Contents

Letter from Bert Bower, TCI Founder and CEO 2
Benets of Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond 3
TCI Technology 4
Program Contents 6
Program Components 7
How to Use This Chapter 8
Student Edition: Sample Chapter 6: How Do People Improve Their Communities? 10
Lesson Guide 24
Lesson Masters 38
Interactive Student Notebook 48
Visuals 55
Study Your Community 59
Welcome to Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond. This
document contains everything you need to teach the sample chapter
“How Do People Improve Their Communities?” We invite you to use this
sample chapter today to discover how the TCI Approach can make social
studies come alive for your students.
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Sample Chapter
E L E M E N T A R Y S C H O O L
Welcome!
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You have in your hands a sample of Social Studies Alive! Our Community
and Beyond from TCI. This sample chapter is intended to give you the
opportunity both to review our program and to try it out in your own class-
room so you can join the growing body of elementary teachers who are
turning to Social Studies Alive! to reinvigorate their social studies and
language arts programs.
As a high school teacher who teaches only one subject, I am in awe of
elementary teachers. You not only teach all subjects—math, language arts,
science, and social studies—you juggle a myriad of other teaching and
nonteaching responsibilities as well. That’s why we created Social Studies
Alive! Our Community and Beyond—-to make it easier for you to integrate
language arts skills and social studies skills, to create active lessons to keep
kids engaged, and to provide meaningful content to inspire young learners
to care about the world around them.
I’m condent you and your students will enjoy this sample chapter. I look
forward to welcoming you to the TCI community of inspired, active social
studies teachers!
Best,
Bert Bower, TCI Founder and CEO
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H
ow can we help our students to
understand their world? How do we
prepare them to participate in it effectively?
To these core social studies goals, TCI
adds another: How do we get students
excited about this learning? Social Studies
Alive! Our Community and Beyond
delivers on all three goals. Interactive
classroom experiences, coupled with
fascinating reading, engage all learners
in today’s diverse classroom.
TCI recognizes the challenge to teachers
of tting social studies into a school day
that must concentrate so heavily on the
three R’s. To meet this challenge, TCI has
created a social studies program that
serves double duty: reinforcing reading
and language arts skills at the same time
that students learn social studies.
Social Studies Alive! Our Community
and Beyond was created by teachers,
for teachers. The program is exible and
easy to use, providing a variety of ways to
meet student needs. Teachers can
• Cover state standards in history,
geography, economics, and government.
• motivate student reading with the
Reading Further feature in each chapter—
a high-interest case study that drills down
into interesting events, concepts, and
people discussed in the chapter.
• support language arts instruction in the
social studies curriculum with vocabulary
development, reading strategies, a variety
of writing activities, and numerous
opportunities to develop speaking and
listening skills.
• Measure student mastery with rigorous
assessments that cover comprehension,
skills, and critical thinking.
• modify instruction for English language
learners, learners with special education
needs, and enrichment.
• extend learning with recommended
additional reading opportunities and TCI’s
online Enrichment Resources, including
a Biography Bank, Enrichment Read-
ings, and Study Your Community activity
booklet.
Social Studies Alive! Our Community and
Beyond will help you ignite your students’
passion for learning social studies and
your passion for teaching it!
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Benets of Social Studies Alive!
Our Community and Beyond
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TCI’s cutting-edge technology solutions for both teachers and students are designed to
enhance teaching and learning.
TeachTCI is the most dynamic social studies technology ever created for teachers.
It delivers a wealth of teaching materials directly to teachers via the Internet. Using
TeachTCI technology, you can plan, present, and manage your TCI lessons all in one
place. Access the technology online, at your convenience, at www.teachtci.com.
PLAN
Here you’ll nd everything you need to conduct a memorable, knock-their-socks-off
lesson—Lesson Guides, Student Handouts, Visuals, and more—in pdf format, all in
one place, and organized by chapter. Other features include:
• Customized state correlations
• Easy-to-use assessment tool—use TCI’s assessments or customize your own
• Enrichment Resources to enhance instruction
• Discussion Groups—share best practices with teachers nationwide
TEACH
TCI’s state-of-the-art Classroom Presenter slideshows translate the printed
Lesson Guide into a visual format that teachers can use with students.
The Classroom Presenter has:
• Rich images that are the hallmark of TCI lessons
• Concise, step-by-step instructions for each chapter’s classroom activity
• A powerful toolbar to enhance presentations—zoom, draw, and write on slides
to emphasize important information
LEARNTCI
See what your students see in LearnTCI before assigning it to them.
LearnTCI includes:
• The Student Edition text
• Game-like Reading Challenges in which students show what they know
• A highlighter, Main Idea Viewer, in-text key term denitions, text-to-audio
features, and more
MANAGE
In one easy-to-use place, you can:
• Set up digital classes
• Assign chapters
• View your students’ Reading Challenge results individually and by class
• Manage accessibility features for individual students
TeachTCI
Technology for Teachers
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LearnTCI—www.learntci.com —enables students to interact with content
online and apply what they’ve learned in a fun and engaging way. LearnTCI
motivates students to read—and they enjoy it more when it’s online!
As students read their Student Edition online, they can:
• Highlight the main ideas and then check their understanding using the
Main Idea Viewer
• Click on key terms and see their denitions, right in line with the text
• Have the text read to them
Reading Challenges use game-like settings to engage students’
interest through visuals, primary sources, maps, and audio cues.
Students are challenged to think about the content of each chapter
in ways that stimulate learning.
Students’ Reading Challenge scores are recorded in TeachTCI so teachers
can learn which topics may need reinforcement and which students may
need extra help. Assignments can be monitored from any computer at a
teacher’s convenience.

LearnTCI
Technology for Students
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In Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond, an Essential Question organizes each
chapter and its corresponding activity. By reading the Student Edition and participating in
the classroom activity, students gain a deeper understanding of the content.
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Program Contents
1 Where in the World Is Our Community?
In a Visual Discovery activity, students learn
where their community is located in the world.
2 Where in the United States Is Our
Community?
In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students learn
how to use map skills as they visit some key
landmarks in the United States.
3 What Is the Geography of Our Community?
In a Writing for Understanding activity,
students learn how physical geography affects
communities.
4 How Do People Become Part of Our Country?
In an Experiential Exercise, students learn
about the immigrant experience.
5 What Makes Our Community Diverse?
In a Response Group activity, students learn
how diverse cultures make contributions to life
in our communities.
6 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity,
students explore individuals’ roles in making
their communities and their country better
places to live.
7 How Are People Around the World Alike
and Different?
In a Writing for Understanding activity,
students compare and contrast their lives with
the lives of children in other countries.
8 How Does Our Economy Work?
In an Experiential Exercise, students learn
about markets and how supply and demand
work together to affect the prices of goods
and services.
9 How Does Global Trade Affect Our Community?
In an Experiential Exercise, students learn
about global trade and its effects on people
and communities around the world.
10 What Are the Public Services in Our Community?
In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students learn
about public services in local communities and
around the world.
11 Who Works at City Hall?
In a Writing for Understanding activity, students
learn about some of the main jobs and depart-
ments in the government of a community.
12 How Do We Have a Voice in Our Community?
In a Visual Discovery activity, students learn
about four ways for people to have a voice in
their community.
13 Whose Planet Is It, Anyway?
In a Response Group activity, students
explore how communities can help to solve
environmental problems.
14 How Can We Help the Global Community?
In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity,
students learn about things they can do to
help the global community.
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All the components of Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond t together to
deliver powerful and memorable learning experiences. Social Studies Alive! comes in both
a print edition and a technology edition to meet your district’s needs.
Student Edition
• Considerate text that is uncluttered and easy to
navigate for students at all levels
• Essential Question in each chapter title to
focus student learning
• Reading Further case study in each chapter to
motivate student reading
• Powerful graphic elements that support visual
learning and spark student interest
• Key social studies vocabulary identied in blue
Interactive Student Notebook
• Preview activities to engage student interest
• Graphically organized Reading Notes to
improve student comprehension and retention
• Reading Further activities to build writing skills
• Processing activities to demonstrate mastery
of new concepts and skills
Lesson Guide
• Simple, step-by-step procedures for each
lesson
• Materials, objectives, vocabulary, and pacing
for each lesson
• Point-of-use tips for integrating language arts
throughout lessons
• Answers to assessments and Guides to
Reading Notes
• Recommendations for differentiating
instruction for English language learners,
learners with special education needs,
and enrichment.
Lesson Masters
• Reproducible student and teacher pages for
classroom activities
• Student Handouts, Information Masters, and
assessments
Visuals, Placards, and Sounds of Social Studies
Recorded Tracks
• Vibrant, colorful images to build and enhance
visual literacy skills
• Musical recordings, dramatic readings, and
sound effects
• Multisensory components essential for
engaging all learners in classroom activities
Solutions for Effective Instruction
• Ideas for integrating reading/language arts into
social studies
• Proven methods of differentiating instruction
• Ways to build critical thinking skills in social
studies
Study Your Community
• Reproducible pages to guide student research,
writing, and mapmaking
• Step-by-step preparation and activity notes for
teachers
Program Components
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Step 1
Plan Instruction
Review the Lesson Guide (pages 24–37) to familiarize yourself with the chapter
objectives, vocabulary, and step-by-step procedures for the classroom activity. Be sure to
review the materials list (page 24), and prepare materials as needed. Also, consider the
options for differentiating instruction and enhancing learning (pages 32–33).
Step 2
Preview the Chapter with Students
Follow the steps under Preview in the Lesson Guide (pages 26–27) to help students
connect to prior knowledge, build background knowledge, and develop vocabulary.
Students will complete the corresponding page in their Interactive Student Notebooks
(page 48).
Step 3
Conduct the Problem Solving Groupwork Activity
This section of the Lesson Guide (pages 27–29) leads you step-by-step through the heart
of a TCI classroom activity—in this case, a Problem Solving Groupwork activity. Here,
students create human monuments honoring the contributions of four individuals whose
actions made a difference in the lives of people in their own community and around the
country. During this activity, students read the chapter in the Student Edition (pages
10–19) as they research and complete the corresponding Reading Notes (pages 49–52) in
their Interactive Student Notebooks.
Step 4
Continue with Reading Further
Have students complete the additional reading and writing activity that drills further into
the chapter’s content (page 30). Students read the feature in the Student Edition (pages
20–23) and complete the corresponding notes in their Interactive Student Notebooks
(page 53).
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How to Use This Chapter
C H A P T E R
Overview
Students explore individuals’ roles in making their communities and their coun-
try better places to live. In the Preview, they learn how Rosa Parks confronted
the problem of segregation in her community. In a Problem Solving Groupwork
activity, students create human monuments honoring the contributions of four
other individuals whose actions made a dierence in the lives of people in their
own community and around the country. In Reading Further, they learn how
individuals and organizations came to the aid of New Orleans aer Hurricane
Katrina. In the Processing activity, students research the contributions of some-
one who has improved life in their own community and design a monument and
a plaque to honor that person.
Objectives
Social Studies
t Identify how four individuals solved problems to improve the lives of people
in their own communities and in communities around the country.
t Synthesize information about one of these individuals to design a “human
monument” to honor that person’s contribution to his or her community.
t Explain why all individuals share a responsibility for making their
community a better place to live.
t Identify examples of individuals and organizations who contribute to the
public good in an emergency such as a natural disaster.
t Research and describe the contributions of someone who has improved life in
the local community.
Language Arts
t Make a brief oral presentation to the class. (speaking)
Social Studies Vocabulary
strike, boycott, canal, disabled, natural disaster, volunteer
How Do People Improve
Their Communities?
6
Materials
Social Studies Alive! Our
Community and Beyond
Transparencies 6A–6D
Interactive Student
Notebooks
Lesson Masters
t Information Masters
6A and 6B
t Student Handout 6
large bedsheet
Time Estimates
Preview: 30 min.
Problem Solving
Groupwork: 5 or
more sessions
(varying lengths)
Reading Further: 45 min.
Processing: 30 min.
P r o b l e m S o l v i n g G r o u p w o r k
© Teachers’ Curriculum
Institute
Social Studies A
live! O
ur C
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m
unity and Beyond
22
A Monument
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A
6 The city of New Orleans wants to put
up a monument to thank some of the heroes of
Hurricane Katrina. Finish writing the words
that will go on the plaque.
R e a d i n g F u r t h e r
Hurricane Heroes
In 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck our community. We honor the
heroes who reached out to help us in our time of need.
The Red Cross helped our community by
.
The SPCA helped our community by
.
Melissa, Jenna, and Jackie Kantor helped our community by
.
Girl Scouts in Strongsville, Ohio, helped our community by
.
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Step 5
Direct the Processing Activity
Have students complete the Processing activity (page 30) in their Interactive Student
Notebooks (page 54).
Step 6
Conduct the Assessment
Have students complete the Chapter 6 Assessment from the Lesson Masters
(pages 46–47).
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N a m e D a t e
Chapter 6 Assessment
Big Ideas
Read the questions. Fill in the circle next to the best answer.
1. When farmworkers decided to
strike, they agreed to
O A. move north.
O B. work harder.
O C. write letters.
O D. stop working.
2. How did a boycott help make
farmowners treat workers better?
O A. People phoned the owners.
O B. People yelled at the owners.
O C. People drew silly pictures of
the owners.
O D. People stopped buying from
the owners.
3. Ruby Bridges made a difference
by being very
4. What did Lois Marie Gibbs say
was wrong with a canal?
O A. Chemicals in it made
children sick.
O B. Boats in it carried too
many people.
O C. Swimming in it wasn’t fun.
O D. Skating on it was dangerous
in the winter.
5. Who formed a group to help
disabled people be treated fairly?
O A. Ruby Bridges
O B. César Chávez
O C. Judy Heumann
O D. Lois Marie Gibbs
Reading Further
6. Which of these is a natural
disaster?
O A. a bad fight
O B. a hurricane
O C. a polluted river
O D. an unfair law
7. How did the Red Cross help people
in New Orleans?
O A. It provided shelter, hot meals,
and water.
O B. It set up an outdoor
music show.
O C. It told people to buy things
in stores.
O D. It let children go to
good schools.
O A. angry.
O B. brave.
O C. pretty.
O D. smart.
Social Studies Alive!
Our Community and
Beyond will help you
ignite your
students’ passion for
social studies—
and re-ignite
your passion for
teaching it!
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6
How Do People
Improve Their
Communities?
Our communities bring us many
good things. ey are full of diverse
people and interesting places. But
communities can have problems,
too. When people see these
problems, they can help solve
them. Just one person can make
a big dierence.
In this chapter, you’ll read about
four people who set out to solve
problems in their own communities.
ey each made their town or city a
better place to live. eir work also
helped people in many other places.
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6.1 César Chávez Helps Farmworkers
César (SAY-zahr) Chávez came from a poor family.
When he was still a teenager, he became a migrant
farmworker to help his family.
Farmworkers had hard lives. They worked long
hours for very little pay. Often workers got sick or
hurt because they had to use unsafe chemicals
and machines.
As a young man, César wanted to help the
farmworkers. In 1962, he helped to start a new group.
It became known as the
United Farm Workers of
America, or UFW. The
UFW helped the workers
ask for better pay and safer
working conditions.
At that time, César lived
in the town of Delano,
California. There were farms
all around the town. At
first, the farm owners there
refused to listen to the UFW.
So César told all the workers
to stop picking the crops.
Stopping work in this way is
called a strike. César hoped
the strike would make the
owners pay more attention
to the workers.

César Chávez (in
the middle) made
life better for
farmworkers.
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13
The owners still didn’t listen. César took another
step. He asked people to stop buying what the farms
sold. This is called a boycott.
It took five years, but many of the farm owners
finally gave in. They agreed to pay the farmworkers
more. The owners also promised that they would
make the work safer.
César Chávez helped to make Delano a better place
for farmworkers. He went on to help farmworkers in
many other places around the country. César helped
them get better pay and safer ways of working.
77
These people are
marching to show
their support for the
UFW.
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78
Ruby Bridges
made history when
she was just six
years old.
6.2 Ruby Bridges Helps African Americans
In 1960, Ruby Bridges was six years old. She was
ready to start first grade. When she did, she would
make history.
Ruby lived in New Orleans, Louisiana. At that time,
black students and white students in New Orleans
went to different schools. Ruby would be the first
African American to go
to the white school near
her home.
Many white people were
upset. They wanted black
and white students to be
kept apart. Still, Ruby’s
mother was hopeful. She
thought the school was a
good one. And she thought
it was time that black and
white children went to the
same schools. But Ruby’s
father was worried. “We’re
just asking for trouble,”
he said.
Ruby’s first day of school
was frightening. Outside
the school, crowds of angry
people threw things at her.
They yelled, “Blacks don’t
belong in our schools!” Ruby
thought some of them might
even hurt her.
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15
79
Inside the school, Ruby discovered she was the
only student in her classroom. All the others had
stayed home.
For months, Ruby was the only student in her
class. Still, she kept coming to school. People started
to see that she wasn’t going away. One day, two white
children came to school with her. Then more and
more students came back to school.
Ruby made it easier for all children in New Orleans
to go to good schools together. As an adult, Ruby
helps people in other communities, too. She talks to
children and adults about her experience and how we
can still learn from it today.
Ruby helped to
show people that
black and white
children could go to
the same schools.
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16
80
6.3 Lois Marie Gibbs Helps Make Her
Community Safer
In 1978, Lois Marie Gibbs lived in Niagara Falls, New
York. Lois had two children, Michael and Melissa.
Michael became very sick. Lois wanted to know why.
There was an old canal,
or waterway, near Michael’s
school. It was called Love
Canal. Businesses had been
dumping dangerous chemicals
into the canal for years.
Love Canal flowed
underneath the school
playground. Lois thought the
dirty canal was making her
children sick.
Lois didn’t know what to do.
No one believed her fears about
Love Canal.
Lois asked her neighbors
about their health. It turned out
that many of the children in the
area were sick. Some scientists
agreed that the canal could be
the problem.
Lois decided to do something
about it. She got all her neighbors together. Lois and
her neighbors knew they needed help. They decided to
tell everyone they could about their problem.
Lois Gibbs wanted
to know why
children near Love
Canal were getting
sick.
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17
81
Lois and her neighbors made signs to carry. Then
they followed the governor of New York around.
People saw them on television.
Finally, the governor came to visit Love Canal. He
agreed to help families move to a safer place. Later,
President Jimmy Carter helped, too.
Lois Gibbs made a big difference in her community.
Later, she helped people in other towns and cities.
She showed them how to join together to make their
communities safer places to live.
This school was
closed because of
the chemicals in
Love Canal.
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82
6.4 Judy Heumann Helps Disabled People
Judy Heumann (HEW-man) was born in 1947. When
she was a baby, she got sick with polio. This disease
hurt her legs. Judy would never be able to walk. She
had to use a wheelchair to get around.
Judy lived in Brooklyn, New York. On her
first day of first grade, her mother brought
her to school. The principal wouldn’t let
Judy in because she was in a wheelchair. A
teacher came to Judy’s house for a few hours
each week instead.
When Judy was in fourth grade, she was
finally allowed to go to school. There she
met other disabled students. Disabled
means not being able to do an everyday
thing, like walk, talk, hear, or learn, in
the same way that most people can. Judy
learned that the other disabled students felt
the same way she did. Her legs didn’t work
right, but she wanted to learn as much as
any other student.
In college, Judy studied to be a teacher. At first,
New York City wouldn’t let her teach because she was
in a wheelchair. Judy went to court to win the right to
teach. She taught school for three years.
In 1970, Judy formed a group called Disabled in
Action. She started the group to protect disabled
people in New York from being treated unfairly.
The group has grown a lot since then. Today it helps
disabled people all across the country live better lives.
Judy Heumann
started the group
Disabled in Action.
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83
Summary
In this chapter, you met four special people. César Chávez,
Ruby Bridges, Lois Marie Gibbs, and Judy Heumann all
helped to improve their communities. They made other
people’s lives better. Their work helped people in many other
places, too. What can you do to make your community a
better place?
Thanks to Judy,
disabled students
like these are
treated more fairly.
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Reading
Further
6
Helping a Community in Need
Sometimes problems are too big for a town
or a city to solve by itself. In 2005, a ood put
most of New Orleans under water. Homes
and businesses were ruined. Thousands of
people had no food or shelter. Who reached
out to help?
The city of New Orleans sits on very low
ground. Nearby there is a large lake.
Years ago, levees, or walls, were built to keep
the lake’s water from ooding the city. But in
2005, a huge storm struck New Orleans.
Afterward, some of the levees broke. Water
poured into the streets. It wrecked homes and
trapped people and animals.
New Orleans needed help—and lots of it.
People being
rescued from
the ood in New
Orleans
New Orleans
Gulf of Mexico
Lake
Ponchartrain
M
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ƒ1
Louisiana
Mississippi
0 25 50 kilometers
0 25 50 miles
1
6
(
:
ƒ:
ƒ1
SSA3_SE_6.5a
Black Cyan Magenta Yellow
First Proof
TCI12 40
New Orleans
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85
A photograph of Hurricane Katrina
taken from space
Helping People Survive
The storm that struck New
Orleans was called Hurricane Katrina.
Hurricanes are large storms with
heavy rains and powerful winds.
These storms can cause a lot of
harm. So can other events in nature,
such as earthquakes. We call these
events natural disasters.
In a natural disaster, people need
help. One group that gives help is
the Red Cross. The Red Cross was
started more than 100 years ago.
It helps people in need around the
world. The Red Cross does not try
to make money. In fact, many of its
workers are volunteers. This means
they are not paid.
Hurricane Katrina struck a large
area in the southern United States.
Much of New Orleans was flooded,
but other places were hit hard, too.
Workers from the Red Cross rushed
to the scene. They set up shelters
for homeless people throughout
the area. They brought drinking
water and other supplies. They
cooked hot meals. They helped
many people survive the disaster.
Red Cross volunteers passing
out drinking water
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Saving Animals
People were not the only ones needing help in
New Orleans. Pets were in trouble, too. A group
called the SPCA reached out to these pets.
SPCA stands for the Society for the Prevention
of Cruelty to Animals. The SPCA has been helping
animals in need for more than 100 years. Like the
Red Cross, it does not try to make money.
The day before Katrina struck, the SPCA took
263 pets to Houston, Texas. It wanted to keep them
out of danger. But the real work started after the
ood. Dogs, cats, horses, and birds were stranded.
Many of them died. Still, the SPCA rescued about
8,500 animals. It also worked to bring pets and
their owners back together.
Dogs being
rescued from
the roof of a
wrecked home in
New Orleans
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This girl is selling
lemonade to raise
money for people
who were harmed
by Hurricane
Katrina.
Kids Helping Out
Melissa, Jenna, and Jackie Kantor live in the state
of Maryland. After Katrina, they had an idea.
They wanted to send backpacks to kids who were
affected by the storm. The girls started Project
Backpack. In two months, they collected about
50,000 backpacks! People from 40 states joined in
to help them.
In Strongsville, Ohio, a Girl Scout troop helped,
too. The scouts collected supplies for people who
were hurt by Katrina. The scouts set up boxes
in schools. Students put food, candles, blankets,
and other items in the boxes. The scouts lled up
about 25 vans with supplies.
Have you ever heard the saying “Every little
bit helps”? That was very true after Katrina.
Large groups reached out to help. So did many
individuals. You can be sure that each little bit of
help made a big difference.
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C H A P T E R
Overview
Students explore individuals’ roles in making their communities and their coun-
try better places to live. In the Preview, they learn how Rosa Parks confronted
the problem of segregation in her community. In a Problem Solving Groupwork
activity, students create human monuments honoring the contributions of four
other individuals whose actions made a dierence in the lives of people in their
own community and around the country. In Reading Further, they learn how
individuals and organizations came to the aid of New Orleans aer Hurricane
Katrina. In the Processing activity, students research the contributions of some-
one who has improved life in their own community and design a monument and
a plaque to honor that person.
Objectives
Social Studies
t Identify how four individuals solved problems to improve the lives of people
in their own communities and in communities around the country.
t Synthesize information about one of these individuals to design a “human
monument” to honor that person’s contribution to his or her community.
t Explain why all individuals share a responsibility for making their
community a better place to live.
t Identify examples of individuals and organizations who contribute to the
public good in an emergency such as a natural disaster.
t Research and describe the contributions of someone who has improved life in
the local community.
Language Arts
t Make a brief oral presentation to the class. (speaking)
Social Studies Vocabulary
strike, boycott, canal, disabled, natural disaster, volunteer
How Do People Improve
Their Communities?
6
Materials
Social Studies Alive! Our
Community and Beyond
Transparencies 6A–6D
Interactive Student
Notebooks
Lesson Masters
t Information Masters
6A and 6B
t Student Handout 6
large bedsheet
Time Estimates
Preview: 30 min.
Problem Solving
Groupwork: 5 or
more sessions
(varying lengths)
Reading Further: 45 min.
Processing: 30 min.
How Do People Improve Their Communities? 69
P r o b l e m S o l v i n g G r o u p w o r k
Note: TCI uses the terms “visual” and “transparency” interchangeably.
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P l a n n i n g G u i d e
Activity Suggested Time Materials
Preview
t Connecting to Prior
Knowledge
t Building Background
Knowledge
t Developing Vocabulary
30 minutes t Transparency 6A
t Information Master 6A
t Interactive Student Notebooks
Problem Solving Groupwork
Exploring the contributions
of individuals who improved
their communities
35-minute session
t Learning about an
individual who made a
difference in a community
(Steps 1–3)
40-minute sessions (2 or
more)
t Creating human
monuments (Step 4)
15-minute sessions
(1 per group)
t Presenting the human
monuments (Steps 5–9)
15-minute session
t Debrieng the activity
(Steps 10 and 11)
t Social Studies Alive! Our Community
and Beyond, Chapter 6 introduction,
Sections 6.1–6.4, and Summary
t Transparencies 6B and 6C
t Interactive Student Notebooks
t Student Handout 6 (1 copy per group)
t Information Master 6B (1 transparency)
t large bedsheet
Reading Further
Identifying groups and
individuals who come to the
aid of a community after a
natural disaster
45 minutes t Social Studies Alive! Our Community
and Beyond, Chapter 6 Reading Further
t Transparency 6D
t Interactive Student Notebooks
Processing
Researching and honoring
individuals who have
improved the local community
30 minutes t Interactive Student Notebooks
Assessment 30 minutes t Chapter 6 Assessment

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71 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
P r o c e d u r e s
Preview
1 Connecting to Prior Knowledge: Help students identify examples of shared
responsibility for the good of the community. Ask questions such as these:
Whose job is it to make sure your home is neat and clean? What part do you
have in that job? What happens if you don’t do your part? What would happen
if no one did his or her part? Can you think of similar things at school where
you share a responsibility for something that is good for everyone? Can you
think of a problem at school that could be solved if more people helped out?
2 Building Background Knowledge: Introduce the concept of public virtue
and explain that it includes taking personal responsibility for making our
communities better places to live.
• Project Transparency 6A: A Monument.
• Ask students these questions: What do you see in this picture? What is it
called? (a statue or monument) Look at all the clues in the picture. Where
do you think this person is? What else can you tell about her? Why do you
think the monument shows her sitting like this? What do you think she
did that made people want to build this monument to honor her? (Note:
It is fine if students are puzzled or cannot guess, since they are about to
discover how simply sitting down on a bus can change people’s lives.)
• Tell students that the monument shows a woman named Rosa Parks.
Explain that the monument is located in the Birmingham Civil Rights
Institute in Alabama. The Institute is a kind of museum that tells people
about the struggle to win equal rights for African Americans.
• Read aloud Information Master 6A: Rosa Parks Fights to Change an
Unfair Law.
• Check students’ understanding by asking: When did the event happen that
this monument is about? How long ago was that? What did Rosa Parks do
that day? How did her action help to make life better for African Americans
in her community and around the country?
• Tell students that Rosa Parks’s action is an example of an important
idea—public virtue. Explain that public virtue means acting in ways that
make our communities and our country good places to live. Tell them
that people can show public virtue in many ways, such as obeying the law,
showing respect for the rights of others, and voting in elections. Another
way is to do something to promote the common good, as Rosa Parks did
when she helped to solve the problem of segregation.
• Have student volunteers create a human monument of the scene on the
bus. Ask one student to take the part of Rosa Parks in the monument by
sitting in front of the image and copying Rosa Parks’ body posture. Next,
ask students to brainstorm other characters that could be added to the
monument, such as the bus driver or the white passenger who boarded the
bus. Ask for other volunteers to take these parts. Have the rest of the class
suggest body positions and facial expressions for these characters that will
tell who these people were and what they did.
Transparency 6A
Information Master 6A
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72
P r o c e d u r e s
• Have students complete the plaque in Preview 6 in their Interactive
Student Notebooks. Explain that a plaque is a sign that is placed on a
monument to tell why the person is being honored.
3 Developing Vocabulary: Introduce key social studies terms—strike, boycott,
canal, disabled, natural disaster, and volunteer.
• Discuss each term before beginning the activity, using methods described
in Solutions for Effective Instruction.
• Review each term again with students as it appears in the activity reading
and encourage them to use it in their writing.
Problem Solving Groupwork
1 Prepare students to explore the contributions of other individuals who
made a difference in their own communities and in communities around
the country.
• Have students read the introduction to Chapter 6 in Social Studies Alive!
Our Community and Beyond with you. Ask them what they think they will
learn in this chapter.
• Project Transparency 6B: How Do People Improve Their Communities? Ask
students to use clues in the image to guess how each of these people made
his or her community a better place to live.
2 Have groups of students learn how one individual improved life for people
in his or her community and across the country.
• Place students in mixed-ability groups of four.
• Explain to students that they will read about one of the people they saw
pictured in the transparency. They will then create a human monument
to celebrate what that person did to improve his or her community. To
create the monument, they will use only their own bodies and a few
simple props.
• Assign each group one of the four people profiled in the chapter.
Have groups read the section of the chapter corresponding to their
assigned figure.
3 Have groups complete the Reading Notes for their assigned figure.
• Have students turn to Reading Notes 6 in their Interactive Student
Notebooks. Make sure each group finds the page of the Reading Notes
that corresponds to its assigned figure.
• Review the questions in the Reading Notes. Make sure students
understand what information they need to find in the Student Edition.
• Have group members work together to complete the Reading Notes for
their figure. Circulate around the room, checking groups’ answers using
Guide to Reading Notes 6 at the end of this chapter.
Transparency 6B
Chapter 6
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73 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
P r o c e d u r e s
4 Have students in each group create a human monument to honor the
contributions of their assigned figure.
• Distribute one copy of Student Handout 6: Steps for Creating a Human
Monument to each group.
• Briefly review Step 1 on the handout with students. Then assign a member
of each group to lead Step 1, and have groups complete the step. The leader
should complete the first page of Student Handout 6. When the groups are
done, check their work and initial the bottom of the page.
• Have groups complete the remaining steps. Briefly review the directions
for each step, guiding students as necessary. Have the assigned student for
each step lead the group and complete the corresponding page of Student
Handout 6 for the group. Initial each page as it is completed. (Note:
Consider spreading this part of the activity over two or three days.)
5 Set up the classroom for the presentations of the human monuments.
• Clear a “stage” at the front of the classroom where students can present
their monuments. Ideally, this space should be in front of a slide screen.
• Fold the bedsheet and leave it near the stage. You will use it as a curtain to
hide students from the audience as they set up their monuments.
• Place the projector as close to the stage area as possible. You will use it
as a spotlight during the presentations to dramatically highlight each
monument.
• Have students sit with their groups. Project a transparency of Information
Master 6B: Steps for Presenting Your Human Monument. Review the steps
with students.
6 Prepare students for the presentation of the first human monument.
• Have all groups that were not assigned the first figure (César Chávez)
read the corresponding section in the Student Edition. As students are
reading, encourage them to think of questions they may want to ask
about the figure.
• Meanwhile, have the group or groups that are presenting a César Chávez
monument gather their materials and come up to the stage area.
7 Have the Chávez group(s) present their human monument(s). When all
students have finished reading the section, have the first group present its
human monument honoring César Chávez. Follow this procedure:
• Hold up the sheet as a curtain in front of the stage area, and dim the
classroom lights. (Note: You may need another adult or a tall student to
help you hold up the sheet.)
• Once the group is in position, drop the curtain and turn on the projector.
The projector will act like a spotlight on the monument.
• Have the audience look at the monument carefully and try to interpret
what each figure represents. Have students share their ideas.
Student Handout 6
Information Master 6B
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74 Chapter 6
P r o c e d u r e s
t Have the group’s Speaker step out of the monument, explain what
each person in the monument represents, and then step back into
the monument.
t Have the Writer step out of the monument, read the plaque aloud, and
then step back into the monument.
t Project Transparency 6C: Monument Map. Have the Geographer step out
of the monument, explain in which community the monument will be
placed and why, point to the location of the community on the map, and
then step back into the monument.
t Have the Sculptor step out of the monument, answer any questions the
audience has, and then thank the audience.
t Ask the audience to give the group a big round of applause.
t Repeat this procedure for any remaining groups who are presenting a
monument to César Chávez.
8 Have audience groups complete the Reading Notes page for César Chávez.
(Note: You might create transparencies of the Reading Notes pages and com-
plete them together as a class. You could then use the groups that presented
the monument as fact-checkers to make sure the notes are accurate.)
9 Repeat Steps 6–8 for the three remaining gures. (Note: Consider doing
the presentations over two or three days.)
10 Debrief the activity. Ask students these questions:
t What was it like to make a human monument?
t What parts of the activity were the most dicult?
t What parts of the activity were the most fun?
t How did the individuals in your monuments make their communities
better places to live? How did they improve life for people in communities
around the country?
t In what ways did each of these individuals show public virtue?
t Why do all individuals share responsibility for making their communities
better places to live?
11 Have students read the Summary in the Student Edition.
Reading Strategy:
Organize Information
Aer each gure has been
presented, have students
use an Extra Student
Work page in the back of
their Interactive Student
Notebooks to organize
the information about
the individual in a four-
column chart with the
headings “Name of Person,”
“Community,” “Action at
Improved Community,” and
“Illustration.”
Transparency 6C
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75 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
P r o c e d u r e s
Reading Further: Helping a Community in Need
1 Project Transparency 6D: A Community in Need. Ask the following visual
discovery questions to help students analyze the image carefully and make
some predictions about what they are about to learn:
• What do you see in this picture?
• What do you think is happening in this community?
• What kind of help do you think the people in this community
might need?
2 Have students read all of Reading Further 6 in the Student Edition.
3 Ask students to reflect on what they learned about the individuals and
groups who contributed to the public good after Hurricane Katrina.
Ask questions such as these:
• Why might a community need extra help after a natural disaster?
• Why do you think groups and individuals around the United States
reached out to help the people and animals affected by Hurricane Katrina?
• If a natural disaster like this happened today somewhere in the United
States, how might you help?
4 Have students work in their groups to complete Reading Further 6 in their
Interactive Student Notebooks. Have students take turns suggesting the
wording for each of the four sentences on the plaque.
Processing
1 Help students identify two or three people who have made their commu-
nity a better place. You can prompt students by noting that many streets,
parks, schools, libraries, and other public buildings are named after people
who have helped their community, but the individuals identified by students
do not have to be famous. (Note: Alternatively, have students ask teachers,
parents or guardians, or neighbors about someone who has made the com-
munity a better place and what that person did. The following day, have
students share what they learned.)
2 Have students complete the Processing activity in their Interactive Student
Notebooks. You may want to have students present their “community
heroes” by reading their plaques aloud to the class.
Transparency 6D
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76 Chapter 6
P r o c e d u r e s
Assessment
Masters for the chapter assessment appear in the Lesson Masters. Answers
appear below.
Big Ideas
1. D 5. C
2. D 6. B
3. B 7. A
4. A
Social Studies Skills
8. Possible answers: They want to keep their river clean; they want people to
pay attention to keeping the river clean.
Show You Know
9. The bulleted points can serve as a rubric for this item.
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77 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
English Language Learners
For the Processing activity, allow students to choose someone they are familiar
with as the person they are honoring. If they are new to the community, you
might allow them to choose someone who made a difference in their previous
home community.
Students with Special Needs
For the Processing activity, have plenty of resources available with information
about people who have made a difference in your community or even in your
school. Allow students to work with partners, especially to create the plaques.
Enrichment
Have students work together to create a single grand monument to honor all the
people discussed in the chapter. Ask them how they might incorporate all these
people into one monument and what a plaque for the monument would say.
(That is, what do all these people have in common?) Alternatively, allow students
to design and present human monuments that include several local people they
identified during the Processing activity.
To help students connect the topic of natural disasters to their own localities,
have them research an event such as a storm, flood, tornado, fire, or earthquake
using local media sources and the Internet. Have students describe the damage
as well as an example of someone coming to the aid of the stricken community.
D i f f e r e n t i a t i n g I n s t r u c t i o n
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E n h a n c i n g L e a r n i n g
Enrichment Resources
LearnTCI
Have students nd out more about making a dierence in their community
and in the country by exploring the following Enrichment Resources for Social
Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond at www.learntci.com:
Internet Connections ese recommended Web sites provide useful and
engaging content that reinforces skills development and mastery of subjects
within the chapter.
Enrichment Readings ese in-depth readings encourage students to explore
selected topics related to the chapter. You may also nd readings that relate the
chapter’s content directly to your state’s curriculum.
TeachTCI
For the teachers’ resources listed below, click on Enrichment Resources for Social
Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond at www.teachtci.com:
Study Your Community Resources Teaching directions and student activity
pages (PDF format) will help you guide your students through researching
their community.
Biography Bank Hundreds of short biographies of notable people in history are
available in PDF format for you to share with your students.
Additional Reading Opportunities
e following nonction books, which can be read aloud to
students, oer opportunities to extend the content in this chapter.
A Castle on Viola Street by DyAnne DiSalvo (New York: HarperCollins, 2001)
Habitat for Humanity volunteers were among the people who came to the aid of
families in New Orleans aer Hurricane Katrina. In this book, students learn
how groups such as Habitat for Humanity help to improve neighborhoods and
increase home ownership. A family living in a run-down apartment building
discovers that they can have a home of their own by volunteering to help repair
and rebuild old houses in the neighborhood.
Rosa by Nikki Giovanni. Illustrated by Bryan Collier. (New York: Henry
Holt, 2005)
Poignant text and beautiful artwork enhance this account of how Rosa Parks
refused to give up her seat on the bus.
is Is the Dream by Diane Z. Shore and James Ransome. Illustrated by Jessica
Alexander. (New York: HarperCollins, 2005)
is book looks at freedom in the United States before, during, and aer the
civil rights movement. Students learn to understand the idea of “freedom and
justice for all” as they follow the history of civil rights in our country.
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79 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
G u i d e t o R e a d i n g N o t e s 6
Think of words that could go on a plaque
for a monument to César Chávez. Write them in
the spaces below.
César Chávez
What did he do to improve his community?
When did he do this?
How have his actions helped people in other communities?
1962 OR the 1960s
include statements about helping farmworkers join together to get better pay and
safer working conditions.
He helped farmworkers in other places get better pay and safer ways of working.
Answers will vary, but should
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80 Chapter 6
G u i d e t o R e a d i n g N o t e s 6
Ruby Bridges
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
1960
include statements about Ruby being brave and continuing to go to school even though
angry whites didn’t want her there.
Ruby talks to people in other communities about what we can learn from her experience.
Think of words that could go on a plaque for
a monument to Ruby Bridges. Write them in
the spaces below.
Answers will vary, but should
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81 How Do People Improve Their Communities?
G u i d e t o R e a d i n g N o t e s 6
Lois Marie Gibbs
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
1978
include statements about helping people live in a safer place or get away from
dangerous chemicals.
She shows people in other towns and cities how to join together to make their
communities a safer place.
ink of words that could go on a plaque
for a monument to Lois Marie Gibbs. Write
them in the spaces below.
Answers will vary, but should
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82 Chapter 6
G u i d e t o R e a d i n g N o t e s 6
Judy Heumann
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
1970
include statements about how she started a group to protect disabled people from being
treated unfairly.
Answers will vary but should include statements about how her group (Disabled in Action)
helps disabled people around the country live better lives.
Think of words that could go on a plaque for
a monument to Judy Heumann. Write them
in the spaces below.
Answers will vary, but should
,
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 27
I n f o r m a t i o n M a s t e r 6 A
Rosa Parks Fights to Change an Unfair Law
Rosa Parks was an African American woman. In 1955, she lived in the
community of Montgomery, Alabama.
At that time, Montgomery had segregation laws. Segregation means
separating people from one another. The segregation laws in Montgomery
separated African Americans from whites. African Americans and whites
had to use different restaurants, bathrooms, and even water fountains. When
African Americans rode public buses, they had to sit in the back. Many places
in the United States, especially in the South, had laws like these.
On the night of December 1, 1955, Rosa headed home from work on a
city bus. She was very tired. She sat down on a seat in the middle of the bus.
When a white man got on the bus, the bus driver told Rosa to move to the
back. That was what the law said. Rosa thought this was unfair. She refused
to give up her seat.
The bus driver called the police, and Rosa was arrested for breaking
the segregation law.
“Why do you push us around?” Rosa asked the police officer.
“I do not know,” said the officer. “But the law is the law, and you are
under arrest.”
Rosa’s arrest made African Americans in Montgomery very angry.
They decided to boycott the public buses. To boycott means to refuse to use
or buy something. People walked or shared cars instead of riding the bus.
Meanwhile, Rosa went to court to try to get the law changed. The case
went all the way to the top court in the country, the United States Supreme
Court. The Supreme Court said that segregating people on public buses was
unfair and went against the United States Constitution. All Americans, the
Court said, had the right to sit anywhere on a public bus.
Rosa Parks made a big difference. Because of her brave action, the laws
were changed in Montgomery and in communities all across the country. In
this way, Rosa Parks helped bring about more equality for all Americans.
39
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 28 Chapter 6
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
Steps for Creating a Human Monument
With your group, create a human monument. Your
monument will honor the person you read about.
Step 1: Assign the four jobs.
Each member of your group will have one of four jobs.
The jobs are Speaker, Sculptor, Writer, and Geographer.
will be the Speaker.
(name of group member)
will be the Sculptor.
(name of group member)
will be the Writer.
(name of group member)
will be the Geographer.
(name of group member)
Teacher’s initials
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve eir Communities? 29
Step 2: Talk about who each group member will be in
the monument.
Talk about the role each of you will have in the monument.
e Speaker leads the discussion and takes notes below.

Name of Group
Member
Who This Group
Member Will Be
in the Monument
What This Group
Member Will Do
Teacher’s initials
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 30 Chapter 6
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
Step 3: Design the monument.
Talk about what the monument will look like.
Brainstorm ideas for four props to use. The Sculptor
leads this discussion. The Sculptor also assigns each
group member to bring one of the props.
Prop
Group Member Who Will Bring
the Prop
Now practice getting in position for the monument.
The Sculptor leads the practice. Practice until you are
happy with the design.
Teacher’s initials
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 31
Step 4: Write a plaque for the monument.
Talk about a sentence to put on a plaque for your
monument. The sentence should tell what the person
did to improve the community. The Writer leads
this discussion.
The Writer writes a first draft of the sentence in the
space below. As a group, check the draft. Make sure it is
written neatly. Check that all the words are spelled correctly.
The Writer makes any corrections that are needed.
Teacher’s initials
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 32 Chapter 6
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
Step 5: Decide where to put the monument.
Talk about where to put your monument. What community
should it go in? The Geographer leads this discussion and
writes the group’s answers below.
Name of community:
Our monument should go here because
.
Circle the name of the community on the map below.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 33
Step 6: Prepare to present the monument.
Rehearse presenting your monument.
• The Sculptor leads the rehearsal. The Sculptor also
makes sure that each group member has brought a prop.
As a group, practice getting into position and holding
the position for two minutes. The Sculptor practices
thanking the audience in a clear, loud voice. The
Sculptor brings a prop for the monument.
• The Speaker practices telling who each group member
is in the monument and what he or she is doing. The
Speaker talks in a clear, loud voice. The Speaker brings
a prop for the monument.
• The Writer neatly copies the plaque onto a new sheet
of paper. Be sure to write in large letters and spell all
words correctly. The Writer practices reading the plaque
in a clear, loud voice. The Writer brings a prop for
the monument.
• The Geographer practices telling where the monument
will be placed and why. The Geographer speaks in a
loud, clear voice. The Geographer brings a prop for
the monument.
Teacher’s initials
S t u d e n t H a n d o u t 6
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 34 Chapter 6
1. Go behind the curtain and quickly get into position.
2. When the curtain drops, hold your position. Remain still
and quiet while the audience talks about your monument.
3. When your teacher says so, the Speaker steps out of the
monument. The Speaker explains who each figure represents.
Then the Speaker steps back into the monument.
4. Next, the Writer steps out of the monument. The Writer reads
the plaque. Then the Writer steps back into the monument.
5. Next, the Geographer steps out of the monument. The
Geographer shows on the transparency where the monument
will be placed. The Geographer explains why the group
chose this community. Then the Geographer steps back
into the monument.
6. Next, the Sculptor steps out of the monument. The Sculptor
answers any questions from the audience. The Sculptor then
thanks the audience.
7. Hold your positions while the audience gives your group a
round of applause.
Steps for Presenting Your Human Monument
I n f o r m a t i o n M a s t e r 6 B
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
N a m e D a t e
How Do People Improve Their Communities? 35
Chapter 6 Assessment
Big Ideas
Read the questions. Fill in the circle next to the best answer.
1. When farmworkers decided to
strike, they agreed to
O A. move north.
O B. work harder.
O C. write letters.
O D. stop working.
2. How did a boycott help make
farm owners treat workers better?
O A. People phoned the owners.
O B. People yelled at the owners.
O C. People drew silly pictures of
the owners.
O D. People stopped buying from
the owners.
3. Ruby Bridges made a difference
by being very
4. What did Lois Marie Gibbs say
was wrong with a canal?
O A. Chemicals in it made
children sick.
O B. Boats in it carried too
many people.
O C. Swimming in it wasn’t fun.
O D. Skating on it was dangerous
in the winter.
5. Who formed a group to help
disabled people be treated fairly?
O A. Ruby Bridges
O B. César Chávez
O C. Judy Heumann
O D. Lois Marie Gibbs
Reading Further
6. Which of these is a natural
disaster?
O A. a bad fight
O B. a hurricane
O C. a polluted river
O D. an unfair law
7. How did the Red Cross help people
in New Orleans?
O A. It provided shelter, hot meals,
and water.
O B. It set up an outdoor
music show.
O C. It told people to buy things
in stores.
O D. It let children go to
good schools.
O A. angry.
O B. brave.
O C. pretty.
O D. smart.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
N a m e D a t e
36 Chapter 6
Social Studies Skills
Look at this picture. Then answer the question.
8. Why are the people in the picture carrying signs?
.
Show You Know
9. Think of a group of people who could start to make
changes in your community. Make a poster for the
group on a sheet of paper. Be sure your poster shows
• the name of the group.
• what kind of change the group wants.
• why the change is important.
• what people should do to help.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 51
Listen carefully to the story about
Rosa Parks. Think of words that
could go on a plaque for the Rosa
Parks monument. Write them in
the spaces below.
P r e v i e w
6
Rosa Parks
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
49
© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
R e a d i n g N o t e s
52 Chapter 6
César Chávez
What did he do to improve his community?
When did he do this?
How have his actions helped people in other communities?
Think of words that could go on a plaque
for a monument to César Chávez. Write them in
the spaces below.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 53
6
Ruby Bridges
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
Think of words that could go on a plaque for
a monument to Ruby Bridges. Write them in
the spaces below.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 54 Chapter 6
R e a d i n g N o t e s
Lois Marie Gibbs
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
Think of words that could go on a plaque
for a monument to Lois Marie Gibbs. Write them
in the spaces below.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 55
6
Judy Heumann
What did she do to improve her community?
When did she do this?
How have her actions helped people in other communities?
Think of words that could go on a plaque for
a monument to Judy Heumann. Write them
in the spaces below.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute 56 Chapter 6
6 The city of New Orleans wants to put
up a monument to thank some of the heroes of
Hurricane Katrina. Finish writing the words
that will go on the plaque.
R e a d i n g F u r t h e r
Hurricane Heroes
In 2005, Hurricane Katrina struck our community. We honor the
heroes who reached out to help us in our time of need.
The Red Cross helped our community by
.
The SPCA helped our community by
.
Melissa, Jenna, and Jackie Kantor helped our community by
.
Girl Scouts in Strongsville, Ohio, helped our community by
.
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute How Do People Improve Their Communities? 57
Pick someone who has made a difference in your
community. Draw a monument to that person.
Write a sentence on the plaque to tell what this
person did.
P r o c e s s i n g
6
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond 22
A

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V i s u a l 6 A
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond 23
H
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V i s u a l 6 B
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond 24
M
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V i s u a l 6 C
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© Teachers’ Curriculum Institute Social Studies Alive! Our Community and Beyond 25
V i s u a l 6 D
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Study Your Community
Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
P.O. Box 1327
Rancho Cordova, CA 95741
Copyright © 2010 by Teachers’ Curriculum Institute
Student materials in this booklet may be reproduced for classroom use only.
Customer Service: 800-497-6138, ext. 0
www.teachtci.com
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S t u d y Y o u r C o m m u n i t y

C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 1
To the Teacher
As your class works its way through Social Studies Alive' Our Communitv and Bevond.
your students will learn how geography. history. people. the economy. and government
shape diverse communities across our nation. AIter each chapter. you can challenge your
students to apply the concepts that they`ve learned to the study oI their own community
by using the activities in this booklet. Responding to research. writing. and illustrating
prompts. they will be using higher-order thinking skills as they create their own books or
portIolios about their state.
Preparation
BeIore you start. it`s a good idea to gather materials and plan Ior space and time Ior
studying your community. What your students learn will enrich their appreciation oI their
local environment. It will also help them question and think and learn about places
throughout their lives. Here are some suggestions to help you plan:
· Determine how students will store and present their work. Gather binders or Iolders.
Encourage students to create original covers Ior them.
· Explore your town or city`s Web site Ior useIul materials on your town or city`s
history. geography. people. places. resources. economy. and more.
· II your town or city has a historical museum. plan a Iield trip there. Alternatively. have
students visit the museum`s Web site. They may Iind much useIul inIormation there
on local American Indians. immigrants. government. and institutions.
· Write or have students write to request inIormation Irom your city hall. You may
receive maps. inIormation about places oI interest. or explanations oI local services.
· Set up a classroom library oI materials. both Ireebies you send away Ior or print out.
and library items that include inIormation on your town or city. Locate materials near
a bulletin board where you can display student work. Help students understand which
oI these sources (iI any) are primary sources and why.
· II your students have access to cameras. encourage them to take photographs oI places
oI interest in your community. Students can add them to your bulletin board or to
appropriate pages oI their Study Your Community work.
· Use the local newspaper Ior inIormation about current issues. people. places. events.
and service organizations or other groups in your community.
· II you have a computer with Internet access in your classroom. make it available Ior
research. You may want to preselect the research sites and then teach students how to
search Ior inIormation. Be sure also to teach inIormation literacyhow to determine
what`s relevant. current. accurate. authoritative. or biased.
· Whenever possible. bring in 'guest speakers¨ or people with relevant experience that
students can interview.
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S t u d y Y o u r C o m m u n i t y

C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 2
How to Use This Booklet
This booklet addresses the community topics that appear in many states` standards. It
may have more than you need Ior your community or your students` abilities. so Ieel Iree
to pick and choose those activities you think are most relevant to your needs.
Reproduce copies oI the activity pages you choose Ior your students. Please note that
some activities include more than one page. Consult the Activity Notes that Iollow to
help you conduct the activities. BeIore starting any activity. you may want to teach or
review with students how to do the research that will be needed. Model how to locate
inIormation and record it on the activity page. Then 'think out loud¨ to show students
how to analyze inIormation and respond to prompts.
Because your students are still new to research. you might have them work in pairs or
threes. with each group taking on one part oI the topic. Once students have Iinished their
work. reconvene the class so that students can learn the other parts oI the topic Irom one
another. Conduct a debrieIing discussion to make sure that your students have learned the
Iacts. Even more important. this is the time to push them to think critically about the
inIormation they have uncovered. You will Iind sample questions to help you do this in
the Activity Notes.
Many oI these activities ask students to record their sources in order to establish good
habits. Provide some guidance on what you expect. such as a URL. the book title and
author. or the name oI the encyclopedia. Remind students that they can always use a
separate sheet oI paper or the back oI the activity sheet iI they need more space to record
their sources or any other inIormation.
Have Iun with this proiect! You and your students are sure to uncover lots oI Iascinating
Iacts and great stories. You`ll want to share them with other classes and with parents.
Activity Notes
Chapter 1. Activity 1
Where in the World Is Our Communitv?
· As a prewriting activity. you might help students brainstorm a list oI interesting places
in your community and talk a little about each one.
· As necessary. review the parts oI a Iriendly letter.
Chapter 1. Activity 2
Who Came Here Long Ago?
· Preselect Web sites. such as town history or museum Web sites. You might reproduce
and distribute or proiect a screen shot oI the home page to show students the site and
to discuss how to navigate it. Alternatively. help students identiIy search words to type
into a search engine. direct students to good sites you Iind. or help students locate
resources about your community in your town or school library.
S t u d y Y o u r C o m m u n i t y

C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 6
· Encourage students to record all their sources. using a separate sheet oI paper or the
back oI the activity master iI they do not have enough space. II necessary. review how
to record sources.
Chapter 5. Activity 3
What Were Some American Indian 1raditions in Our Communitv?
· Direct students to appropriate Web sites. which may include those listed Ior Chapter 5.
Activity 2. Alternatively. discuss possible search terms and good ways oI narrowing
down search results.
Chapter 6. Activity 1
How Has Our Communitv Changed Over 1ime?
· Because this is a long activity. you may want to have students complete only some
categories oI the chart. or break the assignment into parts to be completed at diIIerent
times.
· Help students brainstorm ways oI Iinding inIormation. For example. to Iind
inIormation about schools and colleges. students can think oI the names oI institutions
in your community and enter those names into a search engine. Better yet. you can
oIIer search terms that are most likely to lead to the answers required to complete the
chart. such as Endicott Junior College and founded or established.
· Give concrete examples oI what the categories mean or can include. For the category
oI American Indians. you might suggest search terms related to dates oI treaties. or
dates when groups moved to reservations or received oIIicial Iederal recognition as
tribes. II your state standards require it. students might Iill in this part oI the chart with
signiIicant events related to the interaction oI American Indians with the Iirst settlers
in your community.
· Help students Iind inIormation Ior a category by providing search terms in advance.
For example. Ior the category oI transportation. the Iirst rail lines may be a productive
search. Suggest other possibilities. though. such as Iinding out when local highways.
overpasses. subway lines. bridges. and other public works were built. For physical
Ieatures. you might suggest looking Ior a date when a river was dammed or diverted or
a Iorest was preserved by being turned into a state or national Iorest. For businesses
and iobs. perhaps a very important Iactory opened or closed; maybe there was a maior
strike; or a mall was built. For religion. students might Iind the dates when the Iirst
church. temple. or other house oI worship was built in your community or when new
religions Iirst came to town.
· For all categories. students might be urged to consult with parents and older adults
who perhaps lived through the closing oI a Iactory or celebrated the opening oI the
county bike path or dog park.
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S t u d y Y o u r C o m m u n i t y

C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 7
· When all groups have completed their timelines. work as a class to create a master
timeline. Use the timeline to draw conclusions about liIe in your community during
speciIic periods oI time. You might also ask students to group the events on the time
line into the categories oI past and present.
Chapter 6. Activity 2
Who Helped Improve Our Communitv?
· Work with students to brainstorm a list oI people or Iamilies that they might research.
Chapter 7. Activity 1
How Does Our Communitv Compare with Others?
· II your school district has a pen pal site or a preIerred pen pal site. reIer your students
to it. Otherwise. you might suggest this Web site and guide students through its use:
http://www.ks-connection.org/
Chapter 8. Activity 1
How Has Our Communitv's Economv Changed?
· Consider completing this Iour-step activity over several days. or assign the diIIerent
parts to Iour groups. (When meeting individual needs. consider that the last chart
requires the least amount oI research.)
· To help students locate inIormation related to the American Indians. reIer to the
inIormation given under Chapter 5. Activity 2.
· To help students Iill out the second and third charts. once again a state or local Web
site or local museum or library may be the best sources oI inIormation. Students may
be able to complete much oI the Iinal chart on their own.
· Ask students to record their sources Ior each chart or charts on the back oI each page.
· When all charts are completed. have groups compare what they have Iound and
discuss the changes over time.
Chapter 8. Activity 2
How Can We Prepare for Work in Our Communitv?
· Brainstorm a list oI skills with students to get them started. Skills might include
counting. adding. spelling. writing. using maps. subtracting. multiplying. reading Ior
the main idea. writing complete sentences and paragraphs. using grammar correctly.
using money. understanding the calendar. reading and/or making charts and graphs.
comparing and contrasting. and sequencing inIormation.
S t u d y Y o u r C o m m u n i t y

C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 6
· Encourage students to record all their sources. using a separate sheet oI paper or the
back oI the activity master iI they do not have enough space. II necessary. review how
to record sources.
Chapter 5. Activity 3
What Were Some American Indian 1raditions in Our Communitv?
· Direct students to appropriate Web sites. which may include those listed Ior Chapter 5.
Activity 2. Alternatively. discuss possible search terms and good ways oI narrowing
down search results.
Chapter 6. Activity 1
How Has Our Communitv Changed Over 1ime?
· Because this is a long activity. you may want to have students complete only some
categories oI the chart. or break the assignment into parts to be completed at diIIerent
times.
· Help students brainstorm ways oI Iinding inIormation. For example. to Iind
inIormation about schools and colleges. students can think oI the names oI institutions
in your community and enter those names into a search engine. Better yet. you can
oIIer search terms that are most likely to lead to the answers required to complete the
chart. such as Endicott Junior College and founded or established.
· Give concrete examples oI what the categories mean or can include. For the category
oI American Indians. you might suggest search terms related to dates oI treaties. or
dates when groups moved to reservations or received oIIicial Iederal recognition as
tribes. II your state standards require it. students might Iill in this part oI the chart with
signiIicant events related to the interaction oI American Indians with the Iirst settlers
in your community.
· Help students Iind inIormation Ior a category by providing search terms in advance.
For example. Ior the category oI transportation. the Iirst rail lines may be a productive
search. Suggest other possibilities. though. such as Iinding out when local highways.
overpasses. subway lines. bridges. and other public works were built. For physical
Ieatures. you might suggest looking Ior a date when a river was dammed or diverted or
a Iorest was preserved by being turned into a state or national Iorest. For businesses
and iobs. perhaps a very important Iactory opened or closed; maybe there was a maior
strike; or a mall was built. For religion. students might Iind the dates when the Iirst
church. temple. or other house oI worship was built in your community or when new
religions Iirst came to town.
· For all categories. students might be urged to consult with parents and older adults
who perhaps lived through the closing oI a Iactory or celebrated the opening oI the
county bike path or dog park.

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Stuuy Youi Community Name: _______________________________________
C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 2S
Chaptei 6, Activity 1
How Has Uur Community Cbang¢d Uv¢r Tim¢?
St¢p 1: 0se the Inteinet oi the libiaiy to finu impoitant events that have
happeneu in youi community. Finu one event ielateu to each iuea. Tell
when it happeneu anu what happeneu.
Ev¢nt R¢lat¢d to Y¢ar{s) Wbat Happ¢n¢d
Ameiican Inuians


Tianspoitation


Businesses anu jobs


Technology


Physical featuies


Builuings


Schools anu colleges


Recieation (paiks,
pools, paths)

Religion



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Stuuy Youi Community Name: _______________________________________
C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 24
St¢p 2: Put the events in youi chait on the timeline.

2uuu ÷

÷

19uu ÷

÷

18uu ÷

÷

17uu ÷

÷

16uu ÷

Wheie I founu this infoimation:

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Stuuy Youi Community Name: _______________________________________
C Teacheis' Cuiiiculum Institute 2S
Chaptei 6, Activity 2
Wbo H¢lp¢d Improv¢ Uur Community?
St¢p 1: Choose one peison oi family who helpeu stait, giow, oi change
youi community foi the bettei.
St¢p 2: 0se the Inteinet oi libiaiy to finu photogiaphs, oial histoiies,
letteis, newspapeis, oi othei piimaiy souices about the peison oi
family. Complete the chait.
Nam¢ of p¢rson or
family

When uiu they live.

When uiu they come
to youi community.

Bow uiu they help
youi community.




Bow uoes youi
community
iemembei them.





St¢p 3: 0n a sepaiate sheet of papei, wiite a paiagiaph about this peison oi
family. Bow uiu they change youi community foi the bettei.
Wheie I founu this infoimation:
© 2010 by Teachers’ Curriculum Institute

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