Catalogue 2011-2012

University of Mount Union Catalogue 2011-2012
Table of Contents
The University ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2 Admission and Financial Aid ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7 Tuition and Costs ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Student Life .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 16 Academic Policies and Procedures ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 22 Courses for General Education ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 General Course Information .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 49 Accounting ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 50 African-American Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 53 American Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 54 Art ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 56 Asian Studies .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 59 Athletic Training .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 60 Biology ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 64 Business Administration ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 69 Chemistry and Biochemistry ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 77 Classics ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 81 Communication ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 82 Computer Science and Information Systems ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88 Criminal Justice ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 94 Economics, Accounting and Business Administration ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 96 Economics ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 96 Education ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 99 Engineering .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 110 English.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 111 Environmental Science .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 116 Exercise Science............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 119 Foreign Languages and Cultures ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 121 Gender Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 128 Geology ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 129 Health ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 131 History .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 134 Human Performance and Sport Business ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 136 Information Systems ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 137 International Studies .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 137 Liberal Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 140 Library Science .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 141 Mathematics .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 141 Music ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 145 Philosophy and Religious Studies .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Philosophy ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 156 Physical Education ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 158 Physics and Astronomy ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 161 Political Science and International Studies ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 164 Pre-Professional Programs ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 167 Pre-Law ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 167 Psychology ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 168 Public Health ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 173 Religious Studies .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 175 Reserve Officer Training Corps ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 178 Sociology ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 179 Sport Business ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 182 Theatre ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 184 University Personnel .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 187

The University of Mount Union reserves the right to change policies, regulations, courses and fees at any time subsequent to the publication of this Catalogue. The Mount Union Catalogue in effect at the time of a student’s admission to the University shall govern such student’s degree requirements; an extended period of non-enrollment at the University may, at the time of return, result in a change to requirements as specified in a later issue of the Catalogue. Each student has the responsibility to be aware of and to meet the Catalogue requirements for graduation, and to adhere to all rules, regulations and deadlines published in this Catalogue and in the Student Handbook. It is the policy of the University of Mount Union not to discriminate on the basis of race, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, marital or parental status, or disability in student admissions, financial aid, educational or athletic programs, or employment as now or may hereafter be required by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990, regulations of the Internal Revenue Service, and all other applicable federal, state and local statutes, ordinances and regulations. Inquiries regarding compliance may be directed to (330) 823-2886, Associate Dean of Students, Hoover-Price Campus Center, or to (330) 829-6560, Director of Human Resources and Employee Development, Beeghly Hall.

The University
Institutional Mission
The mission of the University of Mount Union is to prepare students for fulfilling lives, meaningful work and responsible citizenship.

Goals
To accomplish the mission, the University faculty has established guidelines to help students: I. Demonstrate Core Abilities A. Demonstrate ability to acquire and assess information. B. Demonstrate research skills (both quantitative and qualitative). C. Develop ability to think critically. D. Develop ability to think creatively. E. Develop communication skills. II. Foundational Knowledge and Integration A. Acquire knowledge in humanities, arts and sciences. B. Demonstrate the use of concepts and methods in humanities, arts, and sciences. C. Develop the ability to view the world from multiple disciplinary perspectives. D. Integrate knowledge and techniques across multiple disciplines. III. Preparation for Fulfilling Lives A. Acquire the tools for self-development in order to assess and improve physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual growth and wellness. B. Find and cultivate intellectual pursuits. C. Find and cultivate pursuits for personal enrichment. IV. Preparation for Meaningful Work A. Acquire discipline specific knowledge and skills needed at a professional level. B. Demonstrate use of discipline specific knowledge and skills. C. Integrate discipline specific knowledge and abilities with multiple disciplinary perspectives. D. Develop ability to collaborate with others to solve problems. V. Preparation for Responsible Citizenship A. Develop knowledge and appreciation of the individual's culture and other cultures in a global context. B. Understand and employ ethics within diverse cultural, social, professional, environmental and personal settings. C. Demonstrate civic engagement by active involvement in and beyond the classroom.

Heritage
The University of Mount Union has roots in two traditions. The first of these is the Christian tradition as expressed in the American Methodist movement of the 19th Century. An important part of this movement was an effort to advance social progress through the establishment of academically rigorous institutions which were non-sectarian, as well as racially, ethnically, and gender inclusive. This rich, church-related legacy informs the present spirit in which Mount Union maintains an advisory and voluntary relationship with the United Methodist denomination. The Church does not direct policy, administration, academic curriculum, or campus life. The University of Mount Union affirms the spiritual center of all persons and acknowledges the deep impact that spiritual and religious experience has on both cultures and individuals. In light of this, the University takes seriously its dual responsibility to foster the academic study of religious experience and to provide resources that nurture and enrich the spiritual life of our students and all members of the Mount Union community. As a university of higher education, we neither advocate a particular spiritual heritage nor proselytize on behalf of any religious or sectarian orthodoxy. The other significant tradition of the University of Mount Union is rooted in an historic understanding of the liberal arts. A liberal arts education provides students with a broad base of knowledge in addition to training in a specific field of study. At its heart, a liberal arts course of study does not teach a single point of view, but equips and empowers students to form their own conclusions based on critical reasoning. This tradition of learning continues at the University of Mount Union.

These aspects of our heritage reinforce each other in the striving for excellence, concern for the inherent dignity and worth of each individual, and the emphasis on the spiritual as well as the intellectual achievements of humanity. We embrace the global nature of our student body, recognizing that diversity serves as a resource for learning as we develop and prepare our students for “fulfilling lives, meaningful work, and responsible citizenship.”

History
The University of Mount Union is the outgrowth of a town meeting held by forward-looking citizens of the village of Mount Union on October 4, 1846. At that time, the people gathered to hear Orville Nelson Hartshorn outline the need for a new institution in the area, where men and women could be educated with equal opportunity, where science would parallel the humanities, where laboratory and experimental subjects would receive proper emphasis, and where there would be no distinction due to race, color, sex or position. On October 20, 1846, this young man organized and taught on the third floor of the “Old Carding Mill” a “select school” of six students. The school grew rapidly under his inspired leadership and in 1849 became known as “Mount Union Seminary.” In 1853 a “normal department” was added for the training of teachers. On January 9, 1858, the institution was chartered and incorporated under the laws of the State of Ohio as “Mount Union College.” Although Mount Union had not been established by church efforts, its founder and early faculty members were dedicated Methodist laymen. One of the articles in the charter of the institution looked to the day when Mount Union would come under the patronage of some annual conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Pittsburgh Annual Conference “heartily endorsed” the new University in 1858, but it was not until 1864 that Mount Union was granted full patronage by the conference. In September 1911, Scio University, located at Scio, Ohio, was united with Mount Union. By the articles of consolidation, the liberal arts alumni of the former institution were made alumni of the latter. Scio was established in 1857 at Harlem Springs, Ohio, as “The Rural Seminary.” In 1867 the school was moved to New Market, where it was known variously as New Market College, the One-Study University, and finally, Scio University in 1878. For many years Mount Union has claimed the distinction of being one of the first institutions to have a summer school. Started in 1870, this first summer school was actually a fourth term in the school year. Since that time, summer instruction has been offered each year at the institution. On August 1, 2010, the institution officially became known as the University of Mount Union. The change to a “university” designation was made in an effort to better describe what Mount Union is today and more effectively communicate all that the institution has to offer. This decision, unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees, came after careful review of data gathered through numerous research efforts and thoughtful consideration and discussion. From 1846 to present, the administration of the University has been under the leadership of 11 presidents: Orville Nelson Hartshorn, 1846-1887; Tamerlane Pliny Marsh, 1888-1898; Albert Birdsall Riker, 1898-1908; William Henry McMaster 1899, 1908-1938; Charles Burgess Ketcham, 1938-1953; Carl Cluster Bracy, 1954-1967; Ronald Gilbert Weber ’38, 1967-1980; G. Benjamin Lantz Jr., 1980-85; Harold M. Kolenbrander, 1986-2000; John L. Ewing Jr. 2000-2005; and Richard F. Giese, 2005-.

Facilities
(Dates of construction or dedication) Adams Court (2007): This row of townhouses within the village on Hartshorn Street, named in honor of Gary ’75 and Connie Adams, houses 24 upperclass students. Art Center (1985): The William H. Eells Art Center contains a lecture room, painting studio, rooms for print making, sculpture, drawing and design, plus faculty offices. Dr. Eells, a patron of the arts, is a member of the Mount Union Board of Trustees and a former faculty member at the University. Beeghly Hall (1973): The administration building is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Leon A. Beeghly of Youngstown, Ohio, who were major benefactors of Mount Union during their lifetimes. The building houses the principal administrative offices of the University. Berea House (1999): Originally Berea Children’s Home, this building, located at 1315 S. Union Ave., serves as an international house for 16 students. Bica-Ross Residence Hall (1996): This three-story building houses 155 students in suite-style living units, contains two classrooms and is located directly behind the Campus Center. It was named by Violet (Bica ’44) Ross in honor of her sister Virginia and in memory of her late husband L. Clayton and brother George Bica ’41. Bracy Hall (2003): This four-story natural sciences facility houses the departments of Biology, Chemistry, Geology and Physics. Made possible through a lead gift from Jim and Vanita (Bauknight ’63) Oelschlager, the facility is named for Dr. Carl C. Bracy, sixth president of the University. The 87,000-square-foot structure includes 22 laboratories of various types and sizes, three lecture halls, two classrooms and 21 faculty offices. Brown Village (2007): Located on Union Avenue, Brown Village is comprised of three apartment-style buildings (Clutter Manor, Jae Manor and Keller Manor) housing a combined total of 104 students. This living community, which provides housing for juniors and seniors, was made possible by a significant gift from David M. Brown ’54 and was named in his honor. Chapman Hall (1864): This five-story brick, steel and concrete structure is named in honor of Professor Ira O. Chapman, who was associated with the University from the fall of 1851 to the time of his death in 1880. It is the principal humanities classroom building on campus and was completely rebuilt in 1966-67. There are 30 faculty offices, 30 classrooms, an accounting laboratory, an audio-visual room and student and faculty lounges. Cicchinelli Fitness Center (2009): The fitness center, housed in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, was made possible by Christopher Cicchinelli ’98 and his mother, Patricia Brisben. A two-story atrium takes you into a fitness center that has two floors housing cardiovascular and weight equipment. Clarke Astronomical Observatory (1968): Moved in May of 2003 to the south end of Bracy Hall, it was previously located at the south end of East Hall. It is the second such building to honor the memory of Dr. George Washington Clarke, professor of natural philosophy at the University. The first observatory, erected in 1924, served until it was razed to make room for the Timken Physical Education Building. The instruments, used in both observatories, are the gifts of Elmer E. Harrold of Leetonia, Ohio. Clutter Manor (2007): Named in honor of Ronald ’80 and Tracy Clutter, this apartment-style building is located within Brown Village on Union Avenue and provides housing for 32 upperclass students. Cope Music Hall (1964): This facility is named in memory of the late Kenneth B. Cope ’20, alumnus, trustee and churchman. Principal donors to the building are his widow, Lela (Stoffer ’21) Cope, and family. Cope Music Hall connects with the Rodman Playhouse and Crandall Gallery to complete the Fine Arts complex on the northeast edge of the campus. Stauffer Courtyard Theatre, the outdoor Greek theater in the courtyard of the Fine Arts quadrangle, was named for the late Robert E. Stauffer, librarian emeritus, and Mrs. Robert E. Stauffer.

The building contains the offices and teaching studios of faculty members in the Department of Music. Also located in this area is the Sturgeon Music Library, given in memory of Bertha Fogg Sturgeon and her parents, by Samuel Sturgeon. The collection of books, scores and recordings was begun by a generous donation by Mrs. Ella Wilcox Peasley and the Carnegie Corporation. Presently, there are more than 7,000 recordings in LP and CD formats, more than 10,000 music scores, a music reference collection and approximately 60 music periodical titles in the library. The facilities include four listening stations, an A-V room with stereo equipment, a TV and VCR and a computer workstation with access to the campus network, the library system and the Internet. A complete keyboard laboratory of 13 Roland electronic pianos is located in the music theory area, adjacent to a computer laboratory. The Department of Music facility includes a state-of-the-art MIDI synthesizer/computer laboratory. There are currently four computer work stations in place with access to a laser printer. The computers are connected via Studio 3 MIDI interfaces to either the Kurzweil K250, the Korg M-1 or to the Yamaha DX-7 synthesizers. The laboratory is utilized by students to do remedial work in the area of basic musicianship skills, to process music theory assignments, to orchestrate, to study audio theory and to investigate synthesizing, sequencing and voice sampling. A large rehearsal room, a small recital hall, 30 practice rooms of various sizes and three classrooms are on the east side of the building. Presser Recital Hall is dedicated to Theodore Presser, a former Mount Union student and professor. The three-manual organ in the recital hall is the gift of the Kulas Foundation. Crandall Gallery (1954): Attached to the Rodman Playhouse and Cope Music Hall, Crandall Gallery is an art gallery, made possible by the late Charles N. Crandall of Youngstown, Ohio. Exhibitions of work by students and professionals are displayed in Crandall Gallery throughout the academic year. Cunningham Residence Hall (1968): A residence hall for 112 first-year students, this hall is named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Cunningham of Alliance, Ohio. Mr. Cunningham was a trustee for 30 years. The three-story brick structure, facing Clark Avenue, is a duplicate of McCready Hall, and the two halls are separated by a courtyard. Dewald Chapel (1999): The first free-standing Chapel in University history, the Dewald Chapel was made possible by a lead gift from Dr. Donald and Mrs. Eleanore (Iman ’38) Dewald. The Chapel includes a sanctuary, 24-hour meditation room, conference and meeting rooms for religious life programs and offices. Dussel House (1941): This house, located at 1330 S. Union Ave., was presented to the University by the late Mrs. Frank E. Dussel of Alliance, Ohio and is used as a residential facility for up to 18 students. Elliott Residence Hall (1914): Elliott is a three-story women’s residence hall named in honor of A.V.T. Elliott of Canton, Ohio. The building was remodeled in 2006. Forty-two women are housed in the building. Engineering and Business Building (2010): This facility, originally built in 1958, was renovated in 2010 to house the new Department of Engineering as well as the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. The facility includes a two-story lobby, five labs, a computer lab, two lecture halls, a conference room, student lounge, study areas and 21 offices. Gartner Welcome Center (2009): Named for Carl ’60 and Martha Gartner, the Gartner Welcome Center was designed to further enhance the first impression for prospective students as they visit the Mount Union campus. Housing the Office of Admission and Office of Student Financial Services, the Welcome Center displays the University’s commitment to green initiatives through its LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. It is one of only a few college and university buildings in Ohio to be LEED certified and the first in Stark County. Grove Court (2007): Named for Charles and Carol Grove, this row of townhouses within the village on Hartshorn Street is home to 40 juniors and seniors. Gulling Training Center (2001): The Gulling Training Center is located west of Mount Union Stadium. The 12,750 square-foot building contains offices, classrooms and areas for plyometrics and sprinting as well as a weight area for strength training. The building was funded by four major gifts including the lead gift from Paul Gulling ’80 of North Canton, Ohio; Basil Strong ’26 of Atwater, Ohio; Tony Lee ’50 of Alliance, Ohio, in honor of his late wife, Beverly Jean (Bowden ’51) Lee; and Robert Bordner of New Washington, Ohio. Hammond Natatorium (2009): Located in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, the natatorium includes a pool and diving area for recreation and varsity athletic competition. This home of the varsity swimming and diving team includes office space, storage, a scoreboard and seating for 1,000 spectators. Hammond Construction generously provided the lead gift for this facility. Haupt House (2002): The Fred J. Haupt President’s Home is located at 1304 S. Union Ave. Flexible for family living and formal entertaining, highlights of the home include a domed ceiling in the foyer featuring the Mount Union seal and a wall of “University family” photographs dating from the early 1890s. The home was formally named the Fred J. Haupt President’s Home in 2007 in honor of long-time University supporter and Board of Trustees member Dr. Fred J. Haupt ’63. Hoiles-Peterson Residence Hall (1989): Hoiles-Peterson Residence Hall is a two-story, L-shaped building that houses 103 students in suite-style living units. The residence hall, located on the east side of Miller Avenue, is named in recognition of the support and dedication of Josephine (Hoiles ’40) and Donald ’39 Peterson. Hoover-Price Campus Center (1962): The University’s Campus Center is named in honor of the Hoover Company of North Canton, Ohio and the late Mr. and Mrs. H.C. Price of North Canton, Ohio, principal donors for the building. It is a one-story structure of 55,800 square feet located on the northwest edge of the campus. The Campus Center is the extracurricular heart of the campus. Expanded in 1996, the Campus Center includes offices for many student services including the Academic Support Center and the offices of Accessibility Services, Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling and Auxiliary Services. In addition, the Campus Center is home to most of the Office of Student Affairs staff including the vice president for student affairs and dean of the University and associate dean of students, as well as the offices of Residence Life, Multicultural Student Affairs, Student Involvement and Leadership, Counseling Services, Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education and Career Development. Both the Kresge Commons and the B & B Café were renovated in 2006-2007 and are popular gathering spots for students. The Campus Center is also home to the University Store, a computer lab, student mailboxes and the University radio station. The Alumni Room, East Room and West Room, as well as the Osborne and Deuble Conference rooms, provide accommodations for meeting space. The mezzanine level, added in 1988, houses the CCTV and audio-visual operations. A student-staffed Information Desk and the main University switchboard are also located in the Campus Center. Jae Manor (2007): This apartment-style building located within Brown Village on Union Avenue provides housing for 36 upperclass students and was named to honor the legacy of the late Hugh ’54 and Nancy Jae. Keener House (1979): This two-story brick building located at 145 Hartshorn is used to house the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. Keller Manor (2007): Named in honor of Daniel ’72 and Laura Keller, this apartment-style building located within Brown Village on Union Avenue is home to 36 upperclass students. Ketcham Residence Hall (1962): Located on Simpson Street, this residence hall is named for the late Dr. Charles B. Ketcham, president of Mount Union from 1938-1953, and his wife, Mrs. Lucile Brown Ketcham. The three-story brick structure houses 115 students.

Perry F. King Guest House (1981): The home is the gift of Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. King ’33 of Marion, Massachusetts, in memory of his late father, Dr. Perry F. King 1899, who was a prominent surgeon, member of the Board of Trustees (1914-1918), team physician (four decades), one of the founders of the Alumni Association and responsible for the organization of the Student Health Service. The beautiful old home is located at 1414 S. Union Ave. and is used to house male students at the University. King Residence Hall (1960): King Hall houses 114 students. The three-story brick structure is named for the late Dr. George L. King Jr. ’22 and his wife, Margaret (Wagner) King. Dr. King served as president of the Mount Union Board of Trustees for 18 years. Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center (2000): The Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center provides 45,912 square feet of technology and learning space, which is directly linked to the traditional library space (see library entry for resources). It houses the Writing Center, PC labs, a Macintosh lab, a computer science lab, a language lab, several multimedia classrooms, 24-hour access to study space, computer labs and vending. It also contains classrooms and office space for the departments of Computer Science and Information Systems, Foreign Languages and Communication. The facility was made possible through a lead gift from Steve ’84 and Suzanne (Spisak ’84) Harter. Lakes (1916): The campus lakes are located across from Cope Music Hall. An idea provided by former member of the Mount Union Board of Trustees, Walter Ellet, the lakes were constructed in 1916. Shaped by shovels, wheelbarrows and horses using slip scrapers, the lakes were originally formed in the shape of an “M.” The lakes suffered much erosion during the ensuing years, so in 1983, the lakes were cleaned and renovated. Through the installation of a retaining wall, much of the damage caused by the erosion was corrected. The lakes were also restored to their original depth of eight to 10 feet. Other repairs included the addition of new drainage pipes and renovation of the pedestrian bridge. The campus lakes are not to be used for recreational purposes. Lamborn Plaza (1984): The Plaza, adjacent to the north entrance of the Engineering and Buisness Building, is located on the former site of Lamborn Hall, which serviced science classes from 1914 to 1983. The plaza includes in its construction the cornerstone and name plate from Lamborn Hall. Library (1950): Originally built in 1950 and expanded in 1975, the University Library is located within the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center. The library offers more than 230,000 books in open stacks, more than 900 current journal titles, back years of journals in both bound and microform format and more than 350,000 federal government publications. Access to a wide range of computer databases and electronic full-text products is available via campus networked access to the Internet. Library collections are accessed through the OPAL catalog. Mount Union is part of a 19 library catalog consortium which uses the Innovative Interfaces software system. As part of the OhioLINK system, our users may borrow materials directly from all OPAL libraries as well as any of the 74 OhioLINK libraries throughout the state of Ohio. In addition to the OPAL catalog, the Mount Union library home page on the Internet offers access to more than 200 periodical indexes in a wide array of subject areas, more than 5,000 full-text periodical titles, a range of encyclopedias and dictionaries and several gateways to federal government document resources. Special collections are located in the Rare Books Room and the Historical Room, which houses the University’s archives and a local history collection. The estate of Louis H. Brush makes annual grants to purchase books and periodicals in memory of James Alpheus Brush, the first Librarian of the University, and his wife. The Thomas S. Brush Foundation, Inc. made a gift of approximately $500,000 in 1971 to the Endowment Fund of the University with the income to be used for purchase of books and periodicals in memory of Mr. Brush’s grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis H. Brush. The Sturgeon Music Library, located in Cope Music Hall, houses 7,000 recordings, 10,000 scores, current music periodicals and a music reference collection. Listening stations equipped with compact disc players, turntables and cassette recorders are provided for student use as well as a soundproof listening room. The Science Library provides the most recent three years of science journals and a science reference collection in close proximity to science classrooms and laboratories. McCready Residence Hall (1965): A residence hall for 119 first-year students, McCready Hall is located between Hartshorn Avenue and State Street. It is named in honor of the late B. Y. McCready ’16 of Alliance, Ohio, a long-time member of the Board of Trustees, and his widow, Mrs. B. Y. McCready. McMaster Residence Hall (1956): Located on Simpson Street, McMaster houses 163 women. It is named for the late president of Mount Union, Dr. William H. McMaster 1899, and Mrs. McMaster. The three-story brick construction is built in an L-shape and is the largest residence hall on campus. McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex (2009): The McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex is Mount Union’s primary health and wellness complex. The facility is named in honor of Richard ’50 and Dorothy (Werstler ’49) McPherson, whose generosity provided for the McPherson Center for Human Health and Well-Being in 1996 as well as for this latest addition and renovation. The MAAC includes the Timken Physical Education Building, Peterson Field House, McPherson Center for Human Performance, Cicchinelli Fitness Center, Hammond Natatorium and Sweeney Auxiliary Gymnasium as well as a wrestling room, exercise science center and laboratory, athletic training facility, classrooms, laboratories, office spaces and an area dedicated to student recruitment. McPherson Center for Human Performance (1996): The McPherson Center, located adjacent to the Timken Physical Education Building, is the home for the Department of Human Performance and Sport Business with faculty offices, a student lounge and state-of-the-art classroom and laboratory facilities. The building was made possible through a lead gift from Richard ’50 and Dorothy (Werstler ’49) McPherson. The center is part of the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex. Miller Residence Hall (1866): Miller is a three-story brick residence hall named in honor of the Honorable Lewis Miller of Akron, long-time chairman (1868-99) of the Mount Union Board of Trustees. It is the oldest residence hall on campus and was renovated in 2007. Mount Union Stadium (1915): The Stadium was planned and equipped by the University’s Alumni Athletic Association. It contains a football field, an all-weather track, a steel and concrete grandstand, concrete bleachers and dressing and storage rooms. The stadium playing field is made of an artificial surface called AstroPlay. Lights allow for night contests. Stadium capacity is 5,600. Mount Union Theatre (1976): The Mount Union Theatre serves as an auditorium for the University. Located at 1745 S. Union Ave., the theatre was originally constructed in 1920 as an automobile garage and was converted into a motion picture theatre in 1939. Mount Union purchased the theatre in 1976 and renovated it in 1979. The theatre seats 784 people and includes a stage area. Nature Center (1986): The John T. Huston-Dr. John D. Brumbaugh Nature Center is located six miles south of the campus. The 126-acres of woodland, including 27-acres of old growth beech maple forest, provide a nature preserve for plant and animal populations native to northeastern Ohio. The land, donated to the University by Dr. John D. Brumbaugh in honor of his grandfather, Mr. John T. Huston, will be used in perpetuity as a center for environmental education. The preserve, used as an outdoor teaching laboratory for the natural sciences, also supports many faculty/student research projects. In addition, nature trails are open to the public and to organized groups in the area. The Dr. John D. Brumbaugh Visitors Center, completed in 1991, provides classroom and laboratory space and an information resource for students and other visitors. Orwick Court (2007): This newest row of townhouses located on State Street was made possible by a gift from Carl ’42 and Martha “Nickie” (Nicholson ’45) Orwick in honor of the four generations of family who have passed through Mount Union. Forty upperclass students reside within Orwick

Court. Peterson Field House (1981): Located at the west end of the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, the Field House is named in recognition of the late Donald ’39 and Josephine (Hoiles ’40) Peterson. Dr. Peterson’s many contributions included serving as a member of the Board of Trustees from 1954 until 2006 and as Board president from 1971 to 1987. The Field House features the Wuske Track, a 200-meter NCAA regulation indoor track for hosting college and high school meets, named in honor of the University’s successful track coach, the late Jim Wuske. The facility also includes batting cages and indoor practice space for baseball, softball and golf and provides recreational and varsity practice space for basketball, volleyball and tennis. Ramsayer Health Center (1958): The University’s Health Center has treatment rooms, dispensary and consultation offices. It also has two wards for daytime infirmary services. The Center was given by an anonymous donor. Rodman Playhouse (1954): Rodman Playhouse includes a 290-seat proscenium theatre and is attached to Crandall Gallery. The Playhouse is the gift of the C. J. Rodman family of Alliance, Ohio. The Playhouse includes offices, storage and stagecraft areas and a greenroom, which serves as a lounge and classroom. Scott Plaza: Adjacent to the library, Scott Plaza is named in memory of Dr. Joseph Scott who was head of the Department of Biology from 1918 to 1946. Shields Residence Hall (1999): This three-story building houses 155 students in suite-style living units and is located directly behind the Campus Center. It was named in honor of Dr. Clifford D. ’43 and Mrs. Betty (Hatton ’44) Shields. Sweeney Auxiliary Gymnasium (2010): The auxiliary gymnasium, located in the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, provides additional practice space for Mount Union’s intramural program and recreational activities. The facility was made possible through the generosity of Sean ’79 and Caroline Sweeney. Timken Physical Education Building (1970): The Timken Physical Education Building, part of the McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex, includes a performance arena with three full-size basketball and volleyball courts with a seating capacity of 3,000. Also housed in the facility is a state-ofthe-art sports medicine center that includes an athletic training room, offices, rehabilitation center and hydrotherapy facilities. The Office of Athletics is located here along with classrooms, the M Club meeting room and an interactive kiosk that includes the M Club Athletic Hall of Fame. Tolerton and Hood Hall (1982): Tolerton and Hood houses the departments of Mathematics, Psychology and Sociology. The building includes faculty offices, a large lecture room, individual classrooms and student laboratories. The building was endowed in 1983 through a generous gift from Mary (Tolerton ’24) Hood. Tolerton and Hood Hall was named for Mrs. Hood’s father, Howard Tolerton, and her husband, Clifford Hood. Union Avenue Gateway and Park: The Gateway and Park are located between Union Avenue and the University buildings. The park, made possible by the Mount Union Woman’s Club, contains two lakes, walks, a bridge, trees and shrubbery. A brick entrance, erected by the class of 1893, marks the approach from Union Avenue. Union Avenue West Village (2011): Located on Union Avenue, is comprised of three apartment style buildings, housing a combined total of 188 students with 40, three story and eight, two story apartments. This living community provides housing for juniors and seniors. van den Eynden Hall (1928): Located at 136 Hartshorn St. and formerly known as the Administration Annex, the building was named in 1990 in recognition of the late Howard and Kathryn van den Eynden of Shaker Heights, Ohio. The building was the gift of an anonymous donor in 1940. Prior to that time it housed the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity, and from 1942-1962 it served as the college Student Union and a residence hall. The building now houses The Center for Global Education, The Center for Public Service and The Reserve Officer Training Program. Wable-Harter Building (1996): The Wable-Harter Building, located behind the Mount Union Stadium, is the gift of Steve ’84 and Suzanne (Spisak ’84) Harter of Houston, Texas. The building houses the football locker room and facilities, offices, a meeting room and a training room. Whitehill Tennis Courts (1946): The University’s Tennis Courts, located behind Bica-Ross Hall, are the gift of the late Mr. C. E. Whitehill of Indianapolis, Indiana. A new construction in 1999, the site includes six tennis courts.

Accreditations and Affiliations
The University of Mount Union is accredited by the following organizations: the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of College and Schools (www.ncahlc.org) as a Degree-Granting Institution; Department of Education of the State of Ohio; University Senate of the United Methodist Church; Ohio University Association; Ohio Board of Regents (Certificate of Authorization); Ohio Athletic Association; Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Ohio; National Association of Schools of Music; and National Association of Sport and Physical Education-North American Society for Sport Management (NASPE-NASSM). The athletic training program is approved by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE); Mount Union’s teacher education program is approved by the Ohio Department of Education and accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE); and Mount Union’s Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

The Five College Commission
The Five College Commission, which operates as a division of The Commission on Higher Education of the United Methodist Church in Ohio, includes in its membership the five United Methodist Colleges in the state: Mount Union, Baldwin-Wallace, Ohio Northern, Ohio Wesleyan and Otterbein. The purpose of the Five College Commission is to promote communication and understanding and to serve as liaison between the five United Methodist Colleges and the United Methodists of the State of Ohio for their mutual benefit.

Alumni and Related Organizations
The University of Mount Union Alumni Association was officially organized in 1948, having functioned for many years as an informal organization. Its purpose is to promote interest in Mount Union through a variety of programs. All former students are automatically members of the association. Activities are coordinated through the Office of Alumni Relations, part of the University’s administrative staff and the Alumni Council from the association. The Association holds local meetings each year in many areas throughout the nation. Special programs for alumni from all areas are provided at the University on Alumni Weekend and also on Homecoming Day. Mount Union Magazine, a quarterly publication, keeps alumni and friends informed of the programs and activities of the association and of the University. The Mount Union Women, founded in 1933, is an organization of local chapters with the National Cabinet as its governing body. Its purposes are to foster the interests of Mount Union, to promote the education of women, to provide an effective medium of contact between alumnae and the

University and to organize local chapters of Mount Union Women. Any woman who has attended Mount Union is a member of Mount Union Women. Associate memberships may be held by the wife of an alumnus and the mother, daughter or sister of an alumnus or alumna. Honorary memberships are given to the wife of the president of the University, the wives of all members of Administrative Council, the director of alumni activities and women members of the University’s Board of Trustees. Honorary memberships may be given to women professors and wives of professors.

Undergraduate Academic Calendar
Summer School 2011
Summer I Summer II Summer III Summer PA May 9 - 27 May 31- July 22 June 13 – July 22 May 16 – August 5 3 Weeks 8 Weeks (Holiday July 4) 6 Weeks (Holiday July 4) 12 Weeks (Holiday July 4)

Fall Semester 2011
August 27-28 August 29 September 5 September 9 October 14 October 17 October 21 November 7 November 18 November 22 November 28 December 9 December 11 December 12-16 December 16 Sat-Sun Monday Monday Friday Friday Monday Friday Monday Friday Tuesday Monday Friday Sunday Mon-Fri Friday Fall Orientation First day of classes Labor Day, Classes in session Last day to withdraw without ‘W’ Fall Break, Classes not in session Fall Break, Classes not in session Last day to change from Credit to ‘S/U’ Last day to withdraw without penalty Last day to petition to change an exam Thanksgiving recess begins at 11 p.m. Classes resume Last day of classes Reading Day Final exam period Semester ends at 11 p.m.

Spring Semester 2012
January 9 January 16 January 20 March 2 March 3 March 12 March 26 April 6 April 9 April 17 April 23 April 24 April 25-27 April 30-May 1 May 1 May 5 Monday Monday Friday Friday Saturday Monday Monday Friday Monday Tuesday Monday Tuesday Wed-Fri Mon-Tue Tuesday Saturday First day of classes Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Classes not in session Last day to withdraw without ‘W’ Last day to change from Credit to ‘S/U’ Spring recess begins Classes resume Last day to withdraw without penalty Good Friday, Classes not in session Last day to petition to change an exam SCHOLAR Day/Honors Convo Last day of classes Reading Day Final exam period Final exam period Semester ends at 11 p.m. Commencement This calendar is subject to change.

Admission and Financial Aid
Admission to the University
The policy of the University of Mount Union is to enroll applicants who are best qualified to participate effectively and creatively in the life of the total academic community. Admissions decisions are based on past academic achievement as well as potential for future growth. Also considered are participation in high school and community activities, talents, interests, and motivation. A candidate may apply for admission after completion of six semesters of high school study. The University follows a policy of rolling admission with the first decisions released after September 15. Though early application is encouraged, selection is made on the basis of records and credentials rather than on the basis of priority of application. Students may enroll in the University at the beginning of any semester or, with permission, for the Summer Session. (See the Academic calendar on page 7 for opening dates of each semester.) Applications should be submitted well in advance of the opening date of each semester in order to receive

full consideration, and no later than the week prior to the start of each academic session. However, on an exceptional basis, the Office of Admission may give consideration to qualified applicants whose complete credentials are received by the fourth day of the first week of classes.

Entrance Requirements
An entering freshman should hold a diploma from an accredited secondary school and should have completed a minimum of 15 units. Consideration for admission as an entering freshman begins at the cumulative grade point average level of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. Preference is given to applicants who have completed with distinction college preparatory programs which include 4 units in English; 3 units or more in each of the following fields: mathematics, social sciences and laboratory sciences; and 2 units or more in foreign language. Consideration for admission also is given to capable students who have followed alternate programs. Additional documentation may be required to support the admission application. Mount Union requires that an applicant submit the results of either the SAT Reasoning Test of the College Board (www.collegeboard.com) or the ACT examination (www.ACT.org). For all applicants applying for the 2012-2013 Academic Year, the University does not require the ACT Writing Test, and will not use the Writing Test as a factor for applicants from whom we receive the Writing Test score. Applicants for admission should contact their high school guidance counselor for further information concerning either examination. The applicant should arrange to take one or both of the examinations by the spring of the junior year or, at the latest, by the fall of the senior year. An information session with a member of the admission staff is recommended as it provides the opportunity for an exchange of pertinent information between the student and the admission officer. Interviews may be scheduled between the hours of 9 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. on weekdays throughout the year, and information sessions are held on Saturday mornings during the academic year. An applicant should contact the Office of Admission to arrange an interview appointment.

Admission by Transfer
Consideration for admission as a transfer student requires a minimum cumulative grade point average of a 2.0 (on an A = 4.0 scale; 2.0 = C) at the institution previously attended and documentation of good academic standing and honorable disciplinary standing on the Dean’s Evaluation Form. The application for admission should be accompanied by a personal statement explaining the reason for leaving the previous institution and the reason for selecting Mount Union. In addition, the applicant must have official transcripts forwarded from all institutions previously attended (including final high school transcripts). In order to be eligible for acceptance to the University of Mount Union Academic Record, a transferred course must: A. Have been earned at a regionally accredited college or university. B. Reflect a grade of “C” or higher. C. Be in an equivalent program offered by Mount Union. A student who has been registered for one or more courses in another university, with the exception of those students who enrolled under the PostSecondary Enrollment Option or Duel Credit Program, is classified as a transfer student. Failure to report attendance at another college or university, whether or not credit was granted, may result in suspension from the University of Mount Union. All transfer students must complete a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Mount Union before receiving a University of Mount Union degree. Certification of a major on a University of Mount Union degree for a transfer student will require the student to take courses in the major area and a Senior Culminating Experience. The courses necessary for completion of the major will be specified by the chair of the department of the proposed major after evaluation of the student’s transcript. These courses may be taken as part of the 45 semester hours required at the University of Mount Union. Transfer students who hold an associate of arts degree from a regionally accredited institution may be granted credit for up to 60 semester hours. Grade point averages accrued at other institutions are not transferable to the University of Mount Union.

Admission of International Students
An applicant who is not a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen shall be considered an international student and will apply for admission to the University through the Center for Global Education. Students may seek admission to the University once they have successfully completed the secondary school system as officially recognized by the country in which they are being educated. Applicants shall submit certified English translations of official academic records from each school attended beyond the primary level including the results of any government level examination required for official completion of secondary school, a Teacher Reference Form completed by an instructor at the latest educational level, and certification of adequate financial support. Applicants whose native language or language of secondary school instruction is not English must submit for review one of the following: results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or certification of the level completed at an English Language Center.

Returning Students
A Mount Union student whose attendance at the University is interrupted, either by suspension or by withdrawal for any reason, must apply for readmission with the Office of the Registrar in order to resume academic work at Mount Union. An extended absence may result in reassessment and/or adjustment of degree requirements. A student who has attended any other institutions since leaving Mount Union will have to submit transcripts from each school attended before being considered for readmission.

Transient Students from Another Institution
A student who is regularly enrolled at another college or university but who seeks approval to register for classes at Mount Union as a transient in order to have credit transferred to the home institution must apply by submitting a transient application to the Office of the Registrar. Although official transcripts are not required as part of the transient application process, a student seeking transient status at Mount Union must present evidence of good academic and disciplinary standing at the home institution. Following completion of the academic work, a transient student must request an official transcript be sent to the home institution in order to transfer credit accordingly.

Pre-College Credit
Students who have completed regular accredited college courses while in high school through programs such as Post-Secondary Enrollment Option

or dual credit may, by having a copy of their transcript sent from the credit-granting college (not the high school transcript) be awarded credit according to Mount Union policy. General conditions of transferring credit also apply here. Entering students are required to take certain tests at the time of entrance to the University and are encouraged to take placement tests in applicable areas in order that they may begin course work at the proper level.

Advanced Placement
Mount Union encourages the taking of advanced placement courses. The University may award credit based on achieving the appropriate examination score on College Board Advanced Placement Examinations. Further information on the Advanced Placement program may be obtained from the Office of Admission.

Post-Secondary Enrollment Option
The University of Mount Union’s PSEO is designed to provide qualified high school students with the opportunity to complete college-level course work. The University reserves the right to limit the availability of the program based on enrollment trends of traditional students. When space is available, the University will use discretion in determining the best qualified candidates for admission to the program. University courses taken under PSEO also may fulfill high school graduation requirements, if approved by the student’s local school district. The number of courses that a student may take is determined by the Admission Committee and is based upon availability of courses and the academic credentials of the candidate. Preference will be given to high school seniors, then juniors. To be considered for admission to the program, the student should be commuting from a permanent residence (cannot apply to be a resident student), have a cumulative grade point average of a 3.5 or higher, rank within the top 15 percent of his/her high school class and have an enhanced ACT composite score of at least 26 or an SAT - I composite score of at least 1180 (or comparable PLAN or PSAT). Candidates who do not meet the above guidelines but who present other indications of unusual academic potential (i.e. a significantly higher level of achievement on at least one part of the ACT or SAT, with correspondingly high grades in that particular area) also may be considered for admission on a course by course basis. The University reserves the right to limit the number of participants in the program in any given semester. Applicants must submit prior to May 15 (for the following Fall Semester) or November 15 (Spring Semester) these materials: the PSEO Application Form; an official high school transcript; the Principal or Guidance Counselor Recommendation Form; standardized test score results and a 300-word essay on the reason for applying to PSEO. Admission notification is on a rolling basis and will occur no later than two weeks prior to the start of classes. Students enrolling under Option A (for college credit only) are responsible for all tuition, fees and book costs. The tuition for Ohio students enrolling under Option B (for high school and/or college credit) is generally provided by the public school system. However, under Option B, the dropping of a course prior to successful completion or non-attendance may result in the parent/guardian reimbursing the school district the amount of state subsidy lost to the district. At the time of enrollment under Option B, both student and parent are required to sign a Financial Responsibility Acknowledgment Form. PSEO students may request an offical transcript in accordance to university policy.

Consumer Information Disclosures
As a prospective student, federal regulations stipulate that you have the opportunity to access various types of consumer information. If you wish to obtain a copy of the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act Report, please contact the Office of Admission. This report, which contains athletic program participation rates and financial support data, is compiled annually and available to the public. If you wish to obtain a copy of the Campus Crime Report, please contact the Office of Admission. This report is published annually and includes information about campus security policies, procedures, and practices and statistics for the occurrence, during the prior three calendar years, of criminal offenses that were reported to local police agencies or to a campus security authority.

Financial Aid for Undergraduate Students
The primary goal of the financial aid program at Mount Union is to assist students in meeting their University expenses by providing financial resources. Financial assistance from the University should be considered as supplemental to the family effort. The investment of the family includes parental support for dependent students and a contribution from the students themselves. Mount Union will strive to assist eligible students to the greatest extent possible based on the University’s available resources.

Eligibility for Financial Aid for Traditional Undergraduate Students
To be eligible for financial assistance, the student must be classified as a full-time traditional student and show satisfactory progress toward meeting the requirements for a degree (see explanation on page 24). Institutional financial assistance is not available to any student who holds a bachelor’s degree or higher or for summer school. Consideration for institutional need-based grants will be available for up to 10 semesters or until completion of the degree, whichever is less. Students who wish to accelerate their program by attending summer school may be eligible for limited types of assistance. The amounts and types of assistance for summer attendance are limited, and applications for such aid should be made preceding attendance. Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to be considered for financial assistance based on financial need. Students apply online at www.fafsa.gov and the federal school code for the University of Mount Union is 003083. The student will be considered for state funds, federal grants such as Pell and TEACH Grant as well as federal loans and employment opportunities. University aid will be based on the assumption that students will apply for and receive other financial aid for which they are eligible. If additional aid or scholarships are received after the initial aid award has been given to the student, a review of the aid eligibility may require some adjustments to that the total award does not exceed federal, state or institutional guidelines and regulations. Students who attend summer school at Mount Union may be eligible for financial assistance. Students may use federal funds such as Federal Loans for summer if they are eligible (according to the FAFSA). Any federal loans used for the summer sessions may reduce eligibility for the remainder of the year.

Satisfactory Academic Progress: Financial Aid Considerations
Federal regulations require the University of Mount Union to establish satisfactory academic progress (SAP) standards for student financial aid recipients. Mount Union’s SAP policy measures a student’s performance in the following three areas: cumulative grade point average (GPA), completion

rate, and maximum time frame. The Office of Student Financial Services is responsible for ensuring that all students who receive federal, state, and institutional financial aid are meeting these standards. The Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress apply for all financial assistance programs including but not limited to: Federal Pell Grant, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Work-Study (FWS), Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Direct Loans (Stafford and Parent PLUS Loan), as well as financial aid from the state of Ohio and the University of Mount Union. To retain financial aid eligibility, a student must be in “good academic standing,” as described on page 32, in terms of minimum cumulative GPA requirements. A student must also be making satisfactory academic progress in terms of completing courses. A student enrolled at the University of Mount Union on a full-time basis is considered to be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP) if he or she successfully completes a minimum of 67% of the credit hours attempted, reviewed annually at the end of the spring semester. (Please note that financial aid regulations prohibit a student from repeating a course that he or she has already passed more than once.) A student may repeat a course that he or she has previously passed more than once, but such courses will not be eligible for financial aid. Finally, a student must complete his or her degree within 150% of the published length of the program as measured by credit hours attempted. At the University of Mount Union, this means in programs requiring 120 hours for graduation, a student is eligible for financial aid through 180 attempted hours. All attempted hours are counted whether or not financial aid was received or the course work was successfully completed. Once a student reaches 180 attempted credits (150% time frame), eligibility for financial aid will terminated indefinitely. Satisfactory Academic Progress is reviewed annually at the end of the spring semester. Students not meeting the completion rate or the minimum GPA requirement at the end of each academic year will be at risk of losing their financial aid eligibility. Such students will be notified by the Office of Student Financial Services.

Financial Aid Appeal Procedure
Students who have lost federal financial aid eligibility may appeal to the Office of Student Financial Services if they have mitigating circumstances (e.g. emergency, health, family circumstances, etc.). A student must appeal in writing to the Office of Student Financial Services within two weeks of being notified. Such appeals must provide an explanation for why the student failed to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress, and must include a statement explaining how the student will achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress in the subsequent semester. Additional documentation or letters of support may be requested. The Financial Aid Committee, consisting of the Director of the Office of Financial Services and two members of the staff of that office, designated by the Director, will review the appeal and notify the student of a decision within two weeks.

Financial Aid Probation
If a student’s appeal is granted, the student may continue to receive financial aid during the following semester, and will be considered on financial aid probation. If after the following semester, the student succeeds and meets both the completion rate and GPA requirements, he or she will be removed from financial aid probation because he or she will be meeting satisfactory academic progress.

Financial Aid Suspension
If after one semester on academic warning, the student fails to meet minimum SAP standards, his or her financial aid will be suspended and will receive a letter of aid suspension from the Office of Student Financial Services. If the student is otherwise eligible to take classes, he or she may continue to do so, using their own funds or private loans (those that have no SAP restrictions) until they have successfully met the minimum SAP standards, at which time, aid eligibility may be restored.

Determination of Financial Aid Eligibility for Undergraduate Students
The University requires the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine eligibility for need-based financial aid from federal aid programs, state grants and institutional funds. Students can access this website at www.fafsa.gov. Students are encouraged to file electronically. The Office of Student Financial Services determines the financial aid award, which is consistent with federal, state and institutional guidelines. Changes that occur in the family’s financial situation after the aid applications have been filed should be reported to the Office of Student Financial Services for guidance. All financial aid documents must be processed by the last date of attendance or the last day of the semester, whichever comes first. Adjustments to the financial aid award may be the result of submitting documents such as verification worksheets and special circumstance forms or result from a change in the student housing status (on-campus vs. off-campus vs. commuter). In addition, inaccurate information, notification of additional aid from outside sources, certification of Federal Parent PLUS or alternative loans could also cause changes. Amounts may vary due to changes in federal, state or University funding of programs. The student will be notified of each financial aid revision. Students are notified electronically.

Financial Aid Awarding Policies for Undergraduate Students
Housing Status: University policy requires freshmen and sophomores to live on campus or to commute from their parents’ home. For purposes of the initial financial aid award, we will make the assumption that the student will reside on campus unless the FAFSA indicates “with parents.” In the case of FAFSA non-filers, we will assume “on campus” unless notified otherwise by the family. Students should anticipate that their aid will change as a result of a change in housing status. Enrollment Status: Financial aid awards for traditional students are based on full-time enrollment (12 semester hours per semester) unless otherwise indicated. It is the student’s responsibility to check with the Office of Student Financial Services if part-time attendance is desired. However, students enrolled less than 12 semester hours may be eligible for part-time Federal grants and/or a Federal Stafford Loan (minimum of six semester hours). Multiple Grants and Scholarships Policy: The initial institutional merit-based award is offered without regard for financial need. Students who may be eligible for multiple institutional grants and/or scholarships will receive at least the value of the highest grant or scholarship. It is our policy not to “stack” multiple institutional awards on the basis of merit. Consideration that is given for any portion of a second grant/scholarship or award made up of the University of Mount Union dollars will be based on financial need and will require the student to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) which is available online at www.fafsa.gov.

Financial Aid Application Procedures for New Undergraduate Students
The following steps are necessary in order to apply for financial aid at Mount Union: A. The student applies for admission to the University.

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The student files the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov to determine financial aid eligibility for need-based financial aid. The federal school code for Mount Union is 003083. The process begins on January 1 of the student’s senior year. C. The process of sending award letters begins in March. Financial aid awards are made throughout the year, but late applications will be considered only if funds are available.

B.

Financial Aid Renewal Procedure for Undergraduate Students
All financial aid awards are reviewed annually to accurately analyze any changes in the financial position of the student and his or her family. The annual review also permits the University to take into consideration any change in educational costs. The following information relates to renewal of financial aid: A. File the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at www.fafsa.gov to apply for financial aid assistance. All renewal applicants are encouraged to complete their applications accurately and as early as possible after January 1. B. The Office of Student Financial Services provides reminders to students via Ennouncements on campus. C. Award letters are available to students beginning May l.

Financial Assistance for Undergraduate Degree-Seeking International Students
An applicant who is not a United States citizen or eligible non-citizen shall be considered an international student and may apply to the University for need-based financial assistance through the completion of the International Student Financial Aid Application available from the College Board or Mount Union. To be eligible for financial assistance, the student must show financial need, be classified as full-time and show satisfactory progress toward meeting the requirements for a degree (see explanation on page 24.) Institutional need-based financial aid consideration will be available for up to 10 semesters or until the completion of the degree, whichever is less. Institutional financial assistance is not available to any student who holds a bachelor’s degree or higher or for summer school.

Types of Assistance for Undergraduate Students
The term “financial aid” is used to include scholarships, proficiencies, grants, loans and on-campus employment. The majority of students receiving aid are granted a combination of these types of assistance. The initial institutional merit-based award is offered without regard for financial need. Students who may be eligible for multiple institutional grants and/or scholarships will receive at least the value of the highest grant or scholarship. It is our policy not to “stack” multiple institutional awards on the basis of merit. Consideration that is given for any portion of a second grant/scholarship or award made up of the University of Mount Union dollars will be based on financial need and will require the student to file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Presidential Scholarships: Six full-tuition scholarships are awarded to incoming freshmen each year. Requirements to compete include: an ACT score of at least 27 or SAT-1 score of at least 1220 and either a minimum grade point average of 3.5 or a high school rank in the top 15 percent of their class. Awards are for full tuition. A written examination and interview are required parts for the competition. A Presidential Scholarship is renewable for eight consecutive semesters as long as the recipient maintains a 3.0 cumulative grade point average at the end of the fourth semester and annually thereafter and is a full-time traditional student at Mount Union. Trustee Scholarships: Students who compete for the Presidential Scholarship but are not awarded the full-tuition scholarship will be considered for one of these scholarships. Awards are in the amount of $12,000. This award is renewable for eight semesters as long as the recipient maintains a 3.0 cumulative grade point average at the end of the fourth semester and annually thereafter and is a full-time traditional student at Mount Union. The Academy, Founder’s, Dean’s and Academic Merit Awards: Eligibility is based upon outstanding high school academic achievement and demonstrated aptitude for college on the ACT or SAT-I examinations. This award is renewable for eight semesters as long as the recipient maintains a 3.0 cumulative grade point average at the end of the fourth semester and annually thereafter and is a full-time traditional student at Mount Union. The Academy, Founder’s and Dean’s range from $8,000 to $11,000. Academic Merit Awards (for returning students) range from $5,000 to $7,000. Heritage and Hartshorn Awards: These merit awards are based upon the student’s academic achievements and results of the ACT or SAT examinations. The awards are renewable each year (maximum of eight semesters) as long as the student is full-time (minimum of 12 hours per semester). Awards are in the amounts of $5,000 and $7,000. Minority Achievement Award: The Minority Achievement Award, offered as a result of a campus-based competition, is open to African-American, Hispanic, Native American-Indian, Asian American and multi-racial students. In addition, students who are members of other American minority groups or other groups underrepresented on Mount Union’s campus are welcome to submit a brief letter requesting the opportunity to compete. The Minority Achievement Committee will review and respond to all letters received. Application materials may be obtained by contacting the Office of Admission. Proficiency Awards: Entering students who demonstrate exceptional proficiency in music, theatre, communication or art may be considered for these awards. The awards vary in amount and are renewable for eight semesters provided the student exhibits continued excellence and growth in the proficiency area in which the scholarship was initially awarded. Deadlines are available on the University website. United Methodist Scholarships: A limited number of United Methodist Scholarships, which amount to $500 per year, are available to Mount Union students. Recipients of the scholarships must be U.S. citizens and have been active members of the United Methodist Church for at least one year. The Financial Aid Committee will select the recipients of this scholarship. Deadline for completed applications is August l. Methodist Grants: Full-time students who are members of the Methodist Church and are able to demonstrate financial aid eligibility may be eligible for a Methodist Grant. These awards are renewable to undergraduate students in the traditional program (maximum of 10 semesters) providing the student is full-time (minimum of 12 hours per semester), demonstrates satisfactory academic progress and the financial aid eligibility continues. University of Mount Union Grant: Eligibility for such assistance is determined through the analysis of the FAFSA. These awards are renewable to undergraduate students in the traditional program (maximum of 10 semesters) providing the student is full-time (minimum of 12 hours per semester), demonstrates satisfactory academic progress and the financial aid eligibility continues. Ministerial Awards: The Ministerial Award is available to dependent sons or daughters who currently live with the parent who is a full-time ordained minister or missionary. The primary source of income for the minister must come from this full-time position. Awards are for up to $10,000 each year. A FAFSA form is required to be filed to be considered for other financial aid. The parent must sign the Ministerial Award Certification in order to receive this award. These awards are renewable to full-time traditional students for up to ten semesters. Science Fair Scholarships: Scholarships are available to incoming students who have achieved a superior level of performance at the State Science Day in Columbus, Ohio, or at the District 13 Science Fair during their junior or senior years in high school. The scholarship is renewable for four years with a

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cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0. Students must submit documentation of their superior-level of performance. Legacy Awards: The Legacy Award is available to qualified students who are dependent sons or daughters of Mount Union graduates, attend the University as full-time traditional students and meet normal admission requirements. The award is renewable for eight semesters as long as the student maintains satisfactory academic progress and is enrolled full-time (minimum of 12 hours per semester). Students transferring to Mount Union are eligible to receive the award, less the semesters enrolled at any other institutions. Study Abroad Program: A number of financial aid programs are available to offset the educational expenses for a study abroad program for eligible students who are full-time and who have been approved by the Center for Global Education of the University. Contact the Office of Student Financial Services for further information. Ohio College Opportunity Grant: Ohio College Opportunity Grant is provided to Ohio residents who meet specific need-based criteria. It is dependent upon final approval of the State budget. Pennsylvania State Grants: The state of Pennsylvania has a reciprocal agreement with the State of Ohio that enables Pennsylvania residents to bring their state grant eligibility to Ohio schools. In order to be considered for PA state grant funds, parents and students must be residents of the state of Pennsylvania. Students must file the FAFSA by May 1 and must list Mount Union as #1 under Step Six. New students must sign the eligibility statement which is available online at www.mountunion.edu/financialaid. The grant is confirmed when Mount Union receives authorization from PHEAA. Federal Pell Grants: The Federal Pell Grant is a grant program offered by the federal government for families with financial aid eligibility based on income and household information of the student’s family. To apply for this grant, students must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The FAFSA is available online at www.fafsa.gov and Mount Union’s code number is 003083. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants: Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number of full-time students with exceptional financial aid eligibility. The amount of the grant ranges from $100 to $4,000 per academic year and, when awarded, will replace equivalent University grant funds from the latest financial aid award. TEACH Grant: The Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education (TEACH) Grant Program was established under the University Cost Reduction and Access Act to benefit current and prospective teachers. Students may be eligible for up to $4,000 per academic year up to a total of $16,000 as an undergraduate. You must be going into a career in teaching, maintain a minimum of 3.25 cumulative GPA for each semester and score above 75th percentile on the SAT or ACT (admissions test). You must teach full-time for at least four years within eight years of completing the program as a highly qualified teacher, at a Title I school and in a “high-need” field. If service is not met, the grant must be repaid as an Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan, with disbursement. Campus Employment/Federal Work Study: Student employment is an integral part of the financial aid program at Mount Union. Eligibility for consideration is based primarily on financial aid eligibility of a traditional degree-seeking student. Student employment gives students the opportunity to help their families pay for their educational expenses. Community service jobs are available as part of the campus employment program. Earning potential generally varies from $100 to $1,400 per year, depending on the financial aid eligibility of the individual. Students are paid minimum wage. They are expected to enroll full-time, maintain satisfactory academic progress and perform their job in a satisfactory manner. Paychecks are available to students on the 15th of each month. Earnings may be used to pay outstanding charges on their accounts or for other educational costs. Federal Perkins Loans: The Federal Perkins Loan program is a low-interest federal loan available to needy students. The amount of loan which the University may offer a student will depend on the financial aid eligibility of the student and the availability of loan funds. Loans are repaid in installments over a 10-year period beginning nine months after the student graduates or leaves school for other reasons. No interest accrues during the time the student is enrolled at least half-time. An interest rate of 5 percent per year is assessed, beginning with the repayment period. A number of deferment options are available, and information on them can be obtained from the Federal Perkins Loan Student Accounts Clerk in the Office of Business Affairs. The student has the right to cancel a disbursement of the loan within 14 days of having credited the student’s account. Direct Subsidized Student Loans: Direct Subsidized Student Loans are low interest educational loans which have been established to help students cover the costs of a University education. A FAFSA must be filed in order to determine financial aid eligibility. The borrowing limit is currently $3,500 per year for freshmen, $4,500 per year for sophomores and $5,500 per year for junior level and beyond. An additional $2,000 in a Direct Unsubsidized Loan is also available to those who qualify as a result of federal regulations (H.R. 5715) effective July 1, 2008. Class level is determined by the Office of the Registrar. The federal aggregate loan limit for Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized loans is $31,000 for dependent students. The interest rate for new borrowers is a fixed rate set on July 1 of each year. The federal government subsidizes the Direct Subsidized Student Loans while the student is enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates or leaves school. Mount Union participates in an electronic processing system. [Both new and returning students must complete the “Stafford Loan Request Form” available online at www.mountunion.edu/financialaid. First time borrowers will access the Master Promissory Note (MPN) online. A Stafford Information Request Form must be completed annually.] The borrower has the right to cancel a disbursement or request loan funds to be returned and can do so by contacting the Office of Student Financial Services. The borrower must complete the loan application and have it certified by the Office of Student Financial Services prior to the last day of attendance. Firsttime borrowers must complete Federal Stafford Loan Entrance Counseling and can do so by accessing the Internet at this address: www.mountunion.edu/financial-aid. Direct Unsubsidized Student Loans: The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is available to students who may not qualify for the Subsidized Direct Loan or only a partial Subsidized Direct Loan. The borrower is responsible for the interest while the student is in school. The sum of the subsidized and the unsubsidized Direct Loan cannot exceed the program maximums ($5,500 for freshmen, $6,500 for sophomores, $7,500 for junior level and beyond). The borrower has the right to cancel a disbursement or request loan funds to be returned and can do so by contacting the Office of Student Financial Services. The borrower must complete the Stafford Loan Request Form and have it certified by the Office of Student Financial Services prior to the last day of attendance. First-time borrowers must complete Direct Loan Entrance Counseling and a Master Promissory Note (MPN) and can do so at this web address: www.mountunion.edu/financial-aid. Direct Parent PLUS Loans: Parents of undergraduate dependent students may borrow additional loan funds to help cover the family contribution at a fixed interest rate determined on July 1 of each year. This is in addition to the Direct Student Loan maximums. Repayment begins within 60 days of the second disbursement of the loan proceeds. In no case may loan amounts exceed the cost of education less other financial aid received. The parent has the right to cancel a disbursement or request loan funds to be returned and can do so by contacting the Office of Student Financial Services. The borrower must submit the PLUS Loan Request Form to the Office of Student Financial Services; the office electronically certifies the loan. All loans must be certified prior to the last day of attendance. United Methodist Student Loans: Loan funds are available through the United Methodist Student Loan Fund to Mount Union students who are members of the United Methodist Church, citizens of the United States and enrolled as full-time traditional students at the University. Students wishing to apply for a United Methodist Student Loan should contact the Office of Student Financial Services for the necessary forms that are sent to the Nashville Office of the United Methodist Church. Outside Awards: Some students receiving financial aid from Mount Union are also the recipients of assistance from other sources. Students are

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encouraged to apply for outside assistance from educational foundations, industrial and state scholarship programs, etc. However, should a student be successful in obtaining outside assistance, they are required to inform the Office of Student Financial Services when an outside scholarship is received. A copy of the letter or certificate would serve as notification of this award. This amount will always show as estimated on the financial aid award, but once the payment has been received, it will show as a credit to the billing statement that comes from the Office of Business Affairs. If any adjustment to the aid award must be made, loans and campus employment will be reduced before any need-based awards. Several free scholarship services are available on the Mount Union website at www.mountunion.edu/financialaid. Special Scholarship, Grant and Loan Funds: A number of endowed scholarships, grants and loan funds help to provide a portion of the funds for the University’s financial aid program. Prizes and Awards: A limited number of prizes and awards are presented annually to deserving students

Tuition and Costs
Table of Fees, 2011-2012
Regular Fees Per Semester Tuition and fees (all baccalaureate degrees) Technology fee Standard room and board Suite-style room Single room in Elliott or Miller halls (or super single) Apartment-style housing on Union Avenue Apartment-style housing on Hartshorn Street Sigma Nu Sigma Nu (Super Single) Board plan only – 20 meals per week Board plan – 14 meals per week plus $50 dining dollars Board plan – 10 meals per week plus $100 dining dollars Block meal plan – any 50 meals Block meal plan – 50 meals - breakfast and lunch only Part-time Fees Per semester hour Technology fee International Student Teaching Fee Per semester hour Overload Fees (Over 19 Sem. Hrs.) Per semester hour 2012 Summer School Fees Per semester hour (regular classes) Room (per week) Applied Music Fees (all sessions) Fifteen 30 min. lessons – 1 credit hour University Student with Music Faculty Fifteen 60 min. lessons – 2 credit hours University Student with Music Faculty Adult Studies Fee Per Semester Hour Technology Fee Athletic Participation Fee Course Fees Anatomy & Physiology Fee (Fall / Spring) Athletic training lab fee Bowling fee Chemistry Lab Fee Physiology of Human Performance lab fee Incidental Fees Application fee Comprehensive deposit (required of all new traditional students) Lost key/lock change fee Lost Purple Plus I.D. fee Broken I.D. Card: 1st Replacement Amount $ 12,700 $ 150 $ 4,075 $ 4,200 $ 4,825 $ 2,625 $ 2,675 $ 1,950 $ 2,750 $ 2,125 $ 2,065 $ 2,025 $ 400 $ 280

$ 1,065 $ 75

$ 375

$ 630

$ 325 $ 115

$ 335 $ 670

$ 325 $ 75 $ 150

$ 15 / $ 25 $ 40/$ 75 $ 65 $ 40 $ 50

No fee $ 150 $ 50 $ 20 $5

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2nd Replacement 3rd Replacement Housing cancellation fee Returned check for non-sufficient funds Transcripts Retired (age 60 and over) – Technology Fee International insurance fee Early withdrawal fee Library – Lost Book Charge OhioLINK – Lost Book Charge

$ 10 $ 15 $ 150 $ 35 $5 $ 25 $ 300 $ 100 $ 100 $ 175

Student Charges
Tuition, fees, room and meal plan are payable to the Office of Business Affairs by July 31 for fall semester and January 3 for spring semester. A monthly payment plan with minimal application fee is also available. Information is available at the Office of Business Affairs. A student who is enrolled for 12 or more hours in one semester must pay full tuition and fees. A student who enrolls for more than 19 semester hours is subject to an overload fee per semester hour (see Table of Fees). A regularly registered full-time student in either semester is one who has paid full tuition and fees for that semester. A part-time student in either semester is one who has paid less than full tuition for that semester. Tuition and fees should be paid at the Cashier’s Office, and all checks should be made payable to the University of Mount Union. Payment of tuition and fees entitles the student to the use of science laboratories and science materials, use of the University Health Service and University Library, subscription to the University newspaper and yearbook, admission to all regularly scheduled intercollegiate sports events held on the campus, and University theatre and music presentations. In addition, tuition and fees include premiums for a health and accident insurance policy on each student in attendance full-time and also are designated annually for the operation of the Hoover-Price Campus Center, class dues and cap, gown and a diploma at graduation. A technology fee will be charged to each student in order to upgrade and maintain computing resources, services and technologies across the campus.

Advance Deposit Payment of Regular Fees
To enable the University to confirm and assign classroom and residence hall space in advance, each new student contemplating full-time attendance must make an advance payment of $150. Checks should be made payable to the University of Mount Union. New students are to make advance payments after admission to the University and as notified in their acceptance letter or in their financial aid award. The University makes no guarantee of classroom or rooming space to students having been admitted or preregistered who have not made advance payments as required. New students applying for admission for the fall semester may receive a refund of the advance payment providing written notification of withdrawal is received and postmarked prior to May 1. Refunds will not be made after this date.

Private Music Lessons for University Students
Private instrumental and vocal study is available for college credit to Mount Union students. Students may fulfill one-half of the fine arts portion of the general requirements for graduation by taking three consecutive semesters of applied lessons. A complete listing of all course offerings is found on page 152 of the Catalogue. University students register for applied lessons through the Office of the Registrar to receive appropriate academic credit. All fees for university applied lessons are paid at the Office of Business Affairs.
Student Fees (per Semester)

Student fees for private music lessons taught to Mount Union’s full-time students by members of the music faculty are as follows: Semester (15) 30 min. lessons (15) 60 min. lessons Fall or spring semester $335 $670 Summer sessions $335 $670 Part-time students must pay the charges listed above as well as applicable tuition charges. Lessons missed by the teacher are made up at a time acceptable to both teacher and student. Lessons missed by the student will not be made up except in cases of serious illness or emergency. No tuition refund will be given for missed lessons. If a student withdraws after the second week of classes, no refund will be given. Lessons should be completed within the semester for which registration is made. Private music lessons are not available for audit.

Private Music Lessons for the Preparatory Division (Non-University Students)
Private instrumental and vocal lessons are available for non-University students of all ages and levels of advancement through the University of Mount Union Preparatory Division. All information about Preparatory Division policies, fees, and registration is available at the music office in Cope Music Hall. Payment for lessons is to be made at the music office. Lessons are arranged at a time mutually convenient to the teacher and student. No lessons may be given in the Preparatory Division until registration is completed. Payment is made for the entire semester, or in two installments. Preparatory Division faculty includes full-time and adjunct music faculty from the Department of Music and student intern teachers from the Department of Music. Student teachers are supervised by the director of the Preparatory Division. Lessons will not be made up except in the event of extended illness. No tuition refund will be given for unexcused absence from lessons. Preparatory Division lessons must be completed within the semester for which the registration and payment are made.

Refund Policy
Withdrawal Procedure and Policy for the Return of Title IV /State/Institutional Funds

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Withdrawal Process:
A student who wants to withdraw after classes have started for the semester initiates the process with the Office of Student Affairs to indicate that he/she is withdrawing. The official date of withdrawal is the date the student contacted the Office of Student Affairs OR the midpoint of the semester if the student leaves without notifying the institution OR the student’s last date of attendance at a documented academically related activity. This policy applies to students who withdraw from all of their classes for the semester or are suspended. Students who participate in activities on campus prior to the first day of classes and then submit written notice of withdrawal prior to the first day of classes shall be assessed an early withdrawal fee of $100. The charges for tuition, fees, room and meal plan assessed to the student are based on the number of calendar days (including Saturday and Sunday) that the student is enrolled on campus in direct proportion to the period of enrollment (number of calendar days in the semester). The student who withdraws after 60 percent of the enrollment period will be charged for the whole semester and will be eligible for financial aid based on the semester costs.

Return of Federal Title IV Funds
Title IV funds are Direct Lending loans, Federal Perkins Loans, Direct Lending PLUS loans, Federal Pell Grants and Federal SEOG. This is the order used to return funds to the federal programs. The University of Mount Union must return its share of unearned Title IV funds no later than 30 days after it determines that the student withdrew. During the first 60 percent of the period (semester), a student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of time he or she remains enrolled. That is, the percentage of time during the period that the student remained enrolled is the percentage of disbursable aid for that period that the student earned. A student who remains enrolled beyond the 60 percent point earns all Title IV aid for the period. Unearned Title IV funds, other than FWS (Federal Work Study), must be returned by the University to the federal programs. Unearned aid is the amount of disbursed Title IV aid that exceeds the amount of Title IV aid earned. Once the institution determines the Title IV programs to which the student must repay his or her share of unearned aid, any amounts owed to a grant program are cut in half. Any grant the student needs to repay will be reflected on the final billing statement.

Return of State Grant Funds
In addition to calculating all Title IV funds the student received, we calculate state funds according to the State Refund Policy. Aid is refunded only during the first 60 percent of the semester.

Institutional Grants or Scholarships
After all Title IV funds from which the student received aid have been fully returned to those agencies, a proportional share of the remaining tuition refund, not to exceed the amount of the institutional payment the student initially received for the semester, must be returned to the University of Mount Union. Aid is refunded only during the first 60 percent of the semester.

Adjustments
After the proper refund/repayment to Title IV, state, and institutional funds are determined, then adjustments are made to the student’s award. Adjustments are reflected in the Office of Business Affairs final billing, and notification is sent to the student.

Refund policy for university funds and state funds for students who drop from full-time to part-time during the University’s refund period
Students wishing to drop from full-time (12 or more hours) to part-time (less than 12 hours) need to submit a Schedule Change Form to the Office of the Registrar. The date that Change Form is received and processed by the Office of the Registrar will be the “official withdrawal date” from the class or classes being dropped. Dropping to less than full-time can impact satisfactory academic progress, campus employment, athletic eligibility, housing and loan eligibility amount for the following year. The student who changes enrollment status after 60 percent of the enrollment period will be charged for the whole semester and will be eligible for financial aid based on the semester costs. The Office of Business Affairs will charge full fees and will charge tuition as follows: Part-time tuition charges for the part-time hours PLUS a percentage of the difference between full-time and the part-time tuition charges that correspond with the refund policy percentage. Example: A student drops from full-time to seven hours during the 50 percent refund period. Full-time tuition is $12,700, part-time tuition is $1,065 per semester hour. The student would be charged $1065 x 7 or $7,455 plus 50 percent of ($12,700 – $7,455) to equal $10,077 plus full fees for the semester. If a student drops below 12 credit hours during the University’s refund period, the amount of the University grant/scholarship will be determined by the percentage reduction in the student’s actual tuition charges. Example: If a student drops from full-time with tuition charges of $12,700 to seven hours with actual charges of $10,077, the tuition reduction would be $2,623 or 20.6 percent. Consequently, 20.6 percent of the University grant/scholarship would be refunded to the University. If this student had a university grant of $2,000, he/she would then get credit for $1,588 instead of the $2,000.

Refund Appeal Process
If a student believes that individual circumstances warrant exceptions from published refund policies, they should appeal the decision by sending a written letter of appeal to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of Mount Union, 1972 Clark Ave., Alliance, OH 44601.

Other Information
The Comprehensive Deposit. A comprehensive deposit is required of all new students. It serves to guarantee payment of possible residence hall damage, library fines, laboratory breakage, and other charges not paid when billed. The unassessed balance of this one-time deposit is refundable when leaving the University of Mount Union permanently.

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The Transcript Fee. The transcript fee is charged for each transcript issued. Financial obligations to the University must be met before transcripts are issued. Student Employment Forms. All students who will be working at the University must complete the following forms in the Office of Human Resources before the actual work begins in order to receive their payroll checks: Form I-9, Form W-4 and Form IT-4. To complete the I-9 Form one must have a valid U.S. Passport or two other forms of identification (valid driver’s license and Social Security Card or birth certificate).

Student Life
Campus Citizenship
Campus citizenship at Mount Union is based upon ideals embodied in the statement of the goals of the University. The University has declared its position as that of a community of scholars and learners in which cooperation and concern are distinguishing characteristics, and it has further stated that it is expected that all persons within the community be responsible and maturing academic citizens. Each person should treasure and maintain his or her own dignity while respecting the rights and privileges of others. The standards of campus citizenship serve as guides to the development and enforcement of specific regulations, which may be found in the codes of rules dealing with the various aspects of campus life. Those who enroll and continue in this institution are expected to give evidence of understanding of and willingness to abide by the following principles: It is expected that all students enrolled in Mount Union will take seriously their obligations to maintain standards of personal and social behavior befitting maturing and responsible campus citizens. Respect for the rights, privacy and property of all members of the campus community is a primary consideration. We believe that a Christian university must be committed to the principles of honesty and integrity in the classroom and other campus affairs. It is expected, therefore, that all members of this community will identify themselves with the principles of honesty and academic integrity. Students whose behavior demonstrates inability to understand or unwillingness to abide by the requirements set forth by the University are subject to disciplinary action, which may include suspension or dismissal from the University. A complete listing of student rights and responsibilities can be found in the Student Handbook, which is available on the Mount Union website.

Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education
The Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education strives to facilitate student growth and development, and encourage exploration of and balance within the social, intellectual, spiritual, occupational, physical and emotional components of wellness. This office provides programming and outreach in the form of campus-wide “awareness” events (i.e. Breast Cancer Awareness Month, National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, Great American Smoke Out and Safe Spring Break), and small group educational programs. The office provides education and counseling for students concerned about alcohol and drug issues as well as for those referred through the campus disciplinary system. Additionally, the Office of Alcohol, Drug and Wellness Education is a campus-wide resource – providing wellness-related information and referrals for students, whether for a class project or personal use.

Assessments and Graduate School Admissions Tests
Interest tests and occupational surveys are used to assist students in choosing a major and career. The Office of Academic Advising offers the MyersBriggs Type Instrument (MBTI) to help students narrow their interests into a potential major, while the Office of Career Development offers an array of assessments that enable students to select a path toward a career. Students planning to enroll in professional or graduate schools after graduation from Mount Union should make arrangements to take the national admissions tests (GMAT, GRE, LSAT, or MCAT) given in their field. Interested students are encouraged to contact the staff in either the Office of Academic Support or the Office of Career Development to receive information about these tests and/or to borrow resource materials for test preparation.

Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling
Facilities Scheduling: All facilities on campus must be scheduled through the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling as the office maintains an accurate schedule of all activities occurring on campus and other events of interest related to the University of Mount Union wherever they may take place. This provides one central location where an event can be scheduled and details arranged for use of any facility on campus. Faculty and staff can reserve facilities by creating an account on the Event Management System located at http://calendar.mountunion.edu/mastercalendar/ and reserving a facility online or by calling (330) 823-2881. Students can reserve space by completing a facility reservation form which can be obtained from the office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling. Once a room is requested, the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling will review the request for approval. The calendar of events can be viewed from the Mount Union home page at http://calendar.mountunion.edu/mastercalendar/ Purple Plus Cards: All students, faculty and staff receive a Purple Plus Card. The Purple Plus Card is used to access residence halls and meals as well as to check out books in the library or as a debit card at various locations on and off campus. The card is the property of the University of Mount Union and is non-transferable. There is a $20 fee for the replacement of lost cards. Broken or damaged cards are replaced at a charge at charge of $5.00 for the first broken card, $10.00 for the second and $15.00 for the third broken card. To obtain a new card, please visit the Office of Campus Card and Facilities Scheduling which is located in the Hoover-Price Campus Center, adjacent to the Information Desk. For more information, call (330) 823-2881 or visit http://www.mountunion.edu/about-your-purple-plus-card.

Campus Recreation
Campus Recreation contributes to the Mount Union experience by providing quality facilities, programs and services to all members of the campus community. Throughout the year the recreation staff offers a variety of fitness programs and intramural sport activities. The McPherson Academic Athletic Complex (MAAC) consists of cardio machines, free weights, nautilus equipment, an aerobic room, pool and auxiliary gymnasium. The Peterson Field house has a 200 meter track, two basketball courts, four tennis courts and four volleyball courts. During the academic year students, faculty and staff may participate in intramural sports such as flag football, sand night volleyball, innertube water polo, basketball, indoor soccer and many more. Fitness programs such as yoga, step aerobics, zumba and pilates are offered as well. The wide variety of programs allows members of the Mount Union community to be physically active in a safe and fun environment

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Career Development
The Office of Career Development, located in the HPCC Student Success Center, offers a wide variety of services and activities for all levels of students and alumni. The focus of the office is to assist all students during their undergraduate years and upon graduation as they choose a major and embark on a career. Experienced staff members are available to assist students in their quest for self-understanding, evaluation of interests and abilities and efforts to determine satisfying vocational objectives. There are four integrated office components that comprise the center – career exploration, experiential learning, job search and strategies and graduate school selection and advising. Career exploration is available on an individual basis, as well as in groups. In this program, students are assisted in choosing a major and/or a career that best suits the combination of their talents and interests. A one-credit course, BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options, is available for students wishing to engage in a more in-depth understanding of career exploration and planning. A variety of career assessments are available.. Students are also encouraged to participate in experiential learning or the application of academic preparation in the world of work. These are real world work experiences in the student’s field of study. There are two options for experiential learning. An academic internship must be approved by the departmental internship coordinator and must be taken for credit only and only when the student must has successfully taken a minimum combination of academic coursework. The internship can be taken for one semester duration, may be paid or unpaid, and involves a contract between the site, student and institution. There is a departmental formula that determines credits earned vs. hours worked. An externship is experience in the major field, but may be by project, event or a part-time job for the purpose of obtaining transferable skill experience. Arranged through faculty or the Office of Career Development, externships are not for credit, can be paid or unpaid and do not involve contracts. The third aspect of the Office of Career Development – job search strategies – is designed to assist students in their search for internships, externships or full-time employment upon graduation. Employers from many types of businesses and government agencies regularly notify the center of their employment needs. All employment opportunities coming to the Office of Career Development are available through our website, collegecentral.com. Additionally, area employers who are seeking candidates to fill entry-level jobs in many different fields participate in the on-campus recruitment program. Students who plan to interview with company representatives must register with the Office of Career Development complete the University Central electronic registration and resume upload. A very important and popular one-credit course that is offered each fall and spring is BA 343 Life and Career Planning. This academic course is designed to impart helpful information and preparation to students who are beginning their internships and/or job searches. Topics offered include Resume Writing, Writing a Cover Letter, Interview Techniques, Mock Interviews and Job Fairs, How to Dress for the Interview and on the Job, an etiquette luncheon, Researching a Company, Job Search Strategies: A to Z and recruiter presentations and culminates with a professional panel discussion. Weekly Resume ‘Walk Ins’ (or 24-hour resume review drop-offs) are hosted for all students and provide the foundations of writing a professional resume. The Office of Career Development also sponsors Accounting Night and The TGIFriday Job/Internship fairs each fall and is involved in three collaborative job fairs in the spring to provide students additional opportunities for employment. Finally, The Office of Career Development guides students through the graduate school selection, testing and admission process. The office hosts a graduate school fair every October.

Counseling Services
The aim of counseling at Mount Union is to assist students in living as well as possible. Counseling here is a partnership; people working together to find solutions and possibilities in life. The two full-time counselors in the Office of Counseling Services work to help Mount Union students sort out life’s problems and move toward life goals. Counseling Services is located in the Family Medical Center located at 146 E. Simpson St. Free, short-term counseling services are provided by appointment to enrolled students. Counseling appointments are scheduled during daytime business hours and can be made by calling (330) 823-2886. The primary service requested by students is individual counseling. During counseling, students typically discuss problems with relationships, adjusting to college life, stress or burnout, the death or illness of a friend or relative, academic difficulties, career or work decisions, substance abuse problems, family dilemmas, sports injuries or setbacks, the effects of violence or prejudice and/or balancing school, work and social life. Counseling is short-term, as it addresses normal life problems faced by college students. Students experiencing serious emotional, medical or behavioral problems (including but not limited to suicidal or homicidal thoughts or actions, eating disorders, substance addictions and disorders which impair the ability to think logically or relate with others constructively) are referred for outside treatment, often with the aid of parents or guardians. To promote safety and recovery, students who seem a danger to themselves and/or others may be withdrawn from the University. In addition, as there are no psychiatric services available on campus, students must receive such services off campus. As time allows, other services include presentations and consultation. Presentation subjects might include creating good relationships, learning relaxation methods, finding the right path in life, making and reaching goals and communicating effectively with friends and loved ones. In addition, the staff consults with students on mental health, relationship or general life decisions or concerns.

Global Education
The Center for Global Education provides a wide range of services and programs to assist international students, Mount Union students who desire to study abroad and faculty and staff who are active internationally. The Center functions as a resource for the entire campus community through programming, referrals and acting as an advocate and resource on international issues for students, faculty and staff.

Health Center
Purpose and Support of Institutional Goals
The Health Center focuses on health promotion, health protection, health education, disease prevention and clinical care. The main purpose of the Heath Center is to provide medical care for students who have short term illness and injuries so they can be restored to their optimal level of good health and remain in class. The Health Center staff recognizes that good health contributes to the academic success of students. Good health contributes to the productivity and success of students and helps them achieve their academic, social, athletic, career and personal goals. The Health Center supports the institutional mission of the University to “prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives and responsible citizenship.” The Health Center helps individuals achieve their optimal level of wellness so they can face challenges that enable them to obtain meaningful work, lead fulfilling lives and be responsible citizens.

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Location and Hours
The University of Mount Union Student Health Center is located within the Family Medical Center of Alliance Medical Complex located at 149 E. Simpson St. Services are available Monday through Friday with nurses on duty from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. during the academic year when classes are in session. The university physician is available for students between 10:45 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. Summer hours are 8 a.m. until noon with nurses on duty.

Services
The Health Center functions as an ambulatory care center. Services include health promotion, health protection, health education, disease prevention and clinical care. Preliminary diagnostic work, preventative medicine and the care of short-term illness and injuries are services provided. The Health Center staff provides students with opportunities for learning outside the classroom. The Health Center celebrates many national health observances, and the staff teaches students about healthy lifestyles, health promotion, disease prevention, safety and self-care issues.

Emergency Information
Students who have medical emergencies should go to the emergency room at the nearest hospital. The nearest hospital in Alliance is Alliance Community Hospital.

After Hours Care
In case of minor illness and injuries that occur after Health Center hours, students may use an urgent care center, such as an immediate care facility, or the hospital. Students, however, will be liable for expenses incurred unless the medical care is covered by insurance. Students who need assistance in making arrangements for afterhours care should contact their resident directors or community educators. Those students who receive medical care after hours must contact the Health Center the next day to follow up with the physician and complete an insurance claim form.

Policy Statement for Follow-Up Care
It is the policy of the Student Health Center that students who obtain diagnostic tests, medical consultations or other treatments at the Student Health Center receive appropriate follow-up care. If a student has an x-ray, diagnostic test or medical consultation, the results will be provided to the student during his or her follow-up appointment at the Health Center. It is the student’s responsibility to return to the Health Center to obtain x-ray and diagnostic test results or to receive follow-up care. Unless the x-ray, diagnostic test or medical consultation indicates a serious and/or emergency medical condition, the staff will make one telephone call to the student to inform him or her of the need to return to the Health Center, to schedule or reschedule appointments, or to follow-up with any treatments or other care. If a student is not available when a telephone call is made to him or her, the Health Center staff will contact the student by e-mail.

Health Requirements Prior To Arrival On Campus
Health forms are mailed to all freshmen and transfer students prior to the beginning of each semester. The information is mandatory and all forms must be completed and returned to the Health Center prior to the arrival of each student on campus. Lost forms may be downloaded from the Health Center webpage. All students must have a physical. The physical exam includes questions about symptoms of tuberculosis and the possible need for Mantoux (tuberculosis) skin testing. Refer to the physical form for details. Guidelines for screening questions and testing are based on recommendations from the American College Health Association (ACHA) and the Center for Disease Control (CDC). Mandatory immunizations include: Two doses of MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine and a Tetanus-Diphtheria booster or Tdap booster within the last 10 years. Refer to the immunization forms for details. To reduce and eliminate vaccine preventable diseases on campus we support the recommendations of the ACHA, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), and the CDC that all immunizations be up to date. Information about vaccine preventable diseases and vaccines is included in the health forms sent to all students. More information can be found on the CDC website, www.cdc.gov. University freshman living in the close quarters of dormitories are at higher risk of meningococcal disease compared with peers the same age who are not attending the University. The ACHA, ACIP and CDC recommend University freshmen living in dormitories be immunized to reduce disease risk. Other University students may choose to receive the meningococcal vaccination to reduce their risk for the disease. Ohio law states institutions of higher education shall not permit a student to reside in on-campus housing unless the student (or parent if the student is younger than 18 years of age) discloses whether the student has been vaccinated against meningococcal disease and hepatitis B by submitting a meningitis and hepatitis B vaccination status statement. Additional information about the diseases, the vaccines and their effectiveness and status statements can be viewed on the Ohio Department of Health webpage: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/acip/default.htm.

Membership
The Mount Union Health Center is a member of the American College Health Association and the Ohio College Health Association.

Student Accident and Sickness Reimbursement Plan
Because Mount Union has always been concerned with the promotion of good health for its students, the University has adopted a Student Accident and Sickness Reimbursement Plan. The plan is provided as part of the fees paid by full-time undergraduate students. Students must utilize the services of the Health Center whenever possible. When treatment is beyond the capacity of the Health Center, students will be referred elsewhere. Brochures explaining benefits and information about the services of the Health Center are mailed to students prior to the beginning of each academic year and to new students as they enter the University. Students and their parents should read the brochure, and students should carry their plan cards with them. Claim forms and details can be obtained from the Health Center.

Intercollegiate Athletics
Mount Union is a Division III member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Ohio Athletic Conference (OAC). All athletic

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contests are conducted under the rules and regulations of these associations. Student-athletes have the same privileges and responsibilities as other students. A diversified program of 12 intercollegiate sports for men and 11 intercollegiate sports for women is maintained. Men’s sports are baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis and wrestling. Women’s sports include basketball, cross country, golf, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis and volleyball. Lacrosse has been approved as a varsity sport for men and women beginning with the 2012-2013 academic year. A professional medical staff, including three certified athletic trainers, supports the student-athletes of Mount Union. The Committee on Athletics is appointed by the president and serves in an advisory capacity and makes athletic policy recommendations to the president. Actions of the committee are regularly reported to the faculty and are subject to faculty approval. The ultimate responsibility and authority for the administration of the athletics program, including all basic policies, personnel and finances, are vested in the president of the University. The intercollegiate athletic program operates separately from the academic programs in physical education, health education, athletic training, exercise science and sport management. Mount Union annually completes the NCAA Gender Equity Survey. Under the Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act, this report is available for review in the Office of Academic Affairs upon request.

Intercollegiate Athletics Philosophy
Mount Union adopted the following principles as guidelines for our intercollegiate athletics program: A. The educational values, practices and mission of Mount Union determines the standards by which we conduct our intercollegiate athletics program. B. The highest priority is placed on the overall quality of a student’s educational experience and on the successful completion of a student’s academic program. C. The welfare, health, safety and academic progress of student-athletes are primary concerns of athletics administration on Mount Union’s campus. D. Every student-athlete – male and female, majority and minority, in all sports – will receive equitable and fair treatment. E. The admission of student-athletes to Mount Union and the financial aid for student-athletes at Mount Union will be based on the same criteria as that of non-athletes. F. Student-athletes, in each sport, should be graduated in at least the same ratio as non-athletes who have spent comparable time as full-time students. G. The development of sportsmanship and ethical conduct in all constituents, including student-athletes, coaches, administrative personnel and spectators is encouraged. An atmosphere of respect and sensitivity to the dignity of every person, including on the basis of age, color, disability, gender, national origin, race, religion, creed or sexual orientation, will be promoted. H. The time required of student-athletes for participation in intercollegiate athletics shall be regulated to minimize interference with their opportunities for acquiring a quality education in a manner consistent with that afforded the general student body. I. All funds raised and spent in connection with intercollegiate athletics programs will be channeled through the institution’s general treasury – not through independent groups, whether internal or external. The Office of Athletics’ budget will be developed and monitored in accordance with general budgeting procedures on campus. J. Annual academic and fiscal audits of the athletics program will be conducted.

Statement Concerning Sportsmanship/Ethical Conduct of the University of Mount Union Intercollegiate Athletic Teams
The University of Mount Union expects high standards of honesty, integrity and behavior in the conduct of intercollegiate athletic competition. It is the responsibility of coaches, student-athletes, administrators and other athletic personnel of the University of Mount Union to recognize the significance of their behavior as visible members of the campus and local community. These participants are, therefore, expected to live up to their responsibility by demonstrating good sportsmanship. Inappropriate conduct on the part of coaches, student-athletes, administrators or other athletic personnel, which includes the use of alcohol or controlled substances, verbal or physical abuse, or demeaning words or actions toward officials, coaches, players or fans is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Existing rules for athletic competition that deal with sportsmanship/ethical conduct will be fully enforced at the University of Mount Union. Where existing rules are inadequate, the expectations of the University of Mount Union will set the standard for appropriate behavior.

Intercollegiate Athletics Eligibility
To be eligible for participation in the University’s intercollegiate athletic program during the traditional season, a student must be enrolled full-time for the semesters of participation, must be in good academic standing and be making satisfactory progress toward a degree (page 32). To be eligible for participation in the University’s intercollegiate athletic program during the non-traditional season, a student must be enrolled full-time for the semesters of participation. These requirements are in accordance with National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) guidelines.

Marriage of Students
Students who are married must disclose this fact in completing enrollment forms. In order to update appropriate records, students planning to be married are encouraged to notify the dean of students and the director of student financial services in advance of their marriage.

Multicultural Student Affairs
The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs falls under the Office of Student Affairs, reporting to the vice president for student affairs and dean of students. Multicultural Student Affairs primarily serves as a resource for students of color in matters of academic, social, cultural, and personal wellbeing. However, the office also offers services to all students who are interested in/concerned with issues of diversity within the campus community. Mount Union believes that an appreciation of diversity among campus constituencies creates a welcoming campus environment that is crucial to the success of all students.

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The Office of Multicultural Student Affairs actively works to enhance the quality of student life on the Mount Union campus by providing programs, services and other educational opportunities that contribute to student learning and growth. While student needs are the primary focus, diversity focused programming is available to the entire Mount Union community during the academic year.

Residence Life
Housing of students at the University of Mount Union falls under the auspices of the Office of Residence Life within the Office of Student Affairs. Mount Union ascribes to the belief that the residential experience can significantly contribute to a student’s overall collegiate experience. In accordance with those beliefs, all full-time students, prior to their junior year, are required to live on campus unless a University of Mount Union Petition for OffCampus Residency Prior to Junior Year is submitted to and approved by the Office of Residence Life. In addition, all students living in campus housing (with the exception of the apartment-style housing) are required to be on a campus meal plan. Approximately 1,650 students live on campus in 10 residence halls, three apartment complexes, and as many as 15 houses making Mount Union a largely residential campus. There are essentially four types of housing options available to students residing on campus: single-gender and coeducational traditional style residence halls; coeducational, upper-class suite-style residence halls; residential houses and upperclass apartments or townhouse-style living options. In addition, fraternity members in good standing may choose to live in their fraternity house. All rooms in campus housing are equipped with beds, desks, desk chairs, dressers, closets or wardrobes, and drapes or blinds. Additionally, all campus housing is wired for computer networking, campus cable, telephone and voicemail. Laundry machines are available in all residential facilities. Seven professional staff members, called resident directors, live on campus and are responsible for the day-to-day supervision of the residence halls and houses. In addition to ensuring the smooth operation of the building, they supervise the student residence life staff in each area and strive to make the residence halls and houses true living and learning communities. There is a resident director on call (RD on duty) 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The RD on duty is available to assist students with any residence hall emergencies or after-hour situations that may occur.

Service-Learning and Community Service
The Office of Service-Learning and Community Service, part of the Regula Center for Public Service and Civic Engagement in van den Eynden Hall, is a center of resources for students wishing to participate in community service opportunities, faculty wanting to add curricular service to a course and community partners needing student volunteers. The office coordinates extracurricular volunteer community service activities, such as Make a Difference Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service and the annual alternative spring break program. Students can also seek regular community service placements through the office in a variety of fields. Service internships in fields such as grant writing, non-profit management and public relations are also available with some of our partners. More resources are available on iRaider and in the Service Learning Library, located outside the Faculty and Staff Commons in the Kolanbrander-Harter Information Center. Students who would like more information about community service and volunteer opportunities or service-learning can contact the Office of Service-Learning and Community Service at (330) 823-5993 or by emailing the director at pontiucm@mountunion.edu.

Spiritual Life
The University of Mount Union has a chaplain who ministers to the spiritual needs of the academic community. The chaplain serves as spiritual advisor to students, faculty, and administration. The chaplain is responsible for providing and supervising all aspects of spiritual life on campus which include community worship and prayer; advising and coordinating the activities of student religious groups; encouraging student involvement in the worship and community life of churches in the Alliance area; developing and participating in local, regional and national student religious conferences and retreats; and planning and coordinating work trips for students, faculty and administrators. The University cooperates with local churches of all denominations by encouraging students to take an active part in the various churches.

Student Involvement and Leadership
The Office of Student Involvement & Leadership prepares Mount Union students for fulfilling lives, meaningful work and responsible citizenship through engaging and intentional cocurricular activities, programs, services, and partnerships. Through immersed participation, training, practice and reflection, the Mount Union student will gain skills that will complement their academic endeavors and further enable their success after graduation. Student Involvement & Leadership is directly responsible for the coordination of all-campus programs, advising fraternity and sorority life, coordinating and implementing leadership programs, organizing and executing the summer Preview and Orientation programs, providing student organization support, and offering the Student Involvement Record.

All-Campus Programming
Mount Union After Hours and The Raider Programming Board
The Mount Union After Hours program and the Raider Programming Board are the University’s two student-led program boards. After Hours is designed to provide a late night weekend alternative for student social interaction. Held during peak social times, events include acoustical acts, bingo, ice skating, Cavs and Indians game trips, and other themed and student-focused activities. After Hours strives to give students activities free of charge while creating a fun and exciting atmosphere both on and off the Mount Union campus. Raider Programming Board, or RPB, is responsible for a number of the all-campus programs that are brought to campus, including weekly programs, Homecoming, Family Day, Little Sibs Weekend, Springfest, and much more. This group meets weekly in the Hoover-Price Campus Center, so if you have an interest in what acts come to entertain the student body, then joining RPB is definitely for you!

Family Day
Family Day provides students, parents and their families an opportunity to re-connect during the middle of the fall semester. Including attendance at a Raider football game, a luncheon and evening entertainment, Family Day provides resources for families to continue to support the educational pursuits of their students. A full day of events is being planned for Family Day, which is scheduled for Saturday, September 17, 2011.

Homecoming
The Raider Programming Board Vice President and the Assistant Director of OSIL, along with the Office of Alumni Relations and University Activities

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coordinate the events of the annual Alumni/Homecoming Weekend. The Raider Programming Board selects and coordinates the events of the week leading up to Homecoming, providing entertainment such as comedians, musical acts, and hypnotists. Raider Programming Board and the Mount Union Student Senate coordinate Mr. MUC, the annual reverse beauty pageant. At half time of the Homecoming football game, the King and Queen Ceremony take place.

Little Sibs Weekend
A variety of student organizations on campus sponsor events throughout the weekend to provide entertainment and welcome younger family members of the current students.

Leadership Programs
Our leadership programs provide students at a variety of abilities and engagement levels with appropriately designed leadership opportunities to further enhance their learning and engagement on campus. This includes the Emerging Leaders Program for first year students, the Fraternal Leadership Education Program for first year fraternity/sorority members, and additional workshops and offerings available throughout the year to meet the needs of student leaders and organizations.

Fraternity and Sorority Life
Mount Union hosts four fraternities and four sororities on campus. The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership holds the philosophy that the social fraternities and sororities are a part of a community emphasizing the shared values of the various groups, having a high expectation for interaction among all groups. When joining one organization, a member can expect to feel a sense of belonging to a greater whole. Mount Union provides the opportunity for first-year students to join a fraternity or sorority during their first semester on campus, including in the fall of their first year. Any student who is not currently affiliated with a fraternity or sorority may participate in the recruitment process at any point in their college career. A man interested in fraternity life must achieve a minimum 2.75 high school GPA or 2.3 college GPA to be eligible to join a Greek organization. Women interested in joining a sorority must obtain that minimum grade point average required by the chapter of their interest. Interfraternity Council and Panhellenic Council, the fraternity and sorority governing boards, organize and operate the recruitment period in September. The individual chapters also sponsor a variety of events throughout the year to provide new students with information regarding fraternities and sororities. Sophomore, junior and senior students may choose to reside in their fraternity houses. Sorority houses are owned and operated by alumni house corporations but exist as meeting spaces.

Preview and Fall Orientation
Preview
Preview, held during the summer months, is designed to begin the college transition process for both students and parents. In addition to making student, faculty, staff and family connections, Preview will provide students with the foundation to succeed academically. This includes math and foreign language testing, learning about the general education requirements, and meeting with an academic advisor to schedule classes for the fall semester.

Fall Orientation
Fall Orientation, held in the fall prior to the first day of classes, is designed to continue to the transition to college process by providing opportunities to connect with roommates and classmates, learn more about extracurricular activities that enhance the whole college experience, and reconnect with faculty and the academic curriculum through a series of informational and social programs intended to increase a student’s success. All new students will participate in one of the oldest and most celebrated traditions at Mount Union, the Matriculation Convocation.

Student Organizations
In support of the leadership development that takes place in student organizations, the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership also serves as a resource center and clearinghouse for the approximately 80 active student organizations on campus. Students can learn about becoming involved in these student organizations by participating in the Student Involvement Fair held during the first week of the fall semester. All student organizations are required to register with the Office of Student Involvement & Leadership and maintain current contact information for presidents and advisors. Students interested in starting a new student organization can obtain materials and learn the appropriate process by contacting the office.

Student Senate
The Mount Union Student Senate is the chief avenue for students to maintain an effective voice in the affairs of the University by serving as the link between the student body and the administration. Through Student Senate, students can express concerns or make suggestions (either directly or through their representatives) about any issue on campus, be it academics or campus life. In addition, any student or organization may petition Student Senate for funding for extracurricular projects and endeavors.

Student Involvement Record
The Student Involvement Record (SIR) is a chronological record of a student’s participation in co-curricular activities at Mount Union College. The SIR can be best described as a co-curricular transcript intended to complement the academic transcript by providing a chronology of the student’s accomplishments while a student at the College. The Student Involvement Record program is a comprehensive attempt to provide data and information regarding student involvement in co-curricular and related non-classroom activities. The SIR was developed to provide statistical information regarding student involvement, provide useful services to student organizations, and provide students with a chronology of their involvement. The information submitted is kept on file in the Office of Student Involvement & Leadership. Many departments on campus request student involvement information throughout the year for various reasons. It is to a student’s advantage to an SIR on file. This information is often used when students are being considered for an academic or leadership honor/award. Additionally, this information can be used in support of the academic transcript during the job search process. The Student Involvement Record needs to be updated each semester so that a student’s record is as accurate as possible. Each semester, presidents, advisors and coaches will be asked to update information regarding their organization. Information can be updated at any time by contacting the Office

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of Student Involvement & Leadership. Students will be given the opportunity to adjust information on their activity record, but will be required to seek the advisor’s signature as confirmation of their participation.

Student Success Center
The Student Success Center (SSC) located in the Hoover-Price Campus Center, includes the Office of Academic Advising, the Office of Academic Support, Career Development and the Office of Student Accessibility Services. The Writing Center, located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center, actively collaborates with the SSC. While each office provides a different kind of assistance, they work together so that students can locate exactly what they need with ease.

Academic Advising
The Office of Academic Advising (AA) works one-on-one with students who are unsure of their major. Students can opt to take an assessment to help identify the majors that might be a good fit for their academic strengths and interests. This office also offers a class during the spring semester to allow students to further explore their academic pursuits.

Academic Support
The Office of Academic Support assists students with classes in a variety of ways ranging from peer-led study groups and tutoring that focus on course content to ways to study and prepare for tests that utilize individual learning styles. Strategies are tailored to student needs and strengths, looking at all the different components that help students achieve in the classroom.

Student Accessibility Services
The Office of Student Accessibility Services (SAS) provides educational opportunities for qualified persons with disabilities through accessible programs, services, and a campus environment in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and other disability rights legislation. SAS also serves as a resource to the University community in regard to compliance issues.

Writing Center
The Writing Center provides writing tutors who work with students to improve writing and editing skills for many different types of papers, including essays, research papers, and lab reports. Students may work with tutors at any stage of the writing process, from choosing a topic through development of a final draft of the paper.

Academic Policies and Procedures
Student Responsibility
Each student has the responsibility to be aware of and to meet the Catalogue requirement for graduation, and to adhere to all rules, regulations and deadlines published in this Catalogue and in the Student Handbook.

The University of Mount Union Educational Records Policy Annual Notification to Students
In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (commonly referred to as FERPA, or the “Buckley Amendment”), Mount Union has adopted the following policies and procedures to protect the privacy of educational records. Students will be notified of their FERPA rights annually by publication in the Catalogue and on the University’s website.

Definitions
The University of Mount Union uses the following definitions in this policy: Student: any person who attends or has attended the University. Education records: any record in whatever form (handwritten, taped, print, film or other medium) which is maintained by the University and is directly related to a student, with the following exceptions: • personal records kept by a University staff member if the record is not revealed to • others and is kept in the sole possession of the staff member; • student employment records that relate exclusively to the student in the capacity of an employee; • records maintained separately from educational records solely for law enforcement agencies of the same jurisdiction; • counseling records maintained by the University chaplain or the University counselor; • medical records maintained by the University solely for treatment and made available only to those persons providing treatment; and • Office of Alumni Activities records.

Rights Under FERPA
A student shall have the right and parents of a dependent student may have the right to do the following: • inspect and review the student’s education records; • request that the student’s education records be amended to ensure the records are not inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of a student’s privacy or other rights; • consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent; • file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning the failure of the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA;

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Procedure to Inspect Education Records
Students may inspect and review their education records upon request to the appropriate record custodian(s). Students must submit a written request that identifies as precisely as possible the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. Access will be provided within 45 days of the written request. Information contained in educational records will be fully explained and interpreted to students by University personnel assigned to, and designated by, the appropriate office. Student records are maintained in the following offices: • admissions and academic records in the Office of the Registrar; • financial aid records in the Office of Student Financial Services; • financial records in the Office of Business Affairs; • progress and advising records in the departmental offices and faculty offices; • disability-related records in Disability Support Services; • counseling records in the Office of the Chaplain and Counseling Services; • academic dishonesty records in the Office of Academic Affairs; • disciplinary and student conduct records in the Office of Student Affairs.

Right of the University to Refuse Access
The University reserves the right to refuse to permit a student to inspect the following information: • the financial statement of the student’s parents; • letters of recommendation for which the student has waived his or her right of access; • records of applicants who were neither admitted to nor attended the University of Mount Union; • records containing information about more than one student, in which case the University will permit access only to that part of the record which pertains to the inquiring student; and • records which are excluded from the FERPA definition of educational records.

Right to Challenge Information in Records
Students have the right to challenge the content of their education records if they consider the information contained therein to be inaccurate, misleading or inappropriate. This includes an opportunity to amend the records or insert written explanations by the student into such records. The student may not initiate a FERPA challenge of a grade awarded unless it was inaccurately recorded; in such cases the correct grade will be recorded.

Procedures for Hearings to Challenge Records
Students wishing to challenge the content of their education records must submit, in writing to the appropriate office, a request for a hearing which includes the specific information in question and the reasons for the challenge. Hearings will be conducted by a University official who does not have a direct interest in the outcome of the hearing. Students will be afforded a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relevant to the reasons for the challenge. The hearing officer will render a decision in writing, within a reasonable period of time, noting the reason and summarizing all evidence presented. If the hearing results are in favor of the student, the record shall be amended. Should the request be denied, an appeal may be made, in writing, and submitted to the registrar within 10 days of the student’s notification by the hearing officer. The appeal shall be heard by an Appeals Board of three disinterested senior University officials. The board will render a decision, in writing, within a reasonable period of time. Should the appeal decision be in favor of the student, the record shall be amended accordingly. Should the appeal be denied, the student may choose to place a statement with the record commenting on the accuracy of the information in the record and/or setting forth any basis for inaccuracy. As long as the student’s record is maintained by the University, when disclosed to an authorized party, the record will always include the student’s statement and the board’s decision.

Disclosure of Education Records
The University will disclose “non-directory” information contained in a student’s educational record only with the written consent of the student, with the following exceptions: to school officials, including teachers, who have a legitimate educational interest in the record; • to officials of another school in which the student seeks or intends to enroll; • to federal, state and local agencies and authorities as provided under law; • to the parents of an eligible student if the student is claimed as a dependent for income tax purposes; • accrediting organizations; • to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; • emergencies affecting the health or safety of the student or other persons; and • as otherwise permitted by FERPA. • Any student who wishes to authorize release of his or her grades to one or both parents should complete a disclosure form in the Office of • the Registrar.

Directory Information
Disclosure of directory information normally may be made without the student’s consent. Directory information includes the student’s name; school and permanent addresses; school, permanent and cellular telephone numbers; school mailbox address; school e-mail address; date and place of birth; majors and minors; dates of attendance; enrollment status; class level; degree(s) received and dates of conferral; honors and awards earned; previous institutions attended; weight and height of athletes; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and photograph. A student who wishes to have all directory information withheld must submit an “Authorization to Withhold Directory Information” form to the registrar. The hold will become effective the first day of class in the next regular semester (fall or spring). Once filed this request becomes a permanent part of the student’s record until the student instructs the registrar in writing to have the request removed. Because the University’s computer system is

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unable to put a “hold” on selective directory information, all directory information will be placed on hold or all directory information except name and email address will be placed on hold. Moreover, this request does not restrict the release of this information to individuals and agencies list in “Disclosure of Educational Records” above.

Degrees Offered
The University confers upon candidates who satisfy all specified requirements the following baccalaureate degrees: Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Music Education Bachelor of Music Bachelor of Science See page 25-26 for the list of degrees awarded according to major program.

Degree Requirements
University Requirements for All Degrees
A minimum of 120 semester hours is required for all degrees; At least 45 semester hours must be completed at the University of Mount Union; The last 30 semester hours of a degree program must be pursued in residence at the University – cooperative and other special programs may be excepted from this requirement; D. Not more than 48 semester hours in a major field may be counted toward requirements for the bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees; E. A minimum grade point average of 2.000 on a 4.000 scale must be achieved for all Mount Union and transient work attempted; F. Completion of a major with at least a 2.000 grade point average; G. Completion of a minor with at least a 2.000 grade point average; H. If required by the major, completion of a concentration with at least a 2.000 grade point average; I. Completion of a Senior Culminating Experience; J. Completion of the General Education Requirements for the degree to be earned. Please see pages 42-50. Although each student is assigned a faculty advisor for discussion of academic program requirements and progress, it is the student’s responsibility to be aware of and in compliance with all requirements for degree completion. A. B. C.

Special Graduation Requirement Notes
No more than four credits in physical education activity courses, PE 100-199, may count toward graduation requirements. Students entering with less than 58 semester hours of credit must successfully complete nine semester hours of “W” credit beyond EH 100 in at least three courses from not less than three different disciplines. Students entering with 58 or more hours of credit need only complete two courses in at least two different disciplines for a total of at least six semester hours. Each student should have completed EH 100 by the time he or she has accumulated 30 semester hours and should have completed RE 100 and CM 101 or CM 102 by the time he or she has accumulated 60 semester hours. Any single course may be used to meet only one (1) General Education Requirement in Sections I and II with the exception that this same course could also be used to meet a “W” and/or an integrative experience course requirement. Courses numbered “199,” “299,” or “399” may meet General Education Requirements only if specifically identified as doing so by the Office of the Registrar. The Mount Union Catalogue in effect at the time of a student’s admission to the University shall govern such student’s degree requirements; an extended period of non-enrollment at the University may, at the time of return, result in a change to requirements as specified in a later issue Catalogue. When the Office of the Registrar identifies a student who has been pursuing a degree for more than 10 calendar years, that office will request that the department(s) in which the student is doing his or her major and minor work complete a review of the student’s record to date. This review would be to determine if any modifications should be considered or implemented in the student’s program of study toward the major(s) or minor(s). The Academic Policies Committee will be asked to review the student’s record to determine if any general degree requirements – including the General Education Requirements – should be updated for this student. Further updates will be required only if recommended by the appropriate departments or the Academic Policies Committee.

Applying for Graduation
All students who wish to graduate must apply for graduation at least one semester prior to their planned date of graduation. Application for Graduation forms are available in the Office of the Registrar or online at the registrar’s website. The University recommends that students apply at least one year before graduation to ensure that all graduation requirements can be identified and completed by the expected graduation date. The application form will include: when the student plans to complete graduation requirements; a declaration of the student’s major(s), minor(s), and concentration(s); and the degree the student expects to earn. Once an application is received, the Office of the Registrar and the student’s major department chair will identify any remaining requirements for graduation on a Degree Clearance Form, a copy of which will be given to the student and her/his advisor.

Degree Conferral
At the end of each fall and spring semester as well as summer sessions, the registrar presents to the faculty the names of all students who have at that point successfully completed all requirements for graduation. The faculty must then approve these potential graduates before they can be awarded a degree. Once the faculty have approved the candidates for a specific degree, that degree will be conferred on those students by the University. Faculty approval At the end of the spring semester At the end of the summer sessions At the end of the fall semester Degree conferral May August December

For degrees conferred in August or December, diplomas will be mailed to the students; degree conferral in May will be done at Commencement where diplomas will be issued directly to the student. Students whose degrees were conferred in August or December also may participate in the May

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Commencement exercises. The graduates’ official academic records will include evidence of degree conferral. A student who completes degree requirements between the times of degree conferral may request from the registrar a letter of completion certifying that degree requirements have been satisfied and confirming that the degree will be awarded at the next conferral date. If the student has an outstanding financial obligation to the University, until and unless those financial obligations have been reconciled, a potential graduate or a degree candidate may not: A. Obtain a letter of completion. B. Participate in any aspect of the Baccalaureate or Commencement exercises (i.e. wear an academic robe, cross the stage with others who have completed degree requirements, etc.). C. Receive a diploma or any other attendant documents (e.g. certificates, awards, honors, etc.). D. Secure any evidence or verification of degree conferral (e.g. transcript etc.).

“Walking” at Commencement
If a student is or will be within one course of completing all requirements for the bachelor’s degree at the time of the May Commencement, the student may apply to the registrar to be allowed to “walk” at Commencement. If approval is granted, the missing course must be taken at Mount Union or as an approved transient course in the summer immediately following that Commencement. The student must be registered for the course prior to Commencement Students who participate in the May ceremony as “walkers” will not graduate until the August conferral date. During the period of time between completion of all requirements and the date the degree is awarded, students may request a Certificate of Completion to accompany a transcript. Please note: Honors designations will not be listed in the Commencement program.

Second Degree Requirements
Although a second baccalaureate degree is not normally conferred by the University of Mount Union, a graduate of the University or of another accredited institution can pursue a second degree by completing the following: A. The plan must be approved by the major department involved; B. All requirements for the degree being pursued must be completed including a new major and minor; C. All University and liberal arts requirements must be satisfied; D. The second degree may not reflect an essential duplication of a major or minor; E. A minimum of 30 semester hours in residence beyond the first degree must be completed; F. Both degrees may not be conferred at the same time.

The Major
Each student must declare at least one major program of study. A major consists of not less than 24 nor more than 36 semester hours in a major field, at least 12 of which must be completed at Mount Union with none of these 12 being transient credits. However, a student may pursue additional courses in a major field – to a total of 48 semester hours – to count toward the 120 required for graduation. Foreign language majors and minors who take courses in a foreign language as part of a Study Abroad Program in a country where the foreign language being studied is the language of that country may count those courses toward the minimum residency requirement for the major and minor subject to the prior approval of the chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures at Mount Union. The chairperson’s review will include a determination of whether or not there is an appropriate distribution of language/culture/literature in the major/minor. By the time a student has completed 60 semester hours, he or she must declare an academic major and be officially assigned to an academic advisor who is a faculty member in the department responsible for the declared major. To declare a major, the student must complete a Declaration/Change of Major/Minor/Advisor form; the form must be approved by the appropriate department chair and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Satisfactory completion of a major program includes achieving a 2.000 minimum grade point average in the major. Major and departmental requirements appear in the respective discipline sections located in the Programs of Study section of this Catalogue.

Majors are offered in the following areas:
Degree BA BA BA BA BA BS BS BS BS BS BS BA BS BA BA BA BA BA BS BS BA BS BA Major Program Accounting American Studies Applied Criminal Justice Art Asian Studies Athletic Training Biochemistry Biology Chemistry Civil Engineering Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Communication Computer Science Criminal Justice Research and Analysis Early Childhood Education Economics English: Literature English: Writing Environmental Science Exercise Science Finance Financial Mathematics French Degree BA BS BA BA BA BA BA BA BS BS BA BS BA BA BME BM BA BA BS BA BA BA BA Major Program Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business and Economics International Studies Intervention Specialist Japanese Management Marketing Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Media Computing Medical Technology Middle Childhood Education Music Music Education Music Performance Philosophy Physical Education Physics Political Science Psychology Public Health Religious Studies

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BS BA BA BA BA

Geology German Health Health Care Management History

BA BA BA BA

Sociology Spanish Sport Business Theatre

A student may be required by his or her major department to complete selected courses to complement courses in the major field and/or to satisfactorily complete examinations related to the major field. A self-defined interdisciplinary major is available to a student interested in pursuing a concentration of study not specified in this Catalogue. Such interdisciplinary majors must satisfy all University and liberal arts requirements for graduation and must be consistent with the liberal arts objectives of the University of Mount Union. Twenty-four semester hours must be completed in any one department discipline within the self-defined major; however, no more than 36 semester hours in any one departmental discipline may be applied toward the total 120 semester hours required for graduation. A student who has completed less than half the course work in the interdisciplinary major, and who has achieved at least a 2.500 grade point average may submit a self-defined program proposal which will be reviewed and adjudicated by a committee composed of three faculty members representing the disciplines involved in the proposal and the Academic Policies Committee.

The Minor
With the exception of those in the BM or BME degree programs, all students are required to complete a minor program of study; available minors are noted in the discipline sections beginning on page 50 of this Catalogue. A minor program consists of from 12 to 18 semester hours, at least six of which must be completed at Mount Union with none of these six being transient credits. Students may not declare a major program and a minor program within the same discipline. Foreign language majors and minors who take courses in a foreign language as part of a Study Abroad Program in a country where the foreign language being studied is the language of that country may count those courses toward the minimum residency requirement for the major and minor subject to the prior approval of the chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures at the University of Mount Union. The chairperson’s review will include a determination of whether or not there is an appropriate distribution of language/culture/literature in the major/minor. To declare a minor, the student must complete a Declaration/Change of Major/Minor/Advisor form; the form must be approved by the student’s advisor and submitted to the Office of the Registrar. Satisfactory completion of a minor program includes achieving a 2.000 minimum grade point average in the minor.

The Area of Concentration
An area of concentration is a group of courses which together focus on a particular sub-discipline within a given major or on a specific preprofessional program. An area of concentration may be offered by any major, pre-professional program (as defined in this Catalogue) or professional program. Normally, pre-professional programs require specialized post-baccalaureate study and formal certification. Professional programs are those which directly qualify a student to seek formal certification in a given profession without specialized post-baccalaureate study. An area of concentration must be a distinct program of courses which does not duplicate an existing major or minor, although courses which count toward a given major or minor also may count toward an area of concentration. An area of concentration may not be developed within a minor program. To be eligible for inclusion in a student’s official academic record, an area of concentration within a major must contain a minimum of 12 semester hours at least six of which must be from courses within the department which offers the major. An area of concentration for a pre-professional or professional program must contain at least 15 semester hours and will be administered by the advisor or department chair of the program. An area of concentration meeting the above guidelines and approved by the Academic Policies Committee will be noted on the official academic record of any student who has completed such area of concentration along with the corresponding pre-professional, professional or major program. Approved Areas of Concentration: Astronomy Collaborative Piano Deviance Diversity Family Interpersonal/Organizational Communication Media Studies

Peace Studies Piano Pedagogy Pre-Ministry Public Relations Sociology in Practice Statistics

Note: This list reflects the areas of concentration approved at the time this Catalogue was published; to determine if additional areas of concentration have been approved since then, contact the chairs of the respective departments. Satisfactory completion of a concentration includes achieving a 2.000 minimum grade point average in the concentration. The 2.0 in the concentration will be calculated as all the required courses for the concentration that satisfy the minimum number of hours required for the concentration.

The Role of Electives
The University of Mount Union faculty encourages students to use electives to explore courses outside of their major and minor areas of study.

Senior Culminating Experience
Each department has developed programs through which each of its respective majors can pursue a special activity or project during the senior year. These programs provide a variety of experiences through a senior seminar, an independent study/senior research thesis, a departmental comprehensive oral or written examination or a capstone course. A student must complete a Senior Culminating Experience valued at three or more semester hours in each major he or she pursues even if the student has multiple majors.

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English Proficiency
Students displaying substandard ability to communicate in writing may be referred by a faculty member to the Department of English and/or to the Writing Center. Failure to achieve a satisfactory level of written expression may, in an extreme case, be the cause for academic suspension or dismissal from the University. Special programs for non-native speaking students are described on pages 37 and 122.

Writing Across the Curriculum
The Writing Across the Curriculum program offers an opportunity for students to refine their writing skills throughout their University career. The program is comprised of two parts: 1) a Writing Center that facilitates one-on-one skill development; and 2) a “W” course component wherein each student is required to successfully complete nine hours of “W” credit beyond EH 100 in at least three courses from not less than three different disciplines. Students transferring to Mount Union with 57 or fewer hours completed must successfully complete the full “W” course component. Students transferring with more than 57 hours will be required to successfully complete six hours of the “W” course component. To see which courses earn “W” credit, consult the course listings published annually by the registrar. There are six criteria for “W” courses: 3,500 words (roughly 15 pages) of writing; an opportunity for revision; devotion of class time to the discussion of writing; 25 percent of the final grade for the course based upon written assignments; ideally, no more than 20 students in a “W” course; and the successful completion the written portion of the course in order to pass.

Computation of 2.0 in a Major and a Minor
Effective with students entering the University in the 2000 Fall Semester, the 2.0 in the major shall be calculated as the GPA obtained in all the courses required for the major, plus all additional elective courses with the disciplinary prefix of the major. For majors that lack a disciplinary prefix, the 2.0 in the major shall be calculated as the GPA obtained in all the courses required for the major plus all elective courses taken in the home department of the major. For interdisciplinary majors, the 2.0 in the major shall be calculated as the GPA of all courses required and elected for the major, plus all additional elective courses taken with the major interdisciplinary prefix. For self-defined interdisciplinary majors, the 2.0 shall be calculated using all the required and elected courses approved for the major. Courses that do not count for any major will not be included in the calculation of the 2.0. The 2.0 in a minor will be calculated as all the required courses for the minor that satisfy the minimum number of hours required for the minor.

General Education Curriculum
The University of Mount Union offers a liberal arts education grounded in the Judeo-Christian tradition. The University affirms the importance of reason, open inquiry, living faith and individual worth. Mount Union’s mission is to prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives, and responsible citizenship. To accomplish this mission, the faculty has established a program to help students obtain a broad base of knowledge in the humanities, arts, and sciences, along with an awareness of discipline-specific methods of inquiry; to think critically and communicate effectively; to gain knowledge and skills in a specific discipline requisite for satisfying careers and/or graduate work and professional studies; to foster an understanding of various cultures and of the interdependence of the global community; to form moral and religious values that encourage them to address complex social problems affecting individuals and communities; and to understand the United States as a dynamic, pluralistic society. The General Education curriculum provides both a framework and a foundation for this educational program as articulated in the University mission statement. General Education at Mount Union is intended to help students enhance their skills in communication, quantitative reasoning, problem solving, and the practice of healthy living while exposing them to a broad knowledge base grounded in the liberal arts tradition. The General Education curriculum prepares students to develop life-long competencies in critical and creative thinking, to construct historically informed frameworks for ongoing intellectual, ethical, and aesthetic growth, and to understand and deal constructively with the diversity of the contemporary world. The General Education curriculum is divided according to three levels intended to provide both a foundation and a context for each student’s major field(s) of study. Category I, Foundations for Inquiry, consists of a core of courses taken by all Mount Union students. Category II, Contexts for Inquiry, consists of several interdisciplinary groups of courses from which students will select their distribution requirements. Finally, Category III, Contexts for Integration, consists of the Senior Culminating Experience in the student’s major field(s) of study. An Integrative Experience requirement will be added to the Contexts for Integration component in the future as specified by the faculty. I. Foundations for Inquiry Foundations courses are the intellectual cornerstones of the undergraduate educational experience at Mount Union. Learning experiences in these areas are intended to provide students with an introduction to liberal learning, a sharpening of basic learning skills, and an introduction to the study of values and beliefs. In completing this core, students will be provided with opportunities to investigate what it means to be educated and to develop both a desire for learning and a sense of the value and importance of acquiring knowledge. Foundations courses are designed to achieve the following basic goals: the development of an understanding of the meaning and significance of obtaining a liberal arts education; the development of language and communication skills which provide students with the tools needed to be fully involved in the process of lifelong learning; and the development of a basic understanding of the systematic investigation of religion and human experience. In order to achieve these goals, students will complete coursework in the following areas: A. The Liberal Arts Experience: Study in this area is intended as a basic orientation to the meaning and significance of acquiring a liberal arts education. In completing this requirement, students will learn skills for adapting to University life, enhancing academic performance, and developing an understanding of the diversity and complexity that now surrounds them. Students can satisfy this portion of the foundations core by completing LS 100 (The Liberal Arts Experience). B. Language and Communication Skills: The completion of the courses required in this category ensure the development of the ability to communicate effectively in both written and oral modes and the achievement of proficiency in a second, living language through the beginning level. After completion of the writing and communication courses in this category, students should be able to demonstrate: an understanding of the dynamics of written and oral communication; an understanding of the connection between language and the learning process; an appreciation of various disciplinary approaches to written and oral communication; and an ability to critique their own and others’ written and oral presentations. After completion of the foreign language proficiency requirement, students should be able to demonstrate foreign language skills equivalent to the completion of a 102-level foreign language course. In order to ensure continued development and refinement of writing skills, students are required to complete courses selected from the Writing Across the Curriculum Program which is designed to expose them to writing experiences in diverse contexts.

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Students can satisfy the language and communication skills portion of the foundations core by completing the following: one course in written English; one course in oral English communication; (1) bachelor of arts and bachelor of science students must pass the foreign language proficiency test OR a 102-level foreign language course, (2) bachelor of music in performance students must successfully complete six semester hours of foreign language study as part of their professional degree requirements, thus while the foreign language proficiency exam must be taken, passage of the exam will not decrease the requirement to complete six semester hours of foreign language study, and (3) passage of the foreign language proficiency exam or a 102level foreign language course is not required for the bachelor of music education degree as the daily use of foreign language, especially Italian, and the study of music itself as means of communication is so deeply ingrained into the entire gestalt of the University’s bachelor of music education program so as to meet the learning objectives of this area; and three courses from the Writing Across the Curriculum program in at least three different disciplines (students should have completed at least one “W” course by the end of the sophomore year). C. Religion and Human Experience: Consistent with the Judeo-Christian tradition at Mount Union, study in this area is intended to develop in students a critical appreciation for the role religion plays in human experience. Completion of this requirement involves an exploration of issues that lie at the core of Mount Union’s mission statement which affirms the importance of reason, open inquiry, living faith and individual worth. This course is intended to enable students to become aware of and reflect critically upon their own values and the diversity of values within their own culture as well as the world views of others at other times and in other cultures. Learning experiences in this area represent the establishment of a foundation of knowledge, values, and attitudes which will be built upon as students continue their undergraduate careers. Students can satisfy this portion of the foundations core by completing RE 100 (Religion and Human Experience). II. Contexts for Inquiry In the contexts portion of the curriculum, the primary emphasis shifts from developing essential skills and introducing the conceptual framework of acquiring a liberal arts education to the exploration of issues, questions, ideas and methods of inquiry both within specific disciplines and across disciplinary lines. In completing the contexts requirement, students will be introduced to a wide range of content within five interdisciplinary categories: art and aesthetic perspectives; natural sciences and mathematics; human experience and social perspectives; global and cultural perspectives; and healthy living. A. Art and Aesthetic Perspectives: Study in this area is intended to introduce students to a range of creative expressions and critical perspectives in literature, music, film, theatre, and art, and simultaneously expose them to new perspectives on human experience and ways of knowing. In completing this requirement, students will come to appreciate the diversity and intricacy of creative and critical processes through the study of specific works, building informed and mature methods of evaluation. They will develop and apply their own critical, evaluative and creative processes and will be encouraged to apply them in coursework both within and across traditional disciplinary boundaries. Some study in this area will be interdisciplinary in nature. In satisfying the distribution requirement in this category, students will complete one course in literature, one course in the fine arts, and a third course in either the fine arts or chosen from an approved list of courses with an artistic or aesthetic focus (this list will not include additional literature courses). B. Natural Sciences and Mathematics: Learning experiences in this category will introduce students to key theories and concepts in the natural sciences and mathematics and to the methods of inquiry specific to them. In completing the natural sciences courses in this category, students will develop an understanding of their place in the natural universe. Students will improve their mathematical skills by completing a course that provides them with extensive experience in problem solving and critical thinking. These requirements seek to provide students with the knowledge and tools necessary to better comprehend and function in the natural world. In satisfying the distribution requirement in this category, students will complete three courses from an approved list. For (1) bachelor of music education students, one course will be in mathematics while (2) for bachelor of arts, bachelor of science and bachelor of music in performance students one course will be in mathematics or logic; and (1) for bachelor of arts or bachelor of science students two courses will be in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, geology or physics) where one of these natural science courses must include a lab and (2) for bachelor of music in performance and bachelor of music education students either one laboratory (4 or 5 semester hours) or one non-laboratory (3 semester hours) course will be in the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, geology or physics). C. Human Experience and Social Perspectives: This category is intended to provide students with the opportunity to study the ways in which a variety of disciplines examine and explain the nature of human experience. This category is divided into three sub-categories: (1) history, (2) religion and philosophy, and (3) social sciences. In satisfying the distribution requirement in this category, (1) bachelor of arts and bachelor of science students will complete one course in history and (2) bachelor of music in performance and bachelor of music education students will complete MU 101, MU 202W and MU 203, and all students will complete one course in religion or philosophy, and two courses in the social sciences (one in economics or political science, and one in psychology or sociology from an approved list). 1. History: By providing an understanding of the past, the study of history encourages the development of the ability to cope with the complexity of the present and, used cautiously, may offer some insight into the possibilities and challenges presented by the future. In completing this requirement, students will develop an understanding of the ways in which human experience has been shaped by the continuous growth and development of political, religious, intellectual, economic and social forces. The study of history heightens the understanding of those forces and their impact on society over time. 2. Religion and Philosophy: The study of religion and philosophy encourages the development of capacities vital to a liberal arts education. Specifically, learning experiences in this area involve the reflective study of values and a critical examination of the student’s own core beliefs. Courses in these disciplines address contexts of inquiry in the areas of values, knowledge, faith, and meaning. Important to liberal learning is the development of disciplined reflection and active engagement in the process of placing one’s core beliefs into a coherent framework that is subject to critical inquiry. Within a context of respectful intellectual engagement, students will learn to evaluate their own as well as opposing viewpoints and to analyze thoughtfully the arguments used to support them. 3. Social Sciences: These courses are intended to introduce students to the basic methods and theories of the social sciences. Developing an understanding of human experience requires that people be studied at multiple levels of analysis and from a variety of perspectives. People develop and function within a context which includes influences residing in the individual as well as within a complex network of social, political and economic forces. The completion of this requirement is intended to enable students to identify the personal and social forces which affect them and to explore the meaning of these forces for human experience. D. Global and Cultural Perspectives: This category is intended to broaden student perspectives by fostering the ability to understand various cultures throughout the world, to grasp the interdependence of the members of the global community, and to demonstrate an understanding of the United States as a pluralistic society. This category is divided into two sub-categories: (1) international sociopolitical and economic studies and (2) cultural studies. In satisfying the distribution requirement in this category, students will complete one course in each sub-category. 1. International Sociopolitical and Economic Studies: Study in this area treats social, political, and economic systems as objects of scholarly inquiry with a particular emphasis upon the interdependence of members of the global community. Courses in this category may include those with a

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comparative focus. 2. Cultural Studies: Learning experiences in this area involve the exploration of the social, philosophical, religious, artistic and/or cultural traditions of one or more ethnic, national, regional, or cultural groupings. Of particular concern in this area is that the populations under study be treated as subjects of their own experience. E. Healthy Living: These courses are designed to make students aware of what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, help them to establish patterns of behavior which foster healthful living, and acquaint them with various physical activities appropriate for lifelong participation in a regular, individualized fitness program. In satisfying the distribution requirement in this category, students will complete HE 152 (Wellness). III. Contexts for Integration Study in this area requires students to explore the content and methodologies of a variety of academic disciplines with the goal of fostering more intense integrative thinking. Students will be challenged to integrate disciplinary knowledge and to explore the meaning of that information in ways requiring a high level of integrative and analytical skills. The development of integrative thinking will be fostered in two ways: through in-depth investigation within the student’s major field(s) of study and through engaging in interdisciplinary study. Therefore, the integration component of the General Education curriculum is composed of two requirements: A. The Senior Culminating Experience: All Mount Union students will complete a Senior Culminating Experience as part of the requirements in their chosen major(s). While the specific parameters for this capstone experience are determined by each department, the Senior Culminating Experience is intended to provide students the opportunity to integrate what they have learned in their years of study within the major with their interdisciplinary experiences across the General Education curriculum. B. The Integrative Experience Requirement: The integrative experience requirement is designed to achieve two broad goals associated with the overarching purpose of fostering in students personal freedom in the service of human community: (1) to provide a broad context in which to place students’ experiences within specific disciplines. In so doing, students will be introduced to complex and multifaceted ideas which, in order to be understood with depth, require taking the perspective of more than one discipline. As they do this work, students are expected to develop the ability to analyze issues in an active and reflective manner; and (2) to demonstrate the ability to draw from multiple disciplinary bases, integrating and synthesizing those perspectives meaningfully. Students will learn to apply methodology and language from various disciplines as they examine common themes, issues, problems, topics or experiences. The focus of this learning experience is on making connections across disciplines illustrating the interrelationships among them. Courses that meet the Integrative Experience Requirement are designated with a Q at the end of the course number.

Academic Record
The history of a student’s academic career at the University of Mount Union is compiled to create the official academic record; this may take the form of hard copy or computer file format. The academic record contains all information pertinent to the student’s academic progress: courses enrolled, terms enrolled, grades, academic action (suspension, dismissal, etc.), degrees granted, major and minor programs, concentrations, honors, academic awards, etc. Disciplinary information or actions will never appear on the students “academic record.” Administrators and faculty with a need to know (advisors, department chairs, etc.) may secure copies of the academic record for use when advising the student; such copies are unofficial advisor’s copies and may not be replicated for release to a third party.

Transcripts
An official copy of the academic record is called a transcript and bears the signature of the registrar. Only the registrar is authorized to prepare and issue official transcripts. An official transcript must be requested in writing by the student using either the Transcript Request Form, a letter of request, a faxed request or by using SelfService. A transcript may be sent to a third party designated by the student or may be issued directly to the student; in the latter case, the transcript will be marked “Official Transcript Issued to Student.” If the Office of Business Affairs has placed an academic hold on the student’s record, no transcript will be issued until the financial obligation to the University has been discharged.

Transfer Credit
A student admitted to the University of Mount Union after having attended another institution of higher education will be classified a transfer student and must provide an official transcript of his or her academic record at all previous institutions. This transcript will be the basis for determining what, if any, transfer credit will be accepted by the University of Mount Union; such determination will be made by the registrar at the time of admission. In order to be eligible for transfer to the University of Mount Union academic record, a transferred course must have been completed at a regionally accredited college or university, must have a grade of “C” or better and must be in an academic discipline in which courses are offered by Mount Union. Any credit granted at the time of admission is conditional and may be withdrawn if a student is deemed incapable of successfully completing advanced work. Grades for transfer work accepted by the University of Mount Union will not be included when calculating the student’s Mount Union grade point average. When the Office of the Registrar identifies a student who has been pursuing a degree for more than 10 calendar years, that office will request that the department(s) in which the student is doing his or her major and minor work complete a review of the student’s record to date. This review would be to determine if any modifications should be considered or implemented in the student’s program of study toward the major(s) or minor(s). The Academic Policies Committee will be asked to review the student’s record to determine if any general degree requirements – including the General Education Requirements – should be updated for this student. Further updates will be required only if recommended by the appropriate departments or the Academic Policies Committee.

Academic Honesty
The University views the moral and ethical education of its students as being equal in importance to their intellectual development. The codes of conduct and ethical habits individuals practice as students are likely to guide them for their entire lives. As a consequence, a significant part of the University’s mission is to support in its students a belief in the importance of personal honesty and integrity and a strong commitment to high standards in those areas. In all of their academic pursuits, Mount Union students are expected to be responsible members of the academic community. Unless clearly documented with citations indicating otherwise, all academic work is expected to be the student’s own. Plagiarism and/or any other form of cheating or dishonesty will subject the student involved to sanctions ranging from failure of an assignment to possible suspension or dismissal from the University. Instances to which this standard will be applied include, but are not limited to, the following:

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A. B.

C. D. E. F. G. H.

Any academic work presented as the student’s own must be solely the work of that student. Any student’s work which uses ideas, information, or language from other sources must give appropriate credit to such other sources according to rules for proper source documentation as specified in the handbook used in EH 100 College Writing , or the documentation style required by the discipline as noted by the professor of the class. A student may not knowingly give to or receive from another any unauthorized assistance with examinations, papers and/or other assignments. A student may not submit academic work, or any part of academic work, completed for one course as work for another course without the expressed prior approval of both instructors. A student may not destroy, damage, alter, or unfairly interfere with access to the University’s educational resources and materials. A student may not knowingly subvert or otherwise interfere with the academic work of another. A student may not falsify or misrepresent research or laboratory data or observations. A student may not violate the authorial integrity of computer software through plagiarism, invasion of privacy, unauthorized access, or trade secret and copyright violations.

Depending upon the severity of the infraction and the circumstances of the situation, cases of academic dishonesty may result in sanctions ranging from failure of an assignment up to and including dismissal from the University. Having determined that an infraction has occurred, an instructor may immediately impose sanctions according to the stated policies of the course syllabus. In addition, any instructor who suspects or has determined that a case of academic dishonesty has occurred will present the evidence to the department chair and then to the Associate Academic Dean, Curriculum and Student Academic Issues, in the Office of Academic Affairs, who may impose additional sanctions as deemed appropriate. A student who wishes to do so may appeal the decision of the instructor by way of a petition to the Academic Policies Committee. Should the Associate Dean feel the evidence of academic dishonesty warrants possible suspension or dismissal, the Associate Dean will convene a hearing committee consisting of two faculty members from the Academic Policies Committee and one student to be appointed by Vice President for Academic Affairs or the Associate Dean. The hearing committee will review the evidence as outlined in the student handbook under “Academic Dishonesty Hearing Process”, make a determination regarding the student’s responsibility for the alleged violation, and assign appropriate sanctions, if the student is found responsible. A student who wishes to appeal a decision of the hearing committee may do so by following the process described in the appeals section of the “Student Disciplinary Process” in the student handbook.

Petitions and Appeals Regarding Non-Disciplinary Academic Matters
Any student with a concern about a non-disciplinary academic matter (for example, the assignment of a grade or the substitution of a course) should attempt to resolve the matter with the instructor, if one is involved, or the department chair. If the matter then remains unresolved, the student may submit a petition to the Academic Policies Committee for review. Petition forms and information are available from the Office of the Registrar. The student may appeal decisions of the Academic Policies Committee to the Vice President for Academic Affairs of the University. The student must submit a written request for an appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs no later than five business days following the notification of the committee’s decision.

Grades
Each course completed at Mount Union is assessed by the faculty member who will employ the following system of grades and quality point equivalencies: A ... 4.00 B .........3.00 C ........ 2.00 D ....... 1.00 A- .. 3.67 B- .......2.67 C- ...... 1.67 D- ...... 0.67 B+. 3.33 C+ ......2.33 D+ .... 1.33 F ........ 0.00 S AU Satisfactory Satisfactory Audit U UA Unsatisfactory Unsatisfactory Audit

Grading Notations
In addition to grades, certain notations are employed to signify specific conditions: H Honors NG No Grade Submitted I Incomplete P Passed (Transfer Work) IP In Progress W Withdrawn

Grades and/or Grading Notation Definitions
S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory): Applicable for assignment to sophomores, juniors and seniors who elect to enroll in certain courses on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade basis. The S/U option must be declared by the end of the eighth week of the semester. To qualify for this option, a student must satisfy at least one of the following criteria: (1) cumulative average of at least 3.000, (2) an average of at least 3.000 for the two preceding semesters, or (3) a junior or senior with at least a 3.000 cumulative average exclusive of the freshman year. The S/U option may not be used with courses in the major department or with extra-departmental courses required for the major (except for those courses graded on an S/U basis only). The S/U option may not be applied to any course being used to satisfy the liberal arts requirements specified in the “Requirements for a Degree” section of this Catalogue. The S/U option may be used for courses in a minor department taken beyond those required for the minor. These courses will not include those that apply directly to the minor or those extra-departmental courses required for the minor (except those graded only on an S/U basis). Academic work completed at the “C” or higher level will be graded “S”; work completed at the “C-” level or below will be graded “U.” The instructor is expected to report a letter grade equivalent (“A” to “F”) on the final grade reporting form. S/U grades are not included in a student’s grade point averages. A student may enroll for only one elected S/U basis course each semester and a maximum of six such S/U courses in a degree program. The Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option is not available to Mount Union students on Study Abroad unless this is the only manner in which the course is offered by the host university.

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Restrictions governing the number of courses, the area of concentration or liberal arts requirements as these relate to the S/U option for a specific course may be adjusted via petition for an international student who can demonstrate that he or she is experiencing significant difficulty as a result of language differences. I (Incomplete): Applicable in an instance where a student’s work is incomplete for the semester. The assignment of an “I” must be approved by the dean of the University. The dean should be informed of a medical or other emergency as soon as possible. Requests for the assignment of an “I” for legitimate academic reasons must be submitted by the instructor to the dean of the University prior to the last week of the semester. Incomplete grades must be reconciled by the fifth week of the next regular semester following the one during which the “I” grade was assigned. It is the student’s responsibility to arrange for completion of the work. The final grade is due to the registrar during the sixth week of the following semester and may be any grade from “A” to “F”. An “I” grade which has not been reconciled to a final grade by the end of the sixth week of the next regular semester will become an “F” and included in the calculations of the student’s cumulative grade point average. IP (In Progress): Applicable grade assigned at the end of the first semester of a two semester “extended” course. W (Withdrawn): Applicable to students who withdraw from a course after the second week but by Monday of the eleventh week of a semester. Withdrawals processed by the end of the second week are not recorded on the official academic record. Withdrawals processed after the second week but by the first day of the eleventh week will be recorded as a “W” on the official academic record. A student withdrawing after the first day of the eleventh week of classes for any reason – other than medical or non-academic hardship – will receive grades of “F” which will be used in computing the cumulative grade point average. A “W” is also applicable when a student, with the approval of the dean of the University, withdraws from a course anytime during the semester for a verified medical or other verified non-academic hardship. A “W” is not calculated in a student’s grade point average. AU/UA (Satisfactory Audit/Unsatisfactory Audit): The nature and amount of work required of an auditor, as well as the criteria for grading, will be specified by the instructor. Satisfactory completion of this work will result in “AU” on the academic record. Unsatisfactory completion of this work will result in “UA” on the academic record. No credit is awarded for an audited course.

Change of Grade
In order to seek consideration of a request for a grade change in any course, a student must submit a petition to the Academic Policies Committee. Unless there are justifiable extenuating circumstances present, a student must submit such a petition prior to the end of the semester following the one during which the original grade was assigned. (See Petitions and Appeals Regarding Academic Matters section on page 30 for more information, or contact the Office of the Registrar.) Prior to a student’s graduation from Mount Union, when he or she officially changes majors or applies to a graduate or professional school requiring A/F grades for courses originally pursued on an S/U basis, such student may, by petition to the Academic Policies Committee, request that an A/F grade replace the S/U grade on the academic record. The student’s grade point average will be adjusted accordingly. Once changed from S/U to A/F, a grade cannot be returned to the S/U status.

Repeating Courses
A student may repeat a failed course as often as is necessary in order to pass and receive credit for the course. The course credit hours for each attempt are used in the calculation of the student’s GPA unless the course was taken as a “Repeat for change of grade.” With the exception of courses that are expected to be taken multiple times, such as special topic, seminar, or applied music courses--a student may receive credit toward graduation for a course only once. If a student enrolls in a course for which he/she has received credit and “repeat for change of grade” does not apply, the enrollment will be converted to an “audit” enrollment.

Repeat for Change of Grade
A student may “repeat for change of grade” a regularly offered course as many times as necessary or desired subject to the following conditions: A. A student may repeat at Mount Union any regularly offered course taken at the University of Mount Union in an attempt to secure a grade of “A” through “F,” however, experimental courses or topical seminars may be repeated for change of grade only if the subject matter is the same. B. Grades for all course attempts will appear on a student’s official academic record, but only the last attempt will be used in the calculation of the student’s cumulative grade point average (the grade for the repeated attempt will appear in brackets). C. For purposes of this policy, credit earned for any repeated course will apply only once toward fulfilling degree requirements. D. A student may not enroll for an overload during a semester in which a course is being repeated. Notes: Courses repeated under the “audit” option will not affect grades for any previous attempt(s). The “S/U” option may not be used to repeat a course. Due to curricular changes and/or course scheduling, not all courses may be available to “repeat for change of grade.” A student, without permission of the department chair, may not repeat a course which was a prerequisite for a course subsequently taken. Students are encouraged to repeat a course within 12 months or at the next regular offering. Please note that financial aid regulations prohibit a student from repeating a course that he or she has already passed more than once.

Dean’s List
A Mount Union undergraduate student is eligible for and shall be placed on the Dean’s List for a given semester subject to the following conditions. For the semester being considered the student: A. Must complete at least 12 semester credit hours of traditionally graded course work – courses graded “S” (Satisfactory) or taken as a repeated course cannot be included among these 12. B. Must have at least a 3.550 grade point average for all course work attempted. C. Cannot have a course graded below a “B” (3.000). D. Cannot have a course graded “U” (unsatisfactory); E. Cannot have a course marked “I” (incomplete) or “IP” (in progress), however, when the student completes work of the “I” or “IP” graded course(s) he or she may then be eligible to be added to a supplementary Dean’s List for that semester. F. Courses graded “AU” (audit) or “W” (withdrawn) do not disqualify a student who is otherwise eligible for the Dean’s List.

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Student Classification
A student’s rank is dependent on the number of semester hours of credit she/he has completed, the sum of Mount Union credits earned and credit allowed for transfer work completed. A student is classified by rank according to the following. Freshman less than 28 total semester hours completed Sophomore at least 28 and less than 58 total semester hours completed Junior at least 58 and less than 88 total semester hours completed Senior a total of 88 or more semester hours completed Note that credit awarded for approved transient course work taken at another institution is considered to be part of Mount Union credits completed. A student is classified as full or part time according to the following. Full-time enrolled for 12 semester hours or more Part-time enrolled for less than 12 semester hours Overload enrolled for more than 19 semester hours at the University of Mount Union or at Mount Union and as a transient student at another institution

Academic Standing
A student’s academic standing – “good academic standing” or “academic probation” – is dependent upon his/her cumulative grade point average and the number of semester hours that he or she has attempted (note the rule for transfer students below). For a student to attain and/or maintain “good academic standing” at the University, the student must: A. Have a 1.600 grade point average or higher if he or she has attempted less than 29 semester hours. B. Have a 1.750 grade point average or higher if he or she has attempted at least 29 semester hours and less than 45 semester hours. C. Have a 1.900 grade point average or higher if he or she has attempted at least 45 semester hours and less than 60 semester hours. D. Have a 2.000 grade point average or higher if he or she has attempted 60 or more semester hours. For transfer students, the figure used for “semester hours attempted” will be the sum of transfer credits accepted by Mount Union and the credits attempted here at Mount Union. For example, a transfer student who was granted six credits for transfer work and who has attempted 25 credits at Mount Union would have attempted a total of 31 semester hours for the purposes of this policy. Please note that credit hours attempted and grades awarded for approved transient work taken at another institution are considered to be part of Mount Union credits attempted and are included in the calculation of grade point average.

Satisfactory Progress
A student enrolled at Mount Union on a full-time basis is considered to be making satisfactory progress toward satisfying degree requirements if he or she has successful completed at Mount Union a minimum of A. 24 semester hours after two semesters. B. 48 semester hours after four semesters. C. 72 semester hours after six semesters. D. 96 semester hours after eight semesters. E. Or 24 semester hours during the preceding two semesters of enrollment at the University. In addition, a student’s performance must represent a pattern that does not jeopardize the chances of satisfactorily completing degree requirements within approximately 120 semester hours. Credit awarded for transfer work accepted by the University is not included in the hours used to determine satisfactory progress under this policy. Credit awarded for approved transient course work taken at another institution is considered to be part of Mount Union credits. Please note that making Satisfactory Progress Toward Degree does not necessarily ensure that the student is making Satisfactory Academic Progress for the purposes of financial aid eligibility. See pages 9-11 for the requirements for financial aid eligibility.

Intercollegiate Athletics Eligibility
To be eligible for participation in the University’s intercollegiate athletic program during the traditional season, a student must be enrolled full-time for the semesters of participation, must be in good academic standing and be making satisfactory progress toward a degree. To be eligible for participation in the University’s intercollegiate athletic program during the non-traditional season, a student must be enrolled full-time for the semesters of participation. These requirements are in accordance with National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) guidelines.

Academic Review
At the end of each semester, the record of every student is reviewed to determine whether he or she is in “good academic standing” or on “academic probation.” Each student determined to be on “academic probation” will be reviewed by the Probation and Suspension Committee. The voting membership of the Committee consists of two faculty members from the Academic Policies Committee and the Associate Dean of the University (or his or her designee). Several administrators representing Academic Affairs, Enrollment Services, and Student Affairs provide support for the Committee. After reviewing a student’s record, the Committee may suspend (or dismiss) a student. Alternatively, the Committee may allow the student to continue enrollment, with or without conditions. Such conditions may include mandating periodic meetings with the Director of the Academic Support Center, requiring a reduced course load, requiring a grade objective for a specified semester, or other conditions that may be appropriate for a particular student. Regardless of conditions for continued enrollment (if any), a student who is not in “good academic standing” is considered to be on “academic probation,” and may be required to limit participation in extracurricular activities, and may incur financial aid restrictions as described on pages 9-11.

Suspension in Enrollment
Suspension in enrollment is the involuntary separation of a student from the University for a specified period of time. At the end of such period, the student is usually eligible to apply for readmission; procedures for readmission application are listed in “Readmission after Suspension.” A student is subject to suspension from the University if he or she A. Has a cumulative grade point average below that required for “good academic standing.” B. Is already on “academic probation” and fails to show progress toward achieving good academic standing.

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Has an exceptionally poor record of achievement for any semester. Fails to show satisfactory progress toward meeting the requirements for a degree. Is determined to have violated academic honesty policies (see page 29). Becomes subject to disciplinary procedures; in cases where a disciplinary action is deemed to be egregious, immediate involuntary separation may be recommended by either the dean of the University or the dean of students. Note: There may be occasions in which a student is on Financial Aid Suspension, but remains eligible to take classes at the University. This is not considered to be suspension in enrollment. See pages 10 for details on Financial Aid Suspension. Note: A suspension based on unsatisfactory academic performance will be considered an “academic suspension” and will be noted accordingly on the student’s official academic record; a suspension based on unsatisfactory conduct and/or ethics will be considered a “disciplinary suspension” but will not be noted on the official academic record.

C. D. E. F.

Dismissal
Dismissal is the involuntary and usually permanent separation of a student from the University; a dismissed student is ineligible to apply for readmission. A student is subject to dismissal from the University if he or she A. Has been suspended for academic reasons on two or more occasions. B. Would normally be subject to suspension but the circumstances involved are considered, by either the dean of the University or the dean of students, to be egregious; in cases of such seriousness, immediate dismissal may be recommended. Note: A dismissal based on unsatisfactory academic performance will be considered an “academic dismissal” and will be noted accordingly on the student’s official academic record; a dismissal based on unsatisfactory conduct and/or ethics will be considered a “disciplinary dismissal” but will not be noted on the official academic record.

Appealing Academic Suspensions or Dismissals
A student may appeal a suspension or dismissal decision by submitting a written letter of appeal to the Office of Academic Affairs. Students are advised to obtain letters of support from faculty members or advisors. The Associate Academic Dean will convene a meeting of the Appeals Committee approximately two weeks after the original meeting. The Appeals Committee will consist of three voting members: two faculty members from the Academic Policies Committee who were not on the initial Probation and Suspension Committee, and a student from the Academic Policies Committee or a student recommended by the Office of Academic Affairs or the Office of Student Affairs. The Associate Academic Dean will notify students who submit an appeal of the decision made by the Appeals Committee. A student may request that the dean of the University reconsider a suspension or dismissal decision of the Appeals Committee only when additional pertinent information becomes available. The dean of the University makes a decision and notifies the student in writing. No additional appeals are allowed.

Readmission after Suspension
A student suspended from the University for academic reasons is eligible to apply for readmission after a hiatus of at least one semester not including the summer terms. Thus, a student suspended at the end of the spring semester will be eligible to be considered for readmission after the following fall semester. Applications for readmission after suspension must be submitted to the registrar and will be reviewed by the Associate Academic Dean, the Dean of Students, and the Registrar. A student who attends another college or university after being suspended from Mount Union must submit an official transcript from that school before the application for readmission will be considered. Students returning to the University of Mount Union from academic suspension are limited to a maximum load of 16 semester hours.

Registration and Enrollment
Faculty Advisors
Academic advising constitutes a key element in the educational plan of Mount Union. At the time of admission to the University, each student is assigned to a faculty member who serves both as the instructor, or mentor, for the student’s LS 100 class and as his or her initial academic advisor. When a student declares a major, the chair of the major department will assign a faculty member in the department to serve as academic advisor to the student. In addition to this assigned faculty advisor, other members of the University faculty and administration are available to assist students with academic and personal problems.

Registration
For currently enrolled students, each semester during the academic year, all students except graduating seniors will confer with their respective advisors, plan and select a schedule of approved classes for the following semester and then complete registration for the next semester at the appropriate times published by the Office of the Registrar. Scheduling may be done using web registration or by paper form. First time students entering in the fall semester will register during the preceding summer. New students entering in the spring semester will register during the break between the fall and spring semesters. All continuing and new students are expected to be registered and have paid their fees or have satisfactory financial arrangements made prior to the start of each semester. Those who are unable to register until the first week of classes may do so on Self Service (if authorized by their advisor) or with a form signed by their advisors. Students registering during the second week of the semester must have the permission of their advisor and of the department chair and faculty member of each class for which they are registering. No late registrations are permitted after the second week of the semester. A late registration fee of $50 is levied for registration during the second week of classes. The late fee must be paid to the Office of Business Affairs prior to registration.

Prerequisites
Many courses have prerequisites, and these may range from class standing to a series of specific courses. Course prerequisites are noted for each course in the departments’ “Course of Instruction” section located near the back of this Catalogue. It is the student’s responsibility to make certain that he or she has met all prerequisites prior to registration for a course. A student will not be permitted to remain in a course for which the prerequisite has

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not been satisfied.

Enrollment Priorities
As with all institutions, the University cannot offer enough sections of all classes to ensure that all students can enroll in all the courses they wish each semester. For this reason enrollment in some courses is limited to students who must have the course for their major or minor. Ineligible students who enroll in such courses will be withdrawn by the Office of the Registrar. Often, when those needs have been met, any eligible student may enroll in the course, however students not needing the class to meet major or minor requirements may be denied enrollment throughout the entire registration process.

Class Limits
Class limits are established by each department; when this limit is reached during the registration process, the class is considered closed. Written approval by the chair [or his/her designate] of the department in which the course resides is required to be registered in a closed class.

Course Load and Overload
With the approval of his or her advisor, a student may register for an academic credit load up to and including 19 semester hours. A load ranging from 12 to 19 credit hours is considered full-time and is assessed fees accordingly. An academic load in excess of 19 credits is considered an overload and therefore requires the approval of the Associate Academic Dean of the University and is subject to an additional fee for which financial aid is not applicable. Students attending another institution as a transient student at the same time that they are registered for courses at the University of Mount Union are subject to the same limitations on overload. The determination of whether or not the student has an overload will be based on the sum of the hours taken at Mount Union and the other institution. Students attending other institutions in the summer are subject to the same credit hour limitations that would apply at the University of Mount Union. Any course load above that limit – normally nine semester hours – would require approval by the dean of the University. Sophomores, juniors and seniors become eligible to register for an overload by satisfying any of the following: A. Have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.000. B. Have a grade point average of at least 3.000 for the preceding two semesters. C. Be a junior or senior with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.000 exclusive of the freshman year.

Schedule Changes
During the fall and spring semesters a schedule change period occurs during the first week of classes. Students may change their schedule by adding (subject to availability) or dropping classes on Self Service or by use of a schedule change form. During the second week of classes schedule changes may be made only with the permission of the faculty member and department chair of each class being added and the faculty member of each class being dropped. Changes during this week and for the remainder of the semester must be completed on a paper form. Enrollment is not permitted after the second week of the semester. A late registration fee of $50 is levied for courses added in the second week of classes, which must be paid to the Office of Business Affairs prior to registration. Withdrawals from classes processed by Friday of the second week of the semester will not appear on a student’s official academic record. From the third week through the first day of the eleventh week of the semester, students withdrawing from one or more classes must obtain their grade at that time, “W,” and a signature from the instructor on a schedule change form. The schedule change form should be taken to the Office of the Registrar. The date that the schedule change form is received and processed by the Office of the Registrar will be the “official withdrawal date” from the class or classes being dropped. With the approval of the dean of the University, a student may withdraw anytime for verified medical or other non-academic hardship; such withdrawal will be recorded on the student’s official academic record as “W.” Any student intending to withdraw for non-academic reasons should contact the dean of students for assistance. Withdrawals, other than those for medical or non-academic hardship, processed after the first day of the eleventh week of the semester will be recorded on the student’s official academic record as “F” and this grade will be used in computing the grade point average. Designations of “W” are not used in computing a student’s grade point average.

Admission to Class
No student is permitted to attend any class section unless he or she is officially registered for that class section. A student is considered registered only if his or her name appears on the official class list, or he or she presents a computer-prepared personal schedule reflecting the specific class. A student will receive neither credit nor a grade in a course for which he or she was not officially enrolled.

Auditor
Subject to space availability and permission of the instructor, a student may enroll in any class as an auditor. Deadlines and procedures for enrolling as an auditor are the same as for credit registration; however, the registration form must be noted appropriately to designate audit. After the third week of a semester, a student may not change from audit to credit or from credit to audit. The fee for auditing a class is one-half the per-semester hour rate assessed for credit courses. Private music lessons are not available for audit.

Attendance Discrepancies at the Start of the Semester
During the second week of the semester, faculty are asked by the registrar to report any students not attending class who are on the class list and any students who are attending but are not on the class list. 1. Any students who are notified that they are on a class list but are not attending the class must either immediately start attending the class, or they must withdraw from the class. 2. Any student attending a class who is notified that he/she is not on the class list must immediately register and meet any financial obligations for that course, or the student will not be permitted to attend the class.

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Class Attendance and Participation
Since there has been significant mutual commitment, by both students and faculty, to the academic process at Mount Union, it is expected that each student will attend and participate during all class and laboratory sessions for which he or she is registered. A student who must be absent from a class for any reason should contact the faculty member prior to the absence if possible or, in the case of an emergency, as soon as possible thereafter in order to make arrangements to secure and/or make up missed assignments. Repeated absence can and probably will affect a student’s final grade and, if not excused by the instructor, may subject the student to possible suspension or dismissal from the University. Students who stop attending a class and fail to formally withdraw will receive an “F” grade for the course. A student who is required to miss class for health reasons is required to contact the Health Center for either treatment, release or referral. The medical staff will determine the seriousness of health problems and inform the dean of students when absence is legitimate; however, in all cases, the student is responsible to notify the faculty member and make up missed class work. In cases of prolonged illness or off-campus emergency, the student must notify the dean of students who will verify the circumstances and issue excuses when warranted. Field trips and other academic off-campus activities, organized and supervised by faculty to support regular course work, are encouraged within the limits of reasonable time spent away from campus. A student may not be required to participate in a field trip which will necessitate missing other scheduled classes. A student who participates in a University-sponsored field trip does so voluntarily and is responsible to arrange for make-up for any class missed as a result of field trip participation. Plans for a field trip which will necessitate participating students being absent from other classes must be cleared with the dean of the University prior to such event. Organized student activities and intercollegiate athletics may, as a consequence of external scheduling exigencies, interfere with regularly scheduled classes. It is expected that a participant in these activities will confer with his or her advisor and carefully evaluate course requirements when registering for classes each semester; conflicts of time and course work load may be cause for alternate course selection. Coaches and activity advisors are expected to explain activity schedules carefully and as early as possible; however, the student is responsible for arranging to miss classes and making up all work. In the event of a conflict between two field trips or extracurricular activities, the student reserves the right to choose, without penalty imposed by either activity director, which activity he or she wishes to pursue. Because absence detracts in different degrees from various learning and class participation expectations, only the course instructor or the dean of the University may excuse a student from class. However, to avoid confusion, each individual instructor is expected to establish and explain in writing his or her attendance policy for each class at the beginning of each semester; such attendance policy should be coordinated with the class schedule/syllabus, the campus calendar and institutional priorities. Attendance conflicts will be resolved by the dean of the University who may confer with all parties involved. Absences resulting from bona fide emergencies, if verified, may be excused by the dean of the University, and work missed may be made up. Prolonged absence for any reason may result in withdrawal, a grade of “I” (incomplete), or “F” (failure) depending on the nature of the course work missed and the circumstances of the absence.

Final Examinations
Final examinations will be conducted at the conclusion of each academic term during the period designated in the academic calendar. A final examination schedule, specifying days and times for courses, will be established and published each semester by the registrar. All final examinations must be conducted according to the schedule. A student may not take an examination at other than the designated time without petitioning and being granted permission to do so by the Academic Policies Committee, or, in case of emergency, the dean of the University. In addition to petitioning for personal reasons, a student scheduled for three consecutive examinations in a 24-hour period may petition for a change of time of one of the three examinations. No petitions requesting examination time changes will be accepted after the twelfth week of a semester. If he or she cannot be present for an examination, it is the student’s responsibility to advise the faculty member. Unless extenuating circumstances exist, a grade of “F” will be assigned for any missed examination. Cases involving extenuating circumstances must be reviewed by the dean of the University, the department chairman and the faculty member and usually will result in the assignment of a grade of “I” (incomplete).

Readmission for Students Returning After a Break in Enrollment
A Mount Union student whose attendance at the University is interrupted, either by suspension or by withdrawal for any reason, must apply for readmission with the Office of the Registrar and be approved for readmission by the dean of the University in order to resume academic work at Mount Union. An extended absence may result in reassessment and/or adjustment of degree requirements. A student who has attended any other institutions since leaving Mount Union will have to submit transcripts from each school attended before being considered for readmission. Attending another institution as a transient student or as part of a Study Abroad program is not considered a ‘break in enrollment.’

Special Educational Opportunities
First Year Experience
The reason for Mount Union’s existence is the students and the University’s mission statement mirrors that sentiment. Consistent with the University’s mission, the First Year Experience (FYE) seeks to challenge and support students during their first year of University to encourage academic excellence, holistic personal development and a commitment to the Mount Union community. The FYE is an exciting, innovative program for first-year students interested in exploring the connections between learning and living – between what happens inside the classroom and the world that exists outside. Mount Union may eventually offer this program to all students, but during this pilot period, the FYE will bring together a select number of students, a group of distinguished professors from a variety of disciplines, upperclass students who serve as FYE advocates and personnel from the Office of Student Affairs who provide programming and support. The FYE is a University-wide initiative that offers a variety of program and services designed for first-year students – academic support services, opportunities for faculty interaction outside the classroom and involvement with the University community – in the pivotal first year of college.

Honors Program
The Honors Programs provide academic flexibility and challenge for the superior student who desires to move at a faster pace, work more in depth or work more independently than would be usual in a regular course. The aim is to encourage intellectual curiosity, initiative, creativity and a high standard of performance.

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Two Honors programs are available including University Honors and Honors in the Major. A qualified student may participate in any program and may discontinue honors study without penalty. Students beginning in University Honors and electing to discontinue honors study will be advised on a case by case basis. The Subcommittee on Advanced Placement and Honors serves as the agency for matters of policy, for coordination of the Honors Program, for overseeing standards and for carrying on a continuing evaluation of the program. The Honors Review Board considers proposals for honors projects and theses in the Honors in the Major program. For more information about these programs, consult the Honors Handbook or webpage. Cases of academic dishonesty may result in the student forfeiting any honors designation.

University Honors
University Honors will encompass the Honors General Education Curriculum and Honors in the Major. Eligibility is limited to students with an ACT score of at least 27 or SAT-1 score of at least 1220 and either a minimum grade point average of 3.5 or a high school rank in the top 15 percent of their class, or permission of the Honors Review Board. University Honors scholars are expected to maintain an overall minimum grade point average of 3.50 and will need to earn a “B+” or higher in all Honors courses to remain in good standing. The instructor will record the final grade with the prefix “H” so that the honors work appears on the official transcript.

Summary of Honors Curriculum
Honors General Education Semester Hours First Year Seminar 4 Foundational Knowledge 4 Non-Honors Foundational Knowledge course 4 Research Methods 4 Theme 4 Theme 4 Capstone 4 Total Hours in Honors General Education 28 Honors in the Major Semester Hours 12 hours of Honors in the Major Credit must be earned; in the 4 Credit Hour system this translates to three courses (1 at the 200 level or higher and 2 at the 300 or 400 level); specific courses that can be taken for Honors in the Major will be determined by individual Departments 12 Total Hours in University Honors 40 The University Honors Curriculum will include a first year seminar, one foundational knowledge course that integrates knowledge across the disciplines, a research methods course, which incorporates many of the foundational knowledge learning goals from across the disciplines, to be taken in the sophomore year to prepare students for Honors in the Major work, two theme courses to be taken in the junior year and a capstone. In addition, Honors advisors will encourage University Honors Scholars to enroll in non-Honors foundational knowledge courses and will require enrollment in one such course, depending on the student’s interest and previous coursework. The general sequence of coursework is summarized below.

Summary 4-year plan for University Honors Course Sequences for University Honors Scholars
4 credit hour plan Fall, Freshman Year • Honors First Year seminar (4) Spring, Freshman Year • Honors Foundational Knowledge class (4) Total • 8 Honors general education credits this year Total • 4 Honors general education credits this year. • 4 Non-Honors general education credits this year. • 4 Honors in the Major credits in this year. Total • 8 Honors general education credits this year. • 8 Honors in the Major credits in this year. Total • 4 Honors general education credits this year. • Total number of credits in the Honors general education: 28 • Total number of credits in Honors in the Major: 12

Fall, Sophomore Year • Research methods (4) • Foundational Knowledge class (4)

Fall, Junior Year • Honors in the major project (4) • Theme class (4) Fall, Senior Year • Capstone class (4) • The capstone may also occur Spring in the Junior year if the class travels during May term.

Spring, Sophomore Year • Scholars may take theme classes and/or complete Honors in the major projects, depending on their schedules • Honors in the major project (4) Spring, Junior Year • Honors in the major project (4) • Theme class (4)

An electronic portfolio is required for all University Honors students. This will be submitted to the Honors director or co-directors upon completion and reviewed before granting the University Honors designation on the transcript and degree. The electronic portfolio will be a way in which University

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Scholars will demonstrate mastery of the university learning objectives and proficiencies. Special recognition will be given on graduation day for students who earn University Honors, which also includes recognition of Honors in the Major.

Honors Course Descriptions
HON 110 First Year Honors Seminar. This seminar will emphasize academic skills, such as critical reading and writing and active discussion, while stimulating intellectual curiosity and inquiry-based learning. The content of the seminar will vary with professor and will be announced in advance. This is the first in a series of University Honors programs, which are more rigorous and challenging than the typical first-year seminar. A grade of B+ or above is necessary to earn University Honors credit. Open only to University Honors scholars. 4 Sem. Hrs. HON 150 Sustainability and the Environment. This course examines the way in which knowledge is acquired, analyzed and integrated in and across disciplines by focusing on issues tied to sustainability and the environment including, but not limited to science and technology, human health, ethics, policy, economics, ecosystems and community. This course will be taught by guest lecturers, case studies, inquiry- and problem-based learning and active discussion. Students must earn a B+ or better to earn honors credit and remain in good standing in the University Honors Program. 4 Sem. Hrs.

Honors in the Major
The Honors in the Major Program offers the opportunity for intensive, individual study in an area of concentration. Honors in the Major credit is earned by completing a honors project in a regular course. Although the nature of the honors work will vary, it should involve intellectual creativity and may take such forms as research, investigation, or artistic effort. The student initiates and plans the honors project and works closely with one or more faculty members in carrying it out. At the conclusion of the study, superior accomplishment should be demonstrated in some appropriate way. The honors project is done in addition to the normal course assignments and does not directly affect the course grade. Students are eligible to enter the Honors in the Major Program if they have at least a 3.50 grade point average, or permission of the Honors Review Board. Students must formally declare their intention to participate in the Honors in the Major Program no later than the first semester of their junior year by submitting an application to pursue Honors in the Major along with 1-2 letters of recommendation from University of Mount Union Faculty. For permission to attempt an honors project in a regular course, the student must submit a complete Honors Application by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. The approval of the instructor, advisor, department chair, and the Honors Review Board is required. To receive honors credit for the course, the student must earn a final grade of at least “B+” in the course, and a grade of at least “B+” for the honors project. The instructor will record the final grade with the prefix “H” so that the honors work appears on the official transcript. Because of the significantly higher expectations of honors work, students are limited to a total of two honors courses per semester. For graduation with Honors in the Major, a student must have at least a 3.50 grade point average at graduation and honors credit in at least three courses in the major that total at least 12 semester hours. Only one course may be numbered at the 200 level, additional courses must be numbered at the 300 or 400 level and may be further specified by the department. One of the courses may be an Honors Thesis (All-University course 494). This is an honors independent study course in the major consisting of three to six semester hours, open to juniors and seniors. For permission to register for an honors thesis, the student must submit a completed Honors Application by the end of the twelfth week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students who, in the opinion of the department chair and the Honors Review Board, have met these requirements will be graduated with “Honors in __________,” the major being specified in which credit for honors work is earned. Special recognition will be given on graduation day for students who earn Honors in the Major.

Independent Study
Independent studies provide a student with the opportunity for intensive effort in a specific area of study not normally offered by a department. A student who undertakes an independent study should express a willingness to go beyond standard course offerings into an area of special interest to that student. Therefore, the independent study does not duplicate a course regularly offered by a department or contained in a department’s list of courses listed elsewhere in this Catalogue.

English as a Second Language Program
Mount Union offers courses targeted to improve oral and written English language skills. English as a Second Language courses are available to any non-native speaker of English through the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. These courses may be required for those students who need to improve their English language proficiency in order to meet the demands of academic work at the University. In addition, international students are encouraged to select from English as a Second Language courses in content areas, such as literature or film, which are designed to promote fluency with American culture and facilitate cultural adjustment. For further information, students may contact the director of the English as a Second Language Program in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures.

Latin Honors
The following awards are made for superior work. Latin honors are based on Mount Union Grade Point Average (GPA), which includes study abroad coursework and transient, not transfer, credit as approved by Mount Union. Undergraduate students must have earned at least 60 hours from the University to be eligible for Latin Honors at graduation. A. Cum laude – grade point averages in the range 3.550 through 3.749. B. Magna cum laude – grade point averages in the range 3.750 through 3.899. C. Summa cum laude – grade point averages in the range above 3.899.

Off-Campus Study
The University participates in several cooperative programs with other institutions for study in the United States and abroad. Overseas study also is conducted under Mount Union auspices. Typical programs are described below. Internships The internship program offers students academic courses designed to provide practical field experience in the major area of concentration. These

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courses are designed and implemented under the immediate and continuing supervision of a faculty member who, with the student and site supervisor (usually a service or commercial institution manager), will determine learning objectives, background reading, particular experiences in the field and patterns of evaluation of the learning accrued. The amount of credit awarded for a particular internship is determined by the student’s major department. In some cases, regular courses also may be taken concurrently. Students enrolled in an internship pay normal tuition and fee charges to the University. All internships are graded “S/U”. Generally, internships are offered primarily to seniors, but arrangements vary according to departmental programs. International Education Study abroad is a vital component of the international education experience of Mount Union students. Such study in a foreign country can be an extraordinary educational and personal experience. Those Mount Union students who undertake such study are directly exposed to new cultural experiences, which, in turn, open up fresh perspectives on international, political, economic, and social issues, as well as interpersonal relationships, and, perhaps, career choices. The director of the Office of International Programs, the registrar, and the chair of the Subcommittee on International Education can help interested students plan and implement comprehensive educational opportunities which will blend the student’s academic-career interests with the overall objectives of Mount Union. In recent years the University has encouraged student overseas study in Germany, France, Spain, Mexico, Japan, Australia, England, Costa Rica, Russia and Italy. In all instances, Mount Union students are directed to highly selective foreign study programs. Some of these are conducted totally in English; others require varying degrees of fluency in the language of the host country and institution. Appropriate course credits earned overseas transfer to the Mount Union transcript. A minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 is required for participation in most of Mount Union’s study abroad programs. Certain programs require a minimum of 3.00 and others a 3.33. In a limited fashion, the financial aid a student receives from Mount Union may transfer elsewhere and be used to meet the costs of study abroad. The University does this to make overseas study both feasible and attractive, as well as to give deeper meaning to its commitment to international education. Study at Other Accredited Colleges and Universities as a Transient Student Regular students in good standing at Mount Union may register in other accredited Universities as transient students during either semester of the academic year or for a summer session. All programs for transient students must be approved by the registrar and are subject to the rules and regulations applicable to work done at Mount Union. A Mount Union student seeking to enroll as a transient at another regionally accredited institution in order to earn degree-applicable credit to his or her Mount Union academic program must obtain written approval to do so from the student’s advisor and the Office of the Registrar prior to enrollment at the institution. Such approval will include determination of transfer credit equivalency. Departmental approval of transient courses is required if course work is being pursued to satisfy major or minor requirements or if course work is within the last 30 hours before graduation. Approval must be obtained for each semester or session of transient attendance at another institution. Grades earned for course work pursued as a transient student at another institution will be included when the Mount Union student’s grade point average is calculated. The University of Mount Union approval to take transient work does not guarantee that the student will be admitted to take course work by the other college or university. Advanced Placement Mount Union encourages the taking of advanced placement courses. In some cases, the University may award credit. In other cases, the University may waive certain prerequisites or University requirements. Factors considered in granting advanced placement include high school records, scores on University Board Examinations or similar tests, scores and school reports on University Board Advanced Placement program, CLEP examinations, and tests devised and administered by departments within the University. Students who have completed regular accredited University courses while in high school may, by having a copy of their transcript sent from that University, be awarded credit, according to University policy. General conditions of transferring credit also apply here. These courses may not be included as part of the units required for high school graduation unless they are taken under the auspice of the Post Secondary Enrollment Option. Further information on the Advanced Placement Program may be obtained from the Office of Admission. Entering students are required to take certain tests at the time of entrance to the University and are encouraged to take placement tests in applicable areas in order that they may begin course work at the proper level. Postsecondary Attendance While attending as a postsecondary student, each high school student attending Mount Union will receive grades and have a grade point average just like any other student attending the University. However, if the postsecondary student later becomes a regular matriculant at the University of Mount Union, the following guidelines shall apply to credit and grades earned as a postsecondary student. Credit earned will count toward graduation as long as that same credit would count if it had been taken by a traditional Mount Union undergraduate. Credits earned will be classified as hours completed and not as hours attempted. If the student completes a course with an “F” or a “U”, the credits for the course will not be included in either hours completed or hours attempted. Grades earned in courses successfully completed will not be used in any calculation of the student’s grade point average (GPA).

Senior Citizen Enrollment
Any person 60 years of age or older may, subject to permission of the instructor and space availability, attend any class offered by Mount Union. Such attendance will be on a non-credit basis, and no certification of attendance will be available. A technology fee will be charged. Detailed information about this program is available in the Office of the Registrar.

Summer Study
Since 1870 Mount Union has offered a summer term each year. A broad cross-section of courses is offered, taught by members of the University faculty. Three summer sessions are available: Session I: an intensive three-week session Session II: an eight-week session with most classes held in the evening Session III: a six-week session which overlaps with the eight-week term

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The summer school serves a two-fold purpose. It allows students an opportunity to accelerate their progress toward graduation. It also offers opportunities for persons with specific interests to attend the University for shorter periods of time. During the summer terms, the classes are longer and meet more frequently than during a regular term. The evening classes typically meet two nights a week and day classes may be held every day. During a three-week session, students are permitted to enroll in only one class. Several classes may be selected during the longer sessions. Specific information concerning the summer school schedule and tuition may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar.

Information Technology
The University offers state-of-the art teaching and learning resources. Each semester new facilities and technologies are made available on campus to support teaching and learning. For additional details, please visit it.mountunion.edu.

Campus-Wide High-Speed Data Network
This infrastructure is the foundation upon which all of our computer information systems are built. The data network consists of a high-speed fiberoptic network between buildings and Ethernet networks within each building – including small houses. Data, Campus Cable Television (CCTV) and telephone jacks are provided in every residence hall room, office, classroom and lab. The apartment housing and townhouses are equipped with data and CCTV in each bedroom and data, CCTV and telephone in each living room space. Each line has a voicemail mailbox which can be accessed by dialing ext. 8595 on campus or (330) 823-8595 from off-campus. The entire network is directly connected to the Internet. Faculty, staff and students have remote access to campus servers through our VPN.

Public Computer Facilities
General purpose computing labs are located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center (KHIC) and Hoover-Price Campus Center (HPCC). The Labs in KHIC are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Additionally, the library portion of KHIC and some residence halls have public workstations. Numerous classroom computer labs are available as well as several specialized departmental computer labs. For detailed information on public computer labs, please visit the Office of Information Technology website at http://it.mountunion.edu/usersupp/computer_labs.php.

CCTV-Closed Circuit Television System
Residence hall rooms, as well as most offices, classrooms and labs are connected to the Campus Cable Television (CCTV) system. The University satellite dish farm brings to campus a wide variety of television programming including commercial channels, educational channels, movie channels and special teleconferences. Additionally, the University operates several closed circuit channels for calendars and information and educational purposes.

Library
The University operates an automated library system providing online public access to the catalogue, circulation services, interlibrary loan, research journals and databases.

Language Laboratory
A large, state-of-the-art language laboratory is located in the Kolenbrander-Harter Information Center.

Multimedia Facilities
The University has over 30 multimedia-equipped classrooms including large-screen computer and video projection and sound systems, as well as document cameras. Additionally, faculty make use of portable carts with computers and projectors in other classrooms.

Administrative Systems
The student information system provides online access to services via the web ranging from applying for admission to registering for classes and viewing transcript information. The University uses an ID card system for electronic access to residence halls, food service, laundry facilities, vending, copy machines and other transactions. Textbooks and other bookstore items are available on the web.

Helpdesk
The Office of Information Technology provides helpdesk services to faculty, staff and students. To reach the Helpdesk, please dial ext. 4357 on campus or (330) 829-8726 off-campus or e-mail helpdesk@mountunion.edu with details on your needs.

Technology Resources Acceptable Use Policy
Technology User Code of Conduct The following Code of Conduct is intended to instruct technology users in acceptable behavior regarding their use of the University of Mount Union technological resources. This document is not intended to be exhaustive of all possible behaviors that may be deemed inappropriate. Users are expected to adhere to all policies set forth by the University regarding the use of technology resources. Failure to follow the expectations set forth in this Code of Conduct or any other policy of the University regarding use of technology may result in sanctions against the user including, but not limited to, loss of access to technology resources and/or disciplinary action. 1. Users are responsible for how their accounts are used; therefore, every effort must be made to protect against unauthorized access to accounts. Users must have a password which will protect their accounts from unauthorized use and which will not be guessed easily. If a user discovers that someone has made unauthorized use of her/his account, s/he should change the password and report the intrusion to the Office of Information Technology. Users should change their password on a regular basis to assure continued security of their accounts. 2. Users may not intentionally seek information about, browse or obtain copies of or modify files or passwords belonging to other people, whether at Mount Union or elsewhere, unless specifically authorized to do so by those individuals. Also, users may not attempt to intercept, capture, alter or interfere in any way with information on campus or global network paths. 3. Users must not attempt to decrypt or translate encrypted material or obtain system privileges to which they are not entitled. Attempts to do

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4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

any of the above will be considered serious violations. If users encounter or observe a gap in system or network security, they must report the gap to the Office of Information Technology. Users must refrain from exploiting any such gaps in security. Users must refrain from any action that interferes with the supervisory or accounting functions of the system or that is likely to have such effects. Users must be sensitive to the public nature of shared facilities and take care not to display sounds or messages that could create an atmosphere of discomfort or harassment for others. Users must avoid tying up computing resources for game playing or other trivial applications, sending frivolous or excessive mail or messages locally or over an affiliated network or printing excessive copies of documents, files, images or data. Users should be sensitive to special needs for software and services available in only one location and cede place to those whose work requires the special items. Users may not prevent others from using shared resources by running unattended processes or placing signs on devices to “reserve” them without authorization. Users may not copy, cross-assemble or reverse-compile any software or data that the University has obtained under a contract or license that prohibits such actions. If it is unclear if it is permissible to take such actions, users should assume that they may not do so. Software may not be copied or used illegally. Web site materials must be cited appropriately and permission obtained for the publishing, performing or distribution of copyrighted material. Messages, sentiments and declarations sent as electronic mail or sent as electronic postings must meet the same standards for distribution or display as if they were tangible documents or instruments. Users are free to publish their opinions, but they must be clearly and accurately identified as coming from the particular user or, if a user is acting as the authorized agent of a group recognized by the University, as coming from the group s/he is authorized to represent. Attempts to alter the “From” line or other attribution of origin in electronic mail, messages or postings will be considered violations of University policies. Users may not take any action that damages Mount Union technology resources in any way including technology found in classrooms, public computing labs, departmental labs, residence halls and University houses or any other campus location. Users may not establish any computer to function as a server without the knowledge and approval of the Office of Information Technology. Users are required to utilize anti-virus software on their computers. Anti-virus software must be updated regularly. Users may not deploy any network electronic equipment or install wireless access points without express permission from the Office of Information Technology. Users who utilize the Mount Union e-mail system are required to comply with state and federal law, University policies and normal standards of professional and personal courtesy and conduct.

Network Use Policies The University of Mount Union network is provided for the academic use of students and faculty of Mount Union as well as to the University administration for conducting official University business. Academic use is determined to be any legitimate use of the network for the purpose of assisting in the conduct of the University’s academic mission. The official conduct of University business is limited to efforts on behalf of the management and administration of the University. The network provides access to the Internet from all offices, residence hall rooms and computer labs, in addition to public access stations in the library. Students living in on-campus housing are accorded the privilege of using the network for personal use, as long as such use is in keeping with all applicable policies of the University, all applicable state and federal laws and is not excessive (resulting in diminished service to fellow students). User access to the network is governed by the acceptable use policy of the University as well as by the following: 1. Servers. All servers operating on campus must do so with the knowledge and consent of the Office of Information Technology. A server is defined as any computer providing services of any type to other computers on the network or on external networks. Such services could include DNS, DHCP, SNMP, e-mail and application, file and/or printer sharing. In order to request the deployment of a server on the network, written petition must be made, stating: a. The legitimate academic use of the server; b. Intended server operating system; c. All intended server functions and applications, including protocols and services; and d. The identity and function of target subordinate computers/users. 2. Any computer acting as a server without prior authorization as stated above will be removed from the network. All licensing, operation and support of the hardware and software utilized will be the responsibility of the petitioner if such petition is granted. 3. Accounts. All authorized users will be provided an account by which to access the necessary network resources of Mount Union. The information regarding this account, including the account name and password, is privileged and must not be disseminated to anyone other than the account owner for any purpose. Account holders should protect their passwords and keep them confidential. Passwords should be changed frequently. Any problem resulting from irresponsible use of a password (e.g., a password that can be easily guessed or oral or written dissemination of a password) may be treated as grounds for action against the account holder. Any attempt to determine the passwords of other users is strictly prohibited. The following are categories of authorized users: a. Full-time staff of the University. b. Current faculty members c. Current students 4. The following categories of users may be authorized to utilize the University network based on the legitimate need for access to such resources: a. Part-time staff of the University b. Volunteer staff of the University c. Student employees d. Current students on transfer e. Retired members of the faculty and staff f. Guests 5. Other categories of users may be granted special permission to obtain access to the system at the discretion of the University. Student employees who need to access administrative software and resources due to their employment must be given approval for this access by a department administrator.

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6.

Special Access. From time to time, circumstances dictate the provision of short-term, special access to University systems. Such access must be in accordance with the strictest adherence to the user policies stated above and may only be granted by the Office of Information Technology after review of a written petition. The petition must state the purpose of the access, the source user name and the department. Such access will typically be provided only for a limited time and will be allowed only from designated computers. All such petitions that are approved will be maintained on file in the Office of Information Technology. All connections made through such petitions will be monitored. 7. Network Electronic Equipment. Network electronic equipment, including switches, hubs and routers, may only be installed on campus with the knowledge and consent of the Office of Information Technology. In order to request the deployment of this equipment on the network, written petition must be made stating: a. The legitimate academic use of the equipment; b. The type of equipment wishing to be deployed and for what purpose; c. All intended functions, including protocols and services; and d. The identity and function of target subordinate computers/users. 8. Any network electronic equipment deployed without prior authorization as stated above will be removed from the network. If a petition is granted, all licensing, operation and support of the hardware and software utilized will be the responsibility of the petitioner. 9. VPN. (Virtual Private Network) is a resource made available to faculty, staff and non-residential Mount Union students. VPN will allow a user to connect to the campus network from an off campus ISP (Internet Service Provider) and make it appear to the user that they were physically connected to the Mount Union network. VPN will allow users to gain access to their home space (H:\ drive), departmental common space (S:\ drive), and hand-in and handout folders (M:\ drive). VPN will be supported for only specified operating systems. If misuse of this resource occurs or if the user does not comply with the VPN Policy of Mount Union, the Office of Information Technology reserves the right to terminate any VPN connection without notice. Any party found to have violated the VPN policy may be subject to disciplinary action, including termination of VPN access. A copy of the VPN policy can be found on the Office of Information Technology web site. 10. Wireless. Wireless technology is available in specified areas of Mount Union. Use of the wireless information network implies consent to abide by all University policies pertaining to the use of computer resources at Mount Union. Users may not install wireless access points. Any unauthorized wireless access points deployed will be removed from the network. 11. Campus ID Card System. The Campus ID Card System is a network resource and as such is protected by the rules of this policy. Any party found to violate this policy or damage devices specific to this system, such as door card, vending machine or laundry readers, may be subject to disciplinary action. 12. Web Pages. The Mount Union website and individual web pages are network resources and as such are protected by the rules of this policy. Any party found to violate this policy may be subject to disciplinary action. Appropriate Use of E-mail and Internet Mount Union e-mail is intended to serve the communication needs of the University community. Access to the e-mail system is a privilege. Any e-mail addresses or accounts assigned by the University to individuals, sub-units or functions of the University are the property of the University. The Mount Union network is not intended for private correspondence, as such, all communications on Mount Union computer systems, whether personal or business-related, are the property of Mount Union. E-mail users are required to comply with state and federal law, University policies and normal standards of professional and personal courtesy and conduct. Unacceptable uses of e-mail and Internet access include, but are not limited to, the following: a. Use for any purposes that violate a federal, state or local law. b. Use for any commercial activities, including commercial advertising unless specific to the charter, mission or duties of the University of Mount Union. c. Use to publish, post, distribute, disseminate, or link to any: i. Inappropriate, profane, defamatory, infringing, obscene, indecent, harassing or unlawful topic, name, material or information ii. Software or other material protected by intellectual property laws, rights of privacy or publicity or other proprietary rights, unless the individual owns/controls such rights or has received all necessary consents for the use of such software and other materials iii. Software or other material that contains viruses, corrupted files or that may or are intended to damage the operation of another’s computer d. Use to gather or otherwise collect information about others for commercial or private use, including e-mail addresses, without the express consent of the individuals. e. Use for fund raising, political campaign activities or public relations activities not specifically related to Mount Union activities. f. Use to conduct or forward illegal contests, pyramid schemes or chain letters or to spam. g. Use to sell access to the Internet. h. Use to conduct any activity that adversely affects the availability, confidentiality or integrity of Mount Union’s technology. i. Use to benefit personal or financial interests of any employee or student. j. Use for mass e-mail purposes. Ennouncements should be used for this purpose. E-mail users shall not give the impression that they are representing, giving opinions or otherwise making statements on behalf of the University or any unit of the University unless expressly authorized to do so. Where appropriate, the following explicit disclaimer shall be included: “The opinions or statements expressed herein are my own and should not be taken as a position, opinion or endorsement by the University of Mount Union.” Security E-mail, as a public record, is subject to the Freedom of Information Act and to subpoena by a court of law. Users should be aware that any information submitted via e-mail is not confidential and could be observed by a third party while it is in transit. Encryption encourages the false belief that privacy can be guaranteed. Users should never put anything in an e-mail message that must be kept confidential. E-mail users should assume that anyone could accidentally or intentionally view the content of their message. E-mail security is a joint responsibility of the Mount Union Office of Information Technology and e-mail users. The University will provide the security offered by the currently used software, as well as a “firewall” to prevent unauthorized access to the mail server. Users must take all reasonable precautions, including safeguarding and changing passwords, to prevent the use of the account by unauthorized individuals. Users may not divulge passwords for Mount Union accounts to any other person or allow other persons use of their Mount Union account for any reasons.

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Archiving and Retention
The Office of Information Technology does not archive documents. Mount Union records communicated using e-mail or the Internet need to be identified, managed, protected and retained as long as they are needed to meet operational, legal, audit, research or other requirements. Each director is required to comply with approved records retention schedules or to set standards to retain, manage and make accessible in an existing filing system, outside the email system, records needed to support program functions in accordance with Mount Union’s standard practices. Eligibility for E-Mail Privileges Students are eligible for e-mail privileges as long as they are officially registered at Mount Union. Faculty and staff e-mail privileges start on the date employment begins and end at the close of the business day of the date of employment termination. The Mount Union Office of Information Technology may, under its sole discretion, attempt to redirect email for a reasonable period of time as determined by the University for purposes consistent with this policy and the University’s mission. The University may elect to terminate the individual’s e-mail account or continue the account, subject to approval by appropriate University supervisory and systems operational authority. The Office of Human Resources at Mount Union is responsible for notifying the Office of Information Technology of the date of employment termination.

Special Lectureships
Convocations: During the regular academic sessions, the University conducts Convocations on selected Tuesdays and Thursdays. The goal of Convocations is to provide additional opportunities for enrichment and growth through contact with a variety of speakers, performers, artists and forums. They are both externally and internally generated programs whose purpose is to encourage dialogue, debate, and discussion with students, faculty, staff and the larger global community. Additionally, students often have the experience of meeting with speakers in class or personal conferences. The Carr Lecture: The Joseph M. Carr Lectureship was established at Mount Union in 1916 by the Carr family in memory of the Reverend Joseph M. Carr, D.D., a close associate of President Hartshorn in the early days of the University of Mount Union. The condition under which the lectureship was given states that the lecture shall always be upon the subject, “The Mission of the Christian University to the World.” The Dewald Honors Dinner: The Dewald Honors Dinner is made possible by Dr. Donald W. and Mrs. Eleanore (Iman ’38) Dewald of Mansfield, Ohio. The Dewalds have believed that academic achievement should be publicly recognized. This event applauds the quality of student effort and encourages the pursuit of academic excellence at the University of Mount Union. The purpose of the dinner is to recognize freshman honor scholars, upperclassmen who earned Dean’s List recognition during the academic year and students participating in the Honors Program. The Eckler Lecture: The Eric A. and Mary W. Eckler Lecture in Literature and Drama was established through an endowment given by Mr. John A. and Mrs. Dorothy (Nelson ’29) Cummins in appreciation of the Ecklers’ years of service to the community and Mount Union. The income shall be used annually to bring a person(s) to the campus for one or more programs in literature or drama. Residents of Alliance and surrounding areas shall be invited to participate in the public programs. The Faculty Lecture: Each year a member of the faculty is selected to give a special lecture relating interesting and important developments in his or her own field or exploring matters of general concern to the faculty. These lectures are open to the public. The Heffern Lecture. The Gordon Heffern Business Ethics Lecture was established by Mount Union Trustee Gordon E. Heffern to encourage dialogue about the practical ways in which spirituality can transform the workplace. Heffern, a graduate of the University of Virginia, served as chairman of the board of Society Corporation before retiring in 1987. The Judd Lecture: Through a contribution by the Alliance First National City Bank to Mount Union, the George H. Judd Lecture on Business and Finance was established in 1958. This lectureship was established in honor of Mr. Judd’s 54-year connection with the Alliance First National Bank and his service as a member of the Board of Directors of that bank. The Kershaw Lecture: The Myrtie Allen Kershaw Lectureship on Poetry and the Fine Arts was established in 1960 by a bequest from Myrtie Allen Kershaw of Kent, OH, who indicated in her will that such a fund should go to a University chosen by her friend and executrix of her estate, Elizabeth Clark Bell. Because of Mrs. Bell’s personal interest in Mount Union, where she was a student in 1932-33 and where her uncle, Robert E. Stauffer, was a teacher and librarian for many years, she designated Mount Union to receive the fund. The income is used to bring periodically to the University a person of distinction, for one or more lectures on ancient or modern poetry, the fine arts, or music or for an original performance in one of these fields. The Schooler Lecture Series: The Schooler Lecture Series was established in 1988 through a grant made by the Schooler Family Foundation of Coshocton, Ohio. Through their gift, the University is able to provide a dramatically enhanced opportunity for young men and women studying at Mount Union and for residents in the greater Alliance area to experience the breadth and depth of American culture. Speakers have included former U.S. President Gerald Ford; former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop; the late Astronomer Carl Sagan; former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger; and U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor. The Slater Lecture: The Thelma Tournay Slater Classics Lecture is made possible through a gift of Mrs. Thelma E. (Tournay ’42) Slater. Mrs. Slater’s lifelong passion for the classics began at Mount Union. The gift supports student enrichment through an increased appreciation of the civilization and cultural achievements of ancient Greek and Rome that stand at the core of a liberal arts education. The Smith Lecture: The C. Richard Smith Lectureship in Business was established by C. Richard Smith, a 1953 graduate of Mount Union. The purpose of this lectureship is to bring business professionals to campus to share their knowledge and experience with business students, faculty and others from the campus and local community. The Wolf Lecture: The Eleanor Mincks Wolf Lecture was established by John L. Wolf of Medina in memory of his wife Eleanor (Mincks ’39). She was a former teacher of English and Latin in Richfield and Highland school districts. This lecture features a professional in the English field.

Courses for General Education
At the University of Mount Union, the general education courses provide students with the broad base of knowledge necessary for a bachelor’s degree in the liberal arts tradition. The term liberal arts comes from the Latin phrase artes liberales, which can be translated as “the education suitable for a free person.” Each spring, the Office of Registration publishes a list of “courses which qualify for the General Education Requirements for all degrees.” During the year in which a course is completed, a student may count that course toward a General Education Requirement if it is on the registrar’s list of qualifying courses for that year. Courses that do not appear on the registrar’s list during the year of completion cannot be used to fulfill General Education Requirements. The following is the list for this academic year.

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For the B.A. and B.S. Degrees
I. Foundations for Inquiry
A. The Liberal Arts Experience: One course (1 semester hour) LS 100 The Liberal Arts Experience B. Language and Communication Skills: 1. One course in written English (3 semester hours) EH 100 College Writing EH 120 Advanced College Writing 2. One course in oral English communication (3 semester hours) CM 101 Public Speaking CM 102 Group Communication 3. Passing the foreign language proficiency test OR a 102-level foreign language course (3 semester hours) FR 102 Elementary French II GN 102 Elementary German II JA 102 Elementary Japanese II RU 102 Elementary Russian II SN 102 Elementary Spanish II 4. Three courses from the Writing Across the Curriculum program in at least three different disciplines (ie., course sections with a “W” following the course number such as SO 150W) C. Religion and Human Experience: One course (3 semester hours) RE 100 Religion and the Human Experience

II. Contexts for Inquiry
A. Arts and Aesthetic Perspectives: 1. One course in literature (3 semester hours) African-American Studies AA 246Q Imagining Slavery Classics CL 201 Classics I CL 203 Classics III English EH 130 Introduction to Poetry EH 135 Introduction to Fiction EH 140 Popular Literature EH 147W Introduction to Literary Non-Fiction EH 210 Children’s Literature EH 250 African-American Literature EH 255Q Native American Literature EH 257 Canadian Literature EH 260 Post-Colonial Literatures EH 261 Literature for Adolescents EH 265 Gender and Literature EH 270 American Regional Literatures EH 295W The Human Experience in Literature and Language I French FR 150 Francophone Literature in Translation FR 310 Nineteenth Century Romanticism and Realism FR 315 Contemporary French Theatre FR 320 Modern Poetry FR 325 The Classical Period FR 330 Eighteenth Century Literature FR 335 The Novel in the 20th Century German GN 150 German Literature in Translation GN 210 Introduction to German Literature and Film Japanese JA 150 Japanese Literature in Translation Spanish SN 210 Introduction to Spanish Literature SN 215Q Hispanic Literature in Translation SN 280 Gender and Ethnicity and Spanish-American Literature Theatre TH 305 History of the Theatre I TH 306 History of the Theatre II TH 307 History of the Theatre III 2. One course in the fine arts (3 semester hours) Art

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AR 101 AR 105 AR 200 AR 205 AR 210 AR 300 AR 305 AR 400 Classics

Introduction to Art Basic Drawing Art History Survey I Art History Survey II Art History Survey III History of American Art Art Study Travel Seminar (3 hours) History of Modern Art

CL 250 Art History Survey I Communication CM 103 Introduction to Film Music MU 100 Introduction to Music MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I MU 104 Fundamentals of Music Theory MU 202W History and Analysis of Western Music II MU 250W Music in America Note: If one of the following three music options is used to fulfill one of the student’s fine arts requirements, the second fine arts requirement must be met by a traditional classroom course in music or by a fine arts course outside of music: three consecutive semesters of MU 260 Concert Choir or MU 262 Women’s Chorus; or three consecutive semesters of a combination of MU 266 Wind Ensemble [offered spring semester only], MU 268 Fall Band [offered fall semester only] or MU 270 Symphony Orchestra – Orchestral Strings; or three consecutive semesters of the same private lesson, MU 160-180 or MU 460-480. Theatre TH 105 Introduction to the Theatre TH 200 Stagecraft TH 203 Costume Technology TH 205 Interpretive Reading TH 220 Acting I TH 230 Stage Make-Up TH 275 Theatre Production (when taken for three semesters) TH 308 History of American Musical Theatre 3. A third course in either the fine arts or chosen from an approved list of courses with an artistic or aesthetic focus [this list will not include additional literature courses] (3 semester hours) African-American Studies AA 226Q Black Diaspora Culture Philosophy PL 260Q Aesthetics Note: Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree, with a major in music, must take one of the two General Education fine arts courses from a department other than music. B. Natural Sciences and Mathematics: 1. One course in mathematics or logic (3 semester hours) Mathematics MA 110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics MA 120 Precalculus Mathematics MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 125 Elementary Discrete Mathematics MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II MA 151 Calculus for Biology MA 171 Elementary Statistics with Business Lab MA 241 Calculus III Philosophy PL 205 Informal Logic PL 210 Logic 2. Two courses in the natural sciences [biology, chemistry, geology, and physics] (7 semester hours); one course in the natural sciences must include a lab Biology BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology (Credit will not be given for both BI 105 and BI 210) BI 120 Contemporary Biology BI 122 Contemporary Biology with Lab BI 125 The Environment: An Interdisciplinary Approach BI 127 The Environment: An Interdisciplinary Approach with Lab BI 140 The Unity of Life BI 141 The Diversity of Life BI 150 Topics in Environmental Biology BI 190 Introduction to Environmental Science

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BI 210 BI 211 BI 225W Chemistry

Anatomy and Physiology I (Credit will not be given for both BI 105 and BI 210) Anatomy and Physiology II Tropical Biology

CH 100 Chemistry in Society CH 100 Chemistry in Society with CH 101 Chemistry in Society Lab CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry Environmental Biology EV 190 Introduction to Environmental Science Geology GY 110 Physical Geology GY 112 Physical Geology with Laboratory GY 205 Weather and Climate GY 212Q Historical Geology GY 215 Environmental Geology GY 220 History of Life Liberal Studies LS 115 The Oceans Physics PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II PH 110 Concepts of Physics PH 120 Astronomy: A Survey PH 154 Science, Sound and Music PH 200Q Introduction to Planetary Science C. Human Experience and Social Perspectives: 1. One course in history (3 semester hours) HI 101 Western Civilization HI 102 Western Civilization HI 110 Asian Civilizations HI 200 The Historian’s Craft HI 210 Colonial and 19th Century America HI 215 The Middle East HI 225 History of Africa HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations HI 265 East Asia to 1800 HI 285 History of the Contemporary Fundamentalism HI 290Q History of Civil Rights Movement in U.S. HI 295 The Progressive Movement in Twentieth-Century America HI 320 The Renaissance and Reformation HI 325 Early Modern Europe HI 336 History of Southern Africa HI 340 Revolutionary Europe HI 350/CL 350 Ancient Greece and Rome HI 365 Southeast Asia HI 380 South Asia 2. One course in religion or philosophy (3 semester hours) Classics CL 220 Ancient Philosophy Philosophy PL 100 Introduction to Philosophy PL 105 Philosophy and Film PL 120 Contemporary Moral Problems PL 220 Ancient Philosophy PL 230 Modern Philosophers PL 240 Existentialism PL 260Q Aesthetics PL 270Q Philosophy of Science PL 280 Bio-Medical Ethics PL 290 Environmental Ethics PL 300 Feminist Philosophy/Feminist Ethics PL 310Q Philosophy of Religion (cross-listed as RE 310Q) PL 320 Ethics PL 380Q Philosophy of Mind/Artificial Intelligence Religious Studies RE 201 Biblical Literature and Religion RE 215 Native American Religious Traditions RE 220 African-American Religious Traditions

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RE 231 Development of the Christian Tradition RE 232Q Development of the Christian Tradition RE 240 Buddhism in Film RE 260 Religions of the World RE 265 Islam: An Introduction RE 285Q Religion and Science RE 290 Death and Dying RE 300 Paul and Early Christianity RE 310Q Philosophy of Religion (cross-listed as PL 310Q) RE 315 Topics in Hebrew Bible RE 320 Jesus and the Gospels RE 350 Atheism 3. Two courses in the social sciences a. One in economics or political science (3 semester hours) Economics EC 105 Introduction to Economics EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics Political Science PS 105 American National Government PS 270 American Foreign Policy b. One in psychology or sociology (3 semester hours) Psychology PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science PY 210 Educational Psychology Sociology SO 100 Introduction to Sociology D. Global and Cultural Perspectives: 1. One course in international sociopolitical and economic studies (3 semester hours) African-American Studies AA 306 Pan-Africanism Economics EC 327 International Trade EC 328 International Monetary Economics EC 375QW Development Economics EC 380Q Comparative Economic Systems EC 390 Economies of the Asian Pacific Rim Education ED 213 Comparative Education History HI 220 East Europe HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations HI 345 Contemporary Europe Political Science PS 120 Introduction to International Politics PS 180 Introduction to Geography PS 235 Introduction to Political Thought PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics PS 345 Comparative Politics Europe PS 346 Comparative Politics Asia PS 347 Politics of the Former Soviet Union 2. One course in cultural studies (3 semester hours) African-American Studies AA 206W Introduction to African-American Studies AA 226Q Black Diaspora Culture AA 228 Pivotal African-American Figures AA 246Q Imagining Slavery AA 306 Pan-Africanism American Studies AS 200 American Culture and Society Art AR 210 Art History Survey III Classics CL 202 Classics II Communication CM 381 Diversity: The American Indian and the Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q Diversity: African-American Rhetoric CM 384Q Diversity: Intercultural Communication CM 483 Diversity: International Media Systems Economics

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EC 330 English EH 250 EH 255Q EH 260 EH 265 French FR 225 FR 250Q German

Economics of Gender African-American Literature Native American Literature Post-Colonial Literature Gender and Literature A Cultural History of the French-Speaking World Contemporary France

GN 225 A Cultural History of the German-Speaking World GN 250Q Contemporary Germany Gender Studies GS 201Q Introduction to Gender Studies GS 210 Introduction to Men’s Studies GS 220 Gender, Body, Identity GS 310 Seminar, Gender Studies Japanese JA 250Q Contemporary Japan Liberal Studies LS 106 Race, Culture and American Society LS 320QW Vernacular Music and the Vietnam Conflict Music MU 250W Music in America MU 352W World Music Psychology PY 280Q Movies and Madness PY 350 Social Responsibility and Personal Well-Being Religion RE 215 Native American Religious Traditions RE 220 African-American Religious Traditions RE 260 Religions of the World Sociology SO 150 Introduction to Anthropology SO 330 Minority Group Relations SO 384Q Diversity: Intercultural Communication Spanish SN 225 Introduction to Hispanic Culture SN 250Q Spanish and Spanish-American Culture and Civilization E. Healthy Living: 1. HE 152 Wellness (2 semester hours)

III. Contexts for Integration
A. The Senior Culminating Experience B. The Integrative Experience Requirement Accounting AC 450Q Advanced Tax Accounting African-American Studies AA 226Q Black Diaspora Culture AA 246Q Imagining Slavery Art AR 326Q Media Computing I Business Administration BA 280QW Stock Market Psychology Communication CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Diversity: Gender, Communication and Society CM 382Q Diversity: African-American Rhetoric CM 384Q Diversity: Intercultural Communication Computer Science CS 218Q Educational Media CS 231Q Introduction to Neural Processing Systems CS 251Q Evolutionary Systems and Artificial Life CS 326Q Media Computing I CS 331Q Human-Computer Interaction Criminal Justice CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law Economics EC 375QW Development Economics

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EC 380Q English EH 255Q Environmental Biology EV 350Q Exercise Science ES 260Q French FR 250Q Gender Studies GS 201Q Geology GY 212Q German GN 250Q History HI 230Q HI 290Q Japanese JA 250Q Liberal Studies LS 320QW Mathematics MA 222QW Physics PH 200Q PH 345Q Philosophy PL 260Q PL 270Q PL 310Q PL 330Q PL 380Q Political Science PS 300Q Psychology PY 280Q Religion RE 232Q RE 285Q RE 310Q Sociology SO 350Q SO 384Q Sport Management SB 450Q Spanish SN 215Q SN 250Q

Comparative Economic Systems Native American Literature Case Studies Growth, Development and Physical Activity Contemporary France Introduction to Gender Studies Historical Geology Contemporary Germany Problems of Developing Nations History of the Civil Rights Movement in the US Contemporary Japan Vernacular Music and the Vietnam Conflict History of Mathematics Introduction to Planetary Science Methods of Mathematical Physics Aesthetics Philosophy of Science Philosophy of Religion Epistemology Philosophy of the Mind/Artificial Intelligence Introduction to Law and the Legal System Movies and Madness Development of the Christian Tradition Religion and Science Philosophy of Religion Crime, Society and Institutions of Law Diversity: Intercultural Communication International Sport Business and Administration Hispanic Literature in Translation Spanish and Spanish-American Culture and Civilization

Note: Any one course may be used to meet only one (1) General Education Requirement in Sections I and II with the exception that the course could also be used to meet a “W” and/or an Integrated Experience “Q” course requirement. Courses numbered 199, 299 or 399 may meet General Education Requirements only if specifically identified as doing so by the Office of the Registrar.

For the B.M.E. Degree
General Education Requirements are the same as for the B.A. and B.S. degrees, with the following exceptions: I,B,3 Foreign language proficiency Passage of the Foreign Language Proficiency Exam or a 102-level Foreign Language course is not required for the bachelor of music education degree as the daily use of foreign language, especially Italian, and the study of music itself as a means of communication is so deeply ingrained into the entire gestalt of the University’s bachelor of music education program so as to meet the learning objectives of this area. II,B,2 Natural sciences One course in the natural sciences is required; the course may include a lab. History The combination of MU 101, MU 202W and MU 203 will meet this requirement.

II,C,1

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For the B.M. in Performance Degree
General Education Requirements are the same as for the BA and BS degrees, with the following exceptions: II,B,2 Natural sciences One course in the natural sciences is required; the course may include a lab. II,C,1 History The combination of MU 101, MU 202W and MU 203 will meet this requirement.

General Course Information
Course Descriptions
Descriptions of the courses in the departmental curricula are detailed on the following pages. Each course is identified by a two-letter discipline code and a three-digit number followed by the course title. The suffix E following a course number indicates an extended course of more than one semester in length. The suffix W following a course number indicates it meets a Writing Across the Curriculum requirement. The suffix Q following a course number indicates it meets the Integrative Experience requirement. The semester hours of credit given for satisfactory completion of the course follows the course description. Some courses are offered more frequently than others. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted in order to determine when the courses are taught.

Identification of General Education Courses
The University of Mount Union has approved a new set of General Education Requirements that apply to all students starting with those entering in the 2000 Fall Semester. These requirements may be found starting at page 42. To further aid students in identifying which courses may meet a General Education Requirement, a code to identify the requirement has been added where appropriate at the end of the course description, e.g., {GenEd. II, D, 2}. The code in the example would mean that the course would meet a “II Contexts for Inquiry,” “D Global and Cultural Perspectives,” “2 A course in cultural studies.”

Extended Courses
An extended course is a course scheduled to require two consecutive semesters to complete. Students must be registered for part of the total E course credit in each of the two semesters. An “IP” (in progress) will be assigned to the transcript at the end of the first semester. At the completion of the course an appropriate single letter grade will be assigned for the entire course, thus replacing the interim IP. Deadlines for special options (dropping the course, conversion to S/U, etc.) are extended until the drop/add period of the second semester in which the course is active.

Service-Learning Courses
Service-learning is a method of teaching and learning that involves using the information and ideas learned in class in community service experiences outside the classroom. Many classes at Mount Union require service-learning projects. Assistance for faculty and students can be provided by the director.

All-University Courses
An institutional commitment across the entire curriculum has led to the establishment of several universal course designations with common descriptions. The following course descriptions have been established for all departments. 199 Special Topics. A course designed to permit the offering of special subjects appropriate to the program of the department. Such offerings will fill special needs of specific students, take advantage of the expertise of a visiting professor, or serve as an initial experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. Lower divisional offerings will be listed as 199. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. 299 Special Topics. A course designed to permit the offering of special subjects appropriate to the program of the department at the sophomore level. Such offerings will fill special needs of specific students, take advantage of the expertise of a visiting professor, or serve as an initial experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. Prerequisite: as established by the department. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. 399 Special Topics. A course designed to permit the offering of special subjects appropriate to the program of the department. Such offerings will fill special needs of specific students, take advantage of the expertise of a visiting professor, or serve as an initial experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. Upper divisional offerings will be listed as 399. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A research/project course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in the major at graduation. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, and approval of the instructor, the department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6 Sem. Hrs. 498 Internships (Internal)*. Students are provided with a significant learning experience outside the classroom setting. Although the program is designed to be fundamentally an educational experience, professionally productive work will constitute an integral part of the internship. Specific arrangements and requirements will vary with the program. A contract will specify the activities with which the student will be involved. Taken under Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade option only. Credit variable, 1-15 Sem. Hrs. 499 Internships (External)*. Through the cooperation of agencies and businesses in the vicinity of the University, students are provided with a significant learning experience outside of the classroom setting. Although the program is designed to be fundamentally an educational experience, professionally productive work will constitute an integral part of the internship. Specific arrangements and requirements will vary with the program. A

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contract will specify the activities with which the student will be involved. The basis of determining the grade for the program will be given in the contract and will include an evaluation by the supervisor at the organization where the internship work is done, an assessment by the internship faculty advisor, and a written report of the internship experience submitted by the student. Prerequisites will vary with the internship. Participation is by petition to the chair of the department. Taken under Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade option only. Credit variable, 1-15 Sem. Hrs. *Note: For internships, a maximum of 15 semester hours of courses numbered 498 or 499 will be counted toward the 120 hours required for graduation. These 15 semester hours can be spread over as many semesters as a department may approve. All majors will consist of a minimum of 24 semester hours of coursework, exclusive of “498” or “499.” All minors will consist of a minimum of 12 semester hours of coursework, exclusive of “498” or “499.” Credit for internship hours will be in addition to these minimum hours for the major and minor. International students must complete the mandatory forms for academic internships (CPT/OPT) through the Office of International Student Affairs.

Programs of Study
Disciplines
Disciplines are identified in abbreviated form by double initials preceding the three-digit course number. The key to this initialing system is as follows: Accounting, AC Adolescence to Young Adult Education, AE African-American Studies, AA American Studies, AS Art, AR Asian Studies, AN Athletic Training, AT Biology, BI Business Administration, BA Chemistry, CH Civil Engineering, CG Classics, CL Communication, CM Computer Science, CS Criminal Justice, CJ Early Childhood Education, CE Economics, EC Education, ED Engineering, EG English, EH English as Second Language, FE Environmental Science, EV Exercise Science, ES Finance, FI Foreign Languages, FL French, FR Geology, GY German, GN Gender Studies, GS Health, HE Health Care Management, HM History, HI Human Resources, HR International Studies, IN Intervention Specialist, EI Japanese, JA Liberal Studies, LS Library Science, LI Management MN Marketing, MK Mathematics/Financial Mathematics, MA Mechanical Engineering, MG Middle Childhood Education, ME Music, MU Philosophy, PL Physical Education, PE Physics, PH Political Science, PS Psychology, PY Public Health, HP Religious Studies, RE ROTC : Air Force, AF and Army, MS Russian, RU Sociology, SO Spanish, SN Sport Business, SB Theatre, TH

Majors, Minors, Concentrations and Courses by Discipline
Accounting
The accounting major is administered by the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. For a detailed description of the department, see page 96.

Requirements for the Major in Accounting
Required Accounting Courses AC 205 AC 206 AC 310 AC 311 AC 455W Elementary Accounting I Elementary Accounting II Intermediate Accounting I Intermediate Accounting II Accounting Issues and Problems (SCE) Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3

Four additional accounting courses including two from: AC 345 Advanced Cost Accounting AC 445 Advanced Accounting AC 450Q Advanced Tax Accounting AC 454 Seminar in Accounting

3 3 3 3

Required Departmental Courses Semester Hours BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options 1 BA 243 Exploring and Evaluating Life Options 1 BA 250 Business Law I 3 Or

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BA 255 BA 343 BA 496 EC 200 EC 201 EC 271 EC 272

Business Law II Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans 1 Applied Strategy Introduction to Microeconomics Introduction to Macroeconomics Quantitative Methods for Business* Business Statistics*

3 2 3 3 3 3

Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EH 240W Business and Technical Writing Total

3 3 53

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272. **A Senior Culminating Experience is required of all students. Students who major in accounting must complete AC 455 Accounting Issues and Problems as their Senior Culminating Experience.

Preparation for Certification in Public Accounting
Requirements for becoming a Certified Public Accountant are set by the various state boards of accountancy. Currently included in Ohio’s requirement are 150 semester hours with appropriate course work in accounting and business-related topics. Accounting areas should include: • Auditing • Financial accounting • Information systems • Management accounting • Professional ethics and responsibilities • Taxation • Business related subject areas should include: • Business ethics • Business organization • Communication skills • Economics • Group and individual behavior • Finance • Legal and social environment of business • Marketing • Quantitative applications Students should see their accounting advisors to select courses meeting the above criteria. The following options are available to meet the current 150-semester hour requirement. Track 1 – Additional Undergraduate Hours The student may take up to 19 semester hours without overload charges during any or all of the traditional eight semesters. Additional hours may also be earned during summer sessions. The student would major in accounting and satisfy the business-oriented course requirements with a minor in business administration and selected additional course work to include the above topics. Track 2 – The 4 + 1 Program Students may participate in our 4 + 1 Program with a traditional bachelor of arts degree in accounting. After completion of an additional year of appropriate coursework at an affiliated university or other university of the student’s choice, the student would be awarded a master’s degree from that institution.

Preparation for Other Accounting Careers
For accounting majors who are not planning on careers in public accountancy, a traditional undergraduate option is available. This track serves as preparation for careers in business, industry, finance and non-profit or governmental areas. Students complete the required courses for the major in accounting with accounting electives in the areas of: Managerial/cost accounting • Auditing • Federal income tax • Governmental and not-for-profit accounting • Additional recommended courses in the business area are BA 100 Introduction to Business, MN 200 Management Principles, MK 220 Marketing Principles, and FI 320 Corporate Finance I. These courses would provide a minor in business administration. Students following this track might also choose a minor or additional course work in information systems or pre-law.

Requirements for the Minor in Accounting
Required Accounting Courses Semester Hours

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AC 205 AC 206 AC 305 AC 310 AC 340

Elementary Accounting I Elementary Accounting II Federal Income Tax Intermediate Accounting I Managerial Cost Accounting

3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 18

Any One from the Following Economics Courses EC 105 Introduction to Economics EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics Total

Requirements for Honors in Accounting
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in accounting are the following: AC 311, AC 330, AC 340, AC 345, AC 445, AC 450Q, AC 454 and AC 494.

Course Descriptions
AC 199 Special Topics in Accounting. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. AC 202 Financial Accounting. This course is intended to introduce basic concepts of accounting with primary emphasis on analyzing financial statements. The student of financial accounting should become familiar with accounting ideas and terminology, should understand what accounting statements mean, should develop an ability to analyze using accounting as a tool and to communicate using accounting as a language. Designed for majors outside the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. Not open to students with credit for both AC 205 and AC 206. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. Note: It is recommended that student schedule FI 310 Introduction to Finance or FI 320 Corporate Finance I in the semester directly following the completion of AC 202. AC 205 Elementary Accounting I. Introductory accounting including the complete accounting cycle from transaction analysis through preparation of financial statements. Introduction to internal control, and beginning the detailed study of the asset, liability and equity accounts. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 206 Elementary Accounting II. Continuation of introductory accounting including the detailed study of additional asset, liability and equity accounts; proprietorship, partnership and corporation accounting. Prerequisite: AC 205. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 299 Special Topics in Accounting. See All-University 299 course description of page 49. AC 305 Federal Income Tax. A practical and theoretical introduction to the study of federal taxes on income with emphasis on the preparation of income tax returns for the individual. Topics covered include the concept of income as it relates to taxation, capital gains and losses, basis for determining gains or losses, sales and exchanges, deductible expenses, tax credits and special situations. Prerequisite: AC 205. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 310 Intermediate Accounting I. The theoretical foundations of accounting; intensive study of concepts and applications in accounting for cash, investments, receivables, inventories, operational and intangible assets and liabilities. Prerequisites: AC 205 and AC 206 with a B average or better or consent of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 311 Intermediate Accounting II. A continuation of intermediate including intensive study of debt securities, corporate equity accounts, pensions, leases, income taxes, cash flows and accounting changes. Prerequisite: AC 310. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 330 Auditing. A study of audit objectives, principles, standards and procedures for conducting an examination of the financial statements and related accounting records of a business enterprise. Attention is given to current pronouncements of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants issued through its Senior Technical Committee, Standards of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and SEC releases. Prerequisites: AC 311. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 340 Managerial Cost Accounting. Cost behavior analysis; budgeting; cost volume-profit analysis; standard costs for control and product costing; alternative product costing methods; variance analysis; systems choice. Prerequisite: AC 205. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 345 Advanced Cost Accounting. Relevant cost and special decisions; process costing; cost allocation and responsibility accounting; capital budgeting; decentralization, transfer pricing and performance measurement; inventory planning, costing and control. Prerequisite: AC 340. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 399 Special Topics in Accounting. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. AC 400 Independent Study – Accounting. Independent investigation of a problem or problems in accounting. Prerequisite: Open to advanced students in accounting. A prospectus must be submitted for approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 445 Advanced Accounting. Contemporary accounting theory and practice for branches, business combinations, consolidations and international accounting with emphasis on ethical issues in accounting. Prerequisite: AC 311. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 450Q Advanced Tax Accounting. Consideration of the major complexities of tax accounting methods for passive activities, tax credits, business expenses and property transactions. An introduction to the tax concerns for partnerships and corporations. Use of current tax reporting services and other reference materials and tax research on selected cases. Prerequisites: AC 305, AC 311. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B} AC 454 Seminar in Accounting. A series of in-depth studies of various topics in accounting. The seminar may be repeated if different topics are covered. Typical topics are accounting for governmental and non-profit organizations and international accounting. Note: Not all topics available will be offered every year. Prerequisites: Open to all junior or senior accounting majors or others with permission of the instructor. Certain seminars may have special prerequisites; for this information, refer to the department’s yearly listing of seminars offered. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 455 Accounting Issues and Problems. The study of current and relevant developments in accounting theory and practice including authoritative pronouncements of the various accounting standards boards. Students will present papers throughout the semester orally and in writing on relevant issues. A major project also will be included in which the students will form a hypothetical business starting with the proprietorship form and progressing through a partnership and corporation. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals with a

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major in accounting. Prerequisite: AC 311 and senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. AC 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. AC 499 Internship in Accounting. An experience-based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

African-American Studies
This interdisciplinary minor, drawn from the humanities and social sciences, offers a means of gaining an appreciation and understanding of the African-American heritage. Students are offered an opportunity to study the contributions and the impact of the African-American experience on American life. Through this sequence of study, students will be challenged to discover the rich multicultural nature of America.

Requirements for the Minor in African-American Studies
A minimum of 18 semester hours must be taken from the offerings in African-American studies. Required Courses Semester Hours LS 106 Race, Culture and American Society 3 AA 206W Introduction to African-American Studies 3 Four additional courses from among the following list 12 Total 18

A student majoring in American Studies may not minor in African-American Studies. Note: The director of the program reserves the right to allow courses to count toward African-American studies, as appropriate, that are not listed herein.

Courses in the African-American Studies Program
African-American Studies Semester Hours AA 199 Special Topics 3 AA 206W Introduction to African-American Studies 3 AA 226Q Black Diaspora Culture 3 AA 228 Pivotal African-American Figures 3 AA 246Q Imagining Slavery 3 AA 260 Rap and the Rhetoric of the Hip-Hop Generation 3 AA 299 Special Topics 3 AA 306 Pan-Africanism 3 AA 399 Special Topics 3 AA 400 Independent Study Variable 1-3 Communication CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 382Q Diversity: African-Americans and Rhetoric CM 384Q Diversity: Intercultural Communications English EH 250 EH 440 History HI 225 HI 230Q HI 275 HI 290Q HI 336 Liberal Studies LS 106 Music MU 352W Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3 3

African-American Literature Topics in African-American Literature

History of Africa Problems of Developing Nations African-American History History of Civil Rights Movement in the US History of Southern Africa

Race, Culture and American Society

World Music

Political Science PS 305 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties Religion RE 220 RE 265

African-American Religious Traditions Islam: An Introduction

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Sociology SO 330 SO 384Q

Minority Group Relations Diversity: Intercultural Communication

Semester Hours 3 3

Course Descriptions
AA 199 Special Topics in African-American Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. AA 206W Introduction to African-American Studies. A broad introduction to the interdisciplinary field of African-American studies. This course will be organized around six units of inquiry, each of which will address a different disciplinary approach, using a variety of texts, including literature. Particular attention to the critical debates emerging over time from these disciplines will serve as a framework for examining this field. Prerequisite: LS 106 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2} AA 226Q Black Diaspora Culture. An introduction to the issues relative to Black culture as a distinct, living phenomenon emerging out of the Pan-African or diasporic experiences of people of African descent, grounded in and driven by “the folk” and folk experience. Students will be introduced to traditional Western categories of “high v. low art,” “art v. craft,” and the ways in which African peoples brought their cultures and cultural practices across the Atlantic to recreate them in the New World within a variety of regional environments. The course attempts to answer the question: “What kinds of cultural practices developed and continue to develop out of that African-in-design, American-in-origin, transatlantic experience?” through consideration of visible “high” culture – painting, sculpture, music – and invisible “low” or “folk” or “popular” culture—quilting, cooking, hair. Prerequisites: LS 106 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 3; II, D, 2 or III,B.} AA 228 Pivotal African-American Figures. The course will examine the life and times of important African-American figures. This will include, but is not limited to, individuals in religion, science, politics, history, medicine, literature, athletics, business, drama, theatre, television, entertainment, law, art, music, dance and social activism. The purpose of the course is to engage the material to elucidate many contributions to the above areas made by African-Americans. The course will study anywhere from one to three individuals at a time. The course will use primary and secondary sources including books, published memoirs, letters, various recordings (visual and audio), pictures and Internet sources. Prerequisites: LS 106, AA 206W, RE 220 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2.} AA 246Q Imagining Slavery. An interdisciplinary introduction to the “peculiar institution” of slavery in the Americas and its consequences for contemporary American identity(ies) and culture(s). We will explore the “singular landscape” which results from life in the Americas – “nation(s) of people who decided that their world view would combine agendas for individual freedom and mechanisms for devastating racial oppression.” Students will engage with imaginative representations of slavery and its consequences for both enslaved Africans and African-Americans and those who enslaved them including, but not limited to, 18th and 19th century memoirs and histories, escaped slave narratives and neo-slave narratives, poetry and prose as well as contemporary poetry, fiction, film and history. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2; III,B} AA 260 Rap and the Rhetoric of the Hip-Hop Generation. This course is a critical study of the impact of hip-hop culture and the influence of the messages of hip–hop music on American popular culture, political and social activism and commercialism. This course is designed to introduce students to the history of hip-hop culture and music and to analyze and critique the messages disseminated through the various forms of hip-hop music lyrics and music videos. 3 Sem. Hrs. AA 299 Special Topics in African-American Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. AA 306 Pan-Africanism. Pan-Africanism is a worldwide movement by people of African descent to have an impact on the development of Africa and on those places where people of African descent live. The course will focus on the development of pan-Africanism as a socio-political movement. The course will also examine several individuals who have made valuable contributions to the lives of the people of African descent. Prerequisites: LS 106, any AA course or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1 or II,D,2} AA 399 Special Topics in African-American Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. AA 400 Independent Study. A study of selected topics in African-American studies on an individual basis. Emphasis on independent inquiry and on proper form and style for reporting results. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Credit variable, 1-3 Sem. Hrs.

American Studies
The goal of the American studies major and minor is to give the student an appreciation of our civilization as a vital culture with its own traditions, customs, values, ideals, ethics and myths and an understanding of its relationship to other civilizations. As an interdepartmental major, American studies is designed to encourage the student to combine the basic methods and perspectives of several traditional scholarly disciplines so as not to isolate the American experience but rather to demonstrate its rich heritage. The program is not designed to supplant normal departmental work but to supplement it. The philosophy under-girding the concept of the major is that a liberally educated person must be able to comprehend his/her own heritage with discernment and understanding. (Students who plan to become teachers may find an American studies major or minor of particular use.)

Requirements for the Major in American Studies
The student majoring in American studies must submit a written proposal for participation in the program. Each student will design a coherent sequence of courses that will help the student explore in depth a topic related to the American experience. The proposal must be approved by the American Studies Board. The approved program may be modified with the director’s approval. Required Courses Semester Hours AS 200 Special Topics in American Culture and Society 3 AS 400 Seminar in American Studies 3 At least 12 hours from the offerings of a single department 12 (At least three semester hours must be at 300 level or above) Six additional courses approved for the AS curriculum 18

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from at least two different departments (At least six semester hours must be at 300 level or above) Total 36

A student majoring in American studies may not minor in African-American studies.

Requirements for the Minor in American Studies
The minor shall consist of at least 18 semester hours which must include AS 200. The other 15 semester hours may not include more than nine semester hours from the offerings of a single department. At least two courses taken for the minor must be at the 300 level or above.

Courses in the American Studies Program
African-American Studies Semester Hours AA 206W Introduction to African-American Studies 3 AA 228 Pivotal African-American Figures 3 AA 246 Imagining Slavery 3 AA 260 Rap and the Rhetoric of the Hip-Hop Generation 3 Art AR 300 Communication CM 103 CM 130 CM 265 CM 278Q CM 381 CM 382Q CM 435 History of American Art Semester Hours 3

Semester Hours Introduction to Film Theory 3 Survey of the Mass Media 3 Persuasion and Social Movements 3 Minorities, Women and the Media 3 The American Indian and the Rhetoric of Liberation 3 African-American Rhetoric 3 Media Law and Policy 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Criminal Justice CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 410 Advanced Criminal Justice Seminar Economics EC 105 EC 200 EC 201 EC 310 EC 315 EC 330 EC 450 English EH 250 EH 255Q EH 257 EH 270 EH 352 EH 356 EH 371 EH 372 EH 373 EH 440 History HI 210 HI 295 HI 315 Liberal Studies LS 106 LS 320QW Music MU 250W Philosophy PL 250

Introduction to Economics Introduction to Microeconomics Introduction to Macroeconomics Health Economics Money and Banking Economics of Gender Seminar in Labor

African-American Literature Native American Literature Canadian Literature American Regional Literatures American Postmodernism Autobiography Early American Literature 19th Century American Literature 20th Century American Literature Topics in African-American Literature

Semester Hours Colonial and 19th Century America 3 The Progressive Movement in 20th Century America 3 United States Since 1945 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3

Race, Culture and American Society Vernacular Music and the Vietnam Conflict

Music in America

Philosophers of the 20th Century

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Political Science PS 105 PS 110 PS 270 PS 300Q PS 301 PS 302 PS 303 PS 305 PS 306 PS 310 PS 315 PS 360 Sociology SO 100 SO 130 SO 200 SO 230 SO 240 SO 310 SO 320 SO 330 SO 390

American National Government American State and Local Government American Foreign Policy Introduction to Law and the Legal System Judicial Politics The U.S. Congress Presidency Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties Constitutional Law: Sources of Power The Electoral Process American Political Thought Public Policy

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3

Introduction to Sociology Introduction to Social Services Contemporary Social Issues American Society Courtship and Marriage American Family Sociology of Gender Minority Group Relations Social Organization

Religious Studies RE 215 Native American Religious Traditions RE 220 African-American Religious Traditions

*Note: Seminars and “199/299/399” courses in various disciplines oft en treat topics pertinent to American Studies. Such courses may be taken to satisfy the major if prior director approval is received.

Course Descriptions
AS 199 Special Topics in American Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. AS 200 Special Topics in American Culture and Society. An interdisciplinary approach to the study of culture and society in America. The topics to be covered will be chosen by the professor but might include such topics as Puritanism, jazz and blues aesthetics, gender in America and the American west. The instructor will introduce students to American studies and explore the importance of interdisciplinary study. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II.D.2.} AS 299 AS 399 Special Topics in American Studies. See All-University course description on page 49. Special Topics in American Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

AS 400 Seminar in American Studies. An interdisciplinary seminar on some aspect of American experience. The topic of study will be selected by the instructor. Emphasis is on in-depth research, critical methodology and mature scholarship. A major paper is required. AS 400 is the Senior Culminating Experience for the American studies major. Prerequisite: AS 200, junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. AS 405 Independent Study in American Studies. In consultation with the director, the student will select a topic in American studies to be developed on his/her own initiative with an appropriate faculty member. Emphasis is on in-depth research, critical methodology and mature scholarship. A major paper is required. Should the student wish, such a paper might involve archival work in the University’s Historical Room or at other local archives. Prerequisites: AS 200 or instructor’s permission, junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. AS 494 AS 498 AS 499 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course descriptions on page 49. Internship (Internal). See All-University 498 course descriptions on page 49. Internship (External). See All-University 499 course descriptions on page 49.

Department of Art
The Department of Art is committed to the following goals: 1) To provide a sound technical, theoretical, and historical foundation for the student majoring in art; 2) To provide an environment in which the student can function as an independent, creative individual; 3) To serve the student body of a liberal arts institution. A major in art will provide an excellent basis for further study, leading to a career in fine or applied art or for an advanced degree leading to teaching. The department has initiated a program which meets the requirements for a multiage teaching license. The art major is a two-stage program involving the freshman-sophomore foundation courses and junior-senior advanced study. The foundation courses deal with the fundamental theory and studio skills which provide the broad base from which any artist functions. In the junior-senior advanced studio courses, the student uses the theory and skills learned in the foundation sequence to develop a personal creative approach which can function both as a method of inquiry and as a vocabulary for the communication of humanistic ideas. A thorough general study of the history of art is offered as an important part of the art major.

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Requirements for the Major in Art
Required Foundation Courses AR 105 Basic Drawing AR 110W Design I AR 115 Design II AR 216 Life Drawing AR 220 Sculpture I AR 225 Printmaking I AR 230 Painting I Required Upper-Level Studio Courses AR 316 Advanced Drawing AR 450 Senior Exhibition (SCE) Required Art History Courses AR 200 Art History Survey I AR 205 Art History Survey II AR 210 Art History Survey III Strongly Recommended Courses (but not required) AR 300 American Art Survey AR 400 History of Modern Art Any Advanced Studio Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 36

Candidates seeking a teaching license in Visual Arts must earn a grade of “C” or better in AR 250 and AR 251. If a minimum grade of “C” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C” or better is earned.

Requirements for the Minor in Art
A minor shall consist of 12 semester hours of art courses exclusive of AR 250 and AR 251. Specific course requirements for an art minor are flexible so that the student can structure the minor to his/her specific interests. The minor may be in studio, art history, or a combination of the two. Consult with Department of Art faculty when planning an art minor.

Requirements for Honors in Art
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in art if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in art, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be AR 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration Form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the twelfth week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in art include any 200-level or above course except AR 250 or AR 251. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration Form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about Honors Programs.

Requirements for the Major in Media Computing
An interdisciplinary program of study, the media computing major is administered by the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems. Majors will be well grounded in both art and computing. The principles of digital sound, electronic communication and project management are of importance in this field and by using these principles the students will gain experience in production and management of current media. Required Courses Semester Hours AR 105 Drawing I 3 AR 110W Design I 3 AR 115 Design II 3 CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I 4 CS 223 Programming and Problem Solving for Media Comp 4 MU 315 Digital Sound 3 AR/CS 326Q Media Computing I 3 AR/CS 327 Advanced Media Computing 3 AR/CS 427 Advanced Media Computing 3 MN 495 Project Management 3 CS 480 Computer Graphics 3 AR/CS 497 Senior Culminating Experience 3 Total 38

Note: Students may combine media computing with an art major or minor by taking additional courses. (See the department chair.)

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Media Computing Minor
There is no minor in media computing at this time.

Course Descriptions
AR 101 Introduction to Art. A general introduction to art for students not majoring in art. Visual elements, characteristics of various media and highlights of the major historical styles are studied in the context of the purposes of art. Except when taken as a “repeat for change of grade,” this class is open only to freshman students. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} AR 105 Basic Drawing. An introduction to the theory and techniques of representational drawing with emphasis on both the technical and expressive aspects of drawing as a means of visual communication. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A, 2.} AR 110W Design I. A study of the fundamentals of two dimensional design. Emphasis is placed on the elements of shape, value, line, movement and texture as they apply to over all visual organization. Prerequisites: Art or media computing majors; art minors with department approval. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 115 Design II. A continuation of the study of two-dimensional design, with emphasis on color organization and spatial systems. Prerequisite: AR 110W. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 124 Hybrid Photography. A course of study with the goal of combining traditional film-based photo equipment and approaches with the substitution of a digital darkroom for the usual “wet” darkroom facility. An understanding of film capture concepts such as shutter and light, correct exposure, aperture, ISO, filters, equivalent exposures, metering, contrast and many other issues will be developed in order to foster the production of better photographs. The photographs will be edited, manipulated and produced using Photoshop. Students are required to have the use of a 35mm single lens reflex camera – with a “standard” 50mm lens – with the means to manually control shutter speed, aperture, focus and ISO. Students who have taken courses in design or who have experience with film capture, the traditional “wet” darkroom and picture taking are welcome. Assessment will be based on mastery of technique and artistic quality of work. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 199 AR 200 AR 205 AR 210 Special Topics in Art. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. Art History Survey I. Art from prehistoric through Gothic era. Cross-listed as CL 250. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} Art History Survey II. Western art from the Renaissance through the present. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} Art History Survey III. A general survey of Asian cultures. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 or II,A,2.}

AR 216 Life Drawing. The study of the human figure as a subject for drawing with considerations of the figure as a structural entity in itself as a problem in composition and as an expressive vehicle. Prerequisites: AR 105 and AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 220 Sculpture I. An introduction to the problems specific to three-dimensional design and expression. The specific media and techniques studied are variable. Prerequisite: AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 225 Printmaking I. An introduction to printmaking as a vehicle for creative expression. Emphasis is placed on relief printing and etching. Prerequisites: AR 105, AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 230 Painting I. An introduction to the elements of composition, structure, and expression in painting. The primary emphasis is on the acrylic medium. Prerequisites: AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 240 Graphic Design I. Employs various design methods used to create and combine symbols, images and/or words to create a visual representation of ideas and messages. A graphic design student may use typography, visual arts and page layout techniques to produce projects that combine art and technology to communicate ideas. Prerequisites: AR 110W and AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 250 Art Materials and Methods. This course includes philosophy, materials and procedures essential to a balanced art program in the schools. Laboratory experience in art activities is provided. Prerequisites: AR 110W and AR 115. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 251 Professional Issues in Art Education. This course includes strategies for the implementation of a balanced art curriculum for schools. It builds upon knowledge and practices from AR 250. Laboratory experiences are provided. Prerequisite: AR 250. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 299 Special Topics in Art. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. AR 300 History of American Art. A history of American art from the colonial period to present, with emphasis on painting and sculpture. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} AR 301 Appreciation of Visual Art. An analytical course oriented to a basic understanding of the visual aspects of art. Composition, color, style and expression are studied from the viewer’s standpoint, so that the student can develop the capacity to understand, interpret and make judgments. Not recommended for freshmen or students having difficulty with extemporaneous writing. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 305 Art Study Travel Seminar. A guided study tour of various European cities (London, Paris, Venice, Rome, Florence, Cairo and Athens were visited in the past). Emphasis is on direct apprehension of the art and architecture of each site in its actual context. Visits to museum collections, cathedrals, palaces, archaeological sites, and other points of concern and interest. The course incorporates a degree of flexibility in order that it may serve a variety of situations involving foreign on-site study. In addition to the tour, seminar attendance (prior to tour), background study, writing projects and research are required. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. {If taken for 3 hours GenEd: II,A,2.} *AR 316/416 Advanced Drawing. Advanced creative work in drawing, the specific content of which is determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisites: AR 105, AR 110W. 3 Sem. Hrs. each. *AR 320/420 Advanced Sculpture. Advanced creative work in sculpture, the specific content of which is determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisite: AR 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. each. *AR 324/424 Advanced Photography. Advanced creative work in photography, the specific control of which is determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisite: AR 124. 3 Sem. Hrs. *AR 325/425 Advanced Printmaking. Advanced creative work in printmaking, the specific content of which is determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisite: AR 225. 3 Sem. Hrs. each.

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AR 326Q Media Computing I. An introduction to the problems specific to electronic design and expression. The specific media, applications and techniques are variable. Prerequisites: AR 105, AR 115, CS 121, and CS 221. Cross-listed as CS 326Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B.} AR 327/427 Advanced Media Computing. Advanced creative work in media computing, the specific content of which is to be determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisite: AR/CS 326Q. Cross-listed as CS 327/427. 3 Sem. Hrs. *AR 330/430 Advanced Painting. Advanced creative work in painting, the specific content of which is determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Prerequisite: AR 230. 3 Sem. Hrs. each. AR 399 AR 400 Special Topics in Art. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. History of Modern Art. A study of the development of modern art from 1850 to present. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.}

AR 450E Senior Exhibition. A studio project which is intended to draw together the thinking and skills of the student from the entire undergraduate career. It is to be a consistent body of creative work suitable for exhibition in the spring semester of the senior year. This is the SCE for art majors. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. AR 497 Media Computing SCE. It is expected that the SCE will be an extra departmental experience under the guidance of someone from art, computer science and information systems, business, communications or music. The minor may play a significant role in the SCE. The main purpose of the course is to give the student an opportunity to work on a single semester-long project, the subject of which is of particular interest to the student. The topic chosen must require the transformation of current knowledge into knowledge about a previously unknown topic or a completely new aspect of such a topic. The student must document the ways in which such new learning will occur. In addition it is a studio project which is intended to draw together the thinking and skills of the student from the entire academic career. It is to be a consistent body of creative work suitable for exhibition in the spring semester of the senior year. Prerequisites: MU 315, AR 327, AR 427, CS 480 and senior standing. Cross-listed as CS 497. 3 Sem. Hrs. AR 499 Internship in Art. Internship is at Butler Institute of American Art in Youngstown or the Canton Museum of Art. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

*Note: The double numbers on the five advanced studio courses listed above indicate that any of them can be taken twice.

Asian Studies
Administered by the Department of History, an interdisciplinary major is offered, the program draws primarily from the humanities, social sciences and the arts. The major is intended for those students who are not attracted to any single discipline in the curriculum and who would prefer an interdisciplinary approach. Students for whom the bachelor of arts degree will be the terminal degree may find the civilizations of the Eastern world a most broadening experience, especially since they concern the two-thirds of mankind that currently comprises the world of the developing nations. The philosophy behind the major is that liberal education requires knowledge of the entire world and not merely of the Western tradition. Such a program is intended, also, to deepen the understanding of our own culture by showing where we stand in relation to other cultures.

Requirements for the Major in Asian Studies
Required Courses HI 110 Asian Civilizations HI 401 Seminar in Asian History Nine additional courses from those approved for the Asian studies program Total Semester Hours 3 3 27

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Requirements for the Minor in Asian Studies
Required Courses HI 110 Asian Civilization Five additional courses from those approved for the Asian studies program Total Semester Hours 3 15

18

Courses in the Asian Studies Program
Art AR 210 History HI 110 HI 215 HI 225 HI 230Q HI 260 HI 265 HI 336 HI 360 HI 363 HI 364 Art History Survey III Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Asian Civilization The Middle East History of Africa Problems of Developing Nations Women in East Asia East Asia to 1800 History of Southern Africa Modern China Contemporary China China’s Partners in the 20th Century

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HI 365 HI 370 HI 380 HI 401 Music MU 352W

Southeast Asia Modern Japan South Asia Seminar in Asian History

3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 3

World Music

Political Science PS 346 Comparative Politics (Asia) Religious Studies RE 260 Religions of the World

Course Descriptions
AN 199 AN 299 AN 399 AN 494 AN 498 AN 499 Special Topics in Asian Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. Special Topics in Asian Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. Special Topics in Asian Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Internships (Internal). See All-University 498 course description on page 49. Internships (External). See All-University 499 course description on page 49.

Astronomy
Mount Union offers a major in physics with a concentration in astronomy. See page 161 for more information.

Athletic Training
The athletic training major is a part of the Department of Human Performance and Sport Business. For a complete description of the department, see page 136. Mount Union has developed the athletic training major to prepare qualified students for careers as certified athletic trainers. Since 1987, the major has met National Athletic Trainer’s Association (NATA) standards as an Approved Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program, and effective November 1998, it has been accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). Effective July 2006, the Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP)has been fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). The Accredited Athletic Training Education Program (ATEP)qualifies students to challenge the Board of Certification (BOC) examination for athletic trainers as well as the state examination for licensure as an athletic trainer in Ohio upon graduation. Students selected into the athletic training major (see Selective Admission) learn and serve under the direct supervision of the Mount Union Medical Director and Approved Clinical Instructors (ACIs) in the prevention, diagnosis, immediate care and rehabilitation of athletic related injuries and illnesses. A graduate with an athletic training major, having successfully completed the BOC examination, may pursue employment as an athletic trainer in professional sports, colleges and universities, high schools, sports medicine centers, as an orthopaedic physician extender, industrial settings, rodeo, NASCAR, PGA, military, private health/physical fitness clubs and/or the marketing and business aspects of the profession. The major can also be utilized as preparation for post-graduate study in athletic training, physical therapy, physician’s assistant, nursing, podiatry, emergency medical technician, exercise physiology, kinesiology/biomechanics, sport psychology and nutrition. Students in the major are strongly urged to obtain a teaching license in one or more secondary education areas.

Requirements for the Major in Athletic Training
Required Athletic Training Courses AT 115 Foundations of Athletic Training AT 116 Orthopedic Applications in Athletic Training AT 216 Injury Recognition I: Upper Extremity AT 217 Injury Recognition II: Lower Extremity AT 350 Field Experience: Upper Extremity AT 355 Field Experience: Lower Extremity AT 450 Field Experience: Equipment Intensive AT 455 Field Experience: General Medical AT 316 Medical Seminar for Athletic Trainers AT 280 Therapeutic Modalities AT 291 Therapeutic Rehabilitation I AT 292 Therapeutic Rehabilitation II AT 197 Immediate Care of Athletic Injuries AT 397 Practicum: Therapeutic Applications AT 497 Practicum: Assessment Applications AT 475W Senior Culminating Experience in AT Required Departmental Courses HE 205 Personal Health Semester Hours 3 2 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 1 1 3 Semester Hours 3

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HE 250 HE 317 HE 400 PE 305 ES 233 ES 310 ES 334

Nutrition Science Medical Aspects of Sport Community Health Education Kinesiology Physiology of Human Performance Health Appraisal and Prescription Strength Training and Conditioning

3 3 3 3 4 4 4

Required Courses That Also May Count as General Education Requirements BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology * 4 HE 152 Wellness 2 PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 Elective Courses AT 400 Independent Study AT 499 Internship in Athletic Training AT 230 Field Experience: Apprentice 1 AT 232 Field Experience: Apprentice 2 Total Semester Hours 1-3 3 1 1 69

*BI 210 and 211, Anatomy & Physiology I and II, may substitute for BI 105.

Selective Admission
Entrance into the accredited ATEP is by selective admission. A formal application process shall be initiated at the end of the pre-professional level one year, the year in which the student is a candidate for the athletic training major (typically the first year) and after successful completion of the following prerequisites: A minimum grade of C must be achieved in each of the following courses: • AT 115 Foundations of Athletic Training • AT 116 Orthopedic Applications in Athletic Training • BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology • PE 305 Kinesiology FALL: One week with football and two other different sports (women’s soccer, men’s soccer, volleyball) plus 15 additional hours in the Gorman Athletic Training Facility or within practice or competitions WINTER: One week with two different sports (wrestling, women’s basketball, men’s basketball, indoor track) plus 20 additional hours in the Gorman Athletic Training Facility or within practice or competitions SPRING: One week with two different sports (softball, baseball, outdoor track) plus 20 additional hours in the Gorman Athletic Training Facility or within practice or competitions * Observation of seven sports total. Each level one student should rotate through two upper extremity sports (volleyball, wrestling, softball or baseball) and two lower extremity sports (women’s soccer, men’s soccer, women’s basketball, men’s basketball, indoor track, or outdoor track) during their pre-professional year * Level one students should complete a sport with each of the Approved Clinical Instructors at the University of Mount Union during their level one pre-professional year. * Those participating in collegiate athletics with scheduling conflicts will need to meet with the program director to resolve these conflicts. Additional requirements: • Three supportive letters of recommendation (two must be from off campus professionals) • Written application and resume • Written examination (minimum score: 80 percent) • Oral/practical examination (minimum score: 80 percent) • Cumulative GPA of at least a 2.5 at the time of application • Average ACI evaluation score of at least 80 percent • Formal interview with all Athletic Training Faculty and Staff • Meet all technical standards established for the program and the profession of athletic training. (See AETP Student Handbook for the complete policy on technical standards.) These are minimum requirements for admittance. Competitive selection criteria will be employed if/when there are more qualified candidates than available positions. Each year a maximum of 16 candidates are matriculated into the ATEP. A re-application process is available if a student is unsuccessful on the initial application to the program. It is the policy of the Mount Union ATEP not to discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion, age, color, creed, national or ethnic origin, marital or parental status, or disability in the selection of students into the Athletic Training Education

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Program.

Program Fees
As a part of the matriculation process, all students admitted to the program must: • Complete formal OSHA training (which includes obtaining or declining the hepatitis B vaccination at no charge to the student); • Purchase student liability insurance (approximately $15-30 annually); • Complete the Professional Rescuer CPR/AED certification (approximately $15 annually); • Successfully complete a medical pre-participation examination (cost incurred by student); • Lab fees may be assessed for selected courses (see Mount Union catalogue).

Clinical Education
Four semesters of directly supervised clinical field experience are required for graduation. These field experience courses must be completed under the direct supervision of qualified clinical instructors (ACIs and/or CIs), in an approved clinical setting; they are required and available only for students selected into the CAATE Accredited ATEP. The required field experience courses must be distributed over at least two years, coinciding with AT 350, AT 355, AT 450 and AT 455. Additionally, at least one high school experience will be incorporated into the required field experience rotations as well as exposure to at least one opposite gender sport, varying levels of risk, protective equipment and general medical experiences that address the continuum of care that would prepare a student to function in a variety of settings and meet the domains of practice delineated for a certified athletic trainer in the profession. Athletic training majors are encouraged to obtain field experiences in other allied medical settings, i.e., ambulance riding/observation or athletic/physical therapy settings and medical facilities as part of the overall field experience requirement. Additionally, this curriculum is competency-based. Successful completion (documentation at the “master level”) of ALL educational competencies and clinical proficiencies (CPs) established by the CAATE, enumerated in the Mount Union Clinical Proficiency Verification Manual for Students, is required for BOC eligibility and for graduation. These educational competencies and clinical proficiencies are distributed appropriately throughout the required didactic course work and clinical field experiences.

The Athletic Training Minor
The purpose of this minor is to provide the student with basic knowledge of athletic training. It is designed primarily for those students pursuing other allied medical fields or graduate schools or those in teaching/coaching fields. It is an attractive and marketable combination with exercise science, biology (pre-medicine, pre-allied health), health and/or physical education majors and other education majors. The athletic training minor does not meet Board of Certification (BOC) or Ohio licensure eligibility requirements, and therefore, does not lead toward BOC certification or licensure as an athletic trainer in Ohio or in any other state. Required Courses AT 115 Foundations of Athletic Training AT 116 Orthopaedic Applications in Athletic Training AT 216 Injury Recognition I HE 140 Safety, First Aid and Emergency Care HE 205 Personal Health HE 250 Nutrition Science Total Semester Hours 3 2 4 2 3 3 17

Requirements for Honors in Athletic Training
To receive departmental honors in athletic training, a student must meet all criteria for graduating with honors in a major (for a detailed description of the additional requirements for graduating with honors in a major, see page 37). Additionally, the student must complete an in-depth project in one of the content areas described in the BOC Role Delineation Study for Professional Practice of Athletic Trainers for a total of 18 semester hours and the completion of AT 494.

Course Descriptions
AT 115 Foundations of Athletic Training. An introduction to the multifaceted field of sports medicine, specifically, athletic training; includes the roles and responsibilities of various members of the global sports medicine team, basic components of a comprehensive athletic injury/illness prevention program (including the pre-participation physical examination), physical conditioning, sports nutrition and environmental risk factors. The course also includes introduction to the injury/illness assessment process, including general injury classifications, medical-legal considerations, medical terminology and patient documentation skills. Students seeking admittance into the CAATE accredited athletic training major must take this course. Three class hours per week, should be taken concurrently with BI 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 116 Orthopaedic Applications in Athletic Training. This clinical education course has a workshop-type structure. Its purpose is to provide students with the anatomical basis and the technical aspects of applying clinical proficiencies (skills) relating to orthopaedic applications used by certified athletic trainers in the care and prevention of injuries relating to physically active individuals, including supportive taping, protective wrapping, special pad fabrication and other applications. The class meets for two hours per week (lab fee required). Prerequisite: AT 115. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) AT 197 Immediate Care of Athletic Injuries. A clinical education course to prepare students to demonstrate knowledge of the practice of athletic training, to think critically about the practices involved in athletic training (including the ability to integrate knowledge, skill and behavior) and to assume professional responsibility; the entry-level certified athletic trainer must recognize, assess and treat patients with acute injuries and illnesses and provide appropriate medical referral. This course will include the initial exposure to selected educational competencies and clinical proficiencies focusing on emergency medical procedures (spine-board, splinting, environmental illness, shock, etc.). Ninety minutes per week; a lab fee is required.

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Prerequisite: AT 116; required and available only for matriculated athletic training majors or by permission of the athletic training education program director. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) AT 199 Special Topics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. AT 216 Injury Recognition I. Clinical assessment of injuries and illnesses commonly sustained by the competitive athlete and/or physically active individual(s). Prepares students to recognize clinical signs and symptoms in order to effectively formulate clinical impressions about the nature and severity of injuries/illnesses relating to the face, head (intercranium), cervical spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand for the primary purpose of making an accurate assessment and appropriate medical referrals. The course involves extensive application of anatomy, injury mechanics and an in-depth understanding of injury pathophysiology. Three class hours plus 75 minutes of lab/workshop per week. Prerequisites: AT 115, AT 116, AT 118 and BI 105. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 217 Injury Recognition II. The continuation of AT 216: clinical evaluation of injuries and illnesses commonly sustained by the competitive athlete and/or physically active individual(s). Prepares students to formulate a clinical impression of the nature and severity of injuries/illnesses relating to the thoracic spine, thorax, lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, hip, thigh, knee, ankle and foot for the primary purpose of making an accurate assessment and appropriate medical referrals. Three class hours and 75 minutes of lab/workshop per week. Prerequisite: AT 216. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester AT 230 Field Experience: Apprentice I. This elective course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of athletic injuries/illnesses that may occur in an interscholastic or intercollegiate setting within the context of professionally supervised, hands-on patient care. The course requires attendance at all team practices, home contests and selected supervised travel to away contests for the duration of the regular season. Prerequisite: AT 115 and AT 116. This course is not required, but is an elective available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered every semester) AT 232 Field Experience: Apprentice II. This course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of athletic injuries/illnesses that may occur in an interscholastic or intercollegiate sport. The course requires attendance at all team practices, home contests and selected supervised travel to away contests, for the duration of the regular season, Prerequisite: AT 230. This course is not required, but is an elective available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) AT 280 Therapeutic Modalities. In order to demonstrate knowledge of the practice of athletic training, to think critically about the practices involved in athletic training, including the ability to integrate knowledge, skill and behavior, and to assume professional responsibility, the student will demonstrate the ability to plan, implement, document and evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic modalities in the treatment of injuries and illnesses of their patients. Major emphasis will be placed upon the physiological response of the body to trauma/injury, pain modulation, infrared modalities, electrical stimulation modalities, therapeutic ultrasound, mechanical modalities, massage and other manual treatment techniques. Other areas of focus will include indications, contraindications, safety precautions, set-up and standard operating procedures of contemporary therapeutic modalities commonly used in athletic therapy. Prerequisite: AT 116. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 291 Therapeutic Rehabilitation I. Basic components of a comprehensive rehabilitation program for the upper quadrant are introduced including anatomical, physiological and psychological basis of a rehabilitation prescription, determination of therapeutic goals, objectives and the need for psycho-social intervention and referral. Selection and use of various rehabilitation techniques plus the development of criteria for progression through return to full, active participation in upper extremity intensive activities are also introduced. Selected topics will include range of motion techniques, strengthening, proprioception, aquatic therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises and functional progressions. Should be taken concurrently with AT 216 and AT 280. Prerequisite: AT 116 and PY 110. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 292 Therapeutic Rehabilitation II. A continuation of AT 291 including basic components of a comprehensive rehabilitation program for the spine and lower quadrant, including anatomical, physiological and psychological basis of a rehabilitation prescription, determination of therapeutic goals, objectives and the need for psycho-social intervention and referral. Selection and use of various rehabilitation techniques plus the development of criteria for progression to full active participation in lower extremity intensive activities are also introduced. Selected topics will include range of motion techniques, strengthening, proprioception, aquatic therapy, open and closed kinetic chain exercises and functional progressions. Should be taken concurrently with AT 217GY. Prerequisite: AT 291. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) AT 316 Medical Seminar for Athletic Trainers. This course will explore various medical topics relevant for certified athletic trainers. The student will gain an in-depth physician’s and/or allied medical expert’s perspective on selected orthopaedic and general medical problems related to physically active individuals. Prerequisite: At least junior standing or permission of the athletic training education program director (should be taken concurrently with HE 317). 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semesters) AT 318 Injury Recognition III: Head, Spine and Core. Clinical assessment of injuries and illnesses commonly sustained by the competitive athlete and/or physically active individual(s). Prepares students to recognize clinical signs and symptoms in order to effectively formulate clinical impressions about the nature and severity of injuries/illnesses relating to the face, head (intercranium), cervical spine, thoracic spine, thorax, lumbar spine and abdomen for the primary purpose of making appropriate medical referrals. The course involves extensive application of anatomy and injury mechanics and an in-depth understanding of injury pathophysiology. Prerequisites: AT 216 and AT 217. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 350 Field Experience: Upper Extremity. This course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of upper extremity injuries that may occur in an upper-extremity intensive sport (wrestling, baseball, softball, swimming) within the context of professionally supervised, hands-on patient care. The course requires attendance at all team practices, home contests and selected supervised travel to away contests for the duration of the regular season. Prerequisite: AT 216. Available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered every semester) AT 355 Field Experience: Lower Extremity. This course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of lower extremity injuries that may occur in a lower-extremity intensive sport (soccer, basketball, track) within the context of professionally supervised, hands-on patient care. The course requires attendance at all team practices, home contests and selected supervised travel to away contests for the duration of the regular season. Prerequisite: AT 217. Available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered every semester) AT 397 Athletic Training Practicum: Therapeutic Applications. A clinical education course to prepare the student for competence as an entrylevel certified athletic trainer, in various athletic training clinical skills, focusing on the psychomotor aspects of athletic therapy including therapeutic

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exercise and therapeutic modality applications. Prerequisite: AT 280 and AT 292. Class meets two hours per week. 1 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 399 Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. AT 400 Independent Study (elective). The student, in consultation with the instructor, will select a topic, project or problem for in-depth research. Prerequisite: A 2.8 GPA in major and junior standing. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) AT 450 Field Experience: Equipment Intensive. This course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of any injuries that may occur in an equipment intensive sport (football) within the context of professionally supervised, hands-on patient care. The course requires attendance at all team practices, home contests and selected supervised travel to away contests for the duration of the regular season. Prerequisite: AT 197, AT 350 and AT 355. Available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) AT 455 Field Experience: General Medical. This course is a clinical field experience designed to expose students to real-life situations relating to the evaluation and care of injuries and illnesses that may occur in the general population. Content will include the directed observation of the duties and practice of a licensed physician, physician’s assistant and/or nurse practitioner. The course requires attendance at all pre-arranged office hours for the duration of the medical rotation for a minimum of 50 clock hours. Prerequisite: AT 316 and HE 317. Available only for students officially enrolled in the accredited athletic training major. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) AT 475W Senior Culminating Experience in Athletic Training. This course is a study of the administrative aspects of comprehensive athletic training programs including facility design, management, budget development and inventory control. Research design of a selected athletic training topic will be included. This research project will count as the senior culminating experience for athletic training majors. Other topics involving current issues in athletic training are discussed. This course has been approved as a “writing intensive” course through the Mount Union Writing Across the Curriculum Program. Prerequisite: Open to seniors only, those who have completed or will concurrently complete all other athletic training core courses. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AT 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A research project/course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in the athletic training major at graduation. Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the instructor, the department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6 Sem. Hrs. AT 497 Athletic Training Practicum: Assessment Applications. A clinical education course to prepare the student for competence as an entrylevel certified athletic trainer in various athletic training clinical skills, focusing on the psychomotor aspects of injury/illness assessment, applying a problem-based, integrative approach. Prerequisite: AT 216, AT 217 and AT 218. Class meets 90 minutes per week. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) AT 499 Internship in Sports Medicine/Athletic Training. An elective, off-campus field experience learning and serving in a medical or allied health setting. The student intern will gain a hands-on, professionally supervised clinical experience and a broader perspective of the athletic training/sports medicine field. The course provides practical application of theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom. The experience is provided by the cooperating organization and the University. Prerequisites: at least junior standing. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

Department of Biology
The Department of Biology seeks to provide students with an understanding of life as a process. Within its courses, the department emphasizes concepts which unify and clarify this goal. In addition, an appreciation of our biological relationship to the living world is presented. A flexibility in curriculum choices allows students to prepare for graduate work in the biological sciences or professional work in medical or allied health professions.

Requirements for the Major in Biology
Required Biology Courses BI 140 The Unity of Life BI 141 The Diversity of Life Semester Hours 4 4

The Senior Culminating Experience requirement in biology may be satisfied through successful completion of 4 semester hours in any combination of the following courses: BI 405, BI 410, BI 411, and BI 499. Any One from the Following Cellular and Molecular Biology Courses BI 240W Genetics BI 270 Cell Biology Any One from the Following Organismal Biology Courses BI 210 Anatomy and Physiology I BI 211 Anatomy and Physiology II BI 260 Plant Structure and Function BI 285 Vertebrate Zoology Any One from the Following Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Courses BI 215W Evolutionary Biology BI 220 Ecology BI 280 Biology of Marine Organisms Semester Hours 4 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 Semester Hours 3 4 4

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Required Extra-Departmental Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry Any One from the Following Extra-Departmental Courses MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 141 Calculus I MA 151 Calculus for Biology Any from the Following Courses or Those Listed Previously Totaling 12 Hours (At least eight credit hours must be at the 300-level or higher) BI 190 Introduction to Environmental Science BI 225W Tropical Biology BI 226 Tropical Biology Field Experience BI 230 Conservation Biology BI 250 Field Botany BI 295 Developmental Biology BI 300 Molecular Biology BI 305 Microbiology BI 315 Physiological Ecology BI 321 Aquatic Ecology BI 322 Ecotoxicology BI 325 Environmental Soil Science BI 335 Histology BI 340 Immunology BI 380 Vertebrate Physiology BI 399 Special Topics in Biology BI 405 Research BI 499 Internship Total

Semester Hours 4 Semester Hours 3 4 4 Semester Hours

3 3 1 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 4 1-4 1-4 1-4 42-44

Requirements for a Minor in Biology
Required Biology Courses Semester Hours BI 140 The Unity of Life 4 BI 141 The Diversity of Life 4 10 additional semester hours of BI coursework at the 200 level or above 10 Total 18

Requirements for Honors in Biology
Graduating seniors are awarded honors in biology after earning a 3.5 cumulative grade point average in all biology courses, complete of the SCE (4 semester hours) for honors with a minimum grade of B+ and 12 semester hours in honors courses at the 200 or 300 level.

Requirements for the Major in Medical Technology
The University of Mount Union-Cleveland Clinic 3+1 Medical Technology Program Students in this program spend three years at Mount Union and a final year of clinical training at the Cleveland Clinic School of Medical Technology. Upon successful completion, the bachelor of science degree in medical technology is awarded by Mount Union. Graduates are eligible to sit for certification examinations given by the Board of Registry of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists, the National Credentialing Agency for Laboratory Personnel and/or equivalent certifying agencies. The three years spent at Mount Union provide a basic foundation in science and a broad liberal arts background, completing all General Education Requirements, before the year of professional training at the Cleveland Clinic. Admission to the clinical year requires a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA, a minimum 2.5 chemistry GPA, a minimum 2.5 biology GPA, and a minimum 2.0 mathematics GPA. The prerequisite for clinical courses in medical technology consists of 34 or 35 semester hours of course work in biology, chemistry and mathematics. The major consists of 50 units (equivalent to 32 semester hours) of clinical training at the Cleveland Clinic School of Medical Technology. Specific Mount Union courses required include the following. Required Biology Courses BI 140 The Unity of Life BI 141 The Diversity of Life BI 240W Genetics BI 305 Microbiology BI 340 Immunology Required Extra-Departmental Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry CH 231 Organic Chemistry I CH 232 Organic Chemistry II Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 3 Semester Hours 4 4 4

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Any One from the Following Extra-Departmental Courses MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 141 Calculus I MA 151 Calculus for Biology Strongly Recommended Courses (but not required) CH 370 Biochemistry I CH 371 Biochemistry II Total

Semester Hours 3 4 4 Semester Hours 4 4 34-35

The “clinical year” of training at the Cleveland Clinic School of Medical Technology amounts to 2,000 hours of intense study and laboratory experience, culminating in a comprehensive examination, all parts of which must be passed in order to graduate. Successful completion of the comprehensive exam satisfies the Mount Union requirement for a Senior Culminating Experience. Major Courses taken at the Cleveland Clinic (50 units, equivalent to 32 semester hours) Clinical Microbiology (10 units) Bacteriology: Lectures offer a survey of the medically important bacteria, rickettsias and viruses, the infectious disease process and principles of basic laboratory techniques. Laboratory work emphasizes the isolation, identification and antibiotic susceptibility studies of bacteria and exposes the student to the serological identification of viral infection. Mycobacteriology: Lectures and practical work cover the isolation, identification and clinical significance of mycobacteria. Mycology: Lectures and laboratory work cover the isolation of medically important fungi, their identification and clinical significance. Parasitology: Lectures and laboratory work cover life cycles, diagnostic morphology and pathology of human parasites. Laboratory work emphasizes the detection and microscopic identification of diagnostic forms of parasites and detection of blood in fecal specimens. Clinical Hematology (12 units) Hematology: Lectures cover the production, function and morphology of blood cells, discussion of the diagnostic features of hematologic disorders and the laboratory tests employed in their diagnosis. Laboratory work includes specimen collection, manual and automated enumeration and identification of cells and performance of diagnostic test procedures. Coagulation: Lectures and laboratory work cover the process of hemostasis, hemorrhagic disorders and the principles and performance of laboratory procedures used in diagnosing and monitoring them. Clinical Microscopy (2 units) Body Fluid Analysis: Lectures cover the physiology and clinical importance of examining body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, pleural fluids and semen. Laboratory work includes performance of microscopic, chemical and biological procedures. Also included are principles of staining techniques and use and care of the microscope. Urinalysis: Lectures and laboratory work cover the anatomy and physiology of the kidney in health and disease and the chemical, physical and microscopic examination of urine. Clinical Immunology (8 units) Immunopathology: Lectures cover a review of characteristics of antigens, antibodies and their reactions and the principles of laboratory tests involving antigen-antibody reactions. Discussions of the function and dysfunction of the immune mechanism and the laboratory tests used to measure its integrity are included. Laboratory work enables the student to perform some of the various types of tests available and includes exposure to research techniques. Immunoserology: Lectures offer a survey of infectious diseases for which serological testing is of diagnostic importance. Laboratory work emphasizes fundamental technique in the performance of some of the most commonly used test procedures. Immunohematology: Lectures and laboratory work cover the common blood group systems, serologic procedures performed prior to blood transfusion, transfusion reactions and their investigation, collection and storage of blood and its components and disease conditions for which blood or its components are utilized as treatment. Clinical Chemistry (11 units) Chemical Pathology: Lectures and laboratory work cover the biochemistry and normal and abnormal physiology of various classes of chemicals. A survey of laboratory methods used to measure various classes of chemicals, their interpretation and clinical application is included. Analytical Principles: Lectures cover the principles and use of laboratory instruments and equipment, preparation of reagents and statistics and their application to quality control systems. The laboratory work emphasizes basic analytical techniques (manual and automated) in the performance of a variety of routine and specialized procedures. Special Topics (7 units) Laboratory Management: Lectures, group discussion and self-study material cover the basic principles of management and supervision. In order to demonstrate the practical application of basic principles as they apply to laboratory management, the student is required to complete several projects. Medical Terminology: Knowledge and understanding of medical terminology and jargon is a necessary part of good communication skills. Self instructional textbook assignments, written exams and day to day exposure during lab activities enable the student to develop these skills. Hazards and Safety: Lectures, audio/visual materials and reading assignments cover basic knowledge of various chemical and biological hazards, proper methods of handling and disposing of them, body fluid precautions and laboratory safety. The correct use of appropriate safety equipment and techniques is stressed during daily laboratory assignments. Education of Laboratory Personnel: Lectures and reading assignments cover the preparation of objectives, evaluation methods and some theory of adult education. Projects include teaching a bench skill, preparation and presentation of lecture material and preparation of examination items. Comprehensive Review: The last two weeks of the program are used to review the year’s work and to take the program’s comprehensive examination.

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The exam is graded, and the student must pass all sections in order to complete the program successfully.

Course Descriptions
BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology. This introductory-level course concentrates on the basic structure and function of select organ systems in the human body. The following organ systems will be addressed in this course: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory and digestive. This course is designed for the non-science major and does not satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology or medical technology. Enrollment is limited to students with a major in athletic training, health or physical education. A lab fee is charged for the course. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} Credit will not be given for both BI 105 and BI 210. BI 120 Contemporary Biology. A study of selected topics in the biological sciences with emphasis on contemporary problems confronting modern society. This course is designed for the non-science major and does not satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology or environmental biology. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} BI 122 Contemporary Biology with Laboratory. A study of selected topics in the biological sciences with emphasis on contemporary problems confronting modern society. This course is designed for the non-science major and does not satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology or environmental biology. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 125 The Environment: An Interdisciplinary Approach. An introduction to environmental science that emphasizes the interrelationships among natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities. Specific issues will be addressed with the three themes of populations, resources and pollution. This course is designed for the non-science major and does not satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology or medical technology. Credit cannot be received for both this course and BI/EV 190. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 127 The Environment: An Interdisciplinary Approach with Laboratory. An introduction to environmental science that emphasizes the interrelationships among natural sciences, social sciences and the humanities. Specific issues will be addressed with the three themes of populations, resources and pollution. This course is designed for the non-science major and does not satisfy requirements for a major or minor in biology or medical technology. Credit cannot be received for both this course and BI/EV 190. Three class hours and one three hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 140 The Unity of Life. This course examines the common denominators of all life including biomolecules, cell structure and function, biological energetics, respiration, photosynthesis and genetics. This class is required of all majors and minors in biology and is a prerequisite for most biology courses. Laboratories will include inquiry-based experiences. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 141 The Diversity of Life. This course examines the “Tree of Life” beginning with its evolutionary foundation followed by an examination of the resulting diversity of life. This class is required for all majors and minors in biology and is a prerequisite for most other biology courses. Laboratories will include inquiry-based experiences. Three class hours and one three-hour lab per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 150 Topics in Environmental Biology. This course will focus on a specific group of organisms with a strong emphasis on their field biology and the natural history of that group. It will emphasize biological properties of the group and the methods used to study those organisms in field situations. The course will generally be offered during summer sessions. 3 Sem. Hrs. If offered with a lab, 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 190 Introduction to Environmental Science. This introductory-level course focuses on the scientific principles that underlie the functioning of the global environment. The course addresses problems related to human society and explores possibilities for alleviating these problems. The course will provide the student with knowledge of how the environment functions and understanding of the issues of scale, complexity and conflict resolution. Cross-listed as EV 190. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 199 Special Topics in Biology. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. BI 210 Anatomy and Physiology I. This course is an integrated study of the structure and function of all organ systems of the human body. An extensive presentation of the anatomy of these systems will be given at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. The functions of these systems will be addressed through the study of each system’s homeostatic mechanisms as well as their response to homeostatic imbalances in the body. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. A lab fee is charged for the course. BI 210 is a prerequisite for BI 211. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} Credit will not be given for both BI 105 and BI 210. BI 211 Anatomy and Physiology II. This course is an integrated study of the structure and function of all organ systems of the human body. An extensive presentation of the anatomy of these systems will be given at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. The functions of these systems will be addressed through the study of each system’s homeostatic mechanisms as well as their response to homeostatic imbalances in the body. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. A lab fee is charged for the course. Prerequisite: BI 210. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} BI 215W Evolutionary Biology. This course introduces the major principles of evolutionary biology, beginning with a brief history of evolutionary thought and working through the fundamental concepts of evolutionary genetics, adaptation and natural selection, the origins of biological diversity and overall patterns of evolutionary change. The methods employed in evolutionary investigations and experiments and the kinds of reasoning by which those methods are used to develop and test hypotheses are emphasized. Prerequisites: BI 140 and BI 141. 3 Sem. Hrs. BI 220 Ecology. An introduction to the ecological factors affecting the distribution and abundance of the major groups of animals and plants. Emphasis is on the local fauna and flora, utilizing frequent field trips. Prerequisites: BI 141. Familiarity with personal computers helpful but not required. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 225W Tropical Biology. A study of tropical organisms and their environment. Emphasis will be on the Neotropics using Costa Rica as a model. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} (typically offered every other spring semester) BI 226 Tropical Biology Field Experience. An intensive, three week study of tropical biology. Students will explore and conduct field studies in major tropical ecosystems in Costa Rica. Prerequisites: BI 225W or consent of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other summer semester in session one) BI 230 Conservation Biology. This course is an introduction to conservation biology, a synthetic discipline within biology that addresses the loss of biological diversity throughout the world. The course is divided into three principal sections, (1) biological diversity: principles, threats and values, (2) practical applications, and (3) the human role and solutions. The course also will present some of the currently active research in conservation

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biology. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. BI 240W Genetics. A study of hereditary mechanisms and the experimental methods used in the analysis and manipulation of these mechanisms. Topics include classical transmission genetics, the nature of the gene and microbial and molecular genetics. The laboratory includes experiments in Drosophila genetics, bacterial and phage genetics and molecular genetics. Prerequisite: BI 140 and BI 141 or consent of instructor. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 250 Field Botany. A study of the phylogenetic and evolutionary relationships in non-vascular and vascular plants with an emphasis on the native flora of Ohio. Studies in the field and laboratory investigate the taxonomy, life cycles, anatomy and ecology of selected plant groups. Prerequisites: BI 141. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 260 Plant Structure and Function. This course introduces the breadth of contemporary plant sciences so that students can develop a synthetic understanding of the field. The links between genes, plant structure and development and plant physiology will be demonstrated as well as how these factors interact in the environment. Prerequisites: BI 140 and BI 141. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 270 Cell Biology. Modern cell biology is a unifying discipline that combines genetics, biochemistry and molecular biology with traditional morphological descriptions to study how cells function at the molecular level. This course will introduce students to the dynamic relationship between the structure of cellular organelles and the numerous biochemical reactions that are necessary for cell growth and survival with an emphasis on eukaryotic cells. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BI 140. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 280 Biology of Marine Organisms. A study of selected groups of marine organisms. Emphasis is placed on ecological, reproductive and physiological adaptations to the marine environment. Where appropriate, biological and societal factors concerning the economic importance of marine organisms are included. Participation in an extended field trip either during or after completion of the campus portion of the course is required. A fee is charged for the field trip. Prerequisite: Bi 140 and BI 141. Two three to four-hour classes per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 285 Vertebrate Zoology. This course is an introduction to the biology of vertebrates. It will specifically focus on the evolution of vertebrates and the physiology, anatomy, behavior and ecology associated with each vertebrate class. Three class hours and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisite BI 140 and BI 141. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 295 Developmental Biology. This course is an analysis of developmental processes that lead to the construction of an entire organism from a single cell. Study begins with gametogenesis, fertilization, and early developmental processes including cleavage, gastrulation, and axis specification. Later embryonic development will also be covered including the formation of tissues, organs, and limbs. Additional topics may include sex determination, environmental influence on development, and evo-devo. Prerequisites: BI 140 and BI 141. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 299 Special Topics in Biology. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. BI 300 Molecular Biology. A study of eukaryotic cell communication and response on a molecular level through the use of cell structures, chemical signals and gene expression. Emphasis will be placed on modern molecular science techniques and research, as well as disease models. Three class hours and one three-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: BI 140 and BI 270. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 305 Microbiology. An introduction to bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites of economic or pathogenic importance to humans. Microbial ecology, water and soil microbiology, industrial microbiology and medical microbiology are all briefly addressed in this course, providing a general overview of many aspects of the microbial world. Prerequisites: BI 140 and CH 111W. Three class hours and two one-and-a-half hour laboratories per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 315 Physiological Ecology. An examination of how the structure and function of organisms allow them to exploit their specific environment and/or ecological niche. The course focuses on a variety of ecosystems, assesses the environmental stresses inherent in each, and looks at the physiological adaptations that selected organisms have evolved which allow them to be successful in that environment. Syntheses of many biological disciplines, problem solving and experimental procedures/interpretations are involved. Three hours of lecture/discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BI 140 and BI 141. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 321W Aquatic Ecology. A study of the ecology of freshwater ecosystems. Energetics, chemistry, movements of nutrients, and plankton and littoral communities will be presented with particular attention to north temperate ecosystems. Laboratories will emphasize field work. Prerequisites: BI 141 or consent of instructor. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 322 Ecotoxicology. A study of toxic effects of chemicals upon components of ecosystems. The course will begin by examining how human activities have provided pathways for pollutants into the environment. Students will then learn how those pollutants affect biochemical and physiological processes of organisms and thus may alter functions of ecosystem components. Prerequisites: BI 141 or consent of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 325 Environmental Soil Science. An examination of soil characteristics and processes including chemistry, physics, biology and management with an emphasis on environmental and ecological issues. Students will learn to characterize soils and their properties. Three hours of lecture/discussion and one three-hour laboratory per week. Taught in alternate years. Prerequisite: BI 141 and CH 111W or permission of the instructor. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 335 Histology. A study of the microanatomy of tissues and organs. An emphasis is placed on structural/functional relationships. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BI 210 and BI 211 or equivalent. 4 Sem. Hrs. BI 340 Immunology. A study of the immune response mechanisms in man including innate, cell-mediated and humoral immunity. Hypersensitivities, autoimmune diseases and organ transplantation will also be discussed. Prerequisites: BI 140 and CH 111W. Three class hours. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 360 Sem. Hrs. Independent Study. An in-depth exploration of student-selected subject matter. Registration requires consent of the instructor. 1-3

BI 380 Vertebrate Physiology. A study of the functions of vertebrate tissues and organs and how these functions interact to maintain homeostasis. Prerequisites: BI 140 and BI 141, BI 210 and BI 211 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) BI 399 Special Topics in Biology. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

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BI 405 Research. This course involves the experimental investigation of a problem in biology under the supervision of a biology faculty member. Registration requires junior standing and consent of the instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. BI 410 Seminar I. Discussion and critical evaluations of selected topics in biology. Students present seminars on current biological research and perform an extensive review of the primary literature on a specific research problem. Prerequisite: junior standing. Two one-hour meetings per week. 2 Sem. Hrs. (offered every semester) BI 411 Seminar II. In addition to seminar presentations, each student prepares a detailed research proposal on a current problem in the biological sciences. Prerequisites: BI 410 and junior standing. Two one-hour meetings per week. 2 Sem. Hrs. (offered every semester) BI 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. BI 498 Internship in Environmental Education (Internal). Students will gain experience in developing, implementing and evaluating environmental and outdoor education programs. Work will be done through the University’s John T. Huston-Dr. John D. Brumbaugh Nature Center but may involve outreach activities to other agencies or groups in the area. Students will be required to participate in at least one state or regional meeting of environmental educators. The internship is designed for students who intend to be educators or who plan to work in the general area of outdoor education. Specific activities will be specified in a contract between the student and instructor. S/U grade option only. Prerequisite: Open only to juniors and seniors who are majoring or minoring in education, biology or environmental biology. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. BI 499 Internship in Biology. An experience based course designed for juniors and seniors. Students are placed in appropriate laboratories of agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with a work or research experience. The exact location, program and method of evaluation are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the faculty sponsor, and the host internship supervisor. Registration by arrangement with the faculty sponsor and departmental chairperson. Specific restrictions may apply. 1-3 Sem. Hrs.

Business Administration
Majors in Finance, Health Care Management, Human Resources Management, Management, and Marketing are administered by the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. For a detailed description of the department, see page 96.

Requirements for the Major in Finance
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans EH 240W Business and Technical Writing BA 496 Applied Strategy FI 321 Corporate Finance II FI 325 Risk Management & Insurance FI 455 Investment Principles FI 460 Financial Institutions Management FI 465 Finance Capstone Experience (SCE) Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 3 3

Any one from the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship 1 and/or Community Development BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Any one from the following courses FI 473 Derivatives FI 499 Internship-Finance HM 380 Health Care Finance EC 315 Money and Banking Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 60

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in Finance
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in finance are

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the following: FI 321, FI 325, FI 460, FI 473, HM 380 and EC 315.

Requirements for the Major in Health Care Management
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans EH 240W Business and Technical Writing BA 496 Applied Strategy HM 365 Health Policy Analysis HM 380 Health Care Finance HM 390 Health Care Management EC 310 Health Care Economics HM 410 Healthcare Practicum (SCE) Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 3 3

Any one from the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship 1 and/or Community Development BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Any one from the following courses HP 101 Introduction to Public Health HE 400 Community Health Education HP 200 Epidemiology ES 340 Corporate and Worksite Wellness SO260 Social Gerontology FI 325 Risk Management and Insurance HM 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 60

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in Health Care Management
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in health care management are the following: HM 380, HE 400, EC 310, FI 325, SO 260 and ES 340.

Requirements for the Major in Human Resources Management
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3

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BA 343 EH 240W BA 496 HR 395 HR 456 EC 450 SO 390 HR 491W

Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans Business and Technical Writing Applied Strategy Compensation & Staffing Human Resource Management Seminar in Labor Sociology of Organizations Seminar in Leadership (SCE)

1 3 2 3 3 3 3 3

Any one from the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship 1 and/or Community Development BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Any one from the following courses BA 250 Business Law I CM 225 Organizational Communication CM 326 Business and Professional Presentations CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation CM 384Q Intercultural Communication HR 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 60

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in Human Resource Management
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in human resource management are the following: HR 395, HR 456, HR 491W, SOC 390 and one of the following: CM 225, CM 326, CM 329 or CM 384Q.

Requirements for the Major in Management
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans EH 240W Business and Technical Writing BA 496 Applied Strategy MN 341 Production Management HR 456 Human Resource Management MN 425W Planning Policy and Control (SCE) Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3

Any one from the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship 1 and/or Community Development BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Any three from the following courses EC 450 Seminar in Labor BA 335 Business Ethics BA 250 Business Law I or BA 255 Business Law II MN 338 Management of Information and Technology Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3

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MN 435 MN 451 MN 481 HR 491 MN 495 MN 499 Total

Decision Making Strategies Seminar in Management Seminar in Small Business Seminar in Leadership Project Management Internship

3 3 3 3 3 3 60

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in Management
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in manangement are the following: MN 341, MN 338, MN 435, MN 451, MN 481, MN 495, HR 456, HR 491, EC 450 and BA 335.

Requirements for the Major in Marketing
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans EH 240W Business and Technical Writing BA 496 Applied Strategy MK 370 Consumer Behavior MK 371 Integrated Marketing Communications MK 471 Marketing Research MK 474W Marketing Policies & Strategies (SCE) Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 3 3

Any one from the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship 1 and/or Community Development BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Any two from the following courses MK396 Selling and Sales Management MK 397 International Marketing MK 454 Seminar in Marketing- special topics MK 472 Direct and Internet Marketing MK 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 60

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in Marketing
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in marketing are the following: MK 370, MK 371, MK 396 and MK 471.

Requirements for the Minor in Business Administration
Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business MN 200 Management Principles Semester Hours 3 3

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MK 220 EC105 AC 202 FI 310 Total

Marketing Principles Introduction to Economics Financial Accounting Introduction to Finance

3 3 3 3 18

The following courses can also meet the requirements: EC 200 and EC 201 together can replace EC 105. AC 205 and AC 206 together can replace AC 202. FI 320 can replace FI 310. It is recommended that students schedule FI 310 or FI 320 in the semester directly following the completion of their accounting course. The minor in business administration is not available to those who major in international business and economics.

Requirements for the Interdisciplinary Major in International Business and Economics
Any student choosing to obtain a major in international business and economics will not be permitted to dual major in finance, health care management, human resources management, management, marketing, or economics nor to minor in business administration or economics. Required courses BA 100 Introduction to Business BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics MA110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II MN 200 Management Principles MK220 Marketing Principles BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options FI 320 Corporate Finance I BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans EH 240W Business and Technical Writing BA 496 Applied Strategy PS 120 International Politics BA 452W Seminar in International Business (SCE) Any three from the following courses EC 327 International Trade EC 328 International Monetary Economics EC 375 Development Economics EC 380Q Comparative Economic Systems EC 390 Economics of the Asian Pacific Rim Any one from the following courses MK 397 International Marketing FI 398 Multinational Finance Any one from the following courses HI 363 Contemporary China HI 364 China’s Partners in the 20th Century HI 370 Modern Japan HI 380 South Asia HI 385 Modern Russia Total Semester Hours 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 3 2 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 61

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272.

Requirements for Honors in International Business and Economics
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in international business and economics are the following: EC 327, EC 328, EC 330, EC 375QW, EC 380Q, EC 390, MK 397 and FI 398.

Required Language Courses
Students are required to complete 15 hours of coursework taught in the same language other than English. The current offerings from the foreign language department are French, German, Spanish and Japanese. Students who are interested in other languages may transfer credits from other

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universities with advisors’ prior approval. Courses taught in English will not count toward the 15 hours required for the major. Students who graduated from a secondary school located abroad at which the language of instruction was not English have satisfied the foreign language requirement.

Required Study Abroad Program
Students must earn six semester hours of credit while participating in a study abroad program at an accredited university. (International students can fulfill this requirement by completion of six semester hours of credit at Mount Union.) A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for participation in most of Mount Union’s study abroad programs. Certain programs require a minimum of 3.00, and others a 3.33. **Note: A Senior Culminating Experience is required of all students. Students who graduate with a major in international business and economics must complete BA 452W Seminar in International Management as their Senior Culminating Experience.

Course Descriptions
BA 100 Introduction to Business. This course is intended to expose students to the functional areas and environments of business administration. The course includes overviews of accounting, economics, management, finance and marketing, while highlighting such topics as ethics, social responsibility and international issues. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options. This course is intended to generate an enhanced level of self-awareness related to integrating University and life choices. Students will be challenged to identify their personal skills, goals, and objectives and relate them to curricular, cocurricular, and extra-curricular opportunities and possible professional and career alternatives. A review of current economic, professional, and societal trends and opportunities will help students become aware of more diverse future alternatives. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 199 Special Topics in Business Administration. See All-University 199 courses description on page 49. BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience. An experience based course in which students travel to a foreign country for a minimum of one week with an emphasis on the interaction with the people, culture, and institutions. The exact location, program, and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student and the department point of contact. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: A Social Entrepreneurial and/or Community Development Experience. An experience based course in which students engage in activities that allow them to apply their academic knowledge and skills to meet a community need. The exact location, program, and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student and the department point of contact. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: An Applied Professional Bridge Experience. An experience based course in which students are given the opportunity to apply their academic knowledge and skills in a business/corporate environment. There should be interaction with the employees, members of the management group, and customers. The exact location, program, and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student and the department point of contact. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 243 Exploring and Evaluating Life Options. This course is intended to help students reflect upon and refine their professional and personal objectives while gaining vital skills and knowledge that will help them successfully plan for and achieve those objectives upon graduation and throughout their life. Students will engage in activities and personally relevant research designed to expand their knowledge of available opportunities and personal and professional success factors for those opportunities, while continuing to relate them to curricular, cocurricular, and extra-curricular opportunities. They will also develop a better awareness of their personal strengths and weaknesses as they relate to their desired futures and refine or develop plans for pursuing their desired careers or courses of graduate study. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 250 Business Law I. An introductory study of the legal environment associated with managing a business in contemporary American society. Course emphasis will be placed on business-related torts, contracts and the legal implications of employment issues ranging from the hiring process to the termination process.. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 255 Business Law II. A further study of business law with emphasis on topics which include partnerships, corporations, sales, negotiable instruments, insurance and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 280QW Stock Market Psychology. Focus of this course is on the individual investor’s perception of the world and efforts to secure a better or at least equally prosperous future. It is an attempt to bring together empirical findings and relevant and potentially useful theories from financial economics and psychology. It brings together theories from behavioral finance and research results from modern cognitive and social psychology. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B.} BA 299 Special Topics in Business Administration. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. BA 335 Business Ethics. The course is designed to provide students with those concepts and analytical skills that will enable them to utilize general ethical theory in attempting to resolve both personal and professional dilemmas, as well as to reflect on the moral issues facing the larger society. Prerequisite: At least junior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans. This course is intended to help students prepare for and accomplish a successful transition from University to graduate study or a professional career. Students will be challenged to understand various elements of successful pursuit of an ultimate career, including interviewing, career-related communication and professional presence. Workshops and lectures led by subject matter experts will provide important applied techniques and theories. Students will integrate those theories and techniques into their own skill and knowledge. 1 Sem. Hr. BA 399 Special Topics in Business Administration. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. BA 400 Independent Study – Business. Involves the independent investigation of a problem in business administration. Open to advanced students majoring in business administration. A prospectus must be submitted for approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 452W Seminar in International Business. This seminar focuses on the international perspective of business. It broadly outlines how business became international and how countries organize internal economic affairs. It addresses the mounting pressure from foreign companies to increase

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productivity, improve quality and be more creative. To meet existing and future challenges, the various international environments – economic, legal, political, physical, and cultural – will be addressed. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in international business and economics. Prerequisites: MN 200, MK 220, FI 320 and EC 327 or EC 328 or with permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. BA 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. BA 496 Applied Strategy. This course is designed to enable students to work collaboratively to make a wide range of interconnected business decisions. Using a computer business simulation, students will be organized into mixed discipline teams. Each team will be a management group of a simulated company and compete against the other companies. Prerequisites: MN 200, MK 220, FI 320 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. BA 499 Internship in Business Administration. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Finance
FI 310 Introduction to Finance. This course is intended to expose students to the breadth of finance: to provide an understanding of the interrelationships among the three areas of finance: financial management, financial markets and investment; and introduce students to the key tools used by financial managers and investors in analysis and decision making. It will make students aware of the many career opportunities in finance and acquaint them with the vocabulary of finance. Note: A student who successfully completes FI 320 may not subsequently earn credit for FI 310; however, if credit is first earned in FI 310 the student may subsequently take and receive credit for FI 320. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 201 and AC 202 or AC 206. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 320 Corporate Finance I. Principles and problems in financial management of corporations: the study of corporate securities, the management of capital and the analysis of securities. Note: A student who successfully completes FI 320 may not subsequently earn credit for FI 310; however, if credit is first earned in FI 310 the student may subsequently take and receive credit for FI 320. Prerequisites: MN 200 and EC 105 or EC 201, and AC 202 or AC 206 or with permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 321 Corporate Finance II. The study of financial decision making within a business firm. Emphasis on the interrelationships of the various aspects of a firm’s financing decisions will be studied and their impact on the firm’s value analyzed. Prerequisite: FI 320. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 325 Risk Management and Insurance. Addresses concepts of risk, identifying and analyzing loss exposures and techniques for treating loss exposures. Fundamental legal principles related to insurance contracts and the basis of legal liability are covered as well as commercial property, liability and crime insurance. Various personal insurance programs will be reviewed as time permits including life, health, auto, homeowners, employer group plans and social insurance. Prerequisite: EC 272. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 398 Multinational Finance. Provides students with an awareness of the applicability and limitations of business finance theories and practices when applied to the financial management of international business. Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 105 and FI 310 or FI 320. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 399 Special Topics in Finance. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. FI 455W Investment Principles. Designed to enable students to distinguish between various types of investment securities and to acquaint the student with recognized safety tests. A part of the course will be devoted to interpretation of financial statements and ratios and analysis of a security. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in finance. Prerequisites: FI 320 and at least junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 460 Financial Institutions. This course will review the structure of financial institutions in the American economy. Particular attention is given to the asset and liability management of commercial banks, savings and loans, pension and investment funds, insurance companies, credit unions and finance companies. Prerequisite: FI 310 or FI 320 and EC 105 or EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 465 Senior Research in Finance. An extensive research project in finance involving a top down approach to investment analysis will be completed. The analysis will involve the integration of macroeconomic analysis, industry evaluation, and fundamental as well as technical company and competitor analysis to evaluate the timing and investment potential surrounding the equity of a particular company. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of FI 320 and AC 206 and at least Junior Standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. FI 473 Seminar in Derivatives. Designed for advanced undergraduate students in accounting and finance. It is a comprehensive introduction to using the derivative markets for managing risks in commodity and financial markets. It will concentrate on forward and future contracts, options markets, interest rate and forward exchange derivative contracts and advanced topics in pricing derivative securities. Hedging, interest rate risk and foreign exchange risk management techniques will be discussed. Prerequisite: FI 320 and at least junior standing. 3 Sem.Hrs FI 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. FI 499 Internship in Finance. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Health Care Management
HM 365 Health Policy Analysis. This course covers an introduction, a brief history and the present status of health care systems, as well as medical ethics and current problems such as outpatient trends, alternative health care systems and managed care. The course includes a study of the structure and application of medical terminology as used by health care professionals. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HM 380 Health Care Finance. This course attempts to blend the topics of both accounting and finance. It covers those types of financial decisions that health care executives are most likely involved with and provides material that will help students understand the conceptual basis and mechanics of financial analysis and decision making as it pertains to the health care industry sector. Prerequisites: AC 202 or AC 206 and FI 310 or FI 320. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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HM 390 Health Care Management. This course identifies the major issues in the management of health care programs including budgeting, marketing and supervision procedures. Also included are medical record systems, policy and procedural concerns, and reporting requirements unique to the health care industry. Prerequisite: MN 200. 3 Sem Hrs HM 399 Special Topics in Health Care Management. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. HM 410 Health Systems Practicum. Students will be involved with researching a current issue facing the health care industry today with a departmental presentation of the resulting research paper. Course includes training within an appropriate health care facility for actual work experience and observation. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in health systems administration. Prerequisite: HM 390 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HM 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. HM 499 Internship in Health Care Management. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Human Resources Management
HR 395 Compensation and Staffing. The hiring process from recruitment to retention will be the focus of the course. Employee benefits, compensation plans, wage and salary administration as well as government regulations will be discussed. Prerequisite: MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. HR 399 Special Topics in Human Resources Management. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. HR 456 Human Resource Management. This course has been designed to focus on current human resource management issues. Human resource management is the comprehensive set of managerial activities and tasks concerned with developing and maintaining a qualified workforce in ways that contribute to organizational effectiveness. Prerequisite: MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. HR 491W Seminar in Leadership. This seminar is designed to focus on competencies of effective leadership and how leaders influence others through cooperative organizational relationships. How leaders make decisions regarding human resources; current leadership theories, issues and practices; as well as personal attributes associated with effective leadership are examined. Students will be involved in self-diagnostic tools, current literature, and case studies. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in human resource management. 3 Sem. Hrs. HR 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. HR 499 Internship in Human Resources. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Management
MN 200 Management Principles. Introduction to the basic principles, policies and methods employed in the management of business enterprises and not-for-profit organizations. Provides a general understanding of the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling from the viewpoint and needs of the professional manager. An international perspective to business and management will be incorporated in the course. Prerequisite: BA 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 299 Special Topics in Management. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. MN 338 Management of Information and Technology. This course addresses the strategic and tactical roles of technology, information and information systems in modern business organizations. It takes the perspective of managers who must integrate operating strategies from different disciplines. Specific focus will be placed on decisions that modern managers face with respect to the prudent use and management of information and technology in achieving an organization’s objectives. Prerequisites: CS 100 and MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 341 Production/Operations Management. This course describes the conditions through which production operations takes place and the part managers and workers play in performing related activities. Emphasis is on the role of managers as decision makers who continually face alternatives, and the ways in which production/operations decisions must be considered in relation to other functional areas of organizations. Prerequisites: MN 200 and either AC 205 or AC 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 399 Special Topics in Management. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. MN 425W Planning, Policy and Control. Provides an in-depth understanding and application of business strategy, policy and planning, organizational design, organizational objectives and control techniques used in a competitive business environment. A computerized management decision game and case studies are used to integrate the concepts studied. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in management. Prerequisites: MN 200, MK 220, FI 320, and at least junior class standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 435 Decision Making Strategies for the 21st Century. This course is designed to examine decision making strategies used by some of the most successful corporations in the United States. Students will be introduced to the problem solving techniques employed by corporations attempting to exceed customer expectations, envision new products and markets, increase speed and agility, pursue total quality and reshape the organization. Prerequisite: MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 451 Seminar in Management. A series of studies of selected topics in management and human relations. The seminar course can be repeated for credit if different topics are covered. The seminar is open to seniors and juniors with the permission of instructor. Certain seminars may have special prerequisites; for this information, refer to the department’s yearly listing of seminars offered. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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MN 481 Seminar in Small Business. This seminar is designed to focus on the start-up management of small businesses. A strong emphasis will be placed on entrepreneurial opportunities and new venture activities necessary for the successful operating of small business firms. Prerequisites: MN 200, MK 220, FI 320 and at least junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. MN 495 Project Management. This course is designed to introduce students to project management techniques for coordination, implementation and control of complex tasks. The course examines statistical and simulation-based planning tools and applications to real-world projects in the manufacturing and information services industries. Prerequisites: MN 341 or CS 121 (choose one) and MA 123 or MA 125 (choose one). 3 Sem. Hrs. MN 499 Internship in Management. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Marketing
MK 220 Marketing Principles. Introduction to marketing theory and its application. Analysis of marketing functions as they relate to pricing, product decisions, distribution, promotional activity and market research. Prerequisites: BA 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 299 Special Topics in Marketing. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. MK 370 Consumer Behavior. The course focuses on the consumer’s decision making behavior, that is, the specific process through which a consumer passes when he or she considers and evaluates products and/or services for eventual purchase. Also considered are the psychological factors, environmental variables and personal differences that affect consumer behavior. Prerequisite: MK 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 371 Integrated Marketing Communications. The course focuses on the various elements of the promotional mix. Personal selling, promotion, publicity and mass selling (advertising) are each studied in detail. Also considered is the overall role of promotion in the development of a cohesive product or service marketing strategy. The orientation of the course is centered on both theory and application. Prerequisites: MN 200, MK 220 and at least junior class standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 396 Selling and Sales Management. The course examines the disciplines of professional selling and selling management. Prevalent myths are identified and dispelled. The importance of relationship management is emphasized. Prerequisite: MK 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 397 International Marketing. The course examines the theory and application of marketing from a global perspective rather than just from the U.S. points of view. Prerequisite: MK 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 399 Special Topics in Marketing. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. MK 454 Seminar in Marketing. A series of studies of selected topics in marketing. The seminar course can be repeated for credit if different topics are covered. The seminar is open to senior and juniors with the permission of instructor. Certain seminars may have special prerequisites: for this information, refer to the department’s yearly listing of seminars offered. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 471 Marketing Research. The entire marketing research process is studied for the purpose of creating knowledgeable providers and users of marketing research information. A project is included which is designed to demonstrate the role of marketing research as an information-gathering tool and to provide an opportunity to experience the process. Prerequisite: MK 220, MA 123 or EC 272, and either MK 370 or MK 371 and at least junior class standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 472 Direct and Internet Marketing. This is an integrated marketing communications course which focuses on delivering specialized messages to specific audiences using traditional media, as well as the internet and other emerging technologies. Among the topics addressed will be list acquisition, customer database management, direct mail, email marketing, search optimization, and social networking. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 474W Marketing Policies and Strategies. This course is designed as a capstone course in marketing. It will deal with marketing policies and strategies with particular emphasis on managerial decision-making. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in marketing. Prerequisite: MK 471. 3 Sem. Hrs. MK 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. MK 499 Internship in Marketing. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry seeks to contribute to the achievement of the general objectives of the University by providing a wellbalanced program of studies. Courses are offered to satisfy the needs of students with a casual interest in chemistry or biochemistry, those requiring a supporting program to their major, or those desiring a major which provides a strong background of knowledge in the fields of chemistry or biochemistry. Majors are prepared for advanced study in graduate or professional school or for careers in chemistry, biochemistry or secondary education. Instruction in the department places emphasis on the use of modern scientific instruments, a wide range of electronic and print resources in chemistry and the ability of the student to do independent work. The Department is approved by the American Chemical Society and offers a certified degree to those students completing the appropriate course work (see the section below on Certified Degrees).

Requirements for the Major in Chemistry
Required Chemistry Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry CH 214 Inorganic Chemistry I Semester Hours 4 4

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CH 220 CH 231 CH 341 CH 342W CH 370 CH 371 CH 381 CH 382 CH 460 CH 481 CH 482

Analytical Chemistry I Organic Chemistry I Physical Chemistry I Physical Chemistry I Lab Biochemistry I Biochemistry I Lab Chemistry Seminar Chemistry Seminar Senior Culminating Experience Chemistry Seminar Chemistry Seminar

4 4 3 1 3 1 0.5 0.5 3 0.5 0.5 Semester Hours 4 4 3 1 1-4 3 1 3 2 2 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 52

Any from the Following Courses Totaling Seven Hours CH 210 Environmental Chemistry CH 232 Organic Chemistry II CH 343 Physical Chemistry II CH 344 Physical Chemistry II Lab CH 360 Research CH 372 Biochemistry II CH 373 Biochemistry II Lab CH 414 Inorganic Chemistry II CH 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry CH 434 Advanced Spectral Analysis CH 451 Analytical Chemistry II Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II Total

A chemistry major may not major in biochemistry. A Senior Culminating Experience is required of all chemistry majors. This requirement may be met by completion of CH 460 or CH 499 for a minimum of three credits, CH 494 for a minimum of four credits or by certain off-campus research experiences which have been approved in advance.

Requirements for the Minor in Chemistry
Required Courses Semester Hours CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry 4 Three additional CH courses with lab at the 200 level or above 12 Any One from the Following Courses MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 141 Calculus I MA 151 Calculus for Biology Total Semester Hours 3 4 4 19-20

Requirements for Honors in Chemistry
Students desiring honors in chemistry must complete two of the following: CH 232; CH 343 and CH 344; CH 372 and CH 373; CH 414 and CH 451 for honors and CH 494. Additional requirements may be found in the description of the Honors in a Major Program on page 37. Presentation of a paper reporting the honors research at a professional meeting is encouraged.

Requirements for the Major in Biochemistry
Required Chemistry Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry CH 214 Inorganic Chemistry I CH 220 Analytical Chemistry I CH 231 Organic Chemistry I CH 232 Organic Chemistry II CH 370 Biochemistry I CH 371 Biochemistry I Lab CH 372 Biochemistry II CH 373 Biochemistry II Lab CH 381 Chemistry Seminar CH 382 Chemistry Seminar CH 460 Senior Culminating Experience Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 3 1 0.5 0.5 3

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CH 481 CH 482

Chemistry Seminar Chemistry Seminar

0.5 0.5 Semester Hours 4 3 1 3 1 1-4 3 2 2 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 4 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4 64

Any from the Following Courses Totaling Three Hours CH 210 Environmental Chemistry CH 341 Physical Chemistry I CH 342W Physical Chemistry I Lab CH 343 Physical Chemistry II CH 344 Physical Chemistry II Lab CH 360 Research CH 414 Inorganic Chemistry II CH 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry CH 434 Advanced Spectral Analysis CH 451 Analytical Chemistry II Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 140 The Unity of Life BI 270 Cell Biology MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II Any One from the Following Courses BI 240W Genetics BI 300 Molecular Biology BI 305 Microbiology Total

Biochemistry majors may not major or minor in chemistry but may minor in biology.

Certified Degree
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Mount Union is approved by the American Chemical Society (ACS). The Chair of the Department certifies graduates who satisfy the requirements of a specific course of study. Students that have earned a certified degree are recognized as having completed a rigorous curriculum that has integrated chemical concepts with physics, mathematics, biology and appropriate professional skills. In addition, students completing the requirements for certification will have experienced a curriculum that emphasizes the laboratory experience. The course of study for a certified degree for those majoring in chemistry consists of the chemistry major’s requirements listed above plus two additional in-depth course selected from the following: CH 343/344, CH 372/373 CH 414, or CH 451. The course of study for a certified degree for those majoring in Biochemistry

Recommended Curriculum from the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has developed a recommend curriculum for biochemistry majors. A student can complete the recommended ASBMB curriculum by completing a biochemistry major and taking CH 341/342W, BI 240W, BI 300 and BI 305, ( one of the BI courses is already required for the major) and one additional course selected from the following: CH 210, CH 343/344, CH 414, CH 451, MA 241, MA 322, or MA 355. Note that there is no certification with this curriculum.

Course Descriptions
CH 100 Chemistry in Society. A study of the basic principles of chemistry and their application to understanding environmental and societal problems facing man in today’s world and in the future. This course is designed for the student with no background in chemistry. It may be used to fulfill part of the graduation requirement in natural science but is not applicable to the chemistry major or minor or biochemistry major. Designed for non-science majors; no prior knowledge of chemistry is required or assumed. It is recommended that CH 101 be taken concurrently. This course will not count towards a major or minor in chemistry or a major in biochemistry. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} {When taken with CH 101, GenEd: II,B,2 (4 hrs).} CH 101 Chemistry in Society Laboratory. A laboratory course taken concurrently with CH 100. This course will include laboratory investigations of fundamental chemical properties and processes as they apply to class discussions concerning the role of chemistry in understanding problems in the environment and society. The work of this course will be integrated with CH 100, and the same grade will be assigned for both courses. This course will not count towards a major or minor in chemistry or a major in biochemistry. One three-hour laboratory per week. 1 Sem. Hr. CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry. This introductory course begins with an emphasis on the atomic and molecular nature of matter and the stoichiometric relationships of reactions. These fundamental principles will be applied to reactions in aqueous solutions, the ideal gas law, and an introduction to thermochemistry. Special emphasis will be placed on skills necessary to succeed in chemistry including problem solving strategies. This course is intended for students with 0 or 1 year of high school chemistry or as a preparatory course for CH 111W. Three class hours and one three hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.} CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry. This introductory course is a study of atomic structure, intermolecular interactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, and chemical thermodynamics. This course provides a chemical basis needed for the continuing study of chemistry and other natural sciences. Prerequisite: 1 or 2 years of high school chemistry or CH 110W. Three class hours and one three hour lab period. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2.}

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CH 160/CH 260 Independent Study. A course of independent study designed to meet a particular need for specific students. The course may include any combination of seminar, tutorial and laboratory sessions appropriate to the need. Registration for these courses is only by permission of the instructor. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CH 199 Special Topics in Chemistry. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. CH 210 Environmental Chemistry. A study of the chemical reactions controlling the cycling of both natural chemical species and anthropogenic pollutants in the water, soil and air environments of our earth system. The chemical processes operating in the natural environment including acid-base, complexation, redox, photochemical and biotic degradation phenomena are examined. Intermittently throughout the course, the chemistry underlying current issues of water, soil and air pollution, focusing on nutrient, metal and organic contaminants, are studied. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Prerequisite: CH 111W. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 214 Inorganic Chemistry I. A study of the physical and chemical properties of inorganic substances from a consideration of atomic structure, the nature of the chemical bond and the periodic system of the elements. Prerequisite: CH 111W. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 220 Analytical Chemistry I. A study of the principles of chemical equilibrium and their applications to problems of chemical analysis. Includes an introduction to statistics and optical, electrochemical and chromatographic methods of analysis. Prerequisites: CH 111W or permission of instructor. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 231 Organic Chemistry I. A first course in the chemistry of carbon compounds designed for chemistry majors and premedical students. Emphasis is placed on the study of the nature and consequences of covalent bonds as encountered in organic compounds. The major aspects of the chemistry of aliphatic hydrocarbons and saturated functional groups are included. The principles of chirality and both IR and NMR spectroscopy also are studied. The laboratory concentrates on organic microlab techniques including gas chromatography and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CH 111W. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 232 Organic Chemistry II. A continuation of CH 231. This course covers the major aspects of the chemistry of unsaturated functional groups and selected aromatic and heterocyclic compounds. Emphasis is placed on reaction mechanisms. The laboratory is designed to apply the techniques acquired in CH 231 to synthesis, identification and mechanism problems. Prerequisite: CH 231. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 299 Special Topics in Chemistry. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. CH 341 Physical Chemistry I. An examination of the laws of classical thermodynamics associated with energy, entropy and Gibbs energy. Further topics of study include equilibrium, colligative properties, transport properties and chemical kinetics. CH 342W should be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CH 111W, PH 102 and MA 142. 3 Sem Hrs. CH 342W Physical Chemistry Laboratory I. A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CH 341. Experiments involve the determination of a variety of thermodynamic functions studied in CH 341 including heat capacity, enthalpy and equilibrium constants. Additional experiments cover colligative properties, transport properties and chemical kinetics. One three-hour laboratory per week. Corequisite: CH 341. 1 Sem. Hr. CH 343 Physical Chemistry II. A study of electrochemistry, wave mechanics, chemical bonding, molecular spectroscopy, solids, liquids and surfaces. CH 344 should be taken concurrently. Prerequisites: CH 341. 3 Sem. Hrs. CH 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II. A laboratory course to be taken concurrently with CH 343. Experiments involve electrochemical measurements, modern computational techniques, and detailed spectrocopic analysis of selected compounds and materials. One three-hour lab per week. Corequisite: CH 343. 1 Sem. Hr. CH 360 Research. The student will propose and carry out a defined, original research project in the field of chemistry under the supervision of a faculty member. A total of 60 hours of literature and laboratory research is expected for each credit hour taken. A formal written report of the research is due at the end of the semester. The course may be taken for more than one semester. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CH 370 Biochemistry I. To understand what makes living organisms different than their environment, one must investigate their chemical makeup. The structures and properties of the four major classes of biological molecules, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids will be studied. Other topics include enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme action and regulation of enzymes. Prerequisites: CH 232 and BI 140. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. CH 371 Biochemistry I Laboratory. Biochemistry has changed the way we look at biology and chemistry by integrating the two to explain biological principles. In this laboratory students will use a variety of techniques including spectroscopy, chromatography and electrophoresis to learn about the chemistry of the four major classes of biological molecules: proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids. Special emphasis will be placed on the current use of computers in structural biochemistry. Specifically, students will gain experience in protein purification, enzyme kinetics and inhibition and analysis of DNA restriction digests. One three-hour laboratory per week. Corequisite: CH 370. 1 Sem. Hr. CH 372 Biochemistry II. This course builds upon the understanding of the structural chemistry of the four major classes of biomolecules and enzymes. In this course, students will examine various metabolic pathways with special attention to allosteric effects on enzyme regulation, thermodynamics, reaction coupling and integration of the metabolic pathways to meet cellular needs. Additionally, students will study the chemistry of information transfer and molecular biology. Prerequisites: CH 370. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. CH 373 Biochemistry II Laboratory. Building upon the basic principles and techniques introduced in CH 371, this laboratory will focus on the use of molecular biology and biotechnology to perform a cloning experiment. Students will use their knowledge of restriction enzymes to isolate the DNA encoding a protein of interest and insert it into an appropriate expression vector. Competent cells will be transformed and the protein will be expressed. Chromatographic techniques from the previous semester will be employed to isolate and purify the protein of interest. One three-hour laboratory per week. Corequisite: CH 372. 1 Sem. Hr. CH 381/382/481/482 Chemistry Seminar. Library research on a subject of current chemical interest is followed by an oral presentation and discussion. Each student is responsible for giving one seminar in both junior and senior years. In addition, guest speakers from academia and industry will speak to the class. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, respectively. 0.5 Sem. Hrs. each CH 399 Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

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CH 414 Inorganic Chemistry II. A survey of the descriptive chemistry of the elements. In addition, time is devoted to the study of bioinorganic systems, organometallic chemistry and pollution studies. Prerequisites: CH 214 and CH 370. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. CH 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry. Understanding topics in advanced organic chemistry requires knowledge of both synthetic and mechanistic chemistry. Synthetic chemists use reaction methodology to construct target compounds; mechanistic chemists study the detailed mechanisms by which these reactions proceed. Topics in synthetic chemistry include functional group transformations, retrosynthetic analysis and named reactions. Topics in mechanistic organic chemistry include kinetics, general and specific acid/base catalysis, kinetic isotope effects, linear free energy relationships, analysis of reaction coordinates and rearrangements. Prerequisite: CH 232. 2 Sem. Hrs. CH 434 Advanced Spectral Analysis. An advanced course for the characterization of compounds with a focus on IR, UV-vis, NMR and MS analysis. Spectral interpretation will include multi-dimensional NMR and MS fragmentation analysis. Prerequisites: CH 220 and CH 232. Two hours per week of class and instrument time. 2 Sem. Hrs. CH 451 Analytical Chemistry II. A study of the principles and applications of instrumental techniques used for analytical measurements such as spectrophotometry, chromatography, etc. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CH 220. 4 Sem. Hrs. CH 460 Senior Culminating Experience. A course designed to fulfill the University requirements for a Senior Culminating Experience, this course is required of all chemistry and biochemistry majors. This course has as its requirements the completion of a senior research project which will be communicated to the department in a poster and research paper. A total of three credits must be completed in one or both semesters of the senior year. Prerequisites: Chemistry or biochemistry major with senior standing. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. CH 494 CH 499 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Internships in Chemistry. See All-University 499 course description on page 49.

Classics
The classics minor is intended to deepen understanding of the contributions made by Ancient Greece and Rome to the development of history, philosophy and the arts, and indeed to our current culture, by examining the classic literature and art that has long been a major part of formal education. The classics minor and the classics courses are under the direction of the Department of History. Courses in the classics are offered periodically by members of the faculty in the arts and humanities.

Requirements for the Minor in Classics
Any Five from the Following Courses CL 201 Classics I CL 202 Classics II CL 203 Classics III CL 220/PL 220 Ancient Philosophy CL 250/AR 200 Art History Survey I CL 350/HI 350 Ancient Greece and Rome Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

Course Descriptions
CL 199 Special Topics in Classics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. CL 201 Classics I. A survey of Greek civilization as expressed in its mythology, literature, art and philosophy with emphasis on mythology and literature. Homer, Aeschilus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, etc. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} CL 202 Classics II. A survey of Greek and Roman historians, institutions, law, political thought and society. The course will include the early history of Christianity and its impact on the Roman Empire. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} CL 203 Classics III. A survey of Roman civilization as expressed in its mythology, literature, art and philosophy, with emphasis on mythology and literature. Cicero, Virgil, Ovid, Horace, Seneca, Terance, etc. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} CL 220 Ancient Philosophy. This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy with emphasis on the thought of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Other areas of study may include Pre-Socratic philosophy, Hellenistic philosophy (e.g., Stoicism) and classical Roman philosophy. Cross-listed as PL 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 2} CL 250 Art History Survey I. A general survey of the history of art from prehistoric through the Gothic periods. Cross-listed as AR 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} CL 299 Special Topics in Classics. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. CL 350 Ancient Greece and Rome. A survey of the ancient roots of western civilization with emphasis placed on the intellectual and cultural as well as the political development of ancient Greece and Rome from approximately 800 B.C. to 300 A.D. Prerequisite: any 100 or 200-level history course. Cross-listed as HI 350. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1} CL 399 Special Topics in Classics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

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Department of Communication
The goal of the Department of Communication is to help students become effective communicators and critical consumers of messages thus preparing them for life as educated citizens and productive professionals. The Department of Communication seeks to integrate the strengths of the liberal arts tradition with the theoretical foundation and skills necessary for majors to enter communication professions or to continue studies in graduate school. The major is designed to graduate students who are technically proficient as well as knowledgeable and conversant in the theory, history, literature and criticism of the field. The department reinforces a broad perspective on the nature and effects of the communication process rather than a narrow focus on training for a particular career. Such an approach makes students more successful both personally and professionally in this increasingly complex and ever changing world. The Department of Communication offers one 36-semester hour major, one 15-semester hour minor and four 15-semester hour concentrations for non-majors.

Requirements for the Major in Communication
The communication major requires 36 semester hours in the department, and students are encouraged to take 48 semester hours. These hours are divided into a 12-hour core and a 24-hour area of specialization. Required Communication Courses CM 110 Introduction to Communication CM 320W Communication Theories CM 321 Research in Communication CM 490 Senior Culminating Experience Total Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 123 Elementary Statistics or SO 300 Statistics for Social Scientists Any One from the Following Extra-Departmental Courses EH 240W Business and Technical Writing EH 245W Argumentative Writing EH 330 Theories and Practices of Editing Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 12 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3

Area of Specialization Majors must choose at least one of the following areas of specialization: interpersonal/organizational communication, media studies, peace communication or public relations. Students are strongly encouraged to complete two specializations so as to broaden their knowledge base, widen their skill sets and increase their marketability. Majors are allowed to take 48 semester hours in the Department of Communication toward the 120 semester hours needed to graduate. Note: No course can fulfill more than one requirement in the major. Communication course credits must equal a minimum of 36 credit hours. Interpersonal and Organizational Communication This specialization focuses on human interaction in relationships, organizations and society. It explores communication patterns in the family, workplace, social groups and interpersonal relationships. This program of study prepares students to work in a wide variety of fields and for graduate school. Required Communication Courses CM 220 Interpersonal Communication CM 225 Organizational Communication CM 325 Leadership and Team Communication Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 384Q Intercultural Communication Any Four from the Following Communication Courses CM 102 Group Communication CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations CM 326 Business and Professional Speaking CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 1-3 24

Media Studies This specialization focuses on the production and critique of mediated communication including journalism, broadcasting, print media or computer

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mediated communication. This broadly-focused program provides students the skills and knowledge necessary to work in a wide variety of fields and for graduate school. Required Communication Courses CM 130 Survey of Mass Media CM 240 Audio Production and Programming CM 250W Introduction to Journalism Any Two from the Following Communication Courses CM 245 Broadcast News CM 246 Video Production I CM 256 Print Production and Design CM 346 Audio and Video Production II CM 350 Advanced Journalism CM 425 Design for Multimedia Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 483 International Media Systems Any Two from the Following Communication Courses CM 410 Advertising CM 430 Mass Media Criticism CM 435 Media Law and Policy CM 440 Political Communication CM 483 International Media Systems CM 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 1-3 24

Peace Communication This generalist program unites interpersonal, media and public communication studies around the common theme of peace and social justice. Students who choose this concentration develop the skills, knowledge and values necessary for the peace-building process. Specifically, students will learn how to resolve interpersonal, community and global conflicts more effectively. This broad-based program of study prepares students to work in a wide variety of fields and for graduate school. Required Communication Courses CM 260 Peace Communication CM 265 Persuasion and Social Movements CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 440 Political Communication Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 227 Public Advocacy and Argumentation CM 325 Leadership and Team Communication CM 326 Professional and Business Speaking CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation Any Two from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 483 International Media Systems Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 305 Communication Study Travel Seminar CM 400 Independent Research CM 499 Internship Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 1-3 3 1-3 24

Public Relations This specialization focuses on the skills, knowledge and values required of public relations professionals and for graduate school.

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Required Communication Courses CM 130 Survey of Mass Media CM 250W Introduction to Journalism CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations CM 455 Advanced Public Relations Any Two from the Following Communication Courses CM 240 Audio Production and Programming CM 246 Video Production I CM 256 Print Production and Design CM 425 Design for Multimedia Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 483 International Media Systems Any One from the Following Communication Courses (strongly recommend two) CM 225 Organizational Communication CM 265 Persuasion and Social Movements CM 325 Leadership and Team Communication CM 326 Business and Professional Speaking CM 410 Advertising CM 430 Mass Media Criticism CM 435 Media Law and Policy CM 440 Political Communication CM 499 Internship Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1-3 24

Requirements for the Minor in Communication
Required Communication Courses CM 110 Introduction to Communication Four additional CM courses (not including CM 101 and 102), two of which must be at the 300 level or above Total Semester Hours 3

15

Communication Concentrations
The Department of Communication offers four concentrations that are open to students from all majors. Each concentration requires 15 semester hours. (Communication majors will earn a concentration as part of their major.)

Requirements for the Concentration in Interpersonal/Organizational Communication
Required Communication Courses CM 220 Interpersonal Communication CM 225 Organizational Communication CM 325 Leadership and Teams Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 384Q Intercultural Communication Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 102 Group Communication CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations CM 326 Business and Professional Speaking CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 384Q Intercultural Communication Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

Requirements for the Concentration in Media Studies
Required Communication Courses CM 130 Survey of Mass Media Semester Hours 3

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CM 240 CM 250W

Audio Production and Programming Introduction to Journalism

3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 15

Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 483 International Media Systems Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 245 Broadcast News CM 246 Video Production I CM 256 Print Production and Design CM 346 Audio and Video Production II CM 350 Advanced Journalism CM 425 Design for Multimedia Total

Requirements for the Concentration in Peace Communication
Required Communication Courses CM 260 Peace Communication CM 265 Persuasion and Social Movements CM 384Q Intercultural Communication CM 440 Political Communication Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 305 Communication Travel Seminar CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 483 International Media Systems Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 1-3 3 3 3 3 15

Requirements for the Concentration in Public Relations
Required Communication Courses CM 130 Survey of Mass Media CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations CM 256 Print Production and Design CM 455 Advanced Public Relations Any One from the Following Communication Courses CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society CM 381 The American Indian and Rhetoric of Liberation CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric CM 483 International Media Systems Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15

Requirements for Honors in the Department
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in communication if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in communication, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be CM 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the twelfth week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in communication include any 200-level or above course. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit.

Portfolios
The department places heavy emphasis on portfolios for the assessment of student progress. Majors are required to begin a portfolio in their freshman year and add to it throughout their academic careers.

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Course Descriptions
CM 101 Public Speaking. A study of effective extemporaneous speaking emphasizing informative and persuasive public speaking. Special attention is given to the coherent organization of ideas, effective use of language, logical reasoning, argumentation, audience adaptation and critical listening. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,2.} CM 102 Group Communication. An introductory course in the processes and procedures of group decision making. Emphasis is on communication processes and conference leadership within the problem-solving context. Groups define, research, analyze and propose feasible courses of action to problems. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,2.} CM 103 Introduction to Film. An introduction to the fundamentals of film theory and criticism. Students will learn the basic techniques involved in film production and evaluate the impact of film on society. Critical tools that enable the student to analyze and evaluate the film medium will be applied in classroom viewing experiences. Laboratory experience required. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} CM 110 Introduction to Communication. An introductory survey of the concepts, principles and theories that define the study of communication. Attention is given to the history of the discipline, ethics, the process of communication, contexts of communication and research skills fundamental to the study of communication. This course is required for the major and minor in the department and to be completed prior to the end of the second year of study. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 130 Survey of the Mass Media. An introduction into the historical, legal and social backgrounds of contemporary mass communication media including newspapers, radio, television, film, magazines, books and the Internet. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 140 Broadcast Studio Operation. An introduction to the functions, operations and equipment found in the radio studio. FCC Rules and Regulations are emphasized. Required of all students wishing to be on the staff of WRMU. 1 Sem. Hr. CM 199 Special Topics. See All-University course descriptions on page 49. CM 220 Interpersonal Communication. A study of the major approaches, models, theories and research on dyadic and small group communication. Focus will be on topics such as verbal communication, nonverbals, listening, perception, ethics, conflict management and selfdisclosure in personal and professional relationships. Prerequisites: CM 101 or CM 102. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CM 225 Organizational Communication. A review of the development of organizational communication theory and how application of that theory adds to our understanding of organizations as information systems. Topics include information flow, organizational structures, formal and informal networks, organizational cultures and external and internal organizational communication. Prerequisite: CM 101 or CM 102. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CM 227 Public Advocacy and Argumentation. The study of the principles of argumentation, including collection and evaluation of evidence, modes of reasoning, briefing and organizing arguments and the refutation of arguments. Prerequisite: CM 101 or CM102. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester of even-numbered years) CM 240 Audio Production and Programming. An introduction to the principles of writing and producing materials for the broadcast and audio related media. Basic skills necessary for working with audio in various media settings will be stressed. Prerequisites: CM 130 (may be taken concurrently) and CM 140. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 245 Broadcast News Writing and Reporting. An examination of the fundamentals of writing and reporting for the broadcast media. Topics include the newsroom, news selection, news writing, editing, interviewing, press conferences, disaster and on-the-scene reporting and news ethics. Prerequisites: CM 240, CM 250W. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 246 Video Production I. This course will cover the basic principles and techniques employed in video production. Students will be engaged in hands-on experiences with video cameras, lighting, sound and editing technologies. Prerequisites: CM 140, CM 240. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 250W Introduction to Journalism. An introductory course in news gathering and writing for the print media. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations. A course designed to develop public relations skills. Emphasis will be on journalistic style of news releases and informational writing for in-house publications. Prerequisite: CM 250W. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CM 256 Print Production and Design. An examination of the integration of print and design and the concepts, theories and skills needed to convey messages. The course features hands-on experiences in the computer assisted techniques of writing and producing publications. Prerequisite: CM 250W. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CM 260 Peace Communication. Topics include the nature of conflict and peace, the communication strategies used to both create and manage conflict and the messages of the peace movement. Attention will be given to persuasive tactics, language strategies and message development of those voices raised before, during and after times of conflict. Focus will be on social, economic, political, religious and/or human rights conflicts on local, regional, national or international levels. This course examines issues of peace and conflict from a communication perspective utilizing case studies as presented by the Hiroshima Peace Culture Foundation. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 265 Persuasion and Social Movements. A study of persuasion in the initiation and maintenance of social movements for change. Focus will be on one or more of the following movements: peace, abolitionist, labor, African American civil rights, feminist, environmental, gay and lesbian, student, Chicano and/or American Indian. Persuasive strategies used by those advocating change as well as those opposed to change will be considered. Prerequisites: CM 101 or 102. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 270 Photojournalism. This is an introductory course in the basic theories, principles and practices of digital photojournalism. Topics include composing, editing and producing photos for media use. Students learn the fundamentals of visual reporting and the ethical dimensions of photojournalism through this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 275 Sports Journalism. This course is designed to introduce students to sports journalism in the modern era (21st century). This writing intensive course provides a broad overview of the ever-changing sports media field, discusses journalists as public figures, explores the role of the Internet in covering sports and analyzes the 24-hour news cycle and its effects on journalists and the public figures they cover. Cross-listed as SB 275. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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CM 278Q Minorities, Women and the Media. This course in media literacy offers students the opportunity to critically examine the image construction of women and various minorities including but not limited to racial and ethnic minorities. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III, B} (typically offered fall semester of even-numbered years) CM 290 Communication Practicum: Print. Open to majors wishing to pursue an on-campus project in print. Course work involves active participation in a performance-oriented project. Students may count a maximum of four semester hours in any practicum toward graduation requirements. Registration for practicum hours requires completion of an application form. Graded S or U. Prerequisites: CM 110, CM 250W and permission of instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CM 291 Communication Practicum: Audio. Open to majors wishing to pursue an on-campus project in audio production. Course work involves active participation in a performance-oriented project. Students may count a maximum of four semester hours in any practicum toward graduation requirements. Registration for practicum hours requires completion of an application form. Graded S or U. Prerequisites: CM 110, CM 140 and permission of instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CM 292 Communication Practicum: Public Relations. Open to majors wishing to pursue an on-campus project in public relations. Course work involves active participation in a performance-oriented project. Students may count a maximum of four semester hours in any practicum toward graduation requirements. Registration for practicum hours requires completion of an application form. Graded S or U. Prerequisites: CM 110, CM 255 and permission of instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CM 293 Communication Practicum: Video. Open to majors wishing to pursue an on-campus project in video. Course work involves active participation in a performance-oriented project. Students may count a maximum of four semester hours in any practicum toward graduation requirements. Registration for practicum hours requires completion of an application form. Graded S or U. Prerequisites: CM 110, CM 246 and permission of instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CM 294 Communication Practicum: Special Topics. Open to majors wishing to pursue an on-campus project in communication (other than print, audio, public relations or video). Course work involves active participation in a performance-oriented project. Students may count a maximum of four semester hours in any practicum toward graduation requirements. Registration for practicum hours requires completion of an application form. Graded S or U. Prerequisites: CM 110 and permission of instructor. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. CM 305 Communication Study Travel Seminar. A faculty-led trip to various national or international locations for the purpose of studying a topic or event firsthand from a communication perspective. Students will be expected to attend orientation sessions, complete required readings and develop a research proposal before the trip. During the trip, students will keep a journal and collect data for their research project which is to be completed upon return. Seminars may travel to locations such as the Tesuque Pueblo reservation in New Mexico or Hiroshima, Japan. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of instructor. 1 -3 Sem. Hrs. (offered summer only) CM 320W Communication Theories. A thorough examination of classical and contemporary concepts, models and theories of rhetoric, relational communication and mass media. Prerequisites: Junior standing, CM 110. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CM 321 Research in Communication Studies. An introduction to research design with application of qualitative and quantitative methods typically used in communication studies. Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in CM 320W and junior standing or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CM 325 Leadership and Team Communication. This course explores the relationship between communication and leadership within organizations to develop specific communication competencies associated with effective leadership. This is accomplished by considering both theoretical and applied approaches to leadership communication. The relationship between leaders and followers and the communication approaches used to develop and maintain that relationship are investigated. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 326 Business and Professional Presentations. An advanced course in business and professional presentations. Building on the skills and theories of CM 101, this course will focus on the careful planning and delivery of presentations in businesses and organizations. Attention will be paid to organizational and research skills, audience adaptation, language use, persuasion and delivery in professional and community settings. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation. Analysis of the communication dynamics involved in managing interpersonal, organizational and sociopolitical conflicts. Examination of theory and research related to conflict management and negotiation. Emphasis on case studies in various communication contexts. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) CM 335 Communication and the Professions. A course focusing on careers in communication-related professions. Students will learn job search skills and career planning techniques. Working experts from a variety of communication professions will be invited to share career advice. This course is graded S/U. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. CM 346 Audio and Video Production II. An intensive project-driven course offering students the opportunity to further develop their skills in writing and producing audio and video content. This will be a laboratory-based course in which students will gain advanced hands-on experience. Prerequisites: CM 240 and CM 246 (recommended CM 245). 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) CM 350 Advanced Journalism. A course on newsgathering and research designed to develop journalistic writing skills in feature stories, editorials, columns and mulitmedia. Prerequisite: CM 250W. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) CM 380Q Gender, Communication and Society. An examination of how communication structures gender identities, and how gender affects communication. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III, B} (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 381 The American Indian and the Rhetoric of Liberation. A study and critical analysis of the persuasive discourse advanced by American Indians from first encounter to contemporary times in their quest for liberation. Historical, political, cultural, environmental, human rights, justice and spiritual issues will be explored. Emphasis is placed on the rhetorical strategies employed and social exigencies addressed in representative speeches and texts. Prerequisites: Junior standing or above. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) CM 382Q African-American Rhetoric. A study and critical analysis of the persuasive discourse advanced by African-American spokespersons from colonial times to the present including the abolition era and civil rights movement. Emphasis is placed on the rhetorical strategies employed and social exigencies addressed in representative speeches and documents. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and II,B.} (typically offered spring semester of odd-numbered years)

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CM 384Q Intercultural Communication. A study of human communication across cultures focusing on the variables that influence interaction when members of different cultures come together. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or permission of the instructor. Cross-listed as SO 384Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III,B.} (typically offered spring semester) CM 399 Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. CM 400 Independent Study. The study of selected topics in communication. Individual research is emphasized. A paper or major project is required. May be repeated for not more than six semester hours. Prerequisites: CM 110, CM 320W, CM 321 and junior or above standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. CM 410 Advertising. The course will explore the role of advertising in society including its importance to the economic foundation of newspapers, television, radio, magazines and the Internet. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of evennumbered years) CM 425 Design for Multimedia. This course covers the graphic and cognitive design of electronic multimedia. Students will combine creative typography, digital image manipulation and Flash-based web pages in an exploration of the creative side of electronic design. Students will also examine content development and the on-line distribution and display of digital images through electronic story-telling. Prerequisites: CM 240 and CM 250W. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 430 Media Criticism. A seminar which will explore the techniques of mass media criticism and the social, political and economic impact of the media on American society. Prerequisites: CM 320W or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CM 435 Media Law and Policy. A seminar which examines the policy formation and implementation in media law. Topics covered include the role of the Federal Communications Commission, an analysis of the First Amendment and related Supreme Court interpretations of the law as it relates to policies. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 440 Political Communication. This course examines the role rhetoric and the media play in constructing and shaping a variety of political messages and citizen perceptions of politics. Topics include the nature of political rhetoric, campaign discourses, media coverage of campaign discourses, congressional and presidential oratory and media ethics. The course aims to sharpen students’ critical skills in analyzing and evaluating political rhetoric and media coverage of political campaigns. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester of even-numbered years) CM 455 Advanced Public Relations. A course designed to further develop public relations skills. Emphasis is on public relations case studies and the development and execution of a public relations plan. Students will also learn specialized areas of public relations. Prerequisites: CM 250W, CM 255, CM 256 (may be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) CM 483 International Media Systems. Comparison of national approaches to television, radio, cable, telephone, the Internet, satellite communication and print media. The transnational flow of news and entertainment programs and their social and political impact on cultures and the role of international regulatory bodies will be discussed. Prerequisites: CM 130 and junior standing. {GenEd: II,D,2} 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 490 Senior Seminar – SCE. A senior seminar that culminates in a research project focusing on a creative, historical, descriptive, legal or critical aspect of communication. Synthesis is stressed. Required of all seniors. Prerequisite: Senior standing, CM320W, CM321 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters) CM 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. CM 499 Internship in Communication. An opportunity for a significant experiential learning experience outside of the classroom. Admission to the internship program is through a formal application and approval process. A student’s academic record and active participation in the communication activities sponsored by the department are major criteria for admittance into the program. See a department faculty member or the department secretary for details and application form. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in the major and approval of the department. Graded S or U. 3, 6 or 12 Sem. Hrs. May be repeated.

Department of Computer Science and Information Systems
The Department of Computer Science and Information Systems offers a program which gives students a broad background in the fields of the discipline while maintaining a harmony with the overall mission of the University. The specific mission of the department is twofold: (1) to ground our majors and minors in the discipline and (2) to enable all students to take full advantage of current and future technological innovations. Note: Students should get a copy of the requirements for their entry year from a department member. Note: Students will not be allowed to pursue a web design minor and a media computing major. A minor in web design and majors/minors in computer science and/or information systems will be allowed, providing CS 121 is replaced in the minor with CS 223 Programming and Problem Solving for Media Computing.

Requirements for the Major in Computer Science
Required Foundation Courses CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 221 Programming and Problem Solving II CS 225 Foundations of Computing CS 262 Computer Organization Required Core Courses CS 340 Algorithms and Data Structures CS 365 Operating Systems CS 440 Principles of Programming Languages CS 450 Theory of Computation Semester Hours 4 4 2 3

4 3 3 3

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Option A Any One from the Following Courses CS 312 Business Programming CS 313 Artificial Intelligence CS 331Q Human-Computer Interaction CS 351 Numerical Analysis CS 360 Data Communications CS 385 Database Theory and Applications CS 399 Special Topics in Computer Science Option B Any One from the Following Courses CS 421 Computer Simulation CS 460 Computer and Network Security CS 462 Computer Architecture and Design CS 480 Computer Graphics CS 485 Web Database Programming CS 498 Independent Study CS 499 Internship

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 4 3 1-15

Alternative Way to Satisfy Option-A: Any course that can be used to satisfy Option-B also can be used to satisfy Option-A but cannot be used to satisfy both Option-A and Option-B. Senior Culminating Experience CS 491W Software Engineering Fundamentals CS 492W The Practice of Software Engineering Required Mathematics Courses MA 125 Elementary Discrete Math or MA 362 Discrete Math MA 123 Elementary Statistics or MA 141 Calculus I Total Semester Hours 2 2 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3-4 42-43

Requirements for the Minor in Computer Science
Required Courses CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 221 Programming and Problem Solving II CS 262 Computer Organization Any One from the Following Courses CS 313 Artificial Intelligence CS 331Q Human-Computer Interaction CS 340 Algorithms and Data Structures CS 351 Numerical Analysis CS 360 Data Communications CS 365 Operating Systems CS 385 Database Theory and Applications CS 399 Special Topics in Computer Science Any CS course at the 400 level Total Semester Hours 4 4 3 Semester Hours 3 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 3-4 14-15

Requirements for the Major in Information Systems
Required Foundation Courses CS 100 Introduction to Information Management CS 110 Introduction to Databases CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 222 Windows Application Programming Required Core Courses CS 320 Structured Systems Analysis CS 360 Data Communications CS 385 Database Theory and Applications CS 485 Web Database Programming Semester Hours 2 2 4 4 Semester Hours 3 4 3 4

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Additional Departmental Courses Two additional CS courses at the 300 level or above Senior Culminating Experience CS 491W Software Engineering Fundamentals CS 492W The Practice of Software Engineering

6 Semester Hours 2 2

Required Mathematics Courses MA 125 Elementary Discrete Math or MA 362 Discrete Math MA 123 Elementary Statistics or MA 171 Elementary Statistics with a Business Lab Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3-4 42-43

Requirements for the Minor in Information Systems
Required Courses CS 100 Introduction to Information Management CS 110 Introduction to Databases CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 222 Windows Application Programming CS 320 Structured Systems Analysis Total Semester Hours 2 2 4 4 3 15

Requirements for the Minor in Web Design
Required Courses CS 107 Introduction to Web Design AR 110W Design I CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 331Q Human Computer Interaction Recommended Courses (but not required) MA 125 Elementary Discrete Mathematics CS 485 Web Database Programming Total Semester Hours 2 3 4 3 Semester Hours 3 4 12

Requirements for the Minor in Internet Computing
Required Courses CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 221 Programming and Problem Solving II or CS 222 Windows Application Programming CS 360 Data Communications CS 460 Computer and Network Security Recommended Courses (but not required) MA 125 Elementary Discrete Mathematics Total Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 3 Semester Hours 3 15

Requirements for the Minor in Database Management
Required Courses CS 110 Introduction to Databases CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 221 Programming and Problem Solving II or CS 222 Windows Application Programming CS 385 Database Theory and Applications Recommended Courses (but not required) MA 125 Elementary Discrete Mathematics CS 485 Web Database Programming Semester Hours 2 4 4 4 3 Semester Hours 3 4

90 

Total

13

Requirements for the Major in Media Computing
An interdisciplinary program of study, the media computing major is administered by the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems. Majors will be well grounded in both art and computing. The principles of digital sound, electronic communication and project management are of importance in this field, and by using these principles, the students will gain experience in production and management of current media. Required Courses Semester Hours AR 105 Drawing I 3 AR 110W Design I 3 AR 115 Design II 3 CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I 4 CS 223 Programming and Problem Solving for 4 Media Computing MU 315 Digital Sound 3 AR/CS 326Q Media Computing I 3 AR/CS 327 Advanced Media Computing 3 AR/CS 427 Advanced Media Computing 3 MN 495 Project Management 3 CS 480 Computer Graphics 3 AR/CS 497 Senior Culminating Experience 3 Total 38

Note: Students may combine media computing with an art major or minor by taking additional courses. (See the department chair.) Note: Students may combine media computing with any one other major or minor in the department, except the web design minor, by taking additional courses. (See the department chair.)

Media Computing Minor
There is no minor in media computing at this time.

Summary of Majors and Minors Allowed in the Department
A student with a major in computer science: May earn a major in media computing May earn a minor in web design May not earn any other major or minor in the department 2. A student with a major in information systems: May earn a major in media computing May earn a minor in web design May not earn any other major or minor in the department 3. A student with a major in media computing: May not earn a minor in web design May earn any other major or minor in the department It is not possible to earn more than one minor in the department with the exception of the web design minor which may be earned in addition to any of the other minors. 1.

Course Descriptions
CS 100 Introduction to Information Management. An introduction to the tools and assessment methods involved in the collection, storage, retrieval, interpretation and presentation of information. Students will gain facility with a variety of tools in a problem-solving context. The ability to evolve skills in the current environment into skills needed in future environments will be emphasized. This course is designed and intended to be useful for Mount Union students in all disciplines. This course is graded on an S/U basis. Three hours per week of class/laboratory for 10 weeks. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CS 101 Introduction to Virtual Reality. An introduction to virtual reality environments. There are two main components of the course; a history of virtual realities and an introduction to living and building in a virtual space. Building skills will include the creation of web pages, image files, audio files, movies and virtual objects. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 103 Introduction to Digital Aspects of Photography. This course is designed so that students will gain technical skills in the use of the camera, as well as in the management of files, the technical manipulation of digital images, and the basics of technical best practice. Although “good” photography will be encouraged, this course is not intended to present photography as it would be presented in either an art department or in a communications department. Students are encouraged to search for flavor and meaning in atypical places. A collection of images will be created and displayed. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 104 Introduction to Flash Animation. This class, designed for those with no Flash experience, will provide both theory and practice in the animation development process. Using Adobe Flash CS4, which provides a robust object oriented environment, vector drawing and simple animation will be introduced. Students will be introduced to “best practices” in the field of study and gain very basic computing skills. Not open to students who have completed AR 326Q or CS 326Q. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 105 Introduction to Linux. This course provides an introduction to the Linux operating system, from a user's perspective. Topics include installation, software installation and updates, security issues, network configuration, file systems, graphical and command line interfaces, and shell programming to automate repetitive tasks. 2 Sem. Hrs.

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CS 106 Introduction to Digital Video Software. An introduction to the basics of the technical aspects of creating digital video presentations. The primary focus of this course will be on non-linear editing techniques, including scene transitions, audio mixing, titles, animation, machinima and display of video segments by computer programming. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) CS 107 Introduction to Web Design. An introduction to the techniques and assessment methods involved in the collection, storage, retrieval, interpretation and presentation of information on the World Wide Web. Students will gain facility in a problem-solving context with a variety of tools. The ability to evolve skills in the current environment into skills needed in future environments will be emphasized. Three hours per week of class/laboratory for 10 weeks. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 110 Introduction to Databases. Database models, database design and implementation. Emphasis is placed on relational databases and fourth generation tools. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I. An introduction to the computing field with a focus on algorithms and their use in problem solving. Students will, through the laboratory experience, develop concrete problem solving and programming skills and through reading and classroom discussion, gain an appreciation for the essence of the field of computing. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: MA 125 recommended (may be taken concurrently). 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CS 199 Special Topics in Computer Science. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. CS 218Q Educational Media. This course provides the framework for linking national technological standards and non-technological media to the PK-12 classroom by integrating course content from education, library science, psychology, philosophy and sociology. Emphasis is placed on basic operations and concepts of technology; social, ethical and human issues related to technology; technological tools for productivity, communication, research, problem-solving and decision-making; learning environments and experiences supported by technology; methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize student learning; assessment and evaluation strategies that are facilitated with technology; and professional practice enhancement by using technology. Prerequisite: Must have completed ED 150W or have permission from the chair of the Department of Education. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III, B.} (typically offered every semester) CS 220 Fundamentals of Information Systems. An overview of the issues facing the information systems professional, the course discusses how to integrate technology and people to solve real-world problems. In parallel with these integration activities are the archival responsibilities concerned with storing data and information along with creating and maintaining an organization’s knowledge base. Prerequisite: CS 110. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CS 221 Programming and Problem Solving II. Advanced language concepts including data models, order of execution, file management, encapsulation, testing and debugging. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CS 121. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 222 Windows Application Programming. This course is an advanced object-oriented programming course using a visually-oriented, formsbased language. Concepts include encapsulation, inheritance, polymorphism, database and file management and software testing. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: CS 121. Recommended: CS 110. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 223 Programming and Problem Solving For Media Computing. This course introduces advanced object-oriented language concepts using a visually-oriented, time-sensitive language. Concepts include data models, order of execution, file management, encapsulation, testing and debugging. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: CS 121. Recommended: AR 110W. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 225 Foundations of Computing. Development of mathematical concepts used in computer science with an emphasis on application. Topics include: Boolean circuits and binary arithmetic, logic programming, functions and functional programming, programming with sets and relations, simple algorithms from graph and number theory, algorithm correctness and efficiency. Two class/laboratory sessions per week. Prerequisites: MA 125 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 231Q Introduction to Neural Processing Systems. This course will be a comparison study of the biological components that govern brain function, the cognitive frameworks and the behaviors that emerge. These behavioral and biological constructs will then be related to the structure, construction and capabilities of artificial neural network computational devices. The focus will be on the basic principles of neuroscience and cognitive perception as well as the practical application of neural networks to the solution of real-world problems. A major component of the course will be the development of a student-designed, semester-long, neural network project that addresses and provides a theoretical solution to a behavioral problem. Prerequisites: one University-level mathematics course of MA 110 or above, and PY 110. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III, B.} (typically offered every other year) CS 251Q Evolutionary Systems and Artificial Life. This course presents an overview of the field of evolutionary computation and its applied branch of artificial life. The historical foundations of evolutionary thought are explored with particular emphasis on computational simulations of its models and operations. Topics include evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategies, natural selection, evolved cooperation/competition, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, ant-colony optimization, swarm intelligence and artificial life. Students are expected to develop evolutionary solutions to problems and to explore artificial life models. Prerequisites: CS 121 (Programming and Problem Solving I). Familiarity with genetics or evolution is not required as a prerequisite but may be helpful. 3 Sem. Hrs. (GedEd: III,B} (typically offered every other year) CS 262 Computer Organization. An introductory course in computer organization and design with coverage of assembly language programming. Concepts studied apply to various hardware platforms. Students will learn the basic principles governing the organization of computer hardware components, how those components interact and how the components may be controlled via layers of software. Topics investigated will include digital logic, registers, addressing modes, instruction execution, instruction sets and various number systems. Prerequisite: CS 121. 3 Sem. Hrs. CS 299 Special Topics in Computer Science. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. CS 312 Business Programming. An investigation of typical business computing problems and the development of solutions. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CS 221 or CS 222. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 313 Artificial Intelligence. An overview of the field including representing knowledge, logical systems, forward and backward reasoning, searching, learning, planning, natural language processing, case- and rule-based systems and genetic algorithms. Prolog (PROgramming in LOGic) will be introduced and used extensively. Three class/laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: CS 221, CS 222 or CS 223. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year)

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CS 320 Structured Systems Analysis. An overview of the systems development life cycle with emphasis on the techniques and tools of system documentation and logical system specification. Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: EH 100 and CS 121. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CS 326Q Media Computing I. An introduction to the problems specific to electronic design and expression. The specific media, applications and techniques are variable. Prerequisites: AR 105, AR 115, CS 121 and CS 223. Cross-listed as AR 326Q. 3 Sem Hrs. {GenEd: III,B.} (typically offered every year) CS 327/427 Advanced Media Computing. Advanced creative work in media computing, the specific content of which is to be determined by the student in conference with the instructor. Cross-listed as AR 327/427. Prerequisite: AR/CS 326Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 331Q Human-Computer Interaction. This course is concerned with the design, evaluation and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them. Basic design theory from both art and computer science will be studied. Prerequisites: AR 110W and CS 121. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GedEd: III,B} (typically offered every year) CS 340 Algorithms and Data Structures. Topics covered include linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, recursion, searching, sorting, hashing and analysis and measurement of algorithms. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CS 221 and CS 225. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 351 Numerical Analysis. A study of numerical integration and the numerical solution of differential equations, numerical methods for linear algebra, matrix inversion and the solving for real roots of equations. Oriented toward computation using computers. Prerequisites: MA 322 or permission of the instructor. A computer programming course such as CS 221 or PH 241 is recommended. Cross-listed as MA 351. 3 Sem. Hrs. CS 360 Data Communications. History of data communications, hardware, software, protocol architectures, local area networks and wide area networks. Examples will be drawn from current standard protocols. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: CS 221 or CS 222. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 365 Operating Systems. The study of software designed to control the operation of the components of a computer system. A survey of typical operating systems is included along with investigation of concurrent processes, deadlock, memory management, file systems and processor scheduling/utilization. Programming skills will be utilized and expanded. Prerequisite: CS 221 and CS 262. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 385 Database Theory and Applications. Theoretical introduction to database models, database design, normalization and data administration. Specific applications are studied and developed using fourth generation languages and application programming interfaces with third generation languages. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: CS 110, and CS 221 or CS 222. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 399 Special Topics in Computer Science. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. CS 421 Computer Simulation. A comprehensive and practical study of modeling and simulation of real-world systems on computer hardware. The main focus of the course will be simulation of discrete systems using a simulation library for a typical modern programming language. Students will also explore random number generation, methods for modeling real-world systems, some special purpose simulation programming languages and simulation of continuous systems. Prerequisites: MA 123 and either CS 221 or CS 222. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) CS 440 Principles of Programming Languages. The principles and programming styles of programming languages both in design and implementation. Syntax, lexical analysis, BNF, parsing, compilers, interpreters, binding and run-time environment. Languages of various types are examined. Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: CS 225, and CS 221 or CS 222. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 450 Theory of Computation. Topics covered include finite automata, pushdown automata, Turing machines, regular languages, contextfree languages, recursively enumerable languages and the halting problem. Prerequisite: CS 221 and CS 225. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 460 Computer and Network Security. This course provides an introduction to the subject of computer and network security. It will cover major threats to security and tools developed to defend against such threats. Prerequisites: MA 125 and CS 360. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) CS 462 Computer Architecture and Design. An examination of design principles and techniques used in contemporary microprocessors and computers to achieve high performance. Topics include pipelining, caching, parallelism, code optimization and case studies of real-world systems. Prerequisites: CS 221 or CS 222, and CS 262. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) CS 480 Computer Graphics. This course is intended to provide an understanding of the principles behind the art and science of computer graphics. The subject matter is broad and combines elements of computer hardware and software, mathematics and numerical methods, art and programming with complex data structures. Prerequisite: CS 221, CS 222 or CS 223. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 485 Web Database Programming. An introduction to programming client-server applications that use a web browser on client machines and a database engine on the server. The course includes programming the user interface and the database interface. Prerequisites: either CS 221 or CS 222, and CS 385. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 491W Software Engineering Fundamentals. A study of software development characterized by a practical, orderly and measured development process. The dominant features of this process are requirements specification, selection of a software life cycle model, software testing, project management techniques and quality assurance. For the computer science major and for the information systems major, the Senior Culminating Experience consists of taking both CS 491W and CS 492W. Students will receive “W” credit for the sequence (4 hours total) upon successful completion of both CS 491W and CS 492W. Prerequisites: Junior standing in the computer science of information systems majors. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 492W The Practice of Software Engineering. A continuation of the study of software engineering practices begun in CS 491W. Issues of team-building, project planning and configuration management will be explored. Each student will complete a significant software development or research project as part of a team for the computer science major and for the information systems major the Senior Culminating Experience consists of taking both CS 491W and CS 492W. Students will receive “W” credit for the sequence (4 hours total) upon successful completion of both CS 491W and CS 492W. Prerequisite: CS 491W. 2 Sem. Hrs. CS 494 CS 497 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. (offered as needed) Media Computing SCE. It is expected that the SCE will be an extra departmental experience under the guidance of someone from art,

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computer science and information systems, business, communications or music. The minor may play a significant role in the SCE. The main purpose of the course is to give the student an opportunity to work on a single semester-long project the subject of which is of particular interest to the student. The topic chosen must require the transformation of current knowledge into knowledge about a previously unknown topic or a completely new aspect of such a topic. The student must document the ways in which such new learning will occur. In addition it is a studio project which is intended to draw together the thinking and skills of the student from the entire academic career. It is to be a consistent body of creative work suitable for exhibition in the spring semester of the senior year. Prerequisites: MU 315, AR/CS 327, AR/CS 427, CS 480 and senior standing. Cross-listed as AR 497. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every year) CS 498 Independent Study. Students design and implement a project. A contract signed by the student, the instructor and the department chair details the specific project requirements. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: senior standing. 1-15 Sem. Hrs. (offered as needed) CS 499 Internship. This course provides a significant learning experience outside of the academic environment and related to the student’s career goals. Students do their internship at an industrial, business or financial organization, or at a research laboratory. A contract signed by the student, the supervisor and the department chair details the specific activities and requirements. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Senior standing, all but one of the other computer science courses required for the major, cumulative average of 2.50, average of 3.00 in computer science courses, and recommendation of the Computer Science and Information Systems Internship Selection Committee. 1-15 Sem. Hrs. (offered as needed)

Department of Criminal Justice
The goals and objectives of the Department of Criminal Justice are to provide students with an interdisciplinary approach to material keeping in the tradition of the liberal arts. Students are provided with basic knowledge of the operation of the criminal justice system and integration of material from various disciplines. This background will enable students to prepare for meaningful work, fulfilling lives and personal responsibility.

Requirements for the Major in Applied Criminal Justice
This major is designed for the student whose interest in criminal justice is more application oriented. There is a required 6 credit internship for this major. Required Criminal Justice Courses CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 208 Diversity issues in Criminal Justice CJ 308 Criminal Law and Procedure CJ 310 Research Methods in Criminal Justice CJ 410 Advanced Criminal Justice Seminar CJ 492 Senior Culminating Experience (SCE) for Applied Criminal Justice CJ 499 Internship Required Extra-Departmental Courses PS 105 American National Government PY 370 Forensic Psychology SO 205 Juvenile Delinquency or SO 280 Criminology Any from the Following Courses Totaling Six Hours CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law CJ 499 Internship PL 120 Contemporary Moral Problems or PL 320 Ethics PS 300Q Introduction to Law and Legal System PY 330 Drugs and Behavior SO 315 Corrections Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 Semester Hours 3 3

3 Semester Hours 3 1-3 3 3 3 3 3 39

Students are encouraged to develop a proficiency in a relevant foreign language in consultation with their advisor as part of the completion of the major.

Requirements for the Major in Criminal Justice Research and Analysis
This major is designed for the student who is more interested in research and pursuing advanced graduate training in criminal justice. Students in this major will take a heavy course load focusing on analyzing research in criminal justice. Required Criminal Justice Courses CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 208 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice CJ 308 Criminal Law and Procedure CJ 310 Research Methods in Criminal Justice Semester Hours 3 3 3 3

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CJ 410 CJ 490 CJ 491

Advanced Criminal Justice Seminar Senior Culminating Experience (SCE) for Research and Analysis I Senior Culminating Experience (SCE) for Research and Analysis II

3 3 3

Required Extra-Departmental Courses PS 105 American National Government PY 370 Forensic Psychology SO 300 Statistics for Social Scientists Any One from the Following Sociology Courses SO 205 Juvenile Delinquency SO 280 Criminology Any from the Following Courses Totaling Six Hours CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law CJ 499 Internship PL 120 Contemporary Moral Problems or PL 320 Ethics PS 300Q Introduction to Law and Legal System PY 330 Drugs and Behavior SO 315 Corrections Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 1-6 3 3 3 3 3 39

Requirements for the Minor in Criminal Justice
All minors are required to complete 18 semester hours. Required Criminal Justice Courses CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CJ 308 Criminal Law and Procedure CJ 410 Advanced Criminal Justice Seminar Any One from the Following Sociology Courses SO 205 Juvenile Delinquency SO 280 Criminology Any from the Following Courses Totaling Six Hours CJ 208 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law CJ 499 Internship PL 120 Contemporary Moral Problems or PL 320 Ethics PY 370 Forensic Psychology PY 330 Drugs and Behavior PS 300Q Introduction to Law and the Legal System SO 315 Corrections Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 1-6 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Course Descriptions
CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice. This course will introduce the student to the field of criminal justice. Basic information on the police, courts and correctional systems and how they interrelate will be presented. The emphasis will be on contemporary issues in the criminal justice system. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 208 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice. This course will explore a wide variety of current issues involving minorities and women as perpetrators, victims and employees of the criminal justice system. Students will actively participate in analyzing potential solutions. Prerequisite: CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 308 Criminal Law and Procedure. This course will examine the elements which define specific crimes and analyze the processing of a criminal case from the time it is presented for prosecution until its conclusion at the trial court. The course will introduce students to the steps of the criminal process and analyze the constitutional rights of the accused. Prerequisites: PS 105 and CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 310 Research Methods in Criminal Justice. This course will examine the types of research techniques used in the field of criminal justice. Attention will be given to research design in both qualitative and quantitative research. Students will be expected to work through an original research problem. Prerequisite: CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law. This course will focus on topics in criminology, sociology of law and law. The textbook, lectures and in-class activities will provide insights into the theoretical and practical aspects of law and society, focusing on law and criminal justice and their relationship to social control, dispute resolution, social change and the influence of the media. Prerequisites: PS 105 and SO 100. Cross-listed as SO 350Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} CJ 410 Advanced Criminal Justice Seminar. The topics for this seminar will vary. Topics will include violence and society, administration of justice and issues in law. Students must be prepared to work within the framework of a seminar-style format. Prerequisite: CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 490 Senior Culminating Experience for Research and Analysis I. This is the first part of the SCE for the criminal justice research and analysis major. Students will demonstrate competence in designing an original piece of research. Majors are required to submit a formal research proposal. This course is a prerequisite to CJ 491, in which the research proposal is implemented. Prerequisites: CJ 105, CJ 310, SO 300. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 491 Senior Culminating Experience for Research and Analysis II. This is the second part of the SCE for the criminal justice research and analysis major. Students will demonstrate competence in the implementation, analysis, interpretation and presentation of a formally designed research project. Prerequisites: CJ 105, CJ 310, SO 300, CJ 490. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 492 Senior Culminating Experience for the Applied Criminal Justice Major. Students will critically analyze their CJ 499 internship experience. Students will integrate material learned in other courses to develop a monograph. Emphasis will be on integration of interdisciplinary material and formal presentation of the findings. Prerequisites: CJ 105, CJ 310 and completion of 27 credit hours in this major. This course must be taken concurrently with or after CJ 499. 3 Sem. Hrs. CJ 499 Internship in Criminal Justice. An experience based course in which students are placed in appropriate organizations or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration
Department Goals
The Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration, building on the liberal arts foundation, challenges and supports students in developing a capacity for learning. Department programs create opportunities that: (1) contribute to the students’ academic development in a major field of study; (2) assist students in the development of critical thinking skills, including the ability to think in quantitative and analytical terms; (3) support students in developing effective oral and written communication skills; (4) encourage students to become more aware of various cultures and the global environment in which we live and how the many varied social, political and economic forces can affect the decision-making process; (5) help students develop moral reasoning skills and an awareness of professional ethics; (6) enable students to acquire a sense of responsibility and a capacity for service; (7) provide students with the opportunity to develop interpersonal, technological, leadership and organizational skills; (8) foster students’ self-awareness that enables the selection of an appropriate career path and encourages a commitment to lifelong learning. The department offers majors in economics, accounting, finance, health care management, human resource management, management and marketing and an interdisciplinary major in international business and economics. Minors are offered in economics, accounting and business administration. Students are able to prepare for teaching, graduate school and a variety of careers in economics, accounting and business.

Professional Internships and Cooperative Education Opportunities
Students may pursue internships and cooperative education opportunities with business, government or not-for-profit organizations. These experiences provide an opportunity to: Apply and build on academic theories in a practical work setting. • Obtain valuable experience in a career field of interest that provides professional, intellectual and interpersonal challenges in a real • work environment. Build a professional network and develop mentors in a chosen career field. • Explore options and validate personal career desires through a process of research and action aimed at selection for a worthwhile • experiential education opportunity – skills that can be applied directly to future career planning and job search efforts. Internships can be taken for academic credit under “499” series courses. Students can include an internship or cooperative education experience in a traditional four-year baccalaureate degree program. In some cases, however, students may require more than four years to complete their baccalaureate degree. Selection for internships and cooperative education opportunities by sponsoring organizations is competitive.

Economics
Requirements for the Major in Economics
Required Economics Courses EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business* EC 272 Business Statistics * EC 360 Intermediate Microeconomics EC 365 Intermediate Macroeconomics Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3

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EC 455 Seminar in Economics (SCE) Any four additional economics courses at the 300 or 400 level Required Departmental Courses BA 143 Integrating University and Life Options BA 243 Exploring and Evaluation Life Options BA 343 Pursuing Personal Life and Career Plans AC 202 Financial Accounting or AC 205 Elementary Accounting I

3 12

Semester Hours 1 1 1 3 3

Any one of the following courses Semester Hours BA 207 Beyond the Classroom: An International Experience 1 BA 208 Beyond the Classroom: Social Entrepreneurship and Community Development 1 BA 209 Beyond the Classroom: A Professional Bridge 1 Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics* EH 240W Business and Technical Writing Total Semester Hours 3 3 46

*Note: Students may substitute MA120 for MA110 and may substitute MA141 for EC271. Students may also substitute MA 141, MA142, MA123 and either EC436 or EC437 for the following group of courses: MA110, EC271, and EC272. Any student choosing to obtain a major in economics will not be permitted to dual major in international business and economics. **Note: EC 455 Seminar in Economics has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in economics.

Requirements for the Minor in Economics
Required Courses Semester Hours EC 105 Introduction to Economics 3 (designed for majors outside the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration)* The completion of both EC 200 and EC 201 can substitute for EC 105. One additional EC course numbered above EC 201 3 Three additional EC courses at the 300 level or above 9 (excluding EC 435)** Total 15 The minor in economics is not available to those who major in international business and economics. *Note: EC 105 can be substituted for both EC 200 and EC 201 as prerequisites for 300 and 400 level courses. **Note: EC 271 and EC 272 are not eligible to be counted as courses in the economics minor.

Requirements for Honors in Economics
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduating with honors in a major. Courses that may be taken for honors in economics are the following: EC 310, EC 315, EC 327, EC 328, EC 330, EC 375QW, EC 380Q, EC 390, EC 425, EC 435, EC 455.

Course Descriptions
EC 105 Introduction to Economics. An introduction to the tools and techniques of economic analysis. Economics principles and concepts are used to examine current problems such as pollution, surpluses, shortages, poverty, inflation and unemployment. Designed for majors outside the Department of Economics, Accounting and Business Administration. May be substituted for both EC 200 and EC 201 as prerequisites for 300 and 400 level courses. Not open to students with credit for both EC 200 and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. . {GenEd: II,C,3,a.} EC 170 Quantitative Methods for Business and Economics I. Introduces material concerning systems of equations, matrix algebra and linear programming as applied to economic and business analysis. Basic skills will be developed to provide the student with a sufficient background to proceed with the study of more advanced topics. Emphasis of the material presented will be on business and economic applications including computer solutions to real-world problems. Two lecture sessions and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on math placement exam or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 172 Quantitative Methods for Business and Economics II. Introduces material concerning applied statistical tests, calculus and regression analysis. This course will build on skills developed in EC 170 and MA 171. Emphasis of the material will be on business and economic applications, including computer solutions to real-world problems. Two lecture sessions and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: EC 170 and MA 171. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 199 Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49.

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EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics. An introduction to economic principles and analytical tools needed to think intelligently about social and economic problems. The course emphasizes concepts and principles and their use in analyzing current economic issues and the consequences of various existing and proposed government policies. Prerequisite: at least 12 semester hours of college credit. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics. An introduction to the activities and impact of government, consumers and business firms on the national economy including the determination of national income and the use of monetary and fiscal policy. Prerequisites: EC 200, EH 100 and CM 101 or CM 102. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 271 Quantitative Methods for Business. An introduction to quadratic functions and their application to business and economics. A study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and an introduction to indefinite and definite integrals, including applications to minimization and maximization problems related to business and economics. Prerequisites: EC 200 (or concurrent) and MA 110, or MA 120, or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 272 Business Statistics. An introduction to the essential concepts of statistics for economics, accounting and business majors. Concepts reviewed may include descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. Emphasizes business and economic applications including computer solutions to real-world business problems. Prerequisite: MA 141 or EC 271. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 299 Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. EC 310 Health Economics. This course examines how economic analysis can be applied to various components of the health care system. Microeconomic theory is used to understand the operation of health care markets and the behavior of participants (consumers, insurers, physicians and hospitals) in the health care industry. International comparisons and the role of the public sector will be included. Prerequisite: EC 105 or EC 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 315 Money and Banking. A study of the nature and definition of money, the role of money in the macroeconomy, the supply of and demand for money, the role of the Federal Reserve System in monetary policy, the deposit insurance system and recent controversies in monetary theory. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 327 International Trade. The microeconomic aspects of international economics: the pure theory of trade, trade in intermediate goods, trade with imperfect competition, tariffs, quotas, regional integration, multinational corporations and the North-South dialogue. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} EC 328 International Monetary Economics. The macroeconomic aspects of international economics: foreign exchange rates, the balance of payments, capital flows, international indebtedness and alternative international monetary systems. Prerequisite: EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} EC 330 Economics of Gender. This course examines the impact of gender differences on economic opportunities, activities and rewards. Economic issues emphasized are labor force participation, earnings, investment in human capital and gender segregation in the workplace. Crosssocietal comparisons also will be made. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} EC 360 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory. Emphasizes the development of microeconomic theory and its use in explaining and predicting certain types of real world phenomena. Topics covered include consumer behavior, economic decision making, prices, production, wages, resource allocation and economic efficiency. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 365 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory. Topics will include the analysis of consumption, investment and government spending; monetary and fiscal policy; and the classical, Keynesian and Monetarist views of the macroeconomy. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 375QW Development Economics. A study of Third World development problems, such as poverty, inequality, debt burdens and rural stagnation. Global interdependency and policies for management of food, energy, natural resources, technology and financial flows will be examined. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 201 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1 and III,B.} EC 380Q Comparative Economic Systems. An examination of the basic institutions of capitalism, socialism and communism from an economic point of view. The course stresses the development and functioning of present varieties of these “isms.” Special emphasis is given to those countries of the former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe which are making the transition from centrally planned socialistic states to market economies. Prerequisite: EC 105 or EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1 and III,B.} EC 390 Economies of the Asian Pacific Rim. A survey of economic development in the economies of East Asia, focusing on Japan as the model for the region, the four tigers – Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and South Korea – and the newly industrializing economies of Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. The course will include an economic analysis of the factors that contributed to the substantial growth in East Asia from 1960 to 1989 and the subsequent financial crisis that ensued in the 1990s. Prerequisites: EC 105 or EC 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} EC 399 Special Topics in Economics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. EC 400 Independent Study – Economics. Involves the independent investigation of a problem in economics. Open to advanced students majoring in economics. A prospectus must be submitted for approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 425 Managerial Economics. A study of the various ways in which microeconomic principles and quantitative tools can be used to aid managers in making sound decisions. Prerequisites: MA 123, and EC 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 435 Advanced Quantitative Tools for Business and Economics. This course will deal with a comprehensive survey of regression theory and the statistical measurements used and problems incurred in economic modeling. It also will expose students to quantitative methods used in decision making in business. Such topics as transportation modeling, queuing theory and simulation will be discussed. An emphasis will be placed on practical applications in the business world. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in business with a concentration in quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: MA 123 and MA 141. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 436 Introduction to Econometrics. An introduction to basic econometric concepts and techniques with an emphasis on the empirical analysis of applications in various fields. It covers linear regression with one regressor, linear regression with multiple regressors and some issues with multivariate linear regression analysis. Software such as MS Excel, Eviews, and SPSS will be used in the course to carry out the computer-based exercises. Prerequisites: MA 110 or above and MA 123 or EC 272. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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EC 437 Operations Research. Modeling and graph theory with applications to linear programming, critical path analysis, transportation and allocation problems and queuing theory. Prerequisites: EC 272 or MA123 and MA 141. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 450 Seminar in Labor. This seminar deals with the problems of labor relations and labor economics. Key issues dealt with are unemployment, poverty, race relations and inflation. Current labor problems are emphasized. Prerequisites: EC 201 and MN 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 455 Seminar in Economics. An in-depth study of a few contemporary problems and issues such as poverty, welfare, discrimination, crime, environmental abuse, government, energy and unemployment. Topics will be announced in advance. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis, discussion, research and reporting. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in economics. Prerequisites: EC 201 and MA 123 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EC 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. EC 499 Internship in Economics. An experience-based course in which students are placed in appropriate businesses or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with work in their major discipline. The exact location, program and method of education are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the department faculty internship coordinator and the host internship supervisor. Specific restrictions apply. Departmental approval is required prior to registration for this course. Will count as only one course towards the major or minor in economics. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Education
The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program is approved by the Ohio Department of Education for the preparation of competent, capable and caring teachers in early childhood, middle childhood, intervention specialist, adolescence to young adult, and multiage licenses. Mount Union’s Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program is also accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). Candidates are able to major and minor in early childhood (CE), middle childhood (ME) and intervention specialist (EI). Candidates are able to minor in adolescence to young adult (AE) and multiage (M/A). The early childhood major and license prepare candidates to work with typically developing and included children. The middle childhood major offers a choice of four different areas of emphasis leading to licensure: language arts, science, social studies and mathematics. The middle childhood major chooses two areas of emphasis in addition to a minor area of study. The intervention specialist major chooses one area of focus: early childhood intervention specialist or mild/moderate intervention specialist. The early childhood intervention specialist teaching license is valid for teaching learners with mild/moderate/intensive education needs from ages 3 through 8 and prekindergarten through grade three. The mild/moderate intervention specialist teaching license is valid for teaching learners with mild/moderate education needs from ages 5 through 21 and kindergarten through grade 12. The adolescence to young adult minor, when taken with an appropriate major, offers programs leading to licensure in the following areas: earth science (geology major); physical science (chemistry/physics major); life science (biology major); integrated mathematics (mathematics major); integrated language arts (English literature or writing major); and integrated social studies (history major). The multiage minor, when taken with an appropriate major, leads to licensure in the following areas: French, German, Japanese, Spanish, music, health, physical education and visual arts. In all programs, the candidate is prepared to meet the requirements for the appropriate Ohio Provisional License. The early and middle childhood generalist and K-12 reading endorsements are available. Licensure course requirements are available in the Teacher Education Program office or on the Teacher Education Program website. In order to meet the requirements for licensure in all programs, it is critical that the candidate begins the professional education sequence during the second semester of the freshman year and scrupulously follows the sequences for the appropriate major, minor and general education requirements. Field experience begins in the spring semester of the freshman year. In order to provide a rich experience, placements are made in varied school and community agency settings. It is recommended that candidates have access to their own automobiles. All field experience placements are within a 35 mile radius requirement. Candidates interested in teaching in other states should contact the state Department of Education of the other state(s), for information on reciprocity and other licensure information. Assistance to teacher education candidates and graduates seeking teaching positions is provided by the Teacher Education Program office. In addition to meeting and maintaining the requirements for admission and continuance in the Teacher Education Program (TEP) and for course requirements and field experiences for the licensure area, teacher candidates must meet the Ohio qualifying scores on PRAXIS II examinations (Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) and Subject Assessments/Specialty Area Tests).

Introduction to the Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program and Licensure Requirements
The Deparment of Education’s Teacher Education Program at the University of Mount Union is based on the guidelines suggested by the Ohio Department of Education, the Ohio Board of Regents and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Teacher Education Program is guided by a conceptual framework that gives the program “an underlying structure…that gives conceptual meanings through an articulated rationale to the unit’s operation and provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship service and unit accountability” (NCATE, 2008). Mount Union’s Teacher Education Program’s Conceptual Framework focuses on its theme, candidate performance, program areas and commitments to diversity, technology and assessment. The theme, Caring Teachers Live What They Believe, has its roots in the synthesized “We Believe” statements collected from Teacher Education Program faculty, teacher candidates, members of our partner schools and other professional community members. The Teacher Education Program Advisory Council, Unit Governance Committee, Kappa Delta Pi and SNEA interacted with various drafts of the conceptual framework. This allowed input from teacher candidates and cooperating teachers, as well as other constituents from our partner schools. Fundamental to understanding the theme is Martin Haberman’s (1995) belief that only decent people can be prepared to teach, Nel Noddings’ (1995) understanding of the ethic of care, Mount Union’s mission statement and the Teacher Education Program’s 11 common goals. The Teacher Education Program has established criteria for candidate performance. Key elements in understanding Mount Union’s Teacher Education Program’s teacher candidates’ performance are the descriptors competent, capable and caring. Competent reflects our commitment to grounding our teacher candidates in knowledge of content, pedagogy and child development • appropriate to each area of licensure. Capable reflects the nexus of theory to practice. This criterion refers to the Department of Education’s teacher candidates’ ability to apply • the theories regarding instructional techniques, classroom management, reflection and the varying needs of students in microteaching situations as well as actual school settings.

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Caring reflects the disposition that is most essential to the theme, Caring Teachers Live What They Believe. Our teacher candidates must demonstrate that they are committed to service and to the betterment of children’s lives. The Teacher Education Program licensure programs are aligned with state, national and international standards. Licensure standards ensure that only those teachers who can perform the work will do the work. The standards emphasize performance from the time a teacher enters the classroom throughout his or her career. The ultimate benefit of this new direction is a better education for Ohio’s students. These standards increase the rigor in the teaching profession because they: 1. strengthen Ohio’s teacher preparation programs. 2. require successful performance of beginning teachers. 3. achieve higher standards through licensure. 4. intensify professional development. Licensure requirements are subject to the authority of the Ohio State Department of Education and Ohio law. All program curricula, requirements and policies are subject to change given the nature of the ongoing review process between Mount Union and the Ohio Department of Education. •

Teacher Education Program Mission and Goals
The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program’s mission statement is derived from the vision expressed in the University’s mission statement, but it offers a version more particular to the preparation of teacher candidates. The Department of Education’s Teacher Education Program at Mount Union prepares candidates for meaningful careers in the field of education. Building upon a solid liberal arts foundation, the Teacher Education Program assists candidates in developing knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to become effective and caring teachers in an ever-changing society. The Teacher Education Program’s candidates are prepared to become reflective, lifelong learners. This mission is realized for all candidates through the attainment of 11 common goals that are aligned with Ohio Teacher Education and Licensure Standards, INTASC, PRAXIS and NCATE Program standards. The Teacher Education Program has established programs in early childhood, middle childhood, intervention specialist, adolescence to young adult and multiage education to assist candidates to: 1. develop an understanding of subject matter areas and to create meaningful learning experiences based on this knowledge. 2. develop an understanding of students’ cognitive, social, physical and emotional development and to create learning opportunities that support student academic development. 3. recognize and value student diversity and the differences in how students learn and provide instruction to accommodate such diversity. 4. develop instructional plans based on students’ needs, curricular goals and models, subject matter and community. 5. develop pedagogical knowledge and skills and to use this expertise to encourage each student to develop critical-thinking and problemsolving skills. 6. create a classroom environment that facilitates learning and a climate that encourages fairness, positive social interactions, active learning and self-motivation. 7. develop effective verbal, nonverbal, written, technological and media communication skills to support and enhance student learning. 8. understand the role of assessment and the use of formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate student learning. 9. develop skills necessary for self-reflection and to use this knowledge to analyze past experiences and to pursue professional development opportunities. 10. collaborate with students, candidates, parents, community members and professional colleagues in order to support student learning and development. 11. demonstrate a sense of caring. Performance-based assessments are used to monitor candidates’ performances and to determine the extent to which candidates meet goals and standards. The predominant assessment tool relied upon in the Teacher Education Program is the candidate’s assessment profile. The assessment profile is used as a continuous record keeping system not only for individual candidates but also to determine and to re-examine trends in candidate development within and across programs. The assessment profile documents candidates’ successful development of content, pedagogical and professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students learn. Information from the assessment profile is gathered at transition points to document goal attainment with the aim of becoming competent, capable and caring teachers. The transition points are program admission, entry into clinical practice, exit from clinical practice and program completion.

Program Admission
Transition point one, program admission, is the entry stage into the Teacher Education Program. Candidates must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program in order to take 300-level and 400-level education courses. In order to be accepted into the program, the prospective teacher must possess certain personal and professional characteristics. For purposes of admission, the standards are as follows: signatures on the Mount Union Student Code of Conduct and Good Moral Character statements: a minimum of 50 semester hours; the Teacher Education Program application; declaration of a major/minor and have an advisor assigned in major; a minimum 2.5 overall GPA; EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120, CM 101 or CM 102, MA 110 or higher with a course grade no lower than C- and a minimum grade of C+ in ED 150; a minimum grade of C in 200-level (AE, CE, ME and EI) courses for the appropriate program; a minimum grade of C in PY 210; satisfactory field evaluations; evidence of good moral character; positive references including ones from the advisor and from the vice president for student affairs; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I); successful completion of Assessment Profile I; and Specialized Professional Association (SPA) requirements completed. Multiage minors must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major section of the Catalogue. Bachelor of music education degree candidates are required to complete ME 200 and must be approved by the music faculty at the Sophomore Evaluation for continuance in the degree program. Intervention specialist majors must receive a minimum score of 24 on the Multiple Environment Analysis assignment. Post-baccalaureate candidates must pass the PRAXIS II Subject Assessments/Specialty Area Tests and/or the Principles of Learning and Teaching Tests (PLT). Transfer candidates must meet all criteria at each transition point. The candidate must achieve the acceptable level in Assessment Profile I. In order to complete this level, the candidate must successfully complete specific and prescribed artifacts that demonstrate acceptable development of the 11 Teacher Education Program goals. Through the use of the assessment profile, the candidate demonstrates growth in developing content, professional and pedagogical knowledge, skills and dispositions.

Entry into Clinical Practice
The next transition point of candidate assessment takes place prior to admission into clinical practice. Coursework, field/clinical experience

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evaluations, successful completion of Praxis II Tests and Assessment Profile II are key indicators at this juncture. To be eligible for clinical practice, the candidate must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program, submitted a clinical practice application and must have met the following requirements: maintained admission into the Teacher Education Program; a minimum of 88 semester hours; the clinical practice application; a minimum overall 2.5 GPA; a minimum major 2.5 GPA (80 percent coursework completed in AYA and MA; 100 percent in CE, ME and EI); all middle childhood specialty area coursework completed with a minimum of 2.0 GPA; a minimum grade of C in 200-level, 300-level and 400-level (AE, CE, ED, ME and EI) courses for the appropriate program; a minimum grade of C in CS 218 (all programs except BME); attained a minimum grade of C in MU 430 (BME only); successful completion of PRAXIS II Subject Assessments/Specialty Areas Tests and the Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) PRAXIS II tests; positive references; successful completion of Preclinical Impact Unit; satisfactory field evaluations; evidence of good moral character; successful completion of Assessment Profile II; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I); Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) requirements completed; and multiage minors must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major section of the Catalogue. In Assessment Profile II, the candidate must achieve an acceptable level in all 11 Teacher Education Program goals as well as to demonstrate a commitment to technology, a commitment to diversity and an impact on P-12 students. This provides documentation of the candidate’s growth and development of becoming a competent, capable and caring teacher.

Exit from Clinical Practice
At the next transition point, exiting clinical practice, the candidates are commonly assessed by data gathered from clinical practice evaluations and the assessment profile. These assessments are utilized to assess the candidates’ proficiencies to deliver content; to use the pedagogical, professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students to learn; to positively impact all students; and to exhibit a sense of caring. In Assessment Profile III, the candidate demonstrates that he/she has performed on the acceptable level during clinical practice all 11 Teacher Education Program goals, a commitment to technology, a commitment to diversity and an impact on P-12 students. In addition to Assessment Profile III, additional requirements for exiting clinical practice are as follows: maintained admission in the Teacher Education Program; a minimum 2.5 overall GPA; successful completion of clinical practice; satisfactory clinical practice evaluations; positive references; successful completion of Assessment Profile III; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I); and Specialized Professional Assocations (SPA) requirements completed. Multiage candidates must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirement in the major section of the Catalogue.

Program Completion
The final transition point for candidates in Mount Union’s Teacher Education Program is program completion. The focus of this period is to ensure that the candidate has developed content, pedagogical and professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to help all students to learn. The requirements at this transition point are as follows: maintained admission in the TEP; an approved BA, BS or BME degree; successful completion of the Professional Development Plan (if applicable); a minimum 2.5 overall GPA; a minimum 2.5 GPA in major with all content complete; a minimum grade of C in all additional licensure requirements; the satisfactory completion of all portions of PRAXIS II (ex: middle childhood endorsement); caring teacher philosophy statement; professional portfolio; positive references; no record verification from the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI & I) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) requirements completed. Multiage candidates must meet all course grade requirements. Refer to the specific course requirements in the major section of the Catalogue.

Teacher Education Program Monitoring
In order to be accepted into, to continue in or exit from the Teacher Education Program at each transition point, the candidate must document the completion of all requirements for that particular transition point. The Teacher Education Program Administrative Support Analyst documents all qualifications and the completion of transition-point requirements. All updated information is maintained in a candidate database and file. In order to ensure equity, all of the candidates’ applications (traditional undergraduates, transfers and post-baccalaureates) will be formally reviewed during a Subcommittee on Teacher Education meeting held in January, May August or December. The Department of Education chair will notify each candidate in writing via a formal letter of the status of the decision.

Due Process
In order to eliminate bias and to ensure a fair and equitable practice, all candidates (traditional undergraduates, transfers and post-baccalaureates) will be formally reviewed during a Subcommittee on Teacher Education meeting. Based on the recommendations of the subcommittee, the Department of Education chair notifies candidates in writing if they are permitted or not permitted to advance to the next transition point. An individual conferences will be scheduled with the candidate if requested. If the candidate wishes to submit new or additional information that had not been considered when the application was reviewed, he/she may submit an appeal in writing to the Subcommittee on Teacher Education. The appeal must be submitted to the Teacher Education Program office within the time frame determined by the Subcommittee on Teacher Education and prior to the next scheduled meeting. The candidate will be notified in writing within 30 days of the receipt of appeal regarding the status of the decision.

Retention in the Teacher Education Program
All candidates must demonstrate satisfactory progress toward completion of licensure at each transition point. All requirements are indicators of growth in becoming a competent, capable and caring teacher. If a candidate is not making satisfactory progress as described in the assessment plan at each transition point, the candidate will be notified of his/her suspension and/or removal from the Teacher Education Program. During this time, the candidate works with his/her education advisor. The candidate may reapply for readmission upon meeting the prescribed requirements. The candidate has the right to submit an appeal in writing to the Subcommittee on Teacher Education. The appeal must be submitted to the Teacher Education Program office within the time frame determined by the Subcommittee on Teacher Education and prior to the next scheduled meeting. The candidate will be notified in writing of recommendations within 30 days of the receipt of appeal.

Higher Education Report Card
The Higher Education Report Card is a federal requirement of Title II for all colleges and universities offering teacher preparation. Mount Union is proud to announce that in the eleventh year of reporting, the 2009-2010 academic class of new teachers continued to perform successfully on PRAXIS II tests required to obtain licensure. This information will continue to serve as a benchmark as the University builds upon its rich tradition of preparing new educators.

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Requirements for the Major in Early Childhood Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 CE 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 CE 250 Education of Young Children 3 CE 315 Teaching Social Studies to Young Children 3 CE 320 Teaching Mathematics to Young Children 3 CE 322 Family-Community Collaboration 1 CE 335 Teaching Science to Young Children 3 CE 325 Teaching Emergent Readers and Writers 3 CE 345 Content Area Reading and Writing Instruction in 3 Early Childhood Education CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management 3 CE 411 Best Practice in Eartly Childhood Education 3 CE 465 Preclinical and Best Practice in Early Childhood 2 Total Additional coursework is necessary for licensure. 33

Requirements for the Minor in Early Childhood Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 CE 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 CE 250 Education of Young Children 3 CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management 3 Any One from the Following Courses CE 315 Teaching Social Studies to Young Children CE 320 Teaching Mathematics to Young Children CE 335 Teaching Science to Young Children Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 15

Requirements for the Major in Middle Childhood Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 ME 200W Introduction to Middle School 3 ME 250 Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar 1 ME 325 Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School 3 ME 345 Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School 3 ME 350 Middle School Field Experience/Seminar 1 ME 411 Best Practice in Middle Childhood Education 3 ME 465 Preclinical Practice – Middle School 2 Any Two from the Following Courses Semester Hours (which relate directly to the teacher candidate’s chosen areas of emphasis) ME 315 Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School 3 ME 320 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School 3 ME 335 Teaching Science in the Middle School 3 ED 340 Phonics, Processes and the Structure of Language 3 (only language arts area of emphasis). Total Additional coursework is required for licensure. 25

Requirements for the Minor in Middle Childhood Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 ME 200W Introduction to Middle School 3 ME 250 Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar 1 ME 345 Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School 3 Any Two from the Following Courses ME 315 Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School ME 320 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School Semester Hours 3 3

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ME 325 ME 335 Total

Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School Teaching Science in the Middle School

3 3 16

Requirements for the Major in Intervention Specialist
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 CE 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 CE 322 Family-Community Collaboration 1 EI 200 Introduction to Intervention Specialist 3 EI 205 Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability 3 EI 210 Low Incidence Exceptionalities 3 EI 300 The Family and Child with a Disability 2 EI 310 Intervention Specialist General Curriculum 3 EI 330 Intervention Specialist General Methods 3 EI 400 Behavior Management 3 EI 411 Best Practice in Intervention Specialist 3 EI 465 Preclinical and Best Practice in Intervention Specialist 2 Total Additional coursework is required for licensure. 32

Requirements for the Minor in Intervention Specialist
Required Courses ED 150W Foundations of Education EI 200 Introduction to Intervention Specialist EI 205 Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability EI 210 Low Incidence Exceptionalities EI 310 Intervention Specialist General Curriculum Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 15

Requirements for the Minor in Adolescence to Young Adult Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 AE 201 Introduction to Adolescent Education 3 AE 262 Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents 3 AE 372 Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation 3 of Adolescent Education AE 465 Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult 2 Any One from the Following Courses AE 350 Teaching Social Studies Methods AE 360 Teaching Science Methods EH 300 Teaching Writing MA 395 The Teaching of Mathematics Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 17

Additional coursework is required for licensure. Those not desiring to do clinical practice or pursue a license may substitute ED 355 or another approved education course for AE 465. Each licensure area also requires coursework in disciplines other than education. This additional coursework should be carefully chosen and scheduled to fulfill general education requirements (or other University requirements) when appropriate. Please refer to Catalogue listings of specific department course grade requirements. It is essential that a candidate wishing to minor in education consult an advisor in the Department of Education early in the first year at Mount Union.

Requirements for the Minor in Multiage Education
Required Courses Semester Hours ED 150W Foundations of Education 3 ME 200W Introduction to Middle School 3 AE 262 Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents 3 AE 372 Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation in 3 Adolescent Education CE 332 Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Multiage 3 Areas ED 355 Content Area Reading 3

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Total

18

Additional coursework is required for licensure. Each licensure area also requires coursework in disciplines other than education. This additional coursework should be carefully chosen and scheduled to fulfill general education requirements (or other University requirements) when appropriate. Please refer to Catalogue listings of specific department course grade requirements. It is essential that a candidate wishing to minor in education consult an advisor in the Department of Education early in the first year at Mount Union.

Requirements for Honors in Education
Candidates are eligible to enter the Honors Program in education if they have at least a 3.5 grade-point average in their education major, education minor or permission from the Honors Review Board. To receive honors in education, a candidate must have at least a 3.5 grade-point average at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. For permission to register for an honors course, a completed application form must be filed with the director of honors programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to taking the course. Candidates must earn a “B+” or higher in their honor courses to earn honors credit. Either CE 410, ME 410 or EI 410 is a requirement for honors in education. Candidates may take any 300 level or above courses for honors in education.

Adolescence to Young Adult Course Descriptions
AE 201 Introduction to Adolescent Education. This course focuses on the modern secondary school from the perspective of structure, curricular learning, teacher and student. Emphasis is placed upon the role of the secondary teacher and how he/she affects the education and development of the adolescent. Issues of race, gender, diversity and their impact on the modern secondary school will be studied. Twenty clock hours of field experience in a secondary school are required. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AE 262 Conceptual Issues Related to Teaching Adolescents. The professional practice of the secondary teacher is examined in this course. Candidates analyze the various roles that are now used to define exemplary teaching performance. These include: lifelong learner, collaborator, problem solver, communicator, group member, decision maker, value analyzer, integrator of instructional design, thinker, organizer, leader, risk taker and reflective practitioner. Twenty clock hours of field experience in a secondary school are required. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) AE 335 Methods in Adolescent Education. This is a multidisciplinary methods course for candidates who are preparing to teach in adolescence to young adult programs. Content includes: theories, models and strategies for teaching diverse learners, planning instruction, creating effective learning environments and collaboration with parents and other professionals. Emphasis is placed on helping the candidate to develop the professional knowledge base necessary for success in accordance with the requirements of state and other educational agencies. Twenty clock hours of field experience in a secondary school are required. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. AE 350 Teaching Social Studies to Adolescents. Using NCSS/NCATE and Ohio Model guidelines as the framework, candidates focus on establishing and maintaining learning environments that provide all students with an interdisciplinary understanding of social studies. Background for teaching social studies, instructional strategies, classroom management, planning instruction, assessment and professional development will be covered. The candidate will integrate the social studies content with inquiry processes that result in development of life-long problem solving skills. To be taken prior to or concurrently with preclinical practice. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AE 360 Teaching Science to Adolescents. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content, materials, technology and methods of instruction essential to the teaching of science to adolescent to young adult students is undertaken. It will stress discovery, inquiry and process-oriented science and will include an overview of current science curricula materials, classroom methodology and management regarding the teaching of science for all types of learners, ideas about science/technology/society and examples of science activities. Candidates will be exposed to science education philosophy, hands-on experiences with science equipment and materials and alternatives for sciencing in different classroom situations. Successful completion of 20 clock hours of field experience in a secondary school is required. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) AE 372 Assessment, Instructional Design and Evaluation in Adolescent Education. This course builds on the “theory base” developed in AE 335. Assessment techniques and standards are examined for their roles in the planning of instruction. Portfolios, performance-based assessments, rubrics, essential questions and understanding, validity, context and authenticity are included. Planning, evaluating and the integrating of instruction are also incorporated. Clinical experiences are conducted in the classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) AE 405W Advanced Techniques of Instructional Management. This course introduces candidates to a wide variety of tested strategies, activities and tools for creating positive dynamic learning environments. Research-based principles including the most recent information on brain-compatible teaching is incorporated. Current theories and models of classroom management including “assertive discipline,” “choice theory” and “building community” are incorporated with a goal of helping candidates proactively address common disciplinary issues before they become major problems. Strategies for working with “parents as partners” are also incorporated. Assignments are specific to the candidate’s individual licensure area. This course should be taken concurrently with preclinical practice. Prerequisite: appropriate methods course(s) in licensure area. 3 Sem. Hrs. AE 465 Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. In this course, the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in a secondary school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the preclinical practitioner’s major field of study. The preclinical practitioner is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The course is graded S/U. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) AE 466 Multiage Preclinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. In this course, the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in a secondary school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the preclinical practitioner’s major field of study. The preclinical practitioner is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical

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and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The course is graded S/U. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) AE 470 Clinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a secondary school setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) AE 471 Clinical Practice – Adolescence to Young Adult (Multiage). The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a secondary school setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.

Early Childhood Course Descriptions
CE 200 Introduction to Early Childhood Education. An introduction to the field of early childhood education, based on standards set by the National Association for Education of Young Children (NAEYC), includes the diversity of its historical and disciplinary roots; an in-depth study of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) including how it is informed, implemented and evaluated; and a review of the Code of Ethical Behavior. The inclusivity of DAP, as informed by guidelines set by the Council for Exceptional Children(CEC), will also be studied. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem Hrs. CE 250 Education of Young Children. Examination is made of the legislation and public policy that influence early childhood education. This course introduces candidates, in collaboration with parents and other professionals, to the development of IEPs (Individual Education Plans) and IFSPs (Initial Family Service Plans), allowing them to play an initial role in interagency collaboration, referral and consultation. Candidates learn the relationship of IEPs and IFSPs to curriculum and early childhood practice. Thirty clock hours of field experience in an inclusion kindergarten are required. Prerequisite: CE 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CE 315 Teaching Social Studies to Young Children. The candidate explores methods of teaching the social sciences to young children between the ages of 3 and 8, drawing upon Ohio’s Model Competency-Based Program and “Expectations of Excellence” and the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) curriculum standards. These serve as guidelines for interdisciplinary and multicultural lesson design. The incorporation of history, civics and geographical themes, in addition to appropriate use of children’s literature and technological resources in the designing of units, lessons and assessment to meet the needs of a variety of learners, will also be studied. If not taken concurrently with SO 311, 20 clock hours of community agency and family field experience are required. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 320 Teaching Mathematics to Young Children. This course includes a national and state standards-based study of the goals, content, material, technology and methods of teaching mathematics to young children between the ages of 3 and 8. Emphasis is placed on the young child’s natural mathematical development. Lessons are created based on play-centered activities, student exploration and ongoing assessment. Mathematical content for the young child is integrated throughout the course. A minimum of 20 clock hours of primary grade field experience is required to enhance in-class activities. Prerequisites: Completion of one mathematics course within the General Education Requirements and admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 322 Family – Community Collaboration. This is a one-week intensive placement in collaboration with a family of a young child receiving special services through a county board of mental retardation or a public school system. The primary focus is to provide candidates with the opportunity to observe, create and use communication and appropriate assessment strategies for the diverse needs of learners, families and communities. Through guided reflective journals, candidates will demonstrate respect for the reciprocity in collaborative relationships. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered every semester) CE 325 Teaching Emergent Readers and Writers. This course offers a study of theories of language acquisition and the development of narrative reading and writing. Attention is given to issues, purpose, materials, technology and processes for teaching emergent and early reading and writing. A firm knowledge base and skills in planning, delivery and assessment of content based on Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts model are developed. This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical foundation in the teaching of the language arts strands (reading, writing, listening, viewing, visual representation and speaking). These strands are seen as interactive processes through texts and trade books in a rich literacy environment. The impact on individual differences on emergent reading and writing is emphasized. Primary grade field experiences are required. CE 345 and ED 340 should be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CE 326 Teaching Emergent Literacy. A study of the theories, purposes, materials, technology, and processes for teaching reading and writing in preschool and primary school. Emphasis is on emergent literacy development and the developmental process that is influenced by various factors and is sensitive to individual differences (diversity, exceptionalities). Field experiences in primary and preschool levels. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and ME 325. 3 Sem. Hrs. CE 332 Developmentally Appropriate Practice for Multiage Areas. The centrality of play and integration of the Ohio Models are emphasized in the course. Learning the key elements of the fine arts of drama, music, creative movement, dance and visual arts as well as physical education appropriate for young children is enhanced in the course for candidates pursuing multiage licenses. Not required for BME candidates. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 335 Teaching Science to Young Children. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content, materials, technology and methods of instruction essential to the teaching of science to young children between the ages of 3 and 8 is undertaken. Emphasis is placed on lesson development based on play-centered activities, exploration and hands-on experiences. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in one or completion of two science courses (one physical and one life) within the General Education Requirements and admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CE 340 Teaching Mathematics and Science in the Elementary School. This course focuses on the integration of mathematics and science in the elementary school (grades 4 and 5). It addresses the Ohio Academic Content Standards and Teacher Education Program goals. Candidates will

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explore the dynamic context and needs of mathematics and science classrooms, and design engaging lessons that integrate mathematics and science, including the use of inquiry and technology to meet the needs of diverse learners (e.g. ELL exceptionalities, learning styles, etc). Field experience is required in order to complete course assignments. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. CE 345 Content Area Reading and Writing Instruction in Early Childhood Education. A study of the emerging process of expository reading and writing. This course reviews the methods, material, technology and study skills applicable to content area reading and writing for young children between the ages of 3 and 8. A firm knowledge base and skills in planning, delivery and assessment based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts model are developed. A focus on the understanding of interaction of language arts strands as influenced by various factors and sensitive to the individual differences (cultural, linguistic, gender and exceptionalities) is made. Special emphasis is placed on themed curriculum and integrating various types of literature in the content areas. Primary grade field experiences are required. CE 325 and ED 340 should be taken concurrently. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) CE 350 Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies in the Elementary School. This course focuses on the integration of language arts and social studies in the elementary school (grades 4 and 5). It addresses the Ohio Academic Content Standards and Teacher Education Program goals. Candidates will explore the dynamic context and needs of language arts and social studies classrooms and design engaging lessons that integrate language arts and social studies, including the use of literature and technology to meet the needs of diverse learners (e.g. ELL exceptionalities, learning styles, etc). Field experience is required in order to complete course assignments. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. CE 370 Early Childhood-Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment approaches, procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special attention is given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A focus on the diverse and exceptional needs of students is included. The field experience includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis, and remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a primary grade student is required. Prerequisite: CE 325 or CE345. Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. CE 380W Classroom Structures and Behavior Management. This course considers theories, basic principles and procedures of classroom structure and behavior management. Management of inclusion settings also is addressed. Behavioral assessment, self-assessment and self-control skills are emphasized. A sensitivity to possible differences between classroom behavioral expectations and the home environment is developed. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. Corequisite: CE 465. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 410 Research Design. This course affords students the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship in education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement while drawing from and developing scientific capabilities in a broad spectrum. Students engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. CE 411 Best Practices in Early Childhood Education. Emphasis in the course is placed on “best practice” teaching that is aligned with the NAEYC standards through Developmentally Appropriate Practice. The course focus is on teacher decision making that draws on three bodies of knowledge: what teachers know about how children develop and learn, what teachers know about the individual children in their group and knowledge of the social and cultural context in which those children live and learn. Early childhood majors must take this course concurrently with CE 465. This course is the SCE for early childhood majors. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 465 Preclinical Practice - Early Childhood. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in a preschool, kindergarten or primary grade setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to early childhood education. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in instructional, clinical and non-instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. This course is graded S/U. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The early childhood education candidates will provide artifacts of their individual practice in regards to the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s (NAEYC) Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP). This course is taken concurrently with CE 411. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) CE 466 Multiage Preclinical Practice – Early Childhood. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in a preschool, kindergarten or primary grade setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the candidate’s major field of study. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator and include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II) as well as workshops in identification of communicable diseases, abuse and neglect and first aid and CPR. This course is graded S/U and is taken concurrently with CE 380W only for early childhood majors and CE 332 for applicable multiage minors. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) CE 470 Clinical Practice - Early Childhood Education. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a kindergarten through grade 3 setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U and is required for early childhood licensure. Group seminars to enable collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. CE 471 Clinical Practice - Early Childhood Education (Multiage). The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a kindergarten through grade 3 setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars to enable collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Offered every semester. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs.

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Education Course Descriptions
ED 150W Foundations of Education. This is the first course taken in the professional sequence for candidates in all teaching fields and licensure areas. A wide range of topics is explored including historical and philosophical foundations of American education, the role of the teacher, instruction and curriculum and issues impacting students in the schools. A key component of the course will be the candidate’s definition, exploration and evaluation of the mission to teach at the early, middle and adolescent levels. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required. This course is a prerequisite for all other early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence to young adult and multiage candidates. This course should be taken in the spring semester of the freshman year. Prerequisite: Must be prospective education major/minor or have permission from the chair of the Department of Education. 3 Sem. Hrs. ED 199 Special Topics in Education. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. ED 213 Comparative Education. The course focuses on educational practices and global trends (historical, economic, social and cultural forces) that influence education. Case studies will be utilized to stimulate discussion to help students develop a global perspective of universal educational problems. The course is designed to have a central theme to further opportunities for comparison, e.g. creativity, pedagogy, assessment, curriculum, etc. The course addresses the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Ohio Department of Education’s goals that deal with diversity. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1} (typically offered spring semester) ED 215 Multicultural Education. This course introduces the conceptual, theoretical and philosophical issues in multicultural education. The underlying theme is that education is a social concept that should be made more accessible and equitable to all students. Lectures, discussion, projects, guest speakers and field trips are among the instructional modalities. Upon completion of this course, teacher candidates will have the basic understanding of the theoretical and fundamental underpinnings of multicultural education and be better equipped to accommodate students from different cultures in their classrooms. This course addresses the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Ohio Department of Education’s goals for diversity. Prerequisite: ED 150W or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. ED 299 Special Topics. A course designed to permit the offering of special subjects appropriate to the education program at the sophomore level. Such offerings will fill special needs of specific students, take advantage of the expertise of a visiting professor or serve as an initial experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. Regular or frequently recurring topics are not offered under this title. Prerequisite: As established by the department. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Credit variable, 1-4 Sem. Hrs. ED 340 Phonics, Processes and the Structure of Language. This course focuses on the nature, role and elements of phonics and phonemic awareness with the language arts processes. A firm knowledge and skill base in planning, instruction and assessment based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts Model curriculum is developed. Emphasis is on the developmental processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing and the structure of language. Special attention is given to work recognition, vocabulary and comprehension strategies utilized by fluent readers. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) ED 355 Content Area Reading. Emphasis is placed on the development and adaptation of reading, writing and study skills as applied to the content areas. Objectives, content, materials, technology, methods and evaluation necessary in promoting reading at the middle, adolescent and multiage levels are developed. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) ED 399 Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description. ED 400 Independent Study in Education. This course is available to juniors or seniors majoring and minoring in education. The candidate, in consultation with a member of the Department of Education, will select a topic or problem and do an in-depth study. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. ED 420 Reading Professionalism and Practicum. Candidates develop professional knowledge and dispositions. They work with colleagues to observe, evaluate, reflect, and provide feedback on instructional reading practices. They participate in, initiate, implement, and evaluate reading professional development programs. Additionally, candidates collaborate with other educational professionals while utilizing assessment and instructional practices. Candidates participate in an extensive reading field experience (minimum 40 clock hours). Group seminars for curriculum development, collaboration, and reflection are arranged. Candidates complete requirements aligned with the International Reading Association standards. Prerequisites: ME326 or CE326 and Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr. ED 480 Post-graduate Clinical Practice. This course is designed for the post graduate who has completed requirements in a new (additional) teaching/licensure area. The practitioner assumes full responsibilities of teaching in his/her new respective teaching/licensure area for a minimum of 30 to 60 hours. The hour and credit requirements for clinical practice will be determined by the transcript reviewer and by the field placement coordinator on an individual basis. Clinical practitioners will register for 1 semester hour for 30 hours of clinical practice and 2 semester hours for 60 hours. The course is graded S/U. Prerequisites: Completion of all Mount Union Teacher Education Program requirements and approval by the transcript reviewer and by the field placement coordinator 1-2 Sem. Hrs. ED 494 Honors Seminar. See All-University 494 course description.

Intervention Specialist Course Descriptions
EI 200 Introduction to Intervention Specialist. A study of the role and the function of the special educator dealing with mild/moderate learners in self-contained, mainstreamed and inclusion settings and issues in definition, identification and placement procedures. The course addresses the unique needs of young children (P-grade 3) with disabilities in the classroom, and transitions from one placement to another as well as an in-depth study of developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) including how it is informed, implemented and evaluated and individually appropriate practice. Knowledge of major researchers and historians, variations in beliefs, traditions and values across cultures and current practices in the field will be addressed. Prerequisite: ED 150W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 205 Language Acquisition, Behavior and Disability. An overview of language, both typical and atypical, emphasizing terminology, acquisition, development, physiological and psychological systems, impact on learning, assessment and intervention strategies including augmentative communication, that are available to teachers. Prerequisites: ED 150W and EI 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 210 Low-Incidence Exceptionalities. This course focuses on the methods teachers use to organize curriculum and implement assessment and instruction to ensure maximum learning for students with low-incidence disabilities. Candidates are exposed to the curriculum emphasis of low-

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incidence disabled students such as life, vocational and social skills and the functional academics. Candidates are required to identify and define various low-incidence disabilities including young children with multiple and intense needs, medically fragile children and those with complex behavioral issues. They will be expected to complete field experiences, lesson planning and curriculum implementation, consultation and research of available journals and resources for teaching students with low-incidence disabilities. Placement and accommodation issues in integrated educational settings are also included. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 300 The Family and Child With a Disability. In this course, the focus is on the process of interactive teaming, designed to support students with disabilities within the context of standards-based reform. Candidates will learn about the process of teaming and collaboration with professionals, students and their families and apply this process to students with various types of disabilities. At the end of this course, the candidate will have a solid understanding of the roles and responsibilities of members of a collaborative team and have a strong list of resources to support students with disabilities and their families. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) EI 310 Intervention Specialist General Curriculum. This course offers candidates an introduction to inclusive environments and services as well as other classroom characteristics such as self-contained and resource rooms. Legal and ethical considerations relating to special education are also discussed. Candidates will have an understanding of formal and non-formal evaluation methods to assess young children (P-3), grades 4-6 and grades 712 with mild/moderate disabilities which include standardized and state and federally mandated alternative assessment practices. The course examines the role of the teacher in the team-based assessment and multi-factored evaluation processes for both early intervention and the IEP (Individual Education Plans) in K-12. This course will involve practical application and discussion. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 330 Intervention Specialist General Methods. Methods for designing and implementing instruction for students with mild/moderate disabilities. Topics include individualized programming for young children (P-3), grades 4-6 and grades 7-12, designing and managing environments, social interactions, materials, critical teaching behaviors, non-biased meaningful assessment in decision making and skills and knowledge strategy in mathematics, reading and writing. Candidates will participate in a variety of activities to demonstrate the skills and knowledge acquired in the classroom setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 370 Intervention Specialist-Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment approaches, procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special attention is given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A focus on the diverse and exceptional needs of students is included. This field experience includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis and remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a special needs student is required. Prerequisite: CE 325 or ME325. Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 400 Behavior Management. This course considers theories, basic principles and procedures of classroom structure and behavior management. Management of inclusion settings also is addressed. Behavioral assessment, self-assessment and self-control skills are emphasized. The course covers topics related to collecting data, using data to make decisions, analyzing data, graphing data and applying principles of behavior management and instruction to children and youth. Sensitivity to possible differences between classroom behavioral expectations and the home environment is developed. Candidates expand their knowledge of basic applied behavior analysis principles and develop skills for remediating behavior problems using functional behavioral assessment. Candidates learn the techniques and skills needed to address current inclusive classroom management issues as well as how to develop effective teaching strategies for an inclusive classroom. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) EI 410 Research Design. This course affords candidates the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship in education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement while drawing from and developing scientific capabilities in a broad spectrum. Candidates engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. EI 411 Best Practices in Intervention Specialist. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for intervention specialist majors. Emphasis in the course is placed on “best practice” teaching that is aligned with the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) standards. Intervention specialist majors must take this course concurrently with EI 465. Those candidates seeking early childhood intervention specialist licensure will focus on the NAEYC standards in cooperation with the CEC standards. Those candidates seeking mild/moderate intervention specialist license will focus on the areas of concentrations’ Specialized Professional Association (SPA) standards in cooperation with the CEC standards. Prerequisites: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) EI 465 Preclinical Practice – Intervention Specialist. In this course the candidate spends 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 hours) in a special education setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to the candidate’s major field of study. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. This course is graded S/U. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or nondiverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. The intervention specialist candidates will provide artifacts of their individual practice in regards to the Council for Exceptional Children’s Standards. This course is taken concurrently with EI 411. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) EI 470 Clinical Practice - Intervention Specialist. The candidate assumes all responsibilities of teaching in a special education setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. This course is graded S/U and is required for intervention specialist licensure. Group seminars to enable collaboration, evaluation and reflection are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (age range and diverse or non-diverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

Middle Childhood Course Descriptions
ME 200W Introduction to the Middle School. This course is an introduction to the history, philosophy, social/cultural influences and organization of the middle school. The course emphasizes the role of the teacher in the middle school and the relationship between the diverse needs of the young adolescent and the curriculum. Twenty clock hours of field experience are required. Prerequisite: ED 150. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

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ME 250 Middle School Community Field Experience/Seminar. Directed on-site observation and participation in various educational, social, health and community settings are featured. The emphasis is on how the teacher collaborates with social and community services and families in diverse settings to enhance the education of the young adolescent. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required. This course is to be taken spring semester of the sophomore year. 1 Sem. Hr. ME 315 Teaching Social Studies in the Middle School. This course includes a study of the objectives, content, materials and methods of instruction essential for teaching social studies in the middle school. Emphasis is placed on developing a firm knowledge base that includes an understanding of content and skills in social studies based on Ohio’s Model Competency-Based Program. Reflective decision making on selection and integration of the six strands in the Ohio model, appropriate to the candidates’ levels and different settings, is also emphasized. This course also focuses on the multicultural and diversity aspects of teaching. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ME 320 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School. A national and state standards-based (NCTM, NNSA and Ohio Standards) study of the goals, content, materials, technology and methods of teaching mathematics in the middle school is emphasized. A minimum of 20 clock hours of middle school field experience is required to enhance in-class activities. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ME 325 Teaching Reading and Writing in the Middle School. This course focuses on the theories, issues, purposes, materials, technology and processes for teaching narrative reading and writing in the middle school. A firm knowledge and skill base in planning, instruction and assessment, based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts Model curriculum, is developed. This course is designed to provide candidates with a theoretical foundation of knowledge about teaching the language arts strands (reading, writing, listening, speaking) as interactive processes, through traditional and literature-based texts. Emphasis is on the emergent (developmental) process that is influenced by various factors and is sensitive to individual differences (e.g., diversity, exceptionality). Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) ME 326 Teaching Adolescent and Young Adult Literacy. A study of the theories, purposes, materials, technology, and processes for teaching reading and writing in the middle and secondary school. Emphasis is on adolescent and young adult literacy development and the developmental process that is influenced by various factors and is sensitive to individual differences (diversity, exceptionalities). Field experiences in middle and secondary levels. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program and CE 325. 3 Sem. Hrs. ME 335 Teaching Science in the Middle School. A national and state standards-based study of objectives, content materials, technology and methods of teaching science in the middle school is emphasized. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ME 345 Content Area Reading and Writing in the Middle School. Emphasis is placed on the development, purpose, methods, materials, technology and processes of teaching reading and writing and study skills, applicable to the content areas in the middle school curriculum. A firm knowledge base and skills in planning, instruction and assessment, based on the Ohio Department of Education’s Competency-Based Language Arts Model curriculum, is developed. The understanding of reading and writing, as well as the other language arts strands as interactive processes influenced by various factors and sensitive to individual differences (e.g., diversity, exceptionality), is emphasized. Special attention is given to unit integration and integrating various types of literature (e.g., multicultural, gender studies) in the content areas. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ME 350 Middle School Field Experience/Seminar. This course provides a directed on-site educational observation and participation experience in a middle school environment. A weekly seminar addressing issues in the middle school is included. Thirty clock hours of field experience are required. This course is to be taken spring semester of the junior year. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 1 Sem. Hr. ME 370 Middle School- Meeting Individual Needs in Reading. Understanding of the assessment process and various assessment approaches, procedures useful in assessment and diagnosis and the remediation of reading, writing and language problems are emphasized. Special attention is given to portfolio usage, performance assessment and the alignment of assessment with curriculum and instruction. A secondary focus is on the diverse and exceptional needs of students. IDEA, the nature and needs of exceptional children, as well as IEP development are included. The field experience includes an intensive case study which incorporates reading assessment, diagnosis and remediation of a school-aged student. Field experience with a middle grade student is required. Prerequisite: ME 325 or ME345. Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ME 410 Research Design. This course affords students the opportunity to participate in the community of scientific research and scholarship in education as part of their University experience. It furthers excellence in performance and achievement, while drawing from and developing scientific capabilities in a broad spectrum. Students engage in proposing an original piece of research along with a pilot study and/or actual research, which will be presented in a public forum. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. ME 411 Best Practices in Middle Childhood Education. The course focus is on teacher decision-making that draws upon the knowledge, skills and dispositions of middle school educators to develop healthy, productive and ethical students. The content is aligned with the NMSA and state standards, as well as “best practice” research to improve the educational experiences of young adolescents. Middle childhood majors take this course concurrently with ME 465. This course is the SCE for middle childhood majors. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program and senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ME 465 Preclinical Practice – Middle School. In this course the candidate spends approximately 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 clock hours) in a middle school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to one of the candidate’s areas of emphasis. The candidate works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars, collaboratively arranged by the instructor and field placement coordinator, include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). This course is taken concurrently with ME 411. The preclinical practitioner will complete the field experience in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice is completed in the opposite setting. This course focuses on the nexus between theory and practice. Based on state and national middle school standards, as well as “best practice” research, the course emphasizes such topics as classroom management, collaborating in teams to create and teach interdisciplinary units appropriate for a diverse population, advising middle school students in a teacher-based guidance program, etc. This course is taken concurrently with CE 411 and is graded S/U. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester)

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ME 466 Multiage Preclinical Practice-Middle School. In this course the candidate spends approximately 12-13 hours per week for seven to eight weeks (90 clock hours) in a middle school setting daily observing and applying theories, principles and methods of teaching related to one of the candidate’s areas of emphasis. The candidate is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. The completion of an Impact on Student Learning Unit is required. Group seminars, arranged by the field placement coordinator, include preparation of the portfolio (PORT II). This course is graded S/U and is taken concurrently with ME 400. The preclinical practitioner will make a choice of completing preclinical practice in a diverse or non-diverse setting. Clinical practice will be completed in the opposite setting. Prerequisite: Admission into the Teacher Education Program. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) ME 470 Clinical Practice - Middle Childhood Education. The candidate assumes full responsibilities of teaching in a middle school setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester with placement in two areas of emphasis. A special emphasis is on self-reflection, professional development and a commitment to lifelong learning. This course is graded S/U and is required for the middle childhood licensure. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) ME 471 Clinical Practice – Middle Childhood Education (Multiage). The candidate assumes full responsibilities of teaching in a middle school setting from the first day of the fourth week through the last day of the semester. A special emphasis is on self-reflection, professional development and a commitment to lifelong learning. This course is graded S/U. Group seminars are arranged by the field placement coordinator. The clinical practitioner’s setting for clinical practice (diverse or nondiverse) will be the opposite of the preclinical choice. Prerequisite: Admission into Clinical Practice. 12 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

Department of Engineering
The goal of the Department of Engineering is to offer programs that provide technical breadth and depth in an engineering discipline and are integrated with the overall mission of Mount Union. These programs will prepare graduates to become leaders in the engineering profession. The Department of Engineering will seek accreditation for the Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering programs after the first students graduate per the timeline specified by ABET.

Requirements for the Major in Civil Engineering
The civil engineering program focuses on applying the principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics to four technical areas in civil engineering, conducting civil engineering experiments and analyzing and interpreting the results, and designing a system, component, or process in more than one civil engineering context. The required courses listed below are for the first two years of the major. Please refer to www.mountunion.edu/civil-engineering for current required courses and course descriptions. Required Courses * Semester Hours EGE 110 Introduction to the Engineering Profession 2 EGE 120 Introduction to Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving 4 EGE 210 Statics and Dynamics 4 EGE 220 Thermal Sciences I 4 EGE 230 Material Science 2 EGE 240 Mechanics of Materials 2 Required Extra-Departmental Courses* CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II MA 241 Calculus III MA 333 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II *Required courses for the first two years of the program.

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Requirements for the Major in Mechanical Engineering
The mechanical engineering program focuses on applying the principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics to model, analyze, design, and realize physical systems, components, or processes and to work professionally in both thermal and mechanical systems. The required courses listed below are for the first two years of the major. Please refer to www.mountunion.edu/mechanical-engineering for current required courses and course descriptions. Required Courses* Semester Hours EGE 110 Introduction to the Engineering Profession 2 EGE 120 Introduction to Engineering Analysis & Problem Solving 4 EGE 210 Statics and Dynamics 4 EGE 220 Thermal Sciences I 4 EGE 230 Material Science 2 EGE 240 Mechanics of Materials 2 Required Extra-Departmental Courses* CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry MA 141 Calculus I

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MA 142 Calculus II MA 241 Calculus III MA 333 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II

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Course Descriptions
EGE 110 Introduction to the Engineering Profession. A highly interactive seminar style course that explores all aspects of the engineering profession, including engineering disciplines, challenges, education, and employment; creativity and design; and the professional responsibilities of engineers. Student teams make presentations that discuss the relevance of course topics to current events. 2 Sem. Hrs. EGE 120 Introduction to Engineering Analysis and Problem Solving. A hands-on introduction to the practice of engineering and the use of engineering tools to solve problems and design products. Students will complete individual and team assignments using hardware and software platforms. Prerequisites: EGE 110 and MA 141. (MA 141 may be taken concurrently.) 4 Sem. Hrs. EGE 210 Statics and Dynamics. The study of force systems in two and three dimensions to explore the principles of equilibrium applied to various bodies and simple structures, the motion of a particle, and the kinematics and kinetics of plane motion of rigid bodies. The principles of work and energy and impulse and momentum are also introduced. Course makes extensive use of vector methods. Prerequisites: MA 141 with a grade of C or better, PH 101, and MA 142. (MA 142 may be taken concurrently.) 4 Sem. Hrs. EGE 220 Thermal Sciences I. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of heat, power, and fluid motion. Presents property relationships for incompressible substances, simple pure substances, and ideal gases. Applies the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the analyses of processes for open and closed systems. Fluid applications include fluid statics, incompressible fluid flow, and energy losses in pipes. Prerequisites: MA 142, CH 111W, and EGE 210. 4 Sem. Hrs. EGE 230 Material Science. Introduction to the structure, processing, properties, and performance of engineering materials, including metals, glasses, ceramics, and composites. Prerequisite: CH 111W. 2 Sem. Hrs. EGE 240 Mechanics of Materials. Introduction to the behavior of materials, including stress/strain at a point, principle stresses and strains, stress-strain relationships, determination of stresses and deformations in situations involving axial loading and flexural loading of straight members. Prerequisite: EGE 210. 2 Sem. Hrs.  

Department of English
The objectives of the Department of English are to educate students in written and oral expression, linguistics, the cultural significance of literature and literary history. The department prepares majors for teaching, graduate study and professional and business careers.

Requirements for the Major in English: Literature
Required Courses EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I EH 296W Human Experience in Literature and Language II EH 310 Critical Theory and Rhetoric EH 430 English Seminar (SCE) One additional literature course at the 200, 300 or 400 level Any One from the Following Language, Theory and History Courses EH 340 Literacies EH 385 Introduction to Linguistics EH 390 Seminar in Language, Theory and History EH 405 History of the English Language EH 444 Seminar in Linguistics Any One from the Following Pre-1800 British Literature Courses EH 315 The English Renaissance EH 328 Medieval English Literature EH 410 Shakespeare EH 413 Chaucer Any One from the Following Post-1800 British Literature Courses EH 332 Neoclassicism and Romantic Literature EH 345 Victorian and Early 20th Century Literature Any One from the Following Early American Literature Courses EH 371 Early American Literature EH 372 19th Century American Literature Any One from the Following Contemporary American Literature Courses Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours

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EH 352 EH 373

American Postmodernism 20th Century American Literature

3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 36

Any One from the Following Literature Genre Courses EH 335 Studies in the Literary Essay EH 350 Studies in Drama EH 356 Studies in Autobiography EH 360 Studies in Poetry EH 365 Studies in the Novel EH 380 Studies in the Short Story Any One from the Following Writing Genre Courses EH 216 Writing Fiction EH 217 Writing Poetry EH 243 Writing Drama EH 247 Writing Literary Nonfiction EH 392 Seminar in Creative Writing Total

Note: A student may not major in English: literature and minor in English.

Requirements for the Major in English: Writing
Required Courses EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I EH 296W Human Experience in Literature and Language II EH 310 Critical Theory and Rhetoric EH 435 English Seminar (SCE) Semester Hours 3 3 3 3

Any Two from the Following Language, Theory and History Semester Hours Courses EH 319 Issues and Methods in Rhetoric and Composition 3 EH 340 Literacies 3 EH 385 Introduction to Linguistics 3 EH 390 Seminar in Language, Theory and History 3 EH 405 History of the English Language 3 EH 444 Seminar in Linguistics 3 An approved literature course at the 200 level or above 3 Any Four from the Following Writing Courses Professional Writing (choose 3-9 credit hours) EH 240W Business and Technical Writing EH 245W Argumentative Writing EH 330 Theories and Practices of Editing EH 391 Seminar in Professional Writing CM 250W Introduction to Journalism CM 255 Introduction to Public Relations CM 256 Print Production and Design CM 350 Advanced Journalism Creative Writing (choose 3-9 credit hours) EH 216 Writing Fiction EH 217 Writing Poetry EH 243 Writing Drama EH 247 Writing Literary Nonfiction EH 392 Seminar in Creative Writing Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

3 3 3 3 3

Any of the Following Practicum/Application Courses Semester Hours Totaling Six Hours EH 300 Teaching Writing 3 EH 301 Writing Center Practicum (can be repeated three times) 1 EH 302 Calliope Practicum (can be repeated three times) 1 EH 317 Writing Workshop 3 EH 450 Independent Study 3 EH 499 Internship 3 Total 36

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Note: A student may not major in English: writing and minor in English.

Requirements for the Minor in English
Required English Courses Semester Hours EH 295W Human Experience in Literature and Language I 3 Four additional EH courses beyond EH 100/EH 120 12 No more than one 100-level EH course (excluding EH 100/120) At least two EH courses at the 300-level or above Total 15

Requirements for Honors in English
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in English: literature or the Honors Program in English: writing if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in English: literature or honors in English: writing, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be EH 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in English: literature or honors in English: writing include any 200 level or above course required for the major. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about the Honors Program.

Course Descriptions
EH 100 College Writing. A course requiring a research paper and frequent written assignments related to classroom discussions and readings. Individual conferences help students formulate, organize and express ideas. EH 100 is a prerequisite to all other English courses and does not count toward a major or minor in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.} EH 100I College Writing Intensive. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who lack wide experience in writing for the academic community. The purposes of the course are to help students improve their writing abilities, develop and gain confidence in their analytical abilities and discover and develop their own academic voices. The course will fulfill the same requirements as EH 100, but it will entail two additional hours of class time and more personal attention. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.} EH 120 Advanced College Writing. A course in expository writing, including research writing, for the exceptionally strong student writer. This course meets all requirements met by EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,1.} EH 130 Introduction to Poetry. An introduction to the nature and function of poetry as a literary genre. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing and understanding patterns of cultural, ethical and aesthetic experience as these are reflected in a variety of poems by a diverse range of authors. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} EH 135 Introduction to Fiction. An introduction to the study of fiction through the analysis and interpretation of representative examples. A thematic focus may be used to provide a basis for comparing writing from diverse periods and places. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} EH 140 Popular Literature. This course is designed to provide scholarly background to genres that have gained wide readership in various historical periods. The focus of the course will alternate each time it is taught among the following: detective fiction, science fiction, gothic fiction and romance. In each case, students will be provided with historical background and critical strategies for approaching these popular genres. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} EH 147W Introduction to Literary Non-Fiction. An introduction to the genre of literary non-fiction through the analysis and interpretation of representative examples. Extensive reading and discussion of essays, from short, journalistic pieces to longer, book-length pieces. This course may be taught either thematically or historically. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} EH 199 Special Topics in English. See All-University 199 course descriptions on page 49. EH 210 Children’s Literature. A course exploring the scope, importance and content of literature for children. Students will be exposed to the techniques of evaluation and methods of presenting and studying literature with children. Priority is given to students seeking licensure in inclusive early childhood education. Prerequisite: EH 100, ED 150W and CE 200 [CE 200 may be taken concurrently]. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} EH 216 Writing Short Fiction. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of short fiction. Small group conferences as well as regular classes. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 217 Writing Poetry. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of poems. Small group conferences as well as regular classes. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 216 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 235 Practical English Grammar. A study of grammatical conventions and standard vocabulary of written English; emphasis will be on the application of grammar, punctuation, conventions and usage. This course includes required writing assignments. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 240W Business and Technical Writing. A course examining the rhetorical foundations of business, professional and technical writing. Emphasis will be given to such rhetorical elements as style, audience, purpose and convention and how these varying contextual factors affect the creation and reception of professional and technical writing. Prerequisite: EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 243 Writing Drama. An exploration of the unique challenges of writing drama, conducted in a workshop environment in which students write and share original one-act plays. In addition to writing drama, the course will include a study of the elements of drama, dramatic theory and the analysis of published one-act plays. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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EH 245W Argumentative Writing. The study of argument as a rhetorical mode of communication. Emphasis will be given to analysis, argumentative structure (claim, premise, evidence and warrants), research and the examination and production of effective written arguments across disciplines. Prerequisite: EH 100, EH 100I or EH 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 247 Writing Literary Non-Fiction. An exploration of the creative process; directed writing of literary non-fiction. Small group conferences, workshops and full class meetings. Prerequisites: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 250 African-American Literature. An introduction to works of poetry, prose and fiction by African-American writers. Special attention will be placed on those historical factors and literary traditions which shaped African-American literature and eventually led to works by authors such as Hughes, Hurston, Morrison, Petry, Walker and Wright. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.} EH 255Q Native American Literature. This course will focus on the literature of Native Americans which is not covered by traditional genre and period courses. It will deal with the distinctive geographical settings, social concerns and political issues related to the Native American experience. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1; II,D,2 and II,B.} EH 257 Canadian Literature. This course will focus on the literature of Canada through a study of representative fiction, drama and poetry. It will deal with the distinctive geographical, historical, social and political concerns of Canadians as seen through their literature. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} EH 260 Post-Colonial Literatures. A comprehensive exploration of literatures emerging in the wake of the colonial experience in Asia, Africa and/or the Americas. Texts and regional/thematic focus may vary but could include authors such as Amilcar Cabral, Aime Cesaire, Franz Fanon, Trinh Minh-ha, Gayatri Spivak, Edward Said or Leopold Sedar Senghor. The course will address the ways in which social and political experiences affect artistic choices, issues of cultural imperialism, the synthesis of indigenous and imposed cultural traditions, and notions of literature as a means of resistance or liberation from the historical perspectives of both the colonized and the colonizers. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.} EH 261 Literature for Adolescents. A survey of literature appropriate for readers in grades four through nine. The course will include a wide selection of works ranging from traditional folk tales to contemporary fiction. The goal is to help class members establish personal criteria for judging both appropriateness and merit of material suitable for this age level. Whenever possible, connections will be made between analysis of literature and presentation of literature in middle school classrooms. Priority is given to students seeking licensure in middle childhood education. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} EH 265 Gender and Literature. This course will use a wide range of literature including writers whose works have directly addressed gender issues as well as writers whose works have indirectly reflected these issues to explore how cultural expectations about gender and gender roles affect the lives of women and men. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1 or II,D,2.} EH 270 American Regional Literatures. An introduction to works of poetry, prose and fiction by regional writers. Attention will be placed on the historical and social factors which shaped the literary traditions of a particular area. Texts and regional/thematic selections of the course will vary but could focus on the literature of the following: the American South, Appalachia, the American West, the Caribbean, the Gilded Age in New England. Prerequisites: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} EH 295W The Human Experience in Literature and Language I. In this foundational course for minors and majors in English, students are introduced to central concepts and practices of English studies, with emphases on critical and interpretive reading and writing. This course will foster the imagination, develop critical literacy and promote local and global perspectives. Students will gain useful and valuable creative, interpretive and analytical writing skills. Prerequisite: EH 100/120. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1} EH 296W The Human Experience in Literature and Language II. This course, the second foundational course, is required for majors and is open to other interested students. Students of English language and literature will engage with a range of ideas studied in the field of English while also exploring a common body of historic contexts and conventions, critical methods and professional standards. Students will develop their skills in interpreting and analyzing texts as well as their competence in writing. Prerequisites: EH 100/120 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 299 Special Topics in English. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. EH 300 Teaching Writing. This course introduces students to both theoretical and practical issues involved in teaching writing. Theoretical issues include: rhetorical and literacy issues, composing process research, various perspectives on writing and approaches to its teaching. Practical issues include: planning and structuring a writing class; sequencing and designing writing assignments; responding to and evaluating writing; conducting and managing a writing class; conducting peer workshops and student conferences; and using available resources and technologies. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 301 Writing Center Practicum. This practicum will look at the myriad writing situations a tutor must deal with including basic writing skills, writing across the curriculum matters, technological issues and tutoring advanced and ESL writers. Intended for Writing Center tutors; however, able writers with an interest in teaching writing may register for this course with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Writing Center tutor or permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. (repeatable up to 3 Sem. Hrs.) EH 302 Calliope Practicum. This practicum will allow students interested in participating in the production and management of the literary magazine of the Department of English to expand on and explore pertinent relevant topics including visual design, editing and publicity to increase the quality, visibility and viability of the magazine. Prerequisite: EH 100/120. 1 Sem. Hr. (repeatable to 3 Sem. Hrs.) EH 310 Critical Theory and Rhetoric. An advanced introduction to critical and rhetorical theory. The course will introduce students to the major periods of critical and rhetorical theory so that students can develop a historically informed understanding of contemporary critical and rhetorical issues. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 315 The English Renaissance. A study of representative poetry, prose and drama (excluding Shakespeare) from approximately 1500-1660. Some attention will be given to the Renaissance and Reformation movements outside England as background to the English literature of the period. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 317 Writing Workshop. An opportunity for students to study, in-depth, an area of writing (poetry, fiction, drama and/or literary nonfiction/critical essay). Class will provide an intensive workshop experience for students to receive feedback on their writing from the instructor and other members of the class. Prerequisites: a 200-level writing course (EH 216, 217, 240, 243, 245 or 247). 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 319 Issues and Methods in Rhetoric and Composition. This course explores research topics, methodologies, techniques and resources in

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the scholarly area of rhetoric and composition. It also offers a survey of current research in the field including research issues and problems. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 326 Women and Literature. A study of the contributions of women authors to literary tradition with a focus on the images of women in literature and a discussion of feminist criticism. Specific authors, titles and topics will vary, and the focus may be arranged thematically or chronologically. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 328 Medieval English Literature. This course will focus on the culture and literary texts of the English Middle Ages. Through a selection of medieval prose, poetry and drama ranging through religious, learned, courtly and popular works, the course will explore “solace and sentence”literature which entertains and literature which asks fundamental social, political, ethical and intellectual questions as well. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 330 Theories and Practices of Editing. An introduction to and application of the skills and techniques necessary for a career in professional editing. Students will also examine textual and literary approaches to editing given particular rhetorical contexts. Emphasis will be placed on how to make editorial judgments that promote editorial standards without violating authorial intent. Topics covered will include: visual and textual document design, editorial design, copy editing, proofreading and plain language principles. Specialized publishing and editing computer applications will be utilized. Prerequisite: EH 240W or EH 245W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 332 Neoclassicism and Romanticism. This course will concentrate on English literature written during the Restoration and 18th century (often called the Neoclassical Age) and the first third of the 19th century (the Romantic period). Representative authors are Dryden, Pope, Swift, Defoe, Johnson, Radcliffe, Blake, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Percy and Mary Shelley, Coleridge, Keats and Byron. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 335 Studies in The Literary Essay. An advanced study of the literary essay. The course will raise formal questions concerning the literary essay as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 340 Literacies. This course will focus on the history, theory and practice of “literacy” or the acquisition and use of written discourse. Emphasis will be given to exploring literacy as a cultural phenomenon as it is situated within a larger historical, political and ideological context. Topics may include: orality and literacy, writing as a technology, literacy as a situated practice and multiple literacies. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 345 Victorian and Early 20th Century Literature. A study of the novel, popular fiction, non-fictional prose, poetry and melodrama of the Victorian period and early 20th century. Special attention will be given to such representative authors as Arnold, Browning, Tennyson, Dickens, Carlyle, Hardy, Conrad, Eliot and Joyce. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 350 Studies in Drama. An advanced study of drama. The course will raise formal questions concerning drama as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 352 American Postmodernism. A study of the variety of literary texts written in America since World War II. Representative authors may include Barth, Gass, Pynchon, DeLillo, Morrison, Reed, LeGuin and Silko. Prerequisites: EH 100/120; EH 295W or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 356 Studies in Autobiography. An advanced study of the autobiography. The course will raise formal questions concerning the autobiography as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 360 Studies in Poetry. An advanced study of poetry. The course will raise formal questions concerning poetry as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 365 Studies in the Novel. An advanced study of the novel. The course will raise formal questions concerning the novel as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 371 Early American Literature. A study of the origins of American literature in indigenous and immigrant genres. Students will be introduced to Native American creation narratives and other oral narratives, to immigrant journals, spiritual autobiographies, and captivity narratives and to slave narratives as foundations for a distinctive American literature. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 372 19th Century American Literature. A study of American fiction, poetry, non-fiction prose and oral narrative during the 19th century. Representative authors may include Poe, Emerson, Douglass, Thoreau, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Dunbar and James. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 373 20th Century American Literature. A study of literature written in America during the 20th century. Authors studied might include Frost, Pound, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Stevens, Hughes, O’Conner, Albee, Rich, Morrison, Pyncheon and Barth. Prerequisites: EH 100 and EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 380 Studies in the Short Story. An advanced study of the short story. The course will raise formal questions concerning the short story as well as introduce students to critical theories about this genre. The class will typically focus on a literary period, a region or nation, selected authors or a theme – at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisites: EH 295W or permission of the instructor. May be taken concurrently with EH 295W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 385 Introduction to Linguistics. An introduction to the elements of language – phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics – and how these elements are essential to understanding what language is and how we use language. In addition, the course will explore language acquisition and language variety (dialects of a language). Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 390 Seminar in Language, Theory and History. An advanced topics course offering a theoretical and historical approach to the study of the interrelationship between writing, language and literature in the field of English studies. Intended for literature and writing majors. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: EH 295W (can be taken concurrently). 3 Sem. Hrs.

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EH 391 Seminar in Professional Writing. An advanced seminar focusing on topics in the fields of organizational, technical, medical, legal and business rhetoric, writing and communication. Intended for literature and writing majors. Can be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: EH 240W or EH 245W. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 392 Seminar in Creative Writing. An advanced seminar focusing on aesthetic topics in the field of creative writing. Intended for literature and writing majors. Can be repeated for different genres. Seminar will focus on the aesthetic elements of craft. Prerequisites: EH 100/120 and a 200-level creative writing course (EH 216, 217, 243 or 247). 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 399 Special Topics in English. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. EH 405 History of the English Language. A study of the evolution of the English language from its roots in Proto-Indo-European to its present form. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 410 Shakespeare. A study of a representative selection of Shakespeare’s tragedies, comedies and history plays. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 413 Chaucer. A study of The Canterbury Tales and other poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer primarily in Middle English. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 430 English Seminar. A conference course for senior English majors in selected topics in English and American literature with emphasis on individual research. This course is the Senior Culminating Experience for the English major. Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 295W, EH 296W and senior standing. Juniors with outstanding performance in the major may take this course with the permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 435 The Senior Portfolio. An opportunity for senior writing majors to explore, in depth, an area of writing which best reflects their intended field(s) of expertise. Students will spend part of the semester working independently (e.g., reading and writing in their intended field), and the remainder of the semester assembling a senior portfolio (ideally across at least two genres) to represent their work as professional writers. Students also will be responsible for producing a reflective, critical introduction to their portfolios which examines the progress of their individual endeavors over the course of the previous four years. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a writing major. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 440 Topics in African-American Literature. An advanced study of literature in the African-American tradition. Topics will vary, but the course may focus on specific periods (Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, The Black Arts Movement), genres (Orality and the African-American Poetic Tradition), or topics (Violence and the Black Imagination, Women Writers of the African Diaspora). Prerequisites: EH 100, EH 250 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 442 Topics in Gender and Literature. An advanced study of the relationship of gender to literature. The specific topics will vary, but the course may focus on specific periods (Gender and Medieval Literature), genres (Gender and Authorship in the 19th Century Novel) or topics (Men and Women as Readers of Fiction). Prerequisites: EH 265 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 444 Seminar in Linguistics. An advanced study of current issues in linguistics. While specific topics will vary, the course will focus on one to three current issues or approaches. Prerequisites: EH 295W and EH 385 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 450 Independent Study. Open to senior English majors who wish to pursue a topic related to the study of language or literature. Study may be taken on an interdepartmental basis with permission of the departments involved. A prospectus and preliminary bibliography of the project must be submitted for departmental approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. EH 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A research/project course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in English at graduation. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and approval of the instructor, department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6 Sem. Hrs. EH 498 Internship (Internal). Students are provided with a significant learning experience outside the classroom setting. Although the program is designed to be fundamentally an educational experience, professionally productive work will constitute an integral part of the internship. Specific arrangements and requirements will vary with the program. A contract will specify the activities with which the student will be involved. Taken under satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade option only. Only one internship may be taken for credit but may, in certain cases, be repeated for audit. Credit variable, 1-15 Sem. Hrs. EH 499 Internship in English. See All-University 499 course description on page 49.

Environmental Science
The environmental science major at Mount Union is an interdisciplinary major where students complete an in-depth experience in a traditional area of science, a breadth experience in the humanities and four integrative experiences which tie together the sciences and the humanities. The program seeks to develop environmentally informed students who are agents of constructive change and who possess leadership, teamwork and problem solving skills.

Requirements for the Major in Environmental Science
To major in environmental science, a student must complete the following course work. Environmental Science Courses Required Environmental Science Courses EV 190 Introduction to Environmental Science (Cross-listed as BI 190) EV 210 Hydrology and Water Resources (Cross-listed as GY 210) EV 350Q Case Studies in Environmental Science EV 400 Environmental Practicum

Semester Hours 3 4 3 3

Depth Experience Students will pick one area – biology, chemistry or geology – and fulfill the following course requirements.

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Biology Depth Experience Required Biology Courses BI 140 The Unity of Life BI 141 The Diversity of Life BI 220 Ecology BI 321W Aquatic Ecology Any from the Following Courses Totaling 16 Hours BI 215W Evolutionary Biology BI 225W Tropical Biology BI 226 Tropical Biology Field Experience BI 230 Conservation Biology BI 250 Field Botany BI 280W Marine Biology BI 285 Vertebrate Zoology BI 305 Microbiology BI 315 Physiological Ecology BI 322 Ecotoxicology BI 325 Environmental Soil Science BI 360 Directed Study BI 405 Research Required Extra-Departmental Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry CH 210 Environmental Chemistry Chemistry Depth Experience Required Chemistry Courses CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry CH 210 Environmental Chemistry CH 220 Analytical Chemistry I CH 231 Organic Chemistry I CH 341 Physical Chemistry I CH 342W Physical Chemistry Lab Any from the Following Courses Totaling Eight Hours CH160/260 Independent Study CH 214 Inorganic Chemistry I CH 232 Organic Chemistry II CH 299 Special Topics in Chemistry CH 343 Physical Chemistry II CH 344 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II CH 370 Biochemistry I CH 371 Biochemistry I Laboratory CH 372 Biochemistry II CH 373 Biochemistry II Laboratory CH 414 Inorganic Chemistry II CH 451 Analytical Chemistry II Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 142 Calculus II PH 101 Physics I PH 102 Physics II Geology Depth Experience Required Geology Courses GY 112 Physical Geology GY 212Q Historical Geology GY 301 Mineralogy GY 325 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation Any from the following courses totaling at least 14 hours (At least 7 must be GY hours) GY 270 Regional Geology GY 302 Petrology GY 320 Paleontology GY 330 Structural Geology GY 410 Research

Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 Semester Hours 3 3 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 1-3 1-4 Semester Hours 4 4

Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 3 1 Semester Hours 1-4 4 4 1-4 3 1 3 1 3 1 3 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4

Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 Semester Hours 3 4 4 4 1-4

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BI 322 Ecotoxicology 3 BI 325 Environmental Soil Science 4 EV 280 GIS: An Environmental Approach 3 CH 210 Environmental Chemistry 4 Or another appropriate course approved by the director of the Environmental Science Program Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 141 The Diversity of Life CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry or CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry Breadth Experience (three fulfill General Education requirements) Required Extra-Departmental Courses PL 290 Environmental Ethics EC 105 Introduction to Economics PS 207 Environmental Law and Policy Any One from the Following Mathematics Courses MA 123 Statistics MA 141 Calculus I MA 151 Calculus I for Life Science Total Semester Hours 4 4 4

Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 4 4 59-66

Requirements for the Minor in Environmental Science
Environmental Science Courses Required Environmental Science Courses EV 190 Introduction to Environmental Science EV 210 Hydrology and Water Resources EV 350Q Case Studies Semester Hours 3 4 3

Depth Experience The minor in environmental science also requires the completion of at least eight hours of coursework in one depth experience area. For science majors, these eight hours must be outside of the major. Required Biology Depth Experience Courses Semester Hours BI 141 The Diversity of Life 4 At least four hours of BI coursework at or above the 200-level 4 Required Chemistry Depth Experience Courses Semester Hours CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry 4 At least four hours of CH coursework at or above the 200-level 4 Required Geology Depth Experience Courses Semester Hours GY 112 Physical Geology 4 At least four hours of GY coursework at or above the 200-level 4 Total 18

Course Descriptions
EV 190 Introduction to Environmental Science. This introductory-level course focuses on the scientific principles that underlie the functioning of the global environment. The course addresses problems related to human society and explores possibilities for alleviating these problems. The course will provide the student with knowledge of how the environment functions and understanding of the issues of scale, complexity and conflict resolution. Cross-listed as BI 190. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2} EV 199 Special Topics in Environmental Science. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. EV 210 Hydrology and Water Resources. A study of the properties, occurrence, distribution and movement of water and its relationship with the environment within each phase of the hydrological cycle. Course covers both surface and groundwater and introduces statistical methods and computer modeling. Prerequisite: BI 141 or EV 190 or GY 110 or GY 112 or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed as GY 210. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. EV 280 Geographical Information Systems: Environmental Applications. This course introduces the practice of GIS. It is a very hands-on course and will require extensive practice using ArcGIS to illustrate both the principles and the skills involved in geographical information systems. The class will culminate with the completion of a major project. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. EV 299 EV 350Q Special Topics in Environmental Science. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. Case Studies. This three-credit course provides exposure to modern environmental issues on a local, regional and global scale. Using

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case studies, students investigate both enacted and proposed solutions to environmental problems and will be required to integrate the disciplines of biology, geology, chemistry, economics, philosophy and political science, seeking to evaluate and improve these solutions. The course will also discuss complexity, scale and conflict resolution. Prerequisites: EV 210 and eight hours in the chosen Depth Experience. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} (typically offered spring semester) EV 400 Environmental Practicum. This course serves as the SCE course and is required for all students majoring in environmental science. Students, in conjunction with faculty, will identify a problem, develop an investigative plan, execute the plan and present the results. Students will be divided into groups based on their depth interests. (Ideally, one student from each of the depth experiences will be represented into each group.) Team work, leadership and problem solving will be the focus of this course. Prerequisites: EV 350Q and 18-20 hours in the chosen Depth Experience or consent of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) EV 494 EV 499 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University course description on page 49. Internships in Environmental Science. See All-University course description on page 49.

Exercise Science
The exercise science major is a part of the Department of Human Performance and Sport Business. For a complete description of the department, see page 136. The exercise science program has been created to meet the increasing demand in our society for quality health care professionals to create and direct wellness programs. This concentration will prepare the student for various certification levels offered by the American University of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and/or for certification offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) upon graduation. The major can also be utilized as preparation for graduate study in sports related allied-health fields including physical therapy. The graduate may pursue employment in the alliedhealth field, commercial and corporate fitness facilities and cardiac rehabilitation units.

Requirements for the Major in Exercise Science
Required Exercise Science Courses ES 110 Introduction to Exercise Science ES 233 Physiology of Human Performance ES 310 Exercise Testing and Prescription ES 320 Wellness – Special Populations ES 330 Basic Pharmacology ES 334 Strength Training and Conditioning ES 350 Scientific Inquiry ES 400 Environment and Human Performance ES 460 Personal Training ES 475W SCE ES 499 Internship Required Departmental Courses PE 305 Kinesiology Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 210 Anatomy and Physiology BI 211 Anatomy and Physiology CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry PY 110 Introduction to Psychology MA 123 Statistics Total Required Courses for Those seeking ACSM and/or NSCA Certification (not required for degree) HE 140 Safety, First Aid and Emergency Care Recommended Elective Courses ES 240 Cardiac Rehabilitation ES 260Q Growth and Physical Activity ES 485 Independent Research/Study ES 498 Internship (Internal) CH 231 Organic Chemistry I CH 370 Biochemistry I CH 371 Biochemistry I Laboratory PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II Semester Hours 2 4 4 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 3 3 60 Semester Hours 2 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 5 3 1 4 4

Note: Students wishing to pursue graduate work in a related field (physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, exercise physiology, biomechanics) are encouraged to either minor in biology or chemistry.

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Requirements for the Minor in Exercise Science
Required Courses for Track One (Athletic Training Majors) ES 310 Exercise Testing and Prescription ES 334 Strength Training and Conditioning ES 350 Scientific Inquiry ES 400 Environment and Human Performance Total Required Courses for Track Two (Non-Athletic Training Majors) ES 110 Introduction to Exercise Science BI 211 Anatomy and Physiology II ES 233 Physiology of Human Performance ES 400 Environment and Human Performance Total Semester Hours 4 4 3 3 14 Semester Hours 2 4 4 3 13

Requirements for Honors in Exercise Science
To receive honors in the exercise science program a student must meet all criteria for graduating with honors in a major and satisfy all of the following criteria: complete a minimum of 12 semester hours to include ES 233, ES 334 and ES 310 for honors.

Course Descriptions
ES 110 Introduction to Exercise Science. Introduction to the field of exercise science including aspects of human performance, clinical exercise physiology and strength training and conditioning. Includes basic components of program design, training and assessment while placing the students in a variety of professional field settings. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 199 Special Topics in Exercise Science. See All-University 199 course description on page 49.
ES 215 Medical Terminology. Students will be introduced to medical word structures, with emphasis on word roots, prefixes, suffixes, and abbreviations while gaining an understanding of the rules for building and analyzing medical terms associated with body systems. Students will define and interpret terms relating to structure and function, pathology, diagnosis, and clinical procedures. Prerequisite: BI 105 or BI 210/211. 2 Sem. Hrs.

ES 220 Scholarship in Exercise Science. Discussion of current topics in exercise science through the reading and writing of scientific, peerreviewed journal articles. This course is meant to give the student an introduction to the process of research as well as guide them through reading, writing and comprehension of peer-reviewed scientific research articles. A small research study with a write-up will also be included. Prerequisite: ES 110. 2 Sem. Hrs. ES 233 Physiology of Human Performance. The goal of this course is to gain an understanding of system physiology and the effects of physical activity on the human body. Cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal function, energetics and training for human performance will be the areas of focus in this class. This course is designed to introduce exercise science and athletic training majors to the skills needed to complete certification standards established by the American University of Sports Medicine and the National Athletic Trainers Association, respectively. Prerequisites: BI 105 or BI 210 and BI 211. Lecture 3 hrs./week, lab 1 day/week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 240 Cardiac Rehabilitation. An introduction to the field of cardiac rehabilitation. Practical aspects of clinical exercise physiology and its application into the hospital rehabilitation setting are emphasized. Discussion of cardiac physiology, common cardiac issues and arrhythmias. This course also includes the use of diagnostic tools such as stress testing and the associated electrocardiograms. Special attention will be paid to the geriatric population. Primarily designed for those students wishing to pursue either graduate school in the field of clinical exercise physiology or those seeking employment in a hospital based rehabilitation setting. Prerequisites: BI 210, BI 211, ES 233 and ES 330. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 260Q Growth, Development and Physical Activity. This course considers physical activity and fitness in the context of physical growth, biological maturation and behavioral development during childhood and adolescence. The students will receive an overview of the concepts of growth, maturation, wellness and the effects of physical activity on these parameters. Students will understand general concepts in motivation and motor development as they relate to physical activity and fitness. Prerequisite: BI 210 (BI 105 for PE and health majors). 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} (typically offered spring semester) ES 299 Special Topics in Exercise Science. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. ES 310 Exercise Testing and Prescription. A study of the standards for exercise testing and prescription. An emphasis will be placed on both preventive exercise programs for apparently healthy individuals and rehabilitative programs for cardio respiratory diseased persons. Prerequisite: ES 233. Lecture 3 hrs./week, lab 1 day/week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 320 Wellness – Special Populations. This course is designed to explore the role of the exercise specialist and special populations. There is an emphasis placed on working with geriatric populations and addressing issues concerning health and disease in this group. A review of physiological and psychological changes with age will be examined along with disease states such as: cancer, cardiopulmonary, obesity, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, osteoporosis, among others. Prerequisite: ES 233. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 330 Basic Pharmacology. This course will give the students understanding of medications commonly prescribed in the exercise science setting. The student will become aware of indications, contraindications and side effects of drug therapy. Emphasis will range from drugs used for hypertension, diabetes, epilepsy, asthma, cardiac abnormalities, CVD, cardiac arrhythmias, orthopaedic problems and common illnesses. Prerequisite: BI 210, BI 211 and ES 233. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 334 Strength Training and Conditioning. This is a four hour lecture/laboratory course covering the physiological basis of strength and

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cardiovascular conditioning along with the fundamentals of designing comprehensive training programs for improving human performance. Students learn the kinesiological aspects of training, cardiovascular training, plyometrics, flexibility training and sport specific training for injury prevention. Prerequisite: PE 305. Lecture 3 hrs./week, lab 1 day/week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 340 Corporate and Worksite Wellness. Components of administering and managing corporate and worksite fitness and wellness programs are examined. Topics covered include paradigms in health promotion, health and exercise program planning, facility planning and design, program management, policies and procedures, staffing, equipment, ethics, safety and legal issues and marketing. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor’s permission. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 350 Scientific Inquiry. In this course, students learn to evaluate elements of research design, to perform and interpret descriptive statistics, to perform and interpret ANOVA, to evaluate critical features of a research journal article, integrate research findings and formulate a clinically significant research hypothesis. Prerequisites: MA 123 and ES 233. 3 Sem. Hrs. ES 360 Motor Control and Learning. A conceptual and practical approach to the understanding of motor behavior, neuro-physiological control and mechanical function. The course provides the student with a framework and principles to enhance functional ability for a cross-section of individuals, from populations that include persons developmentally and physically challenged to those along the continuum wishing to enhance skilled performance. Prerequisite: ES 260Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 370 Sports Nutrition. The objective of this course is to begin a discussion of what sports nutrition is and proceed to an in-depth review of some of the major concepts within the field of sports nutrition and examine some of the most popular sports supplements on the current market. Prerequisites: ES 233 or HE 250. 2 Sem. Hrs. ES 399 Special Topics in Exercise Science. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. ES 400 Environment and Human Performance. A multidisciplinary approach to human adaptation and factors influencing human movement in diverse micro- and macro-environments. Factors considered include temperature, altitude, precipitation, under-water weightlessness, light, noise and socio-cultural. Health and safety in locomotion, rehabilitation, sport/recreation and occupational contexts are emphasized. Prerequisites: ES 233 or instructor approval. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 460 Personal Training. An advanced course dealing with relevant issues in personal training and fitness. Discussion of lifting techniques, practical application of exercise prescriptions and program design and motivational strategies employed by strength and conditioning professionals will be the focus of this course. Special attention will be given to the populations of sedentary persons, athletes, geriatric patients and children. Prerequisites: PE 305, ES 233, ES 310 and ES 320. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 475W SCE in Exercise Science. Research design plus an in-depth research of a selected exercise science topic and its presentation will be included. The research/presentation will count as the SCE for exercise science majors. Other topics include current issues in exercise science. Prerequisites: Open to seniors only, those who have completed or will concurrently complete all other exercise science core courses with the exception of ES 499. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) ES 485 Independent Research/Study. This course is an independent research and/or study project. It is offered to students who have a desire to pursue undergraduate research in preparation for graduate-level education. It is meant to be an extension of the ES 475W SCE course. Prerequisites: ES 475W (SCE), MA 123, instructor approval. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) ES 494 ES 498 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Internship (Internal). See All-University 498 course description on page 49. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ES 499 Internship. An experience-based course in which the student spends a specified amount of time with a sport related medical or allied health agency or organization in order to gain experience and to understand the application of exercise science. Supervision will be jointly provided by the cooperating organization and the University departmental staff. Prerequisites: ES 233, ES 310, ES 334, junior standing and permission of the instructor. 3-4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester)

Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures
The Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures supports the liberal arts philosophy of the University and its general objectives by offering the student the opportunity to broaden perspectives humanistically and pragmatically. Through the study of foreign languages, literatures and cultures, the student becomes better equipped to develop the flexibility of mind to meet the demands of a pluralistic society and the global marketplace. The department prepares majors for careers where a knowledge of a foreign language and culture is needed, such as government, business, social work and law, as well as for graduate study and the teaching progression. All foreign language majors must complete a University-approved study abroad experience. Teacher candidates must meet the requirements of the University of Mount Union and the Ohio Department of Education for teacher licensure. Teaching licenses are available in French, German, Japanese and Spanish. The department is committed to the effective use of technology in the teaching of foreign languages. The department’s new state-of-the-art language resource center permits computer-assisted instruction and the use of digital media. Native speakers of French, German, Japanese or Spanish who wish to enroll in a course in their native language are encouraged to enroll in an upperlevel content (not a skills) course such as literature and culture. Such students should seek the advice of the instructor or the department chair if they have questions about which course to take. All courses in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures are taught primarily in the target language unless otherwise indicated in the course description. Students wishing to receive CLEP credit in a foreign language at Mount Union must take the CLEP examination prior to completing a course in that language at Mount Union or at another college/university. Once a student has completed a foreign language course, CLEP credit cannot be awarded in the same language.

The Foreign Language Proficiency Requirement
As a graduation requirement, all Mount Union students must demonstrate proficiency in a modern foreign language equivalent to the satisfactory completion of a 102-level course. The proficiency requirement can be satisfied in one of the following ways: 1. By passing the Proficiency Test. 2. By satisfactorily completing a 102 or higher level course in a modern foreign language previously studied.

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3.

By satisfactorily completing the 101-102 sequence of a modern foreign language not previously studied.

Special situations: a. Students who have never studied a modern foreign language before coming to Mount Union must satisfactorily complete the 101102 sequence of a modern foreign language taught at Mount Union. b. Students who have satisfactorily completed a three-semester-hour course at the 102 level or higher in any modern foreign language at an accredited college or university will be considered to have completed the foreign language proficiency requirement. c. Four-year University of Mount Union international students from countries where English is not an official language can choose to satisfy the foreign language proficiency in one of the above-mentioned ways or as follows: 1. By presenting a TOEFL score of 500 or higher (paper score), 173 or higher (computer score) or 61 or higher (internet score). 2. By satisfactorily completing an ESL course at the 109 level or higher.

English as a Second Language
Administered by the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures, courses in English as a Second Language (ESL) are offered, but no major or minor is given in this area of study. The courses offered are provided especially for those international students who require additional English language study in order to meet continuing academic demands at the University.

Course Descriptions
FE 109 ESL Communication. A semi-intensive course designed to cover a broad range of English communication strategies. This class will meet two hours per day for a total of six hours per week. Students who take FE 109, FE 110 and FE 111 may apply no more than the last six credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 6 Sem. Hrs. FE 110 ESL Writing. A writing course designed for students who have learned English as a foreign language. Emphasis is on appropriate organization, focus, structure and grammar of academic English. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. FE 111 ESL Reading. A reading course designed for students who have learned English as a foreign language. Emphasis is on syntax and semantics of academic English as well as on specific aspects of academic reading. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. FE 199 FE 299 FE 399 Special Topics in ESL. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. Special Topics in ESL. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. Special Topics in ESL. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

Requirements for the Major in a French, German, Spanish or Japanese
Required Foreign Language Courses French Major FR 300 Advanced Spoken French FR 301 Advanced Grammar and Composition FR 430 Senior Seminar Any eight additional FR courses German Major GN 304 Advanced German I GN 305 Advanced German II GN 430W Senior Seminar Any eight additional GN courses Japanese Major JA 300 Advanced Japanese I JA 301 Advanced Japanese II JA 430 Senior Seminar Any eight additional JA courses Spanish Major SN 300 Advanced Spoken Spanish SN 301 Spanish for the Professions SN 430 Senior Seminar Any eight additional SN courses Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 24 3 3 3 24 3 3 3 24 3 3 3 24 33

At least six hours for any major must have been earned in a study abroad program approved by the University and the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for participation in most of Mount Union’s study abroad programs. Certain programs require a minimum of 3.0 and others a 3.33. The Teacher Licensure Program requires a minimum GPA of 2.5 for admittance. Licensure is available in French, German, Japanese and Spanish. Students desiring teacher licensure need to take additional courses as per state requirements. Candidates seeking a teaching license in French, German, Japanese or Spanish must earn a grade of “C” or better in FR/GN/JA/SN 385 and FR/GN/JA/SN 386. If a minimum grade of “C” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C” or better is earned.

Requirements for the Minor in a French, German, Spanish or Japanese
Required Foreign Language Courses French Minor Semester Hours

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FR 201 Intermediate French I FR 202 Intermediate French II Any three additional FR courses German Minor GN 201 Intermediate German I GN 202 Intermediate German I Any three additional GN courses Japanese Minor JA 201 Intermediate Japanese I JA 202 Intermediate Japanese II Any three additional JA courses Spanish Minor SN 201 Intermediate Spanish I SN 202 Intermediate Spanish II Any three additional SN courses Total

3 3 9 3 3 9 3 3 9 3 3 9 15

No more that three credit hours (one course) taught in English may be counted toward the minor.

Requirements for the Minor in Foreign Language
A minor in foreign language consists of a minimum of 15 semester hours in a single modern foreign language (Chinese, Russian, Arabic, etc.) through the intermediate level (equivalent of 201 and 202), excluding French, German, Japanese and Spanish. No more than three credit hours (one course) taught in English may be counted toward the minor. Courses for the minor in foreign language must be taken at Mount Union or through a study abroad program approved by the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures.

Requirements for Honors in a Foreign Language
See page 37 for a detailed description of the requirements for graduation with honors in a major. Honors in the French, German, Japanese or Spanish major may be earned by converting a minimum of three 202-level or higher courses to honors credit for a total of at least 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be an Honors Thesis/Project (All-University course 494).

Foreign Language Courses Offered
FL 199 FL 299 FL 399 Special Topics in Foreign Languages. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. Special Topics in Foreign Languages. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. Special Topics in Foreign Languages. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

French Course Descriptions
FR 101 Elementary French I. An introduction to speaking, listening to, writing and reading French, using an interactive approach. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. This course is intended for students who have never studied French before. Students who have completed more than two years of high school French may not take this course for credit. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 102 Elementary French II. Continuation of FR 101. Students who successfully complete FR 102 should have an understanding of the basic grammar and sound system of French, and they should be able to express themselves orally in basic French, read simple French text, write basic sentences in French on certain topics, and understand basic spoken French in uncomplicated circumstances. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: FR 101 or up to three years of secondary school French. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} FR 130 Films from the French-Speaking World. This course focuses on the language, setting, events, culture and cinematography in featurelength films from French-speaking Europe, Africa, America and other French-speaking regions of the world. All films to be viewed are in French. Speaking and listening skills in French, with particular attention paid to the regional variations of spoken French around the world, will be reinforced. Prerequisite: FR 102 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} FR 150 Francophone Literature in Translation. The study of major literary works from various parts of the French-speaking world. Course content, theme and focus may vary with each offering. The course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English translation. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 199 Special Topics in French. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. FR 201 Intermediate French I. A basic grammar review and introduction of certain advanced grammatical structures in French. Continued practice and new applications of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in French. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: FR 102 or three years or more of secondary school French. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} FR 202 Intermediate French II. Continuation of FR 201. Students who successfully complete FR 202 should have a good understanding of French grammar and be able to communicate with reasonable effectiveness in oral and written French in most uncomplicated circumstances. They also should be able to read and understand spoken French of average difficulty. Prerequisite: FR 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} FR 215 Children’s Literature in French. Readings from a variety of children’s authors from the French-speaking world. Works suitable for children ages 5-14 will be examined. The course will focus on an analysis of content, language and cultural information in the readings. This course is conducted In French. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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FR 225 A Cultural History of the French-Speaking World. An intermediate-level cultural survey tracing the artistic, literary, musical, religious and social developments of France from the earliest cave paintings at Lascaux to the end of World War II. Special attention is paid to the mission civilatrice evident in French colonial efforts. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} FR 250Q Contemporary France. A study of the culture and civilization of France and its impact upon the contemporary world. This course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III, B.} FR 299 Special Topics in French. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. FR 300 Advanced Spoken French. An intensive course conducted entirely in French with an emphasis on developing an active command of the spoken language. Class exercises emphasize comprehension and oral proficiency. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 301 Advanced Grammar and Composition. An intensive grammar review aimed at increasing comprehension and written expression. Emphasis is on the use of compositions and translations to develop a correct and idiomatic written style. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 310 19th Century Romanticism and Realism. Readings from such authors as Hugo, Lamartine, Vigny, Stendhal, Balzac, Flaubert and Zola. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 315 Contemporary French Theatre. Readings from a variety of 20th century French playwrights and a discussion of their literary contributions. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 320 Modern Poetry. This course examines the work of a variety of 19th and 20th century French poets. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 325 The Classical Period. This course investigates the works of the great French writers of the 17th century. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 330 18th Century Literature. A survey of 18th century French writers. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 335 The Novel in the 20th Century. A survey of the most important French writers of the 20th century and a discussion of their contributions. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} FR 361 Translation Practicum I. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between French and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced level upon completion of FR 361, FR 362 and FR 363. Prerequisite: FR 301. 1 Sem. Hr. FR 362 Translation Practicum II. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between French and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced level upon completion of FR 361, FR 362 and FR 363. Prerequisite: FR 301. 1 Sem. Hr. FR 363 Translation Practicum III. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between French and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced level upon completion of FR 361, FR 362 and FR 363. Prerequisite: FR 301. 1 Sem. Hr. FR 375 Commercial and Technical French. Advanced training in the language of commercial and technical documents in French. This course is conducted In French. Prerequisite: FR 301. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 385 Methods of Teaching French. A practical and theoretical methodology course which emphasizes lesson planning, writing instructional objectives, assessment, curriculum design and a study of methodologies and materials relevant to the teaching of French in the elementary, middle and secondary schools. The course emphasizes the core guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and relates instructional planning to Ohio’s Model for a Competency-Based Program in Foreign Languages. This course must be taken prior to or concurrently with multiage student teaching and FR 386. This course does not count toward the requirements of the major or minor in French. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in French and permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 386 Practicum in the Teaching of French. A practicum designed to put into immediate practice theories and strategies discussed in FR 385. The student will serve as a teaching assistant in an elementary or intermediate course in French in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with FR 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in French. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in French and permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. FR 387 Teaching French in the Elementary School. This course is a practicum designed to make available to the teacher candidate in French a practical field experience at the elementary school level. Under the direct supervision of foreign language faculty, the teacher candidate will participate in a FLES program at a local elementary school for one semester. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with FR 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in French. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. FR 399 Special Topics in French. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. 1-6 Sem. Hrs. FR 430 Senior Seminar. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for a French language major. The student is expected to complete a research project assigned by the instructor or, as an alternative, a research project proposed by the student and approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. FR 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

German Course Descriptions
GN 101 Elementary German I. An introduction to speaking, listening to, writing and reading German using an interactive approach. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. This course is intended for students who have never studied German before. Students who have completed more than two years of high school German may not take this course for credit. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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GN 102 Elementary German II. Continuation of GN 101. Students who successfully complete GN 102 should have an understanding of the basic grammar and sound system of German. They should be able to express themselves orally in basic German, read simple German text, write basic sentences in German on certain topics and understand basic spoken German in uncomplicated circumstances. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: GN 101 or up to three years of secondary school German. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} GN 150 German Literature in Translation. The study of major literary works by German-speaking authors in translation. Course content and theme may vary with each offering. The course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English translation. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} GN 199 Special Topics in German. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. GN 201 Intermediate German I. A basic grammar review and introduction of certain advanced grammatical structures in German. Continued practice and new applications of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in German. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: GN 102 or three years or more of secondary school German. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} GN 202 Intermediate German II. Continuation of GN 201. Students who successfully complete GN 202 should have a good understanding of German grammar and be able to communicate with reasonable effectiveness in oral and written German in most uncomplicated circumstances. They also should be able to read and understand spoken German of average difficulty. Prerequisite: GN 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 210 Introduction to German Literature and Film. A survey of modern German fiction and poetry. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GN 202 or its equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} GN 225 A Cultural History of the German-Speaking Countries. An intermediate-level cultural survey tracing the artistic, literary, musical, religious and social development of the German-speaking countries from the early Middle Ages through World War II. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisites: GN 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} GN 250Q Contemporary Germany. A study of unified Germany – its cultural, political, economic and social trends since 1945. Special emphasis is placed on German Reunification and its effects as well as on Germany’s role within the European Union. This course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III,B.} GN 280 German Language and Culture Through Film. An upper-level intermediate course designed to improve students’ understanding and command of German language and culture through the medium of film. Students will view German-language feature films and documentaries in the target language both with and without subtitles. Classroom discussions and assessments are in German. Prerequisite: GN 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 299 Special Topics in German. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. GN 304 Advanced German I. An intensive course, conducted entirely in German with an emphasis on increasing speaking, listening, writing and reading skills. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 305 Advanced German II. An intensive course, conducted entirely in German with a further emphasis on increasing speaking, listening, writing and reading skills. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GN 304. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 361 Translation Practicum I. The course offers practice at the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between German and English. Students will complete preset modules under the supervision of the instructor. This course may be taken concurrently with GN 362 and GN 363. Prerequisite: GN 304. 1 Sem. Hr. GN 362 Translation Practicum II. The course offers practice at the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between German and English. Students will complete preset modules under the supervision of the instructor. This course may be taken concurrently with GN 361 and GN 363. Prerequisite: GN 304. 1 Sem. Hr. GN 363 Translation Practicum III. The course offers practice at the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between German and English. Students will complete preset modules under the supervision of the instructor. This course may be taken concurrently with GN 361 and GN 362. Prerequisite: GN 304. 1 Sem. Hr. GN 375 Commercial and Technical German. Advanced training in commercial and technical German as well as a study of German business culture. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 385 Methods of Teaching German. A practical and theoretical methodology course which emphasizes lesson planning, writing instructional objectives, assessment, curriculum design, and a study of methodologies and materials relevant to the teaching of German in the elementary, middle and secondary schools. The course emphasizes the core guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and relates instructional planning to Ohio’s Model for a Competency-Based Program in Foreign Languages. This course must be taken prior to or concurrently with Multiage Student Teaching and GN 386. This course does not count toward the requirements of the major or minor in German. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in German and permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. GN 386 Practicum in the Teaching of German. A practicum designed to put into immediate practice theories and strategies discussed in GN 385. The student will serve as a teaching assistant in an elementary or intermediate course in German in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with GN 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in German. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in German and permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. GN 387 Teaching German in the Elementary School. This course is a practicum designed to make available to the teacher candidate in German a practical field experience at the elementary school level. Under the direct supervision of foreign language faculty, the teacher candidate will participate in a FLES program at a local elementary school for one semester. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with GN 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in German. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. GN 399 Special Topics in German. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. 1-6 Sem. Hrs. GN 430W Senior Seminar. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for a German language major. The student is expected to complete a research project assigned by the instructor or, as an alternative, a research project proposed by the student and approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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GN 494

Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

Japanese Course Descriptions
JA 101 Elementary Japanese I. An introduction to modern spoken and written Japanese with an emphasis on practical everyday transactions. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Mastery of hiragana and katakana syllabaries. Open to all students who have had little or no experience in the language. Students who have completed more than two years of high school Japanese may not take this course for credit. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 102 I,B,3.} Elementary Japanese II. Continuation of JA 101. Prerequisite: JA 101 or equivalent as determined by the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd:

JA 130 Japanese through Film. This course focuses on language, current events and culture in feature-length films in Japan. All films viewed are in Japanese. Speaking and listening skills will be reinforced. Prerequisites: JA 102 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3} JA 150 Japanese Literature in Translation. The study of major literary works from Japan. Course content, theme and focus may vary with each offering. The course is conducted in English and all readings are in English translation. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} JA 199 Special Topics in Japanese. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. JA 201 Intermediate Japanese I. A continued application of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Japanese. Introduction to Kanji characters. Extensive laboratory exercises. Prerequisite: JA 102 or equivalent as determined by the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} JA 202 Intermediate Japanese II. Continuation of JA 201. A basic grammar review and continued application of all language skills and Kanji characters. Students who successfully complete JA 202 should have a sound understanding of basic Japanese grammar for everyday conversation, express themselves orally in Japanese in uncomplicated circumstances, and read and write certain Japanese texts with limited Kanji characters. Prerequisite: JA 201 or equivalent as determined by the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} JA 215 Children’s Literature in Japanese. This course will deal with readings from a variety of Japanese authors. Works suitable for children ages 5-15 will be examined and analyzed. The course work will focus on an analysis of story content, language skills and cultural aspects. Prerequisite: JA 102 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 250Q Japanese Culture. A study of the culture and civilization of Japan and its impact upon the contemporary world. The course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III, B.} JA 261 Kanji Practicum I. An intermediate-level course which offers practice in pronouncing, reading, writing and understanding the meaning of Kanji characters. Prerequisite: JA 202. 1 Sem. Hr. JA 262 Kanji Practicum II. An intermediate-level course which offers practice in pronouncing, reading, writing and understanding the meaning of Kanji characters. Prerequisite: JA 202. 1 Sem. Hr. JA 263 Kanji Practicum III. An intermediate-level course which offers practice in pronouncing, reading, writing and understanding the meaning of Kanji characters. Prerequisite: JA 202. 1 Sem. Hr. JA 299 Special Topics in Japanese. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. JA 300 Advanced Japanese I. This is an intensive course conducted primarily in Japanese with an emphasis on increasing speaking, listening, writing and reading skills, and use of Kanji characters. This course is conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite: JA 202 or equivalent as determined by instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 301 Advanced Japanese II. An intensive course, conducted primarily in Japanese with a further emphasis on increasing speaking, listening, writing and reading skills, and use of Kanji characters. This course is conducted in Japanese. Prerequisite: JA 300 or equivalent as determined by the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 325 A Cultural History of Japan. This course examines the development of Japan as a nation and its historical role in world political events, social developments, literature, the arts, politics, economics and religion. This course is conducted in Japanese. Prerequisites: JA300 or 301, or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 375 Japanese for Practical Business Use. This course will deal with many of the aspects of the Japanese language as it serves the business community. Prerequisite: JA 300 or JA 301 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 385 Methods of Teaching Japanese. This course is a practical and theoretical methodology course which emphasizes lesson planning, writing instructional objectives, assessment, curriculum design and a study of methodologies and materials relevant to the teaching of Japanese in the elementary, middle and secondary schools. The course emphasizes the core guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and relates instructional planning to Ohio’s Model for a Competency-Based Program in Foreign Languages. This course must be taken prior to or concurrently with multiage student teaching and JA 386. This course does not count toward the requirement of the major or minor in Japanese. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in Japanese or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 386 Practicum in the Teaching of Japanese. This course is a practicum designed to put into immediate practice theories and strategies discussed in JA 385. The student will serve as a teaching assistant in an elementary or intermediate course in Japanese in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with JA 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in Japanese. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in Japanese or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 399 Special Topics in Japanese. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. 1-6 Sem. Hrs. JA 430W Senior Seminar. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for a Japanese language major. The student is expected to complete a research project assigned by the instructor or, as an alternative, a research project proposed by the student and approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. JA 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

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Russian Course Descriptions
RU 101 Elementary Russian I. An introduction to speaking, listening to, writing and reading Russian using an interactive approach. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. This course is intended for students who have never studied Russian before. Students who have taken more than two years of high school Russian may not take this course for credit. 3 Sem. Hrs. RU 102 Elementary Russian II. Continuation of RU 101. Students who successfully complete RU 102 should have an understanding of the basic grammar and sound system of Russian. They should be able to express themselves in basic Russian, read simple Russian texts, write basic sentences in Russian on certain topics and understand basic spoken Russian in uncomplicated circumstances. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: RU 101 or more than two years of high school Russian. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.}

Spanish Course Descriptions
SN 101 Elementary Spanish I. An introduction to speaking, listening to, writing and reading Spanish using an interactive approach. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. This course is intended for students who have never studied Spanish before. Students who have completed more than two years of high school Spanish may not take this course for credit. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 102 Elementary Spanish II. Continuation of SN 101. Students who successfully complete SN 102 should have an understanding of the basic grammar and sound system of Spanish, and they should be able to express themselves orally in basic Spanish, read simple Spanish text, write basic sentences in Spanish on certain topics, and understand basic spoken Spanish in uncomplicated circumstances. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: SN 101 or up to three years of secondary school Spanish. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} SN 199 Special Topics in Spanish. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. SN 201 Intermediate Spanish I. A basic grammar review and introduction of certain advanced grammatical structures in Spanish. Continued practice and new applications of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Spanish. Oral presentations, extensive and varied drills, cultural readings and laboratory exercises will be used. Prerequisite: SN 102 or three years or more of secondary school Spanish. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} SN 202 Intermediate Spanish II. Continuation of SN 201. Students who successfully complete SN 202 should have a good understanding of Spanish grammar and be able to communicate with reasonable effectiveness in oral and written Spanish in most uncomplicated circumstances. They also should be able to read and understand spoken Spanish of average difficulty. Prerequisite: SN 201. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} SN 210 Introduction to Spanish Literature. A survey of modern Spanish fiction and poetry. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202 or its equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,1.} SN 215Q Hispanic Literature in Translation. The study of major literary works from various parts of the Spanish-speaking world. Course content, theme and focus may vary with each offering. The course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English translation. Prerequisite: EH 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1 and III,B.} SN 225 Introduction to Hispanic Culture. An intermediate-level course based on selected topics in Hispanic cultures, such as, but not limited to, religion, politics, customs, beliefs, creative expression and issues of gender and race. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202 or the equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} SN 240 Spanish-Language Cinema. A general review of syntax through speaking, listening, reading and writing, emphasizing the study of culture. The course will include feature-length films from throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SN 102 or four or more years of secondary school Spanish. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,B,3.} SN 250Q Spanish and Spanish-American Culture and Civilization. A study of the culture and civilization of Spain and their impact upon the contemporary world. The course is conducted in English, and all readings are in English. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III, B.} SN 280 Gender and Ethnicity in Spanish-American Literature. An exploration of the themes of gender and ethnicity in Spanish-American literature. Emphasis will be placed on viewing the texts through the perspective of women and minorities. This course is conducted in Spanish with supplementary readings in English. Prerequisites: SN 202 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 1.} SN 299 Special Topics in Spanish. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. SN 300 Advanced Spoken Spanish. An intensive course conducted entirely in Spanish with an emphasis on developing an active command of the spoken language. Class exercises emphasize comprehension and oral proficiency. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 301 Spanish for the Professions. An intensive grammar review aimed at increasing comprehension and written expression, emphasizing the use of language in major professions such as, but not limited to, business, education, law enforcement and medicine. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 305 Hispanic Perspectives on U.S. Society. A review of writings describing and analyzing U.S. society from the viewpoints of Spanish and Spanish-American authors. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, Hispanic perspectives on U.S. politics, educational systems, commercial practices, daily customs, religious beliefs and history. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 315 Spanish-American Readings. A survey of the literature of the Spanish-speaking countries in the Americas. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 340 Hispanic Cinema and Art. This course offers the study of Hispanic cinema, painting and music as socio-cultural products of their time. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 345 Peninsular Spanish Readings. A survey of the literature of Spain including works from different literary movements. This course is conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SN 202. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 361 Translation Practicum I. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between Spanish and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced

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level upon completion of SN 361, SN 362 and SN 363. Prerequisite: SN 301. 1 Sem. Hr. SN 362 Translation Practicum II. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between Spanish and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced level upon completion of SN 361, SN 362 and SN 363. Prerequisite: SN 301. 1 Sem. Hr. SN 363 Translation Practicum III. This course offers practice of the techniques of translating commercial, technical and literary texts between Spanish and English. Students will complete specific translation assignments designed to increase reading and writing abilities to the ACTFL advanced level upon completion of SN 361, SN 362 and SN 363. Prerequisite: SN 301. 1 Sem. Hr. SN 385 Methods of Teaching Spanish. A practical and theoretical methodology course which emphasizes lesson planning, writing instructional objectives, assessment, curriculum design, and a study of methodologies and materials relevant to the teaching of Spanish in the elementary, middle and secondary schools. The course emphasizes the core guidelines of the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and relates instructional planning to Ohio’s Model for a Competency-Based Program in Foreign Languages. This course must be taken prior to or concurrently with multiage student teaching and SN 386. This course does not count toward the requirements of the major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in Spanish and permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 386 Practicum in the Teaching of Spanish. A practicum designed to put into immediate practice theories and strategies discussed in SN 385. The student will serve as a teaching assistant in an elementary or intermediate course in Spanish in the Department of Foreign Languages and Cultures. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with SN 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisites: Successful completion of one or more 300-level courses in Spanish and permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. SN 387 Teaching Spanish in the Elementary School. This course is a practicum designed to make available to the teacher candidate in Spanish a practical field experience at the elementary school level. Under the direct supervision of foreign language faculty, the teacher candidate will participate in a FLES program at a local elementary school for one semester. It is recommended that this course be taken concurrently with SN 385. This course does not count toward the requirements for the major or minor in Spanish. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. SN 399 Special Topics in Spanish. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. SN 430W Senior Seminar. This course constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for a Spanish language major. The student is expected to complete a research project assigned by the instructor or, as an alternative, a research project proposed by the student and approved by the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. SN 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

Gender Studies
This interdisciplinary minor, drawn from the humanities and behavioral and social sciences, offers a means of examining the significance of gender in shaping the experiences of societies and communities and individuals. Within the liberal arts tradition, gender studies analyzes the effects of cultural attitudes and social structures on the experiences of men and women, examines previously unavailable information about the lives and contributions of women and demonstrates the importance of gender as a category of analysis to understand social structures of identity, power, and privilege. Graduates who have completed the gender studies minor are poised to work in a variety of settings ranging from social service to policy and lobbying organizations to research centers and educational services. Additionally, minoring in gender studies appropriately prepares students for many graduate programs.

Requirements for the Minor in Gender Studies
Required Gender Studies Courses GS 201Q Introduction to Gender Studies Semester Hours 3

Any Four from the Following Courses Semester Hours (must include one course from at least two disciplines other than GS) GS 210 Introduction to Men’s Studies 3 GS 220 Gender, Body, Identity 3 GS 310 Seminar in Gender Studies 3 CJ 208 Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice 3 CM 380Q Diversity: Gender, Communication and Society 3 EC 330 Economics of Gender 3 EH 265 Gender and Literature 3 EH 326 Women and Literature 3 HI 260 Women in East Asia 3 HI 280 American Women’s History 3 PS 216 Women and Politics 3 PY 345 Human Sexual Behavior 3 PY 385 Psychology of Gender 3 RE 390 Women and Religion 3 SN 280 Gender and Ethnicity in Spanish American Literature 3 SO 240 Courtship and Marriage 3 SO 310 American Family 3 SO 320 Sociology of Gender 3 Total 15

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Course Descriptions
GS 199 Special Topics in Gender Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. GS 201Q Introduction to Gender Studies. A broad introduction to the basic theories, definitions and methods of the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. The course is devoted to analyzing the experiences of men and women with respect to the psychological, cultural and biological factors that influence individual gender identity development and the construction and representation of gender in society. The complex intersection of race, ethnicity, class and gender will be explored. This course is required for the gender studies minor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III,B.} GS 210 Introduction to Men’s Studies. An introduction to the diverse and interdisciplinary field of men’s studies. The complex intersections between masculinities and race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation will be an ongoing concern of the course. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2.} GS 220 Gender, Body, Identity. The course examines the importance of the human body understood as both a biological and cultural entity. Some of the topics to be explored in the class are foot-binding, genital mutilation, “cutting,” tattoos and “body adornment,” steroids, anorexia, cosmetic surgery, the medical construction of gender and the cyborg. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2.} GS 299 Special Topics in Gender Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. GS 310 Seminar in Gender Studies. An advanced seminar exploring current theories and/or issues in the interdisciplinary field of gender studies. The specific topics will vary according to the interests of the faculty member teaching the course. The complex intersections between gender and race, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation will be an ongoing concern of the seminar. Prerequisite: GS 201Q or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2.} GS 399 Special Topics in Gender Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. GS 400 Independent Study in Gender Studies. The study of selected topics or projects in gender studies. Open to juniors and seniors minoring in gender studies. A prospectus must be submitted for approval prior to registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. GS 499 Internship. Prerequisite: Junior or senior status and approval of gender studies director. 1-3 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Geology
The Department of Geology offers a program which is designed to give the student a solid foundation in understanding the materials, processes and history of the earth. Programs of study are available for those students who plan to enter graduate schools and professional careers as well as for those students who intend to terminate their studies with the bachelor’s degree. Opportunities are available for students who wish to include geology as part of a double major or self-defined major. Each student works closely with department faculty members in developing a course of study that best suits his or her individual objectives.

Requirements for the Major in Geology
Required Geology Courses GY 110 Physical Geology or GY 112 Physical Geology GY 212Q Historical Geology GY 301 Mineralogy GY 302 Petrology GY 325 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation GY 330 Structural Geology GY 381 Geology Seminar GY 382 Geology Seminar GY 383 Geology Seminar GY 384 Geology Seminar GY 425E SCE Research Six to seven additional hours of GY coursework (may include EV 280) Total Semester Hours 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 .5 .5 .5 .5 4 6 or 7

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A Senior Culminating Experience is required of all students. In the Department of Geology this requirement may be met by satisfactory completion of GY 425E (SCE research) or GY 494 (Honors Thesis/Project). Required Extra-Departmental Courses MA 120 Precalculus Mathematics CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry or CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry PH 101 General Physics I or One BI course (not including BI 120 or BI 122) Strongly Recommended Courses (but not required) MA 141 Calculus I Semester Hours 4 4 4 3-4

Semester Hours 4

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Total

47-48

Certain requirements may be waived at the discretion of the department if the student presents acceptable alternatives. Completion of a summer course at an accredited field camp is strongly recommended for geology majors intending to continue advanced studies in graduate school. The amount of credit for such a course which can be applied toward the degree requirements will not exceed seven semester hours. Students planning graduate study should note that most geology departments require two courses each in chemistry, physics and calculus. Some graduate programs require a reading knowledge of a second language.

Field Trips
Field trips constitute an integral part of the geology curriculum, and students are strongly encouraged to participate in such trips. Extended field trips may be incorporated into the following courses: GY 212Q, 302, 320, 325 and 330.

Requirements for the Minor in Geology
Required Geology Courses GY 110 Physical Geology or GY 112 Physical Geology with Laboratory GY 212Q Historical Geology Additional courses to equal 15 hours of GY coursework Total Semester Hours 3-4 4 8-9 15

Courses most suitable for completion of the geology minor include GY 210, 270, 301, 320, 325 and 330, but other courses may be selected according to the student’s interests.

Requirements for the Minor in Earth Science
Required Geology Courses GY 112 Physical Geology with Laboratory GY 212Q Historical Geology One additional GY course at the 200 level or higher Required Extra-Departmental Courses PH 120 Astronomy: A Survey Any One from the Following Courses BI 120 Contemporary Biology BI 122 Contemporary Biology (with a lab) CH 100 Chemistry in Society CH 101 Chemistry in Society (with a lab) PH 110 Concepts of Physics Total Semester Hours 4 4 2-4 Semester Hours 4 Semester Hours 3 4 3 4 3 17-20

Requirements for Honors in Geology
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in geology if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in geology, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses required is GY 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the twelfth week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in geology include any geology course numbered 200 or higher. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about Honors Programs.

Geology Course Descriptions
GY 110 Physical Geology. An introduction to the basic principles of geology and processes of earth history including geologic time, weathering and erosion, volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building and the earth model. Emphasis on the scientific method of investigation. Students who complete GY 110 may not receive credit for GY 112. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} GY 112 Physical Geology with Laboratory. An introduction to the basic principles of geology and processes of earth history, including geologic time, weathering and erosion, volcanism, earthquakes, mountain building and the earth model. Three class hours per week and one lab session per week. The laboratory will involve a study of the physical characteristics of rocks and minerals and interpretation of topographic and geologic features. The work of the lab will be integrated with that of the class. Students who complete GY 112 may not receive credit for GY 110. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} GY 199 Special Topics in Geology. See All-University 199 course description on page 49.

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GY 205 Weather and Climate. A study of the nature of the Earth’s atmosphere, atmospheric circulation and energy, clouds and precipitation, frontal systems and other weather phenomena that affect our everyday lives. The relationship between weather and climate and global problems related to sustainable human existence will be considered. Not open to freshmen except by permission. Satisfies the non-laboratory science requirement. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} GY 210 Hydrology and Water Resources. A study of the properties, occurrence, distribution and movement of water and its relationship with the environment within each phase of the hydrological cycle. Course covers both surface and groundwater and introduces statistical methods and computer modeling. Prerequisite: BI 141 or EV 190 or GY 110 or GY 112 or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed as EV 210. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs GY 212Q Historical Geology. Investigation of the development of and distribution of the continents through time based upon evidence of the geologic record and of the evolution of life based upon the fossil record. Prerequisite: GY 110 or GY 112. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2 and IIIB} GY 215 Environmental Geology. The relationships between humans and their geological environments. Topics discussed will vary but may include geologic hazards, the impact of civilization upon streams and ground water, problems related to development of coastal regions, the availability and development of natural resources, waste disposal and urban planning. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} GY 220 History of Life. A study of the basic principles used by paleobiologists to understand the history of life on Earth and an application of those principles through a survey of major events and trends in the evolution and diversification of life. Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} (typically offered every other year) GY 270 Regional Geology. An examination of the geology, geomorphology and geologic history of selected regions of North America. Emphasis will be placed on the use of basic geologic principles in the interpretation of geologic features and landforms. Prerequisites: GY 110 or GY 112, GY 212Q or permission of the instructor. Three class/laboratory hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. GY 299 Special Topics in Geology. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. GY 301 Mineralogy. Introduction to crystallography, physical mineralogy, crystal chemistry, optical mineralogy and x-ray diffraction. Identification, classification and interpretation of minerals. Prerequisite: GY 110 or GY 112. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. GY 302 Petrology. Study of the evolution and occurrence of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Physical and chemical classification of rocks based upon mineralogy and textures. Prerequisite: GY 301. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. GY 320 Paleontology. Introduction to classification and identification of fossils and the evolution and distribution of the major invertebrate phyla through geologic time. Prerequisites: GY 110 or GY 112, GY 212, or permission of the instructor. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. GY 325 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation. Principles of stratigraphy and sedimentation involving studies of the components and structures of sediments. Correlation, classification and interpretation of sedimentary deposits. Prerequisites: GY 110 or GY 112 and GY 212Q. GY 301, 302 and 320 are recommended but not required. Five to six class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. GY 330 Structural Geology. A study of the principles of and causes of deformation in the Earth’s crust at all scales. Recognition and analysis of structural and tectonic features. Prerequisites: GY 110 or GY 112, GY 212Q and MA 120 or equivalent. Four to five class/laboratory hours per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) GY 381/382/383/384 Geology Seminar. A review of classic papers and current publications relevant to the broad spectrum of earth sciences. Each semester students will prepare a written report and give an oral presentation on a subject of their own choosing that is of current geological interest. Normally taken in junior and senior years. Each student is responsible for giving one seminar presentation each semester. Regular attendance at scheduled seminars is also required. Prerequisite: Registration only by permission of the instructor. 0.5 Sem. Hrs. each. GY 385 Directed Studies in Earth Sciences. Studies relevant to a topic selected by the student in conference with the instructor. The study may take the form of library research, discussion, or field or laboratory investigation under close supervision of the instructor. The study may represent an extension of previous course work. Open to advanced students majoring in geology. Prerequisite: Registration only by permission of the instructor. May be taken more than one semester. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. GY 399 Special Topics in Geology. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. GY 410 Research. Independent study and research in earth science may be taken on an interdepartmental basis with permission of the departments involved. Research projects are determined by the student’s interest. A formal presentation of the results of the research is required. Open to advanced students majoring in geology who have demonstrated a desire and an aptitude for independent research. Prerequisite: Registration only by permission of the instructor. May be taken more than one semester. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. GY 425E Senior Culminating Experience. A two-semester course designed to fulfill the University requirements for a Senior Culminating Experience. This course is required of all geology majors. Students will develop and conduct an independent scientific research project and present the results as a written report and an oral presentation. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. each semester for a total of 4 Hrs. GY 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A research/project course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in the major at graduation. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and approval of the instructor, the department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6 Sem. Hrs. GY 499 Internship. Students are provided with a significant learning experience outside the classroom setting. Although the program is designed to be fundamentally an educational experience, professionally productive work will constitute an integral part of the internship. Specific arrangements and requirements will vary with the program. A contract will specify the activities with which the student will be involved. Taken under satisfactory/unsatisfactory grade option only. Only one internship may be taken for credit but may, in certain cases, be repeated for audit. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Health
The health major and minor at Mount Union equip students with the necessary knowledge, skills and dispositions to be discerning and successful

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health professionals capable of serving and leading in their chosen vocations. Students are provided both theoretical foundations and practical experiences related to improving school health programs to ethically enhance student and community awareness and choices related to health, overall well-being, fitness, motivation, citizenship and access to resources. Students may major in health if they wish to pursue a graduate school program in health fields or if they wish to enter the teaching profession.

Requirements for the Major in Health
Required Health Courses Semester Hours HP 101 Introduction to Public Health 3 HE 140 Safety, First Aid and Emergency Care 2 HE 205 Personal Health 3 HE 250 Nutrition Science 3 HE 260W Principles and Administration of School Health Programs 3 HE 320 Methods and Curricula for Teaching Health 3 HE 340 Sexuality and Health 3 HE 400 Community Health Education 3 HE 420 Disease, Illness and Death (The SCE for the major) 3 Any One from the Following Courses Semester Hours HE 410 Health Education Seminar 3 PE 410W Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical 3 Education Required Departmental Courses Semester Hours ES 260Q Growth and Physical Activity 3 HE 230 Substance Abuse and Prevention Education 3 or ES 330 Basic Pharmacology 3 (student must meet all prerequisites for the course) Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology Total Semester Hours 4 40

Candidates seeking a teaching license in health education must earn a grade of “C” or better in HE 260W and HE 320. If a minimum grade of “C” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C” or better is earned.

Requirements for the Minor in Health
Required Health Courses HE 140 Safety, First Aid and Emergency Care HE 205 Personal Health HE 250 Nutrition Science HE 400 Community Health Education Any One from the Following Health Courses HE 230 Substance Abuse and Prevention Education HE 340 Sexuality and Health Total Semester Hours 2 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 14

Requirements for Honors in Health
Criteria for eligibility are stated under the Honors program beginning on page 35.

Health Course Descriptions
HE 130 Sociological and Philosophical Foundations of Health. This course will introduce the teacher-candidate to the ethics, theories, literature, media, strategies, program planning, program implementation, program evaluation, National Health Education Standards, rewards and challenges of health education. It will provide the teacher-candidate with the necessary foundational knowledge upon which to foster competencies and discernment in their future coursework and experiences. This course includes a 5-hour service-learning project. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 140 Safety, First Aid and Emergency Care. The course covers theoretical and practical fundamentals necessary for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of common first aid emergencies and injuries during recreation and in the home, school, and workplace particularly among infants, children and adolescents. Instruction progresses from American Red Cross (ARC) and Responding to Emergencies (RTE) to ARC Community CPR. Upon successful completion of this course, students will obtain ARC RTE certification and ARC Community CPR certification. A materials fee is required. 2 Sem. Hrs. HE 152 Wellness. This lecture and activity course will examine the six dimensions of wellness: physical, spiritual, emotional, intellectual, environmental and interpersonal/social wellness. Students will learn methods of evaluating their own well-being and the importance of adopting/maintaining a healthy lifestyle as a means of not only disease prevention but also discovering a sense of purpose. Concepts of health and physical fitness will be explored and used to develop an understanding of how optimal wellness can be achieved. Students will be expected to design a

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personal wellness plan and carry out the self-designed plan during the semester. 2 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,E.} (typically offered every semester) HE 199 Special Topics in Health. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. HE 205 Personal Health. This course investigates personal health and wellness and discusses various influencing factors like community health operations, self-concept, predispositions, trends, addictive behaviors, motivation, knowledge, and individual responsibility related to choices in consumption, exercise, sexuality, disease prevention, stress management, nutrition, and mental, spiritual and emotional well being. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) HE 230 Substance Abuse and Prevention Education. This course will provide an overview of the major drugs of abuse and their effects on the body as well as the biological, sociological, psychological and legal issues associated with drug use and abuse in our culture. An emphasis will be given to effective educational approaches and prevention programs that address the problems of use and abuse. Prerequisites: HE 130, HE 140 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 240 RTE and CPR Recertification. This course will review the knowledge and skills gained in HE 140. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be recertified in ARC RTE as well as in ARC CPR. Prerequisites: HE 140 or permission of instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. HE 250 Nutrition Science. A comprehensive investigation of the basics of nutrition, the role that nutrition plays in the maintenance of health and its effects on human performance. Teacher-candidates will learn about the six main nutrients, dietary supplements, disordered eating and nutrition for patients with cancer, athletes and children. They will also learn strategies regarding adopting a healthy diet, encouraging others to adopt a healthy diet and refuting dieting myths. Teacher-candidates will hold a nutrition health fair in conjunction with a local elementary school. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) HE 260W Principles and Administration of School Health Programs. A major responsibility of health educators is providing health leadership in the schools while collaborating with other teachers, staff, local families and community agencies. This course will enable teacher-candidates to learn about the various roles they will need to perform in addition to teaching health in the classroom. Teacher-candidates will learn about the National Health Education Standards, health literacy and child abuse and neglect, as well as the eight elements of a coordinated school health system and how to engage other professionals to enhance school health. They will visit schools and fulfill a practicum alongside a practicing health educator and/or administrator in the school system. Various health educators are invited to the class to share about their experiences as advocates for health in the school and community. Various administrative responsibilities will also be taught and practiced. A 10-hour practicum with a health-education specialist in a P-12 school setting is required. Prerequisites: HE 130, HE 140, ED 150W. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 299 Special Topics in Health. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. HE 317 Medical Aspects of Sport. The pathological basis plus the clinical presentation of injuries/illnesses commonly sustained by competitive athletes and/or physically active individuals. Students will increase their understanding of the cellular events and reactions and other pathological mechanisms in the development, progression and epidemiology of injuries, illnesses and diseases. This course prepares students to formulate an impression of an injury/illness for the primary purpose of recognizing the nature and severity of the injury/illness and subsequently formulate a comprehensive treatment plan including the administration of proper immediate care, making appropriate medical referrals and other necessary elements of an effective treatment plan, emphasizing pharmacological intervention. Prerequisite: Junior standing; to be taken concurrently with AT 316. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) HE 320 Methods and Curricula for Teaching Health. This course will provide the theory and experiential learning opportunities for teachercandidates to acquire health knowledge and competencies in curricular design, instructional methods, use of technology and other resources, promoting health and meeting diverse needs in the classroom. Teaching and assessing the National Health Education Standards, six CDC risk behaviors, and 10 general health education content areas will be stressed. A 10-hour clinical practice experience in a P-12 school setting is required. Students must earn a minimum of a C- in this course. Prerequisites: BI 105, HE 130, HE 205, HE 260W, ED 150W, admission into Teacher Education Program (for teachercandidates only). 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 340 Sexuality and Health. This course addresses issues related to the practice, meaning and significance of human sexual relations and their biological, psychological and sociological effects on health. Specific attention will be given to sexually transmitted infections, sexual trends in diverse populations, fostering healthy relationships, refusal skills, morality and values, decision making skills and unique issues such as teaching strategies and curriculum related to teaching sexuality to children and adolescents. Prerequisites: HE 130, HE 205, BI 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 399 Special Topics in Health. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. HE 400 Community Health Education. Theories and techniques of community organization are applied to planning, implementation and evaluation of community health education programs. Health-related organizations, diseases, health across the lifespan, health disparities, environmental health, workplace health, health care systems and the collection and analysis of epidemiological data are emphasized. A 15-hour practicum in two community health agencies is required. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 410 Health Education Seminar. This seminar will provide information on health education competencies. Health education as a profession will be discussed. Students will take active leadership roles in campus and community health education projects; they will plan, implement and evaluate at least one such project. Health education theories and appropriate literature and date will be reviewed. Grant-writing and conference-proposal writing will be demonstrated and practiced. Review for health education competency exams will also be covered. Prerequisites: HE 340 and HE 400 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 420 Disease, Illness and Death. An overview of basic prevention and investigation of the signs, symptoms, prognosis and treatments associated with various common diseases in the world and in the local community. Holistic dynamics associated with illness and death will be explored including related processes, promoting health in the elderly, understanding the meaning of death and the significance of grief, bereavement, cultural differences and care. Cultural diversity and its relationship to health, disease and death will be addressed. This class is the SCE for the major. Prerequisites: HE 130, HE 205, HE 250, HE 320. 3 Sem. Hrs. HE 494 HE 499 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Internship. See All-University 499 course descriptions on page 49.

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Department of History
For a detailed description of the Asian studies major and minor, see page 59. For a detailed description of the classics minor, see page 81.

History
The history major offers a program designed to acquaint students with the Western historical tradition in order to prepare them for the exercise of the duties of citizenship, to promote understanding of the basis of contemporary Western society and to provide context for the appreciation of the Western cultural tradition. The history major also is designed to acquaint students with Asian historical traditions in order to prepare them for participation in the increasingly interdependent world community, to grant them perspective on Western culture and to broaden their intellectual horizons. Generally, course work in history provides students with a sound intellectual foundation, including a background of knowledge as well as writing and critical thinking skills, for any future professional, educational or career endeavor. More specifically, the history major prepares students for graduate study in history and related fields as well as for careers in education.

Requirements for the Major in History
Required History Courses Semester Hours HI 101 Western Civilization 3 HI 102 Western Civilization 3 HI 110 Asian Civilization 3 HI 200 The Historian’s Craft 3 HI 210 Colonial and 19th Century America 3 HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations 3 HI 295 The Progressive Movement in 20th Century America 3 HI 400 Seminar in Western History 3 or HI 401 Seminar in Asian History 3 One additional HI course 3 Three additional HI courses at the 300 level 9 HI 400 or HI 401 serves as the SCE. Majors planning to attend graduate school may register for HI 450 or HI 494 in place of HI 400. These students should also register in foreign language courses. Required Extra-Departmental Courses EC 105 Introduction to Economics PS 105 American National Government Total Semester Hours 3 3 42

Requirements for the Minor in History
Required History Courses HI 101 Western Civilization HI 102 Western Civilization HI 110 Asian Civilization Two additional HI courses One additional HI courses at the 300 level Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 6 3 18

Requirements for Honors in History
Honors in history may be earned by: (1) Holding a 3.5 GPA in history courses at graduation. (2) Completing three 300-level history courses for honors credit. (3) Completing HI 494. Consultation with and permission of both the course instructor and the department chair during the semester prior to doing honors work are required.

Course Descriptions
HI 101/HI 102 Western Civilization. A survey of the development of Western civilization from its earliest times to the mid-17th century. It emphasizes the evaluation of institutions and the cultural contributions of successive periods. HI 102 stresses the major cultural and institutional changes from 1648 to the present. Each 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 110 Asian Civilization. A survey of cultural, political, economic and social developments in Chinese, Japanese, Indian and Islamic civilizations. Critical attention will be paid to the interaction of Asia and the West in the 19th and 20th centuries. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 199 Special Topics in History. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. HI 200 The Historian’s Craft. An examination into the nature and method of historical inquiry and the construction and writing of history. The course will introduce students to historiography, the philosophy of history, issues facing historians, practical research methods and the evaluation of

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sources. The course stresses critical thinking and analysis as well as close critical reading, writing and speaking skills. HI 200 is a prerequisite for the SCE and is suggested as preparation for 300-level courses. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 1} HI 210 Colonial and 19th Century America. A critical review of American history from European exploration through Reconstruction following the Civil War. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 215 The Middle East. An analysis of 20th century political, economic and social developments of the area. Attention will focus on the major nationalistic, religious and international problems that have affected this strategic area. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 220 East Europe. A survey of the history of Eastern Europe from the 18th century to the present. Attention will focus on the Hapsburg and Ottoman Empires, national revival and the emergence of nation-states, Communist domination and Communist collapse. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} HI 225 History of Africa. A study of the ancient African civilizations, the slave trade, the colonial period and the emergence of modern nations. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations. An interdisciplinary focus on the human dimension in the political, economic and social development of new Asian and African states. Emphasis is placed on the conflict between traditional values and institutions and those of modern societies. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1 or II,D, 1 and III,B.} HI 260 Women in East Asia. By examining individual life histories, exploring the development of women’s consciousness, and analyzing historical events, this course is designed to make a historical survey of continuity and change in the roles and conditions of women in East Asian society from ancient times to the present. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 265 East Asia to 1800. A survey of the traditional cultures of China and Japan from early times to the incursion of the West. Attention will focus on Chinese and Japanese history, society, religion, art and literature from the Chinese conception of “dao” to the Japanese “myth of uniqueness.” 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 275 African-American History. This course is a survey of African-American History from colonial times to the present. Slavery, abolition, segregation, civil rights, and social reform will be discussed in the context of social, political, economic, and intellectual history. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 280 American Women’s History. This course concentrates on women as active participants in the history of the United States from precolonial contact to the present. It will begin with an examination of the status of women in Europe, Africa and the Americas before colonization begins and will then consider the changes that occurred as a result of Europe’s “discovery” of the Americas. It will examine both the general contributions that women have made to the economic, social and political spheres and the roles that specific women have played in the development of the nation. Women of all socio-economic, religious, ethnic and color groups will be considered. 3 Sem. Hrs HI 285 History of the Contemporary Fundamentalism. An analytical survey of the origin, nature, and development of militant organized religions in South East Asia and the Middle East. The focus of the course will be an examination of the causes, development, and impact of the emergence of the fundamentalism and revivalism in social and political areas in selected countries in order to assess the nature of hostility toward modernity and democracy. Frequent references will be made to terrorist activities especially in the Middle East in recent years. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 1.} HI 290Q History of Civil Rights Movements in the U.S. The course will examine the origins, development, and the various features of the civil rights movements in the United States. It will focus on the impact of various related movements on the political and social life in America. Frequent references will be made to civil rights leaders, activists, and associations. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 1 and III,B.} HI 295 The Progressive Movement in 20th Century America. An analysis of the domestic development of modern America with an emphasis on the rise of the federal government, the rise of the presidency and the rise of liberalism. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 299 Special Topics in History. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. HI 315 United States Since 1945. The history of the United States focusing on its prominence in world politics and economics since World War II and the repercussions of this at home. Topics for study may include: civil rights and social reform, the Atomic question, the U.S. Soviet conflict, terrorism, domestic politics, foreign relations, U.S. cultural and intellectual history. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 320 The Renaissance and Reformation. A survey of Europe from the first stirrings of the Renaissance in Italy to the conclusion of the Catholic Counter-Reformation, covering the approximate years 1300 to 1600. This course emphasizes intellectual, political and institutional developments. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 325 Early Modern Europe. A survey of Europe from the religious wars of the 16th century through the Enlightenment to the eve of the French Revolution covering the approximate years 1559 to 1789. This course emphasizes intellectual, political and economic developments. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 336 History of Southern Africa. A study of the growth and development of southern Africa from the 17th century African and European invasions and migrations to the present day with emphasis on European economic and political imperialism and black-white economic and political confrontations. Independence movements in Lesotho, Swaziland and the Union of South Africa, the nature of apartheid system of the Republic of South Africa and the rise of the African National Congress also will be explored. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 340 Revolutionary Europe. A survey of Europe from the French revolution to World War I. This course emphasizes the development of nationalism and liberalism, the implications of the progress of science and industry and the emergence of imperialism. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 345 Contemporary Europe. A survey of Europe from World War I to the present. This course emphasizes the rise of communism and fascism, the breakdown of collective security, World War II, the Cold War and the development of the European community. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} HI 350 Ancient Greece and Rome. A survey of the ancient roots of Western Civilization with emphasis placed on the intellectual and cultural as well as the political development of Ancient Greece and Rome from approximately 800 B.C. to 300 A.D. Cross-listed as CL 350. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1} HI 355 Medieval Europe. A survey of Europe from approximately 300 to 1300 with special attention given to the development of the church, the Empire, feudalism, and dynastic states as well as the trade revival. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 358 Topics in Military History. A varying topical study of European and American military history. Emphasis changes from semester to semester but will always include the effects of politics, technology, and tactical theory on military affairs. Students may receive credit more than once as

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long as the topic is different each time. Prerequisites: Three hours of history and sophomore standing, or instructor’s approval. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 360 Modern China. An examination of both the rise of Chinese nationalism and the entangling relations with the West during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 363 Contemporary China. An examination of the society, politics and culture of both the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of China from Mao’s entry into Beijing in 1949 to Deng’s suppression in Tiananmen in 1989. Major topics include the agricultural, industrial and cultural revolutions, the democracy movement, the crisis of leadership under communism, political and economic development under the Guomindang, and U.S. relationships with both Beijing and Taiwan. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 364 China’s Partners in the 20th Century. This course analyzes Sino-foreign cooperative efforts from late imperial times to the present with emphasis on political, military, economic and cultural relations. Students are expected to learn distinguishing characteristics of bilateral exchanges between China and Western European nations, the former Soviet Union and the United States in the 20th century. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 365 Southeast Asia. An examination of the Asian countries south of China and east of India. Emphasis will be placed on the political, economic and social development of the region in the 20th century. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 370 Modern Japan. An examination of the major political, economic, cultural and diplomatic events that have brought Japan from sheltered feudalism to militant aggression, from total devastation to international preeminence in little over a century. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 380 South Asia. An examination of the Indian subcontinent from early times to the present with emphasis placed on the political, economic, social and religious development of modern India and Pakistan. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,1.} HI 385 Modern Russia. A survey of Russian history in the 19th and 20th centuries, from the era of the Napoleonic Wars through the Bolshevik Revolution to the collapse of the Soviet Union and the attempts to structure its successor state in the 1990s. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 399 Special Topics in History. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. HI 400 Seminar in Western History. Each student will select a topic from some area of European or American history, apply critical research techniques to it and complete a polished paper. This course satisfies the Senior Culminating Experience for history majors. Prerequisite: HI 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 401 Seminar in Asian History. Each student will select a topic from some area of Asian history, literature, art or religion, apply critical research techniques to it and complete a polished paper. Required of all Asian studies majors as their Senior Culminating Experience. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. Prerequisite: HI 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 405 Independent Study in History. Open to junior and senior students majoring in history. Emphasis is on an in-depth independent inquiry of a subject. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. Prerequisite: HI 200 and permission of instructor. Variable credit, 1-3 Sem. Hrs. HI 450 Senior Thesis. An independent research course to culminate in a significant, scholarly paper written in consultation with an advising faculty member. Can be completed in one or two semesters. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. Prerequisite: HI 200 and permission of the instructor and department chair. 3 Sem. Hrs. HI 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A formal, scholarly paper written under the supervision of an advising professor. (See All-University 494 course description on page 49.) Can be completed in one or two semesters. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered and proposal must receive approval from the Honors Review Board. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, instructor’s permission, and Honors Review Board approval. Prerequisite: HI 200. 3 or 6 Sem. Hrs. Note: If taken for six semester hours, it will be offered as HI 494E with three semester hours each semester. HI 499 Internship. This is an experience-based course in which the student spends a specified amount of time with a local, county or state historical society in order to learn how such institutions function and to understand the richness of local historical sources and their importance to the historian. Supervision is provided by the cooperating society and the Department of History. The specific program for each internship will vary as agreed upon by the intern, the internship coordinator and the cooperating society. HI 499 will count as only one offering within the major. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

The Department of Human Performance and Sport Business
For a detailed description of the physical education major and minor, see page 158. For a detailed description of the athletic training major and minor, see page 60. For a detailed description of the exercise science major and minor, see page 119. For a detailed description of the health major and minor, see page 131. For a detailed description of the sport business major and minor, see page 182. For a detailed description of the public health major, see page 173. The Department of Human Performance and Sport Business seeks to contribute to the goals and objectives of the University by providing the following programs: A. A program of professional preparation for teaching which allows students to meet state teaching licensure standards for physical education. B. A major in athletic trainingwhich meets the National Athletic Trainer’s Association (NATA) standards as an Approved Undergraduate Athletic Training Education Program and is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)and the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). C. A major in exercise science which prepares students for various certification levels offered by the American University of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and/or for certification offered by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) upon graduation. D. A program of physical education basic instructional activity classes which encompasses lifetime leisure activities, aquatics, physical fitness and recreational pursuits. E. A program of intramural sport activities which provides all students the opportunity for enjoyable participation in individual sports, team sports and recreational activities. F. A schedule for the total physical education and athletic facilities which allows the students maximum opportunity to enjoy their favorite activities at their leisure.

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G.

A major in sport business which prepares students to serve the athletic community as managers, directors, promoters, marketers and administrators.

Intramural Athletics and Student Recreation
The intramural sports program provides a year-round schedule of seasonal sports with voluntary participation in regularly organized and supervised schedules. Selective events for coeducational recreational participation are provided during the year. The McPherson Academic and Athletic Complex is open seven days a week for Mount Union students’ unscheduled recreational activities (University ID required).

Information Systems
Mount Union offers a major and minor in information systems administered by the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems. Those wishing to pursue information systems studies should read the descriptive material contained in the section on computer science and information systems found on page 88.

International Studies
Administered by the Department of Political Science and International Studies, international studies is an interdepartmental major designed to provide students with an international perspective on current economic and political issues as well as with the historical knowledge necessary to understand the development of these issues.

Requirements for the Major in International Studies
Upon declaring the major, students will choose one of two tracks, each of which requires 39 total hours: international relations or comparative politics/area studies. Students will then be asked to develop a coherent plan of study in consultation with their academic advisor within one semester of declaring the major. The student with a double major should be aware that only four courses taken to satisfy the second major will be counted toward the international studies major. Similarly, only two of the courses taken toward the major will be counted toward the international studies minor. Students are required to minor in a foreign language and earn at least six credits either in a study abroad program or in a foreign policy related internship. Depending on the student’s choice of study abroad or internship, these six credits may be counted toward either the foreign language minor or the international studies major as appropriate. Internship credit will not be counted toward a foreign language minor. Students should take into consideration that a minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for participation in most of Mount Union’s study abroad programs and internships. Certain programs require a minimum of 3.0 and others a 3.33.

All Majors
Required Courses for All Majors PS 120 Introduction to International Studies PS 180 Introduction to Geography EC 105 Introduction to Economics (Students may substitute EC 200 and EC 201) PS 350 Quantitative Political Analysis Any One from the Following Economics/International Political Economy Courses EC 327 International Trade EC 328 International Monetary Economics EC 375QW Development Economics EC 380Q Comparative Economic Systems EC 390 Economics of the Asian Pacific Rim PS 340 International Political Economy Any One from the Following History Courses HI 101 Western Civilization HI 102 Western Civilization HI 110 Asian Civilization International Relations Track Required Courses PS 225 Introduction to International Relations IN 400 SCE Any Three from the Following Political Science Courses PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics PS 270 American Foreign Policy PS 227 Model United Nations PS 321 Terrorism PS 326 International Organizations PS 470 National Security IN 199 Special Topics IN 299 Special Topics IN 399 Special Topics Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3

Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

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IN 499

Foreign Policy Internship

3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Any Two from the Following History Courses HI 215 The Middle East HI 220 East Europe HI 225 History of Africa HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations HI 315 United States since 1945 HI 345 Contemporary Europe HI 358 Topics in Military History HI 363 Contemporary China HI 364 China’s Partners in the 20th Century HI 365 Southeast Asia HI 370 Modern Japan HI 380 South Asia HI 385 Modern Russia Comparative Politics/Area Studies Required Courses PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics IN 400 SCE

Semester Hours 3 3

Any Three from the Following Political Science Courses Semester Hours Two of the courses must focus on two different regions of the world. PS 225 Introduction to International Relations 3 PS 227 Model United Nations PS 321 Terrorism 3 PS 345 Comparative Politics: Europe 3 PS 346 Comparative Politics: Asia 3 PS 347 Politics of the Former Soviet Union 3 IN 199 Special Topics 3 IN 299 Special Topics 3 IN 399 Special Topics 3 IN 499 Foreign Policy Internship 3 Any Two from the Following History Courses The choice of courses must reflect an area focus. HI 215 The Middle East HI 220 East Europe HI 225 History of Africa HI 230Q Problems of Developing Nations HI 265 East Asia to 1800 HI 285 History of Contemporary Fundamentalism HI 325 Early Modern Europe HI 336 History of Southern Africa HI 340 Revolutionary Europe HI 345 Contemporary Europe HI 355 Medieval Europe HI 360 Modern China HI 363 Contemporary China HI 365 Southeast Asia HI 370 Modern Japan HI 380 South Asia HI 385 Modern Russia Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 39

Requirements for the Minor in International Studies
Required Political Science Courses PS 120 Introduction to International Studies PS 225 Introduction to International Relations or PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics One additional PS or EC course from the courses approved for the major Required History Courses Two HI courses from the courses approved for the major Semester Hours 3 3 3 3

Semester Hours 6

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Any One from the Following History Courses HI 101 Western Civilization HI 102 Western Civilization HI 110 Asian Civilization Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 18

Students minoring in international studies are strongly encouraged to develop proficiency in a foreign language.

Course Descriptions
IN 199 IN 299 IN 399 Special Topics in International Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. Special Topics in International Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. Special Topics in International Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

IN 400 Seminar in International Studies. In consultation with a faculty advisor, students will independently research a specific question within international studies, reviewing the relevant literature, developing a research design and analyzing the question using appropriate methods. The end product will be a major scholarly paper consisting of original research. This is the Senior Culminating Experience in international studies. Prerequisite: PS 350. 3 Sem. Hrs. IN 494 IN 498 IN 499 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Internships (Internal). See All-University 498 course description on page 49. Internships (External). See All-University 499 course description on page 49.

Leadership
A minor in leadership curriculum is designed to add practical leadership experience and management education to the students’ chosen academic degrees. Students who minor in Leadership are immersed in the practical application of leadership styles and techniques as well as problem solving and decision making. The unified curriculum is undertaken through the study of leadership theory, group dynamics, ethics in leadership, cultural awareness in decision making, historical leadership case studies, small group and organizational leadership and problem solving.

Common Track – 6 hours
Provided by the ROTC Department and open to all students. MS 180 Leadership and Adventure Training. An introduction to the Army, the principles of leadership in the military and society in general. Develops skills in time management, problem-solving and creative thinking. Additionally, offers practical application of these skills in adventure classes of rappelling, orienteering and marksmanship. Co-requisite: MS 190. 1 Sem. Hr. MS 185 Development of Leadership and Self Development. A development of individual leadership and its application in small groups situations. Examines leadership traits, professional ethics and leadership styles. In-class exercises reinforce material presented. Co-requisite: MS 190. 1 Sem. Hr. MS 190 Leadership Seminar I. Hands-on instructional program preparing individual cadets to practice leadership fundamentals learned in seminar classes while engaging in military training. Decision-making roles of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs are stressed. Corequisites: MS 180, MS 185. 0 Sem. Hrs. MS 280 Leadership in Small Groups I. Study of the theoretical and practical leadership dimensions. Students will examine several aspects of communication and leadership concepts, emphasizing class participation and intellectual curiosity. Upon completion, students will be grounded in fundamental leadership principles and will be better prepared to apply such principles to a wide variety of life experiences. Co-requisite: MS 290. 2 Sem. Hrs. MS 285 Leadership in Small Groups II. Continuing the development of the leadership dimensions, students examine the application of leadership in military settings. The theoretical study of decision-making in military situations is studied and compared to historical examples over the last few decades. Co-requisite: MS 290. 2 Sem. Hrs. MS 290 Leadership Seminar II. Hands-on instructional program preparing individual cadets to practice leadership fundamentals learned in seminar classes while engaging in military training. The decision-making roles of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs are stressed. Co-requisite: MS 285. 0 Sem. Hrs.

Non-ROTC Track –12 Hours
Provided by various departments and open to all students. CM 325 Leadership and Team Communication. This course explores the relationship between communication and leadership within organizations to develop specific communication competencies associated with effective leadership. This is accomplished by considering both theoretical and applied approaches to leadership communication. The relationship between leaders and followers and the communication approaches used to develop and maintain that relationship are investigated. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semesters of odd-numbered years) CM 329 Conflict Management and Negotiation. Analysis of the communication dynamics involved in managing interpersonal, organizational and sociopolitical conflicts. Examination of theory and research related to conflict management and negotiation. Emphasis on case studies in various communication contexts. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years)

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SO 390 Sociology of Organizations. An examination of bureaucracy, decision making, communication, leadership, power relations and the environmental context for both business and service organizations. Prerequisites: SO 100 and junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. HR 491W Seminar in Leadership. This seminar is designed to focus on competencies of effective leadership and how leaders influence others through cooperative organizational relationships. How leaders make decisions regarding human resources; current leadership theories, issues and practices; as well as personal attributes associated with effective leadership are examined. Students will be involved in self-diagnostic tools, current literature, and case studies. This course has been designated as the Senior Culminating Experience for individuals majoring in human resource management. 3 Sem. Hrs.

ROTC Track – 12 Hours
Offered by the ROTC Department and open only to contracted Army cadets. MS 360 Leadership of Groups/Teams I. Develops managerial skills with emphasis on group dynamics, leadership theory and practical leadership experiences. Integrates communications skills, decision-making and group motivation through assumption of leadership positions and evaluations. Prerequisite: Permission; Co-requisite: MS 390. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 370 Leadership of Groups/Teams II. Application of management fundamentals, decision theory and leadership principles in varied organizational leadership positions. Emphasis is placed on coordinating, directing and controlling organizations. Prerequisite: Permission; Co-requisite: MS 390. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 390 Leadership Seminar III. Hands-on instructional program preparing individuals to undertake a wide range of tasks associated with the leadership of small organizations. Stress is on decision-making of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs in practical situations on campus and in field environments. Co-requisites: MS 360, MS 370. 0 Sem. Hrs. MS 460 Officership and the Profession of Arms. Professional ethics and the responsibilities of military leaders in our society will be developed. Development of interpersonal and managerial communicative skills will be stressed as it relates to successful leadership. Prerequisite: Permission; Co-requisite: MS 490. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 470 Transition to Lieutenant. An intensive review of management and study of military law for professional military officers. The military justice system and the management of personnel resources will be examined. Prerequisite: Permission; Co-requisite: MS 490. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 490 Leadership Seminar IV. Practical leadership program where students plan, execute and evaluate training of ROTC cadets in preparation for the broad range of tasks associated with officership. Prerequisite: Permission and senior standing. 0 Sem. Hrs.

Liberal Studies
Liberal studies courses are typically interdisciplinary in nature. They are designed by individual members of the faculty, rather than by academic departments, in order to explore topics or areas of interest which involve a number of the traditional areas of study. In a few cases, experimental inquiries and special interests not represented elsewhere in the curriculum are offered by permission of the dean of the University on a non-recurring basis.

Course Descriptions
LS 100 The Liberal Arts Experience. Designed to orient new students to the concepts, goals and processes of liberal arts education. Consideration will be given to the expectations and opportunities which distinguish the particular educational experience of the University of Mount Union. Meets two hours per week until mid-semester and is required of all entering freshmen. 1 Sem. Hr. {GenEd: I,A.} LS 106 Race, Culture and American Society. An examination of the racial and ethnic diversity in American society for an understanding of American culture. This course will look at such issues as the history, culture and contributions of Native Americans, African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and Euro-Americans as a framework for understanding America, from its beginnings, as a pluralistic, multi-ethnic and diverse society. The influence of class and gender on formulations of ethnic and racial identity also will be considered. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} LS 115 The Oceans. An interdisciplinary course surveying the biological, chemical, physical and geological phenomena that are characteristic of the oceans. Man’s interactions with the oceans, e.g., economic resources and technology, maritime law, pollution, fisheries, etc. also are discussed. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} LS 199 Special Topics in Liberal Studies. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. LS 250 Study/Travel Seminar. A course which allows a student to participate in study/travel programs in other countries for international intercultural purposes. An agreement among the student, the dean of the University and an assigned faculty member will enumerate credit, educational objectives and the requirements to satisfy them. Enrollment in the course requires approval of the contract by the Academic Policies Committee prior to initiation of the program. Graded only on an S/U basis. Credit variable, 1-15 Sem. Hrs. LS 299 Special Topics in Liberal Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. LS 300 The Nature of Science. Study of some aspects of the origins, development and social impact of scientific concepts, methods and institutions in the modern era as discussed by scientists and others. Major emphasis will be given to the increasingly massive and powerful science establishment of recent decades and its interaction with public policy and with various aspects of our culture. Prerequisites: EH 100, CM 101. Not open to freshmen. 3 Sem. Hrs. LS 317 Field Experience in Marine Science. Participation in an extended field trip to a marine science laboratory or marine environment. For students enrolled in (or having completed) one of: LS 115, BI 220, BI 280, GY 320 or GY 325. The trip may occur outside the normal academic calendar. A fee is charged. Graded on an S/U basis. Participation is limited, selective and requires permission of the instructor. Registration occurs during the semester following completion of the course. This course does not fulfill the laboratory portion of the all-University liberal arts requirements. 1 Sem. Hr. LS 320QW Vernacular Music and the Vietnam Conflict. A seminar course in which students will study and discuss vernacular music that

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addresses the Vietnam Conflict. The focus of study will be on the music itself, the way in which the music was marketed, the use of song texts as rhetoric, the history of the war and the sociology of audiences for the various genres of war-related songs. Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2 and III, B.} LS 399 Special Topics in Liberal Studies. See All-University 399 course description on page 49.

Library Science
Course Descriptions
LI 100 Library Research Methods. A basic course in information literacy and research methods emphasizing the principles and procedures of effective research planning and design, and the library resources (books, journals, media and government documents) and research tools (search engines, online directories, meta-search engines, subscription databases, and online catalogs) available for specific information needs. In addition, students will learn to apply guidelines for evaluating the quality, authority, and accuracy of information. Ethical considerations about the use of information will also be discussed. Three hours per week for 10 weeks. 2 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Mathematics
The Department of Mathematics seeks to contribute to the achievement of the general objectives of Mount Union by: (1) providing instruction in mathematics as a major independent area of knowledge; (2) providing preparation for study in other departments, since mathematics is the language in which many of the ideas of the natural and social sciences are expressed; (3) providing experience in deductive reasoning, critical analysis and problem solving; (4) providing preparation for immediate employment or for graduate study.

Requirements for the Major in Mathematics
A major in mathematics will give students a substantial introduction to an immense area of interesting and useful ideas. It will equip them for careers in business, industry, government or education and will prepare them for graduate study. Required Mathematics Courses MA 141 Calculus I or MA 151 Calculus for Biology MA 142 Calculus II MA 241 Calculus III MA 301 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics MA 322 Linear Algebra MA 411 Abstract Algebra I MA 441 Advanced Calculus Any One from the Following Courses MA 335 Differential Equations PH 345Q Methods of Mathematical Physics MA 351 Numerical Analysis MA 362 Discrete Mathematics MA 405 Mathematical Statistics I Any One from the Following Mathematics Courses (taken for three credit hours) MA 399 Special Topics in Mathematics MA 406 Mathematical Statistics II MA 412 Abstract Algebra II * MA 440 Complex Analysis * MA 442 Advanced Calculus II * MA 470 Introduction to Topology * Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 2 3 4 4 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3

One of the Following Senior Culminating Experiences Semester Hours MA 400W College Geometry 4 (adolescence to young adult education minors only) MA 460 Senior Culminating Experience 3

Total

34-35

* These courses are recommended for students interested in graduate studies in mathematics. Students interested in teaching should consult their advisor for specific course requirements. Mathematics majors preparing for secondary teaching must pass MA 395 and MA 400W.

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A Senior Culminating Experience is required of all students majoring in mathematics. This requirement may be met by passing three credit hours of MA 460, either taken in one semester or over two consecutive semesters. For those students preparing for teaching, the Senior Culminating Experience requirement will be met by passing the four-semester-hour section of MA 400W. Candidates seeking a license in math education must earn a grade of “C” or better in MA 395. If a minimum grade of “C” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C” or better is earned.

Requirements for the Minor in Mathematics
Required Mathematics Courses Semester Hours MA 141 Calculus I 4 or MA 151 Calculus for Biology 4 MA 142 Calculus II 4 MA 241 Calculus III 4 MA 322 Linear Algebra 3 One additional MA numbered 335 or higher (other than MA 395) 3-4 Total 18-19

Requirements for the Major in Financial Mathematics
A major in financial mathematics will give the student a strong mathematical and computational background in addition to strong skills in business and economics. It will equip them for quantitative financial careers such as financial engineering, risk management and the actuarial field. Students will also be prepared for graduate study. Required Mathematics Courses MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II MA 241 Calculus III MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 322 Linear Algebra MA 335 Differential Equations MA 351 Numerical Analysis MA 405 Mathematical Statistics I MA 406 Mathematical Statistics II MA 460 Senior Culminating Experience Required Extra-Departmental Courses EC 200 Introduction to Microeconomics EC 201 Introduction to Macroeconomics AC 205 Elementary Accounting I AC 206 Elementary Accounting II FI 320 Corporate Finance I FI 473 Seminar in Derivatives EC 436 Introduction to Econometrics CS 110 Introduction to Databases CS 121 Programming and Problem Solving I CS 222 Windows Application Programming Total Semester Hours 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 4 4 62

MA 406 and MA 460 taken concurrently serve as the Senior Culminating Experience for financial mathematics majors. A student with a major in financial mathematics may not major or minor in mathematics. There is no minor in financial mathematics.

Requirements for the Concentration in Statistics
The concentration in statistics is open to both mathematics and financial mathematics majors. Required Courses MA 123 Elementary Statistics MA 405 Mathematical Statistics I MA 406W Mathematical Statistics II EC 436 Introduction to Econometrics Total Semester Hours 3 3 4 3 13

Requirements for Honors in Mathematics or Financial Mathematics
For honors in mathematics or financial mathematics, students may take any 200-level or above course that counts towards that major. Students majoring in financial mathematics may also count EC 435 for Honors. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about Honors Programs.

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Course Descriptions
MA 100 Intermediate Algebra. A study of linear and quadratic equations, linear and quadratic inequalities, functions, graphs and systems of equations intended to better prepare the student for higher levels of mathematics. May not be taken after credit is granted for MA 110 or above except for change of grade. Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 101 Mathematics for Early Childhood Teachers. An exploration of number concepts and problem-solving strategies designed for prospective early childhood teachers. Real number concepts, operations, and properties are considered as are the elementary properties of the common geometric figures. Open only to early childhood education majors. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 102 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers. An exploration of number concepts and problem-solving strategies designed for the prospective fourth through ninth grade teachers. Includes number systems and number theory, concepts of intuitive geometry and measurement systems and concepts underlying computation and estimation. Open only to middle school education majors with a concentration in mathematics. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MA 120 or above 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 103 Mathematics for Generalist Teachers. An exploration of number concepts and problem-solving strategies designed for prospective fourth through sixth grade teachers. Includes number systems and number theory, concepts of intuitive geometry and measurement systems and concepts underlying computation and estimation. Open only to middle childhood education majors pursuing a generalist endorsement. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MA 110 or above. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 110 Introduction to Finite Mathematics. A study of selected portions of traditional and modern mathematics chosen to illustrate the content of contemporary mathematics and to develop an appreciation for the importance of mathematics in today’s world. Topics may include linear relationships, systems of equations, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance, sets, probability, statistics, Markov chains and game theory. Prerequisite: MA 100 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 120 Precalculus Mathematics. A study of topics needed to prepare a student for calculus including polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions, graphs, quadratic equations and inequalities, systems of equations, selected topics from analytic geometry and trigonometry. May not be taken after credit is granted for MA 141 or MA 151 except for change of grade. Prerequisite: MA 100 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 123 Elementary Statistics. A study of measures useful in giving concise descriptions of masses of numerical data. A brief study of probability theory provides the basis for an introduction to methods of testing hypotheses and measuring the confidence with which conclusions may be drawn by sampling. Applications in various fields. May not be taken concurrently with MA 171 or after credit is granted for MA 171. Prerequisite: MA 100 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 125 Elementary Discrete Mathematics. An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics include logic and proof, combinatorics, recurrence relations, graph models and trees. Prerequisite: MA 100 or a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 141 Calculus I. A study of limits, continuity, differentiation, and an introduction to the indefinite and definite integrals. Includes applications to maximization and minimization problems, related rates and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. May not be taken after credit is granted for MA 142 or MA 151 except for change of grade. Prerequisite: MA 120, a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination or permission of the instructor. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 142 Calculus II. A continued study of techniques and applications of integration and study of the calculus of transcendental functions, infinite series, polar coordinates and parametric equations. Also includes an introduction to differential equations. Prerequisite: MA 141 or MA 151. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 151 Calculus for Biology. This course deals with the standard topics of a first course in calculus with emphasis on how these topics may be applied to modeling and analyzing phenomena in the biological sciences. Calculus concepts will often be developed as methods for investigating questions from biology. Prerequisite: MA 120, a satisfactory score on the mathematics placement examination or permission of the instructor. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 1.} MA 171 Elementary Statistics with Business Lab. A study of the measures useful in giving concise descriptions of masses of numerical data. A brief study of probability theory provides the basis for an introduction to methods of testing hypotheses and measuring the confidence with which conclusions may be drawn by sampling. Includes one laboratory session per week with an emphasis on business and economic applications including computer solutions to real-world problems. May not be taken concurrently with MA 123 or after credit is granted for MA 123. Prerequisite: EC 170. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 199 Special Topics in Mathematics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. MA 222QW History of Mathematics. A survey of the history of mathematics from antiquity through the present time. Contributions by various individuals and cultures will be examined. Both European and non-European mathematical developments will be explored with an emphasis on the interrelationship between mathematics and the culture of the time. Prerequisite: MA 141 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B.} MA 241 Calculus III. A study of vectors and vector analysis, functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and Green’s, Stokes’ and the Divergence Theorems. Prerequisite: MA 142. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} MA 250 Calculus Laboratory. An exploration of the use of technology in further exploring concepts studied in the three-course calculus sequence. Individual or group projects will be assigned on topics such as optimization, related rates, numerical integration, infinite series, various coordinate systems and multivariable theory. Prerequisite: MA 241. 1 Sem. Hr. MA 299 Special Topics in Mathematics. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. MA 301 Introduction to Advanced Mathematics. A study of selected topics intended to introduce the student to abstract mathematics. Topics include the language of sets and functions and methods of proof. Prerequisite: MA 142. 2 Sem. Hrs. MA 322 Linear Algebra. An introduction to the principal ideas and methods in linear algebra; systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, finite-dimensional vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MA 142. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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MA 333 Differential Equations and Linear Algebra. An introduction to the principal ideas and methods in linear algebra and differential equations. Some of the topics include systems of linear equations, matrices and determinants, vector spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, linear differential equations, system of differential equations, and applications. Prerequisite: MA 142. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 335 Differential Equations. A study of the theory and techniques of the solution of ordinary differential equations with applications in the sciences. Prerequisite: MA 142. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 351 Numerical Analysis. A study of numerical integration and the numerical solution of differential equations, numerical methods for linear algebra, matrix inversion and the solving for real roots of equations. Oriented toward computation using computers. Prerequisites: MA 322 and either CS 221 or PH 241, or permission of the instructor. A computer programming course such as CS 221 or PH 241 is recommended. Cross-listed as CS 351. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 362 Discrete Mathematics. A study of combinatorics and graph theory, including permutations and combinations, recurrence relations, generating functions, inclusion/exclusion, planarity and transversibility. Applications to computer science and operations research. Prerequisite: MA 142. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 395 The Teaching of Mathematics. A mathematical methods course for students who are preparing to teach in adolescence to young adult programs. Content includes: theories, models and strategies for teaching diverse learners, planning instruction, creating effective learning environments and collaboration with parents and other professionals. Emphasis is placed on helping the student to develop the professional knowledge base necessary for success in accordance with the requirements of State and other educational agencies. Twenty clock hours of fieldwork in a secondary school are required. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 399 Special Topics in Mathematics. A study of selected topics in special areas of mathematics such as modeling, operations research, partial differential equations, non-Euclidean geometry or logic. Topics will be announced before registration. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. Credit variable, 1-3 Sem. Hrs. MA 400 College Geometry. A study of the fundamental concepts of geometry. An axiomatic approach is used to examine both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisites: MA 241 and MA 301 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 400W College Geometry. A study of the fundamental concepts of geometry. An axiomatic approach is used to examine both Euclidean and nonEuclidean geometries. An expository or research paper and oral presentation are required for students who register for four semester hours. Prerequisites: MA 241 and MA 301 or permission of the instructor. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 405 Mathematical Statistics I. An introduction to statistics which makes use of calculus. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous random variables, multivariate probability distributions, and functions of random variables. Prerequisites: MA 123 and 241 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 406 Mathematical Statistics II. A continuation of MA 405. Topics include sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models and ANOVA. Prerequisite: MA 405. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 406W Mathematical Statistics II. A continuation of MA 405. Topics include sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, linear models and ANOVA. An expository or research paper and an oral presentation are required for students who register for four semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: MA 405. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 411 Abstract Algebra. A study of the basic properties of groups and rings. The axiomatic approach is emphasized. Prerequisites: MA 241, MA 301 and MA 322, or permission of the instructor. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 412 Abstract Algebra II. A continuation of MA 411. The axiomatic approach is used to study rings, integral domains and fields. Prerequisite: MA 411. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 412W Abstract Algebra II. A continuation of MA 411. The axiomatic approach is used to study rings, integral domains and fields. An expository or research paper and an oral presentation are required for students who register for four semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: MA 411. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 440 Complex Analysis. A study of complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, Cauchy’s Integral Formula and Theorem, power series, residues, analytic continuation, contour integration, conformal mapping and applications. Prerequisite: MA 241 and MA 301. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 441 Advanced Calculus. A rigorous study of the basic concepts of calculus including the development of the real number system, functions, sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation, the Riemann integral, functions of several variables, and partial derivatives. Prerequisites: MA 241 and MA 301. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 442 Advanced Calculus II. A continuation of MA 441. Topics include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, infinite series, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and Green’s, Stokes’ and the Divergence theorems. Prerequisite: MA 441. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 442W Advanced Calculus II. A continuation of MA 441. Topics include functions of several variables, partial derivatives, infinite series, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, and Green’s, Stokes’ and the Divergence theorems. An expository or research paper and an oral presentation are required for students who register for four semester hours of credit. Prerequisite: MA 441. 4 Sem. Hrs. MA 460 Senior Culminating Experience. A course designed to fulfill the University requirements for a Senior Culminating Experience. This course is required of all mathematics and financial mathematics majors. This course has as its requirements the completion of a senior research project which will be communicated to the department in either a poster or a presentation, and a research paper. A total of three credits must be completed in one or both semesters of the senior year for a mathematics major, and one credit hour for the financial mathematics major which will be taken in conjunction with MA406. Prerequisite: Mathematics or financial mathematics major with senior standing, or permission of the instructor. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. MA 470 Introduction to Topology. A first course in general topology, progressing from metric spaces to general topological spaces. The concepts of compactness and connectedness are included. Prerequisites: MA 301 and MA 322. 3 Sem. Hrs. MA 480 Independent Study. A study of selected topics on an individual basis. Emphasis is on independent inquiry and on proper form and style for reporting results. Open to senior mathematics majors by consent of instructor. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. MA 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. 3-6 Sem. Hrs.

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Department of Music
The Mount Union Department of Music offers vital instruction and essential experiences for future professional musicians and also fulfills its role in the liberal arts curriculum. A highly qualified faculty provides fine training for students who anticipate careers in music and gives instruction in music theory, music history and music appreciation for majors and non-majors alike. Course offerings allow all students to acquaint themselves with our rich musical heritage and to develop a greater understanding of the aesthetic experience. Mount Union is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The Mount Union Department of Music has been accredited by the NASM since 1935, and the requirements for entrance and graduation set forth in this Catalogue are in accordance with the published regulations of that organization.

Curricula Offered
Mount Union offers three degrees in music: bachelor of music in performance (a professional degree), bachelor of music education (a professional degree) and bachelor of arts in music (a liberal arts degree). A flexibility in curriculum choice and variety allows students to prepare for graduate work in music or for professional work in music education.

General Education Requirements for Professional Music Degrees
Bachelor of Music in Performance I, A Liberal Arts Experience I, B, 1 Written English I, B, 2 Communication I, B, 3 Foreign Language Proficiency I, C Religion and Human Experience II, A, 1 Literature II, A, 2 Fine Arts II, A, 3 Fine Arts II, B, 1 Mathematics or Logic II, B, 2 Natural Science II, C, 1 MU 101, MU 202W and MU 203 II, C, 2 Religion or Philosophy II, C, 3a Economics or Political Science II, C, 3b Sociology or Psychology II, D, 1 International Sociopolitical and Economic II, D, 2 MU 352W II, E Wellness III, A MU 490 III, B Integrative Experience Bachelor of Music Education I, A Liberal Arts Experience I, B, 1 Written English I, B, 2 Communication I, C Religion and Human Experience II, A, 1 Literature II, A, 2 Fine Arts II, A, 3 Fine Arts II, B, 1 Mathematics or Logic II, B, 2 Natural Science II, C, 1 MU 101, MU 202W and MU 203 II, C, 2 Religion or Philosophy II, C, 3a Economics or Political Science II, C, 3b Psychology* II, D, 1 International Sociopolitical and Economic II, D, 2 MU 352W II, E Wellness III, A MU 438 III, B Integrative Experience *PY 210 is suggested since it is required for teacher licensure. Semester Hours 1 3 3 max of 6 3 3 3 3 3 3 or 4 8 3 3 3 3 3 2 3 3 Semester Hours 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 or 4 8 3 3 3 3 3 2 10 3

Requirements for the Bachelor of Music Degree
Required Music Courses MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I: Music of the Baroque and Classical Periods MU 110 Theory I MU 111 Basic Musicianship Skills I MU 112 Theory II MU 113 Basic Musicianship Skills II MU 114 Music Notation Lab Semester Hours 3 2 1 2 1 .5

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MU 140 MU 143 MU 144 MU 202W

Vocal Techniques Piano Class I Piano Class II History and Analysis of Western Music II: Music of the 19th Century Through the Present MU 203 History and Analysis of Western Music III: Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance MU 210 Theory III MU 211 Basic Musicianship Skills III MU 212 Theory IV MU 213 Basic Musicianship Skills IV MU 243 Piano Class III MU 244 Piano Class IV MU 320 Choral Conducting MU 321 Instrumental Conducting MU 400 Orchestral Literature MU 401 Keyboard Literature MU 402 Vocal Literature MU 488 Recital MU 490 Senior Culminating Experience: Bachelor of Music Degree Twelve additional MU (or closely related field) semester hours Any One from the Following Music Courses Each Semester MU 260 Concert Choir MU 261 Mount Union Alliance Chorale MU 262 Women’s Chorus MU 266 Wind Ensemble MU 268 Fall Band MU 269 Concert Band MU 270 Symphony Orchestra: Orchestral Strings Any One from the Following Music Courses for Four Semesters MU 360 Brass Choir MU 362 String Chamber Music MU 363 Clarinet Ensemble MU 364 Master Chorale MU 365 Musical Theatre Workshop MU 366 Collegium Musicum MU 368 Keyboard Ensemble MU 369 “Fire Engine Choir” MU 370 Percussion Ensemble MU 371 Accompanying MU 372 Jazz Band MU 373 Horn Choir MU 374 Trombone Ensemble MU 375 Double Reed Ensemble MU 376 Saxophone Ensemble MU 377 Flute Ensemble MU 367 Woodwind Quintet MU 378 Trumpet Ensemble MU 379 Low Brass Ensemble MU 380 Handbell Choir MU 381 Other Ensemble MU 385 Student Musical Any One from the Following Music Courses as an Applied Major (15 hours) and an Applied Minor (eight hours) MU 460 Piano MU 461 Organ MU 462 Voice MU 463 Harp MU 464 Violin MU 465 Viola MU 466 Violoncello MU 467 String Bass MU 468 Clarinet MU 469 Saxophone MU 470 Flute

1 1 1 3 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 3 12 Semester Hours 1 .5 1 1 1.5 .5 1 Semester Hours .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 Semester Hours 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2

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MU 471 MU 472 MU 473 MU 474 MU 475 MU 476 MU 477 MU 478 MU 479 MU 480

Oboe Bassoon Trumpet French Horn Euphonium Trombone Tuba Percussion Guitar Harpsichord

1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2

MU 143, MU 144, MU 243 and MU 244 may count toward the applied minor requirement. Required Extra-Departmental Courses Six hours in a foreign language Total Semester Hours 6 86.5-94.5

Proficiency requirements in keyboard must be met before the student may register for MU 490 (Senior Culminating Experience).

Requirements for the Bachelor of Music Education Degree
Required Education Courses ED 150W Foundations of Education ME 200W Introduction to the Middle School ED 355 Content Area Reading Semester Hours 3 3 3

Required Music Courses Semester Hours MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I: 3 Music of the Baroque and Classical Periods MU 110 Theory I 2 MU 111 Basic Musicianship Skills I 1 MU 112 Theory II 2 MU 113 Basic Musicianship Skills II 1 MU 114 Music Notation Lab .5 MU 140 Vocal Techniques 1 MU 141 Brass Instruments 1 MU 143 Piano Class I 1 MU 144 Piano Class II 1 MU 202W History and Analysis of Western Music II: 3 Music of the 19th Century Through the Present MU 203 History and Analysis of Western Music III: 2 Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance MU 210 Theory III 2 MU 211 Basic Musicianship Skills III 1 MU 212 Theory IV 2 MU 213 Basic Musicianship Skills IV 1 MU 240 String Instruments 1 MU 242 Woodwind Instruments 1 MU 243 Piano Class III 1 MU 244 Piano Class IV 1 MU 245 Percussion Instruments 1 MU 310 Orchestration 3 MU 320 Choral Conducting 2 MU 321 Instrumental Conducting 2 MU 330 Music Methods - Early Childhood 3 MU 331 Music Methods - Middle Childhood and Adolescence 3 to Young Adult MU 430 Music Methods - Instrumental 3 MU 434 Pre-Clinical Practice - Music Multiage Pre K-12 2 MU 436 Marching Band Techniques 1 MU 438 Clinical Practice - Music Multiage Pre K-12 12 Any One from the Following Music Courses Each Semester (Except for the semester of student teaching) MU 260 Concert Choir MU 261 Mount Union Alliance Chorale MU 262 Women’s Chorus MU 266 Wind Ensemble Semester Hours 1 .5 1 1

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MU 268 MU 269 MU 270

Fall Band Concert Band Symphony Orchestra: Strings

1.5 .5 1 Semester Hours .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 Semester Hours 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 82-90

Any One from the Following Music Courses for Two Semesters MU 360 Brass Choir MU 362 String Chamber Music MU 363 Clarinet Ensemble MU 364 Master Chorale MU 365 Musical Theatre Workshop MU 366 Collegium Musicum MU 368 Keyboard Ensemble MU 369 “Fire Engine Choir” MU 370 Percussion Ensemble MU 371 Accompanying MU 372 Jazz Band MU 373 Horn Choir MU 374 Trombone Ensemble MU 375 Double Reed Ensemble MU 376 Saxophone Ensemble MU 377 Flute Ensemble MU 367 Woodwind Quintet MU 378 Trumpet Ensemble MU 379 Low Brass Ensemble MU 380 Handbell Choir MU 381 Other Ensemble MU 385 Student Musical Any One from the Following Music Courses as an Applied Major (seven hours) and an Applied Minor (three hours) MU 460 Piano MU 461 Organ MU 462 Voice MU 463 Harp MU 464 Violin MU 465 Viola MU 466 Violoncello MU 467 String Bass MU 468 Clarinet MU 469 Saxophone MU 470 Flute MU 471 Oboe MU 472 Bassoon MU 473 Trumpet MU 474 French Horn MU 475 Euphonium MU 476 Trombone MU 477 Tuba MU 478 Percussion MU 479 Guitar MU 480 Harpsichord Total

One hour of the applied major should be taken each semester (for a total of seven) with the exception of the semester of student teaching. MU 143, MU 144, MU 243 and MU 244 may count toward the applied minor requirement. Proficiency requirements in keyboard must be met before the student may register for MU 438 (Senior Culminating Experience: Clinical Practice.) Candidates seeking a teaching license in music education majors must earn a grade of “C” or better in all professional music education courses. If a minimum grade of “C” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C” or better is earned.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree with Music as a Major
Required Music Courses MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I: Music of the Baroque and Classical Periods MU 110 Theory I MU 111 Basic Musicianship Skills I MU 112 Theory II MU 113 Basic Musicianship Skills II Semester Hours 3 2 1 2 1

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MU 143 MU 144 MU 202W MU 203 MU 210 MU 211 MU 213 MU 243 MU 244 MU 487

Piano Class I Piano Class II History and Analysis of Western Music II: Music of the 19th Century Through the Present History and Analysis of Western Music III: Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance Theory III Basic Musicianship Skills III Basic Musicianship Skills IV Piano Class III Piano Class IV Senior Culminating Experience: Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music

1 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 3

Any One from the Following Music Courses for Six Semesters MU 260 Concert Choir MU 261 Mount Union Alliance Chorale MU 262 Women’s Chorus MU 266 Wind Ensemble MU 268 Fall Band MU 269 Concert Band MU 270 Symphony Orchestra: Strings Any One from the Following Music Courses as an Applied Major (six hours) and an Applied Minor (three hours) MU 460 Piano MU 461 Organ MU 462 Voice MU 463 Harp MU 464 Violin MU 465 Viola MU 466 Violoncello MU 467 String Bass MU 468 Clarinet MU 469 Saxophone MU 470 Flute MU 471 Oboe MU 472 Bassoon MU 473 Trumpet MU 474 French Horn MU 475 Euphonium MU 476 Trombone MU 477 Tuba MU 478 Percussion MU 479 Guitar MU 480 Harpsichord

Semester Hours 1 .5 1 1 1.5 .5 1 Semester Hours 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2 1-2

MU 143, MU 144, MU 243 and MU 244 may count toward the applied minor requirement. Any One from the Following Music Courses for a Total of One Semester Hour MU 360 Brass Choir MU 362 String Chamber Music MU 363 Clarinet Ensemble MU 364 Master Chorale MU 365 Musical Theatre Workshop MU 366 Collegium Musicum MU 368 Keyboard Ensemble MU 369 “Fire Engine Choir” MU 370 Percussion Ensemble MU 371 Accompanying MU 372 Jazz Band MU 373 Horn Choir MU 374 Trombone Ensemble MU 375 Double Reed Ensemble MU 376 Saxophone Ensemble MU 377 Flute Ensemble MU 367 Woodwind Quintet MU 378 Trumpet Ensemble Semester Hours .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5 .5

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MU 379 MU 380 MU 381 MU 385 Total

Low Brass Ensemble Handbell Choir Other Ensemble Student Musical

.5 .5 .5 .5 38-44

Proficiency requirements in keyboard must be met before the student may register for the eighth semester. Note: Candidtates for the bachelor of arts degree with a major in music must take one of the two general education fine arts courses from a department other than music

Requirements for the Minor in Music
Required Music Courses MU 100 Introduction to Music MU 110 Theory I MU 111 Basic Musicianship Skills I MU 112 Theory II MU 113 Basic Musicianship Skills II MU 143 Piano Class I MU 144 Piano Class II Any One from the Following Courses LS 320QW Vernacular Music and the Vietnam Conflict MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I: Music of the Baroque and Classical Periods MU 202W History and Analysis of Western Music II: Music of the 19th Century Through the Present MU 250W Music in America MU 320 Choral Conducting MU 350 Music in the Work of the Church MU 352W World Music MU 400 Orchestral Literature MU 401 Keyboard Literature MU 402 Vocal Literature MU 403 Choral Literature Semester Hours 3 2 1 2 1 1 1 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 2 2 3 2 2 2 2

Any One from the Following Music Courses for Four Semesters Semester Hours (one ensemble per semester – the same ensemble may be taken each semester) MU 260 Concert Choir 1 MU 261 Mount Union Alliance Chorale .5 MU 262 Women’s Chorus 1 MU 266 Wind Ensemble 1 MU 268 Fall Band 1.5 MU 269 Concert Band .5 MU 270 Symphony Orchestra: Strings 1 Any One from the Following Applied Music Courses (two hours) (one applied music course per semester) MU 460 Piano MU 461 Organ MU 462 Voice MU 463 Harp MU 464 Violin MU 465 Viola MU 480 Harpsichord MU 467 String Bass MU 468 Clarinet MU 469 Saxophone MU 470 Flute MU 471 Oboe MU 472 Bassoon MU 473 Trumpet MU 474 French Horn MU 475 Euphonium MU 476 Trombone MU 477 Tuba MU 478 Percussion MU 479 Guitar Semester Hours 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

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MU 466 Total

Violoncello

1 17-22

Requirements for the Concentration in Piano Pedagogy
Required Music Courses MU 275 Piano Pedagogy I MU 276 Piano Pedagogy II MU 277 Piano Pedagogy III MU 278 Piano Pedagogy IV Six additional semester hours of closely related coursework as approved by the chair of the Department of Music Total Semester Hours 2 2 2 2 6

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Requirements for the Concentration in Collaborative Piano
Required Music Courses MU 160/460 Applied Piano MU 275 Piano Pedagogy I MU 431 Piano Pedagogy Practicum MU 401 Keyboard Literature MU 368 Keyboard Ensemble (taken twice) MU 371 Accompanying (taken twice) MU 381 Other Ensemble (taken twice) (a mixed chamber ensemble) Accompany a half or full student recital, under MU 450, MU488 or MU 489 Additional closely related coursework as approved by the chair of the Department of Music Total Semester Hours 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 1-3 1-3 semester hours 14

Requirements for Honors in Music
The requirements for graduation with honors in music are: a) a grade point average of at least 3.5 in music at graduation; b) completion of at least three courses in music for honors credit for a total of at least 12 semester hours; the courses must be numbered 200, 300 or 400; honors in these courses will be earned with the approval of the instructor and the music faculty; additional requirements for honors may include a series of oral reports, a bibliographic paper, or a music performance or research project; superior quality work is required throughout these courses; c) one of the three courses in part “b” may be an honors thesis/project (MU 494) of three to six semester hours credit. The University-wide requirements for honors in a major program are listed on page 37.

Departmental Regulations
All music majors are required to attend 15 recitals and concerts per semester except for the semester of clinical practice. All music minors must attend five recitals or concerts per semester. The specific distribution of recitals and concerts is posted at the Music Office near the beginning of each semester. Freshman music majors are required to perform a solo in a student recital once each academic year. Sophomore, junior and senior music majors are required to perform a solo in a student recital each semester of applied music major lessons. Any student enrolled in the Department of Music must have prior approval of the applied instructor and notify the department chair of such approval before making a public appearance as a music performer. Students preparing public recitals, other than general student recitals, must perform for the music faculty approximately one month prior to the recital date. Final permission for public appearance is contingent upon faculty approval at this hearing. Accompanists must be approved by the keyboard faculty four weeks before a scheduled appearance. All candidates for the bachelor of music in performance degree must include the study of pedagogy in their major performance area as part of their curriculum. This requirement may be met in a variety of ways, including special honors projects (MU 494) in applied lessons, at least one course in the Piano Pedagogy sequence (MU 275, 276, 277, 278), or at least two semester hours in Special Topics in Music (MU 399) or Special Problems in Music (MU 450) in the area of pedagogy. Music education majors are required to participate in one of the major organizations in their major performance area each semester except when student teaching. Instrumental majors are additionally required to participate in a large choral ensemble for a minimum of two semesters. Vocal majors are additionally required to participate in a large instrumental ensemble for a minimum of two semesters. These ensembles are MU 260, 261, 266, 267 or 268. Students are strongly advised to participate in at least one semester of the opposite area ensemble before the conducting sequence (MU 320 and MU 321) is begun. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree, with a major in music, must take one of the two General Education fine arts courses from a department other than music. Advanced standing in music theory may be granted to students who pass examinations proving they have completed work equivalent to that required by the course. Written consent of the department chair and the dean of the University is necessary for the examination to be given. Success in the examination affects only the theory requirement and does not diminish the number of hours necessary for graduation. Music education majors are required to fulfill the policies outlined in the section entitled “Admission to the Teacher Education Program,” found in the Department of Education section of this Catalogue. All freshmen considering music as a major will be enrolled in an identical music schedule (except for applied major and minor areas) for the first semester. At the end of the first semester, freshmen desiring to continue in music will apply to the department for admittance to the appropriate degree program. At the end of the freshman year, a decision on acceptance of the student will be made by the faculty on the basis of faculty evaluation and

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student self-evaluation. Students seeking continuation in the BME or BM degree track must demonstrate a combined average of “C” or higher in the following courses: MU 101, 110, 111, 143, 112, 113, and 144. Upon evaluation by the music faculty, students whose combined GPA in these courses is lower than a “C” may not continue in the BME or BM degree tracks. In the fourth semester, all music majors will undergo a Sophomore Evaluation consisting of the following criteria: student’s progress will be discussed with the applied instructor; student will be required to perform in his or her primary medium (performance on a student recital shall be the basis for evaluation); presentation of a portfolio containing the student’s assessment of his or her strengths, weaknesses, and professional goals; student’s academic transcript, record of recital attendance, record of recital performances; and the studio teacher’s evaluation. Students will meet formally with the full-time music faculty at the end of the sophomore year. The results of this Sophomore Evaluation will be: (1) continuation; (2) continuation on a probationary basis, with deficiencies specified to be remedied and demonstrated at a specified re-examination; or (3) non-continuation in the music major. The Music Student Handbook outlining all policies and programs pertaining to the music major and minor and private music lessons is available on the Department of Music website and is to be considered an extension of this Catalogue.

Course Descriptions
MU 100 Introduction to Music. Designed primarily for non-music majors. Information and technique for the appreciation of music as related to its elements, basic forms, stylistic traditions and standard literature. Attendance at concerts throughout the semester is expected. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2.} MU 101 History and Analysis of Western Music I: Music of the Baroque and Classical Periods. A study of the history and development of Western music from the beginning of the Baroque era to the early 19th century. Also explored is the connectiveness of music, religion, politics and the arts of the periods. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {Gen Ed: II,A,2.} MU 104 Fundamentals of Music Theory. Designed for non-music majors, this course will introduce the student to music notation, to melodic and harmonic concepts and to the keyboard. Students will learn to play simple accompaniments to songs, to improvise and compose music and to apply some principles of musical arrangement. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd:II, A, 2.} (typically offered spring semester) MU 110 Theory I. A study of the fundamental materials of music and of diatonic harmony. Preliminary discussion of transposition is covered. The course aims to develop skills in common practice part-writing, improvisation, composition and analysis and is preparation for intermediate work in music theory. To be taken concurrently with MU 111 and MU 143. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) MU 111 Basic Musicianship Skills I. An introductory course in sight-singing and melodic and harmonic perception. The course aims to develop skills in identifying, notating, and performing scales, intervals, rhythms, melodies, and harmonies, and in improvisation. Both in-class singing and identification/dictation and computer-assisted instruction are used. To be taken concurrently with MU 110 and MU 143. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) MU 112 Theory II. Continued study of the fundamental materials of music and of diatonic harmony. Form, non-harmonic tones, triads in inversion, seventh chords and harmonic sequences are covered. The course aims to refine skills in common practice part-writing, improvisation, composition and analysis and is preparation for intermediate work in music theory. To be taken concurrently with MU 113 and MU 144. Prerequisites: MU 110, MU 111 and MU 143. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) MU 113 Basic Musicianship Skills II. An introductory course in sight-singing and melodic and harmonic perception building on concepts studied in MU 111. The course aims to develop further skills in identifying, notating and performing scales, intervals, rhythms, melodies, harmonies and in improvisation. Both in-class singing and identification/dictation and computer-assisted instruction are used. To be taken concurrently with MU 112 and 144. Prerequisites: MU 110, MU 111 and MU 143. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) MU 114 Music Notation Lab. Laboratory with hands on instruction in music notation and publishing software for composition assignments in Music 110 and other courses in the music curriculum. To be taken concurrently with MU 110. 0.5 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) MU 115 Introduction to Music Technology. An introduction to the use and functions of micro-computers and peripherals as they apply to music making and learning. The course explores music typesetting and sequencing, basic recording techniques, computer-aided instruction and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) structure. Students must be proficient in basic music notation. No prior experience with computers or music synthesizers is required. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 140 Vocal Techniques. A course designed to teach fundamentals of voice production, principles of diction, vocal teaching methods, the international phonetic alphabet, the elements of interpretation and stage deportment. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) MU 141 Brass Instruments. A course designed to acquaint the student with techniques of performance, teaching methods, literature and maintenance of brass instruments. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 143 Piano Class I. An introductory course in piano technique. The course seeks to begin to develop skills necessary for successful completion of the piano proficiency examination. Emphasis will be placed on rudimentary sight-reading, improvisation, scales, arpeggios and harmonic progressions. Music majors successfully completing the piano proficiency exam after completing this course may be exempted by the department from the remaining courses in the piano class sequence. To be taken concurrently with MU 110 and MU 111. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) MU 144 Piano Class II. An introductory course in piano technique. The course seeks to begin to develop skills necessary for successful completion of the piano proficiency examination. Emphasis will be placed on sight-reading, improvisation, scales, arpeggios and harmonic progressions. Music majors successfully completing the piano proficiency exam after completing this course may be exempted by the department from the remaining courses in the piano class sequence. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MU 143 or permission of the instructor. To be taken concurrently with MU 112 and MU 113. Prerequisites: MU 110, MU 111 and MU 143. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) MU 145 Brass and Woodwind Instrument Repair. A course designed to prepare musicians and instrumental music teachers to diagnose repair and maintenance needs, evaluate the quality of repair technicians’ work, and perform minor emergency repairs on brass and woodwind instruments. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 160-180 Applied Music for Non-Majors. Courses designed to guide the non-music major in gaining competency on his or her instrument. The student will work one on one with an expert teacher to learn the fundamentals of performance techniques, literature and practice techniques for the instrument. All students registered for non-major private music lessons must stop at the music office, located in Cope Music Hall, during the first week of

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the semester to make arrangements for lesson times. Credit Variable: 1-2 semester hours. {GenEd: II, A, 2.} Due to the evolving nature of repertoire prepared for private music lessons, these courses may be taken multiple times but not for a “change of grade.” MU 160 Piano MU 161 Organ MU 162 Voice MU 163 Harp MU 164 Violin MU 165 Viola MU 166 Violoncello MU 167 String Bass MU 168 Clarinet MU 169 Saxophone MU 170 Flute MU 171 Oboe MU 172 Bassoon MU 173 Trumpet MU 174 French Horn MU 175 Euphonium MU 176 Trombone MU 177 Tuba MU 178 Percussion MU 179 Guitar MU 180 Harpsichord MU 199 Special Topics in Music. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. MU 202W History and Analysis of Western Music II: Music of the 19th Century Through the Present. A study of the history and development of Western music from the early 19th century through the present. Also explored is the connectiveness of music, religion, politics and the arts of the periods. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {Gen Ed: II,A,2.} MU 203 History and Analysis of Western Music III: Music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance. A study of the development of music in the Western world from the early Greek period through the Renaissance. Also explored is the connectiveness of music, religion, politics and the arts of the periods. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 210 Theory III. A study of chromatic harmony, altered chords, and modulation using diverse analytical and creative techniques. Compositional forms also are studied. To be taken concurrently with MU 211 and MU 243. Prerequisites: MU 112 and MU 113. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) MU 211 Basic Musicianship Skills III. An intermediate course in sight-singing and melodic and harmonic perception. The course aims to further enhance those skills developed in MU 111 and MU 113. To be taken concurrently with MU 210 and 243. Prerequisites: MU 112, 113 and successful completion of the department proficiency examination in sight singing and ear training. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) MU 212 Theory IV. Advanced harmony and 20th century compositional and analytical techniques are studied using part-writing, improvisation, composition and analysis. To be taken concurrently with MU 213 and 244. Prerequisites: MU 210 and MU 211. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) MU 213 Basic Musicianship Skills IV. An intermediate course in sight-singing and melodic and harmonic perception. The course aims to further enhance those skills developed in MU 111, MU 113 and MU 211. To be taken concurrently with MU 212 and MU 244. Prerequisites: MU 210, 211. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) MU 240 String Instruments. A course designed to acquaint the student with techniques of performance, teaching methods, literature and maintenance of string instruments. To be taken concurrently with MU 362. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 242 Woodwind Instruments. A course designed to acquaint the student with techniques of performance, teaching methods, literature and maintenance of woodwind instruments. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 243 Piano Class III. An intermediate-level course in piano technique. The course seeks to continue to develop skills necessary for successful completion of the piano proficiency examination. Emphasis will be placed on sight-reading, improvisation, prepared piano pieces, scales, arpeggios and harmonic progressions. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MU 144 or permission of the instructor. To be taken concurrently with MU 210 and MU 211. Music majors successfully completing the piano proficiency exam after completing this course may be exempted by the department from the remaining courses in the piano class sequence. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered fall semester) MU 244 Piano Class IV. An intermediate-level course in piano technique. The course seeks to continue to develop skills necessary for successful completion of the piano proficiency examination. Emphasis will be placed on sight-reading, improvisation, prepared pieces, scales, arpeggios and harmonic progressions. To be taken concurrently with MU 212 and 213. Prerequisites: MU 210, MU 211 and successful completion of MU 243 or permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. (typically offered spring semester) MU 245 Percussion Instruments. A course designed to acquaint the student with techniques of performance, teaching methods, literature and maintenance of percussion instruments. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 250W Music in America. A survey of musical practices in America, designed primarily for the liberal arts student to offer an understanding of this varied and important aspect of American life. From the chants of the Indians to contemporary sounds of synthesizers, the course includes such diverse areas as folk, church, concert, stage and popular music. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,A,2 or II,D,2.} Performance Courses — Large Group (MU 260-MU 270). Courses designed to study the music of various composers, periods and styles through performance. Of special interest to music education majors, students will be given the opportunity to study the conductors as role models in such areas as rehearsal pacing, rehearsal technique and conducting technique. All performance ensembles are open through audition. Due to the evolving nature

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of repertoire prepared each semester by these ensembles, these courses may be taken multiple times but not for a “change of grade.” MU 260 Concert Choir. In addition to rehearsal and performances throughout the semester, the Concert Choir tours annually. 1 Sem. Hr. {If taken for three consecutive terms, Gen Ed: II,A,2.} MU 261 MU 262 MU 266 Mount Union Alliance Chorale. 0.5 Sem. Hr. Women’s Chorus. 1 Sem. Hr. {If taken for three consecutive terms, GenEd: II,A,2}. Wind Ensemble. 1 Sem. Hr. {If taken for three consecutive terms, GenEd: II,A,2.}.

MU 267 Symphony Orchestra – Woodwinds, Brass and Percussion. Woodwind, brass and percussion students will rehearse and perform in the Alliance Symphony Orchestra. This group typically performs one formal concert each semester. 0.5 Sem. Hr. MU 268 Fall Band. The class will consist of band camp (one week prior to the start of school), one hour of daily rehearsal (MTWRF) during the fall semester, performance at all regular season home football games and a formal concert to be given during the last week of the semester. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 1.5 Sem. Hrs. {If taken for three consecutive terms, GenEd: II,A,2.} MU 269 Concert Band. Open to students with a background of band instrument training to pursue further training and performance opportunities at the University level. Audition is required as well as the ability to perform satisfactorily on a band instrument. Prerequisites: Sufficient basic fundamentals on a band instrument and able to play the programmed band literature. 0.5 Sem. Hrs. MU 270 Symphony Orchestra –Orchestral Strings. String students will rehearse and perform in a chamber orchestra (Repertory Strings) as well as a large group (Alliance Symphony Orchestra). Both ensembles typically perform one formal concert each semester. 1 Sem. Hr. {If taken for three consecutive terms, GenEd: II,A,2.} MU 275 Piano Pedagogy I. Registered students will be required to visit a specified number of studio/class lessons per week and to attend two regularly scheduled classes per week. Observation and development of appropriate studio teaching techniques, study of pedagogical literature. Successful completion of this course enables students upon permission of the instructor, to participate as student teachers under faculty supervision in preparatory division of the Department of Music. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 276 Piano Pedagogy II. Continuation of MU 275. University preparatory division organization, curriculum development and lesson planning of group and private lessons for first and second year students, some supervised practice teaching. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 277 Piano Pedagogy III. Continuation of MU 276 with emphasis on advancing first year and intermediate students, private studio management and organization, evaluation of literature and supporting materials, observation of group and private lessons, supervised practice teaching. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 278 Piano Pedagogy IV. Continuation of MU 277. Practice teaching at the advanced intermediate level, evaluation of intermediate teaching materials, performance problems of intermediate-level students, observation of group private lessons, methods of studio development, workshop and master class observation, supervised practice teaching. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 280 Diction for Singers. An introduction to Italian, German and French diction specifically for the use of singers; use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) including recognition, transcription and reproduction of language sounds. Students will perform as solo singers in each of the languages studied. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and concurrent registration on either MU 162 or MU 462. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 299 Special Topics in Music. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. MU 310 Orchestration. Description, range and use of instruments in scoring for orchestra and band. The course includes the working out of exercises in orchestration and a major scoring project. In-class performances of scoring assignments provide for a practical laboratory experience as part of the course. Prerequisites: MU 212, MU 213 and MU 244. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 315 Digital Sound. The course covers a variety of topics relating to the treatment of sound and sound processing as a digital medium. Students will learn through hands-on activities and online materials the basics of digital recording and sound sampling including the study of synthesis, digital sound processing, MIDI communications and web-based multimedia. The ability to read music is not a prerequisite for this course. Prerequisite: CS 121. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 320 Choral Conducting. Expressive conducting is developed through score analysis, discussion and in-class conducting experiences. The course concentrates on rehearsal fundamentals: control of dynamics and tempo, communicating with words, gestures, facial and body expressions. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or higher in MU 212, MU 213 and MU 244 and completion of proficiency requirements in piano, or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 321 Instrumental Conducting. Further development of conducting techniques and principles including score reading, musical terminology, transposition, compound and non-symmetrical meters, and organizing the rehearsal. Prerequisite: MU 320 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 330 Music Methods – Early Childhood. The study of curricula, methods, activities and materials for the teaching of music to all children in pre-school through the third grade by means of field observations, demonstrations and lectures. Emphasis on child development, music behaviors (singing, creating, listening, playing, moving), music teaching philosophies and approaches, planning and assessment, the use of technology, the sequencing of skills in general music settings across various populations and the Ohio Fine Arts-Music Academic Content Standards and National Standards for Music. Twenty clock hours of clinical and field experience are required. Prerequisites: MU 212, MU 213, MU 244, admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of proficiency requirements in piano. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 331 Music Methods – Middle Childhood and Adolescence to Young Adult. The study of curricula, methods, activities and materials for the teaching of vocal music, including music appreciation and music theory, to all students in the middle childhood and adolescence to young adult program areas by means of field observations, demonstrations and lectures. Emphasis on adolescent development and music behaviors (singing, creating, listening, playing, moving), music teaching philosophies, rehearsal and performance techniques and approaches, planning and assessment, the use of technology and the Ohio Fine Arts-Music Academic Content Standards and National Standards for Music. A weekly one-hour guitar-techniques laboratory and twenty clock hours of clinical and field experience are required. Prerequisites: MU 212, MU 213, MU 244, admission to the Teacher Education Program, and completion of proficiency requirements in piano. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 350 Music in the Work of the Church. Developing and maintaining a church music program for participants of all ages and competencies. Various aspects of the ministry of music are considered with special emphasis on organization, repertoire and liturgy. Attention also is given to

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instruments associated with church choirs. Comparison of church music programs in different faiths. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 352W World Music. A survey of global music with emphasis on Native America, India, Indonesia, Japan and Africa. A brief history of each culture is presented with an analysis of the music, including the theoretical systems on which it is based, a study of the instruments and the types of notation used. The course satisfies graduation requirements in Asian cultures and is designed for music majors and non-music majors. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} Performance Courses-Small Group (MU 360-385). Courses designed to study the music of various composers, periods and styles through performance. Of special interest to music education majors, these ensembles provide a practical chamber music laboratory emphasizing the type of coaching to be done in their future teaching careers. Prerequisite: Audition or permission of the instructor. 0.5 Sem. Hr. Due to the evolving nature of repertoire prepared each semester by these ensembles, these courses may be taken multiple times but not for a “change of grade.” MU 360 Brass Choir MU 372 Jazz Band MU 362 String Chamber Music MU 373 Horn Choir MU 363 Clarinet Ensemble MU 374 Trombone Ensemble MU 364 Master Chorale MU 375 Double Reed Ensemble MU 365 Musical Theatre Workshop MU 376 Saxophone Ensemble MU 366 Collegium Musicum MU 377 Flute Ensemble MU 367 Woodwind Quintet MU 378 Trumpet Ensemble MU 368 Keyboard Ensemble MU 379 Low Brass Ensemble MU 369 “Fire Engine Choir” MU 380 Handbell Choir MU 370 Percussion Ensemble MU 381 Other Ensemble MU 371 Accompanying MU 385 Student Musical MU 399 Special Topics in Music. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. MU 400 Orchestral Literature. The emergence of the orchestra in the late Renaissance and its subsequent development. Major materials for the course include the large collection of recordings and scores available in Sturgeon Music Library. Prerequisites: MU 100 and MU 202 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.) MU 401 Keyboard Literature. A survey of the principal works for keyboard from the Baroque era to the present. Performance by class members is supplemented with recorded works from the department’s collection. Prerequisites: MU 100 and MU 201 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.) MU 402 Vocal Literature. The history of solo song and the study of the development of opera. Class members perform example works, listen to representative recordings and do individual research. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: MU 100 and MU 201 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester of even-numbered years.) MU 403 Choral Literature. A survey of secular and sacred choral literature from the medieval to contemporary eras. The motet, mass, oratorio, madrigal, chanson and compositions in contemporary idioms are analyzed in terms of stylistic development. Special attention is given to those works most appropriate for performance by secondary school choral groups. Prerequisite: MU 100 and MU 201 or permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years.) MU 412 Choral Arranging. The development of arranging skills appropriate to the high school choral music teacher. Prerequisites: MU 212, MU 213 and MU 244. or permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 430 Music Methods-Instrumental. Organizing the instrumental music program, including bands, orchestras and small ensembles; a survey of the problems of instrumental teaching at various age and ability levels, the care and repair of instruments, and a study of methods and materials for class and private instruction. During the semester, members of the class assume the role of teacher at local schools. The Ohio Competency-based Model for Arts Education will be addressed in this course. Prerequisites: MU 141, MU 240, MU 242, MU 245 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 431 Piano Pedagogy Practicum. Students enrolled in this course teach private piano lessons and/or group piano classes under the supervision of the course instructor. Students build on the teaching skills they learn in the Piano Pedagogy course sequence by employing their pedagogical knowledge in an applied teaching setting. Pre- or co-requisites: MU 275, MU 276, MU 277 and MU 278. This course may be re-taken for credit, but not for a change of grade. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. MU 434 Pre-Clinical Practice-Music Multiage Pre K-12. In this course, the candidate spends 90 hours in a diverse or non-diverse school setting observing and applying theories, principles, and methods of teaching related to the pre-clinical practitioner’s major field of study. The pre-clinical practitioner is a teaching assistant and works closely with school personnel in non-instructional, clinical and instructional activities designed to promote readiness for clinical practice. Ten consecutive days of teaching are required. Group seminars cover various aspects pertaining to the teaching of music and the philosophy of music education for pre-K through grade 12. Field placement is arranged by the field placement coordinator. The course is graded S/U. Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; completion of proficiency requirements in piano. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 436 Marching Band Techniques. A survey of the contemporary marching band with special emphasis on design, charting and rehearsal techniques. Prerequisite: MU 268. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 438 Clinical Practice – Music Multiage Pre K-12. The candidate assumes responsibility for teaching music in a school setting opposite from that of the preclinical experience for a minimum of 300 total clock hours. An additional 30 clock hours of field/clinical experience are required prior to the beginning of clinical practice. The course is graded S/U and constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience for the bachelor of music education degree. The field placement coordinator arranges field placement and required group seminars. Prerequisites: Completion of MU320 and MU321 with a “C” or better, proficiency requirements in piano and all other coursework required for the bachelor of music education degree. See Entry into Clinical Practice and the Music Handbook for additional prerequisites. 12 Sem. Hrs. MU 450 Special Problems in Music. Special work adapted to majors in music who wish to pursue fields of interest not covered in the regular departmental offerings. May be repeated. Some possible areas of exploration include advanced form and analysis, counterpoint, advanced conducting, musicology and pedagogy. Permission of the instructor is required. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. MU 459 Piano for Proficiencies. This course is designed to develop skills required in the keyboard proficiency examination which must be

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passed by all music majors. The fundamental skills include: major-minor scales, arpeggios and cadences; prepared pieces; sight-reading of hymns and early intermediate-level piano pieces; and simple melodic harmonizations. Prerequisites: MU 143, MU 144, MU 243 and MU 244 or permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 460-480 Applied Music for Majors and Minors in Music (Private Instruction). Courses designed to guide the music major and the music minor in gaining proficiency on his or her instrument. The student will work one on one with an expert teacher to learn performance techniques, literature and practice techniques for the instrument, as well as providing the potential future music educator with an example to emulate in the techniques of private teaching. All students registered for private music lessons must stop at the music office, located in Cope Music Hall, during the first week of the semester to make arrangements for lesson times. Credit variable, 1-2 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, A, 2.} Due to the evolving nature of repertoire prepared for private music lessons, these courses (as well as MU 459) may be taken multiple times but not for a “change of grade.” Students must meet Departmental requirements regarding recital attendance (see Music Department Handbook for details). (Numbers for individual instrument types will not change and thus are not rearticulated.) MU 460 Piano MU 467 String Bass MU 474 French Horn MU 461 Organ MU 468 Clarinet MU 475 Euphonium MU 462 Voice MU 469 Saxophone MU 476 Trombone MU 463 Harp MU 470 Flute MU 477 Tuba MU 464 Violin MU 471 Oboe MU 478 Percussion MU 465 Viola MU 472 Bassoon MU 479 Guitar MU 466 Violoncello MU 473 Trumpet MU 480 Harpsichord MU 487 Senior Culminating Experience: Bachelor of Arts Degree in Music. Independent study/senior research paper and/or full recital. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Proficiency requirements in piano must be passed before registering for this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 488 Recital. For students giving joint recitals. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of the instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. MU 489 Recital. The student will prepare and present a full recital to be performed on his/her instrument. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. MU 490 Senior Culminating Experience: Bachelor of Music Degree. Independent study/senior research paper and full recital. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Proficiency requirements in piano must be passed before registering for this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. MU 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies
For a detailed description of the religious studies major and minor, see page 175.

Philosophy
Philosophy enables students to think clearly and creatively by having them identify and analyze the assumptions and arguments of both classical and modern writings. The courses are designed to help students engage in important philosophical works and develop a reasonable and useful understanding of reality and their place in it. The philosophy major and minor are administered by the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Requirements for the Major in Philosophy
Required Philosophy Courses PL 210 Logic PL 240 Existentialism or PL 300 Feminist Philosophy/Feminist Ethics PL 420 Senior Seminar (SCE) Three additional PL courses, at least two of which are at the 200 level or above Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 9

For students with a double major the “three other PL course” requirement is changed to four other courses at the 200 level or above, up to two of which may be courses approved by the department chair as “theoretical foundations” courses in another major field. Double majors are encouraged to take philosophy courses relevant to their other major field. Any Two from the Following Courses PL 220 Ancient Philosophy PL 230 Modern Philosophy PL 250 20th Century Philosophy Any One from the Following Courses PL 260Q Aesthetics PL 280 Bio-Medical Ethics PL 320 Ethics Any One from the Following Courses PL 270Q Philosophy of Science PL 310Q Philosophy of Religion Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3

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PL 330Q PL 380Q Total

Epistemology Philosophy of Mind/Artificial Intelligence

3 3 30 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3

Requirements for the Minor in Philosophy
Any One from the Following Courses PL 220 Ancient Philosophy PL 230 Modern Philosophy PL 240 Existentialism PL 250 20th Century Philosophy Any One from the Following Courses PL 260Q Aesthetics PL 280 Bio-Medical Ethics PL 320 Ethics Any One from the Following Courses PL 270Q Philosophy of Science PL 310Q Philosophy of Religion PL 330Q Epistemology PL 380Q Philosophy of Mind/Artificial Intelligence Other Required Courses Two additional PL courses Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 6 15

Requirements for Honors in Philosophy
Criteria for eligibility are stated under Honors Program on page 35.

Course Descriptions
PL 100 Introduction to Philosophy. Reflection and critical thinking centered in some of the basic problems in philosophy, e.g., the nature of ultimate reality, the problem of knowledge, human nature and the self, freedom and determinism, the existence of God, good and evil and the meaning of life. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL105 Philosophy and Film. A survey of basic problems in philosophy, e.g., the nature of ultimate reality, the problem of knowledge, human nature and the self, freedom and determinism, the existence of God, good and evil and the meaning of life. This course provides the student with an introduction to philosophy that uses movies to illustrate key concepts relevant to the philosophical problems covered in the course. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 120 Contemporary Moral Problems. The purpose of this course is to explore some of the major moral issues confronting contemporary society. The topics discussed may include abortion, sex, drugs, death and suicide, affirmative action, racism, sexism, civil disobedience, punishment, pacifism, war, euthanasia, surrogate parenting, world hunger, environmental ethics and the ethics of scientific research. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2} PL 199 Special Topics in Philosophy. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. PL 205 Informal Logic. A non-formal introduction to the art of correct reasoning, including treatment of such topics as the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement and fallacies. Special emphasis is placed upon recognizing and overcoming hindrances to critical thinking and upon recognizing misleading, fallacious or irrational appeals that attempt to manipulate our beliefs and actions. 3 Sem. Hrs. {Gen Ed: II,B,1} PL 210 Logic. An introductory study of the principles and practice of deductive reasoning. Includes the techniques of both classical and modern logic. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,1.} PL 220 Ancient Philosophy. This course is an introduction to ancient Greek philosophy with emphasis on the thoughts of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. Other areas of study may include Pre-Socratic philosophy, Hellenistic philosophy (e.g., Stoicism) and classical Roman philosophy. Cross-listed as CL 220. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 2.} PL 230 Modern Philosophy. This course is an introduction to Western philosophy from the 17th to the 19th centuries. Areas of study will include central philosophical movements such as Rationalism and Empiricism in addition to central figures such as Descartes, Locke, Hume and Kant. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 2.} PL 240 Existentialism. An overview of the central themes and works of Existentialist authors from Hegel to Camus. After considering the 19th century roots of the view that for humans existence precedes essence (Hegel, Kierkegaard, Husserl and Nietzsche), attention is turned to the view’s full expression in Heidegger, Sartre and Camus. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 250 20th Century Philosophy. This course is an introduction to 20th century philosophy. Emphasis will be placed on the American and British traditions although work in continental and existentialist philosophy also may be included. Areas of study will include important movements in analytic philosophy and issues in the philosophy of language in addition to central figures such as Wittgenstein, Russell, Ayer and Quine. Prerequisite: One other course in philosophy or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PL 260Q Aesthetics. An examination of several ways to understand and appreciate critically works of art including painting, architecture, literature, music and film. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B and II,A,3 or II,C,2}

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PL 270Q Philosophy of Science. A survey of the range of assumptions that lie behind any work in the sciences and consideration of the numerous second-level questions which are raised by actual scientific practice. Particular attention is given to the nature of science (as opposed to pseudo-science), the nature of scientific explanation, the nature of scientific progress (and retrogression) and the extent to which scientists should think themselves committed to the truth of their theories. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and III,B} PL 280 Bio-Medical Ethics. Following a brief review of ethical theory and the current terminology utilized in the technical literature, class discussion focuses on the variety of ethically complex issues attending current medical practice. Topics in the past have included the responsibilities of care-givers concerning confidentiality, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources and the obligations of patients in making decisions about their own care and the care of those for whom they may be required to act. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 290 Environmental Ethics. This course introduces students to ethical issues associated with the relationship between humans and the natural world. Do animals have rights? Do trees? What about entire ecosystems? Can traditional human-centered systems of ethics adequately answer such questions or is a more radical approach to environmental ethics required? Depending upon student interests, the course may offer opportunities for reflective wilderness experiences and/or service learning. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 291 The Wilderness. This course will focus upon the nature and value of the wilderness. Is there an ethical obligation to preserve wilderness areas? How can humans visit and use wilderness areas responsibly? The course will include a 10 day trip to a wilderness area. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 1 Sem. Hr. PL 299 Special Topics in Philosophy. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. PL 300 Feminist Philosophy /Feminist Ethics. The course will examine the literature and thought of various types of feminist philosophy including feminist philosophies of art, science, politics and religion. The course also will examine major theories and practices of feminist ethics as they apply to such issues and the care/justice debate, feminist critiques of constructing an ethical life, and new directions in feminist ethical theory including global feminist ethics. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 310Q Philosophy of Religion. This course examines standard attempts to establish the rationality of belief in God and the challenges raised to those attempts by the evil in the world. Also to be considered are issues such as what God is like and how God is related to our lives and the limitations of this world. Cross-listed as RE 310Q. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and III,B} PL 320 Ethics. An examination of ethical theories about what makes certain actions right or wrong, the place of virtues and the nature of The Good. Current moral issues also will be studied. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} PL 330Q Epistemology. A survey of classical and current attempts to define knowledge and to determine what we know (if anything). Epistemological assumptions are near the heart of any theoretical endeavor, and understanding most of the current philosophical literature (and much of the more theoretical literature in other disciplines) is greatly enhanced by familiarity with the central issues considered in this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} PL 350 Special Studies in Philosophy. An intensive study of some major philosophy or philosophical issue. May be repeated for different philosophers or issues. Prerequisite: PL 100 or PL 220 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PL 380Q Philosophy of Mind/Artificial Intelligence. This course examines contemporary philosophical theories of the mind. The course includes such topics as the mind/body problem, the problem of consciousness and the problem of mental representation. Special attention is paid to the question of artificial intelligence and to the relation of cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and computer science to the philosophy of mind. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and III,B.} PL 399 Special Topics in Philosophy. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. PL 410 Independent Study. Advanced research in philosophy. Primarily for philosophy majors at the junior or senior level. Students may repeat for different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PL 420 Senior Seminar. The Senior Seminar serves as the Senior Culminating Experience for majors. The course comprises both an independent research project and an in-class seminar. The research project will demonstrate the student’s ability to complete a study that is both comprehensive and integrative in nature. In the seminar, students will meet weekly under the guidance of a professor to discuss their ongoing research. Students are required to present their projects to the department in the spring semester. Prerequisite: senior standing in the major or by approval of the department. 3 Sem. Hrs. PL 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

Physical Education
Requirements for the Major in Physical Education
The physical education major requires 44-45 hours of course work. The physical education major shall fulfill the Senior Culminating Experience requirement by successfully completing the student teaching experience or presenting his/her research from PE 410W Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. The physical education major will maintain a portfolio of his/her course work. This portfolio will be used to track the student’s progress during progression through the major. Candidates seeking a teaching license in physical education must earn a grade of “C-” or better in all physical education and exercise science courses required for licensure. If a minimum grade of “C-” is not earned, candidates are required to retake the course until a grade of “C-” or better is earned. Required Physical Education Courses PE 103 Racquet Sports PE 115 Game and Fitness Activities for Teaching PE 122 Advanced Swimming PE 134 Weight Training PE 150 Tumbling-Gymnastics Semester Hours 1 1 1 1 1

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PE 200 PE 305 PE 325 PE 326 PE 401 PE 405 PE 410W PE 430

Principles of Physical Education Kinesiology Instructional Strategies in Elementary Physical Education Instructional Strategies in Secondary Physical Education Adaptive Physical Education Physiology of Exercise Evaluation and Measurement in PE and Health Teaching Fitness and Sporting Activities

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Any Three from the Following Physical Education Courses PE 140 Social and Folk Dance PE 141 Creative Dance for Teaching PE 144 Aerobic Dance PE 165 Karate Any One from the Following Coaching Courses PE 270 Track and Field Coaching PE 290 Soccer Coaching Required Departmental Courses ES 260Q Growth and Physical Activity ES 360 Motor Control and Learning Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 105 Elements of Anatomy and Physiology Total

Semester Hours 1 1 1 1 Semester Hours 2 2 Semester Hours 3 3 Semester Hours 4 44

Requirements for the Minor in Physical Education
Required Courses Semester Hours PE 200 Principles of Physical Education 3 Four additional PE courses (excluding basic instructional 12 activity classes, but may include ES 260Q and ES 360). No more than two coaching technique courses may be counted toward a minor, and no more than two semester hours of PE 450 and 451 may be counted toward a minor. Total 15

Requirements for Honors in Physical Education
To receive departmental honors in physical education, a student must satisfy all of the following criteria: 1) have a grade point average of 3.5 in physical education courses; 2) have completed at least three physical education courses with honors for a total of 12 semester hours from among PE 305, 395, 401, 405 and 410W; 3) have registered with the Honors Review Board for departmental honors. One of the three courses in part 3) may be an Honors Thesis/Project (All-University course 494) of three to six semester hours credit.

Course Descriptions
Basic instructional courses in physical education are numbered 100-199 and are one semester hour (1 Sem. Hr.) credit each. For students entering Mount Union starting in the 2002 Fall Semester, HE 152 is a prerequisite for all courses numbered PE 100-197. A student may take up to four activity classes for college credit. The program features coeducational classes in most activities at beginning and advanced skill levels. Each of the following courses, PE 102 through PE 197, meet the “Old General Education” Requirement. PE 102 Racquetball PE 128 Scuba** PE 103 Racquet Sports PE 130 Individual Fitness PE 104 Tennis PE 134 Weight Training PE 106 Badminton PE 136 Aerobic Running PE 110 Golf PE 140 Social and Folk Dance PE 112 Bowling ** PE 141 Creative Dance for Teaching PE 114 Archery PE 144 Aerobic Dance PE 115 Game and Fitness PE 150 Tumbling-Gymnastics Activities for Teaching PE 165 Karate PE 120 Swimming: Beginning PE 196* Special Programs PE 122 Swimming: Advanced PE 197* Special Programs II PE 124 ARC Life Guarding** * Special individualized programs are arranged for students who are medically unable to participate in other 100-level courses. ** Fee required for this course. PE 199 Special Topics in Physical Education. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. PE 200 Principles and Foundations of Physical Education. An introductory course designed to provide a structural basis for total comprehension of physical education, the course of study encompasses historical and philosophical foundations, and contemporary principles

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regarding objectives, curriculum, methodology and evaluation related to the conduct of the basic instructional, intramural and interscholastic athletic programs. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PE 210 School and Community Recreation and Outdoor Education. A study of principles and organization underlying the conduct of school and community recreation programs. Special attention is given to outdoor education as well as to group organization, special events, camping techniques and other arts, handicrafts and hobbies relating to group recreation programs. Practical field experience required. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semesters of even-numbered year) PE 250 The Philosophy and Psychology of Coaching Competitive Athletics. An examination of potential philosophical and psychological factors that affect athletic performance, with particular attention to personality, motivation, problems facing athletes and research findings in specific sports. (A prerequisite for entrance into departmental coaching courses PE 255-290.) 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester of even-numbered years) PE 255 Football Coaching. Study and practice in the strategy and mechanics of coaching football including a consideration of football rules, football fundamentals, individual and team play, offensive and defensive formations, organization, and practice planning. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester of odd-numbered years) PE 260 Basketball Coaching. Study and practice in the theory, strategy and mechanics of coaching basketball including various systems of offense and defense, organization of practice periods, judgment in handling players, and study of basketball fundamentals. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) 2 Sem. Hrs. PE 265 Baseball Coaching. Study and practice in the theory and mechanics of baseball. Detailed instruction for organizing indoor and outdoor practice. Specific emphasis on preparation for teaching the playing techniques at each position. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of odd-numbered years) PE 270 Track and Field Coaching. Study and practice in the theory and mechanics of track and field events including detailed instruction in each of the events included in an interscholastic or intercollegiate track and field meet. Training and conditioning methods are analyzed. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) PE 275 Wrestling Coaching. Study and practice in the theory and mechanics of freestyle wrestling including detailed instruction in training and conditioning, strength development and effective weight maintenance procedures. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of even-numbered years) PE 290 Soccer Coaching. Study and practice in the theory and mechanics of soccer. The technical, physical and psychological aspects of training and organizing for both game and practice situations will be examined. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission of instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester of odd-numbered years) PE 299 Special Topics in Physical Education. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. PE 305 Kinesiology. A study of the science of human movement with emphasis upon the structure and functioning of the movement mechanism, mechanical principles underlying human motion and an analysis of basic motor skills. Prerequisites: BI 105 or BI 210 and BI 211. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) PE 310 Biomechanics. A study of the laws governing the effect forces have upon the state of rest or motion in humans. Emphasis will be placed on both quantitative and qualitative description of human movement in terms of both kinetics and kinematics. Prerequisite: PE 305 Kinesiology. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PE 320 Health and Physical Education Curricula in Schools. A study of aims and objectives of health education and physical education. Methods of teaching both areas are included. Classes may be arranged in the public schools. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) PE 325 Instructional Strategies in Elementary Physical Education. An introduction to the teaching of elementary physical education (P-6). Physical education in the elementary school is analyzed with emphasis given to teaching methods and program planning of physical education activities as well as on principles of learning. (Field experience required). Prerequisites: PE 200, ES 260Q and ES 360. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PE 326 Instructional Strategies in Secondary Physical Education. This course is designed to provide prospective secondary physical education teachers with the ability to understand, recognize, analyze and demonstrate the range of teaching skills employed by effective educators at the middle and secondary levels. (Field experience required.) Prerequisites: PE 200 and ES 260Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) PE 399 Special Topics in Physical Education. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. PE 400 Independent Study. Open to juniors or seniors majoring or minoring in physical education. The student, in consultation with the instructor, will select a topic or problem that he/she wishes to research in depth. Departmental permission required for registration. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) PE 401 Adaptive Physical Education. A study of the various types of disabilities and modifications necessary to meet the needs and abilities of disabled individuals. Special emphasis is placed on the correction and improvement of motor functions of the physically disabled individuals. These adaptive methods are used in inclusion class settings. Prerequisites: BI 105, PE 200, ES 260Q, ES 360 and junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) PE 405 Physiology of Exercise. A comprehensive study of the elements and principles of exercise physiology with emphasis placed on the application of this knowledge to the teaching of physical education and the coaching of athletics. A review of contemporary research in exercise physiology is included. Prerequisite: ES 360. 3 Sem. Hrs. PE 410W Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. Statistical concepts and analysis are applied to health education and physical education. Tests of health and physical education components are analyzed. Prerequisite: ES 360, PE majors only or with permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PE 415 Problems of Administration and Organization. An investigation of the principles of administrative responsibility in directing the total physical education program. Topics for study include: curricular trends, staff relationships and duties, budgetary concerns, legal liability, purchase and care of supplies and equipment, and public and professional relations. Prerequisite: PE 200. 3 Sem. Hrs. (offered as needed) PE 430 Teaching Sport Concepts and Skills. This course provides instruction on the elements of the Tactical Games Approach. This is composed of territorial, net/wall, fielding and target activities. The principles and skills associated with these activities are addressed and activities are

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designed to prepare students to perform, properly analyze, professionally instruct and appropriately structure practice for participation and improvement of movement and playing skills. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) PE 450 Individual Direct Experience: Intramurals. An arranged, practical experience which provides direct participation in an applied intramural setting. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and instructor’s permission. 1 or 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) PE 451 Individual Direct Experience: Coaching. An arranged, practical experience which provides direct participation in an applied coaching setting. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing and instructor’s permission. 1 or 2 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every semester) PE 494 Honors Thesis/Project. A research/project course designed to meet the needs of the individual student seeking honors in the major at graduation. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, and approval of the instructor, the department chair and the Honors Review Board. Credit variable, 3-6 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Physics and Astronomy
The principal aim of the Mount Union Department of Physics and Astronomy is to help students combine the many advantages to be derived from study at a liberal arts University with the achievement of a high degree of competence in physics through concentrated study. Four intra-departmental curricula directed toward various professional objectives in physics are currently available. They are in the fields of experimental physics, theoretical physics, astronomy/astrophysics and applied physics. Curricula are adjusted to meet individual needs, and each student’s program is established in student/professor conferences. Most students earn a simultaneous minor in mathematics, and all gain experience in scientific computing. Mount Union offers comprehensive preparation for those students desiring to become professional astronomers through a concentration available to those majoring in physics and a minor. Excellent observational facilities available to qualified students include: (1) a 12-inch computer-controlled Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope; (2) a charge coupled device (CCD) camera for digital imaging of faint astronomical objects; (3) an 11-inch SchmidtCassegrain telescope equipped for BVRI photometry of stellar objects; (4) a nine-inch f/15 retracting telescope used for the study of lunar and planetary detail; (5) a portable eight-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope; (6) professional-grade software (IRAF) for digital image analysis; (7) remote access to a 32inch Ritchey-Chrétian telescope near Kitt Peak, AZ. Students interested in physics or astronomy are urged to talk with members of the department at the earliest opportunity.

Requirements for the Major in Physics
Required Physics Courses Semester Hours PH 101 General Physics I 4 PH 102 General Physics II 4 PH 140 Frontiers in Physics 2 PH 270-273 Seminar I, II, III, IV 3 PH 311 Modern Physics I 4 PH 456 Research 3 or PH 460-461 Senior Thesis I and II 3 One additional physics course (at least 3 hours other than PH 110) 3 Any Two from the Following Classical Physics Courses PH 302 Analytical Mechanics PH 307 Electromagnetic Theory PH 318 Thermal Physics Any One from the Following Modern Physics Courses PH 312 Modern Physics II PH 322 Astrophysics PH 409 Quantum Mechanics Any One from the Following Skills Courses PH 130 Electronics PH 220 Observational Astronomy PH 333 Advanced Laboratory Required Extra-Departmental Courses CH 110W Foundations of Chemistry or CH 111W Concepts in Chemistry MA 141 Calculus I MA 142 Calculus II MA 241 Calculus III MA 335 Differential Equations (in most cases) Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 4 4 4 Semester Hours 4 4 4 4 4 3 55

Students desiring to teach physics in high school must consult with their advisors regarding other required science courses and professional courses in education.

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Requirements for the Concentration in Astronomy
The concentration in astronomy will be available to students majoring in physics. Required Courses PH 120 Astronomy: A Survey PH 220 Observational Astronomy PH 322 Astrophysics PH 200Q Introduction to Planetary Science or PH 302 Analytical Mechanics Total Semester Hours 4 4 3 3 3 14

Requirements for the Minor in Physics
Required Courses PH 101 General Physics I PH 102 General Physics II 10 additional credit Hours of PH coursework (PH 110, PH 120, PH 200Q, PH 220 and PH 322 will not count toward the minor in physics.) Total Semester Hours 4 4 10

18

Requirements for the Minor in Astronomy
Any Four of the Following Courses PH 120 Astronomy: A Survey PH 200Q Introduction to Planetary Science PH 220 Observational Astronomy PH 302 Analytical Mechanics PH 322 Astrophysics Total Semester Hours 4 3 4 3 3 13-14

Requirements for Honors in Physics
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in physics if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in physics, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be PH 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in physics include PH 200, 220 or any 300-level or above course. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this catalogue for more information about Honors Programs.

Course Descriptions
PH 101 General Physics I. A practical and theoretical introduction to physics covering elements of classical mechanics and special relativity. Elements of vector analysis and calculus are presented. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: MA 120 or MA 141 (may be taken concurrently.) 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2} PH 102 General Physics II. A practical and theoretical introduction to physics covering elements of elementary thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, waves and quantum physics. Elements of vector analysis and calculus are presented. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Prerequisite: PH 101. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2} PH 110 Concepts of Physics. A non-mathematical introduction to the science of physics. This course is intended for non-science students and may be used to satisfy one of the General Education Requirements in the natural sciences. Topics covered will be from elementary mechanics, properties of matter, sound, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, atomic physics, nuclear physics and relativity. Emphasis will be on the development of a solid qualitative understanding of the physical world. Demonstrations of physical phenomena will accompany lectures. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} PH 120 Astronomy: A Survey. A course designed to introduce students to the field of astronomy. Laboratory sessions include observing and photographing astronomical objects through the observatory’s telescopes. This course may be used to satisfy one of the General Education Requirements in the natural sciences. Three class hours and one three-hour laboratory session per week. 4 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2.} PH 130 Electronics. A laboratory-based course in the basic principles of practical and theoretical modern electronics. Topics include circuit analysis, semiconductor devices, operational amplifiers and digital electronics. Two three-hour classroom plus laboratory meetings per week. Prerequisite: MA 100 or high school equivalent. 4 Sem. Hrs. PH 140 Frontiers of Physics. A seminar/workshop course intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores majoring in one of the natural sciences, computer science or mathematics. The seminar portion will cover topics of recent research interest in physics, possibly including black holes, the Large Hadron Collider and lasers. The workshop portion will consist of several individual or group projects developing both laboratory and computer skills. 2 Sem. Hrs.

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PH 154 Science, Sound and Music. This course examines the science of sound, music and acoustics, exploring ideas including how sound is produced and perceived, the effect of room acoustics on sound and how musical instruments work. Prerequisites: MA 100 or equivalent mathematics in high school. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,B,2} PH 199 Special Topics in Physics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. PH 200Q Introduction to Planetary Science. This course is an introduction to the physical and geological study of the properties, origin and evolution of planets, moons, comets and asteroids. The methods used to explore our solar system and planetary systems of other stars will also be studied. Prerequisite: MA 100 or equivalent mathematics in high school. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, B, 2 and III, B} PH 220 Observational Astronomy. An introduction to aspects of modern observational astronomy. Includes astronomical instrumentation, time, star charts and catalogs, astrometry, photometry, spectroscopy and other selected topics. Particular attention is paid to CCD imaging and data reduction. Three class hours per week plus laboratory and evening observing sessions on individually arranged schedules. Prerequisites: PH 120, MA 120. 4 Sem. Hrs. PH 270 Seminar I. Four semesters of seminar are required of physics majors. Students review classical papers and current publications related to this major, presenting them formally to the class. This course sequence may be started in the sophomore year or, at the latest, by the first semester of the junior year. Students may not register for two seminars in one semester. 0.5 Sem. Hr. PH 271 PH 272 PH 273 PH 299 Seminar II. Prerequisite: PH 270. 0.5 Sem. Hr. Seminar III. Prerequisite: PH 271. 1 Sem. Hr. Seminar IV. Prerequisite: PH 272. 1 Sem. Hr. Special Topics in Physics. See All-University 299 course description on page 49.

PH 302 Analytical Mechanics. A study of classical statics and dynamics including translational and rotational motion, work and energy, damped and undamped oscillating systems, wave propagation, Lagrange’s equations, the Hamiltonian and tensors. Three class hours per week. Prerequisites: PH 101 and MA 142. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 307 Electromagnetic Theory. Topics to be covered include electrostatics and electrostatic energy, dielectric media, electric currents, magnetic properties of matter, electromagnetic induction and Maxwell’s equations. Prerequisites: PH 102 and PH 302. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 311 Modern Physics I. A study of topics in modern physics including special relativity, the quantization of matter and energy, atomic structure, the Schrodinger equation, the basic physics of atoms, spectroscopy and the periodic table. Three class hours and one laboratory session per week. Prerequisites: PH 102 and MA 142. 4 Sem. Hrs. PH 312 Modern Physics II. A continuation of PH 311. Possible topics include quantum statistics, nuclear physics, solid state physics and elementary particles. Prerequisite: PH 311. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 318 Thermal Physics. A study of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and kinetic theory. Core concepts include entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, the canonical probability distribution and the partition function and the chemical potential. Additional topics may include photons and phonons, chemical and phase equilibrium, transport processes and critical phenomena. Prerequisites: PH 102, MA 142 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 322 Astrophysics. Introduction to radiative transport theory, stellar atmospheres and interiors. Selected topics from among interstellar matter, variable stars, stellar dynamics, star clusters, galactic structure, general relativity and cosmology are treated. Prerequisites: PH 120. MA 142 must be taken previously or concurrently. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 333 Advanced Laboratory. A study of basic methods of contemporary experimental physics. Topics include the use of computers for data acquisition and analysis, experimental design and the communication of scientific results. Two three-hour classroom plus laboratory meetings per week. Prerequisite: PH 311. 4 Sem. Hrs. PH 345Q Methods of Mathematical Physics. A study of the interface between mathematics and physics focusing particularly on partial differential equations. Mathematical modeling and various analytical and numerical solutions will be covered. Additional topics may include special functions, the calculus of residues and group theory. Prerequisites: PH 302 or MA 335. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} PH 362 Special Assignments in Advanced Physics or Research. This course permits students, under the direction of a faculty member, to pursue special investigations of interest in physics or in physics-related computer areas. Schedules are arranged individually; the time commitment expected is four hours per week. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. 2 Sem. Hrs. May be repeated for credit. PH 399 Special Topics in Physics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. PH 409 Quantum Mechanics. Historical introduction, uncertainty principle, barrier penetration, Hilbert space, Schrodinger formulation, Heisenberg formulation, SU groups, operator concepts, Poisson, Lagrange, and commutator brackets, Dirac four-vectors, introduction to field quantization, and perturbation theory are among the topics presented. Prerequisites: PH 302, PH 311 and MA 335. Three class hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 456 Research. Prerequisites: Declared and accepted major in physics and permission of the department chair. May be repeated for credit. This course may serve as the Senior Culminating Experience if arranged in advance with the student’s advisor. Class meetings and scheduling are arranged with each student individually; the time commitment expected is six hours per week. 3 Sem. Hrs. PH 460 Senior Thesis I. This course involves the independent investigation of a problem in physics and/or astronomy. Emphasis is on generating appropriate research questions, reading relevant literature and designing a realistic plan of study. When combined with PH 461, this course is designed to fulfill the Senior Culminating Experience requirement. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. 1.5 Sem. Hrs. PH 461 Senior Thesis II. This course involves the independent investigation of a problem in physics and/or astronomy. Emphasis is on executing the plan of study formulated in PH 460 and analyzing and presenting the results. When combined with PH 460, this course is designed to fulfill the Senior Culminating Experience requirement. Prerequisite: PH 460. 1.5 Sem. Hrs. PH 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49.

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PH 499 Internship in Physics. An experience-based course designed for juniors and seniors. Students are placed in appropriate laboratories or agencies where previous classroom learning may be integrated with a work experience. The exact location, program and method of evaluation are provided in a contract drawn between the student, the faculty sponsor and the host internship supervisor. Registration by arrangement with the faculty sponsor and departmental chair. Specific restrictions may apply. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Political Science and International Studies
The mission of the University of Mount Union is to prepare students for meaningful work, fulfilling lives and responsible citizenship, and the study of politics is an important part of this education in our increasingly interdependent world. The Department of Political Science and International Studies seeks to equip students with all the requisite skills and tools to succeed in their future and to instill in them a desire for and commitment to lifelong engagement with the political world. In pursuit of these goals, the Department incorporates an applied approach to the study of politics, encouraging intellectual growth through active learning and internships, which provide a variety of opportunities to explore careers in public service and related fields. Coursework will stimulate critical thinking about government and politics, as students improve their analytical abilities, learn both quantitative and qualitative research methods and develop effective written and oral communication skills. The department offers majors and minors in both political science and international studies (see page 137 for a detailed description of the international studies program). The Department of Political Science and International Studies with the Department of Criminal Justice, offers a minor in pre-law (see page 167).

Requirements for the Major in Political Science
Required Political Science Courses PS 105 American National Government PS 120 Introduction to International Politics PS 235 Introduction to Political Thought PS 350 Quantitative Political Analysis PS 400W Seminar in Political Science Three additional political science courses Any One from the Following American Institutions Courses PS 301 Judicial Politics and Law PS 302 The United States Congress PS 303 The American Presidency Any One from the Following International Relations Courses PS 225 Introduction to International Relations PS 227 Model United Nations PS 270 American Foreign Policy Any One from the Following Comparative Politics Courses PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics PS 345 Comparative Politics of Europe PS 346 Comparative Politics of Asia PS 347 Politics of the Former Soviet Union Any One from the Following Advanced Political Philosophy Courses PS 315 American Political Thought PS 330 Western Political Thought PS 331 Modern Political Philosophy Required Extra-Departmental Course EC 105 Introduction to Economics Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 9 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 39

Requirements for the Minor in Political Science
Required Political Science Courses PS 105 American National Government Two additional PS courses Any One from the Following American Institutions Courses PS 301 Judicial Politics and Law PS 302 The United States Congress PS 303 The American Presidency Any One from the Following Comparative Politics or International Relations Courses PS 225 Introduction to International Relations Semester Hours 3 6 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3

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PS 227 PS 245 PS 270

Model United Nations Introduction to Comparative Politics American Foreign Policy

3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 18

Any One from the Following Advanced Political Philosophy Courses PS 315 American Political Thought PS 330 Western Political Thought PS 331 Modern Political Philosophy Total

Requirements for Honors in Political Science
Honors in political science may be earned by: (1) Holding a 3.5 GPA in political science courses at graduation. (2) Completing three 300-level political science courses for honors credit. (3) Completing PS 494. Consultation with and permission of both the course instructor and the department chair during the semester prior to doing honors work are required. (PS 494 does not replace IN 400 as the SCE.)

Course Descriptions
PS 100 Introduction to Public Service. This course provides students with a comprehensive introduction to public service, which will be defined and contrasted with “not-for-profits” and the “private sector.” There will be a broad analysis of the role of government in contemporary American society. Several topics pertaining to public service will be introduced: the organization, responsibilities and limitations of the public sector, organizational theory, bureaucratic behavior, decision making, public finance, intergovernmental relations and comparative approaches to governing. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 105 American National Government. This course is an introduction to the structure and processes of the federal government of the United States. It is a survey course, covering the foundations of American government, its major institutions and the various forces that shape political decision making at the national level. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,3,a} PS 110 American State and Local Government. This course explores sub-national American governments, focusing on federalism, intergovernmental relations and the institutions of state and local governments, including the organization and function of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government. Recommended prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 120 Introduction to International Politics. This course examines the structure and operation of the international system, providing an overview of the nature, forms and dynamics of world politics covering issues of international security, international political economy and emerging trends in the post-Cold War world. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1} PS 180 Introduction to Geography. This course introduces the general student and the prospective teacher of integrated social studies to an examination of geography in terms of the world in spatial patterns of political, cultural and economic activity; places and regions; physical systems; human systems; environment and society; and the uses of geography. Geography for Life: National Geography Standards will be addressed. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 1.} PS 199 Special Topics in Political Science. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. PS 200 Public Personnel Management. This course focuses on the principles and practices used in the management of personnel in government organizations. Topics to be covered include: (1) the historical development of the rules and practices of employment in the public sector, especially the federal “merit system”; (2) processes associated with personnel management in the public sector including classification, recruitment, performance appraisal and labor relations; (3) various contemporary work issues facing public employees and employers such as drug testing, sexual harassment and affirmative action. Prerequisite: PS 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 207 Environmental Law and Policy. Environmental issues provide a wide array of possibilities for discussing and critically analyzing many aspects of politics, the bureaucracy, the law and law enforcement. This course will discuss the creation of state and national environmental policies, examine the development of corresponding and resulting law and regulations and explore means and issues of enforcement. Students will delve into the bureaucratic nature of the Environmental Protection Agency, the involvement of federal and state court systems and law enforcement agencies and the adaptation of policies through the political process. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 216 Women and Politics. This course examines women’s roles in the political process as well as how women are affected by government policy. Topics to be considered include the evolution of the women’s movement from the suffrage movement to the present, perspectives on women’s roles and how these are reflected in the political arena, challenges and opportunities faced by women in the political process and public policies on issues such as abortion, sexual harassment, child care and population planning. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 225 Introduction to International Relations. This course provides students with an introduction to the basic theories and methods used in the study of international relations. The course covers such topics as the dynamics of conflict and cooperation, the processes of foreign policy decisionmaking and the evolution of the modern international system. Prerequisite: PS 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 227 Model United Nations. This course provides students the opportunity to participate in simulations of United Nations negotiations. Several simulations will be held on campus to familiarize students with the workings of the Security Council and other UN organs. The course will culminate in students’ participation in an intercollegiate Model UN tournament. Topics to be covered during classroom instruction include basic information about the institutions, processes and agenda of the United Nations and its affiliated organizations. Students will be responsible for researching the current agenda of several UN bodies as well as informing themselves about the countries currently represented in the Security Council and other relevant bodies. In particular, students will be required to develop an in-depth knowledge of the countries they represent in simulations. Recommended: PS 120 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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PS 235 Introduction to Political Thought. An examination of the principal themes and ideologies which have molded and continue to affect our political institutions, our political beliefs and our politics. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} PS 245 Introduction to Comparative Politics. An introduction to the comparative study of government and politics. Its purpose is to familiarize students with the basic themes, concepts and theoretical approaches that are used by political scientists to explain governmental institutions, political processes and political change in different regions of the world. Prerequisite: PS 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1} PS 260 Public Budgeting. This course provides an overview of budgeting and financial management in the public sector and will provide some fundamental skills in public budgeting and finance. Fundamental concepts and practices of budgeting, financial management and public finance are introduced for all levels of government with special emphasis on state and local government budgeting and financial management in the United States. The course is organized around certain concepts basic to public sector financial management including intergovernmental fiscal relations, financial and managerial controls in the public sector and capital planning and public borrowing. Prerequisites: PS 100 [Recommended: EC 105 and/or AC 202.] 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 270 American Foreign Policy. A critical analysis of the foreign policy of the United States in the 20th century. Prerequisite: PS 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,3a.} PS 299 Special Topics in Political Science. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. PS 300Q Introduction to Law and the Legal System. This course is intended to provide students with a general understanding of law and the judicial system in the United States. In order to provide a more extensive appreciation of the legal system in the United States, this course will consist of three major segments. The first will analyze the meaning of law, define our legal system and explain the major sources of law. The second will explain our federal judicial system. The final section will introduce students to specific areas of substantive law. Students may not receive credit for both PS 300 and PS 301. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} PS 301 Judicial Politics and Law. In this course, we will examine the origins, development and operation of the American Judiciary. Among the specific topics that will be covered are federalism and the judiciary, jurisdiction, judicial proceedings, selection of judges, current judicial controversies and Supreme Court politics and policies. Students may not receive credit for both PS 300 and PS 301. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 302 The U.S. Congress. This course examines the origins and development of the American Congress, theories of representation and legislative behavior and the legislative process, with particular emphasis on congressional rules and procedures. The course also explores the electoral connection between Members of Congress and their constituents, and the relationship between Members of Congress to other political officials and organized interest groups. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 303 The American Presidency. This course examines the creation of the presidency and the development of the role of the president within our constitutional system of separated powers. In particular, we will focus on the emergence of the “public” presidency. Additional topics include the presidential election process, decision making and personality and policymaking in both domestic and foreign affairs. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 305 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties. This course will provide students with a detailed study and in-depth analysis of areas of American constitutional law relating to civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include freedom of expression, religious freedom, the right to privacy, racial discrimination and equal protection of the laws. The course is geared toward pre-law students. Prerequisite: PS 300Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 306 Constitutional Law: Sources of Power. This course will provide students with a detailed study and in-depth analysis of areas of American constitutional law relating to the powers of government. Topics include political institutions, separation of powers, judicial review, court processes and federalism. The course is geared toward pre-law students. Prerequisite: PS 300Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 310 The Electoral Process. An analysis of political campaigns and elections for president and Congress. Specific attention will be paid to election trends, voter characteristics and the impact of television and polling on modern election campaigns. Recommended: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 315 American Political Thought. An analytical and historical examination of the political ideas important to the evolution of American governmental institutions and to the ethics and politics of American democracy. Prerequisite: Either PS 105, PS 235 or HI 210. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 320 Legal Advocacy. This course will introduce students to the concepts and practice of legal advocacy, including pre-trial, trial and appellate advocacy. The course will focus on effective, persuasive oral and written communication specifically oriented toward the field of law. Course activities may include a mock trial, a simulated appeal, legal negotiations or any combination of these and other activities. Prerequisite: PS 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 321 Terrorism. This course will involve an examination of the historical evolution of terrorism, its definition and development both on a national and international level. Some of the topics covered will include the psychological profile of terrorists, the socio-political conditions that contribute to the growth of terrorism, terrorist group strategies, tactics and targets as well as counterterrorist measures taken to suppress these groups. Prerequisite: PS 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 326 International Organizations. An introduction to the evolution, structure and functions of international political and economic organizations looking at the origins, roles and structures of non-state agents in international politics, including their interactions in the areas of conflict, diplomacy and law, security arrangements and economic and other forms of integration. Intergovernmental organizations as well as non-governmental organizations on the global and regional level will be analyzed and discussed. Prerequisite: PS 225. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 330 Western Political Thought. An analysis of the principal themes of Western political philosophy from ancient times to the 17th century. Prerequisite: HI 101. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 331 Modern Political Philosophy. An analysis of major political thought from the 17th century to the present. Prerequisite: Either PS 235 or HI 102. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 340 International Political Economy. This course examines how political decisions affect economic conditions. Students will learn about how political decisions have affected economic conditions in wealthy democracies, in former communist countries and in developing nations. The international politics of trade, exchange rates and debt also will be discussed. Prerequisite: PS 120. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 345 Comparative Politics (Europe). This course is intended to provide students with a general overview of politics in Europe. Students will become familiar with the political systems of selected European countries and the European Union. Topics will include foreign policy, economic policy and current political issues. Prerequisite: PS 120 or PS 180. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} PS 346 Comparative Politics (Asia). An introduction to the political systems of Asian nations. The subject matter of a course in comparative

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politics includes the study of the political forces, processes, institutions and policies of foreign countries. Prerequisite: PS 120 or PS 180. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1.} PS 347 Politics of the Former Soviet Union. An introduction to the politics of Russia and the newly independent states of the former Soviet Union. This course considers the origins and evolution of the political and economic systems and the sources of change and continuity in post-Soviet politics and society. It also deals with contemporary issues, including the politics of economic reform, the resurgence of ethnic politics and the collapse of communism and its aftermath. Prerequisite: PS 120 or PS 180. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,1} PS 350 Quantitative Political Analysis. The course is an introduction to the practice of empirical political science and provides a preparation for IN 400. Research methodology and design, data collection and analysis, sampling and basic descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 360 Public Policy. An analysis of the governmental policy making process and substantive policy issues such as health care, education, criminal justice and the environment. Within this context, we will compare U. S. policy approaches with those of other countries. Recommended: PS 105 or PS 110. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 399 Special Topics in Political Science. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. PS 400 Seminar in Political Science. In concultation with a faculty advisor, students will independently research a specific question within political science, reviewing the relevant literature, developing a research design and analyzing the question using appropriate methods. The end product will be a major scholarly paper consisting of original research. This is the Senior Culminating Experience in political science. Prerequisite: PS 350. Permission of the instruction is also required. 3 Sem Hrs. PS 405 Independent Study. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in political science. Emphasis is on independent inquiry into a subject in depth. Permission of instructor required. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. PS 470 Colloquium in Political Science (National Security). An in-depth study of the peculiar concerns faced by the American system with particular attention being paid to institutions such as the Department of Defense, the intelligence community, etc; the international environment; and social and cultural considerations. Prerequisite: PS 270. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 494 Honors Thesis/Project. Formal paper written under the supervision of a departmental member. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. 3 Sem. Hrs. PS 499 Internship in Political Science. Open primarily to seniors. An experience-based course in which the student spends a specified amount of time attached to a court, a legal agency, a private law firm or a law enforcement agency in order to gain actual work experience and then have the opportunity to relate classroom knowledge to a work experience situation. The exact program is to be agreed upon by the intern, the internship coordinator and the cooperating agency or office. Permission of internship coordinator required prior to enrollment. Arrangements must be made with the instructor during the semester prior to the one in which the course is offered. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Pre-Professional Programs
Mount Union offers a wide range of pre-professional programs for persons interested in careers in medical-related fields, law and ministry. Brochures describing each of the programs in detail are available through the Office of Admission.

Pre-Health Profesions Program
The pre-health professions program is designed to prepare students for future careers as doctors, dentists, pharmacists, optometrists, physical therapists, physician assistants, veterinarians, podiatrists and chiropractors. The program is not a formal degree program but is a flexible curriculum designed to prepare students for professional schools in the health-related fields. Students will take the appropriate required courses in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics and social sciences and recommended electives in the arts and humanities to become highly-successful professional school candidates.

Pre-Law Program
For more information on pre-law, see page 167.

Pre-Ministry Program
Pre-ministry preparation may involve various disciplines and feature several curricular patterns for students seeking to go into the ministry or other religious vocation. A pre-ministry concentration is offered by the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. See page 176.

Pre-Law
The pre-law minor is administered by the Department of Criminal Justice and Department of Political Science. This interdisciplinary minor is designed to prepare students for the rigors and challenges of law school. The required coursework introduces students to the legal system and to keys aspects of the law, such as constitutional law and the criminal justice system. The minor also helps students develop their communication and advocacy skills. The pre-law minor is designed to accompany to any major. Law schools do not require any particular major for admission; thus, pre-law students are encouraged to major in an academic discipline that interests and excites them. The electives in the minor allow individual students to round out their pre-law education with courses that complement numerous majors, including criminal justice, accounting, business, communication, philosophy, political science, psychology and sport business.

Requirements for the Minor in Pre-law
Pre-law minors are required to complete 18 semester hours of course work. For students majoring in political science, no more than six hours of

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political science credit can count toward both the political science major and the pre-law minor and such students may only select one political science course from the list of elective courses for the minor; the other elective must be chosen from a different academic discipline. Required Courses CJ 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice CM 227 Public Advocacy and Argumentation or PS 320 Legal Advocacy PS 300Q Introduction to Law and the Legal System PS 305W Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties or PS 306 Constitutional Law: Sources of Power Any Two from the Following Courses AC 202 Financial Accounting AC 305 Federal Income Tax BA 250 Business Law I BA 255 Business Law II CJ 308 Criminal Law and Procedure CJ 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law CM 435 Media Law and Policy PL 210 Logic PS 207 Environmental Law and Policy PS 302 The U.S. Congress PS 305 Constitutional Law: Civil Rights and Liberties or PS 306 Constitutional Law: Sources of Power PY 370 Forensic Psychology SB 360 Legal Issues in Sports Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 18

Students must take one constitutional law course (PS 305 or PS 306) as a requirement, they may use the other as an elective.

Department of Psychology
The mission of the Department of Psychology is to develop and maintain an academic curriculum and cocurricular activities that help students acquire a broad base of knowledge in psychology, acquire the intellectual and communication skills necessary to contribute to psychological science and develop characteristics that encourage personal fulfillment and responsible citizenship.

Department Goals
The goals of the department fall into three categories: Knowledge Base: The Department of Psychology provides courses, programs and experiences that foster the acquisition of the significant knowledge of the field including historical and contemporary persons and events that have shaped the discipline. The department seeks to provide students with an understanding of the varied methods, theories and conceptual models that serve as organizing frameworks for understanding behavior and experience. Intellectual Skills: The Department of Psychology provides programs, courses and experiences that enable students to develop skills in the areas of communication, information gathering, critical thinking, problem solving and quantitative and qualitative methods of inquiry, analysis and interpretation. Personal Characteristics: The Department of Psychology provides courses, programs and experiences that promote self-awareness, capacity for selfreflection, interpersonal competence, appreciation of diversity and the development of a personal code of moral and ethical behavior. A systematic study of behavior and mental processes is necessary for students who lean toward psychology as a profession and is of interest to those students who wish to gain greater insight into human and animal behavior. New students will quickly discover that the subject matter of psychology is spread across a wide spectrum of information; consequently, the courses in psychology offer various types of learning opportunities such as lectures, discussions, experiential activities, demonstrations, field placements, internships, seminars and empirical research projects. To become a professional psychologist, students must complete two to five years of graduate study. Professional preparation is a prerequisite for teaching and/or research positions in most colleges and universities and for the practice of clinical/counseling psychology. Undergraduate majors can be sure that, at least, they will be prepared for supervised/training positions in the mental health field such as case manager and group home counselor. They will also be qualified for positions in personnel work, social work, public relations, publicity, sales, advertising, hospital administration and others. However, they will not be prepared for any specific vocational objective. Many career opportunities are also found in school counseling, vocational rehabilitation, business and industry, government service, educational administration and research. In addition, an undergraduate major in psychology can serve as preparation for students choosing to pursue additional training in medicine or law.

Requirements for the Major in Psychology
A general orientation to the field is assured by requiring students to take basic courses in all areas. All psychology majors will take 36 semester hours in psychology: 30 required hours and six hours of electives. Beyond this, no more than 12 additional hours are allowed unless the student takes a like number of hours beyond the minimum of 120 hours required for the undergraduate degree. Required Courses Semester Hours

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PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science PY 200 Professional Development Seminar PY 201 Research and Statistical Methods I PY 202 Research and Statistical Methods II PY 401 Senior Projects I PY 402 Senior Projects II PY 455 History and Systems of Psychology or PY 499 Psychology Internship Two additional PY courses Psychology 401 and 402 comprise the Senior Culminating Experience. Any One from the Following Basic Theoretical Courses PY 215 Child and Adolescent Development PY 219 Lifespan Development PY 220 Adulthood and Aging PY 225 Personality Theory PY 235 Psychology of Social Behavior Any One from the Following Physiological and Experimental Courses PY 230 Motivation PY 250 Behavioral Neuroscience I PY 260 Sensation and Perception PY 270 Cognitive Psychology PY 275 Learning and Conditioning PY 336 Animal Cognition Any One from the Following Applied/Clinical Courses PY 305 Abnormal Psychology PY 310 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology PY 315 Personal Growth and Adjustment PY 345 Human Sexual Behavior PY 365 Introduction to Counseling PY 395 Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy Total

3 1 4 4 3 3 3 3-15 6

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 36

The electives are determined through consultation with the student’s advisor. On declaring a major, a student should come to the Department of Psychology in order to plan a schedule of courses. Achievement of a degree follows from the fulfillment of a well-chosen and balanced program. Several courses outside of the department are recommended for majors. These usually include biology, sociology, mathematics, and as related to a particular plan of study, chemistry, economics or philosophy. For the pre-professional major, most graduate schools expect that an undergraduate will earn at least a 3.0 cumulative average.

Requirements for the Minor in Psychology
Students wishing to obtain a minor in psychology begin with an overview of the field and then take more specialized courses that provide greater depth of inquiry. The psychology minor consists of 15 semester hours in psychology: three required hours and 12 elective hours. The electives can be chosen from the remaining course listings. Required Courses PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science Four additional PY courses Total Semester Hours 3 12 15

Psychology as a minor is appropriate for many types of students because it has applications in many career areas as well as in one’s personal life. It would enhance preparation for careers in the fields of social services, business, medicine, education and the ministry as well as many others. Students interested in human services may wish to choose their electives from among the following courses: PY 215, 220, 225, 305, 310, 315, 340, 350, 365 and 499. Students interested in the scientific, experimental or biological areas may want to consider PY 230, 250, 260, 270, 275 and 380. Students interested in business might find courses PY 225, 235, 320 and 360 appealing. Students considering psychology as a minor are encouraged to speak not only with their advisors but also to a member of the psychology faculty to determine the courses that would be most suitable for them.

Requirements for the Major in Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience
The cognitive and behavioral neuroscience (CBN) major is designed for students with a focused interest in the biological bases of behavior and thought. The major is well-suited for students that are contemplating professional and/or research careers in clinical psychology, medicine, pharmaceuticals, veterinarian medicine, animal science, neurology and neuroscience. However, most of the courses in this major are open to all psychology majors and to students with other majors. Because CBN majors have additional laboratory requirements beyond those for the general

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psychology major, students in the CBN major will receive a bachelor of science degree instead of a bachelor of arts degree. Students who choose the CBN major must meet coursework requirements similar to the traditional psychology major. One difference is that CBN majors must take PY 250, PY 251, PY 255 and PY 270. In addition, CBN majors are not required to meet the capstone requirement of PY 455 or PY 499. Instead, the CBN major must complete at least one proseminar (PY 420). Required Courses Semester Hours PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Sciences 3 PY 200 Professional Development 1 PY 201 Research Methods and Statistics I and Lab 4 PY 202W Research Methods and Statistics II and Lab 4 PY 250 Behavioral Neuroscience I 3 PY 251 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab 1 (Meets group II requirement) PY 255 Behavioral Neuroscience II 4 PY 270 Cognitive Psychology 3 PY 401 Senior Projects I 3 PY 402W Senior Projects II 3 PY 420 Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Proseminar 1 Any One from the Following Basic Theoretical Courses PY 215 Child and Adolescent Development PY 219 Lifespan Development PY 220 Adulthood and Aging PY 225 Personality Theory PY 235 Psychology of Social Behavior Any One from the Following Applied/Clinical Courses PY 305 Abnormal Psychology PY 310 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology PY 315 Personal Growth and Adjustment PY 345 Human Sexual Behavior PY 365 Introduction to Counseling PY 395 Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy Required Extra-Departmental Courses BI 140 The Unity of Life CH 111 General Chemistry II Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 4 4 44

Graduating with a major in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience will require completion of a senior project on a neuroscience topic. Students in the CBN major are encouraged to take additional 200-level and 300-level PY courses as well as other upper-level BI and CH courses. Additional recommended electives will be determined via advising. There are several additional courses a CBN major might wish to take based on his/her interests. For example, if a student is interested in artificial intelligence, he/she would take courses in the cognitive area as well as in computer science. If the student is pre-med, he/she would take additional courses to meet the requirements for admission to medical school. Those students planning to apply to medical/veterinary/physical therapy schools should also take MA 141; BI 210 and 211; CH 231, 232, 370 and 371; and PH 101 and 102. Such students should discuss their academic plan with the pre-med advisor and/or the CBN adviser during their first year. Note: Students who declare a major in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience may not declare a second major or minor in psychology.

Requirements for the Minor in Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience
The objective of the minor in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience (CBN) is to provide undergraduate students with a structured opportunity to take classes in this interdisciplinary field that blends psychology and neurobiology. This opportunity is often beneficial to those interested in pursuing graduate study in a range of scientific fields, as well as those interested in planning professional careers in the health/medical fields. Required Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Courses PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Sciences PY 250 Behavioral Neuroscience I PY 251 Behavioral Neuroscience Lab PY 255 Behavioral Neuroscience II PY 270 Cognitive Psychology Any One from the Following Courses PY 230 Motivation PY 260 Sensation and Perception PY 275 Learning and Conditioning PY 330 Drugs and Behavior PY 336 Animal Cognition Total Semester Hours 3 3 1 4 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 17

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Note: Those majoring in psychology cannot minor in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience.

Requirements for Honors in Psychology
Students are eligible to enter the Honors Program in psychology if they have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major or permission of the Honor Review Board. To receive honors in psychology, a student must have at least a 3.5 grade point average in the major at graduation and honors credit in courses that total a minimum of 12 semester hours. One of the courses may be PY 494 Honors Thesis/Project that may be taken for three to six credit hours. For permission to register for an honors thesis/project, a completed Honors Application and Registration Form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the 12th week of classes of the semester prior to doing the thesis. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Other courses students may take for honors in psychology include any 200-level or above course except PY 200, PY 201, PY 202, PY 401 and PY 402. For permission to register for a course with honors in the major, a completed Application and Registration Form must be filed with the director of Honors Programs by the end of the third week of classes of the semester in which the course is taken. Students must earn at least a “B+” in the course to earn honors credit. Please see page 35 of this Catalogue for more information about Honors Programs.

Course Descriptions
Note: Students will ordinarily begin with PY 110 (or an equivalent course). This course may serve in any of three ways: as an elective; as a requirement in various curricula or as a prerequisite for all other courses in psychology. PY 110 Introduction to Psychological Science. This course is an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Students will be exposed to various issues essential to understanding behavior, thinking and emotion using a variety of methods of scientific inquiry. Topics will include the following: research methodology, biological bases of behavior, development, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory and cognition, motivation and emotion, personality, social behavior, abnormal psychology, and the treatment of psychological disorders. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,3,b.} PY 199 Special Topics in Psychology. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. PY 200 Professional Development Seminar. This course covers topics that will better acquaint students with the field of psychology as well as the relationships that exist between the various areas within the field. In the process of doing this, students will better understand the various career possibilities that exist for them after graduation. Discussion of requirements for various careers and graduate school possibilities also will be included. Other related topics also will be discussed. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 1 Sem. Hr. PY 201 Research and Statistical Methods I. This course is a survey of basic research methodology, design considerations and statistical analyses of corresponding behavioral data. Includes presentation of elementary descriptive and experimental research procedures as well as related statistical procedures (descriptive statistics, data presentation and characterization, inferential statistics, basics of hypothesis testing and parameter estimation). Students will apply these principles in conjunction with and as an introduction to various areas of research psychology through laboratory exercises and use of state-of-the-art statistical packages. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: PY 110 or equivalent (may not be taken concurrently with PY 202) and sophomore standing. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PY 202 Research and Statistical Methods II. This course is a continuation of PY 201 dealing with more complex methodological issues. Advanced correlational and experimental designs are introduced. An experimental research project, laboratory exercises and continued work with computerized statistical programs provide direct experience with these techniques. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: PY 201. 4 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) PY 210 Educational Psychology. This course involves the study of the application of psychological theories and principles to education and teaching. Focus is on the educational implications and application of research relating to human development (including physical, social, emotional and cognitive development). Among the topics covered will be the principles of learning, motivation, individual differences, classroom evaluation and classroom management. Prerequisite: PY 110 (or equivalent) strongly suggested (but not required). Education majors must complete ED 150 before taking this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,3,b} PY 215 Child and Adolescent Development. This course involves the study of the psychological development of the individual from childhood through adolescence. Emphasis will be on emotional, cognitive and social development during childhood and adolescence. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 219 Lifespan Development. This course utilizes a holistic approach to understanding the development of the individual from conception to death. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which contextual variables influence development and functioning in physical, cognitive, affective and social domains. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 220 Adulthood and Aging. This course is intended to facilitate an understanding of and appreciation for the significant developmental processes and changes that occur in early, middle and late adulthood. In addition to examining current research and theories related to biological, cognitive and social factors, particular attention is paid to the impact of culture and the environmental context on the aging process. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 225 Personality Theory. This course is a survey of the work of a diverse group of theorists who have all sought to explain the structure, development and functioning of human personality. Theoretical perspectives covered will include psychodynamic, sociocultural, humanistic, existentialist, behavioral and cognitive approaches. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 230 Motivation. This course deals with current ideas and issues concerning the arousal, direction and persistence of behavior. In addition to the coverage of traditional subjects (e.g. the physiological and social bases of motivation, the nature of primary drives and the interaction of learning and motivation), the course also will include topics of special interest such as weight management, sleep disorders, behavioral impact of stress, aggression, addictive behaviors and motivation in the work place. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. (PY 250 is strongly recommended.) 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 235 Psychology of Social Behavior. This course is an examination of human behavior in a social and cultural context. Topics covered will include the self in a social context, attitudes, attributions, persuasion, conformity, attraction, altruism, prejudice, aggression, group dynamics and inter-

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group relations. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 250 Behavioral Neuroscience I. This course is the first of a two section broad-based survey of the biological bases of behavior. The content of this course begins with an overview of the anatomy and pharmacology of the mammalian nervous system. Classic and current topics in the areas of vision, audition, sensory systems, movement, motivated behaviors and the biology of mental pathology will be presented. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PY 110. One semester of University level biology is suggested. A laboratory section (PY 251) is offered as an optional corequisite. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 251 Behavioral Neuroscience I Laboratory. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the structure and function of the mammalian nervous system with particular emphasis on the relationship between anatomical structure and function. There will be in-depth coverage of recent findings in several topics in neurobiology, neural plasticity and behavioral neuroscience. Laboratory exercises will provide experience in several different areas including ethics, animal care and handling, gross and cellular neuroanatomy, stereotaxic surgical preparations and histological methods. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PY 110; PY 250 is a pre or corequisite. 1 Sem. Hr. PY 255 Behavioral Neuroscience II. This course is the second of a two-part survey of the biological bases of behavior. This course focuses on the neural and hormonal correlates of behavior including sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, learning and memory, language, movement and psychopathology. Other topics include methods used in the brain sciences, the connection between stress and illness and how the brain recovers from injury. Laboratory sessions will emphasize the theoretical constructs discussed in lecture. Prerequisites: Successful (C or better) completion of PY 250 and PY 251. 4 Sem. Hr. PY 260 Sensation and Perception. This course deals with current ideas and issues concerning sensation, the process of detecting a stimulus in the environment and perception, the interpretation of the information gathered by the senses. Subjects studied in this course serve to demonstrate the relationship between basic physiological mechanisms and complex cognitive processes underlying thought. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. (PY 250 is strongly recommended.) 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) PY 270 Cognitive Psychology. This course examines how humans process (i.e., acquire, store and use) information. The course addresses such topic areas as perception, attention, memory, knowledge organization, language comprehension and production, problem-solving and creativity. Time is spent examining current theories, research techniques and the effect these theories have on important practical problems in society. Hands-on projects are used to explore theories in depth. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalents. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 275 Learning and Conditioning. This course is an introduction to the concepts of learning as reflected in major theories including classical, operant and social learning. This course examines how humans and animals seek and acquire information about their surroundings, make correlational or predictive inferences and express those inferences behaviorally. Prerequisites: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) PY 280Q Movies and Madness. This course explores the ways people with mental illnesses and psychological disorders as well as those who treat them have been presented in feature films. The course examines the issue of stigmatization and marginalization of people with mental illness as a social problem exacerbated by misleading and negative images presented in the mass media. The course will also provide basic information about psychological disorders, the mental health system and various treatment approaches. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2 and III, B.} (typically offered fall semester) PY 299 Special Topics in Psychology. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. PY 305 Abnormal Psychology. This course involves the study of the principle forms of mental disorders with emphasis on their origin, treatment, prevention and social significance. These disorders are related to the biological, psychological and cultural determinants of normal behavior. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 310 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. This course provides an overview of the major emotional, behavioral and developmental disorders of childhood. Emphasis is placed on identifying and examining factors that interfere with normal development. Various models of diagnosis, classification and therapeutic intervention are examined. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent; PY 215 recommended. Students who have taken or plan to take PY 218 are not permitted to take this course. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 315 Personal Growth and Adjustment. This course involves the application of psychological principles, theory and research to the process of living a more satisfying adult life. With emphasis both on prevention and correction, this course will help the student formulate personal guidelines to grow in a meaningful way. It will do this by focusing on important areas of living as adults and seeking to find satisfying ways of adjusting to problems frequently encountered in these areas. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 320 Industrial/Organizational Psychology. This course is an introduction to the principles, theories and techniques of I/O psychology. The main emphasis is on the application of psychological principles to solve problems, improve performance and increase satisfaction in work organizations. Topics covered will include personnel selection, performance appraisal, training, motivation and job satisfaction, organizational communication and job design. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 330 Drugs and Behavior. This course investigates the use of drugs as a tool in understanding the nature of brain-behavior relationships, the personal and social impact of psychoactive drugs, the importance of drugs to the treatment of behavior disorders and the nature of drug dependency. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. (PY 250 is strongly recommended.) 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 336 Animal Cognition. This course begins with an overview of the history of philosophical and scientific thought in relation to the debate about what kinds of mental abilities non-human animals have, if any. Past and current empirical research methodologies will be discussed as will findings regarding the existence and extent of self-awareness, memory, problem-solving and other cognitive processes in various species (including but not limited to birds, sea mammals, monkeys and apes). These findings will be discussed in terms of the research on human cognitive processes; however, the implications for the animals themselves will also be explored. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 345 Human Sexual Behavior. This course examines the developmental and experiential determinants of sexual behavior from a number of coordinate viewpoints: cross-species, cross-cultural and historical; genetic, hormonal, emotional and cognitive; gender identity, attitudes, orientation and intimacy. Prerequisites: PY 110 or equivalent preferred and junior or senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 350 Social Responsibility and Personal Well-Being. This is an experientially-based course that looks at the effect of service and other forms of helping behavior on one’s sense of well-being. This course will look at effective ways of providing service and will emphasize the personal impact of helping by providing opportunities for class members to participate in service projects. This generally involves a week-long Spring Break service project in a third world country. The importance of balancing self and other-directed behavior for personal and societal well-being will be addressed. By looking

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at both established service programs as well as the process of initiating a service project, it is hoped that the participant will realize several approaches for providing service and meeting the needs that exist within a community. Prerequisites: PY 110 or equivalent or SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) {GenEd: II,D,2.} PY 362 The Psychology of Humor. The study of humor crosses into multiple psychological domains, including the cognitive, neurological, developmental, social, and positive psychology. This course offer students the opportunity to explore each of these different aspects, and presents an overview of relevant past and current research in this growing field. Students will investigate historical and contemporary theoretical perspectives on humor, and how it is applied in different aspects of life. Prerequisite: PY 110 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 365 Introduction to Counseling. This is a course designed both to acquaint the student with the major approaches to individual counseling and to give the student some training in counseling. Characteristics of the counseling relationship, process and goals will be examined in some detail. There will be a strong experiential focus as a means of applying what is learned to actual situations. Prerequisites: PY 110 or equivalent; PY 225 and/or PY 305 are recommended, especially for majors. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 370 Forensic Psychology. This course is a survey of the field of forensic psychology. Forensic psychology involves the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. The following topics will be included in the course: defining forensic psychology; describing the profession of forensic psychology; the selection, training and evaluation of police officers; psychological techniques of criminal investigation; insanity and competency; dangerousness and risk assessment; eyewitness identification procedures; interrogations and confessions; sexual abuse and sexual harassment; and death penalty cases. Prerequisite: PY 110 or SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered every other year) PY 375 Applied Learning. This course is designed to examine the basic learning principles of classical conditioning, operant conditioning and observational learning with a special emphasis on applying what has been learned in class to personal, academic and professional situations. Students will engage in various activities to help them understand how basic learning principles explain much of human behavior. A major project in the course will be for students to train rats to perform various behaviors and then showcase their rats’ abilities in an event that will be open to the University community at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: PY 110. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 385 Psychology of Gender. The course will examine the issue of gender as it has been studied by psychologists. Topics will include: the nature and meaning of gender roles and gender stereotypes; research on gender similarities and differences with respect to cognitive, physical, personality and social functioning; how gender stereotypes and roles develop; the effects of gender stereotypes and roles on individuals, relationships and society; and alternatives to traditional gender stereotypes and roles. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 395 Introduction to Marriage and Family Therapy. Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) is a unique form of psychotherapy that focuses on relationships, interactional patterns, family dynamics, and mental health from a Family Systems perspective. This course is an introduction to the theory, practice, and research in the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Students will explore both foundational and contemporary theories and practice the ability of applying this knowledge to individual, couple, and family case studies. Also, this course offers an overview and critical analysis of current research, as well the opportunity for students to both observe and demonstrate methods of intervention. Prerequisite: PY 110 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 399 Special Topics in Psychology. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. PY 401 Senior Projects I. This course, along with PY 402 constitutes the Senior Culminating Experience in the psychology and cognitive and behavioral neuroscience majors. Students are required to design an independent research project and conduct an appropriate literature review. Students also will begin writing a detailed research report according to American Psychological Association guidelines. Prerequisite: PY 202. (Cannot be taken concurrently with PY 201 or 202.) 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered fall semester) PY 402 Senior Projects II. In this course, students will complete the research projects begun in PY 401 by collecting and analyzing empirical data and by finishing the written report and presenting the findings in a public forum. Prerequisite: PY 401. (Cannot be taken concurrently with PY 201 or 202.) 3 Sem. Hrs. (typically offered spring semester) PY 415 Psychology Seminar. This course will cover various topics pertaining to present-day psychological issues. These topics may include such things as the psychology of consciousness, animal behavior and creativity. Students may repeat for different topics. This course is primarily for psychology majors. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 Sem. Hrs. PY 420 Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience Proseminar. This course is a discussion-based proseminar intended to provide cognitive and behavioral neuroscience (CBN) majors with a broad exposure to current questions and experimental approaches in the neurosciences. Course themes will vary year to year. In general, the course material will present and illustrate current concepts, techniques and challenges in the cognitive and behavioral neurosciences. Prerequisites: This course is only open to junior or senior CBN majors. 1 Sem. Hr. (Repeatable) PY 455 History and Systems of Psychology. This course is a survey from Greek times to the 20th century. Many examples of great thinkers, key concepts and major trends are used to illustrate the stages in the evolution of modern psychology. Attention will be given to the sociocultural contexts in which this development has taken place. Prerequisite: PY 110 or equivalent. Junior or senior standing recommended. 3 Sem. Hrs. PY 485 Independent Study. This course involves an individual study of a special problem. Concentration may be on a research project or on a review of the literature in the problem area. Offered only upon request of the student who shows the interest and initiative and with permission of the instructor. Variable credit, 1-3 Sem. Hrs. PY 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. PY 499 Psychology Internship. This is an experience-based course in which the student spends a specified amount of time in a social service or psychology-related agency or institution in order to gain actual experience and understand possible applications of psychology to this setting. Supervision will be jointly provided by the cooperating agency and the psychology staff. Prerequisites: PY 365 and permission of the instructor. Variable credit, 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Public Health
The public health major is an interdisciplinary major where students complete a core set of classes in all five areas of public health: social and behavioral sciences, epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, and health services management and policy. Public health is an applied discipline

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so classes stress service-learning as a method of integrating course content with hands-on learning experiences. Students will develop problem-solving skills, communication and group work skills, and leadership skills as they progress through the major. Public health coursework will prepare students for careers in health departments, hospitals, wellness centers, and non-profit organizations as well as for a Master’s in Public Health graduate program.

Requirements for the Major in Public Health
Required Public Health Courses Semester Hours HP 101 Introduction to Public Health 3 HP 200 Epidemiology 3 HE 230 Substance Abuse Education and Prevention 3 HP 270 Program Planning and Evaluation 3 HE 340 Sexuality and Health 3 HP 300 Principles of Health Education and 3 Health Promotion HP 350 Global Health 3 HE 420 Disease, Illness and Death 3 HP 450 Community Assessment 3 HP 499 Internship 3 OR an elective from the approved list of electives Total Required Extra-Departmental Courses BA 365 SO 325 BI 105 BI 125 SO 100 MA 123 RE 290 PL 280 Total Optional Areas of Emphasis and Approved List of Electives Mental Health track SO 235 Stress and Illness PY 305 Abnormal Psychology PY 365 Introduction to Counseling Gerontology track PY 220 Adulthood and Aging SO 260 Social Gerontology HP 375 Seminar in Public Health Worksite track PY 320 ES 340 SO 390 Family track PY 219 SO 225 SO 310 Health Policy Analysis Grants and Planning Elements of Anatomy and Physiology The Environment: An Interdisciplinary Approach Introduction to Sociology Elementary Statistics Death and Dying or Bio-Medical Ethics 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 52 30

3 3 3

3 3 3

Industrial/Organizational Psychology Corporate and Worksite Wellness Organizational Sociology

3 3 3

Lifespan Development Family Violence American Family

3 3 3

Health Management and Policy track (requires minor in business administration) EC 310 Health Economics 3 BA 380 Health Care Finance 3 BA 390 Healthcare Management 3 BA 456 Human Resource Management 3

Requirements for the Minor in Public Health
Required Courses HP 101 HP 200 Introduction to Public Health Epidemiology Semester Hours 3 3

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HP 300

Principles of Health Education and Health Promotion HP 350 Global Health Plus two courses from the approved list of electives Total

3 3 6 18

Requirements for Honors in Public Health
Criteria for eligibility are stated under the Honors program beginning on page 35.

Public Health Course Descriptions
HP 101 Introduction to Public Health. This introductory public health course will include a historical perspective on public health, an introduction to epidemiological and biostatistical principles, determinants of health from a global perspective, an introduction to selected tools of disease control and health promotion, environmental-occupational, legal, and policy approaches as well as health communications, and issues of health care delivery addressed from a population perspective. This course will include a 5 hour service-learning project. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 200 Epidemiology. This course addresses basic epidemiological concepts such as the history and modern use of epidemiology, basic tools of epidemiological analysis and their applications, concepts of cause and effect, integration of statistical/epidemiological concepts into the concept of causal relationships, basic epidemiological study designs, etiology of disease and the efficacy and effectiveness of potential interventions, evidencebased recommendations, and application of epidemiological methods as well as analysis of public health problems such as outbreak investigations. Prerequisites: HP 101 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 270 Program Planning and Evaluation. Planning, implementing, and evaluating interventions are key skills for public health workers. Students will learn the process of public health programming including needs assessment, design, planning, implementation, and evaluation, as well as how to utilize public health planning models and theories. The course will also include an overview of effective public health interventions using the socio-ecologic framework (individual/behavioral/ environmental/social/community and policy) as a foundation to explore various levels of interventions. Prerequisites: HP 101, HP 200, evidence of CPR, First Aid, and AED certification, or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 300 Principles of Health Education and Health Promotion. This course provides students with a foundational understanding of the professional fields of health education and health promotion. Students will gain a greater understanding of the theories, elements, practices, and principles that contribute to health education and promotion activities. This course will assist students in understanding the interrelationships between physical, social, and cultural forces in the etiology of disease and the ensuing practices of public health and disease prevention. Students will be required to complete a minimum of two hours each week of a service-learning experience. Prerequisites: HP 101 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 350 Global Health. Global health issues will be discussed, and case studies and a class project will aid in understanding some basic information about health around the world. Discussion will involve the basic principles of global health, cross-cutting issues underlying health care delivery and population health services strategies and organization, the burden of morbidity and mortality, and approaches to global collaboration to address health issues. Prerequisites: HP 101 and HP 200, or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 375 Seminar in Public Health. This class involves an in-depth examination of current issues and topics in public health. The specific topics may vary, but the course may focus on current diseases (H1N1, etc.), target populations (women, children, or the elderly), or methods in public health (survey research or cognitive interviewing). The topic will be announced in advance. Prerequisites: HP 101, HP 200, or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. HP 450 Community Assessment. Students will become familiar with key historical underpinnings of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and principles of CBPR practice. Through fieldwork and course assignments, students apply theories and techniques of analysis to identify assets, problems, and opportunities of an urban community. Case studies and a variety of practice-related exercises serve as a basis for learner participation in real world public health problem-solving simulations. Teams of students will work with engaged stakeholders to interpret and prioritize assessment findings in order to suggest possible interventions. HP 450 is the SCE course for the public health major. Prerequisites: HP 101, BI 125, HP 200, HP 270, HP 300, and past/current enrollment in BA 365. 3 Sem Hrs. HP 499 Internship. See All-University 499 course descriptions on page 49.

Religious Studies
Religious studies introduce students to the nature and place of religion in human experience in both its individual and corporate dimensions. In wrestling with religion’s role in human life, one is dealing with a living expression of the struggle for human value and meaning. These expressions are examined in the scriptural, historical, theological and ethical traditions of the world’s religions. The religious studies major and minor are administered by the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies.

Requirements for the Major in Religious Studies
Required Courses RE 100 Religion and Human Experience RE 231 The Development of the Christian Tradition or RE 232Q The Development of the Christian Tradition RE 260 Religions of the World RE 400 Seminar in Religious Studies RE 420 Senior Seminar Two additional RE courses Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 3 6

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Any One from the Following Courses RE 201 Biblical Literature and Religion RE 300 Paul and Early Christianity RE 315 Encountering the Bible RE 320 Jesus and the Gospels Any One from the Following Courses RE 310Q Philosophy of Religion RE 321 Christian Social Ethics RE 350 Atheism Any One from the Following Courses RE 215 Native American Religious Traditions RE 220 African-American Religious Traditions RE 265 Islam: An Introduction Any One from the Following Courses RE 285Q Religion and Science RE 290 Death and Dying RE 390 Women and Religion Total

Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 33

Majors must complete the SCE in religious studies, which can be taken in conjunction with RE 400 or RE 420.

Requirements for the Minor in Religious Studies
Required Courses RE 100 Religion and Human Experience RE 260 Religions of the World Two additional RE courses One additional RE course at the 300-level or above Any One from the Following Courses RE 231 The Development of the Christian Tradition RE 232Q The Development of the Christian Tradition RE 300 Paul and Early Christianity RE 320 Jesus and the Gospels RE 321 Christian Social Ethics Total Semester Hours 3 3 6 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 18

Requirements for the Pre-Ministry Concentration
A pre-ministry concentration may be completed in conjunction with any major. Required Courses RE 231 The Development of the Christian Tradition RE 232Q The Development of the Christian Tradition RE 499 Internship in Religion (at least 3 hours) Any Two from the Following Courses RE 201 Biblical Literature and Religion RE 300 Paul and Early Christianity RE 315 Encountering the Bible RE 320 Jesus and the Gospels Any One from the Following Courses RE 310Q Philosophy of Religion RE 321 Christian Social Ethics RE 350 Atheism Total Semester Hours 3 3 1-15 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 Semester Hours 3 3 3 18

Requirements for Honors in Religious Studies
Criteria for eligibility are stated under Honors Program on page 35.

Course Descriptions

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RE 100 Religion and Human Experience. An examination of basic elements common to various religious traditions. The purpose of the course is to develop in the student a heightened awareness of the significance of religion in human life and culture. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: I,C.} RE 199 Special Topics in Religion. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. RE 201 Biblical Literature and Religion. An introduction to the literature and religion of Hebrew Scripture and the New Testament for the purpose of understanding the origins, message and relevance of Biblical Judaism and Christianity. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 215 Native American Religious Traditions. This course focuses on the larger North American continent and into Meso America. Using cultural-historical method, the course emphasizes the changes and continuities in native religious ideas and practices over time. The relationship between native people and Christianity is a major sub-theme of the course. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 or II,D,2} RE 220 African-American Religious Traditions. This course surveys major African-American religious traditions. This course presents overviews and analysis of African-American religious traditions from its African roots through the 18th century to the present. It also examines the context out of which the religious traditions developed in the Americas including North America, South America and the Caribbean. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and II,D,2} RE 231 The Development of the Christian Tradition. The history of Christian thought and practice up to the Reformation. Primary focus will be on the Latin West, but attention also will be given to Eastern Orthodoxy. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 232Q The Development of the Christian Tradition. The history of Christian thought and practice from the Reformation to the present. Particular emphasis will be given to the rise of modernity and questions of religion, philosophy and sociopolitical change. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GedEd: II,C and III,B.} RE 240 Buddhism in Film. This course is an introductory course to Buddhism. This course seeks to explore the basic concepts of Buddhism as they are presented in film. The course will examine the Buddhist concepts of karma, impermanence, Nirvana, enlightenment, desire as the cause of suffering, five aggregates and no self. The course will explore these ideas and more through the characters and situations as they have arisen in various films. The course will also delve into the history of Buddhism as a religious phenomenon and briefly examine the life of the Buddha. Prerequisite: RE 100 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 260 Religions of the World. An introductory study of the history, thought and practice of some of the major religions of the world. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 or II,D,2.} RE 265 Islam: An Introduction. This course will examine the basic tenets and beliefs of Islam and sketch a brief history of this very large and important religion. The course will examine the life of the prophet Muhammad, the role Muhammad played in the development of Islam, the role of women in Islam and the importance of the Qur’an. The course will also examine how Islam has interpreted the lives of Jesus and the Hebrew prophets and the relationship that exists between Islam and the other Semitic religions. The student will also have the opportunity to visit a Mosque. The class will also take brief excursions into the Qur’an, hadiths and the Sharia. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {Gen Ed: II,C,2} RE 285Q Religion and Science. This course surveys contemporary discussion on what it means to be religious in an age dominated by science and technology as well as what it means to be a scientist in an age still strongly influenced by religious beliefs and values. Themes treated in the course include, but are not limited to evolution vs. creationism, big bang vs. cosmic design, the consciousness debate, cloning, mediation and the brain, ESP, telekinesis, chaos theory and spiritual healing. Prerequisites: RE 100 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and III, B.} RE 290 Death and Dying. The first half of the course surveys ideas about death and dying found in both Western and Eastern religions and philosophies. The second half is devoted to such practical and ethical issues as the funeral industry, suicide, grief, living wills, terminal care and “neardeath experiences, and will include several panel discussions hosted by local professionals. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on ways in which the inevitability of death encourages us to live more fully and meaningfully. Prerequisite: RE 100 or PL 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 299 Special Topics in Religious Studies. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. RE 300 Paul and Early Christianity. A study of the writings and theology of Paul and the schools of thought that followed him. The writings of Paul and his followers, the Gospel of John and the Johannine letters, the Petrine letters, Hebrews and other writings in the New Testament will be examined with special emphasis on the role these traditions played in the life and thought of the early church. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, C, 2.} RE 310Q Philosophy of Religion. The course examines standard attempts to establish the rationality of belief in God and the challenges raised to those attempts by the evil in the world. Also to be considered are issues such as what God is like and how God is related to our lives and the limitations of this world. Cross-listed as PL 310Q. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2 and III,B.} RE 315 Encountering the Bible. A close study of a select group of texts from the Bible, focusing on Hebrew Bible/Old Testament (in English). The course will employ several interpretive approaches including historical, literary, feminist and third-world perspectives. Topics will vary and may include Pentateuch, Deuteronomistic History, Prophets, and Wisdom literature. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2} RE 320 Jesus and the Gospels. An investigation into the life, ministry and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as understood by the writers of the Gospels and historical research. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 321 Christian Social Ethics. An introduction to Christian ethics which stresses its social dimensions and addresses such issues as politics, human sexuality, economics and environmental problems. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. RE 350 Atheism. This course looks first at historical arguments against the existence of God [e.g. Nietzsche, Marx, Freud, Russell], along with their refutations, and then proceeds to the writings of contemporary atheists. It also will study the challenges to traditional theism posed by evolution theory, cosmology and biblical criticism. Prerequisite: RE 100 or permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,2.} RE 390 Women and Religion. An introduction to the religious lives, experiences and insights of women as to the role, function and nature of religion in contemporary society. The course deals with a variety of issues and topics from theology, history and ethics to cross-cultural analysis and the challenges which the experience of women pose for the doing of theology and an understanding of institutional religious life. Prerequisite: RE 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. RE 399 RE 400 Special Topics in Religion. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. Seminar in Religious Studies. Critical study and research of a selected topic in one of the following areas: Bible, theology or world

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religions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. RE 410 Independent Study. Advanced research in religion. Primarily for departmental majors at the junior or senior level. Students may repeat for different topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. RE 420 Senior Seminar. The Senior Seminar serves as the Senior Culminating Experience for majors. The course comprises both an independent research project and an in-class seminar. The research project will demonstrate the student’s ability to complete a study that is both comprehensive and integrative in nature. In the seminar, students will meet weekly under the guidance of a professor to discuss their ongoing research. Students are required to present their projects to the department in the spring semester. Prerequisite: senior standing in the major or by approval of the department. 3 Sem. Hrs. RE 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. RE 499 Internship in Religion. Field experience for senior students in churches, church agencies or other social institutions approved by the department chair. The internship can provide a variety of pre-professional work experiences, e.g., parish administration, radio ministry, institutional chaplaincy, etc. Written application should be made to the internship coordinator (department chair) during the first two weeks of the semester which precedes the internship. Grading: S/U. Prerequisites: Senior standing; substantial background in religious studies, including Religion 100, three 200level and three 300-level courses in religion, excluding Religion 260 and Religion 370; and permission of the department chair. 1-15 Sem. Hrs.

Reserve Officer Training Corps – Department of Military Science
Mount Union offers, in cooperation with Kent State University, Reserve Officer Training Programs for the Air Force (AF) and the Army (MS). Army ROTC courses for freshmen and sophomores are taught at Mount Union. The juniors and seniors attend class at Kent State. Air Force classes are all held at Kent State. ROTC courses fulfill elective requirements for graduation from Mount Union and leads to a minor in leadership. The minor is available to both fouryear ROTC students and for those that do not want to contine with the senior ROTC program in the junior and senior years. Students may register for these courses during regular registration periods. Information about courses is available from the Office of the Registrar and information about scholarships is available from the Office of Student Financial Services.

Course Descriptions for Aerospace Studies
AF 101 The Foundations of the United States Air Force I. Explore the doctrine, organization and mission of the U.S. Air Force and its major commands. Review the organization of the U.S.A.F. 1 Sem. Hr. AF 102 The Foundations of the United States Air Force II. Overview of U.S. General Purpose Military Forces, special attention to limited war. Survey of U.S. Air Force’s research and development, procurement, logistics, airlift, educational and training programs. 1 Sem. Hr. AF 103/104 Leadership Laboratory. An instructional program that prepares an individual to undertake the broad range of technical tasks associated with military leadership and defense management. Each 1 Sem. Hr. AF 201 Evolution of United States Airforce I. The beginning of manned flight; development of air power from Kitty Hawk through World War II and the concepts governing air power during this period. 1 Sem. Hr. AF 202 Evolution of United States Airforce II. Development of air power from the Berlin Airlift through Vietnam and the concepts governing the employment of air power during this period. 1 Sem. Hr. AF 203/204 Leadership Laboratory. An instructional program that prepares an individual to undertake the broad range of technical tasks associated with military leadership and defense management. Each 1 Sem. Hr. AF 205 Leadership Evaluation I. Leadership Evaluation will develop self-discipline as related to military conduct and measure the effectiveness of the person’s capability to interact in a leadership role during field training. Prerequisites: AF 101, AF 102, AF 201 and AF 202. 2 Sem. Hrs. AF 206 Leadership Evaluation II. Prerequisite: Permission. 4 Sem. Hrs. AF 301 Leadership Studies I. This class will focus on the development of communicative skills, human and group motivation as well as management principles, theory, functions, tools, practices and controls, decision theory and problem solving techniques. Prerequisite: Permission. 3 Sem. Hrs. AF 302 Leadership Studies II. Managerial fundamentals, coordinating, directing and controlling will be the primary topics of this course. Students also will explore leadership theory, functions and practices and well as management realities and communicative skills development. 3 Sem. Hrs. AF 303/304 Leadership Laboratory. An instructional program that prepares an individual to undertake the broad range of technical tasks associated with military leadership and defense management. Each 1 Sem. Hr. AF 392 Leadership Practicum I. The Leadership Practicum will place a student directly into a leadership position for a 12 to 18 day period to make decisions on Air Force management. Prerequisites: AF 301, AF 302, AF 303 and AF 304. 1-4 Sem. Hrs. AF 401 Defense Studies /Prep. for Active Duty I. This course will explore professional ethics, personal responsibilities of military leaders, civilmilitary relations, socialization process with the armed forces and military law and justice systems. Prerequisite: Permission. 3 Sem. Hrs. AF 402 Defense Studies /Prep. for Active Duty II. Political, economic and social constraints upon national security/defense structure will be covered in this course, as will the determinants of national security policy. Prerequisite: Permission. 3 Sem. Hrs. AF 403/404 Leadership Laboratory. This is an instructional program that prepares an individual to undertake the broad range of technical tasks associated with military leadership and defense management. Each 1 Sem. Hr. AF 405 Aerospace Ground School. This course is provided to those cadets who have been identified for duty as Air Force Pilots and who do not have a fixed-wing pilot’s license. This course must be taken the semester prior to entering the 13 hours of flight instruction. Prerequisite: Permission. 0 Sem. Hrs.

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Course Descriptions for Military Science
MS 180 Leadership and Adventure Training. An introduction to the Army, the principles of leadership in the military and society in general. Develops skills in time management, problem-solving and creative thinking. Additionally, offers practical application of these skills in adventure classes of rappelling, orienteering and marksmanship. Corequisite: MS 190. 1 Sem. Hr. MS 185 Development of Leadership and Self Development. A development of individual leadership and its application in small groups situations. Examines leadership traits, professional ethics and leadership styles. In-class exercises reinforce material presented. Corequisite: MS 190. 1 Sem. Hr. MS 190 Leadership Seminar I. Hands-on instructional program preparing individual cadets to practice leadership fundamentals learned in seminar classes while engaging in military training. Decision-making roles of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs are stressed. Corequisites: MS 180, MS 185. 0 Sem. Hrs. MS 280 Leadership in Small Groups I. Study of the theoretical and practical leadership dimensions. Students will examine several aspects of communication and leadership concepts, emphasizing class participation and intellectual curiosity. Upon completion, students will be grounded in fundamental leadership principles and will be better prepared to apply such principles to a wide variety of life experiences. Corequisite: MS 290. 2 Sem. Hrs. MS 285 Leadership in Small Groups II. Continuing the development of the leadership dimensions, students examine the application of leadership in military settings. The theoretical study of decision-making in military situations is studied and compared to historical examples over the last few decades. Corequisite: MS 290. 2 Sem. Hrs. MS 290 Leadership Seminar II. Hands-on instructional program preparing individual cadets to practice leadership fundamentals learned in seminar classes while engaging in military training. The decision-making roles of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs are stressed. Corequisites: MS 283, MS 285. 0 Sem. Hrs. MS 360 Leadership of Groups/Teams I. Develops managerial skills with emphasis on group dynamics, leadership theory and practical leadership experiences. Integrates communications skills, decision-making and group motivation through assumption of leadership positions and evaluations. Prerequisite: Permission; Corequisite: MS 390. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 365 Survey of American Military History. Traces North American military history, theory, doctrine, strategy and tactics from preRevolutionary period to the present. Prerequisites: MS 280, MS 285 and MS 290. 2 Sem. Hrs. MS 370 Leadership of Groups/Teams II. Application of management fundamentals, decision theory and leadership principles in varied organizational leadership positions. Emphasis is placed on coordinating, directing and controlling organizations. Prerequisite: Permission; Corequisite: MS 390. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 390 Leadership Seminar III. Hands-on instructional program preparing individuals to undertake a wide range of tasks associated with the leadership of small organizations. Stress is on decision-making of leaders in planning and executing organizational programs in practical situations on campus and in field environments. Corequisites: MS 360, MS 370. 0 Sem. Hrs. MS 460 Officership and the Profession of Arms. Professional ethics and the responsibilities of military leaders in our society will be developed . Development of interpersonal and managerial communicative skills will be stressed as it relates to successful leadership. Prerequisite: Permission; Corequisite: MS 490. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 470 Transition to Lieutenant. An intensive review of management and study of military law for professional military officers. The military justice system and the management of personnel resources will be examined. Prerequisite: Permission; Corequisite: MS 490. 3 Sem. Hrs. MS 490 Leadership Seminar IV. Practical leadership program where students plan, execute and evaluate training of ROTC cadets in preparation for the broad range of tasks associated with officership. Prerequisite: Permission and senior standing. 0 Sem. Hrs.

Department of Sociology
The Department of Sociology seeks to provide a program grounded in the liberal arts tradition of Mount Union through which students can master the basic skills necessary to scientifically study human social behavior. Departmental courses are designed to enhance students’ understanding of their cultural heritage, become sensitive to international and intercultural issues, and understand and appreciate the interrelationships among the humanities, arts and physical and social sciences so that they may make informed value commitments. To these ends, the department provides a wellqualified, professionally oriented faculty and encourages close student faculty relationships.

Requirements for the Major in Sociology
Required Courses SO 100 Introduction to Sociology SO 300 Statistics for Social Scientists SO 305 Research Design and Methodology SO 395 Sociological Theory SO 420 Data Analysis in Social Science SO 490W Senior Practicum 17 additional SO semester hours Total Semester Hours 3 3 3 3 3 4 17 36

General Information for All Department Students
Students may not count more than 48 semester hours in sociology toward graduation. There is no language requirement – other than the General Education Requirement in foreign language proficiency – for the sociology major.

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However, students are strongly encouraged to determine whether the election of a foreign language or computer language would be advisable in light of the type of career planned.

Requirements for the Minor in Sociology
Required Courses Semester Hours SO 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 No more than six additional hours at the 100 or 200 level 6 At least six hours at the 300 or 400 level 6 Total 15

The following tracks in Sociology cover the core problems that all human societies must struggle with: Human homogeneity and heterogeneity (Diversity), social norms, their violation, and social control (Deviance), the core social institution in all societies (Family), helping the disadvantaged through informed social action (Sociology in Practice).

Requirements for the Concentrations In Sociology
An area of concentration will not be required to complete the major in sociology. A student may choose more than one area of concentration. The concentrations are available only to sociology majors. Diversity SO 150 SO 320 SO 330 SO 384Q Deviance SO 205 SO 280 SO 315 SO 350Q SO 380 Family SO 225 SO 240 SO 260 SO 310 Semester Hours 3 3 3 3

Intro to Anthropology Sociology of Gender Minority Group Relations Intercultural Communication Choose 12 semester hours from the following Juvenile Delinquency Criminology Corrections Crime, Society, & Instituiton of Law Deviance

3 3 3 3 3

Family Violence Courtship and Marriage Social Gerontology American Family

3 3 3 3

Sociology in Practice SO 130 Introduction to Social Services SO 200 Contemporary Social Issues SO 325 Grants and Planning SO 390 Sociology of Organizations

3 3 3 3

Requirements for Honors in Sociology
Students seeking honors in sociology or credit in sociology for general honors should consult the description of these Honors Programs on page 35 of the Catalogue for prerequisites, course requirements and application procedures.

Course Descriptions
SO 100 Introduction to Sociology. A survey of the basic concepts, methods and principles used in the scientific study of human interaction. Emphasis is on such distinctively sociological concepts as socialization, social stratification, social organization, minority groups, deviant behavior and social change. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,C,3,b.} SO 130 Hrs. Introduction to Social Services. A study of contemporary social service organization and practice in private and public agencies. 3 Sem.

SO 150 Introduction to Anthropology. A study of variations among prehistoric and contemporary human groups in terms of their ways of life. Some consideration of biological variation will be included. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} SO 199 Special Topics. See All-University 199 course description on page 49. SO 200 Contemporary Social Issues. A study of the major social issues in American society. Among the issues considered are aging, the environment, terrorism, family violence, gender roles and minority group relations. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 205 Juvenile Delinquency. The course is an overview of the theoretical models that explain delinquency. The emphasis will be on how these theoretical models relate to our social institutions and to juvenile corrections. Prerequisite: SO 100 or CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 225 Family Violence. An examination of family violence from sociological, legal and medical perspectives. Considers major issues related to family violence including types, predictors and consequences. Also evaluates the strategies that are used by professionals to study, detect, intervene, treat and prevent family violence. 3 Sem. Hrs.

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SO 230 American Society. An application of sociological concepts to the understanding of contemporary American society. Particular emphasis is placed upon the operation of and interrelationships between the economic and political institutions. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 235 Stress and Wellbeing. An examination of how the social environment affects health. Investigates stress processes that are rooted in social structures including race, class, gender, age, work and family. Examines how such characteristics and conditions help explain the unequal distribution of health. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 240 Courtship and Marriage. An examination of sex and gender role development, social interaction and social institutions as they relate to dating, mate selection and singleness as well as traditional and nontraditional marriage forms. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 260 Social Gerontology. An introduction to the process of human aging with particular emphasis on their social and social psychological aspects. Included in the course are examinations of the processes of aging, problems of the aged and demographic characteristics of the aged. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 280 Criminology. A survey of the major theories of crime causation and a social scientific examination of various types of crime, criminals and criminal behavior. Prerequisite: SO 100 or CJ 105. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 299 Special Topics in Sociology. See All-University 299 course description on page 49. SO 300 Statistics for Social Scientists. A study of basic statistical procedures necessary for understanding the design and analysis of social science research with emphasis on interpretation of quantitative data. Prerequisite: SO 100 and SO 305. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 305 Research Design and Methodology. A survey of the methods and techniques of sociological research. Attention is given to instrument construction, research design, qualitative and quantitative analysis by proposing and working through an original research problem. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 310 American Family. Both an historical and contemporary examination of the family system in America from marriage through death or divorce. Includes discussions about marital commitment, adjustment, satisfaction and sexuality as well as child rearing, family violence and abuse. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 315 Corrections. An introduction to the area of adult corrections in criminal justice. The major focus of this course is the history and purpose of correctional philosophy as well as an overview of correctional institutions. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 320 Sociology of Gender. A study of the cultural norms and social roles which govern the relationships between men and women in contemporary American society. The course examines the origin of masculine and feminine gender roles, the nature of sexism, and the changing roles of men and women in families, occupations, politics and religion. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 325 Grants and Planning. This course introduces students to the professional skills required of social scientists working in applied settings. In particular, the course emphasizes the development of both theoretical and practical knowledge associated with grant writing, strategic planning and other philanthropic-related skills required of social scientists working in both non-profit and for-profit organizations. Prerequisites: SO 100 or PY 110 and junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 330 Minority Group Relations. An examination of the social and structural relationships between racial, ethnic, religious, sexual and other stigmatized groups and the dominant society in America. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II,D,2.} SO 350Q Crime, Society and Institutions of Law. This course will focus on topics in criminology, sociology of law and law. The textbook, lectures and in-class activities will provide insights into the theoretical and practical aspects of law and society, focusing on law and criminal justice and their relationship to social control, dispute resolution, social change and the influence of the media. Prerequisites: PS 105 and SO 100. Cross-listed as CJ 350Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: III,B} SO 380 Deviance. Emphasis is upon examination of the major theoretical explanations of deviant behavior and the empirical evidence supporting these perspectives. Prerequisite: SO 100. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 384Q Diversity: Intercultural Communication. A study of human communication across cultures focusing on the variables that influence interaction when members of different cultures come together. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above or permission of the instructor. Crosslisted with CM 384Q. 3 Sem. Hrs. {GenEd: II, D, 2 and III, B} SO 390 Sociology of Organizations. An examination of bureaucracy, decision making, communication, leadership, power relations and the environmental context for both business and service organizations. Prerequisites: SO 100 and junior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 395 Sociological Theory. A study of sociological theory from Comte to the present with emphasis upon the major schools of sociological theory and the main contributions of outstanding sociologists. SO 395 is a prerequisite or corequisite of SO 480 for sociology majors. Prerequisites: SO 100 and junior or senior standing. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 399 Special Topics. See All-University 399 course description on page 49. SO 405 Independent Study. A study of selected topics in sociology with emphasis on individual research and systematic reporting. Offered upon demand and with permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: SO 100, SO 300 and SO 305. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 420 Data Analysis in Social Science. Data entry and retrieval, statistical analysis, interpretation of the statistical output and preparation for the presentation of the research findings and utilizing the computer as a research tool. Prerequisites: SO 100 and SO 300 or permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 450 Seminar in Sociology. An advanced seminar in selected topics in sociology such as medical sociology, sociology of work and occupations, sociology of law, penology and social stratification. Seminars are designed primarily for junior and senior sociology majors and minors. Emphasis is placed on the presentation, discussion and reporting of theories and research findings relevant to the topic under study. The topic will be announced in advance. Students may repeat the course for credit when a different topic is covered. Prerequisites: SO 100, junior or senior standing and permission of the instructor. 3 Sem. Hrs. SO 490W Senior Practicum. The Senior Practicum is the SCE requirement for a major in sociology. This course will involve an applied experience, which is an on-site placement in a profit or non-profit organization. The applied experience will be the basis for a thesis which will analyze the applied experience by incorporating theory, methods, and knowledge gained from previously-taken sociology classes. In addition, the practicum

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will include class meetings covering topics related to the applied experience and career paths for majors in sociology. Prerequisites: SO 100, SO 300, SO 305, SO 395, and SO 420. 4 Sem. Hrs. SO 494 Honors Thesis/Project. See All-University 494 course description on page 49. SO 499 Field Work Internship. Sociology majors are placed in appropriate profit or non-profit organizations. Supervision is provided by both the sociology faculty, who will conduct at least one onsite visit, and the host organization, which will provide a written evaluation of student performance. Students will be assigned appropriate readings and written assignments, including a daily journal, as part of a weekly seminar. Prerequisites: senior sociology major, minimum 2.0 GPA, and permission of the sociology faculty. 3, 6, 9, 12, or 15 Sem. Hrs.

Sport Business
Requirements for the Major in Sport Business
The sport business major is designed for students interested in joining the growing field of sport managers, directors, promoters, marketers and administrators. A demand for well-trained individuals in sport related fields creates possible employment with professional sport teams, colleges and universities, private clubs, government agencies, city recreation departments and the Y.M.C.A. Required Sport Business Courses Semester Hours SB 110 History, Philosophy and Ethics of Sport and Recreation 3 SB 220 Program Management 3 SB 240 Sports Public Relations 3 SB 325 Areas and Facilities for Physical Education, 3 Recreation and Athletics SB 360 Legal Issues in Sport 3 SB 410 Financing Sport and Recreation 3 SB 425W Sales and Marketing of Sport 3 SB 450Q International Sport Business and Administration 3 SB 452 Individual Direct Experience: Recreation 2 SB 453 Individual Direct Experience: Athletic Adm