, xina 55. [OE. to-dmlan.~\ To-dryue, v. to dispel, destroy; subj. sg. xv & 16. [OE. todrifan.\

9

*

GLOSSARY
To-for(e), adv. before,
tofore, just prep, before, in

xn

188

;

ii

222, iv a 89,
sg.
;

xvn
;

398
52,

(dis-

nou

131,

Xina43,

front of, xn* b 26. [OE. to-

now, xil* 43;

trib.

see
I

Herte)

speech,

language,

58,
;

Vina

xia

7,

foran.~]

To-fruschyt, pa. t. smashed to pieces, *x 75 (Ms. till frusche
;

see Til).
sier.~\

[OE.

to-

+ OFr.ft-uis;

XIII* 2, &c. hold pi long, XVII 217; (spekyngc) in tonge, (words) on tongue, on our tongues, XI * 1 2 1. [OE. t&nge.] Toolde. See Telle.

Top. Toppe,

n. hair

on the crown
;

To5ere, adv. this year no)t tojere, not for a long time yet, vi 228.

[OE.

to gcare.]

To-gidre, -gider(e), -gyd(e)re, adv. together, n 121, IX 173, 253, xi* 9, xv A 9, &c. To;

469; (of a ship = Topcastell", xvn 271 fro toppe to taile, from top to bottom, beginning to end, xvi 159. [OE. topp.~\ Topcastell, n. fighting top, em;

of the head,

XV-

16

top,

xva

gedre
VII

;

131,

-geder, -yr, -ur, I 229, ix 53, xiv c 29, &c.

battled platform at mast-top for archers, &c., vii 148, x 121.
[Free.

[OE. to-gasdereJ] Togideres, adv. together, villa
175.
[Free.
adj.

+ Castell,
t.

To-rett,/a.
ritten,

q.v.\ rent in pieces, II 81

+ adv. -.]

(riming witf).

[OE.

to

+ ME.
[OX.

To^t,

taut, firmly bound ; hit tojt, ? made a compact of it, VI 162. Maken hit = raise tough(f), is a fixed expr. objections, make conditions (see forms and senses in N.E.D.,

OE.

*rittan.'\

made

Torfer, n. hardship,

vn

81.

Torne.

tor-f&ri^ See

Turne.

but this would require ne for ami. [OE. *to/it, rel. to teon, draw.] Toiper. See ToJ>er. Tok(e), Token. See Take(n). Token, -yn, Tokne, . token ;
s.v.

'TougK);

To-rochit, //. torn to shreds, VII 147. [OE. to-+*ryccan, pull (see Ryched).] See Take(n). Tot5Toper, -ir, Toiper, Touper, adj. and pron. in J>e toper, &c.,
the other,
I

181,

vn

X

introd.,

xi *
at

63, ix 4, 104. [False
spell-

omen, Xll 517; memento,
sign,

149, XVH47I, v 330. [OE.

division (not

merely in

tdcn.}

ing see pet oper ;
O};er(e),

allit.

vii 63)

see J?e, def. art.']

of See
102.

Tokynyng,

n.

indication, proof,

xvil 476. [OE. tacnung.-\ Told(e). See Telle. Tole, weapon, v 192, xvi 179.
.

Ton. v. to menace, xivr [OE. to- +preatian.'] To- tore, To-torn, //. torn
To-J>rete,

[OE.

tol.-]
t.

Tolled, /a.

enticed, I 53. *tollian, rel. to Tyl, z>.j

[OE.
leisure,

106, 171, 173, 538. pieces), [OE. to-teran, pp. to-toren"].

n

(to

Tom(e),

Tume

(x),

.

Tou, Tow. See J>ou. Touche, Toche. Towch,
touch,
(note),

v.

to

opportunity, vii 43, X 143 ; time, vi 225. [ON.^o'w.] Tomorwe, adv. to-morrow, II 165,

reach,

affect,
1

*iv6 60

XV //
;

8

(note),

xvn

XII* 170.

Ton,pron.
27, 104.

in

[OE. to morgeu.-] }e ton, the one, xi *
J>et

462; touchsth to, joins on to, touche of, touch on, IX 182 treat of, ix 282, Xlla 90. [OFr.
toucher.']

[False division of
def.

on J>et see J>e, See On(e), To>er. Tone. See Take(n).
;

on

art.~\

Toumbe,
tuntbe. ]

n.

tomb,

I

243.

[OFr
.

Toun(e), Tounne, Town(e),
.

Tong(e),

Tung(e),

tongue

:

town.

I

f-2,

II

588,

VII 112,

GLOSSARY
121, x 12, 46, xiv a 7, b 83, XVJI 539> &c ' * w ' oftoun, out of the town (or from the society
-

Trantis,
[?

.

Cf.

MDu.

//. tricks, xvi trant, step.]

159.

of men; see below), n 236; to toune, to town, XII b 27; ]>e tonnes ends, end of the main street, outskirts of the town, II 481, 564; the dwellings of I, c 28 men, the world, xv

See Traist(e). Trauail(le), Trauayl(e), Traueile, Trauel, &c., n. labour, toil, I 206, iv a 3, b 8, XI b 227, XII b 197 ; trauel and tene, toil and trouble, \\ a 36, vill a 127 ;
I 204; travel Journey, [OFr. travail(le).'] Trauail(l)e, Trauayl(l)e, Traval(e), Trauele(n), v. to toil, labour, IV b u, vi 190, Vina 133, x 142, xi a 17, 49, XII b

Traste.

affliction,

OE. lencten gsej> to tune) ; in ilke a toune, among all men,
(cf.

v

1

73.

xvi 253. [OE. tun.'] tower, II 159, Tour, Towre, 2 45 359 xvn 349; (of a ship = Castell), xiv c 18. [Late OE. tiir from OFr. tour.'] Tourne(s). See Turne. Touper. See To)>er. Toward(e), prep, towards, in the direction of ix 3 1 , 7 1 1 36, &c. me toivarde, to me, VI 78
.

140, xiv<:94; travel, xni ^40; trans, subject to hardship, IX

272;

afflict,

IX 93;

Trauail-

lynge

vin a

,

,

;

;

Traues, xvi 150.
Tra-w(e
)

(in), n. assiduity (in), 244. [OFr. travailler.} v. to thwart 3 sg. prcs.
;

[OFr. traverser.]
;

with regard to, in the eyes of, xii a 17 Towardes, prep, towards, ix 225. [OE. tu-weard,
;

;

Trawpe. See Trow(e)

Treuthe.

-luean/es.]

Towch(ith\
Tray,
.

See Tonche.

misery, xvii 533.

[OE.

trega.']

Trayno,
94,

n. 1 stratagem, guile,
9.

vn

xvi

Trayne,

trainc.~] u. z error for tayncr, bur-

[OFr.

row, fox's earth, ix 222.
taigitere.}

[OFr.
41.

Trayst,

[ON.

adj. traust-r,

faithful,

\v a

Tre, Tree, n. tree, n 268, 508, xii a 74, xvii 34, &c. wood, xni a 44 piece of timber, xvii cross, IV a 86; Trees,/)/, 253; vn 103, &c. Treis, logs, x 21 Tren, trees, xill a 5 1 53 pieces of wood, xill a 44. [OE. treoJ] Treble, n. ? treble note, XV A 18. [OFr. treble.'] Trechery(e), treachery, n 7, v 315. [OFr. trecherie.]
;

;

;

;

,

;

.

inn.

by

next.]

Treson,
[OFr.
1

n.

;

do

him

tr.,

work
b " 38.

See Tryste, Trystyly. Traist(e), Traste '(on, to), v. to trust (in), rely (on), iv a 68,

treason against him,

xiv
.

AFr. Tresour, Tresowre,
(rai'son,

treson.~\

treasure,
tresor.} xiv c

xvi

1

79

;

truforto

traist, to

be
(cf.

VI I
14.

2

1 ,

XI b 283.

relied on, trustworthy,

vn

[OFr.

17

Trete,

v. to treat, consider,

xvii 5 1 5). Tnst.

[ON.

treystal\

See

[OFr. trailer, treticr.} Tretys, treatise, IX 290. [AFr.
.

Traytoure,
[OFr.
I2 3

n. traitor, xvi 150. traitre, ace. sg. traitour.~\

treiiz.~]

v. transform, xn a h e hadde f>e transfrom that (into which) formed, he had been changed, XI I a 20. [OFr. transformer.} Translate, v. to translate, VII 71, XI a 17, 19, 26; Translating, n. XI a 43. [OFr. trans-

Transforme,

Treuthe Trouthe, Trovtrthe, XII Trawpe, v, vi; Truth(e),
;

;

f thut

n. truth, vu 43, 51, 94; (personified) villa 16, 39, &c. ;

vn;

fidelity,

xii a

164

;

faith,

later^

(plighted) word, troth, v 219, vni a 35, xii b 164, 203; compact, v 280 ; honesty, vni a 70, 90; equity, VI 135. [OE. See Vntrawj'e. treowj>.]

GLOSSARY
Trew(e)
;

Treue, xi b 51; Tru,

GLOSSARY
Turn(e)
;

Teorne,

xm a
xma

iv a 44 (see note), xn passim Tourne, IV a 3, v 7 ; v. trans, to turn, ix 73, 32 ; turned into, diverted to, XI a with (iti)til, (in)to, change, 229 turn (into), iva 94, b 26, Vlll*

53

;

Tome,

;

v 44, 68, vi 8, XV 30 if, that (after no wonder '), v 239, 346. [OE. unacc. form bah. or ON.
; '

;

107,
late,

pervert,

xn a 168, xm a 43, &c. vn 42, xvi 332 trans;

;

turn, IV b 37 ; intr. tnrn (back), iv b 83, xn a 33, b 142 ; tunic vntill, turn upon, XVII 218 ; turne to, return
;

XI a 36

reft,

v

upon, ix 87 pass, proceed (to), 7, xiv a heading (with til,
; ;

into] change, turn (into), IV a 72, XIII a 30, 53 ; turneth to ben,

*foh ; see J?ogh, f>ei.] pai, pay, pel, pey, adj.pl. those, x 25, 27, 135 ; pron.pl. those, ix 128, 149, 216 (second), X 13,68, &c.; they, I 32, n 32, 523, iv 8, Vina 144, xvn 24, &c. ; alle fay, all of them, V 357, IX 104. Ace. and dat. (to, for) them, those: paym(e), iv 2, 19, 23, 37, &c. ; pam(e), ivb 25, x 13, xiv b 14, &c. ; refi. (to, for) themselves, iv b 20, 37, 39, x 3, 41, &c. ; pamaelfe, ace. themselves, iv b 12. Pass. adj. (gen.

turns, becomes, ix 23. Yturnd (to}, inclined to, fond of,

xm

pl.\ their:
14,

pair(e),

iva

61,

64; Turnyng, translating, XI a 44. [O E. tuniian, tyrnan OFr. to(u)rtier.~\
.

;

Turtill, n. turtle-dove,

xvn
;

506.

19, x 28, &c. ; par(e), 59, x 78, xvi 18, 310, &c. ; peire, peyre, iv^ 27, 41; per(e), vn 9, xia i, xvi 20, 30, &c. [ON J>ei-r ,}eim (dat),

iva

[OE.

turtle.-]

Twa; Twey(n).
Twelue,
twelf(e).-]

See

Tuo Tuaye.
i

adj. twelve,

30.

[OE.

See Hi, pron. pi. See par(e), adv. See Janne, conj. }>at pan(e).
}eira.~\

Thair.

;

;

pe,

def. art.

Tweluemonth(e), TwrelmonyJ),
n.

pank,

n. favour, XI b 167.

[OE.

twelvemonth, year,

I

97

;

]>anc.~\

quasi-adv. a year ago, V 1 75 ; pat tweluemonpc, all that year, I 103 ; (atf>e~) tweluemonth tndc, at the end of a year, I 95, 187.

Thank(e),

xvn
472,

v. to thank, xvi 381, 172, &c.; ponk(k)e, II 340, XII* 135 ; ThankIX 334. [OE. panynge,

V

.

[OE. twelf

nioti(a)J>, pi.]

Twyneth, 3 xv h 1 8
twlnen
.]
;

sg.fres. twines, joins, (see note). [ME.

dan, ]>oncian.~] pan(ne), adv. then, thereupon,
afterwards, in that case, consequently,
i

?

from OE. twin, twine,
n. twinkling, in
I

224,

in

7,

vn

Vina
yn
192.

169,
;

Twynkelyng,
tw. of an ye,
clian.~]

34, xi b 16, 150, &c. pen(e), v 131, 191, 227, &c.

;

[OE. twin-

penn(e), v
&c.
;

78, 92, 268,

or than, or else,

X

321, 51.

Twyn(ne),

v. intr. separate, part,

iv a 19 xvi 278. [Cf. OE. See A(ge-}t-unnn, double.]

[OE. ponne, Jianne, jmenne.'] pan(ne), pane, pen(n), conj.
than, i n, iv b 82, v 32, vi 195, IX 249, xvn 13, &c. nor, xvn 108 (see note), 535. [As. prec.]
;

twynne.

Twyys,

adv. twice,

I

182

;

for the

second time,
twi(g~ja

xvn
-esJ]

362.

[OE.

Thapparence =
par,

J?e

+ Apparence-

+ adv.

Twnnys,

n. gen. sg. tun's, great cask's, X 26. [OE. tunnel]

pajfe),

pau

(xv),

conj.
if,

(with

subj.) though, even

in 40,

3 ig. pres. need, v 287 ; inipers. in jow (ace.) far, you need, I 132. [OE. Pear/.} par(e), Thair, adv. there, iv b 39, V 105, X 31, 156, XIII a 10, &c. ; anticipatory iva 70, 89, &c.; rel.

GLOSSARY
where, when, iva i, 41,82, XIII a 4; combined with or adv., there-, it, them : prep
(in cases)
def.
(ii)

art.

(orig.

ncut.\ see

]>s.

Emphatic
;

&c.
190,
f>os.

Tharat,x

for(e), on I 88, 254,

183, i86,&c.;par(e)that account, &c.,

that, I 93, 108, the same, that very, I 95, 226, &c. pane, ace. sg.
III 9.

masc. that,

for pi.

see f>o,

parfram, (after fat rel.) from, XIII a 37; par(e)in, parynne, IV a
6,
;

xv/

&c.

26,
it,

x

128,

of, IV b 57,

X 48
;

;

xnia 38; par(e)x 23 Thartill, to parto, iv a 68, X '97,
; ;

[See next.] pat; pet (in), pron. that, it, the same, II 131, 543, in 56, V 44, XIII b 49, &c.; even that, villa

181
63.

Tharwith, thereby, *iv 6 and [OE. fxr, far(a)
See pai.
(i)

prob. unaccented f&r, fara.~\ See J>er(e), >>ore. par(e).
that,
i

pat.pet (ni),conj.

With indie.

30, n 333, in 5, &c. ; so that (of result}, n 439, v 246,

(So), Swych, &c., passim ; (with nff.), without (with vbl. 156, 197, &c. (ii) With subj. that, to (with infin. esp. after verbs of commanding,
sf>.\ i
;

xv b Swa

12, &c.

;

until, II

76

;

after

306 ; am I that, is it I (you mean), xv^- 27 ; that is myne, there's one from me, xvn 226 that withoute, what is outside, XII a 73; quasi-adv. (at) that, too, xvn 146; as regards that, xvn 524 (see Bold), pan, dat. sg. in after (hi) fan, after (by) see Bi, Wi>. that, n 553, 597 [OE.// (Kt/rf), neut.; fane, ace. masc. fam, dat.]
;
;

;

pat, pet (in), rel. pron. indecl. that, which, who(m), I u, 16, 47, in 17, &c. for whom, xiva 32 (see Betre but here fat is
;
;

534. desiring, purposing, &c.), in 7, 37, xi b 217, xivc 99, &c. ;
loosely connected with what precedes, villa (note), 52, xi b

n

n

247

;

lest (after

'

fear'),

XI0

61,

xvn 184, 372, &c.; so that (of purpose), in order that, lest (with neg.), I 220, iv a 22, b 13, xvi c -5 see Forbede. *99> 399> So that, in order that, XII a 19, &c. wende . . fat, go ... and, VIII 0271. Indef. where, if, IV b 75. 83, &c. (iii) Forming conjunctions with preps, and advs. a pro-nominal use as in (orig. OE./or fam fe}, see the preps. &c.; subjoined to other conjs. (as 3if, &c.), see the conjs. or to rel. and interrog. advs. (see ]?at, re/.~), as whan that,

a perh. already felt as nom.} thing which, XI b 26, &c.: fat that which, what, iv b 65, fat, ix 70, &c.; fat at, vi 176; it... fat, vina 242, &c.; (elliptically) fat, that which, I 178, 180, n 516, xvii 164, &c. ; be who, v
;

196;

him

that,

vm a

114;

&
.

those whom, xvi 8 ; sa?Hefat,jnst

;

what, XVI 71, &c.; (loosely, or with ellipse of prep.) fat, to whom, vi 64, XV i 4 (as that) in which, I 1 88 (from that) in which, ix 320; that into which,
;

;

XII a

20.

Supplemented
.
.

pers. prons., as fat

.

by hym,

;

hit, which, fal i 185, iva 36, vi27, 1x6, x6; fatfai, which, xiv b 76; that thame ilkane, x 160 (see note)

whom, v

37

;

.

.

.

.

.

.

;

similarly,

when, IX

22,

&c.

;

hence used

to obviate repetition of a conj.. in whan (that} . . . and that, when . . . and when, XII a 36, b 155-6, 180-2 ; similarly pleonastic in

( then), when, v 17; fat ferof, of which. XI b 222-3

=

fat

.

.

.

fat tyde
.
.

.

;

cf.

xin a 36-7.
.

\\l>

fe more fat, the more, 114. [OE. //, >JB/fe.]
(i)

pat, pet, demonstr. ad>.

As

rated preps, . . of, of whom, vi 65) see the preps., &c.; note fat. . after, that after which, vn IQ. same fat . .fro, same as that from which,
. .

For use with sepaand advs. (as, fat

GLOSSARY
ix 230.
relatives, tives, see

Subjoined

to

other

and

indir.

interroga-

173, 247, 433, xiii a 32 pey}, Theigh, villa 220, \\llb 9.
;

Hou, Whan, What,
;

&c. ; cf. pat, conj. [Substitution of prec. for OE. fe pat, that which, may in part repres. OE. P&t-pe, fatte.'} See App. p, 289. patow, = POU, that thou, II
,

[OE.Je(a}A.\ See f>ogh. peire ; peise. See pai pes.
;

Themperour =
adv., conj.

J>e

+ Emperour.
See J?an(ne),

pen(e), penn(e).

pat

penche, penk(en),
I

165, 454, 471

;

cf.

Pat tou,

XV g

See pou. 9. pau. See J>a}(e). pe, adv. demonstr. (by) so much, b 100 ; for that, the, v 300,
;

v. to think, 373, xi b 253, &c. ; pinke, Thynk(e), II 44, IV a vil &c. 30, 78, po3te,

221,

n

;

(pleonastic), wars I thee see,

vm a

vm

Thoghte. pa.
&c.
;

t.

Ill 57,

xna

11,
;

Th.ou.cht,

112;

so

much

the the

pou3te,

Thoughts, vm a
on

x

28,

&c.

293,

worse
rel.

by which,
.

for seeing you, xvil 191 ; in fie better, (so)

1x167; Thoght, poujt, //>..!! 390, xiv 53, &c.; to consider,
xvi 3
;

that

175
'

;

. better, correl. in

.

vm a
. .

/.

(vpoti), think,

be

46, xvil
.

J>e
I

J>e

(.

.

.

}e~),

the ... the,

(see note).
For]>i.

[OE.

]>y,

255, vi 240 /?.] See

pe,

xvi 1 70 (MS. 5e), generic, ix 109, &c. ; see Whiche, Whilke, Who. Te, in an te, and the, xv e 19 ; Th(before vowels), XII a 127.^ 191, 211. pane, ace. sg. masc. in
&c.
;
;

* def. art. the, 1 8,

pat, pet, neitt. sg. 10, 14, 59 Ill 41, 44, 46, 57 ; with French masc. in 46 ; before vowels and merging into J>at demonslr., I 43 esp. in fiat yche, ilk(e}, the same, &c., I 208, v 65, &c. but pe ilke, masc. and fern., ill 27, 45 pat o(w), the one, V 244, 344, IX 176, xv ^ 7 ; fatoj>er(e), the other, v 72, 169, 200, 344,
; ; ;

mindful, of, IV a 78, 95, V 329, VI 10, &c.; intend to, be resolved to, vil 30, X 79 ; expect to, XII a 28 ; p. to (for to, till}, expect a 293, x 28, xiv b 36, to, &c. conceive, imagine, n 373, 390, xvil 286, &c ; Thynkynge. iv b 68. [QE,J>encan,po/ite.] See pinke. penne, adv. thence, I 153. [Cf. OE. panone?\ See Thine. pens, adv. thence, in from fens, ix 259, xvn 548. [Free. + adv. -&$.] per(e), adv. demonstr. there, I 98,

vm
;

.

II

189, III 42, &c.
. . .

;

correl. in

pere

-where, where,
;

ix 222;
see

indef. (unaccented ii 10, 39, xn a 75,

pyr),
;

&c.

rel.

XII a
like,

118,

xv h
ToJ>er,

7;

see

Ich,
se

Ton,

&c.

[OE.

(late },e\

&c.]

The, v. to prosper, in as euer myght I the, so may I prosper, on my life, xvil 328. [OE.
peon.']

where, when, I 154, v S, 52, a 240, xii a 141, &c. 329, equiv. to nent. pron. it, that, them, and occas. rel. which : per(e)aboute(n), (round) about it, IX 156, *XI b 252 perafter, aiterwards, V 350, Villa 108, &c. ; according to it, XI b 244 ;

vm

;

;

Perap(p)on, on
See J>ou.

it,

&c.,

vn

pe, The(e).

xvn
VI

75,

pede, *. (folk), land, n 475, 494, R35jVIi33. [OE./w^.] pedyr, -ur, &c. See j?ider. b 17; peeues, n. pi. thieves, peuys, xi b 176; pieues, ill 18. [OE. f.cof (Kt. ftof) .] pei, pey, conj. though, even if, n

282 perate, there, II 380, 154; perby(e), by that means, XI a 13, XVI 161 ; on
;

vm

that account, xni b 35 ; according to it, xvi 322; per(e)for(e), peruore, &c., on that account,
71, in 41, v 211 (pleonastic), on account 289. xvil 20, &c.
i
;

GLOSSARY
of which, xvi 167 ; because, ix 108 (note) ; perfro, xvi 295 ; ther . . .fro, whence, xna 33 ;

pyderward, Thederward, adv. thither, in that direction, xin a
33,

XVII

245.

[OE.

J>ider-

perin(ne), -ynne, II 278, V 1 06, xiil a 16, &c. rel. wherein,
;

w(e}ard^\

11413; Ther(e)myd(d)e, therevni a 69, 151 ; per(e)of, pereoffe, of it, from it, &c., in 20, iv a 39, villa 191, ix 6, &c. ; rel. of which, xin a 31 ; see J>at, rel.; peron, of it, vi 27 ;
with,

pieuea. See peenes. Thilke, adj. that (same), XII b 59, pulke, those, xiil a 205, 220 2. [OE. Jylc, such; treated in sense as a contraction of pe +
;

Ilk(e),

f.v.-]
thence,

Thine, adv.
furth,

v

perto, to it (that), v 257, xvn 385 at it, xiil a 48 for it. XI b 200; 254; in addition, Xll (after rel.} to, xi 246, xnia 37 per vnder, underneath (them),
; ; ;

infra thine

thenceforward,

X

130.
(cf.

[Obscure red. of

Jtadan) ; cf. sty(p)en, selen^

ON.

ME.>>
sine

from

1 1

;

perupon,

at

it,

xn

l>

pin(e), pyn(e). ping(e), pyng,
thing,

Seepou.

it (after Part, v.), vn 96. [OE. pxr,per.'] See )>ar(e) pyr, pore. per(e). See J?ai ; Thire. perewhiles, adv. in the meantime, VIII a 8. [OE. (oii) pmre hwtle + adv. -es.~\ See ]?erwhile.

162; per(e)with, by means, vnia 95, 102, &c.

that
;

with

29, &c. ; a/ tat ]>ing, everything there, II 417 ; althisthyng, all this, xvn 154. Na tkyng, no J>ing(pynk, &c.), nothing, anything (with Miff.), n i72,iVrt 6. vi 136, 227, ix 275, &c. as adv. no whit,

n

pynk
iva

(vi),

.

33,

;

in

perk, adj. dark, n 370. [OE. = deoratng) *peorc (Beaming
see

no way,
289
;

I

67,

n

39,

v
for

168,

XVII
I

na kyn thing, no
any

;

whit,

X 59 ; for no fting,

Kluge, Urgerm.
conj. while,

37 d.\
;

perwhile,
see
/<?.]

While. See perewhiles. pes, demonstr. adj. (and/nw.) sg. this, VIII b 78, xv * 1 8 pis(e), pys(se), i 20, II 47, vi 10, 173, &c. phis, xvi 6 1 this, this woman, xvii 403 ; peise, //. these, IX 117, 318; pea, \l\\b 42, XI a 61. &c. pron. v 354, vn 50, &c. peso, i 43, 47, &'c. pis, pys, II 13, 340, vi 145 pise, (note], xvn 445, &c.
; ; ;
;

vni a 156 [OE. on pxre hwile

(other) cause, II 98. ping, &c., //. things, affairs, matters, I 7, 114, 218, 297, xi b 249; al(le) J>ing, &c. (constr. as sg. or//.) everything, n n, iv<r<58, viii

203, ix 239,

xiv

c 2,

xvn
;

&c.

;

all things,

xv c 6

73, bi al

J>ing,

by every token,

II

321,

375; pinges, Thynge;, &c., 11496, iv ^ 62, &c. ; compositions,

tasks,

xin

b

19.

[OE.

;

;

^f-3
pink(e), pynk(e), penk(e), v. to seem to (with dat. pron.\ n 442 pynkke5, thou seemest,
;

;

[QE.fes, peos,pis; see N.E.D.~\ pet. See pat pe, def. art. peuys. See JJeeues.
; ;

pyse, in 59, v 355, &c. puse, vni b 70.

xvn

181,

V 294 i infers, in me pinkel, thynkys me, Sac.., it seems to me, vin b 55, xiv c 28, xvn form &c. endingless 511,
;

;

pi, py.

See

ForJ>i, J>ou.

in,

me

Thicke,awy. dense, pouring

(rain),

seems to

(him, vs) pink, &c., me, I think, &c.,

it

II

107, 132. [OE./?V.] pider, adv. thither, II 316, 318,

vu

375, ivrt 10, 12, V 41, vi 192, 230, xvn 399, &c. ; pynk me,

&c.

;

vn

88, ~

pedyr, Thedir, -ur, i 43, xvn 312, &c. [Of:.

xvn

255 ; with nom. pron. in thou thynk, (it) seems good to pojt, you, XVII 196, 379.

GLOSSARY
Thoght(e), pa.
to,
t.

v

95,

xn b

(it)

74,

xvn

82,

seemed 425

out, over

;

;

(means
20, viil

of)

because of, out of ; by ix 87, xv * 3, &c. ;
: ;

with nom.pron. in ]>ey Jiojt, they thought good, I 87. [OE. The endingJyncan, f>uhle. less forms prob. arose in i sg. by confusion with J^enche, q.v. but cf. QM.fykki /r.] pyr, adv. indef. there 1 170. [Reof duced unaccented form J>er(e) y repres. obscure vowel, as (e.f.) inpedyr, 171.]
; ;

Thoro, xvii 278 porw, villa
xiv c 19, &c. Thorwgh, a 320; pourgh, villa 320; Throu, X 15 ; Throughe, vn 16, 92; purch, II 237, &c.
; ;
;

pur?, v 83, vi 53, &c. purgh(e), I 186, iv b 71, vn 103, &c. adv. through. IX 224.
;

porghout, prep, throughout, ix
217; Thurghout, adv.
detail, xii
in every

Thire, adj. and pron. pi. these, i v <* 55. 59J Per, xvi 97, 399. [Obscure; usually Northern.] Thirt6. Set ]>ritti. pis(e), pys(se), &c. See ]*s.
See ]?ou. piself(f)e, piselue(n). po, demonstr. adj. pi. those, V 1 30, vn 113, VIII b 5, ix 33, &c.

219. [OE..Jur&-ut.]

porsday, n. Thursday, xv^- i [OE. jtoresdaeg, from ON. Jnrsdag-r. ]

See Scere.
pi.

pos, pron.
See
]?at.

those,

vi

Those, xvn 45, &c. [OE./<zj.]

155

;

;

pron. they, those, &c. n 575 (second), vi 197, villa 155, ix 8, xv b 23, xvi 279, xvn 228. See \>al. po, adz: then, thereupon, II 49,
117,

pou,/ww.
&c. xvi
;

in
;

&c.
rel.

12, vnia 22, in addition, more,

xna
in

6,

po

ii 452, xva 17, g 9; see also art<nv,canstow, hadestoiv, nettow,

thou, you, I 130, n 108, po-w(e), iva 22, v 256, 242, &c.; pu, vn 94; Ton, Tow (after closely connected words ending in d, t, s]
,

fyue, five (times) more, vi 91 ; when, III 3, 32, 44, 54, 56.
if,

saltou, shaltoiu,
icolle

patow,

ivi/fou,

(with further reduction).

pe, The(e),
pof, conj. though, even
75, 29. alteration of

Te

(after is], ace.

iva

12,
cf.

vii

[As

next, with

thee, you. II 116, xvii 118,407, &c. ; dat. (to, for) thee, II 132,

final spirant;

V

pouj

;

Rof.]
;

concerning thee,
is te,

J)ogh, conj. though, (even) if, ix 207, XII a 187, &c. pogh pat, though, I 224; pou, xv/ 8 pou;, pougb, ix 139, xiv c 37,
;

175, 218, 291, xv^- 10, &c. xv^ 28 ; what whatpe is, what is the matter
;

with thee,
as far
as

n

xvn

102, 115 for t/ie, you are concerned,
;

193;

refi. (to, for) thyself,

&c.

;

J>ei, Allthough. po}t(e), Thoght(e). See penche,

40, &c. See paje,

Pow3, powgh, villa 36, [ON./o, earlier *J>o/i.~]

yourself,

v 184, 229 (first), 289, villa 32, 223, xv/ 13, xvn &c. pi, py pin, pyn(e) 224,
;

J>inke, J?ou?t.

pollen, pole, v. to endure, IV a 14, V 351, xv c 33; tholid . . . for to be, suffered myself to be,

[OE. polian.] Thoner; ponk(k)e. See Jumlyr Thanke.
3.

XVI

(usually before vowels) ; pass. adj. I 125, II 105, V 235, vi 207, &c. ; (objective} of thee, villa 27. XV 31, &c. ; pine, pyne, oblique and //. 109, xv c 23, &c. ; pron. belonging to
thy, your,

g

n

;

thee,

xvi 221; thy
piselffe,

folk,

xvi

252.

-aelue;

py-

pore, adv. there, then, l 96, 175, v 288, vi 202. [OE. pdi-a.] See f>ar(e).

porgh, prep, through

;

through-

seluen, -self(e), now. (thou) thyself, xvi 206, 261,299: refi. thyself, v 73,^1 113, xvi 350, &c. [OE./, -tH;pe; put.}

GLOSSARY
pou. pouj, pough.

Thoucht, pou3t(e),
)>enche.

See pogh. &c. See

Thirde, Thyrde, iv b
;

6,

xvi

pou3t,

.

tion, II 373; po^te, see Dede; Thcght(e),

thought, mind, imaginavi 164,

b 23, xvii 156, &c.
fiht.-\

iva 5, [OE. (ge-)-

pourgh.
;

See porgh.
;

Pousand(e), -end, -ond; pouzond Thowsande n. sg. and //. thousand, III 30, 34, vin a 185, XI b 279, XIII b 31, xvi 39, &c. [OE. /</.]

XH* 81, xvii 460. [OE.iridda, late Nth. firda.] prien, adv. thrice, xv,- 33. [OE. See pryys. }ri(g}a.'] Thrife, Thryfe. See f>riue. Thryft, prosperity in oath by
. ;

31 ; at J>e J>rid, on the third occasion, v 288 J>e pryd(d() tyme, for the third time, I 142,

my

thryft

=

as

eiter
t>riue),

myght I
xvii 218.
;

thrife (see

The,

Thrifty
fine,

Thousandfold,
sendfold,
in

adj.

;

many

thon-

adj. prosperous goodly, VII 158. [From prec.l
,

many

thousands,

XII a 97. [OE. /w&:</-/?7</.] pou}>, conj. though, even if, XI b 190. [As J>ogh, with alteration of final spirant ; cf. ]?of.] pow(e); powj, &c. See pou;

pryys, adv. thrice, I 182. See J>ri( g]a + ad v. -es.~\

[OE.
J>rien.

prynge,

v.

to press
;

one's way, v 329 pres.p. pressing,

make Thringaud,
;

inlr.

X

166.

[OE.
15, 21
;

pogh. slave Thrall, predic. as adj. in bondage, subject, xvi 134. [OE. /;//, from ON. />-#/-/.] pre(e), adj, three, I 196, u 70, IX 244, &c. pri, ill 6, 15; prc (squared), IX 106; a J>re, in
.

pringan.~\ pritti, adj. thirty,

;

Thretty, vn 158; Thirte, Thyrty, xvii 125, 260. [OE.

xv^4,

'-

;

priuaund, pres. p. prosperous goodly, noble, vn 158. [From
next.]
Cf. Thrifty.

;

three,

xm
.

49.

[OE.

J>rco,

priue,

fern., neut.

prepe,

; fo1(e), masc.] contest, v 329.

[Cf.

OE. preapian,
n.

v.]
;

Thrife, Thryfe, v. to / may not thryfe, I prosper can ill bear it, or may scarcely recover, xvii 414; in oaths: so
;

presch, v. to thrash smite, V 232. [OE. lerscan, late J>rescan."\
prestelcoc,
(male)
throstle,

song-thrush, frost'le + cocc

xv
;

7.

[OE.
see

so may you (I) prosper, on your (my) life, li 532, xvii 191, 243 (cf. The, v.}.
thrife, &c.,

I

mot pou priue, as

etier

myght

on

form

[ON. >#**. ]
pro.
adj.
fierce,

N.E.D.,

s.v. Throstle.'}

v

232.

[ON.

232, prete, 31 ; to wrangle, vi 201 ; refl. in 'him pretep, wrangles, chides,
7 (note). [OE./flfitfM; QiN.J>rKta (in sense wrangle ').] Threting, n. threatening (language), xiv a 30. [OE. freat'

v. to threaten,

v

xiva

prd-r, stubborn.]

Throu, Throughe. See J>orgh. prowe, n. time, moment, XII b
59
;

xv b
1

a firmve, for a time,

l

in-

V 151. \QE.frag.~] prublet,/. t. crowded, gathered
"irod.,

**]
Thretty.
See
t.
;

N.E.D.
J>iitti.

In (inlr.}, vii 132. [Obscure. as var. of Trouble,
;

grow dark but
. . .

cf.

Purity, 504,

Prewe, pa.
See

otter

overturned,

n

fire'ue,

879.]

578.

[OE.

fird-

pu; pulke.

wan, twist;
pri.

pa. \.]>reow.~\

J're(e).

St-epou; Thilke. pundyr, n. thunder(storm), I 166; Thoner, vn 132, XVII

prid(de), pryd(de), adj. third, in 10, ix 30, xii a 122, &c.

346. [OE. punor.~] purch, purj. &c. See porgh.

GLOSSARY
pus, adv. thus, so, I 37, XI b 270, xil a 88, xvi 383, &c. ; therefore, xi a 40. [OE. pus.']
See J>es. pusgate, adv. in this way, vni b See So53. [JJus + Gate, w.2]

Verrit (for}, pp. averred, declared
(to

be),

VII

49.

[Shortened

from OFr. avercr.]
Verst.
See Furst.

pus(e).

Vertu(e),

gat.
1J-,

n. power, peculiar property, quality, IX 67, 70, 74, xil b 175, xv * 3, &c. ; virtue,

IV b

1 6,

V 307

;

kyng of verities,
note).

V-

;

for init.

tt,

v

(in

in) see

xvi

128

(see

[OFr.
adj.
in

also F.

vertu.~\

Vayn(e),

adj.

frivolous,
;

worthless, iv b 28 104, 124, 137, &c. ; yn veyn, in vayn, in vain, I 178, XVII 360. [OFr. vain.']

vain, Veyn, XI b

Vertuous,

Virtuus,

possession of its proper qualities, ix 1 26 ; virtuous, vn 49. [OFr.
vertuous,~]

Ves.

See Was.
.

Vale, n. vale, V 203 (see Hil). [OFr. vol.] Valay, Valeye, n. valley, v 77, 177, ix 195, xi b 155. [OFr.

Vessel(l), xvn 327.
horrible,

vessel,

I

218, (ship)

[OFr.

vessel.']

Vggely, Vgly,

adj.

V n,

forbidding, 122, XVI 101.
133.

[ON.

ugg-ligr.}

Vald

See Wille, v. Wai. Value, n. value, x 132. [OFr.
;

Vail.

;

Vgsom, adj. horrible, VII [Cf. ON. uggsam-ligr.}
Victorye
IX
81,

value. ]

(of), n. victory (over),

Vanyt6,

frivolity, vanity, vain thing, iv b 13, 52, XI 'b 181, [OFr. vanite".} 219, XIV f 3.
. ; ;

XI

b

153.

[OFr.

viclorie.~\

See Weppen Was. Vauntwarde, n. vanguard, VIII b 60. [ONFr. avant-warde.~\

Vapnys Var.

Vif (tene), &c. See Fyne, Fyfteyn. Vylany, Velany, n. unknightly
conduct, shameful
vilanie.~\

v
fate,

307 ignominy, XVII 67. [OFr.
;

Vch(on). See Ich(on). Velany. See Vylany.

Vedde. See Fede. Veyn. See Vayn(e).

adj. worthless, IV b 12; miserable, n 548. [OFr. #.] Vilt<, vileness, iv b 77. [OFr.

Vile,

.

Venge

(on), v. to take vengeance (on) ; it schal ben venged . so, such vengeance shall be taken, XII b 100. [OFr. vengcr.']
. .

viltl^
pres. p. turning over x 129. [Cf. ON. vindla, wind.] Vyne, n. vineyard, VI 142, 161, &c.; vine, ix 158. [OFr. -

Vyndland,

and over,

Venia(u)nce,

Vengaunce,

n.

vengeance, punishment, I 92, 129, vni a 138, xi b 49, xvn 55, &c. [OFr. venjance.'] Venym(e), n. poison, iv b 86, ix
94.

Violastres,

n. pi.

as

supposed

name

[OFr. vcnfm.']
adj.

Venyrnous,

poisonous,

ix

of a kind of diamonds of inferior lustre due to mistransl. of French violastres (adj.
;

203. [OFr. venimous^\ Ver(r)ay, adj. true, ix 65, xvn i adv. truly, very, XVII 198;
;

pi.), purplish,

ix 97 (note).
adv.
violently,
violent.}

Vyolentlych,
XIII a 33.

Verayly, adv. [OF. verai.]

truly,

V
,

[From OFr.

177.
6.

Vyolet,

Verament, adv.

assuredly

xvn

. violet Violet(te), (flower), IX 9Q, XV e 13; (colour), IX 98 ; see IX 97 note. [OFr.

[OFr. veirement, veraintent."] Verce, n. verse, VI 233. [OE. fers ; OFr. vers.]

violet (le\]

Vyrgyne,
240, &c.

.

Virgin, virgin, \QFi.virgine.']

I

85,

GLOSSARY
perfect maidenhood, VI 66. [Free. + Flour.] Virtuus. See Vertnous.

Vyrgynflour,

.

Vnder,
153.
tide.

n. ' the third hour ', about the middle of the morning, vi

[OE. undent.] SeeVnder-

Visage, n.

face,

II

80.

[OFr.

visage.,] Vyse, n. vice,

V 307. [OFr. vice."] Vitayll, n. victuals, provisions, xvil 155. [OFr. vitaille.~\ Vithall, -in. See Withal, -inne.
(hyi), pa. t. bethought (him), reflected, X 179. [OE. *ymb(e)-pencan (cf. ymbe;

Vnderjete, pa. t. pi. perceived, 576. [OE. under-getan, pa.
pi. -ge^a)ton.]

n
t.

Vnderlynge,
47.

.

inferior,

vill a

Vmbethoucht

[OE.

underling.']

Vndernome,
Nym(e).

pp. taken in (men-

tally), realized, II 320.

[OE.
See

itnderniman. pp. -nunten.]

ON. umb.] Vmbreide (of),
by
fix

Jxinc)

but prefix

is

influenced

Vnderstonde,

pa, t. subj. reproached (with), xn b 98. [OE. Hp-gebregdan, upbraid, with preassimilated to

ME.

umb(e) as

in prec.]

Vnable,

adj. incapable, IX 313; impossible, VII 46. [OE. nn- + OFr. habit.} See Able. Vnablen, v. to render incapable, XI * 109, 117. [From prec.]

&c., v. hend, I 12, IV b 76, IX 214, XI b 117, xin b 55, &c.; learn, be told, I 26, n 215, ix 187, &c. ; vnderst. bi, intend (to be understood) by, xi a 9 ; vnderst. of
preiere of holy lif, mean by ' ' prayer (that consisting in) holy living, xi b 82; Vnderstod, pa. t. xn b 36, 88, &c.

Vndirstand(e), to understand ; compre-

Vnbarred, //. unbarred, v 2. [OE. on-(un-) + OFi. barrer.]
See Bard, Barres. , Vnbynde, v. to unbind, release, XVI 8 ; Vnbounde, //. I 228. [OE. on-bindan ) late un-bln-

[OE. understdndan, -stondan.] Vnderstondyng(e),-standynge.
&c., n. comprehension, XI b 134 ; intelligence, iv b 49, 56, 65 ; of kynde vnderst., it stands to ordinary reason, naturally, vnr b
58.
,

AM.] Vnblendyde, adj. unpolluted, IV b 16. [From pp. of Blende.
q.v.]

[OE. untter-stdnding^]
;

Vndertake,

z>. to undertake, xiv c 52 ; warrant, xvn 274 Vndertake,/*. xil a K2. TOE. under-

Vncessantle", adv. unceasingly, xvil 147. [From OFr. inces-

+ ON.

taka.\

Vndertide,

Vndrentide,

n.

sant^

Vnclene, adj. impure, IV b 17. [OE. un-clxne.]

(orig.) mid-morning, (esp. as time for a rest from work), but often vaguely applied and appar.
' nearly equiv. to noon ', II 65, 76, 133, 181, 282; slepe her were taking a noonundertidts, tide sleep, n 402. [OE. undcrnSee Vnder, tid.'}
.

Vncoujw,
Vncrouned,
tonsure,

Vnkowthe,
without

adj.

strange, unknown, II 535, 146. [OE. ww-tv?/.]
adj.
lay,

vn
the See

vill b 66.

Crounede.

Vndisposid
70, ix

Vndede. See Vndo. Vnder, -MT,prep. under, n
179, XIII a
see

(to\ adj. indisposed, XI b disinclined (to), 135.
;

15; (postponed) Gore, Heuenryche; adv. underneath, xvil 409; in reality (opposed to appearance on surface), VII 18, xiva 18 see j?ere. [OE. under.]

V 250;

[From OFr. disposer.] Vndo, v. to undo, open, XVI 182 Vndede, pa. t. n 385. [OE.
on-don, un-don.~] See Do(n). Vnglad, adj. in misery, XVI I 32. [OE. un-glxd.] Vnit6, n. coherence of mind,

;

GLOSSARY
but this sense unex(? ampled), vill b 10. [OFi.umtf,
sanity
unity.]

Vnkept,

adj. not kept, broken,

Vntil(l), prep, to, XII a 133, xvi 370, xvn 218 (see Turne); until, XVI 53. [As next with snbst. of interchangeable ft'/.]

xi b 233.

.S^Kepe.
adj. un-

Vnto

;

Vnkinde, Vnkuynde,

to, I

Vntew, xvn 505 prep. in, II 186, xn a 25, xvi
;

natural (in conduct, &c.) ; disloyal, XIV c 103; .hard-hearted, XII b i, 220, 224. [OE.
(ge}cynde.~]

319, XVII

241

;

towards,
I

for,

xvi 246

;

up

to, until,

95,

vn

[?OE. *unto\ cf. OS. unto, prep. ; Goth, unte,
conj.]
conj. until, I 68. [As prec.] See To, conj. Vntrawjie, n. perfidy, v 315. [OE. un-trio-w])^ See Treuthe. Vntrew(e), adj. inaccurate, untrue, vn 47, xi a 43. [OE. tin-

95, ix 328.

Vnkindenes.se. Vnkyndnes,
unnatural conduct, xii b

n.

205,

Vnto,

XVII

1 2.

[From

prec.]

See Vncou]>e. Vnlokynne,//. opened, XVI 197. OE. on-Iucan, tin- ; pp. -locen.~\

Vnkowpe.
|

Vnmanerly, adv. discourteously, V 271. [From ME. mancr-ly,
formed on Maner(e),
y.v.~\

treowe.'}

See Trew(e).
less
-

Vntreweliere, adv. compar. [OE. accurately, XI a 59.
treow-lice.] Vntrusse, v. to unload,

Vnnepe,
hardly,

adv.
II

with

difficulty,

221, 416, XIII b 60,

xn b

52.

xiv c 4. [OE. un-eape.'] Vnoccupied, adj. unoccupied,
XI b 127.

[OE. onSee Trns.

(-) + OFr.

trusser.]

Vnreso(u)nable,
able, VI 230,

See Occupied. adj. unreason-

Vnwar,

vin a

145.

[From

OKr.
bele.

resonable.~\

See Resona-

adj. (or adv.} unawares, XII b 9. [OE. nnwxr, adj. and adv.] See Vvar(e). Vnworthi, adj. unworthy, IX 308.

Vnrid, adj. hard, cruel, xvn 40. [OE. un-geryde, rough.] Vnryghtwysely, adv. unrighteously ; more than is right, IV b 34. [OE. un-riht-wts-ltce.} Vnschape, adj. formless, xin b [OE. un-gescapen, un59.
Vnschette, v. to open, xn a 71. [OE. on-(un-) + scyttan (Kt.
formed.]

[Extended
weorp(e).'] Vochen saf.
I

from

OE.

ttn*

See WorJ>y. See Vouchesaf. ' Voided, //. cleared out ', been dismissed, II 574. [OFr. (a)voider.~\

j

Vois, &c.

n.
;

voice,

xn

119, b 31,

*#/<z).] Vnsober, adj. violent, VI I 143 Vnsoberly, adv. violently, vn 130. [From OFr. sobre.~\ See
;

Voyce, Voice, xvi 73, 79. [OFr. vots.~] Vol^ueld). See Ful(fillen). Vorbisne(n), //. examples, illustrations, ill 2, 59. [OE.
.

for(e)-bisen.~\

Vore-yzede, Vorzede.
seyde.

See For-

Sobre.

Vouche-saf, Vowch-sayf,
adj.
for,

Vnsoght,
atoned

unexpiated. not 97. '[ME. from ON. A-sdttr nn-sa(u^sht, (older i-un-saht-} ; cf. OE. tinseht. The orig. rimes were

xvn

v. to vouchsafe, deign, IX 330, xvn Vochen saf, pres. pi. 173 guarantee (sc. me), Vlll6 51.
;

[OFr. vo(ii)cher saztf.~\ Voundit. See VVonndit.

prob. naght. saght, wraght

;

see

Vouaour,

n.

vaulting,

II

363.

Werche.]

[OFr. vousure.~\

Vnstudied,

adj. not studied, xi 165, 333. See Stndie.

Vp, Vpp(e), adv. up, i 200, H 96, v n, xvi 113, &c.; open, x

GLOSSARY
185;
(open)

wide, xvi

122,

GLOSSARY
be
chosen),

conspicuous,

ex-

GLOSSARY
141,1118, 11158, v 354, vi
1

8,

GLOSSARY
&c. ; cf. Welnes.

Wo.

[OE.

wil.~]

See

is

a 198, &c. ; departed, I 93, went, went, x 178; Ywent,
III introd.

vm

Wela,
(see

adv. very, in wela wylle
16.

come about,
we'ndan.]

[OE.

Wylle),v

[OE. wel +

Id

(intensive).]

Wene(n),
as

Welcom, Welcum, Welcome, adj. welcome, II 433, v 172,

vm b

52
;

;

interj.
infl.

VI

39.

[OE. wil-cuma
\-cweme)
cf.

by

wel20.

to think, imagine, expect, iv.a 35, v 336, villa 242, XI b 72, &c. ; Weyn, xvn 444, 535 ; Wende, pa. t. i no, 127, xn b 66. [OE. wenan.} See

ON.

vel-kominn.~\

Awenden.

Welde,

v. to

possess,

iva

Wenges
Wente,
[From

;

Wenne.
n.

See

Wyng

;

Whan(ne).

Wele, Weole, n. (usually with Wo, q.v.} happiness,
perity, wealth,

allit.

n

pros-

5,

iva

2, 3 74,

VI 34 ; worldes wele, good things of this world, wealth,

V 66,
iva

Weole; Wepe, n.
II

6. turn(ing), xn r ende, v.~\ Weor. See Wele; Was.

W

weeping,

in

w. and wo,

28,

xiv

16;

wunnewe(p}le,

wealth of joy,
wynter), 35.

xv

*u (MS.

[OE.

we(o)la.~\

Weleful,
17.

adj.

prosperous, xiv

[Free. + OE. -///.] Wei-fare, n. welfare, easy life, b 8. [Wel + Fare, .]

Wepe, Weepe, v. to weep, n nS, xn a 32, xiv b 60, xv/ 6; Wepte, pa. t. sg. 1 1 74 "Wepe, Wepeing, Weppi. II 591
; ;

195, 234. [OE. wop, assimilated to stem of next.]

vm

yng(e), 155, &c.

.

219, iva 32, xi [OE. wipan pa. t.
;

n

n. sky, VII 138. [OE. wolcen, weolcn.'] Well(e), n. spring, fount, VI 5, ix 5, xiii a i, &c. ; fig. xivc

Welkyn,

Weppen, Wapin,
pi.

weop (ONth. wxpde).~] n. weapon, V 154 XI v 15; Vapnys,

;

x

190.

[OE. wepn; ON.

108. [OE. well(a}:\ Welle-spring, spring, xv*
.

16.

Wer(e),
15;

n. war,

vn

OE. well(e}-spryng.} Well-wirkand, adj. righteous in deeds, xvn 120. [Cf. OE. wel[Cf.

Werre, ix

8, 88, xiv b 81, xiv<: 76.

[ONFr. werre.~] Wer(e), Weryn, &c.

wyrcende.~\

See Werche.

Werby.
Werohe, make
;

Welnej,

Welny;, Welnygh, adv. almost, VI 168, xiud 4; now, but a moment ago, welnygh
vi 22 1.

See Was. See Wher(e), adv. to work, labour; v. act, bring about, cause
;

do

;

I

90,

218, villa

297

;

[OE.
.

wel-ne(a}h.~]

See

Werke, xvi
xiv
b
20,

334;

Wel(e), adv. ; Nyj. happiness, IV a 32, Welth(e), xvi 324. [Extended from Wele with abstract -}.~\ Wen, n. blemish, diseased growth
;

116; 262; Wyrk(e), vi 176, v 28, vi 151, villa Woreh(e), 8, Werkis, 2 sg. xvi 25, &c.
;

xvi 265,

xvn xvn

Wirk(e),

fig.

in

introd.

[OE. wenn,

i

tumour.]

264; Wro;t(e), Wroght, pa.t. 65, 168, v 293, vi 165, xvn 4 a (2 sg .), &c. ; Wrou^te,

vm

Wende,

v. trans, to turn,
I

intr. to turn

to return,

n

427,

vm

v 84 ; (and toss), xv c 1 1 ; come, I 94, 199 go, a a 6; depart,
;

vm

103, 243 (sufy'.),8cc.;

b

87

(sTtbj.*)

;

vm

67, 79, *7<

5

"ft-

g, "

475,

501; Went(e), pa. t. I 113; Wende, I *i89 (see note), II 65,
185, &c.;

Wroght, //. V 276, VII 58, &c. Wroujt, n 374, vm a 308; Wraght, *xvn 98 (MS. wroght see Vnsoght) let Cod worche, let God do as He wills
;
; ;

Wrouhte, Wro^t,

Went(e), pp. gone,

(?read

worthe;

see

Wor}>e,
*

10

GLOSSARY
Yworth), v 140. [OE. wyrcan pa. t. worhte (warhte, wrohte) ; with er forms cf. Scherte, Werse, and see App. p. 280.] "Were, v> to ward (off), I 167. 1 [OE. werian. ] "Were, v? to wear (clothes), v 390; Ywerd,//. n 341. [OE.

West(e), adv. and n. west, vii 105, xvi 333. [OE. west, adv.]

Wete, adj. and n. no, xiv c 30.
wxta,
.]

wet,

n

80,

vn

[OE.

wxt;

Were,
Xiv c

v. 3

3

to

wear

;

/*'/

(out), decay, hit be wered ffut,

Wete, Weete, v. to wet, ix 62, xni a 34. [OE. wxtan.~] Weper. See WheJ>er, conj?pp. Weue(n), v. to weave Wouen, woven, v 290. [OE. cf. ON. pp. wefati, pp. wefen
;
;

until the present state has passed away, VIII b 85. [A sense-

(v}ofam.'\

Weued,

pa.

development of the prec. (cf. OE. forhatred, worn out) bnt the infl. of forms of quite distinct origin, such as OE. forweren, -woren, worn out, de;

(see note).

Wexe(n).

presented, v 291 [OE. wxfanJ] See Waxe(n).
t.

Wha(m). See Who. Whan(ne), adv. interrog. and rel. when, i 104, 161, v 163, ix 19,
XI a 8, &c. -whan that, when, ix 22, xn a 28, 155, &c. (see
;

was

cayed, (Jor}weorttian, perh. ultimately
sible.]

decay, respon-

Wery.
\Very,
48,

See Wary, v.
adj. weary, xi

135,
I

xnic
156,

XV c 30. Werynes, n.

[OE.

werig.'}

wearyness,
.

[OE. werig-nes.~\ work; Werk(e), Wark(e),
49.

xn I a

Huanne, in 27, 31 Quen, v 206, 247, vi 18 Quhen, x 40, 171 Wanne, vin b i, 52, &c. Wenne, vni b 7; When, i 221, &c. Whon,xiv<rno. [OE. h-wonne,
pat)
;

;
;

;

;

:

191, &c.; 374; iverkis, works, fortress, XVI 191 action, deed, IV a 65, 84, vii 58, xi b 106, &c. ; task, 56, xvn 130, 2 44> 2 55i & c J written work, vii 4, 55 ; in sg. deeds, doings,
fabric,
II
;

labour, vi 239,

vma

hwanntf hwsRnne.\

Whar(e), Hwar,
;

adv. interrog.

and rel. where, xiv a 7, XV a 6, xvi 294 (with subj.) wherever,
II 170; Quhar, to the place where, X 1 8 ; quhar at, quhar where, X 38 (see At that, As neut. pron. in: rel.}, 149. Whar(e)fore, for what (which) reason, iv b 33, xni a 1 3. [OE.

vm
'

dealings, &c., XVI 17, 200.

n

317,

v

299,

[OE.

we(o~"rc.~]

Werke.

See Werche.

"Workman,

"Workeman,

la-

hwser, hwdra, and prob. nnacc. hwKr, hwara."} See Nowhar(e)

;

bourer, craftsman, villa 308, b 25 ; Werk(e)men,//. vi 147, villa 53, ix 119, &c. ; my werkemen, doers of my will,

Wher(e), adv.

;

Wharred,
[Echoic.]

pa.

t.

par(e) whirred, V 135.
(v,

cf.

What(e), Wat, Quat

vi),
;

XVI

17.

Werldes; WernfeX
Was.

[OE
n.

we(o]rc-mann.'] See World;

Wernyng,

refusal,

v

185.
in

pron. interrog. what, II 102, xi b 195, xv e 8, xvn 163, &c. indir. I 56, iv 65, v in, vin b 38, &c. ; indef. (with
subj.)

[From OE. we'rnan.'] Werre, adj. and adv. compar.

whatever,

n

467
(cf.

;

worse plight, worse, xvi *154 (MS. ware; ^<;note), 334. [ON.
verri; *&y.verr.~\ See VVors(e).

Vina

approaching
242),

rel.

339, 450, xn b 142
(see

xvi 174

Werre

;

Worse (Werst) Wes.
;

note and App. p. 289) ; exclam. what!, XVI 101 ; lo! V 133-6 ; quat so, whatsoever, vi 206 ;

See Wer(e)

;

Wors(e)

;

Was.

what with

.

.

.

and

('as

Mn.E.

GLOSSARY
idiom), XVII 2 1 4. Adj. interrog. indir. VI what, vi 115, &c. 32, VII 83, &c. indcf. (with vi 163; exclam. j4/'0 whatever, what !, II 234 ; /0/fo 7fAa/, j^
;
;

Loke; what man (ping), who, what, II 421, 116, &c. what
; . .

whethire . or, whether ... or, IV b 76 ; Quepersoeuer, (with whether, vi 246. [OE. See Wher(e), conj. /iwx}er.~] Wheper, conj? however, (and) VI 221. [OE. hwxpere^ yet,
.
.

subj.~)

.

Whette,

fat,

what,

VII

Xlia 11, xnirt 58 (with

92

;

whatever,
stibj.}.

Wheder; Whedir. 5teWheter;
Whider.

Whelp,

n. whelp, pup,

xiv

78.

Wher(e), Quere
rog.

(vi), adv. interII

and
vi

rel.
1

where, whither,

194,

6,

xvi

272,

377;

pa. t. ground ; made a grinding noise, V 135; Quettyng, sharpening, grinding, v 152 (note). [OE. hwettan.} Whi, Why, Hwi, adv. interrog. why, I 64, II 332, xv a 17, xvn 294, &c. ; for whi, xvn 14, 518 ; Quy, vi 201 Wi, xv^25 ; Wy, VI 173, 204; indirect \npe cause why, the reason why, xni b 66 exclam. why then,
.

;

;

wherever (with subj.}, xvi 402 ; wher(e) pat, (to the place) where, ix 184, xn 59, 153, &c. ; in a case where, when, xn b 139; wherever, ix 177.

v

232.

[OE. Awf.]

Which(e), Wiche,
which, what, which, who,

n

interrog. adj.

494, &c. ; pron.
126,

Vina

&c.

;

As

neut.

Wherby,
VIII b 35
;

Werby, pron. in on account of which,
:

rel. adj. in the whiche, which, IX 2 ; pron. who, which, XII a

Wheriore, wherefore
;

by which, xil b 55 why, ix and so, V 210, IX 135, 176, &c.; 202, &c. Whereof, Huerof, (out) of which, in 2, 8, IX 153, 238, XII b 120, &c. ; on account of which, xn a 10, 38, 71, 190,
;

;

52, 61, in, &c. ; the ivhicfi(e) b 31, (wiche), which, whom, IX 276, 298, xn a 35, &c.; the

vm
.

whiche
J
I

J>at,

who(m), ix 190,
. ;

337 rf the whiche . offe, of which, ix 24 as he which, &c., see note xn a 23. See App.,
p.

289.

[OE.

hwJlc.']

See

* 159, &c. ; concerning which, II 16, XII b 212, &c. ; -wherof that, whereby, wherefore, xil a 1 16, 140, b 222 ; Whereon, in

Whilke.
i

Whider, Whedir

\

i

interrog. whither, 21, xvu 296, xi v

n

(xvil), adv. 128, 288,

which,
/i-aier.]

II

267.

[OE.

/iivser,

i

whithersoever,

See Whar(e).
conj., interrog. (introcl.
|

Whider
hwider.~\
j

so,

Wher(e),

whithersoever,

129, 130; (with subj.} n 340. [OE.

n

313;

indef.

a direct question), XI b 64, 171, 197, 266, 274 (indir.) whether, xi a 51, b 207. [Reduction of
;

Whyyt, adj. white, xnifl Whyte, White, n 105,
89, &c.
;

31; xvi

Whestones,
XIII

n.

pi.

whetstones,

a 45.

[OE.

hwet-stan.'}

Quyte, Quite, v 20, 296; Whittore, compar. xvc h-wit; 27. [OE. compar.
(x), conj. while, I 8, vn 56, xiv c 29. 36, &c. ; until, vi 168, X 32, 67, 197; quhill pat,

Whete,

n. wheat,

299; adj.

villa 9, 33, wheaten, vni a 131.
;

folffttt.]

Whil(e), Whyl(e), Wyl, Quhill

Wheper, Whethire, Wheder (xvn\ Weper (vi), conj?- interrog.viiihind.orsubj. (introd. a direct question) V 118, VI
;

[OE. hw&te

adj. kw&ten.'}

205; 363 ;

(indir.)

whether,

xvn

until, *x 63. see next.]

[OE. pd AwJ/e/e

;

(alternative

condition)

While, Whyle, Wyle, n. time, while, v 301, xiv a 5 (see Wei),

10**

GLOSSARY
by whyle, from time to time, II 8 ; eny ivyle, for any of time, VIH b 25 ; }at length
23, &c.
;

ilke

-while

.

.

.

(fottj'.'),

vill

a

1

perwhile, while 55-6 ; pe while,

while

(conj.~},

vine

58,

283.

Hondqwile, Ojwrwhile, J>erewhiles, &c.
hwil.~\

[OE.

See

[OE. *widr(f}an, expose, be exposed, to the weather.] Wyde, Wide, adj. wide, spacious, II 365, xvil 541 ; adv. wide open, X 185 ; far and wide, XIV b 29. [OE. oft/; adv. ivid(e}^\ Wydwes. See Wodewe.
Wif(e),

Whyle,
hiles ;

adv. for a while,
;

xv c

33.

n

Wyf, Wiif (n),
283,
;

n. wife,

W[OE. hwik, hwilum.] Whils, Whyls

178, v 106, &c.
;

xn a 3, xvii Wyue, dat. sg. in
a 13, xvii 144,
ill 30, 31, III 23 ;
a;;/.]

Qwiles

(vn) ; conj. while, vn 39, VIH a 314, xvi 55, xvn 397. [Extended from While, conj., with
adv. -.] Whilke, Wylke,r/.lr<w. which,

52

Wiues, Wyues, Wifls,
[OE.
.

//. II 399, viii

&c.

Wyfman,
36
;

woman,
7
;

Wymman,
xv^-

Wimon,

xvi 14 /* wy/fe, which, iv
;

30.

[OE./te>ifc.]

J

Which(e).
adv.
2,

Whilom, Whilum,
formerly, xil a 179, [OE. hwifam.~\

once,
5.

XIV

Whyne,
[OE.

v. to

scream,

xvn
378.

229.

ii 211, xi A 61, &c. Wymmen(e),//. iv b 54, v 347, xv b c ii,&c. Wommen, I 53, 32, vill a 8, &c. Women(e), IV b xvii 208. [OE. wif-wann, 42, ivimmanl\
; ;
;

Wom(m)an,

AtttiMff.]
.

Whyp,
scure.]

whip,

xvn

[Ob-

Whyrlande,
154.
hvirfla.~]

pres. p. whirling,

v

Wight. Wyht, Wicht (x), adj. valiant, X 122, 148, XI v b 5 (see Wede) ? adv. quickly, straightway, xv b 36. [ON. vig-r, neut.
;

[OE. hwyrf(t}lian; ON.
See Whyyt.

vig-t.~]

Wight,
who,
;

White, Whittore.
ititerrog.

Who, Wha (iv), Quo (\'i),pron.

n

263,
is,

iva

14,

Wyght, n. creature, Vina 243, xvii 47, &c.: Wyjte, vi 134; Wiht, xn b 77 Wytes, pi. xv i 9. [OE.
person,
;

1

xvn

vi 67, &c.

who
indir.

who

is it,
;

witt.]

295;

I

50, &c.
Obi. case

indef. in

who

Wyje, Wegh,

.

knight, man,

that,

whoever,

if
:

any one, XII b 24.

Wham,
128;
vi
93,

interrog.

whom,

n
rel.
;

Quom, Whom(e),
ix
;

V 6, 30, vil 19, &c. ; vocative, Sir (knight), &c., V 23, 59, 172 ; Wy3e3, Weghes, Wees, pi. vi 219, vii 23, 55. [OE. wiga,
warrior.]

77,

xvi 82, &c.
whose,
i

Whos,w.
xn b
113.
ittdef.

sg. rel.

79

the whos, whose,

xn

91,

a

Whasa, Whoso
;

(euer),

whoever, I 2, iva 71, vin a 67, &c. but whoso, unless VIII a i. [OE. hwa, dat. one^

Wijtliche, adv. vigorously, vill a 21. [From Wight, adj'^ Wiif. See Wif. Wyke, M. week, vin a 253. [OE.
See Woke. voice.] Wikid, Wikked, Wykked, Wicked, adj. bad, evil, wicked, iv a 65, ihu a i, 29, ix 85, xvi
234, &c. [Extended from (obscure) ME. wikke, bad ; cf.

Whon. See Whan(ne). Wi, Wy. See Whi.
Wycche,
wiccaJ]
n. wizard, ix 85.

hwam.']

[OE.

Wrecched.]

Wiche; Wicht.
Wight,
adj.
v. to

^Which(e):

Wil,

Wid.

See With.
wither,

Wild.

See Wyl(e). Wille, n. and v. See Wille, v.

Whil(e);

Widder,

xvn

63.

Wild(e), Wylde,

adj. wild,

n

GLOSSARY
214,
3 57

v

95>

&c -;

unruly,

self-willed,

\alof he wer neuer

GLOSSARY
v
35 3
5

hyn

to

mekill wyn, to

his great profit, (ge-}winn.~]

XVII 109.

[OE.

Jece Wise, se,
_

of wisdom, )E. wis-doi.~\
n.

vm

a 206.

Wynne(n), Winne, Wyn, v. to win Wan(ne), pa. t. sg. vm a
;

guise.

65

77>

90,

XVI

9,

&c.

;

//. vil

1

74

;

23, vi 157, Wonne(n), //. &c. ; Wonen, v 347, vn 169 iv a 40, &c. ; Ywon, n Won,
;

v

many

*n 158 (note), v 124, vn VIU a S9> XVI 2 r in wise, in many ways, xn a
'

manner, fashion,

561

:

trans, to

toil),

vm

procure (with
to

021,127;

wm ( m

a 39 ; in no(?ie) wise, at all, 300, ix 283; in the wise as, xil a 101 ; other wise just as, many fold, in many another

vm

contest, &c.), win over, iv a 8, 20, xiv b 1 6, 56, xvi 9, &c.; to a 90, xvi earn, vi 219, 230, &c. ; to gain, get, xvi 132, xvii 363, &c. ; to (manage to)

Wish,

fashion, xvii 54. [OE. wise.'] n. desire,^ will, xvn 4.

vm

bring, get, IV a 40, v 23, 347, VII 174; wynne (away) rescue,
,

[Stem of OE. wyscan, v.] Wysli, Wysely, adv. thoughtfully, carefully, xiv c 14, XVII 435. [OE. wls-lice.'] Wisse, Wysshe, v. to guide,
direct,

n

vn 4 (note)
directed

;

wissed hyi
(to

561, xvi 18, 171, 266, 406;

bettere,

him
158.

do)

intr. to labour profitably, earn

a 155, 316, (something), XII b 37 ; to win one's way, get (to), v 163; get (away, from), escape, xvn 24, 549, &.c.;(were] wonen of, had escaped, VII 169 ; ivyn to end, succeed in completing,

vm

better,

VI

11

a

[OE.

wissian.~\

Wist(e), &c.

See Wite(n),..

xvn

130

;

vi 47, vi 1 5 7. [OE. ge-winnan and ON. mtina."] Wynnynge, gain, profit, VIII b 102. [From prec. ON. vin.

to go, come,

adj. lonely, deserted, v [OE. wtstig; for vowel cf. Ryste, and see Morsbach, ALE. Gram., 109.] Wit, Witt(e), Wyt, Wytt(e),

Wysty,
121.

n. sg. mind, senses, wits, 82, in 46 (dot.}, xn* 137, xvi 344,

n

&c.
ing,

;

wisdom, XI a 10
i

;

intelli-

;

gence, discernment, understand-

ning-r.~]

n, vn

4,

vm 053, xi a

1

2,

Wynt. See \Vind(e). Wynter, Wintur, -er,
II
;

32
n. winter,

(?

198, &c.

interpretation), 52, XI ; sense, meaning,

xn
a
6,

359, vil 100 as adj. xv b 8, note) Winter-schours, winter storms, winter time, n 59, xiv b 26. [OE.
1 1 (see
;

-tyde,

winter; winter-scur,

-tid.~\

Wypped,/a./T.

sent flying,

[Cf. Fris., Du., Wyrde, n. fate,

V 181. LG. wippcn.}

47, 53, &c. ; //. intelligence, II 38, xi b 113 ; senses, wits, xn a 158 ; fyue wytiej, five senses, V 125. Bi my wytle (wit}, as I think, v 28, xvn 452 ; do . his wit, apply his mind, XI b 6
.

.

;

66, 350 (cf. b 217); wyrdes, chances, 102. [OE. wyrd.~\ v. to turn; throw, X 112. Wyre,

v

vm

gode wytt, sound mind, ix 83 Kynde Witt, (natural) good a 243. [OE. viitt.~\ sense, Wit, Wyt. See With.

;

vm

[OFr.

virer.~\

Wirk(e), Wyrk(e), Werche. Wis(e), Wys(e), adj.
2, VII 31,

&c.

See

wise, iv a XI b 250, XII b 222,
wis.~]

Wite(n), Wyte, Witte, v> to know, learn, be aware, I 38, a 204, xi b 82, xn a 43, &c. Wate, i and 3 sg. pres. iv a 16, vi 142, xvn 444, &c.;

vm

;

Woot,
38,

&c.

[OE.

vm a

xi a 43, 50
124,

;

Wote,

I

xvn

Wys(e)dome,

Wisdome,

n.

wisdom, iv b 56, 68,

vm a

see Ichot,

Not

;

West,
222;

313, &c. ; 2 sg. vi

53;

51;

Wote, xvi

Wate,

GLOSSARY
pi.
I

introd.

;

Wyte,
171.
t.

I

250

;

[OE.
(*#).]

wij>

Wotte, xvi
"Wyst(e), pa.

Wist(e),
1

i

60,

II

194,

Withal, Vithall,

blended with mid See J>ar(e), Jter(e). adv. withal,

in

27, 45,
&.c.

vn
;

23,

(stibj.\

would

xv g ii know
Z><?

x

xn

9

;

forth withal, straightway, b 82, 129. [OE. mid alle;
v.

(*#.), ix 184; j^ Nist.
wyte, inform,
witte,

to

see prec.]

II 2 ; We wille je intend that you should have full warning of the rescue of the souls), xvi

Withdrawe,

to

withdraw

;

we

know
176;
pret.

(i.e.

xy l 35Ywyte.

taitte pou wele,

be assured,

intr. retire, vin a 324 ; //. reft (from her), xii a 158. [OE. wip + dragan.] See Draw(e). Wythhalde, v. to hold back, v

[OE. witan;
;

wat
See

pres.

iviste,

&c.]

200; Withhelde.Wythhylde, pa. t. v 100, 223, &c. [OE. wip + hdldan.] See Holde(n).

y "Wite, v. to guard, keep, II 206, xv 1 3. [OE. witian t but in ME. the senses and forms clue

Within(ne), Wi]?ynne, Vithin
(x), &c., adv. inside,

/

to

OE. witan

(str.)

,

witan

(pret.

13, 70, in (his)

xm a

16,

XV

IX 141, X * a, &c.
;

heart,

v 302

; ;

prep.
(freq.

pres.),

and witian (wk.) were
a 34.

within, in, vi 80, &c.

confused.]

Wyte,

v. z fade, vanish, iv

postponed) iv a 38, 40, xvi 282, &c. ; (of time) xii a 29.

[OE. ge-wttan.}

Wyter, adj. wise, xv c 25. [Late OE. aV/<rr, from ON. #/-.] Wyterliche, adv. clearly, vin b
38.
'

[OE. wip-innan^ Withoute(n), -outten, -owte(n),
out, &c., adv. outside, X 68, XV * 2, xvil 127, &c. prep, without, ii 460, iv a 96, vi 30, xvi xvil 149, &c. ; see Ende, 300, Lees, Nay, No, &c. [OE. wty;

[From
'.]

prec. in

ME.
.

sense

plain

Wytes. See Wight, With, Wy}>, Wid (xvg\ Wit

utan.~]

(xv d 6), &c., 36, prep, with, against, xiv xvil 138, &c.; (meet) with, n

(vm

6),

Wyt

Withtakand,
ing, iv b 9.

taka.}

pres. p. reprehend[OE. wip~ + ON. See Take(n).

510, VIII b 6, XV g 7 ; (together) with, among, I 54, 133 (see Wo), ii 84, iv a 4 (see Beste), 5, xv^so, &c.; <$?/;/* with, does not associate with, iv b 2 ; at, xn a 142 ; zwiVA vill a 239; J>at, thereupon, with (instr.*) II 106, IV b 62, xv,f
of),
; by (means, reason 404, vii 142, xvi 160, 297, &c. ; by (agent}, v 348,351, With al, 358, vii 53, &c.

Witnesse, v. to testify, vin b 91. [From Wittenesse.] Wit-sunday, n. Whitsunday (with pun on Wit], XI a 12. [OE. se hwtta sunnan-dxgJ]
Witt(e), &c.
.

See Wit, Wite(n).

Wittenesse, witness, testimony, xvi 279 see Drawe. [OE. ge;

8,

29, &c.

i.uit(f}nes.~\

n

Wyues, Wiues.
Wlaffyng,

See Wif.

n. stammering, indis-

tinct utterance, XIII b 14.

OE.

entirely,
alle)
',

vin a 76 (OE. mid
this,

meanwhile, x 114; wyth lytiel, with little result, vi 215 ; -what with . and with, what with and, xvil 214. Bowes to schote with arwes (to shoot arrows with) is normal ME. order, ix 258; cf. vin a 259, 290, &c.
. . . . .
.

with all

Wlytep, pres. pi. pipe, warble, xv b ii. [Imit. of sound, or cf. OE. corrupt for ? ivryttej)
;

writian, warble,
linge, n.]

ME.

write-

.

.

Wo,
&c.,

.

woe,

I 168, n 5, xv b 8, xvil 40, &c.; Woo(e), xvi 18, 300,

grief, pain,

sorrow,

GLOSSARY
&c.; Wa(a), IV a 23, xvi 406, &c. ; wo was wyth (hym\ (he) grieved, I 132; me is wo,
is

Won.
xiv a

Won(e),

See Wan(ne), Wynne(n). v. to dwell, abide, V 30,

was

woe

me, unhappy

am

vi 44,

xn a
33,

191,
;

xin
;

b 5,

7,

I,

II

33 *> 542 ; (with nom. pron.} or ye be wo, ere you are in trouble, xiv d 1 1 (see Ware, adj.} with (mocker) wo, (very) painfully, vn 169, xn a 105; wept aiut wo, II 195, 234; for wele ne iva(a), on no account, IV a 2, b 74; worpe hit wele o]>er wo, whatever happens, v 66 (see
;

Wonne, xvi Wonyd, 'Si pp. dwelt, V 46 Wont, accusvin a 160, xn a 179. tomed,
&c.
235, 379, &c.
;

(ge)-wunian, dwell, be See Ywon(ed) ; accustomed.]

[OE.

Wones,

Wonder, -ur Wounder (xv b) Wunder, -yr; (i) n. wonder,
;

n. pi.

;

WorJ>e,

z/.).

[OE.

wd.~\
I

Wod(e), 3 37> v
;

n. wood(land),
'6, 84, &c.
;

62,

II

trees,

xv

b

14; wood, fuel, XII b 113, 123, &c. to wode, into the woods,

xn

Wode, Woode
xv g

b 5.

[OE. wudu.~]

furious, 11394,

v 231, xn a

(xvi), adj.

mad,
138,

iv a 85, xili b 42, xvn 265, &c. ; miraculous deed, 1 102 ; mans wonder, amazement of mankind, monster, xvii 408 ; spake of hem wunder, spoke wonderingly of them, I Wondres, //. marvels, 225 xin a 6 ; (ii) adj. (orig. loose

amazement,

(a) marvel,

;

17, xvi 344, xvn 426. [OE. wod.] See Awede.
I

compound), marvellous, xin a 3 1, xvi 1 496; (iii) adv. (cf. OE.
132, xin a 10, xv* 33, &c. [OE. wundor, w&ndor^\ See Wundred. Wonderfol, Wondirful(l), adj. wonderful, ix 144, 266, Xllla
7.

Wodehed,
ness,

madness, reckless31. [OE. wod + *-hdu.~]
n.
.

wundrum}, 104, 356, v

marvellously,

II

Wodenes,
wad-nes.']

fury,
.

vn

138.

[OE.
9.

Woderoue,
[OE.

woodruff,

xv b

wuihi-rofe.']
;

[OE. wundor-ful.]
adv.
54,

Wodewe, n. widow, in 23 Wydwes, //. vina 13; Wedows, xvn 389. [OE. wudnwe,
wid(e)we~\

Wonderli, Wonderlych,
marvellously, Xlla
14.

Xllla

wundor-Iice.~] Wondringe, n. wonder,

[OE.

Xili
wende,

Wogh,
[OE.

n. evil, misery,
woh.-} w. week,

xvn
28.

533.

213.

[OE. wundrungJ]
I
1

Woke,

xma

Woned,
[OE.
went
;

89

:

?

read

see note.

wucu.~\

See Wyke.

Wol(e),

Wold',e),

Woll(e).

Wonon. See Wynne(n). Wones, Wone5, n.pl. halls,
365
;

II

Welcom. Wolle, n. wool, vin a 13, ix 238, 239. [OE. wull(t}.~\
Wolt(e).

Welcome.

See Wille, v. See

142,

Wolues, Wolues-kynnes, kind, wolvish. vin a
.

See Wille, v. //. wolves,
of

n

539

;

wolfs

wulf;
cynnes.']

wulfes See Kyn.
.

154. [OE. (gen. sg.) +

(with sg. sense) dwelling, 332. [?ON. -van, ex' pectation, occas. used as place where one may be expected to be' (cf. Norweg. von, expectation, haunts of game) ; but the word was infl. by assoc. with Wone, dwell (g.v.), with which

v 130,

it

was often joined

in allit.

ME.

Wombe,
b 54
30.
;

belly, distrib. sg.

vinas 168, {see Herte)

rimes all require See Wane, v.

wgn

or wan.']

Wonges,
Won(e).

n.pl. cheeks,
ivong.~]

XVC32.

vin a

209, 253

;

womb, XI b
See

[OE. wdng,

[OE. wdmb, womb.']
&c.

Wonne(n).

See

Wynne(n),

Wom(m)an,

Wyfman.

GLOSSARY
Wonte,
(dat.)
-v.

to be lacking

;

yow

wonted, you lacked, v 298 ; jef me shal wonte, if I do not have, xv b 34. [ON. vanta.~\ Woo(e) ; Woode Woot. See
;

75, xni a 59, xvi 320, &c. ; Wers(e), xvi 200 neuer him nas wers, never had he been more unhappy, II 98 "Wars,
; ;

Wode, adj. Wite(n), vl Worchinge, -yng, n, working, wondur w., operation, IX 56
;

Wo

;

adv. in the wars, so much the worse that, xvn 191 (see J>e,
adv.}.

Werst,
II

attj.

super!.

;

worst, meanest,

367

;

miraculous property, XIII a 32. [OE. wyrcuHg.-] See Werche. "Worchip. See Worschipe.

V 3. [OE. wyrsa, wyrsta',

"Worst, with

Word(e), Woord, "Wurde
.

word, I 1 08, n 139, 222, v 305, xi a 10, xvn 380, &c.; plighted word, II 468 ; fame, in fie word of him walkes fitl
wide, his fame is spread abroad, Xiv b 29 worchip and wordes, VII 174. obsequious words,
;

(i),

er- forms cf. Werche, Scherte.] See Werre. "Worst. See Wor]>e, v.

Wortes,

.

vegetables,

vni a 303.
;

[OE. wyrt.-] WorjMJ, "Wrjje,

adj. worth, vi 91

worthy, in pou were wrj>e, you would be worthy, you deserve, xv^ 8 (cf. WorJ>y). [OE.

[OE. "Wore,

word."] n. 1 troubled pool, xv c 30 (note). [OE. -war (in doubtful gloss), turbid, muddy water (see

"Worpe,

weorpe, wyrj>e.~\ v. to come to pass, be-

Napier,
(note)
ivori,
;

O.E.
but
cf.

Glosses,

p.

49

OE. wdrig, ME.
;

muddy).]

come, be, and auxil. of passive (esp. with fut. sense) ; "Worst, 2 sg.pres. wilt be, II 170, 174; "Worth, 3 sg. will be, VIII a 48 will come to pass, \liia 156; "Worjje, "Worth, "Worth, subj.
;

"Wore
See
.

;

Was

World(e),
I

"Workis "Workeman. Werche Werkman. ; world, earth, men,
; .

225,

n

pres. be, let there be, v 306, vi 2; worle hit wele oper wo, come weal or woe, v 66 (see Wo) ;
it go well with thee, v 59 wele wurthpe while, good luck to the time, happy the occasion, xiv<r 5,
;

Warld, n warId so

41,

ix 72,

&c.

;

403, xvn 70, 303 ; xvn 541 ; wide, "World, xiv o 16 ; in world, of the w., on earth, xv c 25, ix 183; werlttes, worldes, (gen.) of the world, worldly, in worldes reckes, IV 6 61 ; worldes wele,
see \Vele,
.

wel worth pe, may

[OE. w(e]orold.]
2, 55,

"Worldly, adj. worldly, secular,
temporal,

Wel). "Warth,/a. t. sg. warth, accrued to him, 102; "Worked, subj. would fare, v 28; "Worjwn, //. in is w. to, has turned to, is become (one of), vi 34. [OE.
(see

&c.
in

vm

hym

\ib

96, 140,

&c.

Worm,

snake, worm, n 252, iv b 27, xn b 195, xv b 31. [OE. wyrm.-}
.

[OE.

worold-lic.~\

"Worschipe, \Vorschyp,
our, vi 34,
;

.

hon-

Worjjy, "Worthi, adj. merited, just, xvi 324 worthy, deserving (constr. to and injin.}, \\ b 10, ix 172, xvi 132 ; w. to reherse, worth repeating, XI a 4
;

;

119, ix 109, 333; "Worchip, vn 174 "Worshep, viii b 79; Wurschyp, I 91. [OE. w(e}orj>-, wurp-scipe^\ Worsohip(e), v. to honour, worship, viii a 95, XI b 168 ; Wurschy ppe p, imp pi. \ 84. [From
.

were w. (be), deserve (to be), xvi 357, xvn 200 (were is subj. cf. WorJ>e, adj.}; worthy (of
;

honour), worshipful, VI 134, ix 269, XI a 25, xn a 165, xvn 19 ; worthiest (of}, most worshipful (in), xvn 489. "Worthier, compar.adv. more honourably, 48; "Worpili, adv. honour-

prec.]

vma

Wors(e),

adj. conipar. worse, xi

l>

GLOSSARY
ably, xi vc 67.

[OE.

wy>-J>ig,

Wost, Wot(t)e.

See Vnworthi. See VVite(n), &. 1 1 Woth, Wope. See WaJ>e, n. Wou, adv. how (is it that), why,
merited.]

"Wreth.

Wouen. Wounde,

xv<f 25. [OE. //, 1 infl. by //o% &c.] See Hou. A<f Weue(n). //. wounds, n 393; "Woundis, x 51. [OE. wuitd.]
.

4, 5, xvi 199. [OE. See Awreke. expel, punish.] n. anger, iva 75. [OE. See Wra)>}>e. r&po, wr&ppo^ Wrethe. v. to anger, offend, iv b [Cf. OE. ge-wr&pan, refl., 85. to be enraged.] See Wrath.
I 176; carpenter, Wry?t, Write, xvi 230. [OE. wyrhta,
.

"Wounder.

See Wonder. //. wounded,
63.

Woundit,

x

141,

154; Voundit, x
iv&ndianJ]

[OE.
woo, [OE.

Wrightry, carpentry, xvn 250. [Free. + OFr. .(e}rie.'] Wryng(e), v. to wring; wring (the hands), iva 65, xvn 211 ;
.

wryhta^\

Wowes, Wowep,
make
love,
.

pres. pi.

xv

19, 31.

ivogian.~\

Wowyng,
suit,

love-making, love-

v

293, 299,

xv c

29.

[From
138.

"Wronge, pa. t. sg. wrung, twisted and pinched, vine 168. [OE. wringan.'] Writ(e), Writt(e), Wryt, writing, in 36 (dot. sg.} Scrip.

;

ture,

I

12,

iv 6 76,

xi a 10,

Wrake, rake,
[OE.

. injury, ioracu.~\

xvil

Wrang(e)
wrdng,

adj. and adv. wrong, unjustly), vi 128, xvi 264, 265, 305, xvn 1 88. [Late OE.
,

b 23, &c. [OE. writ.'] "Write, "Wryte, v. to write, vin a 72, ix 122 ; "Wrote, 79,

from
v.
?

ON. *wrang-,

Olcel. rang-r.~]

"Wrappe,

to wrap,
cf.

xv/

10.

pa. t. sg. I 247 ; //. vn 58 ; "Writen, pa. t. pi. xi a 23 ; "Write(n), "Wryte(n),//. i 37, 40, iva 2, vn 31, ix 318 (see Putte), xn a i, &c. ; Ywryte,

[Obscure; wrap.]
matches,

ME.
.

(w}lappen,

Twrite,

n

i,

13,

in

inlrod.,
23,

Wrastlynges,
1 1.

wrestling[OE. wr&stlung.~\
//.

vn . 33; "Writyng(e), xi b 305. [OE. wrUan.~] "Write. See Wryjt.
Wrype(n),

"Wrath,

v.

hym

(refl.),

to anger; to ?fra//* to become enraged,

"Wrip, 3 sg. pres. covers, II 244. TOE. -cvreon, 3 sg. wrtj>.~]
v. to twist; bind, vi 151 ; turn aside (from the just course) vi 128. [OE. wrtfan.} Wro, . nook, corner, v 154. [ON. *wrd, Olcel. rd.-\

Villa

Wrathed, //. 146; wronged, brought to grief, v 353. [From next.] See Wrethe.
anger, xi^ Wra]))>e, Wrath)>e, 94; offence, vi 2. [OE.wr&J>fo, See WroJ>, anger, injury.]
.

Wrostfe)

;

"Wroken

;

"Wronge.

Wreth.

.S^rWerche; Wreke; Wryng(e..
adj. afflicted, trou-

Wrechched,
bled,
.

Wrote,
II

v.

to root in the earth,

IX 317;
iv

misery,
n.

Wrechidnes, 29. [From
11

255.

[OE. wrotan.']

Wro])(e),
variance,

Wroth,
II

next.]

Wreche,

unhappy one,
;

*333

xvn
(OE.

adj. angry, at 122, vi 19, xv/ 7,
;

36,

(MS. wroche), 544 Wretche, xiv c 21, 23. [OE. ivrecca.~\ Wreke, n. vengeance, xvi 191. [OE. uora.cu or wrsec, infl. by
next.]

wroth,

make hym become angry,
&c.
fiercely,

(refl.)
I

10.

v>r&}.~\

See WraJ>>e.

Wropely, adj. Wropeloker,
severely,
l\ce, -htcor.~]

v

221

;

compar.

more
iurdj>-

v 276.

[OE.

"Wreke, //. revenged, xv,f

n;

Wroken,

removed, vi 15

V7"rokin, (banished), ; revenged, xiv

Wrou3te(n),
Werche.

Wrouhte.

See

GLOSSARY
WrJ)e. See Worjie, adj. Wruxled, //. in wr. in grene, 1 changed into, turned, green, V 123 but adorned' is usually assumed here and for ivntxeled, Purity 1381. [OE. wrixl(i)an,' ' sense adorned (ex)change. might be derived from an (un' ;

Ye(--Te). SeeEi~,e. Yeaf, Yeaue. See 3eue. Yei, adv. yes indeed, XVII 370, 458; oh yes (ironic), xvn 353. [? Reduction of a reiteration jeje,

A

nay;
See

or assimilated to ME. nei, see N.E.D. s.v. Yea.']
3a, 3e.

recorded)
wrigels],

earlier
'

'

wind round

(? rel.

turn, sense, to ivreon,

Yelp, [OE.
3eer.

n.

boast(ing),

XVII

321.

gelf.-\

from OE. ivrixlan (bleoni), change colours,
or
perh.
exhibit varied hues.]

Yendles; Yer(e).

See Endles;
all

Yfere, adv. in al yfere,
gether,
I

to-

Wulde. See \Yille, v. Wundred, pa. t. wondered,
[OE. iuundrian.\

114.

See Wonder.

223. [Orig. yfere(ti), ge-feran, pi., (as) comSee Fere, n? panions.]

n

OE.
;

Wuxme,

joy ; gen. sg. in wtmne wele (weole), wealth of joy, xv *u (MS. wynter), 35. [OE. wynn.~]
.

Yfet Yfou3te Yfounde Y3e Yjyrned. See Fecche Fight
; ;

; ;

;

Fynde(n) Else ; 3erne. Ygraced,//. thanked, villa 118.
;

Wurde; WurschypSee

;

Wurth.
;

Word(e)

;

Worschip(e)

Yhad Yhe(n).
;

[OFr.

gracier.~\

See Habbe(n)
;

;

Wor]>e, v.

Ei 3 e.
3,

Y-

;

see also

I.

ticiples in y- not entered see the verbs concerned.

For past parbelow

Yhere, v. to hear, n 420 Yherd, pa. t. ii 528; Yhyerde, in 49.
[OE. ge-heran.~\
See Here.

Yaf. See 3ene. Y-arched, pp. in y-arched ofgold, built of gold in the shape of an arch, II 362. [OFr. archer, v.]

Yhyjt, //. (adorned), arranged. XIII a i. [ME. hifiten, prob. from OE. hyht, pleasure (hyhtlic

pleasant).]

Yarn.

See Eorne.
II

Yrus. adv. yes, xvi 61 (MS.). [OE. gise.~\

Ybilt, //.
s.vv.

? lodged, seenole); j^Bilt.

483 (MS.

;

Yhonged
Leue,

;

Yiif. See

Hange

;

5ef.

[See

N.E.D.
See

Build,

Btiilt.~]

Ylefde, pa. t. believed, HI 36. See Eeleue; [OE. ge-lefan.'}

Ybore, -born; Ybounde.
Ber(e); Bynde. Yclongen. See Clinge.

v?
Ylent.
See Leue, v. 1
;
;

Yleft
24,

;

l.eude.

Yclosed, //. enclosed,
40.

xm a

Ylet, n. hindrance
otts ylet, if

jiffou makest

[ME. closen, from Clos, g.v.] (orig. pp. of Chese, q.v.}, as mere inchosen, excellent tensive rime-tag, n 105, 148. [OE. j2-<wra.] Ydel, Ydill(iv), Hydel (vin), adj. unemployed, idle, iv b i, vi 154, 155, viil b 27, &c. slothful, iv b 9, xi b .219. [OE.

you

offer

any

resis-

Yeore

;

tance to us, II 169. [Not recorded elsewhere; usual ME. form is Lette, q. v. Other MSS. read any let.~] Ylokked, //. locked up, IX 174.

[ME.
loc,

lok(t}ett,
;

from

lot,

OE.
See
2,

;

n.

cf.
;

ON.

loka, v.J

Loke, pp.

idel.~]

Ylond,
44.
;

n. island, XIII

Vnlokynne. a 20, b
See Lese,

Ydelnesse, Ydyllnes (iv), ;/. lack of (useful) employment,
idleness, iv b 7, XI b 64, 127,

Ylore Ymad. Maken.

[OE.

Tg-ldnd.-]
v. 1
;

197.

[OE.

tdel-nes.']

Ymayraed,
35.

Ydronke.

See Drynke(n).

[OFr.

//. m(ali)ainier,

maimed, vin

b

&c.

GLOSSARY
cf.

mafiaim,

mayhem,

&c.,

INDEX OF NAMES.
For the personifications in vni, generic names (as Bayardf), and names of peoples (as Brytotms), see also the Glossary.
Abell, Abel,

xvi 306.

Abirdene, Aberdeen, XIV a I. Abiron, Abiram, XVI 309. Adam(e\ Adam, V 348, xiv introd., xvi 37, 45, &c., xvn 30.

Austyn, St. Augustine of Hippo, XI b 87, 94, 142 Saynt Anstyne, iv b 70. Austin ; Sauynt Austin, St. Augustine of Canterbury, III
;

Adrian, \llb 2 (note), 34, 56, 68, Adrianes, gen. 219. 78, 208 Ajone, Azo, I 46, 105, no, 122.
;

introd.

;

Saynt Austines,
(monastery),

Augustine's
introd.

St in

Aiax\ Oelius Aiax, Oileus Ajax,

vn

155 (see 178 note).

Bacharie,

-ye,

Bactria,

IX

137,

Alceone, Halcyone, xiia 3, 132; Akeoun, Xiiai95, 197 (note). Alisandre, King Alexander the Great, IX 166, 223, 232. Alysoun, Alison, xv^r 12, 40. Amazoine, Amazonia, land of the Amazons, ix 190, 206. Ambrose, St. Ambrose, XI b 126. Anaball, a dependent of Satan,

236. Banocbttrn,
2.

Bannockbnrn, XIV a

heading; }e Bannokburn,

xiva

Baptist, St. John the Baptist, XI b 28 ; Ion Baptist, XI b 24, 34 ;

xvi 113 (note). Antecrist, Antichrist, IX 210, 221 Anticristis, gen. XI b 55.

Iohan(nes) Baptista, xvi 73 ; Baptista, xvi 361. Bardits, XII b 20, 50, 63, 73, 80, 87,94. 134. 155, 194; s ee xii b
2

;

note.

Arabye, Arabia, ix 38 ; Fenyx of Arraby, VI 70 (note). Archedefdl, (corrupt, of) Ahithophel (Achitophel), xvi 308. 18; ArysArestofitt, Aristotle, iv totill, iv b 33.
466. Armonye, Armenia, Arjiur, King Arthur, V 229; Ar-

Barsabe, Bathsheba, v 351. Bathe, Bath, xin<z 51.
Bele-Berit, Baal-Berith, XVI 115.
Belliall, Belial,

xvi 139; Belial

xvi 115.
Bclsabttb, Beelzebub,

xvn

xvi 97, 109, 137. 169, 198, 205, 345.

kynge) burcj, gen. V 34, 261 hous Arthor, V 207 (note).
;

Astrotte, Ashtoreth (Astarte),

xvi

Benvik, Berwick, xiva i, 35. Betannye, Bethania, XVI 162. Betkleem, Bethlehem, ix 25. Beuo, (in Latin) I 59 Beu(u)ne, I 55 (note) ; Beuolyne, diminu;

Atthenes, Athens, vn 67. 3 (MS. Auarre, Auxerre, Aucerne). I Aue, 48, 50, 106, 126, 138, 209, 216.

H3-

tive fdr rime,

I

62.

*m

Boece, Boethius, Introduction xxi. Boniface, Saint, St. Boniface of
Ferentia, III 38 (note). Brytayn, Little Britain, Brittany, II 13; Bretaitte, n 597.

INDEX OF NAMES
Brylayn, (Great) Britain, xni a
Brig, Bruges, xiv a
i,

Cornehulle,
(note).

Cornhill,

vmi

i

22 (note); see
(in

Burghes. firunne wake, Bourn
Lines.),
I

introd.

Wake

Kesteven, is the

Cornelius, Cornelius Nepos, vil 70 (note). ' Master of Cornwal, lohan, a

Grammar',

xm

28.

name

of

whose Brunyng, Bruno, afterwards

family, part of estates lay about Bourn.

the

St.

Leo IX,
Btikcestre,

I

246 (note).

Seynt, sister of St. Magnus, I 35 (note). Burghes, Bruges, xiva 25; see

Crab, lohne, a Flemish engineer, X no; Crabbis, gen. *x 15 (Mss. Craggis, Crabys). Crist(e\ Christ, \\ a i, 39, &c.; Cryst(e\ \ 185, iv a 16, &c. ; Kryst(e), v 5*2, vr 98, 209;

Brig.

XI b

Cayme, Cain, xvi 306.
Calabre, Calabria ; see glossary. Calais, XIV b heading, 59, 91, 95 ; Calays, XIV b I (as adj.), 42, 53.
Caldilhe, ! Korea, the land where the lamb-gourd grows, IX 138.

b 63 Cristis, Cristes, gen. 7, 38, &c. Crystes, VI 23, villa 214; Crystys, I 83; bi Crist, &c., villa 22, 24, 280,
; ;

vm

<>93Cnsis, alleged name of Ethiopia, ix 17 ; see Saba, and cf. Cush,

Genesis

x.

6-8.

Cam(e\ Ham, XVII

142, 528. Canlerberi, Canterbury, in introd.

Caspye, Caspia, lands about the Caspian Sea, ix 161, 216; See of Caspye, Caspian Sea, IX 175,
178.

Dalyda, Delilah, v 350. Dares, Dares Phrygins, reputed author of the De Excidio Troiae,

vn

60, 64.

Cassandra, VI I 179. Cathaye, Cathay, China, ix 136
(note).

Datan, Dathan, xvi 309 (note). Dauid, David, xvi 127, 187, 369, 373 ; Dauyth, v 350.

Dawe,

Daw

Calon, Dionysius Cato, traditional name of the author of Disticha de moribus ad filium ; gen. Caa 309. tones, Cedle, Seynt, St. Cecilia, Introduc-

a 325. name), Dedalion, Dsedalion, xn a 7. Dee, ]>e ryuer, the R. Dee, xni a
54. 62. Dites, Dictys Cretensis, reputed author of the De Bella Troiano, vn 61 ; Dytes, vn 60.

vm

(as typical peasant's

vm

tion xxi.

Ceyx, xn a 2. Ckaucer, XII introd. Cherdkol, ? Cheddar,
Cei'x,

Donde, Dundee, xiv a

24.

xnia
54.

14

(note).

Edyght, Seynt, St. Edith of Wilton, i 240 (note), 245.

Chestre, Chester,

xni a

Edward, King Edward
fessor,
i

the
III,

Con-

Chymerie, Cimmeria, land of fabulous Cimmerii who dwelt in perpetual darkness (form perhaps due to assoc. with OFr. chimere, chimaera), xn a 61. Cipre, lie of, Cyprus, ix 40.
Clyron, alleged name of 'strait passage' leading out of land of the enclosed Jews, IX 205. Colbek, Anhalt, Kolbigk (in Saxony), I 32 (note).
Colchestre, Colchester,

27.
;

Edward, King Edward
;

XIV b heading, 36, 56 King Edward, xivfl 4 E.ftfntUt, xivc 58 Sir Edward, xiv a 9, 16, 04, Edwardes 44, 60, 62 J>e third
; ;

tyme,

I

introd.

Edward, Prince, the Black Prince, XIV c 107 see also 59, 62. Emanuel, xv i 17.
;

Emlak

(for

*Euilak~),

Havilah

XIV d

2.

IX 27 (note).

INDEX OF NAMES
England, England, xi a 29, 33 55, 58, b 20, Engelond, Ingland, 33, 46, 48, 54, 63 I 26, XIV b 84; Inglond, n 26.
;

xma

;

Hector, *v 34 (MS. Hestor). Ilely, Elias, xvi 87. Henri, Duk, Henry, first Duke of
Lancaster, xiv c 65. Henry, J>e Emperoure, Henry II of Germany, I 172 (note), 218.

Erceldoun,

Thomas

of Ercelcloun,

Introduction xxxiii.

.,

Ethiope, Ethiopia, IX j, 12, 16, 21, 23 (note), 26. Eve, xvi 45; Eue, xiv inlrod., xvi 357, xvil 30.
Zfl<f, Dom Philip de Burton, prior of Sempringham (? 1 303- 1 33 2), I inlrod. Frounce, France, xni*48, xivr 44, 46, 54 ; Fraunse, xi a 25 ; France, XIV b 32, 70.

Herodis,

Dame, Eurydice, II 52 ; Dam(e) Heurodis, II 63, 322,
xiv d
38.
6,

406, 594.

Hobbe,

see

notes

and

glossary.

Homer, vn

/v^,

lacke, lak, see glossary.

Cawayn, v

lame, Seynt, St. James ; bi Seynt lame, VIII a 57. laphet, Japheth, XVII 142, 528. lerom, Seynt, St. Jerome, xia 17. leromye, Jeremiah, XI b 29. lem, iv a 74, &c., vi 93, xiv b 30,

5, 58, 81, 88, 137, 146, 171, l82, 192, 197, 2O2, 212, 224, 231, 297; Sir Gawayn(e), v 50, 167, 328; Wowayn, v 121 (note). Genesis, (personification of) the Book of Genesis, villa 228.

xv/i,

7,

xvi 349

;

lesns,

x.vg

lent 19, xvi i, 121, &c. ; Crist(e\ &c., Jv 30, vi 98, XI a 23, &c. ; lesns Crist, XI b

Geretrude,

Sent,

St.

Gertrude,
;

xv *

7 (note).
I

Gerlew, Gerlevus,
Grysly.

40, 56

see

Ingland, &c., see England. Innocent, Pope, Innocent III, author of De Miseria Conditionis Humanae, Introduction
xxi.

Germain, Saint,
Auxerre, in 3

Germanus of (note); Germayn,
St.

XVI 285. Iohn(e), Ion, &c., see the accomlob, Job,

in

6.

Gydo, Guido de Columna, compiler of the Historia Troiana,

vn

panying names. lohn: Sir lohn (oj France), son of Philip VI and afterwards King John of France, XIV b 32,
70, 92.

54, 76.

Gill, see glossary.

Goth andMagoth, Gog and Magog, ix 163-4 (note).
Gregori, Saint,

lohnes:
Perth,

Saint

lohnes

toune,

xiv a

7 (note).

Great
(note)
;

St Gregory the (Pope 590-604), ill 38 Gregory, xi b 20 (note),

lohon Schep,

John Pastor ', pseudonym of John Ball, xiv d i. Ion, St. John the Evangelist, vi
23,

94

;

Seynt Gregoryes, gen. xi b

xv i 5;

tones Gospel, xi
St.

5 2Grese, Greece,

269.

vn

90

;

Grice,

vn
92.

Ion

Amoner, moner, in 16
f>e

John the Al-

(note).

40.

Gryngolet, Gawayn's horse, Grysly, error for Gerlew t
(note).

V
I

lordanne, flume, the R. Jordan,

xvi

76.

65

Irla(ii)nde, Ireland, xv</ i, 3, 7. Ithecus, Icelos (according to Ovid),

XII a 118 (note).
jerk,

York, XI a XIV d i.

34,

XIII b

58,

Indas, Judas Iscariot,
8, 12, 14, 27,

XV g

2,

3,

xvi 147, 165, 308.

INDEX OF NAMES
futtas, St. Jude,

Judas brother of James, in introd. luno, the goddess Juno, xn a 40, 44, 102 King luno, as ancestor of Orpheo's mother, n 30 (note).
;

Gospel), vi 137 (note),
;

xvr

5

;

Matheus Gospel, XI a 3 5 Mathew with mannes face, a 234

vm

(note).

lurselem, Jerusalem, xv f 3, 17. htslinian, Justinian, xn 191
c

(note).
A'asi, Sent,

Maundevyll, lohn, ix 307 (see IX introd:). Medf, Media, land of the Medes, ix 30.

Kendale,

xv i 1 1 Thomas

(note).

Melane t Milan, in 4. Mtrswynde, I 42, 52
i

; ;

Merswyne,
MersrvynI

of

Kendal,

62 (see

I

55 note)

Introduction xxxiii.

dam
Michel,

(accus., in Latin),

60.

Kent, in introd.
Kesteuene,
Kytte,

Kesteven,

southern

division of Lines., I introd, via b 2 (note).

Michael; Dan Michelh (gen.) of Northgate, in introd. Mighill, St. Michael the Archangel,

xvi 339, 389.

Forms

Lazarus, XVI 162, 171. Leoun, le pope, St. Leo ix, I 249. Lethes, the rivere, the River Lethe
(Oblivion), Xlla 85. Properly gen. sg. (Ovid, Metamorphoses, Bk. xi 603, rivus aquae Lethes).

Lajar,

with j, gh, &c., appear only to be used of the archangel.

Mynerua, the goddess Minerva

(or
;

Athene), *vn 1 77 (MS. Mynera) taken as a male divinity, XI 1 1 a

Londen(e),

London,

Lucifer, xvn 16 ; as dependent of Satan, xvi 119, 197.

vm b 4.

London,

vm3

46;

Moyses, Moses, xvi 85, 86. Moretane, Mauretania (modern Morocco and part of Algeria), ix 3. Morpheus, son of the God of
Sleep,

Luke, St. Luke, Lukes, Lucca,

vm a 94 (note).

xv i

5.

xn a

113, 131.

Macedoyne, Macedonia, ix 41. Magdaleyne, St. Mary Magdalen, XI b 56; Magdeleyne, xi 59, 68 ; Maudeleyne, Introduction
xxi.

Neptalym, Naphtali, xvi 51 (see 49 note). NichollNedy, 'Nicholas Needy', allit. nickname used mockingly,

xvn

405.

Magne, Seynt,
(note),

90

;

Magnus, I 34 Seynt Magnes, gen.

St.

Noe, Noah, xvn 65, 106, 118, &c.; Hoy, xvil 532.
Oelitts, see

no,

*37Magoth, see Goth. Mahounde, Mahomet; as a dependent of Satan, xvi 343. Malton, Malton, Yorks., site of a house of the Gilbertine order,
I

Aiax.

Origenes, Origen, to whom was falsely attributed a De Maria Magdalena, Introduction xxi.

Orphewe,

introd.

Marie, Mary, xvi 231, 250; Mary(e), VI 65, XV* 3; gen. VI 23 (note), also in Seynte

Sir, Orpheus, II 24; (Sir) Orfeo, II 25, 97, 120, 182, SM. 379. 5i8, 524. 543, 55S, 603 ; as name of a lay, 601
;

Marie prest, xiv d I (note) Mary-jet, X 163, 177. Mary (as oath), v 72, xvn 209, 220,
;

593 Orpheo, n 33, 42. Ouyde, Ovid, vil 48.
;

King

Orfeo,

n

175, 553, 576,

226.

Mark, St. Mark, xv i 5. Mathew, St. Matthew

Panthasas, Phantasos (according to Ovid), xn a \ 23. Pectoun, the Peak of Derbyshire,
XIII a 7 (note).

(in

his

INDEX OF NAMES
b 29, 30. Pencrych, Richard, Pentexoire, Yle of, IX 26 1 (note). Peres, Piers (Peter), villa 106,
180, 191, &c.; Pieres, villa 35, 38, in, &c. ; Piers, villa 9, 225; Pieres, gen. villa 72; a 147, Pieres ]>e plowman, 152 ; /fefw ploujman, as type

xm

Salomon, Solomon, V 349, xvi 281 ; Salomon, xi 91 (note). Salesbury, Salisbury, xni a 10 ; Salisbury. XI 6 3, 183; Salisbury vss(e), xi b 189, 196, 228,
308.

vm

Samson, V 349. Satan, xvi 117, 199

ol honest labourer,

xiv d

5 (see

14 note). Perkyn, diminutive of prec. (applied to same character), VIII a I0 5J /%r*y* 25, 59. 99, I 2 pe plouman, VIII a 3. IX 181. /Vrj*f, Persia,
Peter, St. Peter, XI b 285, xv^ 29, 33 ; bi Seynt Peter of Rome,

; Sattan, XVI 1*5, !33. J45, &c. ; Sir Sattanne, XVI 169 ; Sathanas, gen. xi 6 311. Saturne, Saturn, villa 321 (note). Sem, Shem, xvil 142, 528; see

320 note. Symeon, Simeon, XVI 60, 61.

Symon,
introd.

St.

Simon
sone,

(Zelotes),

in

villa 3

;

/fefc* /,

xvil 367.

Philip, Sir, Philip (de Valois) VI of France, xi v b 32 (note), 47, 69, 93 ; Philip ]>e Valas, XIV b

Symondes Magus,
VIII b 83.

son

practiser

of Simon of simony,

Sympryngham(e),
Lines.,
I

Sempringham,

5
Pilatus, Pilate,

introd.

XV

Pimbilmere, Lake

18, 30. Bala in Wales,

Sythye, Scythia, IX 166.
Sutille, Sizhill, Lines., I introd. Stafford, xvil 200 (note) ; see glossary, s.v. Slew. Steward, Sc/tir Valter the gude,

xni a
Pluto,

63.

King,

as

ancestor

of

Orpheo's father, II 29 (note). Paul, St. Paul, XI b 80, 82 ; Saynt bi Seynt Pottle, Poule, vi 97
;

X 36

Walter the Steward of Scotland, Schir Valter (note);

25, 270. Prestre I.ohn, Prester John, fabled Christian Emperor of the far

Vina

Steward,

x

1

70.
9.

Stonhenge, Stonehenge, XIII a
Strifiin, Stirling,

XIV a

13.

East, IX 260 (note).

Richard, le secunde Kyng, King Richard II, XHiiJ 32; Kyng Richarde, xiv<! 2. Roberd, Robert, surnamed Mannyng, of Brunne, I introd. (q.v.). Robert ; Dan) Robert of Malton,
I

Telamon, Telamon (properly Telamonius Ajax), VII 178 (note) Kyng Telamon, vii 150.
;

241. Tolous, Toulouse (for rime's sake substituted for Toul), I 246
(note).

Teodryght, Theodric,

I

introd.
i

Robert, priest of Colbek, Syre Robert, I 201.

45;

Traciens
identified

(Thracians),

Thrace

;

with Winchester,

n

Robert Renne-about, 'Robert the Vagabond ', as type of itinerant a 142 (note). preacher, Rome, I 172, 232, 250, in 4, villa 3, ix 285, xn b 3, 84, 189.

vm

47' foTrocinie, 'Trachinia tellus', the land about the city of Trachis, XII a 2. Troy, VII 27, 63.

Sab a, a city of Ethiopia, IX 23 cf. Cuds, and Psalm Ixxii. 10
Isaiah Ix. 6.

;
;

Valas, Valois; see Philip. Valter, see Steward.

INDEX OF NAMES
Vber, alleged local name of the mountains of Caspia, IX 162.
Vient, Sir lohn de, Jean de Vienne,
I

Winchester,

II

49, 478;

Wyn-

chestre. XIII
|

a 41.

Wowayn,

see

Gawayn.

XIV* 82 (note). Virgille, Vergil, VII 49.

Ynde, India, vaguely applied to
central,

Wake, see Brunne. Wales, XIII a 58, b

^.

Wat Wynk,

allit. nickname used mockingly, xvil 382. Wat is nn abbreviation of Walter.

southern, and eastern Asia, IX 26, 27, 43, 49, 50, 97, 157 (note), 260 (note): high Ynde le Ynde, IX 27, 137; /esse, IX 29; (Ynde) le more, IX 28
Iris,

I'm,

messenger

of

Juno,
Isaiah,

Wybessyne, I 42, 52. a Williem, William; man's name, xi 177.

typical
(in

XII 46, 51,98. Ysaias, Isaiah, XVI 50 *xvi 49 (MS Isaac).

;

Wynbumey, Wimbome set), xia 050.

Dor-

Zabulon, Zebulun, XVI 52 (see 49
note).

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