MERCER

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Inside Today
Greater
Mercer
County
Community
Calendar
St. Henry Picnic
Celina Freedom
Days
June 25
Ohio Truck & Tractor Pull
Eldora Speedway
June 24,25,26
Maria Stein Country Fest.
Maria Stein
June 24,25,26
Water Race & Field Trial Ohio
Progressive
Sportsman Club
June 25
Red Cross Kart Racing
@ 6:00pm Maria Stein
Country Fest
June 26
Savannah Jack 8:00pm
Ft. Recovery
VanTrees Park
June 26
Annual Prehistoric
Artifacts Exhibit 1-4pm
Mercer County Historical
Museum
June 29
Mariners vs. Hamilton 7:00pm
Westview Park, Celina
July 1
Mariners vs. Lake Erie
7:00pm Westview Park,
Celina
July 1,2,3
Freedom Days Picnic
Lakeshore Park, Celina
July 1,2,3
St. Henry Picnic
St. Henry Town Square
July 3
Sharon Bertke 8:00pm
Ft. Recovery VanTrees Park
If you would like to have
your event posted in the
Greater Mercer County
Community Calendar,
e-mail your information,
at least 4 weeks prior to
event, to
mercercountychronicle@bright.net.
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with paid subscription
www.mercercountychronicle.com
Established 1884
THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 2011 75
¢
By: Martha Schoen

Whether you want to go
for a walk or ride your bike,
Mercer and Auglaize County
has much to offer. There are
many bike paths and nature
trails available for the public
to enjoy.
In Coldwater just off of
St. Anthony Road is the 47
acre Nature Preserve called
Baker Woods. Baker Woods
has a 1.25 mile foot trail
consisting of two loops. One
loop is named the Lela Mae
loop after Lela Mae Baker
who donated the property to
the Division of Natural Areas
and Preserves in 1992. The
second is named the Pawpaw
Loop. This loop gets it name
from the Pawpaw tree which
is native to Ohio. Many
settlers and Indians used this
fruit as part of their survival
in the swamp area of Ohio.
The fruit of the Pawpaw
tree is green and changes
to yellow at maturity. The
custard like fruit surrounds
large seeds and has a taste
and texture similar to a
banana. Pawpaws have often
been called the poor man’s
banana. Besides Pawpaws,
there are many large trees that
dominate the forest canopy.
Much of the woods is very
wet through out the growing
season so if you hike the trail
during the summer be sure to
use plenty of bug spray. The
trail is open year round and is
best to visit in the fall when it
is relatively dry and mosquito
free or in the spring when the
wildfowers are blooming.
Parking is available at the
entrance to the trail at 4316
St. Anthony Road.
Of course, the Celina-
Coldwater bike path is well
traveled by walkers and
riders. The 4.5 mile scenic,
partially shaded trail crosses
several country roads and
follows the railroad from
Coldwater to Celina. Access
can be gained at Vine and
Fourth Street in Coldwater
or at Schunck Road just off
127 in Celina. This is a great
way to enjoy rural Mercer
County.
Just outside of
Montezuma, at the corner
of 219 across from the old
Franklin School building,
begins the Franklin Township
6.5 mile bike trail. The trail
follows highway 219 with
several paths diverting off
of 219 and then returning as
well as nature stops along the
way. One section takes you
into the Montezuma Park and
past Our Lady of Guadalupe
Church. Another section, off
Karaft Road, travels to the
Franklin Nature Park where
you can stop and step onto a
wooden lookout tower to see
the wetlands and possibly
hear frogs or Canadian geese.
As you continue to follow the
path around you will come to
a covered bridge and proceed
into some wooded areas on
the scenic trail which ends
on 219 just past Club Island
Road. On Club Island Road,
just a short distance from 219,
is a Nature Sanctuary with a
one mile grass walking trail.
Last year a night hike was
held at the Nature Sanctuary
which is home to many
Pawpaw trees.
Another hiking trail,
Red Wing Black Bird Trail,
can be found at the Grand
Lake St. Marys State Park
Campground. If you want
to hike the one mile loop,
you can park in the visitor’s
parking lot at the campground
and walk over to the Nature
Center to begin your hike.
As you walk through the trail
there are trail markers with
tree identifcation guides. Be
on the look out for rabbits,
squirrels, and all different
kind of birds. Some have
even seen deer walking
through the wooded area.
Of course there is always
the Miami and Erie Canal
Towpath also known as the
Buckeye Trail. You can gain
access to the trail in St. Marys
at K.C. Geiger Park just off of
State Route 66 on Greenville
Road or north of High Street.
New Bremen has entrance to
the canal towpath off of State
Route 66 and Washington
Street and Minster has access
off Seventh Street. Besides
enjoying the beauty of the
canal and nature, most of
these paths are stone which
makes it nicer to walk and
even ride a bike or push a
stroller.
As you are planning your
summer outings remember
what this area has to offer.
Take an afternoon with
family or friends and go for
a bike ride or enjoy a country
stroll. If you have never
been on some of these trails,
try taking a new path this
Take a New Path this Summer
The Coldwater Academic Promoters (CAP)
organization was founded in 1987 to promote and
recognize the outstanding academic achievements of
the students of Coldwater Exempted Village Schools.
Annually the organization selects graduating seniors to
receive special recognition and scholarships to further
their education. Scholarship recipients are selected
by a combination of their ACT scores, grade point
averages, participation in extracurricular activities,
and their responses to three (3) essay questions
as judged by an independent panel of community
members.
The CAP Scholarship Committee is pleased to
announce the following 2011 scholarship recipients.
Students who will receive $1000 to attend a four-
year college or university are:
Emily Grieshop, daughter of Conrad and Tamra
Bettinger; Jessica Pax, daughter of Steve and Marlene
Pax; Sarah Wenning, daughter of Nate and Karen
Wenning; Rachel Wermert, daughter of Jim and
Nancy Wermert; Jayme Wright, daughter of Randy
and Rosalie Wright.
The student chosen to receive $500 to attend a
trade/technical school program is: Amanda Sudhoff,
daughter of Pat and Bernice Sudhoff.
Coldwater Academic
Promoters Announce 2011
Scholarship Winners
By: Betty Lou Denney/Hall

Former Fort Recovery grad-
uate, Bernard Schwieterman,
son of Ben and Hilda Sch-
weiterman, has spent the last
21 years as a much loved ffth
grade teacher in the Ketter-
ing School System in Dayton.
His concern for our youth led
him to team with a friend, Jill
Chabut, and form an ecumeni-
cal youth group called SIGNS.
This stands for Supporting In-
dividualism, Growing and Nur-
turing Spirituality. The group
originally started 11 years ago
at a church. Wanting to make it
more of an ecumenical group,
Chabut and Schwieterman de-
cided to team with the YMCA.
They were delighted to have the
group since it was right in line
with their own YMCA’s mis-
sion statement. The group has
been affliated with the YMCA
for the past six years.
SIGNS high school youth
group strives to plant and nur-
ture the seeds of morality, spiri-
tuality and community in the
young students that join the
club. Word of mouth is their
advertisement. Two previous
students are now a part of the
group as co-leaders. Jessica
Birt, who graduated from col-
lege with a degree in Biology,
says she was so shy when frst
joining SIGNS and she wanted
to help other young people
achieve their fullest potential.
Fellow co-leader, Nick So-
rensen, who was also a past
member of SIGNS, was so
impressed that he wanted to
give back part of what he had
received. Sorenson graduated
from a construction school and
owns a plumbing business in
Dayton.
The group meets weekly
throughout the school year with
monthly community outreach
programs, social and spiritual
outings. The group ends each
year with a summer trip to live
out their mission.
The group has traveled
throughout the country every
summer. Their travels include
the states of Texas, Mexico,
Tennessee, Colorado, and
Minnesota. This year’s trip
brought them to Mercer County
to help with the building of the
Kremer house being built on
Erastus Durbin Road. Schwi-
eterman heard about the project
by reading the Mercer County
Chronicle.
SIGNS had a full week in
and around Mercer County.
They toured the Fort, and vis-
ited with an Amish family for
the day. A ghost hunt was in the
venture as well as a Pow Wow.
The group spent two days help-
ing with the construction on the
Kremer’s house. The house is
scheduled to be completed by
fall.
Schwieterman’s father, Ben,
enjoys helping and has been
with the group on several of
their summer trips throughout
the country. He also takes part
in some of the athletic ventures
of the group, which included
Ben propelling down a cliff.
Bernard Schwieterman Co-Founder
of “Signs” Youth Group
Photo by Roy Hall
SIGNS youth group from Dayton helping with the building project of the Krem-
er house. Standing third from the right is: Jessica Birt - co-leader, Bernard Schwieter-
man - co-founder of SIGNS, Mrs. Kremer and daughter Eva, Jill Chabut - co-founder of
SIGNS, Nick Sorensen - co-leader, and Ben Schwieterman.
the mercer county chronicle
Page 2 • June 23, 2011
area obituaries
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Brad Chuck Bev
Lavern J. Bruggeman, 77,
Portland, indiana, died at 8:45 p.m.
June 17 at his residence.
he was born march 5, 1934, in
Burkettsville, to the late lawrence
and elizabeth (heitkamp)
Bruggeman.
he was married June 5, 1957,
in maria Stein, to Virginia
Bruggeman, and she survives in
Portland, indiana.
he is survived by six sons
and spouses, John and Donna
Bruggeman, Dan and Stephanie Bruggeman, and roland
and marie Bruggeman, all of Portland, indiana; Jim and
Bonnie Bruggeman, and tim and Samantha Bruggeman,
all of Fort recovery; Bill and emy Bruggeman,
celina; a daughter and spouse, Donna and mike noll,
coldwater; four sisters, evelyn Sutter, Fort recovery,
Bernice Bruggeman, coldwater, margie Buschur, celina,
and marlene calhoun, tucson, Arizona; two sisters
and spouses, Janet and ernie muhlenkamp, Portland,
indiana, and rosemary and Art Prenger, chickasaw; a
sister-in-law, catherine Bruggeman, coldwater; and 18
grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
he was preceded in death by a brother, leroy
Bruggeman, and two brothers-in-law, herb Sutter and
rich Buschur.
he was a self employed truck driver and served in the
Army during the Korean War. he was a member of mary
help of christians catholic church, Fort recovery.
Funeral services were held June 22, at mary help
of christians catholic church, Fort recovery, with
Fr. Thomas Dorn offciating. Burial followed in St.
marys cemetery, Fort recovery. military graveside
honors were conducted by the American legion, Fort
recovery. contributions can be made at State of the
heart hospice. condolences may be directed to www.
brockmanboeckmanfh.com.
Cletus John Gariety, 94, celina, died June 19, at celina
manor nursing home.
he was born September 10, 1916, in newport, ohio, to the late
Frank henry and Grace elizabeth (miller) Gariety.
he was married to helen Burton Gariety and she preceded him
in death in 1992.
he is survived by a son and spouse, Pat and Patti Gariety,
Celina; fve grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren.
he was preceded in death by a son, michael Gariety, a
daughter, Brenda yaney, and seven siblings, Agnes Gariety,
Francis J. Gariety, leonard J. Gariety, ruth catherine Gariety,
lloyd James Gariety, irene catherine Gariety, and mildred mary
Gariety Bernholt.
he was a truck driver for thermogas and worked 27 years as
an inspector in Quality control at huffy’s. he was a u.S. Army
Veteran of WWii, having served in north Africa, and a member of
celina V.F.W. Post #5713.
Funeral services were held June 22, at W.h. Dick and Sons-
hellwarth Funeral home, celina, with Pastor matt overman
offciating. Burial followed at Mercer Memory Gardens, Celina.
memorials may be directed to celina V.F.W. online condolences
may be sent to dickandsonshellwarthfh.com.
Jay M. Hinshaw, 71, Fort recovery, died at 11:22
a.m. June 15, at the ohio State university medical center,
columbus.
he was born January 27, 1940, in Portland, indiana, to
the late Dale and lucille (Whipple) hinshaw.
he was married August 6, 1967, in Fort recovery, to
rose Partin, and she preceded him in death August 2,
2008.
he is survived by two sons, Brian “Scott” hinshaw,
Dublin, and craig hinshaw, Fort recovery; a daughter
and spouse, Kathi and David Shauver, Fort recovery; a
brother, carl hinshaw, Portland, indiana; a brother and
spouse, Bill and Diana hinshaw, Portland, indiana; and
four grandchildren.
he was retired from teledyne Portland Forge, Portland,
indiana. he was a graduate of the former Portland high
School, Portland, indiana, and he served in the u.S. Army.
he was a member of the church of the nazarene, Fort
recovery.
A memorial service was held June 18 at the church of
the nazarene, Fort recovery, with rev. Dennis Kelley
offciating. Contributions may be made to the American
heart Association. online condolences may be directed to
www.brockmanboeckmanfh.com.
Richard J. Meiring, 92, Fort
recovery, died at 8:40 a.m. June 20, at
mercer health, coldwater.
he was born march 13, 1919, in
Sharpsburg, to the late Wesley and
Philomena (Guggenbiller) meiring.
he was married June 20,1946, in
celina, to mary helen mcconaha and
she survives. he died on the couple’s
65th wedding anniversary.
he is survived by two sons and
spouses, richard and Barbara meiring,
Starkville, mississippi, and robert and
Karen meiring, Fort recovery; a sister and spouse, Delores
and Don Kahlig, Sharpsburg; six grandchildren; four great-
grandchildren; two sisters-in-law, Jean meiring, Sharpsburg, and
Sue mcconaha, Decatur, indiana; and a brother-in-law, Jerry
mcconaha, Versailles.
he was preceded in death by two brothers, herb and tom
meiring; and a sister, merilda Dues.
he was a former Deputy Sheriff of mercer county and retired
as a sales manager for hull Brothers, Fort recovery. he served
in the 3rd Army under the command of General George Patton in
the Battle of the Bulge and received 5 battle stars and the Bronze
Star. he was president of the former Fort recovery Banking
company Board of Directors, Fort recovery, and vice president
of the Second national Bank Board of Directors, Greenville. he
served on the Fort recovery town council and was a member of
the Fort recovery American legion Post #345 and mary help of
christians catholic church, all of Fort recovery.
mass of christian Burial will be held at 10:30 a.m. June 23
at mary help of christians catholic church, Fort recovery,
with Fr. thomas Dorn and concelebrant Fr. Paul Wohlwend
offciating. Burial will follow in St. Marys Cemetery, Fort
recovery. Graveside military honors will be conducted by the
Fort recovery American legion. calling is 3 - 8 p.m. June 22 and
9 - 10 a.m. June 23 at Brockman-Boeckman Funeral home, Fort
recovery. contributions may be made to Special olympics. online
condolences may be directed to www.brockmanboeckmanfh.
com.
David Joseph Romer, 32, coldwater, died June 13,
at his residence.
he was born october 28, 1978, in coldwater, to
David romer, who survives in Fort recovery, and
melinda and Stephen Bubp, who survives in new Port
richey, Florida.
he is survived by a brother and spouse, Gregory
and lauren romer, coldwater; a sister and spouse,
Deborah and Jeremy lees, tampa, Florida; a step-
brother and spouse, Brennan and emily Bubp; a
step-sister, Ashley Bubp, new york, new york; a
grandmother, Jane moeder, melbourne, Florida; a step-
grandmother, Agnes Bubp, Berne, indiana; and four
nieces and nephews.
he was a member of holy trinity catholic church,
coldwater, and played softball Friday nights in
coldwater and for the St. Joe Store.
mass of christian Burial was held June 18, at holy
trinity catholic church, coldwater, with Fr. Barry
Stechschulte officiating. memorials may be directed
to coldwater memorial Park. condolences may be left
at hogenkampfh.com.
news from st. henry
the St. henry Knights
of columbus is accepting
donations large or small at
the St. henry Bank to help
replace the roof of the K of
c., which was damaged this
last winter from snow and
ice buildup. $30,000 is the
estimate for the gable roof
replacement which would
match the Santa house and
beautify the downtown.
St. henry Pool Aqua
Aerobics has begun and will
continue through August 30
every tuesday and thursday
from 8:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.
instructors: marie Stahl
and Jean homan. For more
information, call marie
at 419-852-5642 or the St.
henry Pool at 419-678-
8494.
A free movie and popcorn
will be held at the north Park
on June 30. Bring your lawn
chairs and drinks and enjoy
the movie.
the St. henry Altar rosary
Sodality is asking each
member to donate three items
or $15 for the fancy stand
at the picnic. All donations
can be dropped off at Vicki
Koesters, 5072 St. rt. 119,
St. henry, or teresa Poling,
112 Sunset Ave, St. henry.
if you have questions, please
call Vicki at 419-678-3451 or
teresa at 419-678-4457.
St. henry Picnic presale
ride tickets are available at
St. henry Bank and Gels
iGA. Pre-sale tickets are 10
tickets (1 strip) for $8 or 80
cents per ticket. once the
picnic begins, the price per
ticket will increase to $1.25.
the D of i cake Stand is
looking for anyone interested
in donating or helping bake
cakes for the St. henry Picnic.
Please call link at 419-678-
8132 or Judy Stout at 419-
852-9560. Drop times are
July 2 from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m.
at the St. henry library.
St. henry Picnic “little
miss and little master St.
henry” contest will be held
July 2 at 6 p.m. open to all 3
- 6 year olds in the St. henry
School District. cash prizes
and trophies will be awarded.
children will be judged on
costume (red, white, and blue
theme), stage presentation,
and their ability to answer
questions. A $10 entry fee
is required. registration
will take place immediately
before the event or you may
pre-register by calling Kevin
Schulze at 419-678-4118.
only 15 boys and 15 girls
will be accepted.
St. henry Picnic Presale
Pork chop Dinners for July
2, sponsored by the Gardens,
are available at St. henry
Bank, Shell and Gel’s iGA.
St. henry Picnic talent
Show will be held July 3 at
3 p.m. A frst and second
place prize will be given for
each of the four age groups:
under 6, 7 - 10, 11 - 13 and
14 - 18. A $10 entry fee is
required for all competing
acts. Please pre-register by
calling Kevin Schulze at 419-
678-4118. you may also
register immediately prior to
the event.
the Annual Server’s
Picnic for the weekday church
servers will be held July
12, at St. Anthony church,
St. Anthony. meet behind
St. henry church at 7:15
a.m. Bring softball gloves.
Volunteers who would like
to help should call rose
moeder at 419-678-8257.
Any questions should also be
directed to rose moeder.
Vacation Bible School will
be held July 18 - 22, from
6:30 - 9 p.m. in the St. henry
church basement. the theme
is “Dare to be a h.e.r.o.
4 God”. registration forms
are available at the various
church entrances. Deadline
to register is June 30. Grades
K-5/2011-2012 school year
romer’s catering, St.
henry, will host a preventive
health screening event on
August 8, for residents in
and around the community.
this event is also being
sponsored by upper Valley
medical center and Dayton
heart & Vascular hospital
at Good Samaritan. For
more information please
call 1-888-653-6441 or
visit www.lifelinescreening.
com/community-partners to
schedule an appointment.
if you have news from
the Saint henry area, please
contact Jenny Sutter at 419-
678-2324 or mccnews@
bright.net.
area births
Baby Girl Braun
Jeffrey and leisa (Dysert) Braun, coldwater, announce
the birth of a daughter, mallory Ann Braun, at 8:35 a.m.
June 7, at mercer health, coldwater. She weighed 8 pounds
and 8 1/2 ounces and was 20 inches long.
She was welcomed home by a brother, Griffn, age 3.
maternal grandparents are William and Karen Dysert,
Jr., St. henry. Paternal grandparents are michael and linda
Braun, coldwater. maternal great-grandparents are myra
Dysert, coldwater, and the late William Dysert and the
late John J. and the late mary Ann leopard. Paternal great-
grandparents are the late Anthony and the late margaret
Braun and the late charles and the late hilda Axe.
Baby Boy Kaiser
Scott and Janelle (uhlenhake) Kaiser, St. henry,
announce the birth of a son, Kasen Scott, at 1:14 p.m. on
June 7, at mercer health. he weighed 8 pounds 4 ounces
and was 21 inches long.
he was welcomed home by brothers, Jackson, age 4, and
cole, age 2.
maternal grandparents are robert and Alice uhlenhake,
St. henry. Paternal grandparents are les and marlene
Kaiser, Fort recovery. Paternal great-grandparent is cy
Fortkamp, Fort recovery.
Baby Girl Knapke
tim and Ashleigh (Knoth) Knapke, coldwater, announce
the birth of a daughter, emersyn marie Knapke, at 3:25
p.m. on June 3, at mercer health, coldwater. She weighed
7 pounds and was 19 inches long.
maternal grandparents are Ken and Ann Knoth,
coldwater. Paternal grandparents are roger and Vicky
Knapke, coldwater. maternal great-grandparents are mark
and thelma Jutte, Fort recovery, and louAnn Knoth,
coldwater, and the late clete Knoth. Paternal great-
grandparents are Betty Jean Brockman, Fort recovery,
and the late cy Brockman and the late louis and Wilma
Knapke.
Baby Boy Luebke
Josh and Julie luebke, columbus, announce the birth
of a son, Jackson robert luebke, at 10:06 a.m. June 6, at
ohio State hospital. he weighed 7 pounds and 13 ounces
and was 21 1/2 inches long.
maternal grandparents are David and Janet Baker,
Shelby. Paternal grandparents are Phil and Janie luebke,
maria Stein. maternal great-grandparents are Alice Baker
and margaret Jenkins, Shelby. Paternal great-grandparents
are mark and lois Steinbrunner, osgood.
1. SETH ROLLINS 20:24
2. TANNER BATES 22:06
3. CALEB ROLLINS 23:37:37
4. ALLISON GAERKE 23:37:54
5. CALEB JACOBS 25:18:20
6. WYATT FELVER 25:18:44
7. KRIS GANGWER 26:15:43
8. CALEB HEINDEL 26:15:69
9. BRANDON GIBSON 26:43:47
10 RYAN LAUTZENHEISER 26:47:65
11. TRACE WALLS 27:57
12. BETHANY SCHLEEMER 28:01
13. PAIGE HAMRICK 28:20
14. JASMINE OLDS 28:24:08
15. COLIN GANGER 28:41:50
16. REID ETZCORN 28:46
17. KC FILI 28:47
18. DEVON DICKE 29:01:12
19. CLAYTON AGLER 29:01:40
20. DERRICK MOSIER 29:14
21. TYLER KITTLE 29:22
22. SAGE DUGAN 29:33
23. BAILEY RODRIGUEZ 30:22
24. NOAH JOSEPH 30:29:25
25. RACHEL JUTTE 30:29:97
26. COLLIN LEIGHNER 30:33
27. JUD BOURELLE 31:38
28. CADEN MAY 31:39
29. HAYDEN LYONS 31:40
30. ZACK 31:53
31. SHELDON KITTLE 32:08
32. JAMI PONSLER 32:32
33. SYDNEY CROUCH 32:52
34. TREVOR SMITH 33:05
35. CHANDLER ROOF 33:07
36. SAMANTHA WEHE 33:27
37. JUSTIN THOMAS 33:33:44
38. NATHANIEL VORHIES 33:36
39. CODY MURPHY 33:42
40. CODY KUHN 33:43
41. LOGAN JACKSON 33:46
42. RAYMOND WOOD 34:05
43. REESE FOKINE 34:35
44. ANDREW BAKER 34:36
45. JAKOB STEVENS 35:19
46. TIMMY LAVERGNE 35:26
47. NAOH STEPHENSON 35:50
48. BRANDON GANGER 35:52
49. DUSTIN HUTSON 35:54
50. EMILY STRUNK 35:58
51. CODY COFFMAN 36:06
52. CHEVY VAN GUNDY 36:21:68
53. JARED PUTHOFF 36:21:97
54. CALEB CARLSON 36:25
55. MADDIE FORD 36:37
56. HALLE BEOUGHER 36:43
57. BRODY ADAMS 36:45
58. CASSIDY BOECKMAN 36:46
59. MACKAID BEERY 36:48
60. AUSTIN METZ 37:05
61. HALEY PHILLIPS 37:10
62. JUSTIN BARNA 37:18
63. ZOEY POND 37:21
64. SHAY POND 37:22
65. SETH S 37:23
66. ALEC S 38:10
67. ASHLEY CLARK 38:24
68. MIKEY 38:26
69. LOGAN FELVER 38:28
70. MADISON MEYER 39:13
71. CASSI KUHN 39:25
72. ABBY SHELLABARGER 39:26
73. CONNOR MORTON 39:28
74. JARED GIBSON 39:48
75. CARSON FORD 39:49
76. ZION ARMSTRONG 40:10
77. ANTHONY WELKER 40:12
78. LOGAN HUFF 40:15
79. ZACH ALBRIGHT 40:17:64
80. CALLIE EICHLER 40:17:97
81. SCHRADER STETLER 40:25
82. COLE KETCHUM 40:33:53
83. CLAY BOLLENBACHER 40:33:90
84. TRISTEN MCKEE 40:34
85. THOMAS BUCHNER 40:45
86. CRISTAIN MATA 40:47
87. LYDIA HEINDEL 40:48
88. JUSTIN RICE 40:49
89. GRANT DUGAN 40:51
90. JD HILEMAN 40:55
91. TYLER MILLER 40;56
92. COLE SCHOENLEBEN 41:40
93. ALYX SLUSHER 41:41
94. BAILEY PARRIS 41:42
95. ASHLEY BAUGHMAN 41:43
96. DAVID HESS 42:33
97. ANGEL GANGER 42:43
98. KAYLA HODGE 42:44
99. BAILEY BATES 42:46
100. TANNER MATTHEWS 42:55
Get reAl 5 K rAce 2011 reSultS
the mercer county chronicle
June 23, 2011 • Page 3
A Look
Back
MERCER COUNTY
CHRONICLE
Vol. 114 no. 25
USPS 339-15560
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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
106 S. Second St.
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Coldwater, OH 45828
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TF. 866-678-3252
John.yoder@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Ed-
ward Jones Financial Advisor.
Edward Jones, its employees and fnancial advisors are not estate
planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. Consult a qualifed tax
specialist or attorney for professional advice about your situation.
Financial Focus is a weekly column courtesy of...
John M. Yoder, Financial Advisor
Your 401(k) offers tax-deductible contributions, tax-deferred growth of
earnings potential and a variety of investment options — so it’s a great tool
for building retirement savings. Yet like all tools, your 401(k) must be used
properly to get the best results. That’s why you should review your 401(k) at
least annually and make whatever adjustments are needed.
Depending on where you work, you may get some 401(k) review help
from your plan provider. But if that assistance isn’t available, you might want to
consult with a financial professional to make sure you’re getting the maximum
benefit from your plan.
As you begin to review your 401(k), your first question should probably
be this:
“How much should I contribute?” At the very least, try to put in enough to
receive your employer’s matching contribution, if one is offered. If you don’t
earn this match, you are essentially walking away from “free money.” Beyond
this, though, the amount you put into your 401(k) might depend on what other
retirement savings vehicles you have available. For instance, if you’re eligible,
you may also want to contribute to a Roth IRA, which offers tax-free growth
potential, provided you’ve had your account for five years and don’t start
taking withdrawals until you’re 59½.
Of course, it’s not only how much you put into your 401(k) that determines
its success — it’s also how you choose to allocate your investment dollars.
(Keep in mind that asset allocation does not guarantee a profit or protect
against loss.) Your 401(k) may have a dozen or more investment choices,
such as stock funds, bond funds and money market funds. To choose the right
investment mix, you’ll need to consider a variety of factors, including these:
• Your age — Generally speaking, the younger you are, the more
aggressive you can afford to be with your 401(k) investments, because
you’ll have decades in which to potentially overcome the inevitable down
periods of the market. As you get older, you may wish to invest somewhat
more conservatively, but you’ll still need some growth potential in your 401(k)
portfolio.
• Your goals — Everyone has different goals for retirement. You might
want to retire early and travel the world, while your co-worker desires to
work as long as possible and then, upon retirement, stay close to home and
pursue hobbies. Because you each have different goals, with different income
needs, you also may need to follow different investment strategies within your
401(k).
• Your other retirement income sources — If you have a variety of
retirement income sources — a pension from another job, an IRA, a spouse
with generous retirement benefits — you may need to invest differently,
perhaps less aggressively, than if you had fewer options for retirement
income.
Apart from putting away as much as you can into your 401(k) and
choosing the right investment mix, what else can you do to get the most out
of your plan? Here’s a suggestion: If you have worked at various jobs and
acquired multiple 401(k)s, consider rolling them over into one account. You
might save money on fees and reduce paperwork, but more importantly,
you’ll be able to concentrate your resources and pursue a unified investment
approach, with your investment dollars working together toward your ultimate
retirement goals.
As you can see, a 401(k) review and rollover can reward you in many
ways — so do whatever it takes to maximize your 401(k)’s performance.
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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING
106 S. Second St.
P.O. Box 67
Coldwater, OH 45828
Bus. 419-678-3252
TF. 866-678-3252
John.yoder@edwardjones.com
www.edwardjones.com
This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Ed-
ward Jones Financial Advisor.
Edward Jones, its employees and fnancial advisors are not estate
planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice. Consult a qualifed tax
specialist or attorney for professional advice about your situation.
Financial Focus is a weekly column courtesy of...
John M. Yoder, Financial Advisor
Some investments are appropriate during your working years, while others
are more suitable for retirement. But a Roth Individual Retirement Account
(IRA) can provide you with benefits at virtually every stage of your life. Let’s
take a quick “journey” through some of these stages to see just how valuable
a Roth IRA can be.
To begin with, you can open a Roth IRA at any age, provided you have
earned income and meet certain income limits. So if you’re just starting out in
your career, put as much as you can afford into your Roth IRA and gradually
increase your contributions as your income rises, up to the contribution limit.
A Roth IRA is an excellent retirement savings vehicle because it can grow tax
free and your contributions can be invested into just about any investment you
choose — stocks, bonds, mutual funds, CDs and so on.
Of course, when you’re young, you might not be thinking much about
retirement. But the earlier you start contributing to a Roth IRA, the more
you could end up with — and the difference could be substantial. In fact, if
you started putting money into a Roth IRA at age 30, and you contributed
the maximum amount each year until you reached 65, you would accumulate
more than $766,000, assuming you are in the 25% tax bracket and you earned
a 7% return, compounded annually. But, given the same assumptions, you’d
end up with only about $365,000 if you waited until 40 before you started
contributing.
It clearly pays to contribute early and annually to a Roth IRA. (In 2011, the
annual contribution limit is $5,000, or $6,000 if you’re 50 or older.) There are
additional benefits to funding a Roth IRA, such as its flexible withdrawal options,
which are available to you even before you retire. Since you already paid taxes
on the money you put into your Roth, you can withdraw your contributions at
any time without paying taxes or penalties. Generally speaking, it’s certainly
best to leave your Roth IRA intact for as long as possible. But if there’s an
emergency and you need access to the funds, you can also withdraw your
Roth’s earnings tax free, provided you’ve held your account at least five years
and you don’t start taking withdrawals until you’ve reached 59½.
Now, let’s fast-forward to your retirement. Unlike other retirement accounts,
such as a traditional IRA or a 401(k), your Roth IRA does not require you to
start taking withdrawals at age 70½ — or ever. If you don’t need the money,
you can leave it alone, possibly to grow further, for as long as you like. This
means that you might have more money to bequeath to your children or other
beneficiaries, and they won’t have to pay income taxes on withdrawals from
either your contributions or your earnings, provided your Roth IRA account has
been open for at least five years. Keep in mind, though, that your beneficiaries
will be required to take distributions based on their life expectancy.
As you can see, a Roth IRA can be an excellent financial “traveling
companion” as you go through life. So consider adding a Roth to your portfolio
— and bon voyage.
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THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 10 • May 21, 2009 - May 27, 2009
Celina Couple Receives Albert Heckler
Award from Cheryl Ann Programs
Louis and Dorothy Hoyng never imagined that they’d be-
come involved with Cheryl Ann Programs.
They were raising three happy, healthy boys in their Celina
home. Louie operated his custom upholstery shop next door,
and Dorothy worked in the high school cafeteria. They were a
typical family.
Then a very atypical thing happened. Their middle son,
Brian, was struck by lightning in 1981 when he was 16. With
that bolt out of the blue, the Hoyngs’ lives changed forever.
The odds of being struck by lightning are one in 280,000,
but the Hoyngs couldn’t afford to spend much time thinking
about their terrible luck. They had a son who needed them
more than he ever had. The first years after Brian’s accident,
which left him with severe disabilities, were very difficult,
they said, as they searched for someone who could help them
help Brian.
Their school district helped as much as it could.Finally, then-
Superintendent Ralph Stelzer recommended a place the Hoyngs
knew about but had never visited as parents: Cheryl Ann.
“Cheryl Ann was the best thing that ever happened to us,”
Louie Hoyng said. “It gave Brian his life back.”
The people of Cheryl Ann helped Brian with his everyday
life. They gave him a place to go and jobs to do. He made new
friends, and enjoyed everything about his experiences there,
up to and including the bus ride out to Mud Pike.
“When he would see Sam Morden (his bus aide) he would
just smile, and the people in Adult Day Services really knew
how to make him laugh,” Dorothy Hoyng said.
It wasn’t long before the Hoyngs were finding ways to re-
pay Cheryl Ann for its help. They were regular volunteers.
Louie Hoyng completed upholstery jobs for the unique
equipment used at Cheryl Ann, and often, said Superintendent
Mike Overman, “Louie would forget to send us a bill.” He
also served a term on the county MRDD board and was the
board president.
For all that, and for their tireless advocacy on behalf of
their son, the Hoyngs received the Albert Heckler Award at
the staff appreciation banquet in March. The award is given
each year to a Cheryl Ann family that exemplifies service and
advocacy.
“The Hoyngs both served as good examples of first-rate
advocates for their son,” Overman said. “They rarely ever
missed a day spending time with him, and they always spoke
up to be sure his needs were being met. They were really spe-
cial parents for Brian, and really good supporters of our pro-
gram.”
Brian Hoyng died in February 2008 at the age of 43. In the
years after the lightning strike he taught his family a lot about
patience, hope, endurance and acceptance. He introduced the
Hoyngs to a world they had only seen from the outside—but it
was a world where they found welcome and acceptance.
“We met some wonderful people during our years at Cheryl
Ann,” Dorothy Hoyng said. “They worked their hearts out
helping us with Brian.”
Dorothy and Louis Hoyng
Stateline Writers Meet
At the April meeting of the Stateline Writer’s Club, members read
profiles they had written about someone, living or dead or make-
believe, and member Eileen Whitsett’s special activity of having mem-
bers combine pictures of particular scenes with a person or people
assigned to them to put into that scene brought interesting results.
Sue Miller and Gretchen Bollenbacher’s proposal for a special
meeting designed to attract new members was described and approved.
Members will be hosted by the Coldwater Public Library in June for
a reading of their best work.
At the next meeting, which will be on Saturday, May 16, mem-
bers will rehearse for their special program in June.
Stateline club members meet the 3rd Saturday of each month at
10 a.m. at the Celina Mercer County Library. Anyone interested in
coming to a meeting or becoming a member is cordially invited to
attend.
Celina Rotary Dog Park Dedicated
BY: BETTY LOU DENNEY/HALL
Opening day at the Celina Rotary Dog Park received
rave revues from the dogs. As the gates opened for the first
time on Tuesday May 12, dogs of all sizes were seen mak-
ing their way to the park to get a chance to run in over 3
acres of wide open spaces of the chain-linked fenced in
area. Small dogs area is an acre and the large dogs have
over 2 acres. The new park, which is one of newest and
biggest things happening in the State Parks around the coun-
try, was made possible due to the efforts of Deborha Borns,
Rotary Club President. Her friend, Darlene Lynskey, is also
working on getting a State Dog Park in her home town of
St. Marys. The two dog lovers along with many volunteers
worked many hours with the help of the State and Craig
Morton, who is the regional manager of Grand Lake St.
Marys. Together they cleared away debris from the previ-
ously unused land. The Park is located at the end of West
Bank Road
Deb Borns saw her idea come to life with the help of the
Celina Rotary Club’s major donation and businesses as well
as individuals who helped with labor and monetary dona-
tions. The idea came to her after visiting another dog park.
At the dedication ceremony Deb thanked many of the
people who made the park possible. Jeff Larmore, Past
Rotary President and Celina City Council Member spoke
as his 150 pound Newfoundland, Bentley checked out the
park. Jeff is also a large contributor to the park in honor of
the recovery of Bentley after he had been lost for several
days. Craig Morton, Regional Manager of State Park Gand
Lake St. Marys and John Hunter, Assistant Chief of the
Division of Parks and Recreation also spoke at the dedica-
tion ceremony. Deb concluded her speech with some wise
lessons that she has learned from her own dogs. A few of
which were: Never leave home without your leach and
your ID. If you stare at someone long enough, you will get
what you want. Last, if it is not wet and sloppy it is not a
real kiss.
One of the many visitors enjoying running free on dedi-
cation day was a lab /poodle mix owned by Dave Hochstien,
professor at Wright State University. He has other dogs at
home but decided to only bring one at a time. He com-
mented that this was the first time his dog had this much
exercise since he got him a year ago.
There are a few small problems to work out with the
park, such as the water faucet would not shut off and there
was a small hole under the fence in the small dog side of
the park, which of course was found by one of the little
furry visitors on dedication day. These problems will be
easily fixed. Memberships ($10) to Fur Ever Friends are
being sold to help with the upkeep of the park. The use of
the park is free to the public. One of the additions they
would like to have is benches added to the park for the
comfort of the owners.
The green stations placed around the fence for the dog
wastes were given at a discount by Florida based company
named DogiPot. Gary Brown, Assistant Operations Man-
ger, heard about the plans for the park and wanted to help
by giving discounts on the pots. The company has all Oxi-
biodegradable bags inside the pots for your dog waste. Gary
flew in from Florida to be a part of the ribbon cutting and
opening of the park. More of their products can be found
by going to: www.propet.org.
If visiting the park remember to follow the rules that are
posted at the entrance. Common sense is your guide such
as:
Dogs should have their current shots
The park has little dog and big dog sections, keep
dogs in their own spaces.
Don’t leave dog unattended
Do not bring a dog that shows aggressive behavior
Keep small children under close supervision
Clean up after your own dog
Never bring a dog to the park that has an illness.
These are just a few precautions to remember. Check
the rules before entering the park and you and your dog
will have a great time The Park is open daylight to dark
everyday.
Deb Borns prepares to cut the ribbon at the Dedication of the Celina Rotary Club Dog Park. Helping to hold the ribbon
is Darlene Lynskey and John Hunter, assistant chief of the Ohio’s Division of Parks and Recreation. On left is Craig
Morton, Regional Manager of Grand Lake St. Marys. Right: Jeff Larmore and Bentley. Photo by Roy Hall.
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Hanna Mast, a 2011 graduate
of Celina Senior High School,
won the Celina Police Depart-
ment’s Wear Your Seatbelt…
Win A Car contest on June 1.
Mast was one of 24 students
who had an opportunity to win
the car after being chosen in a
pre-qualifcation drawing at the
2011 Senior Assembly earlier
this month. After drawing num-
bers to determine the order of
the contestants, Hanna predict-
ed that being 13
th
in line would
guarantee her a win, because 13
had been her lucky number for
her entire life. The Ford Escort
4-door was donated to the Wear
Your Seatbelt…Win A Car
program by KERNS AUTO
GROUP. This is the sixth year
that Kern’s family dealerships
have donated a vehicle to the
Celina Police Department for
the contest.
The Celina Police Depart-
ment started the program after
members of the Celina Senior
High School Marching Band
and other student groups as-
sisted them with efforts to pro-
mote safety belt use by teenag-
ers. Those efforts eventually led
to the Celina Police Department
winning two free police cruisers
from the Ohio Traffc Safety Of-
fce. The Wear Your Seatbelt…
Win A Car program offered
Celina Police Department a dual
beneft. It was an opportunity to
promote safety belt use among
teenagers and give back to the
students that had helped the
department receive recognition
for their safety programs and
win the free cruisers. of course,
the program never would have
gotten off the ground if not for
the generosity of Kern’s Auto
Group. While their initial com-
mitment was to provide a prize
vehicle to the program for three
years, 2011 was the sixth year
that the family of dealerships
has donated a car to be given
to a graduating senior who has
never received a citation for fail-
ing to wear a seatbelt.
The group photo includes, (from left to right): Celina
Mayor Sharon LaRue, Mike Kerns of Kerns Auto Group,
Hanna Mast, Superintendent Matt Miller, Chief David
Slusser and Kevin Mast, (Hanna’s father).
Celina Police Department WHYB Wear
Your Seatbelt…Win A Car contest
Zuma Days Fun
From the Archives of the Mercer
County Chronicle
10 YEARS AGO (2001)
Coldwater High School recently
hired both a Varsity Boys Basketball
coach and a Varsity Girls Volleyball
coach. Donald D. Vogt, Jr. will
be the new basketball coach and
teach learning disabilities, and
Molly Michelle Kinninger will be
the new volleyball coach and teach
frst grade.
Coldwater Mayor Lavern
Stammen signed a Proclamation
stating that the week of June 17
through June 23, 2001, as Ohio
Bicentennial Days. People and
organizations are to be acknowledged
at this time for donating monies
towards the Ohio-shaped cast
aluminum signs that capture the
area’s signifance in a brief phrase
or sentence.
25 YEARS AGO (1986)
Coldwater Mayor Maurice Cron
was presented with a certifcate
designating him as a Kentucky
Colonel. The presentation was
made by Carl Bolts, representing
the Hamilton County Municipal
League, and was made for Cron’s
recent work as president of the Ohio
Mayor’s Association.
A familiar Coldwater sight
has disappeared from view with
the demolition of the former New
Idea Spreader Works museum and
the structure which housed the
1902 manure spreader on display.
According to Ron Hottes, president
of the New Idea Farm Equipment
Corp. plant in Coldwater, the former
museum was deemed beyond repair,
hence its removal.
50 YEARS AGO (1961)
Three Indiana men drowned
Sunday evening in Grand Lake-St.
Marys when an outboard motorboat
carrying four men and one woman
capsized off Scotty’s Beach east
of Celina. Bodies of the three men
were found Monday morning after
continuous rescue operations all
through the night. It was the worst
drowning accident on the lake since
1929 when a party of fve lost their
lives in a storm when their boat
overturned.
Offcial dedication of the Mercer
County Elks country club and
golf course will be held Sunday
afternoon June 25,1961 at the Club
eight miles south of Celina. Auditor
of State James A. Rhodes will be the
featured speaker.
Can you imagine
how you would feel
if you took some of
the drugs into your
body that the kids
are doing today? I
cannot conceive how
anything can be so
bad that you have to take
some form of stimulant
to help you get through
the day. I cannot imagine
what it feels like when
the stimulant wears off.
I guess that is why they
keep taking them so they
don’t come “down”. Sure
is hard for me to under-
stand why you would get
into those types of situa-
tions. Maybe I never tried
it because of my work and
all the drugs I had access
to. Maybe I also knew
what damage they could
do to the body and most of
the damage was irrevers-
ible. It cannot be because
of the kids not knowing
what will happen to their
bodies because there is
lots of information out
there on the subject.
I guess kids just live
for the day and they don’t
worry about tomorrow.
And, you know, we
as adults have helped
create this world they
are living in and I must
say we haven’t done
too good of a job in
doing so. So, maybe
we shouldn’t blame our
kids, maybe we should
accept the blame as par-
ents and grandparents. It
would appear we haven’t
worked very hard to make
this world a better place.
Maybe it is not too late
to help our kids see the
future thru a clearer view.
It will help if we talk with
our kids and spend some
quality time with them.
That’s My Opinion..............
What’s Yours??
Photos by Buck Hall
JOSEPH NIEPORT’S FAMILY
WOULD LIKE TO CELEBRATE
95 YEARS OF DAD’S LIFE
WITH AN OPEN HOUSE ON
HIS BIRTHDAY, SUNDAY,
JUNE 26TH. 2 - 4 P.M. AT THE
GARDEN’S AT ST. HENRY.
Cards can be mailed to: Joseph
Nieport, Garden’s of St. Henry,
522 Western Ave., St. Henry,
Ohio 45883
the mercer county chronicle
Page 4 • June 23, 2011
NOW OPEN!!
HOME MEDICAL
EQUIPMENT
808 E. WAYNE ST.
CELINA, OH 45822
LOCAL 567-890-8687
FAX 567-890-8688
TOLL FREE 855-441-8687
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10-5
Medical Equipment
• Home Oxygen
• CPAP/BIPAP
• Nebulizers
• Wheelchairs
• Hospital Beds
• Commodes
• Lift Chairs
• Scooters
• Folding &
4-Wheeled Walkers
• Bath Chairs &
Safety Equipment
• Canes & Crutches
• Compression
Stockings
Therapist Services
• Overnight
Pulse Oximetery
• Sleep Apnea
Screening
(Apnea Link)
• Home Therapist
Visits for
Oxygen and
PAP Patients
Have A Website?
Tell the World!
SHOP
Online 24/7
Call 419-678-2324
to be included in next weeks directory
Assisted Living
newspAper
Hospice cAre
AutomobiLes
Briarwood Village
100 Don Desch Dr., Coldwater 419-678-2311
www.briarwood-village.com
AutomobiLe pArts
Williams Auto Parts, Inc.
127 Detroit Ave., Portland, IN 800-669-5762
www.williamsautopartsinc.com
State of the Heart Hospice
230 W. Main St., Coldwater 419-678-4808 • 800-584-9853
www.stateoftheheartcare.com
Hull Brothers Inc.
520 E. Boundary St., Ft. Recovery • 800-336-8279
www.hullbros.com
St. Marys Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Inc.
500 McKindley Rd., St. Marys
419-394-7970 • 800-589-8073
www.stmaryschrysler.com
Kerns Ford, Lincoln-Mercury
1000 W. Logan St., Celina • 419-586-5191 • 800-211-9667
“A $200 gas card with any used vehicle purchase”
www.kernssuperstore.com
Hastings Auto Sales
110 S. Wayne St., Ft. Recovery 419-375-4617
www.hastingsauto.com
Bud’s Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep
New Certified & Pre-Owned Sales, Service & Parts
“YOU CAN’T BEAT A BUD’S DEAL”
419-586-7000
www.budschrysler.com
C.A.R.S.
Repair Sales
419-678-4949 419-678-3969
SEE ALL WE CAN DO FOR YOU!
www.carscoldwater.com
Pictures,
Prices & Options
The Mercer County Chronicle
124 W. Main St, Coldwater • 419-678-2324
www.mercercountychronicle.com
FArm equipment
The Sharper Image
937-547-9476
www.sharperimageautodetailing.com
veHicLe detAiLing
Tuna Supremo Casserole Reinvents Classic Comfort Food
By Janet Tharpe
Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons
“I was tired
of the same
old tuna
casserole, so
I combined
a couple
recipes.”
KellieSimpson
BowlingGreen, KY
(Pop. 84,961)
W
ondering what to make with those cans of tuna
sitting in the pantry? Well, wonder no more!
Kellie Simpson has given us a remarkable tuna casserole
recipe that is guaranteed to satisfy! Aptly named Tuna
Supremo, this scrumptious casserole is heavy on favor,
with a decadent blend of tuna, cream of mushroom soup,
cheddar cheese and even a hint of hot sauce. (Try using
pepper jack cheese if you’re in the mood for something
extra spicy.)
See step-by-step photos of Kellie Simpson’s Tuna
Supremo recipe and thousands more recipes from other
hometown Americans at:
www.justapinch.com/tunasupremo
You’ll also fnd a meal planner and coupons for the
recipe ingredients. Enjoy and remember, use “just a
pinch”...
www.justapinch.com/tunasupremo
Kellie Simpson
What You Need
1 pkg egg noodles,
cooked and drained
2 cans cream of
mushroom soup,
undiluted
1 pkg shredded cheddar
1/2 md onion, diced
2 cans tuna, packed in
water, drained
1 pkg Ritz crackers or
similar
1 stick margarine,
melted
1 c mayonnaise
1/2 pkg frozen mixed
Tuna Supremo
corn/peas/carrots
3-4 dashes hot sauce
1 jar (small) pimento
1 c ricotta cheese
(optional)
3/4 c water
Directions
• Preheat oven to 350°.
In large bowl mix tuna,
soup, onion, mayo,
veggies, hot sauce,
pimento, ricotta, water
and half bag of shredded
cheddar.
• Fold in cooked egg
noodles, then spread
mixture in 9x13 pan
sprayed with non-
stick spray; cover with
remaining cheese.
• Mix melted margarine
and crushed crackers
until well-coated, and
sprinkle over casserole.
Bake until golden and
bubbly.
• HINT: For a spicier
taste, substitute cheddar
with pepper jack cheese
cheddar. Add an
additional can of tuna
for more tuna favor.
Submitted by: Kellie Simpson, Bowling Green, KY (Pop. 84,961) www.justapinch.com/tunasupremo
-Janet
fort notes
by Betty Lou Denney/Hall
What’s Happening
around the Fort….

Savannah Jack, opening
act for Vince Gill and Doobie
Brothers will be performing at
the Van trees Park on June 26
at 8 p.m.
A drawing is held every
Sunday night; tickets can be
obtained when making a pur-
chase from the Fort recovery
merchants.
the St. Peter neurological
center’s winning number for
the past two weeks were: robert
linn from celina with num-
ber 527 and nancy Bohman
from Powell, ohio, with num-
ber 099.
The Archaeology fnd was
an interesting event for children
this past week. last tuesday the
public was invited to visit the
site of the ‘dig’ at the corner of
the nature's corner building and
the street. nancy Knapke, direc-
tor of the museum, noted that
some of the children found some
interesting things at the “dig”
site. many times the historical
Society was approached to sell
the property for a parking lot.
thank goodness it was well
protected through the years.
thouGht For the
WeeK As Buzz hull reminded
his honored alumni class of 55
years….today is the youngest
you’ll ever be, and life does
come with an expiration date.
until neXt WeeK
rememBer: Be happy, love
one another and remember that
there is a miracle out there that
can change your life.
Sunday, June 26, 1:00
– 4:00, the 31
st
Annual
Prehistoric Artifacts exhibit,
hosted by the mercer county
indian relic collectors, will
be held at the mercer county
historical museum lawn, 130
east market, (a block east of
the courthouse), celina. the
public is welcome; there is no
charge.
Ken Sowards is President
of the Blue Jacket ASo
chapter in Bellefontaine, and a
retired history teacher, as well
as a member of the indian
relic collectors. Ken is also
known for his studies of Fort
loramie.
Prior to the indian Wars
of the 1790’s, the British and
French were in confict over
the ohio Valley. loramie’s
Store entered the history books
in 1782. eugene rosebook and
Francis Weisenburg wrote an
excellent history, “the history
of ohio” in 1958. loramie’s
Store was addressed on page 42.
“George rogers clark, taking
the feld for the last time, in
november led 1,050 mounted
rifemen up the Miami Valley
against the Shawnee towns.
one detachment went as far
as loramie’s (or lorimier’s)
Store, a British trading post at
the head of the miami river.
no resistance was offered by
the feeing tribesmen, whose
towns were burned and whose
supplies were destroyed by
the avenging Kentuckians.
this raid, made in november
1782, marked the close of the
revolution in the west.” this
statement has brought the local
attention that the battle at Peter
lorimier’s Store was the “last
Battle of the revolutionary
War!”
For the past 30 years, the
mercer county indian relic
collectors have shown their
collections at the Prehistoric
Artifact exhibit at the mercer
county historical museum.
each member has his individual
specialty and knowledge of
local history.
this June 26 Artifact
exhibit is an excellent time to
personally get to know each
of these gentlemen and their
search for artifacts. they have
not only acquired academic
knowledge about these artifacts,
they have also acquired the
technical knowledge of how the
artifacts were made and how
the artifacts were used. Ask
them about skills in hunting
artifacts. Ask them questions
about your artifacts.
robert n. converse’s books
about artifacts made from
stone, fint, and/or slate, are the
best books in the business. the
books by converse provide
excellent color photographs.
ohio Stone tools include
axes, celts, chisels, cupstones,
mortars, abrading stones, net
sinkers, pestles, adze stones of
various cuts, hammerstones;
mauls, and hoes.
ohio Flint types include
futed and unfuted points,
lanceolates, Blades, Knives,
Scrapers, Serrated and/or
notched Points, Bifurcates,
turkeytails, Drills, Birdpoints,
and the most famous of all,
the Dovetail. ohio Slate
types include various weights,
the Double crescent as well
as the Knobbed crescent,
Bannerstones, Gorgets,
Boatstones, loafstones, Bar
Amulets, Pendants, ovates,
Discoidals, and Plummets.
Birdstones are made of slate, or
granitic hardstone or sandstone.
A Stone Sandal Sole Gorget
was found at Sharpsburg, a
few decades ago. of all the
artifacts, Dovetails, Birdstones,
Pendants, and Winged
Bannerstones are among my
favorites.
Visit the June 26 Artifact
exhibit at the museum and
meet the Artifact collectors.
Appreciate their collections.
See converse’s reference
books. Bring your own artifacts
for identifcation. Thank you to
each collector for Preserving
local history and educating
the Public about that history.
[the mercer county
historical Society President
Joyce Alig, may be contacted
at 3054 Burk-St. henry road,
Saint henry, oh 45883, or
histalig@bright.net or 419-
678-2614.]
Ken Sowards, displaying
his collection at the Prehistoric
Historic Artifact Exhibit, at
the Mercer County Historical
Museum, Celina in June 2010.
Solomon’s Oak
By Jo-Ann Mapson
Solomon’s oak
is my second good
read this summer and
makes my “Skeet’s
Favorite list” along
with night road
by Kristin hannah.
Glory Solomon,
a young widow,
rents out the chapel
her husband built under the
200-year-old oak tree on their
central california farm for
weddings. First on the docket
is an unusual pirate handfasting
(betrothal) ceremony complete
with a pirate ship wedding cake,
fagons of lemon bumble, and a
butterfy release. At this point, a
gun-toting photographer enters,
scares everyone but then saves
the day taking over as wedding
photographer.
Fourteen-year-old Juniper
mcGuire, veteran of the foster
care system, arrives on Glory’s
doorstep, pierced, tattooed,
angry and homeless; the sole
survivor of a family decimated
by a kidnapping. Glory and her
late husband raised foster sons
for years, but Juniper may be
too much for her.
Joseph Vigil is a former
Albuquerque police
offcer and crime
lab photographer
who was shot during
an assignment that
took the life of his
best friend and left
him disabled and
in constant back
pain. he comes
to california to
photograph the great
trees of the state and
to say good-bye to his childhood
vacation cabin.
Glory, Juniper and Joseph’s
paths cross and recross through
weddings, bad weather, teenage
drama and the simple joys of life.
the bonds they forge change
their lives forever. if you like
dogs and horses, you will enjoy
Glory’s work with both. her
dogs answer to Ford, Dodge and
edsel. these animals are her
family along with the horses.
the old Solomon’s oak tree on
the property plays an important
role in the story along with a
soon-to-be destroyed cabin.
Glory struggles to make a living
with her cooking and weddings.
i suggest reading slow to make
the book last longer. once i
fnished Solomon’s Oak I was
wishing for more pages.
happy reading. Skeet
Lisa Timmerman,
an employee of Cooper
Farms, spoke to the
Coldwater Kiwanis on
June 7 about “The Good
Egg Project.” Using
a video presentation
she highlighted the
evolution of farming
based on larger
farms, increased demand for
food, increased population, new
technology, and new production
systems. She noted that in spite
of the improvements many
persons in the world still die from
starvation and malnutrition. In the
future, more production will be
necessary. The egg continues to
be an excellent source of nutrients.
Several notable statistics were
that Ohio is ranked number two
in the nation in egg laying and
87% of the 2.2 million farms in
the U.S. are owned by individuals
or married couples.
Cooper Farms began
in 1938 in Oakwood,
Ohio, and now has
facilities in Oakwood,
Van Wert, St. Henry
and Fort Recovery.
Though the company
was originally a turkey
growing operation they
are now involved in the areas
of turkeys, hogs, laying hens,
and chickens. Some interesting
aspects of their business include
the many diets, designed by a
dietician, for various species at
different stages of their growth,
the importance of biosecurity
to keep disease away from the
animals, and the amount of feed
produced at their mills in one
year. Cooper Farms supports
family farms and gives back
to the community through the
Cooper Farms Foundation.
Kiwanis News
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
June 23, 2011 • Page 5
Celina Fraternal
Order of Eagles
GRAND
LAKE
AERIE
#1291
1400 EAST MARKET STREET, CELINA, OHIO
419-586-4295
A Proud Sponsor of Freedom Days!
Proudly Supporting Our Veterans & Your Community!
POST
5713
V
ETERANS OF
FOREIGN WARS
1118 West Logan Street • Celina, Ohio 419-586-3140
WHERE “IT ISN’T THE PRICE YOU PAY TO BE A MEMBER,
IT’S THE PRICE YOU PAID TO BECOME ELIGIBLE”
A Proud Sponsor Of The
FREEDOM
DAYS
PICNIC
Friday, July 1
thru Sunday, July 3
Make Plans To Come! Fun For All
At Celina’s Lake Shore Drive!

“We’re Your Strong
Hometown Bank”


The
Peoples Bank
Co.
6o|dwater - 6e||na - 8t. Harys
Rockford - ßurkettsv|||e
www.pbcbank.com
To|| Free 1-8ôô- Pß6 ßANK

Veroe( F0lC - Ecua| lous|rd Lerde(
Have A “GREAT” & Safe
4th Of July Weekend!
Dave Kaiser
Mercer County Treasurer
Have A Safe Holiday
& Enjoy
Celina’s Freedom Days!
Have A Safe Holiday
& Enjoy
Celina’s Freedom Days!
1950 HAVEMANN ROAD
CELINA, OHIO
419-586-3777
W.H. DICK & SONS
HELLWARTH
FUNERAL HOMES
Celina & Mendon
Serving The Community Since 1913
2 0 1 1
Located on The Shores of
Grand Lake at
Lake Shore Park
Celina, Ohio
www.freedomdayspicnic.com
4:00 BEER TENT OPENS
4:00 FOOD TENT OPENS
5-8:00 BAND: EXPLOIT
9-12:00 BAND: MUSTANG SALLY
10:00 FOOD TENT CLOSES
11:00 BEER TENT CLOSES
FRIDAY JULY 1, 2011
MUSTANG SALLY
SATURDAY JULY 2, 2011
9:00 FISHING DERBY
REGISTRATION BEGINS AT 730AM
AT EASTVIEW PARK POND
TWO AGE GROUPS:
8 YEARS & YOUNGER
9 YEARS TO 13 YEARS OF AGE
TROPHIES & PRIZES AWARDED
AT LAKESHORE PARK
11:00 FOOD TENT OPENS
11-7:00 INFLATABLE RIDES OPEN
11:00 BEER TENT OPENS
1:00 CORN HOLE TOURNAMENT
1-6:00 PONY RIDES
1:00 LITTLE MISS LIBERTY PAGEANT
REGISTRATION AT 12:00
AGES 4-7
2-5:00 BAND: NICHE (BEER GARDEN)
4-9:00 CAR SHOW
REGISTRATION 4-6
5-8:00 T102 COUNTRY STAR PLAYOFFS
8-10:00 BAND: ALABAMA BLUES BROS.
10:00 FOOD TENT CLOSES
10:00 GRAND FIREWORKS
10:30-12 BAND: ALABAMA BLUES BROS.
11:00 BEER TENT CLOSES
ALABAMA BLUES
B R O T H E R S
10:00 NON-DENOMINATIONAL
CHURCH SERVICE
THE LORDS CHURCH
10-7:00 KICKBALL TOURNAMENT
REGISTRATION BEGINS AT 900
SINGLE ELIMINATION
11:00 FOOD TENT OPENS
11:00 BEER TENT OPENS
1-4:00 PONY RIDES
1-5:00 INFLATABLE RIDES
1-3:00 BAND: RENEGADE
(BEER GARDEN)
5:00 VETERANS CEREMONY
TRIBUTE TO 9/11
7-10:00 BAND: JUSTINE BLAZER
10:00 FOOD TENT CLOSES
11:00 BEER TENT CLOSES
SUNDAY JULY 3, 2011
JUSTINE BLAZER
NO PETS
NO SOLICITING
NO COOLERS ALLOWED
NO CARRY - IN
FOOD OR DRINKS
The Motor Inn Auto Truck Stop has joined the Celina
Mercer County Chamber of Commerce. They are located
at 10391 US Route 127, Mendon. Phone: 419- 363-
3376. Visit www.motorinntruckstop.com. Chamber of
Commerce gift certifcates can be redeemed at Motor
Inn.
Motor Inn joins Chamber
Pictured from left to right: Gena Bittner, Chamber
Trustee; Joelle Steinbrunner, Chamber Trustee;
Betty Dubry, Chamber President; Debby and
Rex Bragg (co-owners); George Moore, Chamber
Trustee; Steve Schmidt, Chamber Trustee; Pam
Buschur, Chamber Director
The Celina Police Depart-
ment held the 13th annual Ul-
timate After-School Party on
June 1, the last day of classes
for Celina City School students.
Over 450 students enjoyed an
afternoon of music, pizza, pop
and prizes, along with 20,000
water balloons. The Celina
Fire Department provided a
fre truck to hose down the
crowd that was enjoying the
sunny 80-degree weather.
The Ultimate After-School
Party was actually started as a
traffc safety program. In the
90s, the practice of celebrat-
ing the last day of school be-
gan spilling onto the streets of
Celina. There were several in-
stances of broken windshields
and minor traffc crashes lead-
ing to arrests being made.
While members of the Celina
Police Department understood
that the students just wanted
to celebrate, it was not safe
to do so, on city streets. The
department began combating
the problem in a new way, by
sponsoring the Ultimate After-
School party at Lakeshore Park
on the last day of school. Stu-
dents who attended were of-
fered a free afternoon of food,
fun and prizes. This was ac-
companied by a zero-tolerance
policy towards water balloons
and other celebratory activities
on city streets.
2011 Ultimate After-School Party
CALL
Subscriber Services
The Mercer County Chronicle
For delivery service-related inquiries.
419-678-2324
THIS SPACE CAN BE YOURS!
Advertise your Specials of the Week, Lunch
Menu, Employee of the Week or any special
sale or event that you would like to highlight.
Call The Mercer County Chronicle
Today at
419-678-2324
the mercer county chronicle
Page 8 • June 23, 2011
Sports Sports
MARIA STEIN COUNTRY FEST
SCHEDULE
Friday, June 24, 2011
5:00 Lunch stands open
5:00-10:00 Craft show
5:30-10:00 Volleyball tournament
call 937-371-4773
6:00-12:00 Rides & concessions open
featuring Otterbacher Shows
7:00 Opening ceremonies
with Marion Local Band
7:30 Lawn mower races
8:00-12:00 T-102 Country Star
Play off (with Exploit Band) NEW!
8:00 The Plow
NEW King Acoustic
8:30 Edge Motorsports
9:00 Lawn mower races
10:00 Tractor Square Dancing
10:30 $100 attendance prize drawing
10:30 Lawn mower races
Saturday, June 25, 2011
9:00 Breakfast & lunch stands open
10:00-10:00 Craft Show
12:00-6:00 Relic Shrine, museum
& pilgrim gift shop open
12:00-6:00 The Celina Flying Sportsmen Fun Fly
(Radio controlled airplanes - south of
the Park, Sunday rain date)
12:00-close Rides & Concessions open
featuring Otterbacher Shows
(Kids day special wrist bands $10.00,
1:00-4:30) NEW
12:00 Volleyball Tournament
12:00 Punt, pass & kick
registration (ages 8-13)
12:30 Punt, pass & kick contest
12:30 Bean Bag registration
12:00-5:00 Cruise-in awards at 4:30
(in the park)
1:00 Edge Motorsports
1:00 Bean Bag tournament
1:30 Dodgeball tournament
(6 person team, 14 and younger,
15 and older, call 419-733-1595
2:00 Lift-a-thon (with Andy Lynch
of WTLW-TV44)
2:00 Red Cross go-kart race time trials
2:30 Tractor Square Dancing
3:00 Chicken Dinners by the Knights
of St. John (Carry-outs at Knights
of St. John Hall)
4:00 Folk Mass (in patio with The
Ranly Brothers) NEW
5:00 $100 attendance prize drawing
5:30 Bingo
5:30 Edge Motorsports
6:00 Red Cross go-kart race
7:00 Adult big wheel race
7:00 DJ Pac-man
8:00-12:00 Empty Tank NEW
9:00 Edge Motorsports
10:00 Tractor square dancing
10:30 $100 attendance prize drawing
Sunday, June 26, 2011
9:00 Breakfast & lunch stands open
9:00 Mercer Health 5K run/walk
Call 419-925-4620 (awards in south tent)
9:00 “3 on 3” basketball tournament
(Call 419-564-0059)
9:00-5:00 Craft show
11:00 Volleyball tournament
11:00 Poor boys antique & classic tractor
pull division 1 & 2
(for info 419-678-4352 or 937-295-3934)
10,000 lb. smoker class diesel &
gas truck classes
(For info 419-305-0977)
11:30-Close Rides & concessions open featuring
Otterbacher Shows (kids day special
wrist bands $15.00 - 5:00-10:00) NEW!
12:00-6:00 Relic Shrine, museum & pilgrim gift shop
open
1:00 77th annual pilgrimage
(services in the patio)
1:30 Mini-Indy Race registration (ages 4-6)
2:00 Mini-Indy race
2:00-5:00 Robbie V & Heidi (South tent)
2:30 Edge Motorsports
3:00 Indy Air Bears (jump ropers) NEW!
3:00 Chicken Dinners by the Knights
of St. John
(Carry-outs at Knights of St. John Hall)
3:30 Bingo
3:30 Tractor square dancing
4:00 Diaper Derby (west tent)
4:00 Free Lance (music duo)
5:00 Edge Motorsports
5:00 $100 attendance prize drawing
5:00 & 6:15 Challenger League Baseball
(ballfield in the park)
5:30 Indy Air Bears (jump ropers) NEW!
6:30 Auction of Woodcarvings (west tent)
7:00-11:00 Mustang Sally
8:30 Edge Motorsports
10:00 Tractor square dancing
10:30 $100 attendance prize drawing
11:00 Raffle drawing
Grand prize: a cruise or $2,000 cash
FEATURING ALL WEEKEND:
• BelgiumHorses&WagonRides
• Bingo
• PettingZoosponsoredbyMarionLocalFFA
• ChainsawWoodcarving
featuring Tim, Mack & Luke Kuenning
• TheFennig’sWoodCutOuts
• HotShot“Z”ClownNEW
• JimMcEwenanimalherdingdogs
• LaurieTournoux
“Master Sand Sculptor”
• CrazyCraigMuhlenkampEntertainment
GREAT FOODS!
•LegionTurtleSoup
•KnightsFriedChicken•Brats•Mets•Sausage&
CabbageRolls•Dinners•Pizza•LoadedFries
much, much more!
Mercer Health 419-586-1611
Cy Schwieterman 419-925-4290
The Home Place 419-678-3600
Huelsman Automotive 419-925-4711
Osgood State Bank 419-925-4514
3-Way Machine & tool 419-925-7222
Brookside Companies 419-925-4457
Carriage Werks 419-678-4530
St. Henry Bank 1-800-482-3001
Pleiman Landscaping 419-925-4033
Marion Mutual 419-925-0335
Wagner’s IGA 419-628-3537
Chickasaw Quick Stop 419-925-8888
Sponsors:
All Events Subject to change without Notice

ELDORA SPEEDWAY
13929 State Route 118
New Weston, OH 45348
presented by
4 HUGE CLASSES !
Unlimited Super Modifieds
Super Stock Tractors
Super Farm Tractors
Two Wheel Drive Trucks
Kiddie
Tractor Pull
4:00 PM

& Premier Crop Insurance
Coldwater Baseball
Regional Highlights
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13• June 4, 2009 - June 10, 2009
P H O T O S B Y B U C K H A L L & F R E D K R E M E R
Coldwater Baseball
Regional Highlights
COMPLAINING
AGAIN
My two favorite golf
tournaments to watch from
the comfort of my recliner
are the U.S. Open and the
British Open. At these two
events the occasional poorly
played or just unlucky
shot often means serious
problems and interesting
recovery alternatives for
the unfortunate golfer.

A number of years ago
my high school golfers
had fnished play in our
morning tournament and
were watching college men
teeing off in an afternoon
event. My kids were
initially impressed, but after
a few groups of college
golfers, one of my kids said,
“This is boring, they are
all hitting them like that.
Let’s go.” The young man
was correct in part, because
golf played at a high level
is somewhat similar to trap
shooting. Both contests
are not won with several
spectacular shots, but rather
the repetition of the same
skill time and time again,
often under mental distress.
Both are games won by
basically eliminating misses.
Unfortunately, pro golf is
currently played on courses
so minutely manicured, with
ultra high-tech balls and
equipment, that the missed
and marginal shots are often
not actually penalized.
Congressional Country
Club, home of this year’s
Open, is a monster in length
from the championship
tees, but length is almost
irrelevant for modern pro
golfers. They have the club,
ball, and physical training
to hit it as far as necessary.
If we wish to challenge
the pros, I would suggest
offcials allow the rough
to grow to a height which
would require time to fnd
the occasional errant ball.
It would be entertaining if
the rough also had some
sticker bushes, rocks, and
mounds scattered in random
order. It would also be
difficult, but enjoyable
for us fans, if tournament
play could be delayed or
rescheduled if wind gusts
did not occasionally reach
twenty miles an hour during
the day’s competition. That
last idea might be diffcult
to do, but I would suggest
bunkers not be raked. It
might seem unfair to hit
from someone’s footprint
or divot, but good and bad
breaks are part of golf’s
tradition. It is offcially
called the “rub of the green”
and often tests the character
of the player. Present
conditions on championship
courses often produce sand
bunker lies that are perfect
and allow for easier shots
to the green than from the
grass. It would make the
game more interesting
if sand hazards became
true hazards again for the
pros.
 The U.S. and British
Opens are unique among
pro golf tournaments. All
other tournaments are
administered and “set up”
by the professional players’
tournament offcials, but
the U.S. Golf Association
and the British Component
administer their Open
Tournament. The U.S. Golf
Association traditionally
considers par a good
measure for the national
champion and courses were
prepared in that manner. I
annually enjoy watching
pro golfers facing some
of my type of diffculties
and frustrations during the
tournament. This year the
2011 U.S. Open, however,
looked rather similar to the
Waste Management Phoenix
Open. In that February
event, Mark Wilson led
with a score of 16 under
after Saturday and fnished
18 under par 71 for the
championship. In the recent
U.S. Open, Rory Mcllory led
with 14 under on Saturday
and fnished 16 under par.
The Waste may have made
for better television as it
was played in the Arizona
sun while we shivered in the
depths of our Ohio winter. I
am not mocking the Waste
Management Open; I would
be very proud to have that
trophy on my mantel and
the one million, eighty
thousand dollar winner’s
check that went with it. The
U.S. Open, however, should
differentiate itself from the
Waste Open and give me
some cause to spend Father’s
Day afternoon and evening
in front of my television.
Watching the best golfers in
the world being thoroughly
tested by the most diffcult
course would probably
work
 I also annually enjoy
watching some or all of the
College Baseball World
Series, but I must question
the timing of the event. An
NCAA promo said the vast
majority of college athletes
will become professionals
in some feld other than
athletics. Classes have been
over for most collegians for
weeks or months. Should
they not be having summer
jobs at this time in their
careers? Shouldn’t the
college baseball season
have ended similarly to the
end of the academic year?
 

OFF THE WALL
Observations ... by John Bruns
Photos by Ron Muhlenkamp
Coldwater vs Versailles
Coldwater vs Fort Loramie
the mercer county chronicle
June 23, 2011 • Page 9
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Education/
Instruction
NOW ENROLLING In-
fants through 12 years old
for childcare and pre -
school programming. Our
school-age summer pro-
gram includes four field
trips every week. We are
a 2 Star Rated Program
through Step Up To Qual-
ity. We are a preschool li-
censed by ODJFS. All
meals and snacks are pro-
vided for all children en-
rolled. We even provide
formula and baby food for
infants. We open at 4:30
a.m. and close at 10:30
p.m. Monday-Friday. We
are the only center in Mer-
cer County that gives you
the opportunity to see your
children all day while they
are at Li ttl e Fl ower
through Blossom Cam.
For a tour and more infor-
mation about our program
at Little Flower Learning
Cent er, pl ease cal l
419-586-8030 or email us
at admin@littleflowerlc.com.
You can also visit our
website at www.littleflow-
erlc.com. Please remem-
ber: “We Don!t Grow Flow-
ers, We Grow Kids!”
NOW ENROLLING In-
fants through 12 years old
for childcare and pre -
school programming. Our
school-age summer pro-
gram includes four field
trips every week. We are
a 2 Star Rated Program
through Step Up To Qual-
ity. We are a preschool li-
censed by ODJFS. All
meals and snacks are pro-
vided for all children en-
rolled. We even provide
formula and baby food for
infants. We open at 4:30
a.m. and close at 10:30
p.m. Monday-Friday. We
are the only center in Mer-
cer County that gives you
the opportunity to see your
children all day while they
are at Li ttl e Fl ower
through Blossom Cam.
For a tour and more infor-
mation about our program
at Little Flower Learning
Cent er, pl ease cal l
419-586-8030 or email us
at admin@littleflowerlc.com.
You can also visit our
website at www.littleflow-
erlc.com. Please remem-
ber: “We Don!t Grow Flow-
ers, We Grow Kids!”
018

Education/
Instruction
025

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Drivers-Regional: Home
Weekly! Start .40cpm. 4wks
Vacation! 401K. CDL-A, 1yr
exp. Recruiting: 800-497-2100
Apply:
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PART-TIME POSITION as
a veterinary assistant. Re-
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receptionist duties. Send
resumes with references
to Veterinary Assistant c/o
Mercer County Chronicle,
PO Box 105, Coldwater,
OH 45828.
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Notices
CASH FOR Gold. Scrap
Gold, Gold jewelry, Silver
coins, Silverware, Pocket
wat ches, Di amonds,
Raines Jewelry, 2330
Shawnee Road, Lima,
(419) 229-2899
041

Services
FULL SERVICE Detail.
Make your vehicle look
new again. Free pick up &
delivery. Mobile service
available. 937-547-9476
L.S. CONSTRUCTION -
Over 20 years experience.
Free estimates. Roofing,
Siding, Windows, Doors,
Remodel jobs, Concrete
Work, Decks and more.
Building pole barns for 10
years. Wind and storm
damage repair. Phone
1-260-724-1934.
WE POWERWASH
houses by hand from top
to bottom with soft 4 inch
brushes and we do a qual-
ity job. We will power -
wash anything anywhere.
Call Greg for information
at 419 296-3433.
Classifieds Sell
Shop The
Classifieds for
Great Deals
classifieds
Ohio Scan Ads
Auctions St. louis,
mo - June 30, 2011
ritchie Bros. will
be holding an unre-
served public auction.
no minimum bids or
reserve prices. rbauc-
tion.com for details.

Business Services
REACH 2 MILLION
N E W S P A P E R
READERS with one
ad placement. ONLY
$295.00. ohio’s best
community newspa-
pers. Call Kathy at
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614-486-6677, or
E-MAIL at: kmc-
cutcheon@adohio.net
or check out our web-
site at: www.adohio.
net.

Business Services
REACH OVER 1
MILLION OHIO
ADULTS with
one ad placement.
Only $975.00. Ask
your local newspa-
per about our 2X2
Display Network
or Call Kathy at
614-486-6677/E-mail
kmccutcheon@ado-
hio.net. or check out
our website: www.
adohio.net.

Health Wanted:
Diabetic Test Strips.
Paying up to $15.00
per 100 strips. Call
Alan (888) 775-3782.
www. di abet i ct est -
stripswanted.com.

Help Wanted Class
A cDl Drivers needed
Midwest Regional.
38-40 CPM - Paid
Orientation. 401K
Health Coverage.
$2000 Sign On Bonus.
Online Transport
1- 866- 543- 1234
x 118 Apply: www.
onlinetransport.com

Help Wanted
Dedicated Drivers
Wanted! Multiple
Lanes Available!
Home Weekends!
Excellent Benefits!
New Equipment!
Heartland Express
1-800-441-4953 www.
heartlandexpress.com.

Help Wanted Driver
- cDl-A experienced
Drivers. otr
Regional & Dedicated
Runs. Up to 50c per
mill. Class A CDL &
hazmat Req’d. 800-
942-2104 Ext. 7307
or 7308 www.totalms.
com.

Help Wanted Driver
- cDl-A experienced
otr Drivers. up to
$3000 Bonus! Up to
.39c Per Mile. 888-
463-3962. 6 mo. OTR
exp. & CDL required.
www.usatruck.jobs.

Help Wanted Driver
for the Best! Top
Pay for Experience,
excellent equipment/
Benefts. Outstanding
Careers! Boyd Bros.
Transportation.
CDL-A & 6 mo.
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543-8923.

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- Not getting enough
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Recent Grades or
Exp. Drivers: Sign
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Drivers Better
HOURS! Regional
Van Drivers start at
41.5cpm w/12+ month
experience. home
EVERY WEEK. Great
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888-362-8608, or visit
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Help Wanted
Drivers - cDl-A
Drivers needed
Yesterday! Teams,
Solos & CDL Grads.
Up to 50c per mile.
Paid loaded or empty.
800-942-2104 Ext.
238 or 243. www.
totalms.com.

Help Wanted
Drivers - cDl-A
Flatbed Drivers
Needed. Teams, Solos,
& O/O’s. Great Pay
& benefts. Consistent
miles & hometime. 1
yr. exp. req’d
8 8 8 - 4 3 0 - 7 6 5 9
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Help Wanted
Drivers, Company
Drivers .32c - 35c/
mile. consistent
Home Time and Great
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Operators also need-
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Help Wanted
V A C A N C I E S :
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G e r m a n ( 5 - 1 2 ) ,
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Biology (9-12), School
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(Piedmont Regional
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Schools, Farmville,
VA - (434) 315-2100.
www.pecps.k12.va.us
Closing Date: Until
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Help Wanted
WOOD TRUCKING,
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instruction Attend
College Online from
Home. Medical,
Business, Paralegal,
Accounting, Criminal
Justice. Job Placement
Assistance. Computer
Available. Financial
Aid if Qualifed. Call
877-295-1667. www.
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Attn: Fosamax
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If you used the prescription drug Fosamax
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Call Today!
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110 S. Wayne St.
Ft. Recovery, Ohio
419-375-4617
VISIT US 24/7
www.hastingsauto.com
• Pictures •Prices •Options
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri. 7:00 a.m.-5 p.m.
Wed. 7 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat. 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
CARS
VANS SUVs
11 Buick LaCrosse CXL
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10 Nissan Altima 2.5S
8,000 miles ....... $18,500
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06 Saturn Relay 3
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the mercer county chronicle
Page 10 • June 23, 2011
2011 Baseball Camps
for Girls and Boys
Circle desired
camp(s)
Camp 1-
June 20-22
9:00am-12:00pm
2
nd
,3
rd
,4
th
graders
Baseball Fundementals
$50 - Registration
deadline June 17
th
Camp 2-
June 27-29
9:00am-12:00pm
5
th
,6
th
,7
th
graders
Baseball Fundementals
$50 - Registration
deadline June 24
th
Camp 3-
July 11-12
9:00am-12:00pm
2
nd
- 7
th
graders
Batting Clinic
$35 - Registration
deadline July 8
th
Location: All camps will take place at “Jim Hoess Field,” located in West-
view Park, Fairground Rd., in Celina.
Payment: Make checks, for full amount payable to “Grand Lake Baseball
Club,” and include with registration. Mail completed forms to the following
address:
Participants will receive souvenir T-shirts and each needs to bring his/her
own baseball glove and bat, if available. Cancellations will be announced
on local radio stations WCSM and WKKI. Call 937-869-5202 for more
information.
Shirt Size: Sm. 6-8 _____ Med. 10-12 _____ Lg. 14-16 _____ X-Lg. 18 _____
Camper ___________________ Grade in Fall _______ Date of Birth ________
Parent’s Name ______________________ Address _____________________
Phone: (home) _____________ (work)________________(cell) _____________
Email address: ________________ Emergency contact person _____________
Emergency phone # _________________
A parent or guardian must read and sign the waiver of liability that follows:
I release The Grand Lake Baseball Club, its agents, the city of Celina and
its agents, from liability of damage or injuries to my child due to his/her
participation in this activity. I acknowledge that my child’s participation is
strictly voluntary and I agree to bring no claims against the organizer(s)
and/or sponsors of this event.
________________________________________
(Print name of parent or guardian)
_______________________________________ _____________
(Signature of parent or guardian) (Date signed)
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13 • May 28, 2009 - June 3, 2009
Power of the Pen program a definite hit at
Coldwater and Fort Recovery middle schools
Ansonia
Fort Recovery eighth-grade Power of the Pen team from left are Sara Schoenlein, Grace
Roessner, Adam Westgerdes, Taylor Wendel and Mallory Hull. Wendel finished 8th in the
regional POP competition and though not now eligible to go to the state competition in May,
would be next in line as an official alternate if one of the other finalists was unable to attend.
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BY GRETCHEN
BOLLENBACHER
Power of the Pen (POP) is
Ohio’s award-winning educa-
tional enhancement program
devoted to excellence in cre-
ative writing. In its 24th year,
one of its main aims is to help
seventh and eighth grade stu-
dents realize their highest aca-
demic achievement.
The program’s benefits for
students include empower-
ment in writing at an early
age, the gaining of self-con-
fidence and the imparting of
a love for writing and reading
that identifies, challenges and
rewards gifted creative minds.
The program offers the oppor-
tunity for interscholastic writ-
ing events much like sports
offer that same interscholas-
tic opportunity. Each year par-
ticipants compete in a district
event and can move up to re-
gional and finally to the state
level.
“Coldwater Middle School
has been involved in the
Power of the Pen program
since the early 1990s. I started
being involved when I came
to Coldwater,” said Chris
Miller, senior English instruc-
tor. “Judy Bruns was my men-
tor. Tessy Huwer, middle
school intervention specialist,
also works with me. I am the
coach, and Tessy and I act as
judges for the competitions.”
“Though we didn’t win
anything this year, in both
2007 and 2008 we took four
trophies – third place for sev-
enth grade at the district com-
petition and second at the
regionals in 2007, and in 2008
we placed first at the district
meet and third at the regionals
in the eighth grade,” Miller
said. The kids love the pro-
gram. In a town known for its
sports, these kids get the rec-
ognition they deserve through
POP,” Miller said.
Coldwater’s Ashley
Backs, a seventh grader, said
about the program, “I think it
is a lot of fun, and you can
meet a lot of new friends. And
you meet a lot of new people
from other schools at the com-
petitions. The writing helps
you to express your creativ-
ity.”
Backs and other students
that participated in the pro-
gram went to school early one
morning a week. They were
given a word or a “prompt”
to write about. The instructor
read their stories and gave
them ideas and compliments
about what they had written.
Miller said though he him-
self hadn’t been able to see
any direct improvement in the
students’ writing since he
teaches senior language arts
and doesn’t get to see the kids
for about four years, “All the
middle school teachers agree
that it does help, even if the
kids have to struggle with the
writing.”
Reimbursement to cover
expenses comes from the
school and a local company.
“CAP gives us $150 each year
for t-shirts, and the school
gives us $1,000 annually for
tournament fees and penal-
ties,” Miller said.
Team members are Conner
Stammen, Shannon Hess,
Lauren Rose, Karla
Borgerding, Andrea
Moorman, Ashley Backs,
Haley Fledderjohann,
Courtney Kunk, Rachel
Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein,
Caleb Siefring and Matt
Kramer.
Fort Recovery Schools
Grades 1-8 Gifted Interven-
tion Specialist Marcia Weigel,
said, “A generous contribu-
tion from our Academic
Booster Club has allowed our
eighth grade students to take
their creativity on the “write”
path as we’ve formed a cre-
ative writing team as part of
the Power of the Pen program.
We had several practice ses-
sions, and then Mallory Hull,
Grace Roessner, Sara
Schoenlein, Taylor Wendel
and Adam Westgerdes at-
tended the POP district tour-
nament at Mississinawa Val-
ley Middle School in Febru-
ary.
“Of the 72 eighth-grade
students from 13 different
schools who took part in the
tournament, our Taylor
Wendel ranked 8th place
overall and earned a spot in
the regional tournament.”
In the tournament each stu-
dent rotated through three
rounds of writing competi-
tion. In each round, the stu-
dents were given a creative
writing prompt and forty min-
utes to complete a piece of
writing to turn in to the
judges. Each student’s writ-
ings were ranked in order by
his or her overall ability to
effectively and creatively ad-
dress the prompt. They were
also given quality points for
their work.
There were just over 80
eighth-graders participating in
the regional tournament held
at Minster Middle School in
March. While Wendel did not
earn one of the top overall
awards, she may still be able
to participate in the state tour-
nament to be held in Wooster
the end of May. Weigel said,
“To earn a spot at the state
tournament, writers must fin-
ish in the top twenty percent.
While Taylor did not quite
make the cutoff, she did earn
a spot as an official alternate
should a qualifier be unable
to attend the event.” In the
tournament competitions stu-
dents’ writings are judged on
creativity, originality, voice,
composition and mechanics.
Weigel said this was Fort
Recovery’s first year with
POP. She said that leading up
to the tournaments, her team
had been meeting one or two
times a week to practice. “I
gave them sample creative
writing prompts and 40
minutes to respond. Then
I gave them feedback as to
how to improve their writ-
ing, to work on grammati-
cal and spelling errors, and
we discussed ways to ef-
fectively incorporate more
figurative language into
their writing. We also cri-
tiqued past competition
winners to see which ele-
ments made the writings
good.”
Weigel said that at this
point POP is strictly an
extra-curricular event at
Fort Recovery but “some
of the strategies can be
helpful in the regular class-
room. I have noticed im-
provement in the teams’
skills as we went along.
We got a late start this year,
but I anticipate a greater
degree of improvement
next year when we have a
longer period of time to pre-
pare. “The kids really loved
the program. I imagine we’ll
have more participation next
year, too, as the word
spreads.”
The other county schools
do not currently have the POP
program.
Power of the Pen (POP) is
a non-profit educational orga-
nization with a home office in
Richfield, Ohio. The POP
w e b s i t e ,
www.powerofthepen.org,
says that, “Because the ideas,
dreams and beliefs of today’s
youth form the foundation of
tomorrow’s communities in
Ohio, Power of the Pen is
dedicated to helping young
people find and develop a cre-
ative voice that is uniquely
their own. It is a mission we
will realize when we inspire
every teacher and challenge
every student to truly embrace
the art of creative expression
through writing as a life skill.”
POP offers the “judgment of
the whole” evaluation ap-
proach, meaningful awards or
recognition and pursuit of ex-
cellence.
The program has grown to
become one of Ohio’s largest
educational enhancement pro-
grams. More than 120,000
middle school students ben-
efited from Power of the Pen
instructional methodologies
this year, including more than
8,000 who competed in for-
mal Power of the Pen inter-
scholastic writing tourna-
ments. POP is made possible,
in large part, through grants
and contributions from those
who value educational excel-
lence.
Catholic Adult
Singles Club Events
The Catholic Adult Singles Club enables its members
to share, trust and enjoy the company of fellow single
adults through weekly activities. We are always inter-
ested in meeting new people to join our group. For more
information concerning our organization or any of the
following activities, call Becky Koeing at 419-204-3013.
*Sunday, June 7-Benedication at Retreat Center in
Maria Stein, Ohio.
*Sunday, June 14-Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in Fort
Wayne, Indiana.
*Friday, June 19-Concert in the Van Wert Park in Van
Wert, Ohio.
*Saturday, June 27-Robert Rothchild Farms in Urbana,
Ohio.
For more information on any of these activities, please
call 419-204-3013.
Parkway Local
Schools Events
May 29: High School Track and Field Regional Meet at
Troy at 4 p.m.
June 1: Summer Physical Education begins.
June 12: Last day of Summer Physical Education.
Pictured are members of the Coldwater ‘Power of the Pen’ enjoying their visit to COSI.
Pictured are Karla Borgerding, Lauren Rose, Courtney Kunk, Haley Fledderjohann,
Shannon Hess, Connor Stammen, Matt Kramer, Rachel Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein, Caleb
Siefring, Andrea Moorman and Ashley Backs.
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13 • May 28, 2009 - June 3, 2009
Power of the Pen program a definite hit at
Coldwater and Fort Recovery middle schools
Ansonia
Fort Recovery eighth-grade Power of the Pen team from left are Sara Schoenlein, Grace
Roessner, Adam Westgerdes, Taylor Wendel and Mallory Hull. Wendel finished 8th in the
regional POP competition and though not now eligible to go to the state competition in May,
would be next in line as an official alternate if one of the other finalists was unable to attend.
937-548-1147 • 800-589-4531 • 1270 SWEITZER STREET, GREENVILLE, OHIO
PONTIAC • BUICK • CADILLAC • GMC
5-YEAR/100,00
MILE
WARRANTY!
Beyond Precision
Wear Are Professional Grade
Showroom Hours:
M-W-F 9AM-8PM,
T & Th 9AM-6PM,
Sat. 9AM-4PM
Service
Hours:
M 7:30AM-8PM,
T-F 7:30AM-5PM
CHECK US OUT AT WWW.HITTLES.COM
#1031
2009 CADILLAC DTS
Loaded
$49,705 MSRP
Less $9,710 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995 Plus Tax & Title
SAVE NOW
AT
HITTLES!
BUY! BUY!
2009 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 1/2 TON
UP TO
$
7,000 OFF STICKER
INCLUDES REBATES & OWNER LOYALTY • PLUS TAX & TITLE
#0427
2009 BUICK LUCERNE
3.9 Flex-Fuel, Auto Duel Zone AC,
Premium Pant & Bench Seat
$31,315 MSRP
Less $5,320 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
25,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#9999
2009 CADILLAC SRX
All Wheel Drive & Loaded
$46,775 MSRP
Less $6,780 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lease, Sign &
Drive
*Up To 60 Months
On Most
GM Models!
Summer
Specials
BY GRETCHEN
BOLLENBACHER
Power of the Pen (POP) is
Ohio’s award-winning educa-
tional enhancement program
devoted to excellence in cre-
ative writing. In its 24th year,
one of its main aims is to help
seventh and eighth grade stu-
dents realize their highest aca-
demic achievement.
The program’s benefits for
students include empower-
ment in writing at an early
age, the gaining of self-con-
fidence and the imparting of
a love for writing and reading
that identifies, challenges and
rewards gifted creative minds.
The program offers the oppor-
tunity for interscholastic writ-
ing events much like sports
offer that same interscholas-
tic opportunity. Each year par-
ticipants compete in a district
event and can move up to re-
gional and finally to the state
level.
“Coldwater Middle School
has been involved in the
Power of the Pen program
since the early 1990s. I started
being involved when I came
to Coldwater,” said Chris
Miller, senior English instruc-
tor. “Judy Bruns was my men-
tor. Tessy Huwer, middle
school intervention specialist,
also works with me. I am the
coach, and Tessy and I act as
judges for the competitions.”
“Though we didn’t win
anything this year, in both
2007 and 2008 we took four
trophies – third place for sev-
enth grade at the district com-
petition and second at the
regionals in 2007, and in 2008
we placed first at the district
meet and third at the regionals
in the eighth grade,” Miller
said. The kids love the pro-
gram. In a town known for its
sports, these kids get the rec-
ognition they deserve through
POP,” Miller said.
Coldwater’s Ashley
Backs, a seventh grader, said
about the program, “I think it
is a lot of fun, and you can
meet a lot of new friends. And
you meet a lot of new people
from other schools at the com-
petitions. The writing helps
you to express your creativ-
ity.”
Backs and other students
that participated in the pro-
gram went to school early one
morning a week. They were
given a word or a “prompt”
to write about. The instructor
read their stories and gave
them ideas and compliments
about what they had written.
Miller said though he him-
self hadn’t been able to see
any direct improvement in the
students’ writing since he
teaches senior language arts
and doesn’t get to see the kids
for about four years, “All the
middle school teachers agree
that it does help, even if the
kids have to struggle with the
writing.”
Reimbursement to cover
expenses comes from the
school and a local company.
“CAP gives us $150 each year
for t-shirts, and the school
gives us $1,000 annually for
tournament fees and penal-
ties,” Miller said.
Team members are Conner
Stammen, Shannon Hess,
Lauren Rose, Karla
Borgerding, Andrea
Moorman, Ashley Backs,
Haley Fledderjohann,
Courtney Kunk, Rachel
Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein,
Caleb Siefring and Matt
Kramer.
Fort Recovery Schools
Grades 1-8 Gifted Interven-
tion Specialist Marcia Weigel,
said, “A generous contribu-
tion from our Academic
Booster Club has allowed our
eighth grade students to take
their creativity on the “write”
path as we’ve formed a cre-
ative writing team as part of
the Power of the Pen program.
We had several practice ses-
sions, and then Mallory Hull,
Grace Roessner, Sara
Schoenlein, Taylor Wendel
and Adam Westgerdes at-
tended the POP district tour-
nament at Mississinawa Val-
ley Middle School in Febru-
ary.
“Of the 72 eighth-grade
students from 13 different
schools who took part in the
tournament, our Taylor
Wendel ranked 8th place
overall and earned a spot in
the regional tournament.”
In the tournament each stu-
dent rotated through three
rounds of writing competi-
tion. In each round, the stu-
dents were given a creative
writing prompt and forty min-
utes to complete a piece of
writing to turn in to the
judges. Each student’s writ-
ings were ranked in order by
his or her overall ability to
effectively and creatively ad-
dress the prompt. They were
also given quality points for
their work.
There were just over 80
eighth-graders participating in
the regional tournament held
at Minster Middle School in
March. While Wendel did not
earn one of the top overall
awards, she may still be able
to participate in the state tour-
nament to be held in Wooster
the end of May. Weigel said,
“To earn a spot at the state
tournament, writers must fin-
ish in the top twenty percent.
While Taylor did not quite
make the cutoff, she did earn
a spot as an official alternate
should a qualifier be unable
to attend the event.” In the
tournament competitions stu-
dents’ writings are judged on
creativity, originality, voice,
composition and mechanics.
Weigel said this was Fort
Recovery’s first year with
POP. She said that leading up
to the tournaments, her team
had been meeting one or two
times a week to practice. “I
gave them sample creative
writing prompts and 40
minutes to respond. Then
I gave them feedback as to
how to improve their writ-
ing, to work on grammati-
cal and spelling errors, and
we discussed ways to ef-
fectively incorporate more
figurative language into
their writing. We also cri-
tiqued past competition
winners to see which ele-
ments made the writings
good.”
Weigel said that at this
point POP is strictly an
extra-curricular event at
Fort Recovery but “some
of the strategies can be
helpful in the regular class-
room. I have noticed im-
provement in the teams’
skills as we went along.
We got a late start this year,
but I anticipate a greater
degree of improvement
next year when we have a
longer period of time to pre-
pare. “The kids really loved
the program. I imagine we’ll
have more participation next
year, too, as the word
spreads.”
The other county schools
do not currently have the POP
program.
Power of the Pen (POP) is
a non-profit educational orga-
nization with a home office in
Richfield, Ohio. The POP
w e b s i t e ,
www.powerofthepen.org,
says that, “Because the ideas,
dreams and beliefs of today’s
youth form the foundation of
tomorrow’s communities in
Ohio, Power of the Pen is
dedicated to helping young
people find and develop a cre-
ative voice that is uniquely
their own. It is a mission we
will realize when we inspire
every teacher and challenge
every student to truly embrace
the art of creative expression
through writing as a life skill.”
POP offers the “judgment of
the whole” evaluation ap-
proach, meaningful awards or
recognition and pursuit of ex-
cellence.
The program has grown to
become one of Ohio’s largest
educational enhancement pro-
grams. More than 120,000
middle school students ben-
efited from Power of the Pen
instructional methodologies
this year, including more than
8,000 who competed in for-
mal Power of the Pen inter-
scholastic writing tourna-
ments. POP is made possible,
in large part, through grants
and contributions from those
who value educational excel-
lence.
Catholic Adult
Singles Club Events
The Catholic Adult Singles Club enables its members
to share, trust and enjoy the company of fellow single
adults through weekly activities. We are always inter-
ested in meeting new people to join our group. For more
information concerning our organization or any of the
following activities, call Becky Koeing at 419-204-3013.
*Sunday, June 7-Benedication at Retreat Center in
Maria Stein, Ohio.
*Sunday, June 14-Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in Fort
Wayne, Indiana.
*Friday, June 19-Concert in the Van Wert Park in Van
Wert, Ohio.
*Saturday, June 27-Robert Rothchild Farms in Urbana,
Ohio.
For more information on any of these activities, please
call 419-204-3013.
Parkway Local
Schools Events
May 29: High School Track and Field Regional Meet at
Troy at 4 p.m.
June 1: Summer Physical Education begins.
June 12: Last day of Summer Physical Education.
Pictured are members of the Coldwater ‘Power of the Pen’ enjoying their visit to COSI.
Pictured are Karla Borgerding, Lauren Rose, Courtney Kunk, Haley Fledderjohann,
Shannon Hess, Connor Stammen, Matt Kramer, Rachel Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein, Caleb
Siefring, Andrea Moorman and Ashley Backs.
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13 • May 28, 2009 - June 3, 2009
Power of the Pen program a definite hit at
Coldwater and Fort Recovery middle schools
Ansonia
Fort Recovery eighth-grade Power of the Pen team from left are Sara Schoenlein, Grace
Roessner, Adam Westgerdes, Taylor Wendel and Mallory Hull. Wendel finished 8th in the
regional POP competition and though not now eligible to go to the state competition in May,
would be next in line as an official alternate if one of the other finalists was unable to attend.
937-548-1147 • 800-589-4531 • 1270 SWEITZER STREET, GREENVILLE, OHIO
PONTIAC • BUICK • CADILLAC • GMC
5-YEAR/100,00
MILE
WARRANTY!
Beyond Precision
Wear Are Professional Grade
Showroom Hours:
M-W-F 9AM-8PM,
T & Th 9AM-6PM,
Sat. 9AM-4PM
Service
Hours:
M 7:30AM-8PM,
T-F 7:30AM-5PM
CHECK US OUT AT WWW.HITTLES.COM
#1031
2009 CADILLAC DTS
Loaded
$49,705 MSRP
Less $9,710 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995 Plus Tax & Title
SAVE NOW
AT
HITTLES!
BUY! BUY!
2009 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 1/2 TON
UP TO
$
7,000 OFF STICKER
INCLUDES REBATES & OWNER LOYALTY • PLUS TAX & TITLE
#0427
2009 BUICK LUCERNE
3.9 Flex-Fuel, Auto Duel Zone AC,
Premium Pant & Bench Seat
$31,315 MSRP
Less $5,320 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
25,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#9999
2009 CADILLAC SRX
All Wheel Drive & Loaded
$46,775 MSRP
Less $6,780 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lease, Sign &
Drive
*Up To 60 Months
On Most
GM Models!
Summer
Specials
BY GRETCHEN
BOLLENBACHER
Power of the Pen (POP) is
Ohio’s award-winning educa-
tional enhancement program
devoted to excellence in cre-
ative writing. In its 24th year,
one of its main aims is to help
seventh and eighth grade stu-
dents realize their highest aca-
demic achievement.
The program’s benefits for
students include empower-
ment in writing at an early
age, the gaining of self-con-
fidence and the imparting of
a love for writing and reading
that identifies, challenges and
rewards gifted creative minds.
The program offers the oppor-
tunity for interscholastic writ-
ing events much like sports
offer that same interscholas-
tic opportunity. Each year par-
ticipants compete in a district
event and can move up to re-
gional and finally to the state
level.
“Coldwater Middle School
has been involved in the
Power of the Pen program
since the early 1990s. I started
being involved when I came
to Coldwater,” said Chris
Miller, senior English instruc-
tor. “Judy Bruns was my men-
tor. Tessy Huwer, middle
school intervention specialist,
also works with me. I am the
coach, and Tessy and I act as
judges for the competitions.”
“Though we didn’t win
anything this year, in both
2007 and 2008 we took four
trophies – third place for sev-
enth grade at the district com-
petition and second at the
regionals in 2007, and in 2008
we placed first at the district
meet and third at the regionals
in the eighth grade,” Miller
said. The kids love the pro-
gram. In a town known for its
sports, these kids get the rec-
ognition they deserve through
POP,” Miller said.
Coldwater’s Ashley
Backs, a seventh grader, said
about the program, “I think it
is a lot of fun, and you can
meet a lot of new friends. And
you meet a lot of new people
from other schools at the com-
petitions. The writing helps
you to express your creativ-
ity.”
Backs and other students
that participated in the pro-
gram went to school early one
morning a week. They were
given a word or a “prompt”
to write about. The instructor
read their stories and gave
them ideas and compliments
about what they had written.
Miller said though he him-
self hadn’t been able to see
any direct improvement in the
students’ writing since he
teaches senior language arts
and doesn’t get to see the kids
for about four years, “All the
middle school teachers agree
that it does help, even if the
kids have to struggle with the
writing.”
Reimbursement to cover
expenses comes from the
school and a local company.
“CAP gives us $150 each year
for t-shirts, and the school
gives us $1,000 annually for
tournament fees and penal-
ties,” Miller said.
Team members are Conner
Stammen, Shannon Hess,
Lauren Rose, Karla
Borgerding, Andrea
Moorman, Ashley Backs,
Haley Fledderjohann,
Courtney Kunk, Rachel
Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein,
Caleb Siefring and Matt
Kramer.
Fort Recovery Schools
Grades 1-8 Gifted Interven-
tion Specialist Marcia Weigel,
said, “A generous contribu-
tion from our Academic
Booster Club has allowed our
eighth grade students to take
their creativity on the “write”
path as we’ve formed a cre-
ative writing team as part of
the Power of the Pen program.
We had several practice ses-
sions, and then Mallory Hull,
Grace Roessner, Sara
Schoenlein, Taylor Wendel
and Adam Westgerdes at-
tended the POP district tour-
nament at Mississinawa Val-
ley Middle School in Febru-
ary.
“Of the 72 eighth-grade
students from 13 different
schools who took part in the
tournament, our Taylor
Wendel ranked 8th place
overall and earned a spot in
the regional tournament.”
In the tournament each stu-
dent rotated through three
rounds of writing competi-
tion. In each round, the stu-
dents were given a creative
writing prompt and forty min-
utes to complete a piece of
writing to turn in to the
judges. Each student’s writ-
ings were ranked in order by
his or her overall ability to
effectively and creatively ad-
dress the prompt. They were
also given quality points for
their work.
There were just over 80
eighth-graders participating in
the regional tournament held
at Minster Middle School in
March. While Wendel did not
earn one of the top overall
awards, she may still be able
to participate in the state tour-
nament to be held in Wooster
the end of May. Weigel said,
“To earn a spot at the state
tournament, writers must fin-
ish in the top twenty percent.
While Taylor did not quite
make the cutoff, she did earn
a spot as an official alternate
should a qualifier be unable
to attend the event.” In the
tournament competitions stu-
dents’ writings are judged on
creativity, originality, voice,
composition and mechanics.
Weigel said this was Fort
Recovery’s first year with
POP. She said that leading up
to the tournaments, her team
had been meeting one or two
times a week to practice. “I
gave them sample creative
writing prompts and 40
minutes to respond. Then
I gave them feedback as to
how to improve their writ-
ing, to work on grammati-
cal and spelling errors, and
we discussed ways to ef-
fectively incorporate more
figurative language into
their writing. We also cri-
tiqued past competition
winners to see which ele-
ments made the writings
good.”
Weigel said that at this
point POP is strictly an
extra-curricular event at
Fort Recovery but “some
of the strategies can be
helpful in the regular class-
room. I have noticed im-
provement in the teams’
skills as we went along.
We got a late start this year,
but I anticipate a greater
degree of improvement
next year when we have a
longer period of time to pre-
pare. “The kids really loved
the program. I imagine we’ll
have more participation next
year, too, as the word
spreads.”
The other county schools
do not currently have the POP
program.
Power of the Pen (POP) is
a non-profit educational orga-
nization with a home office in
Richfield, Ohio. The POP
w e b s i t e ,
www.powerofthepen.org,
says that, “Because the ideas,
dreams and beliefs of today’s
youth form the foundation of
tomorrow’s communities in
Ohio, Power of the Pen is
dedicated to helping young
people find and develop a cre-
ative voice that is uniquely
their own. It is a mission we
will realize when we inspire
every teacher and challenge
every student to truly embrace
the art of creative expression
through writing as a life skill.”
POP offers the “judgment of
the whole” evaluation ap-
proach, meaningful awards or
recognition and pursuit of ex-
cellence.
The program has grown to
become one of Ohio’s largest
educational enhancement pro-
grams. More than 120,000
middle school students ben-
efited from Power of the Pen
instructional methodologies
this year, including more than
8,000 who competed in for-
mal Power of the Pen inter-
scholastic writing tourna-
ments. POP is made possible,
in large part, through grants
and contributions from those
who value educational excel-
lence.
Catholic Adult
Singles Club Events
The Catholic Adult Singles Club enables its members
to share, trust and enjoy the company of fellow single
adults through weekly activities. We are always inter-
ested in meeting new people to join our group. For more
information concerning our organization or any of the
following activities, call Becky Koeing at 419-204-3013.
*Sunday, June 7-Benedication at Retreat Center in
Maria Stein, Ohio.
*Sunday, June 14-Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in Fort
Wayne, Indiana.
*Friday, June 19-Concert in the Van Wert Park in Van
Wert, Ohio.
*Saturday, June 27-Robert Rothchild Farms in Urbana,
Ohio.
For more information on any of these activities, please
call 419-204-3013.
Parkway Local
Schools Events
May 29: High School Track and Field Regional Meet at
Troy at 4 p.m.
June 1: Summer Physical Education begins.
June 12: Last day of Summer Physical Education.
Pictured are members of the Coldwater ‘Power of the Pen’ enjoying their visit to COSI.
Pictured are Karla Borgerding, Lauren Rose, Courtney Kunk, Haley Fledderjohann,
Shannon Hess, Connor Stammen, Matt Kramer, Rachel Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein, Caleb
Siefring, Andrea Moorman and Ashley Backs.
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13 • May 28, 2009 - June 3, 2009
Power of the Pen program a definite hit at
Coldwater and Fort Recovery middle schools
Ansonia
Fort Recovery eighth-grade Power of the Pen team from left are Sara Schoenlein, Grace
Roessner, Adam Westgerdes, Taylor Wendel and Mallory Hull. Wendel finished 8th in the
regional POP competition and though not now eligible to go to the state competition in May,
would be next in line as an official alternate if one of the other finalists was unable to attend.
937-548-1147 • 800-589-4531 • 1270 SWEITZER STREET, GREENVILLE, OHIO
PONTIAC • BUICK • CADILLAC • GMC
5-YEAR/100,00
MILE
WARRANTY!
Beyond Precision
Wear Are Professional Grade
Showroom Hours:
M-W-F 9AM-8PM,
T & Th 9AM-6PM,
Sat. 9AM-4PM
Service
Hours:
M 7:30AM-8PM,
T-F 7:30AM-5PM
CHECK US OUT AT WWW.HITTLES.COM
#1031
2009 CADILLAC DTS
Loaded
$49,705 MSRP
Less $9,710 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995 Plus Tax & Title
SAVE NOW
AT
HITTLES!
BUY! BUY!
2009 GMC SIERRA CREW CAB 1/2 TON
UP TO
$
7,000 OFF STICKER
INCLUDES REBATES & OWNER LOYALTY • PLUS TAX & TITLE
#0427
2009 BUICK LUCERNE
3.9 Flex-Fuel, Auto Duel Zone AC,
Premium Pant & Bench Seat
$31,315 MSRP
Less $5,320 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
25,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
#9999
2009 CADILLAC SRX
All Wheel Drive & Loaded
$46,775 MSRP
Less $6,780 Hittle Discounts & Rebates
Sale
$
39,995Plus Tax & Title
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lease, Sign &
Drive
*Up To 60 Months
On Most
GM Models!
Summer
Specials
BY GRETCHEN
BOLLENBACHER
Power of the Pen (POP) is
Ohio’s award-winning educa-
tional enhancement program
devoted to excellence in cre-
ative writing. In its 24th year,
one of its main aims is to help
seventh and eighth grade stu-
dents realize their highest aca-
demic achievement.
The program’s benefits for
students include empower-
ment in writing at an early
age, the gaining of self-con-
fidence and the imparting of
a love for writing and reading
that identifies, challenges and
rewards gifted creative minds.
The program offers the oppor-
tunity for interscholastic writ-
ing events much like sports
offer that same interscholas-
tic opportunity. Each year par-
ticipants compete in a district
event and can move up to re-
gional and finally to the state
level.
“Coldwater Middle School
has been involved in the
Power of the Pen program
since the early 1990s. I started
being involved when I came
to Coldwater,” said Chris
Miller, senior English instruc-
tor. “Judy Bruns was my men-
tor. Tessy Huwer, middle
school intervention specialist,
also works with me. I am the
coach, and Tessy and I act as
judges for the competitions.”
“Though we didn’t win
anything this year, in both
2007 and 2008 we took four
trophies – third place for sev-
enth grade at the district com-
petition and second at the
regionals in 2007, and in 2008
we placed first at the district
meet and third at the regionals
in the eighth grade,” Miller
said. The kids love the pro-
gram. In a town known for its
sports, these kids get the rec-
ognition they deserve through
POP,” Miller said.
Coldwater’s Ashley
Backs, a seventh grader, said
about the program, “I think it
is a lot of fun, and you can
meet a lot of new friends. And
you meet a lot of new people
from other schools at the com-
petitions. The writing helps
you to express your creativ-
ity.”
Backs and other students
that participated in the pro-
gram went to school early one
morning a week. They were
given a word or a “prompt”
to write about. The instructor
read their stories and gave
them ideas and compliments
about what they had written.
Miller said though he him-
self hadn’t been able to see
any direct improvement in the
students’ writing since he
teaches senior language arts
and doesn’t get to see the kids
for about four years, “All the
middle school teachers agree
that it does help, even if the
kids have to struggle with the
writing.”
Reimbursement to cover
expenses comes from the
school and a local company.
“CAP gives us $150 each year
for t-shirts, and the school
gives us $1,000 annually for
tournament fees and penal-
ties,” Miller said.
Team members are Conner
Stammen, Shannon Hess,
Lauren Rose, Karla
Borgerding, Andrea
Moorman, Ashley Backs,
Haley Fledderjohann,
Courtney Kunk, Rachel
Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein,
Caleb Siefring and Matt
Kramer.
Fort Recovery Schools
Grades 1-8 Gifted Interven-
tion Specialist Marcia Weigel,
said, “A generous contribu-
tion from our Academic
Booster Club has allowed our
eighth grade students to take
their creativity on the “write”
path as we’ve formed a cre-
ative writing team as part of
the Power of the Pen program.
We had several practice ses-
sions, and then Mallory Hull,
Grace Roessner, Sara
Schoenlein, Taylor Wendel
and Adam Westgerdes at-
tended the POP district tour-
nament at Mississinawa Val-
ley Middle School in Febru-
ary.
“Of the 72 eighth-grade
students from 13 different
schools who took part in the
tournament, our Taylor
Wendel ranked 8th place
overall and earned a spot in
the regional tournament.”
In the tournament each stu-
dent rotated through three
rounds of writing competi-
tion. In each round, the stu-
dents were given a creative
writing prompt and forty min-
utes to complete a piece of
writing to turn in to the
judges. Each student’s writ-
ings were ranked in order by
his or her overall ability to
effectively and creatively ad-
dress the prompt. They were
also given quality points for
their work.
There were just over 80
eighth-graders participating in
the regional tournament held
at Minster Middle School in
March. While Wendel did not
earn one of the top overall
awards, she may still be able
to participate in the state tour-
nament to be held in Wooster
the end of May. Weigel said,
“To earn a spot at the state
tournament, writers must fin-
ish in the top twenty percent.
While Taylor did not quite
make the cutoff, she did earn
a spot as an official alternate
should a qualifier be unable
to attend the event.” In the
tournament competitions stu-
dents’ writings are judged on
creativity, originality, voice,
composition and mechanics.
Weigel said this was Fort
Recovery’s first year with
POP. She said that leading up
to the tournaments, her team
had been meeting one or two
times a week to practice. “I
gave them sample creative
writing prompts and 40
minutes to respond. Then
I gave them feedback as to
how to improve their writ-
ing, to work on grammati-
cal and spelling errors, and
we discussed ways to ef-
fectively incorporate more
figurative language into
their writing. We also cri-
tiqued past competition
winners to see which ele-
ments made the writings
good.”
Weigel said that at this
point POP is strictly an
extra-curricular event at
Fort Recovery but “some
of the strategies can be
helpful in the regular class-
room. I have noticed im-
provement in the teams’
skills as we went along.
We got a late start this year,
but I anticipate a greater
degree of improvement
next year when we have a
longer period of time to pre-
pare. “The kids really loved
the program. I imagine we’ll
have more participation next
year, too, as the word
spreads.”
The other county schools
do not currently have the POP
program.
Power of the Pen (POP) is
a non-profit educational orga-
nization with a home office in
Richfield, Ohio. The POP
w e b s i t e ,
www.powerofthepen.org,
says that, “Because the ideas,
dreams and beliefs of today’s
youth form the foundation of
tomorrow’s communities in
Ohio, Power of the Pen is
dedicated to helping young
people find and develop a cre-
ative voice that is uniquely
their own. It is a mission we
will realize when we inspire
every teacher and challenge
every student to truly embrace
the art of creative expression
through writing as a life skill.”
POP offers the “judgment of
the whole” evaluation ap-
proach, meaningful awards or
recognition and pursuit of ex-
cellence.
The program has grown to
become one of Ohio’s largest
educational enhancement pro-
grams. More than 120,000
middle school students ben-
efited from Power of the Pen
instructional methodologies
this year, including more than
8,000 who competed in for-
mal Power of the Pen inter-
scholastic writing tourna-
ments. POP is made possible,
in large part, through grants
and contributions from those
who value educational excel-
lence.
Catholic Adult
Singles Club Events
The Catholic Adult Singles Club enables its members
to share, trust and enjoy the company of fellow single
adults through weekly activities. We are always inter-
ested in meeting new people to join our group. For more
information concerning our organization or any of the
following activities, call Becky Koeing at 419-204-3013.
*Sunday, June 7-Benedication at Retreat Center in
Maria Stein, Ohio.
*Sunday, June 14-Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in Fort
Wayne, Indiana.
*Friday, June 19-Concert in the Van Wert Park in Van
Wert, Ohio.
*Saturday, June 27-Robert Rothchild Farms in Urbana,
Ohio.
For more information on any of these activities, please
call 419-204-3013.
Parkway Local
Schools Events
May 29: High School Track and Field Regional Meet at
Troy at 4 p.m.
June 1: Summer Physical Education begins.
June 12: Last day of Summer Physical Education.
Pictured are members of the Coldwater ‘Power of the Pen’ enjoying their visit to COSI.
Pictured are Karla Borgerding, Lauren Rose, Courtney Kunk, Haley Fledderjohann,
Shannon Hess, Connor Stammen, Matt Kramer, Rachel Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein, Caleb
Siefring, Andrea Moorman and Ashley Backs.
THE MERCER COUNTY CHRONICLE
Page 13 • May 28, 2009 - June 3, 2009
Power of the Pen program a definite hit at
Coldwater and Fort Recovery middle schools
Ansonia
Fort Recovery eighth-grade Power of the Pen team from left are Sara Schoenlein, Grace
Roessner, Adam Westgerdes, Taylor Wendel and Mallory Hull. Wendel finished 8th in the
regional POP competition and though not now eligible to go to the state competition in May,
would be next in line as an official alternate if one of the other finalists was unable to attend.
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BY GRETCHEN
BOLLENBACHER
Power of the Pen (POP) is
Ohio’s award-winning educa-
tional enhancement program
devoted to excellence in cre-
ative writing. In its 24th year,
one of its main aims is to help
seventh and eighth grade stu-
dents realize their highest aca-
demic achievement.
The program’s benefits for
students include empower-
ment in writing at an early
age, the gaining of self-con-
fidence and the imparting of
a love for writing and reading
that identifies, challenges and
rewards gifted creative minds.
The program offers the oppor-
tunity for interscholastic writ-
ing events much like sports
offer that same interscholas-
tic opportunity. Each year par-
ticipants compete in a district
event and can move up to re-
gional and finally to the state
level.
“Coldwater Middle School
has been involved in the
Power of the Pen program
since the early 1990s. I started
being involved when I came
to Coldwater,” said Chris
Miller, senior English instruc-
tor. “Judy Bruns was my men-
tor. Tessy Huwer, middle
school intervention specialist,
also works with me. I am the
coach, and Tessy and I act as
judges for the competitions.”
“Though we didn’t win
anything this year, in both
2007 and 2008 we took four
trophies – third place for sev-
enth grade at the district com-
petition and second at the
regionals in 2007, and in 2008
we placed first at the district
meet and third at the regionals
in the eighth grade,” Miller
said. The kids love the pro-
gram. In a town known for its
sports, these kids get the rec-
ognition they deserve through
POP,” Miller said.
Coldwater’s Ashley
Backs, a seventh grader, said
about the program, “I think it
is a lot of fun, and you can
meet a lot of new friends. And
you meet a lot of new people
from other schools at the com-
petitions. The writing helps
you to express your creativ-
ity.”
Backs and other students
that participated in the pro-
gram went to school early one
morning a week. They were
given a word or a “prompt”
to write about. The instructor
read their stories and gave
them ideas and compliments
about what they had written.
Miller said though he him-
self hadn’t been able to see
any direct improvement in the
students’ writing since he
teaches senior language arts
and doesn’t get to see the kids
for about four years, “All the
middle school teachers agree
that it does help, even if the
kids have to struggle with the
writing.”
Reimbursement to cover
expenses comes from the
school and a local company.
“CAP gives us $150 each year
for t-shirts, and the school
gives us $1,000 annually for
tournament fees and penal-
ties,” Miller said.
Team members are Conner
Stammen, Shannon Hess,
Lauren Rose, Karla
Borgerding, Andrea
Moorman, Ashley Backs,
Haley Fledderjohann,
Courtney Kunk, Rachel
Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein,
Caleb Siefring and Matt
Kramer.
Fort Recovery Schools
Grades 1-8 Gifted Interven-
tion Specialist Marcia Weigel,
said, “A generous contribu-
tion from our Academic
Booster Club has allowed our
eighth grade students to take
their creativity on the “write”
path as we’ve formed a cre-
ative writing team as part of
the Power of the Pen program.
We had several practice ses-
sions, and then Mallory Hull,
Grace Roessner, Sara
Schoenlein, Taylor Wendel
and Adam Westgerdes at-
tended the POP district tour-
nament at Mississinawa Val-
ley Middle School in Febru-
ary.
“Of the 72 eighth-grade
students from 13 different
schools who took part in the
tournament, our Taylor
Wendel ranked 8th place
overall and earned a spot in
the regional tournament.”
In the tournament each stu-
dent rotated through three
rounds of writing competi-
tion. In each round, the stu-
dents were given a creative
writing prompt and forty min-
utes to complete a piece of
writing to turn in to the
judges. Each student’s writ-
ings were ranked in order by
his or her overall ability to
effectively and creatively ad-
dress the prompt. They were
also given quality points for
their work.
There were just over 80
eighth-graders participating in
the regional tournament held
at Minster Middle School in
March. While Wendel did not
earn one of the top overall
awards, she may still be able
to participate in the state tour-
nament to be held in Wooster
the end of May. Weigel said,
“To earn a spot at the state
tournament, writers must fin-
ish in the top twenty percent.
While Taylor did not quite
make the cutoff, she did earn
a spot as an official alternate
should a qualifier be unable
to attend the event.” In the
tournament competitions stu-
dents’ writings are judged on
creativity, originality, voice,
composition and mechanics.
Weigel said this was Fort
Recovery’s first year with
POP. She said that leading up
to the tournaments, her team
had been meeting one or two
times a week to practice. “I
gave them sample creative
writing prompts and 40
minutes to respond. Then
I gave them feedback as to
how to improve their writ-
ing, to work on grammati-
cal and spelling errors, and
we discussed ways to ef-
fectively incorporate more
figurative language into
their writing. We also cri-
tiqued past competition
winners to see which ele-
ments made the writings
good.”
Weigel said that at this
point POP is strictly an
extra-curricular event at
Fort Recovery but “some
of the strategies can be
helpful in the regular class-
room. I have noticed im-
provement in the teams’
skills as we went along.
We got a late start this year,
but I anticipate a greater
degree of improvement
next year when we have a
longer period of time to pre-
pare. “The kids really loved
the program. I imagine we’ll
have more participation next
year, too, as the word
spreads.”
The other county schools
do not currently have the POP
program.
Power of the Pen (POP) is
a non-profit educational orga-
nization with a home office in
Richfield, Ohio. The POP
w e b s i t e ,
www.powerofthepen.org,
says that, “Because the ideas,
dreams and beliefs of today’s
youth form the foundation of
tomorrow’s communities in
Ohio, Power of the Pen is
dedicated to helping young
people find and develop a cre-
ative voice that is uniquely
their own. It is a mission we
will realize when we inspire
every teacher and challenge
every student to truly embrace
the art of creative expression
through writing as a life skill.”
POP offers the “judgment of
the whole” evaluation ap-
proach, meaningful awards or
recognition and pursuit of ex-
cellence.
The program has grown to
become one of Ohio’s largest
educational enhancement pro-
grams. More than 120,000
middle school students ben-
efited from Power of the Pen
instructional methodologies
this year, including more than
8,000 who competed in for-
mal Power of the Pen inter-
scholastic writing tourna-
ments. POP is made possible,
in large part, through grants
and contributions from those
who value educational excel-
lence.
Catholic Adult
Singles Club Events
The Catholic Adult Singles Club enables its members
to share, trust and enjoy the company of fellow single
adults through weekly activities. We are always inter-
ested in meeting new people to join our group. For more
information concerning our organization or any of the
following activities, call Becky Koeing at 419-204-3013.
*Sunday, June 7-Benedication at Retreat Center in
Maria Stein, Ohio.
*Sunday, June 14-Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo in Fort
Wayne, Indiana.
*Friday, June 19-Concert in the Van Wert Park in Van
Wert, Ohio.
*Saturday, June 27-Robert Rothchild Farms in Urbana,
Ohio.
For more information on any of these activities, please
call 419-204-3013.
Parkway Local
Schools Events
May 29: High School Track and Field Regional Meet at
Troy at 4 p.m.
June 1: Summer Physical Education begins.
June 12: Last day of Summer Physical Education.
Pictured are members of the Coldwater ‘Power of the Pen’ enjoying their visit to COSI.
Pictured are Karla Borgerding, Lauren Rose, Courtney Kunk, Haley Fledderjohann,
Shannon Hess, Connor Stammen, Matt Kramer, Rachel Eichenauer, Brad Eckstein, Caleb
Siefring, Andrea Moorman and Ashley Backs.
Showroom Hours:
M-W-F 9AM-7:30PM
T & Th 9AM-6PM
Sat. 9AM-4PM
Service
Hours:
M 7:30AM-7PM
T-F 7:30AM-5PM
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By: Betty Lou Denney/
Hall

Archaeologists and
students from Ball State
university have discov-
ered what is thought to
be the site of the origi-
nal Fort in Fort recovery.
The archaeological feld
school of Ball State
university’s Department
of Anthropology, directed
by mark Groover, Ph.D.,
archaeologist and professor
of the current archaeologi-
cal feld school, has been
working on the Fort project
for the past fve weeks.
the project was fund-
ed by the national Park
Services American
Battlefield Protection
Program grant which
was written by Ball State
university Department
of Anthropology Applied
Archaeology laboratories
in collaboration with the
Fort recovery historical
Society and the ohio
historical Society.
the strip of land next
to nature’s corner that is
owned by the historical
Society was the site of the
new discovery. Although
Groover was not willing to
state that this was the origi-
nal location of the Fort, he
felt that enough evidence
was uncovered to substan-
tiate the statement. the 17
foot trench line with small
and large post holes which
indicate the possible fort
palisade wall or related
structure was uncovered.
Also found were pottery,
redware, bones and shell
buttons and other artifacts
from the 1790s. Another
fact that added credibility
to the fact that this is the
site of the original Fort is
that the trench line lines
up and seems to follow
the Greenville treaty line.
the original Fort was still
standing at the time when
the treaty line was estab-
lished.
chris Keller, Ball State
university Archaeologist,
who manages the geo-
physical archaeology work
currently being done on
23 acres of battlefeld
grounds, stated that the site
to dig was determined by
sophisticated ground pen-
etrating radar equipment.
the equipment was con-
ducted by Jarrod Burks,
ohio Valley Archaeology,
inc.
closing of the project
will include flling in the
excavating site. to pre-
serve and indicate the
site it will be backflled
with stone. Fort recovery
museum Director nancy
Knapke stated that the site
will be well marked to help
with any future “digs”. the
artifacts that were found
will be taken to Ball State
university to be cleaned
and studied and then will
eventually be on display
at the Fort recovery
museum.
Archaeology dig uncovers probable
location of the original Fort
(Right) One of the arti-
facts uncovered by the Ball
State archaeologist team
was a construction spike
thought to be part of the
original Fort. (Above) Eli
Ovahhar proudly holds
his frst fnd of the past
few weeks.
Photos by roy hall
Students and professors from Ball State University
working at the “dig” site beside Nature’s Corner. The
group recently uncovered what they think to be the
original site of the frst Fort in Fort Recovery.
Father’s Day Special at Eldora
Open Wheel Modifed cars lined up for practice
Above: Bob Sutter in Stock car
#18
Below: Ryan Sutter in Modifed
Car #18.
The Sutters are a father and son
team from Coldwater.
Saturday’s racing action at
eldora Speedway wasn’t lim-
ited to the racing surface – it
was also a race against mother
nature. cooperative measures
between track offcials and
the race teams produced all
of the preliminary heats and
B-mains in 45 minutes for
the umP (united midwestern
Promoters) Modifeds, Eldora
Stock cars and circle track
mini-trucks.
With the main events in the
staging area and ready to pull
on to the racing surface, the
frst round of showers moved
into the area. A brief respite
from the rains allowed the track
crews to begin re-working the
one-half mile clay surface
before another round of show-
ers moved in. those showers,
with the high humidity found
the track efforts to be futile and
the event was cancelled.
Persons holding tickets and
or pit passes from the June 18
event may apply the value of
those tickets to any remain-
ing event on the 2011 eldora
Speedway schedule of events.
Per established eldora policy,
there are no cash refunds.
next up on the eldora
schedule is the ohio State
championship tractor and
truck pull this Saturday (June
25), with the Kings royal
weekend approaching July 15
and 16.
complete event details may
be found on the track’s website
www.eldoraspeedway.com.
race Against rain Fails After heats completed

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419-394-2366 * www.otterbein.org
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Open Houses
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Photos submitted by roger Grevenkamp

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