You are on page 1of 30

Minex 5

Getting Started TRAINING TUTORIAL

Surpac Minex Group Pty. Ltd. P O Box 129 3 Albert Street Mittagong NSW 2575 Tel: 02 4872 6000 | Fax: 02 4872 6050 Support: 02 4872 6003 Minexhelp@surpac.com http://www.surpacMinex.com

Version 5.1B July 2005

Table of Contents Chapter 1 Introduction ..................................................................................................2 Chapter 2 Overview - Mine Planning with Minex........................................................3
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 The iterative mine planning process............................................................................3 Gridded model.............................................................................................................4 Triangulations..............................................................................................................4 Geometry data ............................................................................................................4 Geological models.......................................................................................................4 Introduction .................................................................................................................5 Requirements..............................................................................................................5 Objectives ...................................................................................................................5 Starting Minex5 ...........................................................................................................6 Create a project ......................................................................................................7 Geometry data display ..........................................................................................12 Setting the local origin...........................................................................................17 Displaying triangles basics.................................................................................19 Displaying grids basics.......................................................................................21 Object control panel ..............................................................................................22 Zooming, panning and navigation .........................................................................22 Graphics functions ................................................................................................25 Summary ..............................................................................................................29

Chapter 2 Getting Started Tutorial.................................................................................5

Chapter 1 Introduction
This is an orientation session on Minex 5 computerized mine planning software. It is designed to provide you with an extensive overview of what you can expect mine planning software to provide for you, and specifically what can be accomplished using the Minex 5. This orientation session is geared at all levels of personnel within the company. It is the collective objective of the Surpac Minex Group to have a wide range of personnel use Minex 5 so as to promote the engineering use of Minex Software throughout the organization at all levels.

Chapter 2 Overview - Mine Planning with Minex


Overview - mine planning with Minex

Getting started tutorial

Gridding Tutorial

Triangles tutorial

Geometry data tutorial

Plans and sections Tutorial

Seam Modelling

Drill and blast

Earth Works tutorial

Spoil Regrade

The steps involved in computerized mine planning are not very much different from the steps involved in manual mine planning. The ultimate objective in mine planning is to determine the net worth or net present value (NPV) of the mineral reserve. In order to do this, you must first build two models: A geological model, and an engineering model. The geological model defines the mineral resource, as it exists in the ground. The engineering model defines that portion of the mining resource, which can be economically mined. Within either of these processes Minex allows for Pit Optimisation and the application of Maximiser NPV software to fully evaluate the mineable resource. In order to build the geological model, you must first collect all the raw data and other information necessary to do your analysis. Second, you decide which portion of that data is reliable enough to use in your evaluation. Third, you construct a geological model, which is your interpretation of the configuration, amount and quality of the resource you believe to be present in the ground.

1.1 The iterative mine planning process


The first step in building the engineering model is to determine which layers of the geological model you will mine. Layers can include such things as overburden, interburden, coal seams, etc. The second step is to select a mining method and place a mine design for this method on the engineering model in the location you believe is best to make a mine. Third, you select equipment, which you believe will cost-effectively mine the area. Fourth, you schedule the

equipment through the design over the life of the mine. Fifth, you run financial analyses and see if the rate of return is acceptable. If it isn't, you begin the process again using different designs, schedules, equipment selections and possibly even a different model to see if there is a better method that brings a higher return on investment while most completely recovering the resource. Because the process of mine planning is iterative, generally requiring constant re-examination due to changing mine design, equipment selections, schedules and constantly changing economics, computerized mine planning is essential to speed up the process of constant reevaluation.

1.2 Gridded model


Minex models ore-bodies using grids. A grid is a surface that has been created that represents a geological interface, such as a seam floor or roof, or a geological quality such as ash or sulphur or any other variable that changes over the x,y plane. User defined quality grids are assigned to geological grids during modelling generating reserves in a much more data efficient (faster) manner than block modelling.

1.3 Triangulations
Triangulations are surfaces that are created by joining adjacent survey points together in a series of triangles. Surveyors upload point data daily and maintain a pit triangle that can be used by other people at the mine site. Triangulations are helpful in quickly determining surfaces, from which engineers can design on current pit data.

1.4 Geometry data


Geometry data is information relating to the location of points of interest. This data incorporates all strings and points. These points could be imported GPS data, design lines, boundaries etc. This data is stored in a geometry file in a hierarchical filter to organise data into their respective groups. This data can be triangulated to form a surface from which volume calculations can be undertaken.

1.5 Geological models


There are various geological models that get stored in different file locations. These are merge, cut and uncut. The uncut model projects the coal seam through the topography, the cut model either cuts the seam off on topography or on base of weathering and the merged model merges the topography with the coal seam in order to calculate volumes. It is important to know which model you are working with or some calculations can be meaningless. Let us begin our orientation on computerized mine planning using Minex 5 by looking at the basics.

Chapter 2 Getting Started Tutorial


Introduction to mine planning with Minex

Getting started tutorial

Gridding tutorial

Triangles tutorial

Geometry data tutorial

Plans and sections tutorial

Seam Modelling

Drill and blast

Earth Works tutorial

Spoil Regrade

1.6 Introduction
This tutorial is aimed at first time users who need an orientation of Minex before getting into the more technical facets of the software. It focuses on users setting up projects and displaying and navigating their way through data. Once this tutorial has been completed the user will be able to undertake the three data manipulation tutorials that follow.

1.7 Requirements
The user must have Minex installed and set-up on their computer with the tutorial data provided on the install disk.

1.8 Objectives The user should be able to:


Set-up a project Set the local origin Display strings Display grids Display triangles

Starting Minex 5.1 Manipulate the graphics window using the object control panel Navigate their way through the data Manipulate the way data is viewed through graphics functions Use the dynamic clipping function

1.9 Starting Minex5


If you have successfully installed Minex 5 on your system you should have a Minex 5 Icon displayed on your Desktop. Double Click on the icon to start Minex 5.

Minex 5 will start displaying the splash screen shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Minex 5 splash screen


This Icon displays the current Minex 5 version you are running and finishes by opening the Standard Minex 5 Graphical User Interface (GUI) as shown below in Figure 2.

The Minex 5.1 GUI

Menu Bar Toolbars Action Panel Status Bar

Graphics Window Tabs Click here to Expand OR Collapse Project

Minex Explorer Window

Minex Graphics Windows

Figure 2: Minex 5 Graphical User Interface (GUI)


Users are able to customize the Menu to suit their respective preference and this selection is used in subsequent sessions. Note the Project Explorer on the Left Hand Side and hover help as you pass the mouse over the various options. The Explorer is used extensively during the Tutorial process. The procedure of highlighting a file and using Right Hand Mouse (RH Mouse) Contextual Options demonstrates the ease of use and simple action operations of Minex 5.

1.10

Create a project

A Minex 5 project consists of a folder that contains all relevant files for a particular project. It is necessary to map to this folder to increase the efficiency at which the user can access relevant files. In order for Minex to start in a particular project we must first set the projects directory. In this case the projects directory will be the Tutorial Data Set. The Project Manager is activated from the File Menu Option as shown below in Figure 3. Open the File Menu and use the LH Mouse to display the additional Contextual Option to the right of the Project option.

Creating a Project in Minex 5.1

Figure 3: Minex 5 project manager path


Once you have accessed the project explorer shown in Figure 4 select new to create a new project.

Creating a Project in Minex 5.1

Figure 4: Project explorer


After selecting the New button you will be prompted to enter the name of your Project in the field as shown below in Figure 5. Simply type in the name and click OK Note this input field is in overtype mode as shown by the darkening of the existing text, so simply type over the existing text

Figure 5: Name the project directory


Congratulations, you have successfully created your fist Minex Project Area. To finalise the Project Set-up we will link this project name to an actual directory on your system. To link this project name to your tutorial data area, return to the Minex explorer and browse through using the explorer key symbol to open the directories and highlight your tutorial directory. If you have downloaded the Minex tutorial data with the Minex5 software installation and is located in the directory then the path to this folder is:

C:\Minex5\etc\Tutorials\Getting_Started_with_Minex5
If you have down loaded the tutorial data sets to a different location, use the Minex explorer to locate this directory and highlight the directory as shown in Figure 6.

Creating a Project in Minex 5.1

Figure 6: Highlighting the project directory


Once at this stage you can either right click on the highlighted folder and select set project directory or go back to the project option under the file menu, shown in Figure 3, and select set project directory. This procedure can be repeated to set up any number of projects. The project tab in the explorer window will now be given your project name and will contain all files from the prescribed directory as shown in Figure 7.

10

Creating a Project in Minex 5.1

Figure 7: Project tab in the explorer window


You have now set up a project and linked it to a directory. You are ready to start displaying and using data

11

Displaying Geometry Data

1.11

Geometry data display

In order for Minex to operate in real world co-ordinates it is necessary to input co-ordinates that are close to the projects area to maximise precision. This concept will be described in detail when you set the projects local origin in section 3.4. In order to know where data is in the directory it is necessary to first plot some data and secondly, query that data to find out where it resides in real world co-ordinates. The first step to display data is to open the geometry file from the explorer window. Its called MAP.GM3 and is represented by the symbol. A red tick will appear beside the file to indicate that it is open as the primary geometry file as shown in Figure 8. This file can now be viewed and edited. Secondary geometry files can be open and are represented by blue ticks. Secondary geometry files can be viewed but not edited. Open Title.GM3 as a secondary geometry file by right clicking and selecting open as secondary.

Figure 8: Opening the geometry file

12

Displaying Geometry Data Now go to the plot geometry data dialogue window accessed from the shortcut menu shown in Figure 9 or the string menu shown in Figure 10 or using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl D. In the first two cases it is represented by the symbol.

Figure 9: Plot geometry data shortcut

Figure 10: Plot geometry data from menu


The plot geometry data dialogue window will appear shown in Figure 11. It is now necessary to select the locations of the strings you wish to display. The geometry file is organised through a hierarchical data filter. Groups represent the highest form of data. Contained within individual groups are a series of maps. Contained within individual maps is a series of idents that contain classes. The user can plot and edit individual classes or they can choose to operate on a higher level and edit and plot a group that contains its respective classes and so forth.

Figure 11: Plot geometry data dialogue window

13

Displaying Geometry Data Select the field labelled data type and select structure from the drop down menu. Secondly put your curser in the field called map and select the Map button (located underneath the input fields). A list of potential maps will be displayed as shown in Figure 12.

Figure 12: Maps contained in MAP.GM3


Select SURVEY and then click ok. Select the F button on the plot geometry data dialogue window. Geometry data will be displayed immediately in your graphics window as shown in Figure 13.

14

Displaying Geometry Data

Figure 13: Survey geometry data from MAP.GM3


You have now plotted your first data into the Minex graphics window. It is now necessary to determine the projects real world co-ordinates. Select the graphics query button located in the short-cut bar, and under the graphics menu represented by the symbol. Alternatively you can use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl Q. Select the snap-to-line mode shown in Figure 14 and click on a line.

15

Displaying Geometry Data

Figure 14: Snap to line digitise mode


Once you have selected a line you will notice the output window open in the bottom of the graphics screen with information on the point you have selected shown in Figure 15.

Figure 15: Output window giving x,y and z co-ordinates of the point selected

The x and y co-ordinates here should be noted to the nearest 1000. In this case x=2000, y=9000 is noted and will be used when setting the local origin explained in the next section.

16

Setting the Local Origin

1.12

Setting the local origin

The local origin should be set so the user gets double precision accuracy. That is to say that the user will get an accuracy to 3 decimal places, or accuracy to the closest mm if set correctly. Each dimension is represented by 8 spaces (including the decimal place), so if a point is within 9,999.999 of the local origin then no accuracy is lost. If the point is between 10,000.00 and 99,999.99 of the local origin then accuracy could be off by 1cm. In a mining sense this is a very small amount. If, however you are in the hunter valley Australia, the northing is in the vicinity of 1,399,000. The eighth space for a number of this size is the decimal place, allowing points to be off by 1m, which is a significant amount when doing, for example, a blast plan. If the local origin is more than 9999.99 meters away from the data a warning will be displayed in the status bar saying warning: local origin (x,y) is far from your local origin. Go to the Tools menu and select options as shown in Figure 16.

Figure 16: Minex options


The options dialogue window will open demonstrated in Figure 17.

Figure 17: Options dialogue window

17

Setting the Local Origin

The left side of this window contains variables that can be changed. The right side of the window contains the fields to be changed in order to change the respective highlighted variable. Select the local origin variable from the left side of the window and change the x and y co-ordinates in the right hand window as shown in Figure 18.

Figure 18: Re-setting the local origin


Once you have done this, hit enter and you will get the warning/information dialogue shown in Figure 19.

Figure 19: Information box regarding re-setting local origin


Now you must exit from Minex by selecting exit from the file menu. Restart Minex and re-plot the survey data. Congratulations. You have now created a project, set its directory and set its local origin. Its now possible to start using Minex for design purposes.

18

Displaying Triangles

1.13

Displaying triangles basics

Ensure the TUTORIAL project directory is open by clicking on the Minex Explorer Key. Note: Clicking on the Key again will collapse the listing for that project. Highlight the File SEOVB.TRI3 in the Explorer with the Left Hand Mouse Button, (Note the triangle icon beside the file indicating it represents a triangulated surface). Now use the RH Mouse button to show the Contextual Options available for this file type. Select the display option from this list by using the left mouse button. Your 3D Design window should display the selected Triangle file as shown in Figure 20. For more detailed Triangle Display functions go to the Error! Reference source not found..

The Explorer Key -Click to Open/Close

Right Hand Mouse Click to display the Contextual Menu Options Choose Display

Figure 20: Displaying a triangle with the explorer window

19

Displaying Triangles Similarly Minex 5 has an active Drag & Drop function for displaying various file types quickly and efficiently. Choose the same Triangle File SEOVB.TRI3 with the Left Hand mouse button by clicking on the Triangle Icon and holding the Left Hand Mouse button down at the same time dragging the mouse icon into the 3D Design Window. You should now observe the same Triangulated Surface displayed BUT with a different colour. Try this again and note the colour changes. Minex 5 toggles through a series of Minex standard colours for the same file displayed. To check this colour sequence go to the Graphics menu on the Minex Menu bar and choose the Colour Map option to display the Minex Standard Colour Map shown in Figure 21.

Figure 21: Drag and drop function and the colour map

20

Displaying Grids

1.14

Displaying grids basics

Using the Minex Explorer open the grid file directory by clicking on the Structur.grd key to list all the available grids for display. Scroll down to find the D1SF.grid and Drag & Drop this surface into the 3D Design Window. You will now have the triangle surface and the grid surface displayed as in Figure 22. Minex convention uses a 2 character suffix to describe the Structural AND/OR Quality attribute of each of these surfaces. For example the seam A1 will have both a Structure Floor (SF) and a Structure Roof (SR). Obvious variations of this naming convention are Structure Thickness (ST), Interburden (IB), and Quality Attributes ranging from Relative Density (RD), Ash (AS), Specific Energy (SE), Stripping Ratio (SR) etc. NOTE: As the Structure Thickness (ST) grid represents a thickness it is not generally displayed as a surface in the 3D Design window, however using the thickness as an attribute of the Seam, the SEAM Roof AND/OR Floor can be plotted showing the variations in thickness using various colour combinations described in the Error! Reference source not found..

Use the Explorer Key to Open Structur.grd

Drag & Drop D1SF.grid

Figure 22: Grid and triangle displayed

21

Object Control Panel

1.15

Object control panel

The object control panel, accessed through the runtime tab in the explorer window, contains all the objects displayed on the graphics window or in memory. The user can manipulate the data they see by right clicking on the names in the object control panel and choosing remove or delete. Deleting will only delete the object out of the object control panel and off the graphics window, not off the disk. Alternatively the user can double click on one of the objects to see the properties. Visibility can be quickly turned of and on by this properties menu shown in Figure 23.

Figure 23: Object control panel

Display several grids with the current triangle. Selectively switch these objects on and off in the object control panel to get familiar with the functionality.
1.16

Zooming, panning and navigation

The Action Panel shown in Figure 24 provides access to your Minex workspaces and viewing tools.
These tabs indicate the workspace youre using. Click a different tab to go to that workspace. Interactive 3D Navigation View control buttons

Status bar

Zoom in Zoom last

Zoom to extents

3D Navigation Pan

These object selection modes simplify object picking in the graphics window

Figure 24: The Minex action panel


There are two methods of altering the perspective of the data in the graphics window. One is via the 3D navigation window and the zoom and pan buttons (highlighted above in red) in the action panel. The other is via the Interactive 3D Navigation button that allows the view to be manipulated via mouse control. Zoom In allows you to zoom in on the area selected in the graphics window.

22

3D Navigation & Display Zoom Last reverts to the previous zoom. zooms to the extents specified by the 3D working area.

Zoom to Extents

allows you to pick a reference point in the graphics window, then the position to look Pan at the new viewpoint. The 3D Navigation dialog box is accessed via the 3D Navigation button and is shown in Figure 25. It allows you to control how a 3D object is displayed in the graphics window.

Figure 25: 3D navigation dialogue window


Use the N, S, E and W buttons if you want to change the azimuth in 90 degree increments. The Normal button can be used to reset the display to the original view (azimuth 0). The Dip scroll bar allows you to adjust the dip angle using a scroll bar. The viewing dip angle is taken from the horizon.

For negative values, the dip angle is "down".

23

3D Navigation & Display For positive values, the dip angle is "up". The Precision fields allow you to specify the Azimuth, Dip and Z-Amp in exact values. Z-Amplification allows you to "exaggerate" the graphics display. A value of '1' in this field is the standard view. Upon selection of the Interactive 3D Navigation button (highlighted below) the cursor goes into a mode where you can alter the dip, azimuth, pan and zoom via mouse control. It also opens up an array of zoom functions in the action panel shown in Figure 26.
Click this 3D Navigation button to display navigation tools on the Action Panel

Figure 26: Action panel zoom functions


Hold the left-hand mouse button down and move the object in the desired direction to alter the Dip and Azimuth of the data in the display. Pan through the data on display by pressing on the middle mouse button while moving the mouse in the direction you want the data to be moved. Zoom in and Zoom out by pressing on the right-hand mouse button and moving the mouse forward to zoom in and backward to zoom out. The azimuth, dip tilt and z amplitude can all be altered by typing the required value in their respective field. The view can be changed so you look at the image from the north, south, east or west by selecting N, S, E or W and the normal button can be selected to quickly snap back to the top view. The normal button is important, as some digitising modes will only let you digitise if you are viewing the object from the normal position. The adv button brings up a red circle around the objects allowing the user to dynamically change the dip and the azimuth depending on if the user is moving the curser within or outside the red circle. Fast is used when theres a lot of geometry information on the screen and the computer has trouble rotating all the information. Fast will allow all the information to be taken off the screen temporarily while the user tilts the geometry area. The X-Y, Y-Z and X-Z buttons are all controls for quickly viewing information from their respective plane of reference. The button on the far right allows the user to set a centre of rotation, which is very helpful when trying to rotate around a small area when a large amount of information is displayed. Become familiar with all these functions before moving onto the next section. Good skills in this area will ensure a much higher efficiency in the operation of Minex 5.

24

3D Navigation & Display

1.17

Graphics functions

The graphics functions can be accessed from the menu or from the toolbars shown in Figure 27.

Figure 27: Location of graphics functions

Graphics functions are used to change the way you view data. View Is used to select the mode of navigation as discussed in the previous section. Clear Graphics Is used to clear the graphics screen.

Define 3D Area This button is used to define the area in which you are working. It can be automatically set (based on the viewed data) by selecting reset or the user can define the working co-ordinates by selecting digitise from the dialogue window shown in Figure 28.

Figure 28: Define 3D area

25

3D Navigation & Display Reset 3D Area This is used to reset the 3D area to the one specified in the define 3D working area dialogue box from Figure 28. Try changing the fields in this dialogue box and then selecting this button. Query - Select this button and choose the snap to solid option as shown in Figure 14. LH mouse click on the triangle surface displayed and look at the information displayed in the output window. This button is useful for determining elevations of surfaces or the distances between reference points. Clip scene This button is used to view and rotate a small portion of the displayed information. Select the button and digitise the bottom left and top right of a thin rectangle above the graphical data you wish to view. You should get a result similar to Figure 29.

Figure 29: Clipped sceen

Toggle black/white Lets say you want to capture the current image and print it out. You dont want a black background as it uses up too much ink. Select the black/white toggle to change the background to white as in Figure 30.

Figure 30: Black and white toggle

26

3D Navigation & Display The colour map options show the current pallet that you are working with as in Figure 21, and allow you to change the properties of the map you are working with. The graphics capture option will be explained later in Error! Reference source not found.. Dynamic clipping Is used to step through an object in user defined sectional stages. It is accessed from the Minex action panel. This very useful graphical tool is used to see how a seam/surface varies with displacement over a specified section. Select the dynamic clipping button and you will notice the dynamic clipping buttons appear in the action panel as shown in Figure 31. These are to specify the parameters of the section you wish to view. The first of the four buttons will clip the section in the north south direction, the second will clip the section in the east-west direction, the third button will clip on a pre-determined sectional plane (this will be discussed when the Error! Reference source not found. is undertaken) and the fourth button orientation of the section. is used if you wish to digitise the

Figure 31: Dynamic clipping functions


Choose one of the options to create your clipping section. Vary your width of section as shown in Figure 31. Use your LH mouse button to move along the section, your middle wheel will do the same and your RH mouse button will change the orientation of the section. Your graphics window should look similar to Figure 32.

Figure 32: Dynamic clipping

27

3D Navigation & Display Now choose the dynamic navigation button shown in Figure 26 and move the object around on the screen by holding down the LH mouse. Your graphics window should now look something like Figure 33.

Figure 33: Rotated dynamic section


option and you can once more step through the section Go back to the dynamic clipping but now on the rotated angle you have just defined. Select the Display bounding box will appear as shown in Figure 34.

button. A box of the cutting plane around the object

Select the Display corner co-ordinates

button and the co-ordinates at the corner of the clipping plane will be displayed as shown in Figure 34.

Select the Display Mid-plane button and a thin translucent grey section will be displayed at the centre of the section you have defined as shown in Figure 34.

Figure 34: Dynamic section with mid-plane, annotation and bounding box
The Change view normal to section button will change from a plan view to a section view at the location of the dynamic section.

28

1.18

Summary

Congratulations! You have now gained the skills necessary to display and navigate your way through Minex 5 data. You have: Created a new project and set its local origin Displayed grids and triangles Displayed geometry data Navigated your way through the data Modified the data display Used the object control panel to switch objects on and off. Interrogated surfaces by visualising them on dynamic sections You are now ready to continue to the following specialised tutorials that will teach you how to edit surfaces and strings.

29