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SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 2
Feds Launch Action
Plan to Protect People
and Families from
Radon is one of the leading causes of lung
cancer


(WASHINGTON - June 20, 2011)
–
Today,
U.S
Environ-
mental
Protection
Agency,
the
General
Services
Administra-
tion,
and
the
departments
of
Agriculture,
Defense,
Energy,
Health
and
Human
Services,
Housing
and
Urban
Develop-
ment,
Interior,
and
Veterans
Affairs
have
joined
forces
to
help
save
lives
and
create
healthier
home
and
school
environments
for
America’s
families.
The
plan
brings
together
commitments
that
help
to
reduce
exposure
to
radon
and
protect
the
health
of
Americans
through
leveraging
and
advancing
existing
state,
local,
and
national
programs.
Radon
exposure
is
the
leading
cause
of
non-smoking
lung
cancer
and
leads
to
an
estimated
21,000
deaths
each
year.


“With
nearly
one
in
15
homes
af-
fected
by
elevated
levels
of
radon
and
thousands
dying
each
year
from
radon-induced
cancer,
it’s
time
to
step
up
our
ac-
tions
in
the
federal
government,”
EPA
Administrator
Lisa
P.
Jackson
said.
“Through
the
Federal
Radon
Action
Plan,
we’re
working
with
partner
agencies
to
raise
awareness
about
the
threat
of
radon
in
our
homes
and
to
take
steps
to
mitigate
this
hazard.
Together
our
efforts
will
help
reduce
radon
exposure
and
make
our
homes,
schools
and
communities
healthier
places
to
live,
learn,
work
and
play.”

The
Federal
Radon
Ac-
tion
Plan
brings
together
government
agencies
to
demonstrate
the
importance
of
radon
risk
reduction,
address
finance
and
incentive
issues
to
drive
testing
and
mitigation,
and
build
de-
mand
for
services
from
industry
professionals.
The
plan
will
help
spur
greater
action
in
the
marketplace,
create
jobs
in
the
private
sector,
and
significantly
reduce
exposure
to
radon.
The
plan
includes
strategies
to
reach
low-income
families,
many
of
whom
do
not
have
the
resources
to
make
the
simple
fixes
necessary
to
protect
their
homes
and
loved
ones.
With
the
help
of
all
agency
networks,
approximately
7.5
million
build-
ings
and
homes
in
the
United
States
will
be
able
to
receive
in-
formation
and
build
awareness
around
this
serious
public
health
risk.



The plan includes federal government actions
to reduce radon risks:
►Launching
a
cross-government
outreach
initiative
to
edu-
cate
families
about
the
health
risks
associated
with
radon
ex-
posure
and
the
solutions
to
address
the
risks.
►Incorporating
radon
testing
and
mitigation
into
federal
pro-
grams.
►Investing
in
new
standards
and
updating
codes
for
measure-
ment
and
mitigation
in
schools,
daycare
facilities,
and
multi-
family
housing.
►Establishing
incentives
that
drive
testing
and
mitigation
in
the
private
and
public
sectors.

Radon
is
a
naturally
occurring,
invisible
and
odorless
ra-
dioactive
gas.
Approximately
one
in
15
American
homes
con-
tain
high
levels
of
radon.
Millions
of
Americans
are
unknowingly
exposed
to
this
dangerous
gas.
EPA
and
the
Sur-
geon
General
urge
people
to
test
their
homes
for
radon
at
least
every
two
years.

Contact
your
state
radon
office
for
informa-
tion
on
locating
qualified
test
kits
or
qualified
radon
testers.

Information
on
the
Federal
Radon
Action
Plan:
http://www.epa.gov/radon/action_plan.html
Information on radon and testing your home:
http://www.epa.gov/radon/index.html
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 3
New Lions Club in El Paso..
“Señal de Esperanza”
“ Beacon of Hope”
By
Joe
Olvera
©,
2011
A
new
Lions
Club
that
consists
entirely
of
Mexicans
who
have
migrated
to
the
United
States,
is
focusing
on
one
of
their
service
proj-
ects

–
seeing
that
youngsters
and
children
who
are
being
detained
in
two
camps
by
the
INS
are
well-treated,
respected,
and
offered
an
op-
portunity
to
remain
in
the
United
States
if
rela-
tives
can
be
found.
Otherwise,
these
children,
aged
from
5
to
11,
will
be
returned
to
their
country
of
origin
–
mainly,
Mexico.
Hector
Rodriguez,
pres-
ident
of
the
22-member
group,
said
that
his
club
is
the
only
one
in
the
United
States
that
con-
sists
primarily
of
Mexicans
and
is
the
only
one
where
meetings
are
held
in
Spanish.
“These
members
are
all
pro-
fessionals
that
have
migrated
to
the
U.S.,”
Rodriguez
said.
“Our
focus
will
be

international relations,
besides
the
projects
which
Lions
Clubs
all
over
the
world
are
focused
on,
which
is,
serving
the
communities
in
which
they
live
and
work.”

Although
the
meetings
are
conducted
in
Span-
ish,
members
at
each
meeting
recite
the
Pledge
of
Allegiance
to
the
United
States
and
salute
to
the
Mexican
flag.

This
newest
club
is
one
of
40
clubs
belonging
to
District
2T3.
At
each
meeting,
the
flags
of
Texas,
the
U.S.,
and
Mex-
ico
are
prominently
and
proudly
displayed.
“Even
though
we
will
officially
receive
our
charter
on
June
25
at
the
Lancers
Club
on
the
East
side,
we
have
already
started
one
of
our
most
important
projects,”
Rodriguez
said.
“We
feel
there
is
a
void
in
El
Paso
concerning
young
children.
There
are
two
detention
cen-
ters
where
children
who
are
in
the
U.S.
ille-
gally
are
being
detained
–
one
is
in
San
Elizario,
the
other
is
in
Canutillo.
These
are
kids
who,
for
one
reason
or
another
were
left
behind
either
by
coyotes
or
other
evil
people
to
fend
for
themselves.
They
are
the
lucky
ones,
the
Border
Patrol
managed
to
pick
them
up
and
to
offer
them
a
safe
haven
while
they
await
either
a
relative
or
someone
to
help
them
leave
the
centers.
“These
children
don’t
know
about
borders,
they
are
detained
until
their
parents
are
lo-
cated.
Meanwhile,
they
are
offered
a
safe
and
sanitary
place
in
which
to
stay.
They
are
not
mistreated;
on
the
contrary,
they
are
very
well
treated.
They
receive
their
three
meals
a
day,
a
comfortable
bed
in
which
to
sleep,
and
activi-
ties
to
keep
them
busy.
All
too
often
they
are
escorted
to
a
public
park
where
they
may
play
baseball,
or
where
they
are
allowed
to
ca-
vort
as
children
are
wont
to
do.
The
vast
majority
of
these
kids,
from
40
to
80
at
any
one
time
remain
anywhere
from
two
weeks
to
two
months.
Lawyers
are
assigned
to
help
them
with
their
case.
Like
I
said,
these
children
are
the
lucky
ones.
The
unlucky
ones
are
those
left
behind
to
die
in
the
desert.”
Rodriguez
said
that
his
group’s
main
wish
is
that
the
immigration
officials
at
each
center
allow
him
and
others
to
visit
the
children.
Even
though
they
are
provided
safe
haven,
they
need
to
be
able
to
speak
to
others
like
them,
people
who
understand
what
the
U.S.
is
all
about
and
who
can
offer
them
spiritual
services.

The
group
hopes
that
someday,
they
will
be
al-
lowed
to
offer
Catechism
classes
to
the
young-
sters,
at
least
to
those
who
are
Catholic.

“They
already
receive
educational
classes,
arts
and
crafts
activities,
and
the
like,”
Rodriguez
said.
“However,
we
feel
that
they
need
some-
thing
more
than
that.
It
is
our
fervent
wish
that
we
will
be
allowed
to
visit
with
them,
to
speak
to
them,
to
make
them
feel
more
comfortable.

These
children
are
provided
everything
they
need,
at
least
until
a
relative
is
found,
or
until
they
are
returned
to
their
country
of
origin.
We
only
want
to
offer
them
what
we
can,
which,
in
our
case
is
‘
Señal
de

Esperanza,’
or,
A
Beacon
of
Hope.
Meanwhile,
we’re
thankful
the
children
are
well
cared
for.”
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 4
Well
the
regular
session
is
now
history
but
I
am
still
in
Austin
for
the
special
session.

Since
some
appropriation
bills
did
not
pass,
and
the
session
failed
to
pass
other
issues,
the
governor
proclaimed
a
special
session.
In
the
regular
session,
my
office
worked
on
several
bills
with
the
intent
of
passing
them
or
incorpo-
rating
them
in
other
bills.

This
is
the
final
one
informing
you
about
the
priorities
of
my
office.
Two
days
before
Thanksgiving
of
2009,
my
chief
of
staff,
along
with
an
enforcement
officer
from
TCEQ,
discovered
a
tire
dump
with
over
19,000
tires
in
far
east
El
Paso
county.
This
started
a
period
of
months
researching
the
possibility
of
new
legislation.
We
did
file
House
Bill
405
early
in
the
session
with
the
in-
tent
of
getting
an
early
hearing
thereby
improving
the
chances
of
passage.

The
bill
basically
imposed
more
regula-
tions
on
those
who
transported
scrap
tires,
required
more
re-
porting
of
dumped
tires,
and
elevated
some
acts
to
criminal
status.

One
of
the
problems
that
enforcement
officers
had
was
that
the
civil
actions
were
not
the
ideal
punitive
action.
Even
though
the
bill
was
supported
by
many,
powerful
forces
imposed
their
will
by
delaying
and
amending
the
bill
which
prevented
early
consideration
in
committee
and
on
the
House
floor.

Our
hopes
for
strengthening
scrap
tire
laws
were
alive
right
up
until
the
last
hour
of
the
last
day
possible
for
passing
the
bill.

Unfortunately,
it
did
not
happen.
I
also
had
two
bills
that
addressed
problem
bars.

For
some
reason,
a
member
who
had
higher
seniority
blocked
both
bills.

It
may
have
been
because
he
was
a
bar
owner.

Who
knows?

One
bill
that
we
really
needed
to
pass
would
have
given
the
city
the
authority
to
prevent
very
bad
bars
and
bar
owners
from
continuing
the
operation
of

a
bar
(where
the
liquor
license
was
revoked
for
cause)
as
a
bring
your
own
booze,
byob,
club.

There
was
one
particular
bar
that
was
in
the
news
during
the
session
that
would
have
been
closed
for
good
had
this
bill
passed.
I
was
successful
in
passing
a
bill,
along
with
Senator
Ro-
driguez,
that
allows
the
courts
of
El
Paso
county
to
operate
more
efficiently.

The
bill
gave
the
courts
the
exclusively
au-
thority
to
accept
requests
for
postponements.
The
last
bill
that
I
will
discuss
with
you
was
a
cleanup
of
legislation
that
was
filed
over
twenty
years
ago.

That
bill,
by
the
El
Paso
state
representative
for
District
75
at
the
time,
was
supposed
to
lawfully
define
the
boundaries
of
the
Fabens
Water
District.

Because
the
wording
was
wrong,
the
District
had
experienced
difficulties
in
many
legal
areas,
in-
cluding
with
the
Central
Appraisal
District.
While
it
may
seem
simple,
the
process
required
an
effort
to
document
the
exact
boundary
metes
and
bounds.

After
twenty
years,
any
number
of
complications
could
have
made
the
passage
impossible.

We
did
pass
the
bill
and
now
the
district
can
go
about
their
business
properly
and
expedi-
tiously.
Chente Quintanilla
State
Representative
Legislative
Update Monday June 27, 2011 is
National
HIV
Testing
Day.
Across
our
country,
public
and
community-health
organizations
will
be
organizing
educational
and
free
HIV-
testing
events
in
observance
of
the
30-year
fight
against
HIV/
AIDS.
Centro
de
Salud
Famil-
iar
La
Fe
(La
Fe)
is
proud
to
be
leading
El
Paso’s
regional
coali-
tion
of
HIV-service,
public
health,
and
educa-
tion
agencies.
Together,
we
will
be
offering
free
HIV
testing
and
community
aware-
ness
events
on
that
day
at
various
El
Paso
sites.
Event
information
and
schedules
will
be
forwarded
to
you
and
your
news
department
in
the
coming
days.
HIV/
AIDS
continues
to
be
a
life-threat-
ening
public
and
community-health
crisis
throughout
the
world
—
an
epidemic
that
continues
to
esca-
late
in
alarming
numbers
along
the
US-Mexico
Border.
The
La
Fe
CARE
Center

—
the
Southwest
region’s
largest
comprehensive
HIV/
AIDS
re-
search,
treatment
and
education
center
—
has
been
documenting
our
own
community’s
fast-rising
new
infection
rates
among
heterosex-
ual
Latinas,
senior
citizens,
and
youth.
National HIV Testing Day
SB 332
Signed
into Law
FORT
WORTH,
TEXAS
–
The
long-awaited
groundwater
own-
ership
bill
was
signed
into
law
by
Gov.
Perry
today.
SB
332,
by
Senator
Troy
Fraser
(R-Horse-
shoe
Bay)
and
Allan
Ritter
(R-
Nederland),
clarifies
that
landowners
own
the
groundwa-
ter
below
their
land
as
real
property.
Landowner
groups
across
Texas,
including
the
Texas
and
Southwestern
Cattle
Raisers
As-
sociation
(TSCRA),
worked
alongside
members
of
the
Texas
Legislature
to
ensure
SB
332
was
passed
and
made
law.
"We
want
to
thank
Chairmen
Fraser
and
Ritter,
Lt.
Gov.
De-
whurst,
Speaker
Straus
and
the
rest
of
the
legislature
who
worked
hard
to
pass
SB
332,"
said
Joe
Parker
Jr.,
rancher
and
TSCRA
president.
"And
we
want
to
especially
thank
Gov.
Perry
for
recognizing
the
impor-
tance
of
this
bill
and
signing
it
into
law."
SB
332
states
that,
"The
legisla-
ture
recognizes
that
a
landowner
owns
the
groundwater
below
the
surface
of
the
landowner's
land
as
real
property."
The
bill
goes
on
to
say
that
landowners
are
entitled
to
drill
for
and
pro-
duce
the
groundwater
below
the
surface
of
real
property.
SB
332
reaffirms
this
landowner
owner-
ship,
but
still
allows
local
groundwater
conservation
dis-
tricts
the
ability
to
manage
groundwater.
SB 332 will go into
effect Sept. 1, 2011.
The
Texas
and
Southwestern
Cattle
Raisers
Association
is
a
134-year-old
trade
organization.
As
the
largest
and
oldest
live-
stock
association
in
Texas,
TSCRA
represents
more
than
15,000
beef
cattle
producers,
ranching
families
and
busi-
nesses
who
manage
approxi-
mately
4
million
head
of
cattle
on
51.5
million
acres
of
range
and
pasture
land,
primarily
in
Texas
and
Oklahoma.
TSCRA
provides
law
enforcement
and
livestock
inspection
services,
legislative
and
regulatory
advo-
cacy,
industry
news
and
infor-
mation,
insurance
services
and
educational
opportunities
for
its
members
and
the
industry.


SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 5
Weather Trivia:
June of 1980 had the most triple days (for this month)
since records were kept (since 1879). How many days
did the temperature hit 100+?
A n s w e r : C – 2 5 d a y s .
The
month
of
June
is
the
hottest
month
of
the
year
in
El
Paso.
We
average
a
daily
temperature
of
95.
This
is
typically
the
month
that
we
also
witness
record
setting
temperatures
in
the
triple
digits!
Hot
weather
means
activities
and
fun
under
the
sun
but
it
can
also
lead
to
heat
sickness.
Normally,
the
body
has
ways
of
keeping
it-
self
cool,
by
letting
heat
escape
through
the
skin,
and
by
evaporating
sweat
(perspira-
tion).
If
the
body
does
not
cool
properly
or
does
not
cool
enough,
the
victim
may
suffer
a
heat-related
illness.
Anyone
can
be
suscep-
tible
although
the
very
young
and
very
old
are
at
greater
risk.
Heat-related
illnesses
can
become
serious
or
even
deadly
if
unat-
tended.
Preventing Heat-Related
Illness
•Dress for the heat. Wear
lightweight,
light-colored
clothing.
Light
colors
will
re-
flect
away
some
of
the
sun's
energy.
It
is
also
a
good
idea
to
wear
hats
or
to
use
an
umbrella.
•Drink water. Carry
water
or
juice
with
you
and
drink
continuously
even
if
you
do
not
feel
thirsty.
Avoid
alcohol
and
caffeine,
which
dehydrate
the
body.
•Eat small meals and eat more often.
Avoid
foods
that
are
high
in
protein
which
increase
metabolic
heat.
•Slow down. Avoid
strenuous
activity.
If
you
must
do
strenuous
activity,
do
it
during
the
coolest
part
of
the
day,
which
is
usually
in
the
morning
between
4:00
a.m.
and
7:00
a.m.
•Stay indoors when possible.
•Take regular breaks when
engaged
in
physical
activity
on
warm
days.
Take
time
out
to
find
a
cool
place.
If
you
recognize
that
you,
or
someone
else,
are
showing
the
sig-
nals
of
a
heat-related
illness,
stop
activity
and
find
a
cool
place.
Stages of Heat-Related Illness
Heat-related
illness
usually
comes
in
stages.
The
signal
of
the
first
stage
is
heat
cramps
in
muscles.
These
cramps
can
be
very
painful.
If
you
are
caring
for
a
person
who
has
heat
cramps,
have
him
or
her
stop
activity
and
rest.
If
the
person
is
fully
awake
and
alert,
have
him
or
her
drink
small
amounts
of
cool
water
or
a
commercial
sports
drink.
Gently
stretch
the
cramped
muscle
and
hold
the
stretch
for
about
20
seconds,
then
gently
massage
the
muscle.
Repeat
these
steps
if
necessary.
If
the
victim
has
no
other
signals
of
heat-related
illness,
the
person
may
re-
sume
activity
after
the
cramps
stop.
The signals of the next, more serious stage
of a heat-related illness (often called heat
exhaustion) include--
• Cool, moist, pale skin (the skin may be
red right after physical activity).
• Headache.
• Dizziness and weakness or exhaustion.
• Nausea.
• The skin may or may not feel hot.
General Care for Heat
Emergencies
1.Cool the Body
2. Give Fluids
3. Minimize Shock
For heat cramps or heat exhaustion:
Get
the
person
to
a
cooler
place
and
have
him
or
her
rest
in
a
comfortable
position.
If
the
person
is
fully
awake
and
alert,
give
a
half
glass
of
cool
water
every
15
minutes.
Do
not
give
liquids
with
alcohol
or
caffeine
in
them,
as
they
can
make
conditions
worse.
Remove
or
loosen
tight
clothing
and
apply
cool,
wet
cloths
such
as
towels
or
wet
sheets.
For heat stroke: Heat
stroke
is
a
life-
threatening
situation!
Help
is
needed
fast.
Call
9-1-1
or
your
local
EMS
number.
Move
the
person
to
a
cooler
place.
Quickly
cool
the
body.
Wrap
wet
sheets
around
the
body
and
fan
it.
If
you
have
ice
packs
or
cold
packs,
wrap
them
in
a
cloth
and
place
them
on
each
of
the
victim's
wrists
and
ankles,
in
the
armpits
and
on
the
neck
to
cool
the
large
blood
vessels
“Doppler" Dave Speelman is the chief meteorologist at KVIA-TV
in El Paso. You can watch his forecasts at 4, 5, 6 and 10 pm on
ABC-7 (channel 6 cable). If you would like Doppler Dave to ad-
dress (explain) any weather issues you can email him at
Dopplerdave@kvia.com.
June…Our Hottest Month!
By: “Doppler” Dave Speelman
A. 12
B. 18
C. 25
D. All 30
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 6
“The Sin Fin Column” by Joe Olvera
Chicano Studies in Arizona Schools?
To be or not to be
Are
we
Chicanos
and
Chicanas
ever
going
to
get
any
peace
from
Republicans
and
other
politicians?
Besides
the
battle
to
keep
Mexi-
cans
from
coming
to
the
U.S.
legally
or
ille-
gally,
efforts
continue
to
keep
us
undermined
and
ignorant
of
our
own
history.
I
mean,
Ger-
man
Americans
know
their
history,
don’t
they?
French
Americans
know
their
history,
don’t
they?
Greek
Americans
know
their
history,
don’t
they?
And,
ad
nauseum.
So,
why
the
angst
that
some
Arizona
politicos
feel
about
us
Chicanos
knowing
who
we
are,
where
we
came
from,
what
brought
us
to
these
shores?
It
seems
that
there
is
a
certain
hatred
brewing
against
all
things
Mexican,
even
against
those
of
us
who
are
here
legally,
either
because
we
were
born
here,
or
because
we
naturalized
to
become
U.S.
citizens.
For
example,
Arizona
Superintend-
ent
of
Public
Instruction
John
Huppenthal
is
now
saying
that
because
Chicano
youths
want
an
Ethnic
Studies
Program
in
their
school,
they
are
“violating
state
law”
because,
accord-
ing
to
him,
they
are
advocating
ethnic
solidar-
ity
among
Latinos
and
“promoting
resentment
against
white
people.”
Why
the
very
idea.
If
the
Tucson
Unified
School
District
does
not
end
its
Ethnic
(Chicano)
Studies
Programs
in
its
schools,
the
district
stands
to
lose
some
$15
million
in
state
funds.
This
is
because
Chi-
canos
and
Chicanas
are
asking
questions
that
are
uncomfortable
to
answer.

What
are
they
afraid
of?
For
one
thing,
those
against
the
program
say
that
stu-
dents
are
wanting
to
learn
about
such
passages
as
:
“We
will
now
see
the
real
forces
behind
this
so-called
‘manifest
destiny.’
We
will
see
how
half
of
Mexico
was
ripped
off
by
trickery
and
violence.”
Well,
the
facts
are
that
the
U.S.,
in
those
days,
did
resort
to
“trickery
and
vio-
lence.”
Don’t
believe
me?
Look
it
up
yourself.
Study
the
history
if
you
will,
and
even
if
you
won’t.
Here
are
some
facts
about
that
era
that
anyone
can
look
up.
For
one
thing,
after
the
war
between
the
U.S.
and
Mexico
that
created
Texas’
so-called
independence,
the
boundary
that
was
established
was,
according
to
the
Mexicans,
the
Nueces
River.
The
Americans,
however,
said
that
no,
the
boundary
had
actu-
ally
been
the
Rio
Grande
–
which
meant
about
150
miles
more
of
Mexican
territory.

Then-U.S.
President
James
K.
Polk
–
a
great
believer
in
Manifest
Destiny
-
which
trumped
the
belief
that
God
had
meant
for
the
U.S.
to
own
the
land
from
the
Atlantic
to
the
Pacific
and
all
points
north
and
south
-
helped
to
create
the
conflict
between
the
two
nations
by
sending
a
contingency
of
American
troops
because,
according
to
him,
the
Mexican
Army
had
entered
U.S.
territory
north
of
the
Rio
Grande
and
south
of
the
Nueces
River.
The
en-
suing
war,
highly
unpopular
with
such
states-
men
as
Abraham
Lincoln
and
John
Quincy
Adams,
was
not
to
be
denied.
Even
Henry
David
Thoreau
got
into
the
fray
when
he
was
jailed
for
refusing
to
pay
taxes
to
the
war
ma-
chine.
He
was
jailed
for
his
obstinacy,
whence
he
penned
his
famous
tome
“Civil
Disobedi-
ence.”
Most
Whigs
in
the
north
and
south
opposed
the
war,
most
southern
Democrats
supported
it,
seeing
in
the
potential
new
terri-
tories
further
opportunities
to
expand
slavery.
Whig
official
Joshua
Giddings
called
the
war
with
Mexico
“an
aggressive,
unholy
and
un-
just
war.
In
the
murder
of
Mexicans
upon
their
own
soil,
or
in
robbing
them
of
their
country,
I
can
take
no
part...the
guilt
of
these
crimes
must
rest
on
others.”
Fellow
Whig
Abraham
Lincoln
demanded
to
see
the
exact
site
in
which,
allegedly,
16
Americans
had
been
killed
in
a
skirmish
against
Mexican
soldiers.
Whig
leader
Robert
Toombs
of
Georgia
declared:
“This
war
is
non-descript.
We
charge
the
President
with
usurping
the
war-making
power,
with
seizing
a
country
which
had
been
for
centuries,
and
was
then
in
the
possession
of
the
Mexicans.
Let
us
put
a
check
on
this
lust
of
dominion.
We
had
territory
enough.
Heaven
knew.”
Perhaps
the
problem
lies
in
the
fact
that
Huppenthal,
his
predecessor
Arizona
State
Attorney
General
Tom
Horne,
and
others,
are
ignorant
of
the
history
between
Mexico
and
the
U.S.,
and
of
their
refusal
to
see
the
U.S.
as
other
than
a
benevolent
nation
with
a
squeaky
clean
image
that
today
is
used
to
cow
young
Chicanos
and
Chicanas
into
not
seeking
the
truth.
The
fact
of
the
matter
is
that
it
did
hap-
pen.
Manifest
Destiny
was
used
as
fodder
to
create
the
war
with
Mexico,
a
war
in
which
the
U.S.
garnered
more
than
one
million
square
miles
of
Mexican
territory
–
land
that
today
encompasses
the
present
states
of
Ari-
zona,
California,
New
Mexico,
Colorado,
Utah,
and
other
territories.
To
put
things
in
perspective,
only
647
out
of
13,000
students
are
today
taking
courses
in
Chicano
Studies.
What’s
to
fear?
Huppenthal
says
that
such
classes
cannot
be
allowed
to
continue
because
they
promote
ethnic
solidarity
and
ethnic
re-
sentment.
As
if
it
didn’t
exist
already,
albeit,
in
very
mild
forms
-
unlike
the
sometimes
vio-
lent
efforts
to
know
the
truth
that
colored
the
1960s-1970s.

So,
if
647
students
continue
to
take
these
classes,
this
means
that
the
Tucson
Unified
School
District
stands
to
lose
$15
million,
a
move
that
would
impact
on
the
more
than
13,000
students
that
are
not
attending
these
classes.
Now,
that
would
be
damaging
a
huge
constituency,
or
doesn’t
Huppenthal
care?
I
ask
again,
What’s
to
fear?
Teach
students
their
history,
no
matter
how
painful
it
may
be.
After
all,
the
facts
are
there.
My
beloved
United
State
of
America
has
not
always
been
a
paragon
of
virtue,
and
we
all
know
that,
albeit
some
of
us
won’t
admit
it.
Orale!
Sin
Fin
ALL JUNE DONORS WILL BE
ENTERED INTO RAFFLE FOR A
GAS GRILL AND A $250 WAL-
MART GIFT CARD!
Earn
reward
points
that
can
be
redeemed
for
movie
tickets,
video
games
&
more.

Earn
ad-
ditional
points
by
scheduling
&
keeping
an
appointment!
Mark
your
calendar
and
sign
up
today
for
the

upcoming
Blood
Drive
at
City
Hall
Thursday, June 30, 2011
8:30
am
-
3:30
pm
City
Hall,
10th
Floor
Conference
Room
2
Civic
Center
Plaza
El
Paso,
Texas
79901
You
can
choose
a
sign
up
time
by
visiting
http://www.bloodhero.com/index.cfm?group=op&hlc=epgov&hostlookupcode=epgov.
Eat
a
good
meal,
drink
plenty
of
fluids
and
bring
a
picture
ID!

Donors
will
receive
a
cholesterol
check
and
snacks.
This is the gift that really does keep on giving!
Give blood. Be a hero. Save a life.
Sharon Mosley
Oh,
say,
can
you
see
past
that
closet
full
of
clothes
that
you
never
wear?
Yes,
you
can
have
too
many
clothes!
Instead
of
complaining
about
your
wardrobe,
pare
down
your
choices
to
a
few
all-American
favorites.
After
all,
fashion
trends
come
and
go,
so
it's
better
to
invest
in
clas-
sics
that
you'll
count
on
for
years
to
come.
Here is a list of essentials that have stood the test
of time, no matter the season of the year:
— A sharp white shirt. The
key
to
this
all-time
fashion
favorite
is
fit.
Since
there
are
so
many
new
styles
of
the
white
shirt,
it
is
best
to
choose
one
that
is
"not-so-basic"
and
has
a
stylish
edge
to
it
...
whether
it's
ruf-
fles,
bows
or
ruching.
Go
for
the
best
quality
you
can
find
—
cotton
al-
ways
looks
chic.
Steer
clear
of
cheap
and
shiny
synthetics.
The
white
shirt
is
one
of
the
most
versatile
items
that
you
can
have
in
your
wardrobe.
Team
it
with
jeans
and
platform
sandals
to
dress
up
a
ca-
sual
look;
wear
it
with
a
long,
black
skirt
with
statement
jewelry
to
a
cocktail
party.
— A fitted jacket. Just
like
the
white
shirt,
a
jacket
can
be
pivotal
when
worn
with
other
pieces:
skirts,
pants
or
jeans.
When
choosing
a
jacket,
keep
it
simple
in
style.
You
don't
want
it
to
become
outdated
and
stick
to
fabrics
that
will
span
the
seasons
like
rayon.
A
great
jacket
can
be
worn
over
a
dress
for
even
more
versatility.
If
you
want
to
add
a
more
fashion-forward
look,
search
for
a
jacket
in
a
bold
color.
— A perfect pair of pants.
Again,
a
simple
cut
in
a
classic
fabric
is
the
best
way
to
go
when
it
comes
to
choosing
pants,
which
you
will
reach
for
day
in
and
night
out.
You
can
thank
Katharine
Hepburn
for
making
tailored
trousers
an
all-American
favorite.
Today,
the
flat-front
boot
cut
is
a
figure-flatter-
ing
shape
that
has
proved
to
be
a
perennial
winner.
— A great dress. No,
it
doesn't
have
to
be
black!
Instead,
choose
your
favorite
color
and
make
a
statement
in
a
feminine
style
and
flowing
fab-
ric
—
skip
the
tight
dresses
and
go
for
figure-skimming
styles.
— A classic knit sweater. Whether
you
like
twin-set
cardigans,
turtlenecks
or
V-necks,
knits
are
always
on
the
all-American
fa-
vorites
list.
Choose
the
finest
quality
you
can
—
cashmere
is
always
a
great
choice
—
and
mix
and
match
with
other
ba-
sics
for
plenty
of
classic
combinations
that
never
go
out
of
style.
— A flattering pair of jeans. Denim
is
another
American
favorite
that
hasn't
really
changed,
since
the
first
pair
of
Levis
"blue
jeans"
was
introduced
in
1873.
Find
a
brand
that
fits
you
and
stick
with
it.
Be
careful
of
trendy
shapes
(yes,
jeg-
gings
are
already
a
passing
fad!)
and
overly
decorated
styles.
Dark
denim
is
always
a
flatter-
ing
choice.
— A trench coat. Inspired
by
British
military,
the
trench
coat
has
become
a
favorite
style
statement
on
this
side
of
the
pond,
too.
A
great
fitting
trench
coat
will
be
a
fashion
essential
that
you
will
grab
for
years
to
come
...
in
rain
and
snow.
You
can't
go
wrong
with
a
neutral
color,
but
colorful
hot
pinks
and
purples
are
turning
up
in
stores
for
a
bold
change
of
pace.
Sharon Mosley is a former fashion editor of the Arkansas
Gazette in Little Rock and executive director of the Fashion Edi-
tors and Reporters Association.
COPYRIGHT 2011
CREATORS.COM
From Shoshanna, a bold red sundress is the perfect choice
for an all-American classic to update your summer wardrobe.
Photo courtesy of Shoshanna.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 7
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 8
DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren
DEAR ABBY: My
hus-
band,
"Ed,"
and
I
have
been
together
for
six
years,
mar-
ried
for
two.
This
is
the
sec-
ond
marriage
for
both
of
us.
We
have
children
from
our
first
marriages.

Ed
works
offshore.
He's
gone
21
days
and
here
21
days.
The
three
weeks
he's
gone,
I
work,
take
care
of
the
house
and
the
kids,
do
the
yard
work,
etc.
When
he
comes
home,
I
want
him
to
myself
the
first
weekend
--
I
don't
want
to
share
him
with
his
friends.
I'd
like
to
do
fun
things
with
him
sometimes,
just
the
two
of
us.
Ed
says
I
have
to
understand
his
friends
are
im-
portant.
He
says
I'm
selfish
and
jealous.
He
doesn't
show
affection
very
well
either
(ex-
cept
behind
closed
doors),
and
I
am
a
very
affectionate
person.
Am
I
asking
too
much
from
him?
I
am
consid-
ering
counseling,
but
I'm
un-
sure
whether
Ed
would
go.
--
BORED
AND
LONELY
IN
MISSISSIPPI
DEAR BORED AND
LONELY:
Counseling
is
an
excellent
idea,
and
if
Ed
won't
go,
you
should
go
with-
out
him.
Asking
your
hus-
band
to
spend
two
days
of
one-on-one
time
with
you
when
he
returns
from
three
weeks
away
isn't
too
much,
and
it's
not
selfish.
He
needs
to
reorganize
his
priorities
and
put
you
higher
on
the
list
than
his
buddies.
Affection
is
sup-
posed
to
be
spontaneous,
and
you
shouldn't
have
to
beg
for
it.
What
you
describe
going
on
behind
closed
doors
sounds
more
like
plain
old
sex
and
a
whole
lot
less
like
affection.
Unless
your
hus-
band
is
willing
to
put
more
effort
into
your
marriage,
I
can't
see
you
living
until
death
do
you
part
on
a
starvation
diet
--
and
you
can
tell
both
your
husband
and
your
counselor
I
said
so.
**
DEAR ABBY: I
know
you
get
many
letters
from
people
who
are
unemployed,
de-
pressed
and
don't
know
how
to
climb
out
of
the
funk.
I
was
laid
off
from
my
man-
agement
position
three
weeks
after
giving
birth
to
my
first
child.
Talk
about
depressing.
After
several
months
of
recovering
from
a
difficult
birth,
I
contacted
my
local
SPCA
and
began
volun-
teering.
Not
only
do
I
help
by
feeding
and
cleaning
the
kit-
ties,
but
I
am
using
my
pro-
fessional
skills
to
help
them
with
photography,
graphic
design
and
fundraising.
I'm
still
looking
for
work
and
getting
occasional
interviews.
And
in
those
interviews,
po-
tential
employers
always
seem
impressed
with
my
vol-
unteer
work.
I'm
writing
to
en-
courage
anyone
who
is
unem-
ployed
to
find
charitable
organizations
to
work
with.
Offer
your
professional
skills.
It
is
something
to
get
up
for
and
do
during
the
day.
It
also
looks
good
on
your
resume
and
makes
you
feel
great.
--
UNPAID
FOR
NOW,
BUT
HAPPY
IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR HAPPY: That's
a
valuable
suggestion,
and
thank
you
for
it.
At
this
point,
13.9
million
Americans
are
unemployed.
Many
suffer
from
depression
because,
through
no
fault
of
their
own,
they
have
been
unable
to
find
jobs.
When
people
feel
em-
barrassed,
frustrated
and
angry,
they
tend
to
isolate
themselves,
which
does-
n't
help
and
can
be
un-
healthy.
The
more
connec-
tions
you
make,
the
greater
your
chances
for
finding
permanent
employ-
ment,
because
in
the
final
analysis
it's
all
about
people
and
relationships.
I
wish
you
luck
in
your
job
search.
Who-
ever
hires
you
will
be
lucky
to
have
you.
**
DEAR ABBY: My
brother
often
tells
me
that
I'll
"make
a
good
wife
someday."
Is
this
an
insult
or
a
compliment?
--
BAFFLED
IN
BOSTON
DEAR BAFFLED: I'd
consider
it
a
compliment.
An
insult
would
be
you'd
make
a
LOUSY
wife
someday.
How-
ever,
whether
it's
meant
as
an
insult
or
a
compliment
would
depend
upon
your
brother's
opinion
of
the
institution
of
marriage.
**
Dear
Abby
is
written
by
Abi-
gail
Van
Buren,
also
known
as
Jeanne
Phillips,
and
was
founded
by
her
mother,
Pauline
Phillips.
Write
Dear
Abby
at
www.DearAbby.com
or
P.O.
Box
69440,
Los
An-
geles,
CA
90069.
**
For
everything
you
need
to
know
about
wedding
plan-
ning,
order
"How
to
Have
a
Lovely
Wedding."
Send
a
business-sized,
self-addressed
envelope,
plus
check
or
money
order
for
$6
(U.S.
funds
only)
to:
Dear
Abby
--
Wedding
Booklet,
P.O.
Box
447,
Mount
Morris,
IL
61054-0447.
(Postage
is
in-
cluded
in
the
price.)
COPYRIGHT 2011
UNIVERSAL UCLICK
Dear Abby
HUSBAND WHO WORKS OFFSHORE
CHOOSES FRIENDS OVER HIS WIFE
CaII 915-346-5243 Nancy Minter · Take control of your life
Emeral d Pl acement
Criminal checks, conduct checks,
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Criminal checks.done
Hire a nursing assistant for home health, child
care, hospital stay, personal care, shopping, house
cleaning, cooking, companionship
Make sure your loved one is safe.
You Choose the time, you choose the pay.
We have
LVNs CNAs Nursing Assistants
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Painters
Movers
Labors
Everyday Cheapskate
Terrific Travel Tips for the
Well-Traveled Cheapskate
Mary Hunt
No
matter
where
your
travels
take
you
this
summer,
there
are
always
little
things
you
can
do
to
make
the
time
more
enjoyable.
Here
are
some
of
the
best
travel
tips
we've
come
across.
First flight. Try
to
book
the
first
flight
out
in
the
morning
because
those
planes
often
arrive
at
the
airport
the
evening
before.
You
won't
have
to
rely
on
an
incoming
flight,
which
could
be
delayed
or
canceled,
resulting
in
your
own
flight
being
delayed
or
canceled.
Save the milk. Before
leaving
on
a
trip,
take
any
milk
that's
left
in
your
refrigerator
and
pour
it
into
empty
water
bottles
and
put
them
in
the
freezer.
When
you
return
home,
remove
one
or
more
to
thaw.
You'll
have
fresh
cold
milk
the
next
morning
without
the
need
to
run
to
the
market.
Watch your account. Sign
up
for
online
ac-
cess
to
your
credit-card
and
bank
accounts.
Monitor
them
often
at
Internet
cafes
when
traveling.
This
helps
catch
problems
quickly
so
it's
easily
resolved
before
you
leave
that
area
or
country.
You
can
also
pay
your
bills
online
while
you're
away.
Save the iPod. When
you're
on
a
beach
or
near
a
pool,
put
your
iPod
or
MP3
player
in
a
clear
plastic
bag
and
tape
it
closed.
You'll
still
be
able
to
turn
it
on
and
off,
adjust
the
volume
and
switch
to
another
song,
but
it
will
be
pro-
tected
from
sand
and
water
—
even
if
you
drop
it
in
the
pool.
Pamper yourself. If
you'll
be
taking
a
long
flight,
create
your
own
comfort
kit.
Fill
a
plas-
tic
zip-type
bag
with
lip
balm,
a
travel
tooth-
brush
and
toothpaste,
hand
lotion,
a
sleep
mask,
cozy
socks
and
eye
drops.
Kids in museums. Want
to
visit
museums
with
your
children
but
avoid
the
boredom
and
tears?
Head
to
the
gift
shop
first
and
buy
post-
cards
of
the
museum's
most
famous
works.
Create
a
treasure
hunt
in
the
museum
for
these
masterpieces.
Send
the
postcards
or
add
to
your
trip
album.
Two for one.
Using
your
frequent-flier
miles,
you
might
be
able
to
visit
two
cities
on
one
ticket.
For
example,
if
you
fly
through
Dallas
to
get
to
San
Francisco,
stop
over
in
Dallas
for
as
long
as
you
want
before
continuing
on
to
San
Francisco
—
using
only
one
frequent-flier
ticket.
It's
worth
inquiring
with
your
frequent-
flier
carrier.
Teens and travel dough. Sending
your
teen
away
from
home
alone?
Look
into
giving
him
or
her
a
Visa-branded
gift
card.
They're
ac-
cepted
everywhere
just
like
a
regular
Visa
card.
Go
online,
and
check
out
them
out.
Some
of
them
are
reloadable,
and
you
can
do
that
within
seconds
by
phone
or
online.
Overnight flights. If
you
know
you'll
be
on
that
red-eye
flight,
pack
a
few
Dove
Body
Re-
freshers
and
Oral
B
Brush-Ups
in
your
carry-
on
bag.
Before
the
plane
lands,
you
can
"wash"
your
face
and
"brush"
your
teeth
while
sitting
in
your
seat.
You
will
be
refreshed
and
ready
for
the
day.
Mary Hunt is the founder of www.Debt-
ProofLiving.com, a personal finance member
website. You can email her at mary@every-
daycheapskate.com, or write to Everyday
Cheapskate, P.O. Box 2135, Paramount, CA
90723.
COPYRIGHT 2011
CREATORS.COM
Rose Bennett Gilbert
Q:
We
are
renovating
the
guest
bath
and
are
ready
to
either
paper
or
paint.
My
husband
wants
to
paint
it
dark
brown
(he's
retired
from
UPS).
I
say
it
will
be
too
dark
and
heavy
—
most
of
my
friends
are
women.
If
you
weigh
in
on
my
side,
he
might
give
in
more
easily.
A: LOL!
That's
the
best
reason
I've
ever
heard
for
"doing
it
up
brown"!
But
not
reason
enough
to
doom
a
guest
bath
—
and
your
guests
—
to
such
a
solemn
fate:
one's
self
in
the
morning
mirror
against
a
background
of
dark,
dull
brown.
Color
bounces,
you
know.
Which
is
why
professional
designers
seldom
use
a
lot
of
green
in
a
bathroom.
And
why
they
love
to
paint
dining
rooms
a
warm,
glowing
peach
—
everyone
around
the
dinner
table
takes
on
the
glow
of
robust
health.
Browsing
through
"The
Happy
Home
Project"
(written
by
Jean
Nayar,
Fili-
pacchi
Publishing),
I
found
what
could
be
the
perfect
compromise.
The
pictured
bath
is
a
happy
combo
of
your
husband's
beloved
"UPS"
brown
and
bright,
shining
white
on
the
wain-
scoting,
which
runs
three-quarters
of
the
way
up
the
walls.
You
also
get
a
balance
between
the
masculine
and
feminine.
Brown
walls
and
dark
hardwood
floor
balanced
with
white
curtains
and
interesting
crystal
chandeliers.
An
unseen
feature
your
hosts
will
ap-
preciate
most
is
the
eco-savviness
of
this
bath.
As
Nayar
writes,
all
faucets
are
"WaterSense"
labeled,
which
means
they're
designed
to
reduce
water
consumption.
Your
guests
may
never
guess
that
they're
actually
going
green
in
this
brown-and-
white
bath.
Shawn
Dell Joyce
Instead
of
making
pricey
travel
plans
this
year
that
damage
the
environment
as
well
as
your
bank
account,
take
a
local
vacation,
or
"stay-
cation."
This
is
a
chance
to
re-
discover
the
beauty
of
your
home
region
by
taking
the
time
to
visit
cultural
attrac-
tions
and
natural
places
that
you
may
be
too
busy
to
see
in
your
daily
routine.
A
staycation
does
not
mean
staying
home
and
doing
yard-
work,
or
the
list
of
jobs
you've
been
putting
off
for
the
past
year.
"Instead,"
suggests
Pauline
Frommer
of
From-
mer's
Travel
Guides,
"become
a
tourist
in
your
own
home-
town."
Plan
to
see
tourist
at-
tractions
or
historic
sites,
take
an
art
class,
learn
to
swim
or
have
a
number
of
small
ad-
ventures
you
always
wanted
to
do
if
you
had
the
time.
A
fringe
benefit
of
staycations
is
that
you
develop
a
deeper
connection
to
your
commu-
nity
and
hometown.
People
feel
more
connected
to
a
place
when
they
experience
the
his-
tory
and
natural
beauty
of
it
firsthand.
Try
to
see
some-
thing
different
each
day
—
a
different
spectacular
view,
a
different
museum,
a
new
restaurant.
At
the
same
time,
you
benefit
your
local
com-
munity
by
pumping
vacation
money
into
the
local
economy.
Some
staycationers
go
so
far
as
to
camp
in
a
nearby
camp-
ground
to
get
away
from
the
daily
routine.
If
you
are
ad-
dicted
to
technology,
and
can't
imagine
a
day
without
email
or
Internet,
then
consider
leaving
the
house
and
stayca-
tioning
in
a
local
campground
or
bed
and
breakfast.
You'll
still
save
gas
money
and
travel
expenses,
but
you'll
feel
refreshed
after
being
away
from
the
computer
for
a
few
days.
Here are a few tips for a
successful staycation:
— Explore the rail trails in
your area by bicycle. Most
communities
have
rail
trail
projects
connecting
larger
cities
by
walking
and
biking
paths.
Explore
your
area
by
riding
in
five
miles
sections
each
day.
www.railtrails.org
— Go to the local tourism
office or website for a list of
historic sites and museums
to visit.
— Spend a Saturday tour-
ing farms and farm markets
in
your
region
to
find
out
what
is
grown
locally,
and
get
a
fresh
delicious
taste
of
the
local
flavors.
www.localhar-
vest.org
— Pick a nearby town on
the map,
and
spend
the
day
walking
through
the
whole
town,
antiquing,
eating
in
local
restaurants,
and
getting
a
real
sense
of
the
history
and
culture
of
the
place.
— Take an art, music or act-
ing class. Do
something
you
always
said
you
would
do
if
only
you
had
the
time.
If you really must go out of
town, make your vacation as
green as possible:
— Stay in a green hotel
when possible.
If
you
strive
to
be
green
at
home,
why
not
on
vacation
as
well?
www.greenhotels.com,
www.environmentallyfriend-
lyhotels.com.
— Travel with friends, and
share the costs and carbon
of each car trip.
If
you
car-
pool,
then
share
a
vacation
rental
including
meals.
You
form
tighter
friendship
bonds,
use
less
gas
and
eat
out
less.
— Consider a working va-
cation
and
volunteer
to
work
on
an
organic
farm
located
in
a
place
you
wish
to
visit.
Many
countries
also
have
pro-
grams
for
whole
families
to
spend
a
vacation
working
as
part
of
a
relief
effort.
www.globeaware.org,
www.globalvolunteers.org.
— Offset the carbon emis-
sions from your air travel by
purchasing
carbon
offsets
through
the
airline
or
www.carbonfund.org
Shawn Dell
Joyce is an
award-win-
ning colum-
nist and
founder of the Wallkill River
School in Orange County, N.Y.
You can contact her at
Shawn@ShawnDellJoyce.com.
COPYRIGHT 2011
CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 9
How Now, Brown Guest Bath?
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 10
Toxic Lawns
Shawn Dell Joyce
Afarmer
friend
pointed
out
to
me
recently
that
homeowners
in
our
com-
munity
use
more
chemicals
on
their
lawns
than
most
farmers
use
on
their
crops.
Sure
enough,
a
little
research
turned
up
some
really
star-
tling
statistics
behind
the
American
obsession
for
the
perfect
lawn.
Pesticide
application
rates
for
farmers
are
2.7
pounds
per
acre,
while
homeowners
(and
lawn-care
companies)
slather
on
3.2
pounds
to
9.8
pounds
per
acre.
According
to
a
re-
cent
Virginia
Tech
study,
homeowners
commonly
use
up
to
10
times
as
much
chem-
icals
as
farmers.
Each
year,
homeowners
apply
at
least
90
million
pounds
of
pesticides
to
their
lawns
and
gardens,
according
to
the
Boston-based
Toxics
Action
Center.
Homeowners
repre-
sent
the
only
growth
sector
of
the
U.S.
pesticide
market,
as
agricultural
uses
of
these
chemicals
are
declining.
This
market
trend
was
started
by
the
pesticide
industry
in
an
at-
tempt
to
establish
new
mar-
kets
for
old
products.
Most
lawn
pesticides
were
regis-
tered
before
1972,
and
were
never
tested
for
many
human
health
hazards
like
carcino-
genicity,
neurotoxicity
and
environmental
dangers.
Lawn
chemical
companies
are
not
required
to
list
all
the
in-
gredients
on
their
containers.
Many
toxins
are
hidden
on
the
product
label
by
being
classified
as
"inert."
Inert
does
not
mean
"inactive"
and
in
the
case
of
benzene
and
xy-
lene,
can
be
even
more
toxic
than
the
listed
chemicals.
Some
of
the
listed
chemicals
include
components
of
defo-
liants
like
Agent
Orange,
nerve-gas
type
insecticides
and
artificial
hormones.
The
blue
meanies
of
lawn
chemicals
are
2,4-D,
Captan,
Diazinon,
Dursban,
Dacthal,
Dicamba,
and
Mecocrop.
These
chemicals
were
regis-
tered
without
a
full
safety
screening.
A
combination
of
several
of
these
toxins
is
usu-
ally
found
in
on
store
shelves.
2,4-D
is
a
hormone
disruptor,
Dursban
concentrates
in
the
environment,
and
Diazinon
is
an
organophosphate
that
dam-
ages
the
nervous
system.
Some
of
these
chemicals
have
been
banned
for
use
on
golf
courses
and
sod
farms
due
to
massive
water
bird
deaths,
but
are
still
widely
used
on
lawns
and
gardens.
Pesticides
applied
on
lawns
are
harmful
to
humans
who
inhale
them,
ingest
them
or
absorb
them
through
skin
contact.
These
chemicals
also
get
tracked
into
our
houses
on
our
shoes
and
pets.
An
Envi-
ronmental
Protection
Agency's
(EPA)
study
found
outdoor
pesticides
loads
build
up
in
carpets
and
can
remain
there
for
years,
where
they
do
not
degrade
from
exposure
to
sunlight
or
rain.
This
leaves
our
pets
and
chil-
dren
most
vulnerable,
as
they
frequently
play
on
lawns
and
carpets,
and
breathe
in
toxins.
The
Toxic
Action
Center
re-
port
notes
that
"children's
in-
ternal
organs
are
still
developing
and
maturing,
and
their
enzymatic,
metabolic
and
immune
systems
provide
less
natural
protection
than
those
of
an
adult."
Re-
searchers
caution
that
chil-
dren
are
most
vulnerable
in
the
fetal
and
adolescent
stages
when
"chemical
exposures
can
permanently
alter
future
development."
The
EPA's
risk
assessments
indicate
that
home
lawn
care
products
account
for
96
per-
cent
of
the
risk
associated
with
using
this
chemical
for
women
of
childbearing
age,
and
that
anticipated
doses
are
"very
close
to
the
level
of
concern."
EPA's
studies
found
that
rats
exposed
to
the
most
common
lawn
chemical,
2,4-
D,
in
utero
showed
an
in-
creased
incidence
of
skeletal
abnormalities
such
as
extra
ribs
and
malformed
ribcages.
In
rabbits,
2,4-D
and
its
di-
ethanolamine
salt
caused
abortion
and
skeletal
abnor-
malities,
as
well
as
develop-
mental
neurotoxicity
and
endocrine
disruption.
Even
though
many
lawn
chemicals
are
legal,
and
widely
avail-
able,
that
doesn't
equal
"safe."
Shawn Dell Joyce is an
award-winning columnist and
founder of the Wallkill River
School in Orange County,
N.Y. You can contact her at
Shawn@ShawnDellJoyce.co
m.
COPYRIGHT 2011
CREATORS.COM
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 11
Video Game Reviews
Jeb Haught
Video
games
used
to
be
considered
a
childish
endeavor,
but
the
average
age
of
modern
gamers
is
37
years
old.
In
addition,
a
whopping
72
percent
of
American
households
play
video
games!
With
such
a
large
audience,
it's
not
surprising
to
discover
that
the
annual
Electronic
En-
tertainment
Expo
(E3)
is
the
largest
gaming
conference
in
the
world.
I
had
the
pleasure
of
attending
this
year's
show
in
Los
Angeles,
and
the
fol-
lowing
games
were
the
high-
light
of
my
experience.
Action
games
don't
get
any
better
than
Bethesda's
open-
world
futuristic
title,
"RAGE,"
for
the
PC,
PS3
and
Xbox
360.
With
a
large
selec-
tion
of
customized
weapons
and
armed
vehicles,
this
title
will
surely
please
both
shooter
and
racing
fans.
Play-
ers
encounter
all
types
of
ene-
mies
ranging
from
humans
to
mutants
to
gigantic
monsters
in
a
futuristic
post-apocalyp-
tic
world.
In
addition,
chal-
lenging
A.I.,
which
differs
dramatically
for
each
enemy
type,
forces
players
to
adapt
in
order
to
survive.
Modern
warfare
fans
will
surely
salivate
at
the
mere
sight
of
EA's
first-person
shooter,
"Battlefield
3,"
on
the
PC,
PS3,
and
Xbox
360.
This
incredibly
gorgeous
game
features
destructible
buildings
as
well
as
awesome
infantry
and
vehicular
combat
on
gigantic
battlefields.
Fire-
fights
are
very
intense
when
chunks
of
concrete
rain
down
on
players
and
enemies
blow
away
their
cover.
These
de-
structible
environments
affect
each
battle
differently,
which
alters
the
standard
play
style
found
in
most
FPS
games.
Activision's
"Spider-Man:
Edge
of
Time"
for
the
PS3,
Wii
and
Xbox
360
dabbles
with
the
concept
of
time-
based
causality.
Players
con-
trol
the
amazing
Spider-Man
in
present
day
as
well
as
Spi-
der-Man
2099
in
...
well,
you
can
figure
it
out.
Both
web-
heads
share
the
same
basic
move
set
with
subtle
varia-
tions
and
can
communicate
with
each
other
through
time.
Through
certain
actions,
pres-
ent-day
Spider-Man
can
alter
the
future,
while
the
2099
mutant
must
adapt
to
these
changes.
Batman
returns
in
Warner
Bros.'
"Batman:
Arkham
City"
for
the
PS3
and
Xbox
360.
When
the
former
warden
of
Arkham
Asylum
becomes
the
mayor
of
Arkham
city,
he
has
a
giant
section
walled
off.
Batman
is
called
in
to
protect
the
area
and
subsequently...
Continues
on
page
13
E3 2011 Showcases the Fu
tu
re
of
Video Games
“Battlefield 3”
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 12
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 13
Continued
from
page
11...
en-
counters
the
Joker,
Two-Face,
the
Penguin,
Harlequin
and
countless
minions.
Fortu-
nately,
he
can
now
perform
double
and
triple
takedowns
and
combine
gliding
with
the
grapnel
gun
for
maximum
maneuverability.
Players
will
also
be
able
to
control
the
un-
predictable
Catwoman
in
cer-
tain
areas.
If
you
think
download
games
aren't
worth
their
time,
you
will
change
your
tune
after
playing
Warner
Bros.'
"Bas-
tion"
on
Xbox
Live.
This
ac-
tion
RPG
features
both
ranged
and
melee
weapons
as
the
hero
attempts
to
build
a
safe
haven
from
the
ashes
of
a
dying
world.
Giant
blocks
quickly
drop
from
above
to
form
platforms
and
structures
as
levels
are
literally
con-
structed
before
the
player's
eyes.
Exceptional
narration
rounds
out
this
unexpected
gem.
From
Ubisoft,
"Driver:
San
Francisco"
offers
high-octane
action
for
the
PS3
and
Xbox
360.
Get
behind
the
wheel
of
over
100
licensed
vehicles,
including
muscle
cars,
sports
cars,
sedans,
trucks
and
trac-
tor-trailers.
Players
will
feel
the
adrenaline
kick
in
as
they
experience
thrilling
car
chases
and
huge
jumps
in
a
realistic
recreation
of
the
infa-
mous
city
by
the
bay!
A
cool
new
feature
called
"shift"
al-
lows
players
to
leave
their
ve-
hicle
and
enter
other
vehicles
to
help
them
complete
objec-
tives.
Capcom
enters
the
open-
world,
action
RPG
arena
with
their
fantasy-based
title,
"Dragon's
Dogma,"
for
the
PS3
and
Xbox
360.
Players
begin
by
choosing
a
class
and
then
progress
through
each
level
with
the
aid
of
a
"pawn."
Deep
customization
options
let
players
tailor
their
hero
to
suit
their
play
style,
and
the
pawn
is
also
upgrade-
able.
Temporary
pawns
can
be
summoned
to
round
out
the
party,
and
all
pawns
can
be
given
basic
commands.
Forming
a
strong
fighting
group
will
be
necessary
to
de-
feat
hordes
of
enemies
and
giant
bosses
in
combat.
On
the
PS3,
Sony
plans
to
un-
leash
the
infantry
and
vehicu-
lar-based
action
title,
"Starhawk"
(the
sequel
to
"Warhawk").
In
addition
to
vastly
improved
infantry
combat,
this
fast-paced
game
now
allows
players
to
con-
struct
a
wide
variety
of
build-
ings
on
the
fly,
including
energy
generators,
supply
bunkers,
walls
and
vehicle
bays.
As
a
result,
none
of
the
single
or
multiplayer
levels
ever
play
out
the
same
way.
One
of
my
favorite
additions
is
the
ability
to
pilot
a
giant
mech
that
transforms
into
a
flying
machine.
Sony's
"Ratchet
and
Clank:
All
4
One"
may
have
cartoon
visuals,
but
the
addictive
game
play
will
satisfy
fans
of
all
ages!
Featuring
a
deep
sto-
ryline,
lots
of
humor,
wacky
weapons
and
full-sized
levels,
this
four-player
coop
title
re-
sembles
others
in
the
popular
series.
Unlike
most
coop
games,
"All
4
One"
stresses
team
play
instead
of
competi-
tion.
For
example,
if
one
player
falls
in
battle,
his
or
her
character
must
be
resur-
rected
or
all
players
are
reset
to
the
nearest
spawn
point.
Fans
of
"the
little
plumber
that
could"
will
definitely
flock
to
play
Nintendo's
"Super
Mario
3-D"
on
the
3DS.
This
fun-filled
game
lets
players
see
environments
in
3-D,
which
makes
them
eas-
ier
to
navigate.
Developers
have
taken
the
liberty
to
hide
items
behind
objects
and
make
levels
that
stress
the
use
of
roaming
around
in
3-D.
Players
will
feel
familiar
per-
forming
rolling
somersaults
and
dashing,
while
alternate
versions
of
the
plumber,
like
Tanooki
Mario,
offer
addi-
tional
maneuvers
to
conquer
challenging
levels.
Anyone
who
thinks
most
games
coddle
to
the
player
will
appreciate
the
action
RPG,
"Dark
Souls,"
by
Namco
Bandai.
This
ex-
tremely
challenging
PS3
and
Xbox
360
game
will
test
the
player's
skills
and
patience,
but
the
sense
of
accomplish-
ment
gained
with
success
is
unparalleled.
As
the
develop-
ers
stressed,
"Expect
to
die
frequently
while
playing
this
game."
Players
feeling
partic-
ularly
unfriendly
can
actually
invade
other
player's
games
and
attack
them
on
sight.
The
highly
successful
"Tomb
Raider"
series
has
received
a
"reboot"
and
will
be
available
on
the
PC,
PS3
and
Xbox
360.
Square
Enix
decided
to
create
a
prequel
that
stars
a
younger,
more
vulnerable
Lara
Croft
that
doesn't
resem-
ble
the
perfect,
mega-heroine
portrayed
in
the
movies.
En-
vironmental
puzzles
and
ex-
ploration
are
still
the
main
focus,
but
Lara
can
use
her
new
Survival
Mode
to
high-
light
objects
in
the
area
where
she
can
interact.
In
addition,
enemy
encounters
are
much
more
personal
and
stress
her
inexperience
as
a
spelunker.
COPYRIGHT 2011
CREATORS.COM
“Dark Souls”
the Future of Video Games...
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 14
By Dr. Laurie Hess
Universal
Uclick
“I’ve never had to bring him
to the vet before, because he’s
never been sick ...”
At
the
animal
hospital,
I
hear
this
same
declaration
every
day
from
pet
owners
about
their
sick
pets,
regardless
of
the
species
they
own.
And
here’s
the
catch-22:
If
these
folks
had
brought
in
their
pets
before
they
were
sick,
instead
of
waiting
until
after
they
showed
signs
of
illness,
their
pets
might
not
have
become
ill
in
the
first
place.
This
is
especially
true
of
fer-
rets,
those
masked
mischief-
makers
who
make
wonderful
companions
but
have
become
so
popular
as
pets
that
their
domestication
and
inbreeding
have
made
them
susceptible
to
a
handful
of
common
—
often
preventable
—
illnesses.
Among
the
top
preventable
health
problems
in
ferrets
are:
♥Foreign object ingestion:
Just
as
human
children
put
everything
in
their
mouths,
so
do
young
ferrets.
Shoes,
parts
of
the
couch,
toys
—
you
name
it;
they’ll
eat
it.
And
then
they
develop
intestinal
obstructions,
which
are
marked
by
diarrhea,
bloating
and
sometimes
vomiting.
This
requires
lifesaving
intestinal
surgery
to
resolve.
So
if
you
ferret-proof
your
crazy
crit-
ter’s
environment
by
remov-
ing
all
small
objects
from
the
floor
and
never
leaving
him
out
of
his
cage
unsupervised,
you
can
avoid
a
costly
trip
to
the
emergency
room.
♥ Hairball ingestion: Just
as
young
ferrets
eat
foreign
ob-
jects,
middle-
to
older-age
ferrets
ingest
hair,
and
can
de-
velop
intestinal
obstructions
due
to
hairballs.
These
furry
friends
often
groom
exces-
sively,
consuming
large
amounts
of
hair
that
stick
to-
gether
with
mucus
in
their
saliva
to
form
cigar-shaped
mats
that
plug
up
their
narrow
intestines,
leading
to
diarrhea,
lack
of
appetite,
lethargy
and
occasional
vomiting.
Some-
times
a
laxative
treatment
will
help
these
hairballs
pass,
but
more
often,
complicated
in-
testinal
surgery
is
required
to
unplug
these
tiny
creatures.
With
brushing
and
a
couple
of
oral
doses
of
a
petroleum-
based
cat
hairball
laxative
each
week,
you
can
avoid
this
situation.
♥ Urinary-tract obstruc-
tion: The
most
common
cause
of
urinary-tract
obstruc-
tion
in
male
ferrets
is
prostate
gland
enlargement,
which
compresses
the
urethra
(out-
flow
tract
of
the
bladder),
pre-
venting
urination.
Prostate
gland
enlargement
in
ferrets
is
most
often
a
result
of
an
adrenal
gland
tumor
that
pro-
duces
hormones
that
cause
the
prostate
to
swell.
Both
males
and
females
can
de-
velop
these
tumors,
but
be-
cause
females
don’t
have
prostates,
they
don’t
develop
urinary-tract
obstructions.
While
the
cause
of
adrenal
disease
in
ferrets
is
not
com-
pletely
understood,
and
we
cannot
prevent
it,
we
can
rec-
ognize
its
telltale
signs
—
hair
loss
and
itchy
skin
—
and
treat
it
with
hormones
and
sometimes
surgery
when
it
first
occurs,
before
urinary
obstruction
develops.
So
if
your
ferret
starts
scratching
and
showing
patchy
baldness,
it’s
time
for
a
visit
to
the
vet.
♥ Dental disease: Can
you
imagine
eating
every
day
and
never
brushing
your
teeth?
That’s
what
most
pets
do,
but
at
least
most
cat
and
dog
owners
take
their
pets
for
reg-
ular
dental
cleaning.
On
the
other
hand,
most
ferret
own-
ers
never
do.
In
fact,
most
fer-
ret
owners
are
not
even
aware
that
their
naughty
nibblers
need
dental
cleaning.
Ferrets,
like
dogs
and
cats,
should
have
an
annual
dental
scaling
and
cleaning,
and
ferret
own-
ers
should
brush
their
pets’
teeth
weekly
to
help
keep
tar-
tar
buildup
down.
There
are
tiny
toothbrushes
that
fit
on
a
human
finger
that
are
used
with
poultry-flavored
tooth-
paste
especially
designed
for
ferret
fangs.
Regular
tooth
care
in
ferrets
reduces
gin-
givitis,
tooth
root
infection
and
tooth
loss
that
commonly
occurs
in
ferrets
as
they
age.
So
if
you
own
a
ferret
and
he
has
never
visited
a
vet,
it’s
time
for
a
checkup
—
even
if
he
isn’t
ill.
Remember,
an
ounce
of
prevention
is
always
worth
a
pound
of
cure.
Dr. Laurie Hess cares for
birds and other exotic pets,
such as rabbits, ferrets,
guinea pigs, smaller rodents
and reptiles at the Veterinary
Center for Birds & Exotics in
Bedford Hills, N.Y. Dr. Hess
previously served as head of
the Avian & Exotic Pet Serv-
ice at the renowned Animal
Medical Center in New York
City.
Ferrets are lively pets whose curiosity can get them into problems that are far easier to
prevent than to treat.
Fun ferrets need owners who keep
them out of trouble
PREVENTING
PREVENTING
Mr. Leon Blevins & Mrs. Shannah Blevins Mr. Leon Blevins & Mrs. Shannah Blevins
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 16-17
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m6:15pm7:40pm8:25pm9:10pm10:35p
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m4:50pm7:05pm7:45pm9:55pm10:40p
Digital Cinema Showtimes:9:35am
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5:35pm6:30pm8:30pm9:25pm11:25pm
Mr. Popper's PenguinsDigital Cinema
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2:00pm3:25pm4:40pm6:10pm7:20pm
8:55pm10:05pm
Judy Moody and the Not Bummer
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Schedule good for Friday June 24
Tinseltown
Bad TeacherCinemark XD Showtimes:
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times:9:50am1:05pm4:15pm7:30pm
10:50pm
The Hangover Part II Digital Cinema Show-
times:9:05am11:40am2:25pm7:55pm10:40pm
Kung Fu Panda 2Digital Cinema Show-
times:9:45am12:15pm3:00pm5:15pm
10:15pm
Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides-
Digital Cinema Showtimes:
9:35am12:55pm4:20pm7:40pm11:00pm
BridesmaidsDigital Cinema Showtimes:
10:15am1:15pm4:25pm7:35pm10:35pm
2D GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 11:15a 11:45a
2:00p 2:30p 5:00p 5:35p 7:45p 8:30p 10:30p
2D KUNG FU PANDA (PG) 10:45a 12:15p
1:10p 2:35p 3:40p 5:00p 6:10p 7:30p 8:35p
10:00p
2D PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN:
ON STRANGER TIDES – D (PG) 10:30a 1:45p
5:00p 8:15p
3D GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 10:45a 1:30p
4:35p 7:30p 10:15p
3D KUNG FU PANDA 2 - DIGITAL(PG) 10:30a
1:35p 4:00p 6:30p 9:00p
3D PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN:
ON STRANGER TIDES – D (PG-13) 11:15a
2:30p 6:10p 9:25p
BRIDESMAIDS - DIGITAL (R) 10:45a 12:45p
1:30p 3:45p 4:30p 6:40p 7:30p 9:35p 10:25p
DBOX 3D PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN:
ON STRANGER TIDE (PG-13) 11:15a 2:30p
6:10p 9:25p
THE FIRST GRADER (PG-13)
11:35a 2:20p 5:00p 7:40p 10:30p
THE HANGOVER PART TWO - DIGITAL
(R) 10:30a 11:30a 12:15p 1:00p 2:00p 2:45p
3:30p 4:30p 5:15p 6:15p 7:00p 7:45p 8:45p
9:30p 10:15p
THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13)
11:45a 3:15p 6:35p 10:00p
X-MEN FIRST CLASS (PG-13)
10:30a 11:30a 12:30p 1:45p 2:45p 3:45p
5:00p 6:15p 7:00p 8:15p 9:30p 10:15p
Premiere Cinemas 6101 Gateway West S.15
AFRICAN CATS (G) 12:10 | 2:05 | 4:00
BATTLE: LA (PG-13)12:25 | 2:40 | 5:05 | 7:35 | 10:00
DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2: RODRICK RULES (PG)
1:00 | 3:10 | 5:25 | 7:30 | 9:35
HANNA (PG-13) 5:15 | 9:40
HOODWINKED TOO: HOOD VS EVIL
2-D (PG) 12:30 | 2:30 | 4:30 | 6:50 | 8:45
HOODWINKED TOO: HOOD VS EVIL 3-D
(PG) 1:15 | 3:15 | 7:45
HOP (PG) 12:45 | 2:45 | 4:45 | 6:40 | 8:50
MARS NEEDS MOMS 3-D 12:20 | 2:50 | 5:00
RANGO (PG) 12:50 | 3:05 | 5:20 | 7:40 | 9:50
RIO IN 2-D (G) 12:40 | 3:00 | 5:10 | 7:10 | 9:30
RIO IN 3-D (G) 12:00 | 2:10 | 4:20 | 6:30 | 8:30
SCREAM 4 (R) 7:15 | 9:55
SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13)12:05 | 2:15 |
4:40 | 7:00 | 9:25
SOUL SURFER (PG) 6:55 | 9:20
THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R)
12:15 | 2:35 | 4:55 | 7:25 | 9:45
EAST POINTE MOVIES 12
I-10 & Lee Trevino Schedule good for 6/24 - 6/30
Schedule good for Friday June 24
Schedule good for 6-24-11
Bad TeacherDigital Cinema Showtimes:
10:45am11:45am1:45pm2:45pm4:45pm5:4
5pm7:45pm8:45pm10:45pm
Cars 2RealD 3D Showtimes:
10:30am1:30pm4:30pm7:30pm10:30pm
Digital Cinema Showtimes:10:00am
11:15am1:00pm2:15pm4:00pm5:15pm
7:00pm8:15pm10:00pm
The Art of Getting By 7:10pm10:10pm
Mr. Popper's PenguinsDigital Cinema
Showtimes:10:15am11:30am1:15pm
2:30pm4:15pm5:30pm7:15pm8:30pm
10:15pm
Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Sum-
mer Digital Cinema Showtimes: 10:10am
1:10pm 4:10pm
Midnight in ParisDigital Cinema
Showtimes:10:25am1:25pm4:25pm7:25pm
10:25pm
Super 8Digital Cinema Showtimes:
10:35am11:35am1:35pm2:35pm4:35pm
5:35pm7:35pm8:35pm10:35pm
ThorDigital Cinema Showtimes:
10:05am1:05pm4:05pm7:05pm10:05pm
Fast FiveDigital Cinema Showtimes:
10:20am1:20pm4:20pm7:20pm10:20pm
RioDigital Cinema Showtimes:
10:40am1:40pm4:40pm
InsidiousDigital Cinema Showtimes:
7:40pm10:40pm
Schedule good for Friday June 24
PREMIERE MONTWOOD 7
Schedule good for June 24 - June 30
DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2 (PG)12:45p 3:00p 5:15p 7:35p
9:50p
HOODWINKED2 (PG)12:15p 2:20p 4:25p
HOP (PG)12:25p 2:40p 4:55p 7:10p 9:25p
LINCOLN LAWYER (R)12:35p 3:15p 5:50p 8:30p
RANGO (PG)12:05p 2:30p 4:50p 7:15p 9:40p
SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13)12:00p 2:25p 5:00p
7:25p 9:45p
SOUL SURFER (PG)12:10p 2:35p 5:05p 7:30p 9:45p
THE BEAVER (PG-13)6:30p 8:40p
2200 N. Yarbrough
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 18
Now Showing
The First Grader
It’s Never too late to dream
Directed
by
Justin
Chadwick
In
a
small,
remote
mountain
top
pri-
mary
school
in
the
Kenyan
bush,
hundreds
of
children
are
jostling
for
a
chance
for
the
free
education
newly
promised
by
the
Kenyan
gov-
ernment.
One
new
applicant
causes
astonishment
when
he
knocks
on
the
door
of
the
school.

He
is
Maruge
(Oliver
Litondo),
an
old
Mau
Mau
veteran
in
his
eighties,
who
is
des-
perate
to
learn
to
read
at
this
late
stage
of
his
life.

He
fought
for
the
liberation
of
his
country
and
now
feels
he
must
have
the
chance
of
an
education
so
long
denied
-
even
if
it
means
sitting
in
a
classroom
alongside
six-year-olds.
Moved
by
his
passionate
plea,
head
teacher
Jane
Obinchu
(Naomie
Harris),
supports
his
struggle
to
gain
admission
and
together
they
face
fierce
opposition
from
parents
and
officials
who
don’t
want
to
waste
a
precious
school
place
on
such
an
old
man.
Full
of
vitality
and
humour,
the
film
explores
the
remarkable
relationships
Maruge
builds
with
his
classmates
some
eighty
years
his
junior.
Through
Maruge’s
journey,
we
are
taken
back
to
the
shocking
untold
story
of
British
colonial
rule
50
years
earlier
where
Maruge
fought
for
the
freedom
of
his
country,
eventually
ending
up
in
the
extreme
and
harsh
conditions
of
the
British
detention
camps.
THE ART OF
GETTING BY
Open
Limited
06/17/11
Runtime
83
min
MPAA
Rating
PG-13
Starring
Freddie
Highmore,
Emma
Roberts,
Michael
An-
garano,
Elizabeth
Reaser,
Sam
Robards
Genre
Romance
Synopsis
George,
a
lonely
and
fatalistic
teen
who's
made
it
all
the
way
to
his
senior
year
with-
out
ever
having
done
a
real
day
of
work,
is
befriended
by
Sally,
a
popular
but
complicated
girl
who
recognizes
in
him
a
kindred
spirit.
Bad Teacher
Open
Nationwide
06/24/11
Runtime
89
min
MPAA
Rating
R
for
sexual
content,
nudity,
language
and
some
drug
use.
Starring
Cameron
Diaz,
Jason
Segel,
Justin
Timberlake,
Lucy
Punch,
Thomas
Lennon
Genre Comedy
Synopsis
After
being
dumped
by
her
current
boyfriend,
a
foul-mouthed,
gold-digging
seventh-grade
teacher
sets
her
sights
on
a
colleague
who
is
dating
the
school's
model
teacher.
Green Lantern
Open
Nationwide
06/17/11
Runtime
105
min
MPAA
Rating
PG-13
Starring
Ryan
Reynolds,
Mark
Strong,
Peter
Sarsgaard,
Blake
Lively
Genre
Action/Adventure,
SciFi/Fan-
tasy
Synopsis
Each
sector
of
space
is
pro-
tected
by
a
Green
Lantern,
possessing
a
power
ring
that
uses
a
powerful
green
energy
to
do
anything
within
the
limits
of
the
user's
imagination
and
will
power.
When
the
Green
Lantern
assigned
to
this
sector
of
space
finds
himself
dying
on
planet
Earth,
he
tells
the
ring
to
find
a
suitable
successor.
The
chosen
replacement,
hot-shot
test
pilot
Hal
Jordan,
finds
himself
with
a
new
job
he
never
expected.
Cars 2
Open
Nationwide
06/24/11
Runtime
112
min
MPAA
Rating
G
Starring
Owen
Wilson,
Larry
the
Cable
Guy,
Michael
Caine,
Emily
Mortimer,
Bonnie
Hunt
Genre
Animation,
Comedy,
Ac-
tion/Adventure
Synopsis
Star
racecar
Lightning
McQueen
and
the
incomparable
tow
truck
Mater
take
their
friendship
to
exciting
new
places
in
"Cars
2"
when
they
compete
in
the
first-ever
World
Grand
Prix
to
determine
the
world's
fastest
car.
But,
the
road
to
the
championship
is
filled
with
plenty
of
potholes,
detours
and
hilarious
surprises
when
Mater
gets
caught
up
in
an
in-
triguing
adventure
of
his
own:
international
espionage.
Torn
between
assisting
Lightning
McQueen
in
the
high-profile
race
and
towing
the
line
in
a
top-secret
spy
mission,
Mater's
action-packed
journey
leads
him
on
an
explosive
chase
through
the
streets
of
Japan
and
Europe,
trailed
by
his
friends
and
watched
by
the
whole
world.
The Tree of Life
Runtime
138
min
MPAA
Rating
PG-13
for
some
the-
matic
material.
Starring
Brad
Pitt,
Sean
Penn,
Joanna
Going,
Fiona
Shaw,
Jackson
Hurst
Genre
Drama,
SciFi/Fantasy
Synopsis
The
Tree
of
Life
is
the
im-
pressionistic
story
of
a
Midwestern
family
in
the
1950's.
The
film
follows
the
life
journey
of
the
eldest
son,
Jack,
through
the
innocence
of
childhood
to
his
disillusioned
adult
years
as
he
tries
to
reconcile
a
complicated
relationship
with
his
father.
Jack
finds
himself
a
lost
soul
in
the
modern
world,
seeking
answers
to
the
origins
and
mean-
ing
of
life
while
questioning
the
existence
of
faith.
We
see
how
both
brute
nature
and
spiritual
grace
shape
not
only
our
lives
as
individuals
and
families,
but
all
life.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 19
SUPER STIMULUS TUESDAY: $1
DRINK, $1 POPCORN, or $5.00 OFF
ANY REGULAR COMBO
ALL SEATS ALL SHOWS $5.00
EVERY TUESDAY!!
SUMMER KID SERIES: MADAGAS-
CAR THURSDAY JUNE @10:00AM
ADMISSION IS ONLY $1.00!
CARS 2 2D G 10:30 12:15 2:50 5:25
8:00 (10:45 FRI/SAT)
CARS 2 3D G 11:00 1:35 4:10 6:45
9:15 (12:00 FRI/SAT)
BAD TEACHER R 10:30 12:50 3:10
5:25 7:50 10:10 (12:15 FRI/SAT)
GREEN LANTERN 2D PG-13 10:30
11:00 1:00 1:30 3:30 4:00 6:00 6:30
8:30 9:00 (11:00 11:30 FRI/SAT)
GREEN LANTERN 3D *3D SUR-
CHARGE APPLIES* 11:30 2:00 4:30
7:00 9:30 (12:00 FRI/SAT)
MR.POPPERS PENGUIN'S PG 10:45
11:45 1:15 2:15 3:45 4:45 6:15 7:15
8:45 9:45 (11:15 FRI/SAT)
SUPER 8 11:00 12:40 1:40 3:20 4:20
6:00 7:00 8:40 9:40 (11:30 FRI/SAT)
X-MEN:FIRST CLASS PG-13 11:00
1:00 2:00 4:00 5:00 7:00 8:00 10:00
(11:00 FRI/SAT)
KUNG FU PANDA 3D PG *3D SUR-
CHARGE APPLIES* 12:15 2:50 5:25
KUNG FU PANDA 2D PG 10:30
12:50 3:10 5:25 7:50 10:10
HANGOVER II R 11:30 2:00 4:30 7:00
9:30 (12:00 FRI/SAT)
BRIDESMAIDS R 11:30 2:20 5:10 8:00
(11:00 FRI/SAT)
MIDNIGHT IN PARIS PG-13 7:40
10:10
Schedule good for 6/24 - 6/30
Uncle
Sam,
El
Paso
Community
College
(EPCC)
Govern-
ment
Instructor
Leon
Blevins,
will
be
honored
by
the
El
Paso
International
Museum
of
Art
during
their
exhibit,
“Happy
Birthday,
America!”

Mr.
Blevins
has
donated
his
entire
“Uncle
Sam”
memorabilia
collection
to
the
International
Museum
to
be
used
in
this
an-
nual
pa-
triotic
ex-
hibit.

Uncle
Sam
and
Aunt
Sammie
(Mrs.
Shannah
Blevins)
will
be
part
of
the
opening
reception
that
will
take
place
from
2:00
–
4:00pm,
Sunday, June 26th.

The
El
Paso
International
Museum
of
Art
is
located
at
1211
Montana
Avenue.


“Happy Birthday, Amer-
ica!” will
be
an
exhibit
of
art
with
patriotic
themes,
including
land-
scapes,
U.
S.
Military,
4th
of
July
celebrations
and
Uncle
Sam.

Artists’
work
from
West
Texas
and
Southern
New
Mexico
will
be
on
display.

The
exhibition
will
run
from
June
26th
through
July
30th.


Leon
Blevins
has
been
an
in-
structor
of
Government
at
EPCC
since
1972
and
learned
early
on
that
costuming
was
an
impor-
tant
way
to
hold
the
attention
of
stu-
dents.

Mr.
Blevins’
costumes
number
over
60.
His
most
famous
is
Uncle
Sam.

He
has
been
recognized
nation-
wide.

Some
of
his
highest
honors
have
been
events
with
Bill
and
Hillary
Clinton,
George
W.
Bush
and
partici-
pating
in
the
many
Independence
Day,
Veterans’
Day
and
Thanksgiving
Day
parades.
Mr.
Blevins
hosts
a
weekly
television
show,
“Perspectives
El
Paso”,
that
appears
on
EPCC-TV
and
KCOS
Public
Television.
For
more
information
on
“Happy Birthday,
America!” contact
Museum
Docent,
Jaime
Gonzalez,
at
(915)
543-6747
or
visit
the
El
Paso

International
Museum
website
at
http://www.internationalmuseumofart.net.

Uncle Sam Immortalized at
El Paso Museum
“El Paso Wind Symphony”
7:00PM – 9:00PM
July 3, 2011
Chamizal National Memorial
www.elpasoartsandculture.org
The
City
of
El
Paso
Museums
and
Cultural
Affairs
Department
(MCAD)
is
pleased
to
present
the
El
Paso
Wind
Symphony
as
part
of
the
Music
Under
the
Stars
Independence
Day
Fireworks
Spectacular.
The
El
Paso
Wind
Symphony
will
play
patriotic
selections
with
a
fireworks
finale
at
8:45
pm.
The
concert
will
be
held
Sunday
July 3,
2011 from
7:00
pm
to
9:00
pm
at
the
Chamizal
National
Memorial
located
at
800
South
San
Marcial
Street.
Grills
are
allowed
at
the
park
except
in
the
inner
part
of
the
park
known
as
the
bowl.
The
first
6,000
visi-
tors
will
receive
complimentary
3D
glasses
for
fire-
works
courtesy
of
the
Museums
and
Cultural
Affairs
Department.
Please
note
alcohol
is
not
allowed
at
the
Chamizal
National
Memorial.
Glass
containers
or
pets
are
not
allowed
at
the
park.
Park and Ride!
Concert
goers
may
park
at
the
El
Paso
Zoo
and
take
a
shuttle
to
the
park
for
free!
Shuttle
hours
are
from
6:00
pm
to
10:00
pm.
to
perform
at

Music
Under
the
Stars

Independence Day Fireworks Celebration
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 20
If you want your upcoming event listed in SPOTLIGHT’S Out & About section, please send all your relevant data by e-mail to:
editorial@spotlightepnews.com
Calendar of upcoming events for
El Paso/ Southern New Mexico are
from June 24th - June 30th, 2011
NORTHEAST/
CENTRAL
El Paso Diablos
Baseball —
The
American
Association
minor
league
team
regular
home
game
time
is
7:05
p.m.
(Sundays
at
6:05
p.m.)
at
Cohen
Stadium
in
Northeast
El
Paso.
Ticket
in-
formation:
755-2000
or
diab-
los.com.
•
June 21-23 —
Amarillo
•
July 2-5 —Lincoln Salt-
dogs
Chivas El Paso Pa-
triots Soccer —
The
pro-
fessional
soc-
cer
team’s
home
games
are
8
p.m.
at
Gary
Del
Palacio
Field
of
Dreams,
6941
Indus-
trial.
The
Patriots
are
an
affili-
ate
team
with
Chivas
de
Guadalajara.
Information/tickets:
771-6620
or
chivaselpaso.com.
• Friday, June 24 —
Laredo
Heat
•
Saturday, June 25 —
Rio
Grande
Valley
FC
‘A Few Good Men’ —
El
Paso
Playhouse,
2501
Montana,
presents
the
stage
version
of
the
movie
(which
starred
Jack
Nicholson,
Tom
Cruise
and
Demi
Moore)
June 24 through July 16.
The
stage
version
was
writ-
ten
by
Aaron
Sorkin,
who
wrote
the
original
screenplay.
Showtimes
are
Showtimes
are
8
p.m.
Friday
and
Saturday
and
2
p.m.
Sunday.
Tickets:
$10
($8
seniors,
$7
military/students
with
ID).
In-
formation:
532-1317,
elpaso-
playhouse.com.
The
story
centers
on
the
death
of
a
soldier
and
the
trial
of
two
Marines
accused
in
the
case,
and
the
lawyer
who
must
unravel
the
secrecy
hid-
ing
the
facts.
The
play
opens
the
Play-
house’s
2011-2012
season.
Summer Repertory
2011 —
El
Paso
Commu-
nity
College
Performer’s
Stu-
dio
presents
its
3rd
Summer
Repertory
Season
in
June
and
July
at
the
EPCC
Transmoun-
tain
Campus
Forum
Theatre
on
Hwy
54
(Diana
exit).
Showtime
at
7:30
p.m.
Thurs-
day
through
Saturday,
unless
listed
otherwise.
Box
office
opens
at
6:30
p.m.
Admis-
sion:
$10
($5
students,
fac-
ulty,
staff,
military
and
seniors).
Ages
7
and
older
welcome.
Information:
Forum
Box
Office,
831-5056
or
831-
3205.
•
“The Great Ameri-
can Trailer Park
Musical” —
The
Off-
Broadway
hit
is
June 23-25.
Joyful
and
unashamedly
vul-
gar,
Betsy
Kelso’s
comic
fable
about
women
in
a
Florida
trailer
park
and
their
no-account
men
is
more
fun
than
a
chair-throwing
episode
of
Jerry
Springer
set
to
music.
•
“Rodeo Mongolia:
A Children’s Musi-
cal” —
2
p.m.
Saturday,
June 25.
This
different
and
engaging
story
tackles
themes
of
arrogance,
treachery,
self-
sacrifice,
forgiveness
and
hope.
Written
by
Charles
Pas-
coe,
the
show
has
been
per-
formed
across
the
world.
Box
office
opens
at
1:15
p.m.
‘Viva El Paso!’ —
The
summertime
pageant
returns
to
McKelligon
Canyon
Am-
phitheatre
for
its
34th
season
8:30
p.m.
Fridays
and
Satur-
days, June 3-Aug. 13,
offer-
ing
an
array
of
multicolored
costumes,
electrifying
musi-
cal
production
numbers,
and
legendary
characters.
The
outdoor
musical
extravaganza
highlights
the
four
major
cul-
tures
of
the
region,
through
drama,
song
and
dance,
that
have
called
El
Paso
home:
Native
American,
Spanish
Conquistadors,
Mexican
and
Western
American.
Tickets:
$15
general
admission,
plus
service
charge.

Continues
on
next
page
P
IC
T
U
R
E
S
F
O
R
IL
L
U
S
T
R
A
T
IO
N
O
N
L
Y
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 21
Continued
from
page
20
‘Viva El Paso!’...Bar-
beque
dinner
with
the
show
offered
6:30
to
7:30
p.m.
Tickets:
$20
($10
ages
12
and
younger).
(Ticketmaster).
In-
formation/group

Scenic Sundays —
El
Paso
area
citizens
and
their
pets
are
invited
to
ride,
skate,
walk
or
run
on
Scenic
Drive,
from
Rim
Road
to
Richmond,
6
a.m.
to
11
a.m.
Sundays
through September,
and
7
a.m.
to
noon
during
the
fall
and
winter
months.
Safety
barrels
will
line
the
area
and
the
El
Paso
Police
Depart-
ment
will
provide
security
along
this
popular
path.
Hosted
by
the
office
of
city
Rep.
Susie
Byrd.
Admission
is
free.
Information:
541-
4416
or
district2@elpaso-
texas.gov.
Barrio Tour —
El
Paso
Chicano(a)
History
Preserva-
tion
Project
hosts
the
second
in
its
series
of
barrio
tours,
El
Paso’s
“Old
Eastside”
8:30
a.m.
to
1
p.m.
Saturday,
June 25,
starting
in
front
of
Lincoln
Center,
4002
Du-
razno
(beneath
the
Spaghetti
Bowl).
The
city’s
old
eastside
was
from
Piedras
Street
to
Reynolds
Street.
Bring
sun
block,
walking
shoes,
hat
and
water.
Participants
may
also
bring
a
walkie-talkie.
Admis-
sion
is
free;
please
RSVP
at
258-0989
or
rayerojas@gmail.com.
The
tour
includes
the
inner
Chamizal,
Lincoln
barrio,
French
Addition,
as
well
as
a
tour
of
where
neighborhoods
where
Diablo,
La
Roca,
Cor-
dova
Gardens,
Siapan
and
Dizzyland
used
to
be.
Crystal Dreams 7 -
The
electronic
“Paint
Party”
music
event
is
7
p.m.
to
1:30
a.m.
Saturday, June 25,
at
Cohen
Stadium,
9700
Gate-
way
North,
with
DJs,
per-
formers,
artists,
vendor
booths,
live
circus
and
acro-
bat
acts,
firework
show
and
the
explosion
of
the
(wash-
able)
paint
bomb
at
11
p.m.
Audience
members
are
en-
couraged
to
wear
white.
Tick-
ets:
$15
general
admission.
Information:
755-2000
or
dia-
blos.com.
MISSION
VALLEY
El Paso Roller Derby
El
Paso
County
Coliseum,
4100
E.
Paisano.
Doors
open
at
3
p.m.
Tickets:
$6
to
$10,
plus
service
charge.
(Ticket-
master).
Information:
474-
1666
or
elpasorollerderby.com.
El
Paso
Roller
Derby
was
established
in
late
2010
and
hopes
to
become
a
member
league
of
the
Women’s
Flat
Track
Derby
Association.
Ballet Folklórico
Churuhui —
The
group
performs
dances
from
the
dif-
ferent
regions
of
Mexico
at
7:30
p.m.
Friday and Satur-
day, June 24-25,
at
the
Chamizal
National
Memorial,
800
S.
San
Marcial.
Admis-
sion:
$7.
Information:
588-
5743.
Music Under the
Stars —
Havana
Quintet,
and
Art
Lewis
with
Fernando
Lechuga
perform
7:30
to
9:30
p.m.
Sunday,
June 26,
at
the
Chamizal
National
Memorial
amphitheater,
800
S.
San
Marcial.
Admission
is
free.
Information:
541-4481
(MCAD),
532-7273
(Chamizal)
or
elpasoartsand-
culture.org.
No
alcohol,
glass
containers,
or
pets
permitted
at
park.
No
smoking
al-
lowed
in
bowl
area.

Free
park-
and-ride
shuttles
available
from
El
Paso
Zoo
to
Chamizal
and
depart
regu-
larly
6:30
to
10
p.m.
EASTSIDE
Newsboys —
The
Grammy-nominated
and
Dove
Award-winning
Chris-
tian
pop
rock
band
performs
at
7
p.m.
Friday, June 24,
at
Abundant
Living
Faith
Cen-
ter,
1000
Valley
Crest.
Continues
on
next
page
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 22
Continued
from
page
21..

Newsboys...The
band,
originally
from
Queensland,
Australia,
has
sold
more
then
6.5
million
units
with
five
Gold
albums
and
26
No.
1
hits.
Tickets:
$20;
available
in
advance
at
the
ALFC
office.
Information:
532-8543
or
alfc.com.
The
band
features
lead
vo-
calist
Michael
Tait,
a
former
member
of
the
band
“dc
talk”
along
with
guitarist
Jody
Davis,
keyboardist
Jeff
Frankenstein
and
drummer
Duncan
Phillips.
Their
latest
CD
“Born
Again”
had
the
2nd
highest
debut
on
Billboard’s
Christian
album
charts
and
placed
at
No.
4
on
the
Bill-
board
overall
charts.
The
performance
is
part
of
Oneeighty
Ministries’
2011
youth
conference,
“Super-
nova”
June 21-24.
WESTSIDE/
DOWNTOWN
Dancing in the City
—
The
City
of
El
Paso
Muse-
ums
and
Cultural
Affairs
De-
partment
and
Conventions
and
Visitors
Bureau
present
the
outdoor
dance
concerts
8
to
10
p.m.
Saturdays,
June
11-July 30,
at
Arts
Festival
Plaza,
featuring
local
and
re-
gional
performers.
Dance
les-
son
precedes
the
event
at
7
p.m.
Beverages
and
food
available
for
purchase;
no
outside
food
or
drinks
permit-
ted.
Admission:
$6
($10
cou-
ples);
available
at
the
door.
Information:
541-4481.

June 25 – Grupo Soncache
(merengue,
bachata)
Cool Canyon Nights
—
The
summer
series
of
free
outdoor
concerts
are
Thurs-
days
at
McKelligon
Canyon,
sponsored
by
Townsquare
Media
and
the
El
Paso
Con-
vention
and
Performing
Arts
Centers.
Information:
544-
9550
or
231-1100.
Bi-national Rally on
the River -
Rio
Grande
Safe
Communities
Coalition’s
7th
annual
event
in
obser-
vance
of
“International
Day
Against
Drug
Abuse
and
Il-
licit
Trafficking”
is
Saturday,
June 25,
at
International
Boundary
Monument
Marker
One,
where
Texas,
New
Mex-
ico
and
Mexico
meet.
The
anti-drug
awareness
day
was
established
by
the
United
Na-
tions
in
1988.
Admission
is
free.
Sponsored
by
Rio
Grande
Safe
Communities
Coalition.
Information:
775-
2555
or
safecommuni-
tiesept@sbcglobal.net.
To
get
there:
Cross
the
Rio
Grande
at
Ewald-Kipp
Road
and
West
Paisano,
near
the
railroad
overpass
just
south
of
Executive
Center.
Turn
left
and
follow
dirt
road
to
the
boundary
marker.
Santa Lucia Ker-
mess —
Santa
Lucia
Catholic
Church
will
host
its
2011
Gran
Kermess
4
p.m.
to
midnight
Saturday
and
Sun-
day,
June 25-26,
at
on
the
church
grounds
at
518
Gal-
lagher,
featuring
love
music,
games
and
rides
and
home-
made
gorditas
and
churros.
Admission
is
free;
donations
appreciated.
Information:
592-5245.
Willie Cager Retire-
ment Party —
The
re-
tirement
party
for
El
Paso
basketball
legend
and
philan-
thropist
Willie
Cager
is
6:30
to
11
p.m.
Saturday,
June 25,
at
El
Paso
Convention
Center,
in
celebration
of
Cager’s
Learning
Center/Kids
Univer-
sity
to
be
built
in
Fabens.
Guest
speakers
include
Nevil
Shed
and
Judge
Williams.
Dinner
and
entertainment
also
offered.
Tickets:
$100
($125
per
couple);
available
at
the
door.
Information:
920-4173
or
cageruniversity.org.
Cager
will
retire
from
the
Ysleta
Independent
School
District
after
20
years
of
teaching,
coaching
and
help-
ing
more
than
200,000
kids.
Anime Convention —
The
Fellow
Anime
Lovers
Convention
(FAL-Con)
is
June 24-26 at
2501
Mesa.
The
event
features
competi-
tive..Continues
on
next
page
“Antiques Roadshow” at Cattleman's Steakhouse
PBS’s highest-rated series, “Antiques Roadshow” recently chose the
legendary Cattleman’s Steakhouse on Indian Cliffs Ranch to tape one
of their field trip segments for consideration as part of the El Paso
episodes in Roadshow’s 2012 season.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 23
Continued
on
page
22...

Anime Convention
..gaming,
artists
and
anime
product
vendors,
food
tables
with
pocky
and
other
items,
card
tournaments,
cosplay
events,
giveaways
and
more.
Hours
are
9
a.m.
to
2
a.m.
Friday;
10:30
a.m.
to
2
a.m.
Saturday
and
10:30
to
6
p.m.
Sunday.
All
ages
welcome
during
the
day;
ages
18
and
older
only
after
9
p.m.
Ad-
mission:
$30
for
all
three
days
(ticketbully.com).
VIP
badges
available
at
the
door
for
an
additional
$5.
Informa-
tion:
fal-convention.com.
Alfresco! Fridays —
The
free
outdoor
concerts
begin
at
5:30
p.m.
Fridays
through
Sept.
30
at
Arts
Festi-
val
Plaza
(between
El
Paso
Museum
of
Art
and
Plaza
Theatre).
Presented
by
the
El
Paso
Convention
and
Per-
forming
Arts
Centers
and
the
El
Paso
Convention
and
Visi-
tors
Bureau.
No
outside
food
or
beverages,
or
pets
allowed.
Information:
534-0675,
or
al-
frescofridays.com.
• June 24 - Radio La
Chusma (Latin Reggae).
SOUTHERN
NEW
MExICO
Petting Zoo at Two
Rivers Park —
Rui-
doso’s
Parks
and
Recreation
hosts
a
petting
zoo
for
kids
9
a.m.
to
noon
Saturday,
June
25,
at
Two
Rivers
Park
on
Sudderth
(behind
the
Visitors
Center).
Admission
is
free.
Information:
(575)
257-5030.
San Juan Fiesta and
Turtle Fest —
The
23rd
annual
event
is
Saturday
and
Sunday,
June 25-26,
at
Our
Lady
of
Guadalupe
Catholic
Church
in
Tortugas,
N.M.,
near
Las
Cruces.
The
celebra-
tion
dates
back
to
when
the
present
day
Tortugas
con-
sisted
of
two
separate
vil-
lages,
Guadalupe
and
San
Juan.
Information:
Parish
Of-
fice,
(575)
526-8171.
The
Pre-Derby
Tardeada
is
8
p.m.
Saturday
in
the
covered
pavilion
with
music
by
Genie
and
the
Starliners.
Admission:
$5.
Information:
(575)
526-
4003.
Sunday’s
fiesta
is
10
a.m.
to
8
p.m.
Sunday
with
the
an-
nual
Turtle
Races
at
3
p.m.
(registration
begins
at
noon),
and
a
dance/tardeada
at
4
p.m.
with
music
by
Fierro
Band.
New
this
year
is
the
first
Tortugas
Idol
Contest
at
2
p.m.
Traditional
foods
served
both
days.
Events
conclude
at
8
p.m.
Sunday
with
a
raffle
drawing
for
Southwest
Airline
tickets.
The
6th
annual
Tortugas
Open
Golf
Scramble
is
Fri-
day,
June 24.
To
get
there:
Take
Interstate
10
to
Las
Cruces,
exit
on
Uni-
versity
Avenue
and
go
under
the
freeway;
turn
left
at
the
stop
sign
and
continue
on
Main,
going
through
two
sig-
nals.
Turn
left
on
Tortugas
Drive
and
then
turn
right
on
Parroquia.
Spencer Theater for
Performing Arts —
Airport
Hwy
220
in
Alto,
N.M.
(about
12
miles
north
of
downtown
Ruidoso).
Infor-
mation:
(575)
336-4800,
(888)
818-7872
or
spencertheater.com.
• Miss New Mexico
Pageant —
The
2011
prel-
ude
to
the
Miss
America
Pag-
eant
is June 22-25.
Preliminaries
are
7 p.m.
Wednesday
and
Thursday,
with
finals
at
7
p.m.
Saturday.
Cost:
$29
per
night
for
pre-
liminaries;
$39
for
finals.
A
“Little
Miss
New
Mexico”
talent
show
is
5
p.m.
Thurs-
day.
A
VIP
dinner
and
show
with
former
Miss
America
Kellye
Cash’s
“Tribute
to
Patsy
Cline”
is
Friday.
Cost:
$50
dinner
and
show;
$29
show
only.
VIP
all-event
tickets
are
$175.
Continues
on
next
page
ACROSS
1 Kind of goat
6 Bruce ___
10 Future tulip or onion
14 Debate
15 Cerebral creation
16 ___ Minor
17 Start of an author’s
lament
20 ___ out: nullifies a typo
21 Em follower?
22 Gumbos
23 State
25 The Great Commoner
27 More of the author’s
lament
34 Record
35 In re
36 Assam silkworm
37 Semana components
38 Tabs or markers
40 ___ off: drove
41 Charged up atom
42 Pub game
43 Kind of engagement
44 More of the author’s
lament
48 Estops
49 Leather flask
50 European ermine
53 Taste ___
54 ___ -disant: self-styled
57 End of the author’s
lament
62 ___ grease
63 Expel
64 Airs
65 “Vaya Con ___”
66 Elizabeth, diminutively
67 Stalks
DOWN
1 Pensive
2 Essence
3 Film critic James
4 Beats
5 Shocking sea crit-
ter?
6 Moolah, to Miguel
7 Slive
8 Gridiron judge
9 Burns refusal
10 “___ the Future”
11 ___ -friendly
12 6 Down, to Dino
13 Drum or viol leader
18 Cake topper
19 “___ People”: Doris
Day/Buddy Clark hit
24 TV adjunct
25 Attention getter
26 Followers meaning follow-
ers
27 Press, TV, and radio
28 “All your strength is in
your ___”: Longfellow
29 “___ By Me”
30 Marten
31 Christopher ___, aka Su-
perman
32 REM indicates a ___
state
33 See 7 Down
38 Knob or mat leader
39 Infinity, almost
40 Dates or deletes
42 Aristotle’s teacher
43 Playful bite
45 Slackens off
46 Stirs up
47 Law degs.
50 Food fish
51 Maneuver on an apron
52 Christiania, today
53 Oversee
55 Caen’s river
56 Same as before: in foot-
notes
58 Pen’s mate
59 Seek absolution
60 Barbell add-ons: abbr.
61 Draft board initials
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 24
COPYRIGHT 2011 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC
PISCES (Feb.
19-March
20).
Though
rainbow
chasing
can
be
a
lovely
pastime,
don't
chase
those
that
promise
effortless,
fast
results
for
the
low,
low
price
of
(insert
high,
high
price).
Also
dangerous:
rainbows
that
involve
an
ongoing
financial
obligation.
Bottom
line:
You
shouldn't
have
to
shell
out
much
money
to
follow
your
dreams.
The
Taurus
moon
is
an
appetite
stimulant.
For
those
of
us
who
don't
need
to
eat
more
than
we
already
do,
it
should
come
as
a
comfort
that
the
Taurus
moon
doesn't
confine
her
voracious
influence
to
the
realm
of
food.
Even
stronger
may
be
the
craving
for
excitement,
attention,
ex-
perience,
luxury
and
passion.
Wednesday
brings
a
wel-
come
change
of
pace.
Friday's
new
moon
in
Cancer
presses
an
emotional
"reset"
button.
ARIES (March
21-April
19).
You're
self-assured
until
a
cer-
tain
someone
comes
around,
and
you
become
tongue
tied
and
childlike.
Perhaps
you
see
this
person
as
an
unfriendly
author-
ity
figure.
Hang
in
there.
Something
will
happen
midweek
to
change
this
perception
and
get
you
back
to
your
usual
high
level
of
confidence.
TAURUS (April
20-May
20).
You
will
grow
in
power
as
you
change
self-defeating
behaviors.
Of
course,
you
first
have
to
recognize
which
behaviors
fit
the
bill.
For
instance,
you
may
be
ignoring
instruction
or
half-listening
when
your
full
atten-
tion
is
required.
You'll
make
an
exciting
leap
forward
once
you
identify
the
problem
and
nip
it
in
the
bud.
GEMINI (May
21-June
21).
Most
people
are
reluctant
to
give
honest
feedback,
but
not
you.
You
have
a
way
of
being
truthful
and
charming
at
the
same
time.
So
when
you
commu-
nicate,
the
truth
does
not,
in
fact,
"hurt,"
as
the
saying
sug-
gests.
It
heals.
You'll
give
the
gift
of
constructive
criticism,
and
you'll
change
someone's
life
for
the
better.
CANCER (June
22-July
22).
There
are
"givers,"
and
there
are
"takers."
Here's
how
you
know
that
you're
a
"giver."
When
you
don't
know
what
else
to
do,
you
just
give.
This
week,
you'll
unselfishly
help
humanity
by
building
up
the
people
around
you
in
any
way
you
can.
It
mostly
happens
in
small
gestures
that
mean
more
than
you
realize
at
the
time.
VIRGO (Aug.
23-Sept.
22).
Think
of
cut
flowers
on
their
sec-
ond
day
in
the
vase:
They
may
look
just
as
pretty
as
they
did
on
the
first
day,
but
they
don't
smell
nearly
as
nice.
You're
lucky
when
you
make
an
effort
to
be
fresh
in
every
aspect
of
your
presentation,
including
your
appearance,
the
work
you
do
and
what
you
talk
about.
LIBRA (Sept.
23-Oct.
23).
You've
planned
out
a
certain
goal
several
times,
and
each
time
it
didn't
pan
out.
It's
not
the
goal
but
the
method
of
planning
that
is
flawed.
It's
likely
that
your
plan
doesn't
accurately
account
for
the
resources
of
your
cur-
rent
reality.
Maybe
a
more
creative
approach
is
needed.
Con-
sider
talking
it
out
with
a
good
friend.
SCORPIO (Oct.
24-Nov.
21).
You,
like
most
people,
would
prefer
that
everyone,
or
at
least
a
majority
of
the
people,
like
and
approve
of
you.
However,
this
preference
waxes
and
wanes
throughout
the
week.
For
instance,
midweek
it
will
be
far
more
important
to
you
that
you
do
what's
right
for
you,
even
if
it
means
displeasing
the
group.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
22-Dec.
21).
You
have
no
problem
pointing
out
when
someone's
expectation
is
unrealistic
—
ex-
cept
when
the
person
in
question
is
a
child.
Children
make
you
wonder
if
the
world
might
be
a
better
place
if
we
im-
posed
a
few
more
unrealistic
expectations
on
it.
It's
one
way
to
come
up
with
a
better
tomorrow.
CAPRICORN (Dec.
22-Jan.
19).
Ever
wonder
why
people
seem
to
expect
more
from
you
than
they
do
from
the
others?
Every
time
you
make
a
miracle
happen,
you
set
the
bar
higher
for
the
next
time.
It's
something
to
think
about
as
you
wave
your
magic
wand
over
(i.e.,
put
your
blood,
sweat
and
tears
into)
this
week's
projects.
AQUARIUS (Jan.
20-Feb.
18).
Some
find
it
odd
that
you
are
better
able
to
accept
criticism
than
praise.
They
do
not
yet
un-
derstand
how
complicated
you
can
be,
and
the
puzzle
has
them
fascinated.
You'll
get
more
practice
with
compliments
this
week,
so
try
to
become
more
comfortable
with
and
ac-
cepting
of
the
glowing
aspects
of
who
you
are.
LEO (July
23-Aug.
22).
Maybe
you're
feeling
older
and
more
mature
—
perhaps
even
a
bit
jaded
and
tired.
That's
why
it's
important
to
nudge
your
inner
child
awake.
Call
the
friends,
play
the
games
and
read
the
books
of
your
youth.
Conjure
the
innocence
inside
you.
The
magic
is
all
around
you.
You
just
have
to
believe
it's
there.
Inn of the Mountain
Gods Resort and
Casino —
Mescalero,
N.M.
Shows
begin
at
8
p.m.
Age
21
and
older
admitted.
Prices
listed
do
not
include
service
charge.
(Ticketmaster)
Information:
1-877-277-5677
or
innofthemountaingods.com.
• Clint Black —
The
country
music
legend
per-
forms
at
8
p.m.
Thursday,
June 23.
Black
has
sold
more
than
23
million
albums
worldwide
and
written
and
recorded
more
than
100
songs,
including
No.
1
hits
“Killin’
Time,”
“Put
Yourself
in
My
Shoes,”
“Nothin’
but
the
Taillights”
and
more.
Tickets:
$25-$100.
Music in the Park —
The
Las
Cruces
summer
con-
cert
series
is
7
p.m.
Sundays
June 5-Aug. 28,
featuring
both
local
and
guest
artists.
No
pets
allowed.
Admission
is
free.
Information:
(575)
541-2200
or
las-cruces.org.
• June 26 —
Ekiz (Spanish
dance
and
country)
and
Echo (old
school
R&B)
at
Klein
Park.
‘25th Annual Put-
nam County Spelling
Bee’ —
No
Strings
Theatre
presents
the
musical
comedy
by
William
Finn
and
Rachel
Sheinkin
June 24-July 10,
at
the
Black
Box
Theatre,
430
N.
Downtown
Mall,
in
Las
Cruces.
Directed
by
Tom
Smith.
Performances
are
8
p.m.
Fridays
and
Saturdays,
2:30
p.m.
Sunday
July
3
and
10
and
7
p.m.
Thursday,
July
7.
Tickets:
$10
($9
students
and
seniors
over
65;
$7
all
seats
Thursday).
Informa-
tion/reservations:
(575)
523-
1223
or
no-strings.org.
Set
in
a
middle
school
gym-
nasium,
the
play
takes
a
hilar-
ious
and
heartwarming
look
at
the
pressures
of
growing
up
through
the
eyes
of
quirky
yet
lovable
characters
competing
for
the
title
of
spelling
bee
champ.
Throughout
the
Bee,
each
learns
that
winning
isn’t
everything
and
that
losing
doesn’t
necessarily
make
you
a
loser.
At
each
performance,
four
audience
volunteers
are
selected
and
invited
on
stage
to
participate
in
the
Bee,
mak-
ing
each
performance
unique.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 25
HOME OWNERS - RENTERS I NSURANCE AVAI LABLE
FREE QUOTES • 6560 Montana Ave., Suite 6. El Paso 915-779-2489
By T.J. TOMASI
Eight ways to
Here
are
eight
actions
you
can
take
that
will
improve
your
putting,
and
not
one
of
them
involves
the
stroke
itself!
1.
Take
care
of
direction
at
address
by
standing
behind
the
ball
to
pick
out
the
line
on
which
you
want
your
putt
to
roll.
You
fix
your
direction
with
your
aim,
then
concentrate
on
producing
the
distance
with
your
stroke.
2.
Be
realistic
in
your
expectations
and
don’t
get
mad
or
make
continu-
ous
changes
in
your
putting
stroke
just
because
you
miss.
Fifty
percent
of
all
the
putts
you
miss
are
not
your
fault.
These
misses
are
due
to
imper-
fections
of
the
green
that
you
can’t
always
see,
like
footprints,
spike
marks,
etc.
Remember,
the
best
put-
ters
in
the
world
on
perfect
greens
make
about
50
percent
from
8
feet.
3.
For
short
putts
where
you
can
see
into
the
hole,
pick
a
spot
on
the
cup
liner
and
putt
to
that.
This
will
in-
crease
your
accuracy
since
you’re
putting
at
a
smaller
target.
Aim
small,
miss
small.

4.
On
breaking
putts
where
you
can’t
see
the
cup
liner,
aim
to
the
break
point,
allowing
for
the
pull
of
gravity
down
the
slope.

Continues
on
next
page
IT’S GOOD FOR YOUR GAME
your putting
Dr. T.J.
Tomasi is a
teaching
professional
in Port St.
Lucie, Fla.
Visit his
Web site at
tjtomasi.com.
ABOUT THE WRITER
It looks like I
should roll it
over the trian-
gle here, but
that read does-
n’t include the
pull of gravity.
If I roll it over
the white spot
at the correct
speed instead,
gravity will pull
it in the side
door.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 26
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
Continued
from
page
23
Once
you
have
deter-
mined
where
the
putt
be-
gins
its
break
to
the
hole,
that
should
be
your
new
target.


5.
Stand
on
the
arc
of
the
putt,
not
on
the
target
line,
when
you
read
a
breaking
putt.


6.
Read
all
your
putts
from
three
vantage
points:
from
behind
the
ball,
from
midway
between
the
hole
and
your
ball
on
the
low
side
of
the
break,
and
from
behind
the
cup.
7.
When
you
read
putts,
look
for
the
drainage
pat-
terns.
The
architect
builds
in
slopes
to
route
the
water,
and
they
also
route
your
putts.
8.
On
breaking
putts,
visu-
alize
the
ball
going
in
the
side
door,
as
it
does
in
the
photos
below.
Eight ways...
In the left door it goes.
“Either
this
manis
dead,
or
my
watch
has
stopped.”
— A tour official jokingabout Trevor Immelman
Black and white
BIRDIES AND BOGEYS
White
heads,
black
heads
—
it
sounds
like
a
teenager
with
major
skin
problems,
but
it
isn’t.
It’s
the
battle
of
clubhead
col-
ors
on
the
PGA
Tour,
and
white
is
gain-
ing
on
the
longtime
champion.
Black
has
always
been
the
predominate
color.
TaylorMade
started
it,
and
now
over
80
percent
of
its
tour
pros
use
the
white
head.
What’s
the
advantage?
According
to
the
company,
white
makes
the
club-
head
look
bigger,
and
that
suggests
more
power.
And
it’s
easier
to
line
up.

Maybe
so,
but
the
most
effective
part
of
the
white
head
phenomenon
is
on
the
marketing
side:
The
white
clubhead
“screams”
innovation
without
saying
a
word.
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 27
DON’T MISS IT
Putting
The
Putting
T-Bar
can
help
you
learn
an
im-
portant
part
of
putting
—
using
your
shoul-
ders
like
a
teeter-
totter
to
move
the
putter
head
instead
of
hitting
the
putt
with
your
hands.
It’s
designed
to
help
improve
your
posture
and
alignment
as
well
as
your
stroke.
Find
it
at

www.wrightputtingdynamics.com
for
$99.
ASK THE PRO
Q:
I’m
one
of
the
best
players
at
the
club,
but
I’ve
never
won
the
club
championship
because
it’s
match
play
and
I
always
seem
to
draw
some
guy
who
shouldn’t
even
be
in
the
cham-
pionship
flight,
but
gets
lucky
against
me.
All
I
want
to
do
is
beat
the
guys
I’m
better
than,
then
take
my
chances
in
the
finals,
but
I
never
get
there.
Should
I
change
my
swing
and
take
a
chance
I’ll
get
worse?
—
D.D.
A:
You
don’t
have
to
change
your
swing,
but
you
do
need
to
change
your
concept.
Losing
to
someone
with
a
sorry-looking
swing
is
an
in-
justice
that
violates
your
sense
of
fairness.
It
sounds
to
me
like
your
concept
is
that
the
best
swing
should
always
win,
and
that’s
a
concept
that
can
cause
you
endless
grief.


You
need
to
white
out
the
part
of
your
script
that
reads,
“The
best
swing
should
always
win.”
Condition
yourself
so
that
as
soon
as
you
see
one
of
those
funky,
homemade
swings,
you
get
tough.
You
need
to
embrace
the
“It’s
not
how,
but
how
many”
mindset.
And
there
is
more
good
news:
You’re
not
alone.
In
fact,
former
world
No.
1
Lee
West-
wood
has
the
same
problem.
He
lost
to
Ian
Poulter
in
the
World
Match
Play
Champi-
onship
even
though
Westwood
stripes
it
while
Poulter
is
like
a
popcorn
machine,
spraying
it
all
over
the
place
—
but
he
putts
like
a
dream.


“You
know
he’s
not
going
to
hit
it
great,
but
he’s
going
to
make
a
lot
of
putts
and
get
up
and
down
from
everywhere,”
moaned
West-
wood
after
his
loss.
“He
had
a
few
breaks
as
well.
That’s
the
frustrating
thing
about
match
play
…
sometimes
it’s
not
reflective
of
how
the
players
are
playing.”

This
is
not
the
mindset
of
a
great
match
player.
If
you
want
to
be
club
champ,
don’t
change
your
swing;
change
your
concept.
(There’s more on this subject in my book “The
30-Second Golf Swing” at www.tjtomasi.com.)
(To Ask the Pro a question about golf, e-mail
him at: TJInsider@aol.com.)
to a T
No points
for style
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 28
By RICK MINTER / Cox Newspapers
NEXT
UP...
Race: Bucyrus 200
Where: Road America
When: Saturday, 5:30 p.m. (ET)
TV: ESPN
2010 winner: Carl Edwards
SPRINT CUP CAMPING WORLD TRUCKS NATIONWIDE SERIES
Race: UNOH 225
Where: Kentucky Speedway
When: July 7, 8 p.m. (ET)
TV: SPEED
2010 winner: Todd Bodine
Race: Toyota/Save Mart 350
Where: Infineon Raceway
When: Sunday, 3 p.m. (ET)
TV: TNT
2010 winner: Jimmie Johnson (right)
I
t’s long been a fact
that for NASCAR
teams to improve the
performance of their cars
and gain an edge on the
competition, they have to
work in the “gray area” of
the rule book. That is,
they have to come up with
something that isn’t
specifically prohibited
and hope it will be ruled
illegal by series inspec-
tors.
But the “gray area” for
fans and people outside
NASCAR is whether
those enterprising me-
chanics are innovators or
cheaters.
The issue arose again
last week at Michigan In-
ternational Speedway,
where all three Sprint
Cup cars from Joe Gibbs
Racing were found to be
equipped with engine oil
pans that had not been
previously approved by
NASCAR. Many in the
garage said the pans,
which were changed be-
fore the race, were signifi-
cantly heavier than a nor-
mal oil pan. A heavy oil
pan would allow a team to
have weight in an advan-
tageous place on the car,
as Ford driver Carl Ed-
wards pointed out in his
weekly meeting with the
press.
“I am certain that they
were trying to achieve
some balance with the
car,” he said.
Edwards, who has seen
his own team have a run-
in with NASCAR officials
over technical issues, said
it’s tough for a driver, the
most visible member of
the team, to defend the
work of his crew in a situ-
ation that looks like
cheating.
“It is hard to explain,”
Edwards said, adding
that he got an eye-opener
on the subject when he
was chosen for the Presi-
dent’s Council for Fitness,
Sports and Nutrition.
“There is a big vetting
process that goes with
that. I had to be on a 30-
minute phone call about
every bad thing I have
done in my life.
“They really wanted to
talk about these times
that our team had been
caught cheating. They
were like, ‘Why were you
fined these points and
this money? You guys
were cheating.’”
Edwards said he an-
swered by saying that
auto racing is different
from other sports, at least
as far as “cheating” is con-
cerned.
“I am like, ‘No, you
don’t understand, this is
auto racing. The guys at
the shop build the most
trick thing they can and
bring it to the race track.
I hop in and drive it, and
if you run well or some
part falls off or the
heights aren’t right, then
it looks like we were
cheating, but that is just
part of the sport,’” he said.
“It is hard to explain that
to some people. They
think that if it didn’t fit
the rules, then I was
cheating.”
Edwards also said that
if a team isn’t being cre-
ative, the driver won’t be
winning many races.
Continues on page 31
Denny Hamlincelebrates after winning Sunday’s Sprint Cup Series Heluva Good! Sour Cream Dips 400 at Michigan International Speedway. (NASCAR photo)
Teams look for competitive edge in fuzzy parts of rule book
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 29
Even
after
scoring
84
victories
on
the
Sprint
Cup
circuit,
Jeff
Gor-
don
is
still
willing
to
go
the
extra
miles
to
try
to
make
his
race
cars
faster.
He
recently
traveled
to
the
Mid-Ohio
Sports
Car
Course
near
Lexington
to
work
on
his
team’s
preparation
for
this
week’s
race
at
Infineon
Raceway
in
Sonoma,
Calif.

The
Mid-Ohio
track
has
two
pri-
mary
configurations:
a
2.4-mile,
15-turn,
and
a
2.25-mile,
13-turn
circuit.

Gordon
tested
alongside
road
racing
specialist
Boris
Said,
who
will
be
driving
the
No.
51
Chevro-
let,
which
is
built
by
the
same
Hen-
drick
Motorsports
people
that
prepare
Gordon’s
car.
“I
thought
we
had
a
good
test,”
he
said.
“I
thought
Mid-Ohio
was
a
departure
from
what
we
normally
do
to
try
to
learn
something
and
make
some
gains.


“I
feel
like
we
made
some
gains
and
I
hope
it
shows
up
out
on
the
track
out
in
Sonoma.”
Gordon
acknowledged
that
his
team
hasn’t
been
as
good
as
it
should
have
been
in
recent
road
races,
especially
at
Sonoma,
where
he
leads
all
drivers
in
wins
with
five,
top-five
finishes
with
11
and
top-10s
with
15,
but
hasn’t
won
since
2006.
“We
have
not
been
competitive
enough
to
win
there,”
he
said.
“Probably
better
there
than
at
Watkins
Glen,
but
even
at
Sonoma
the
last
couple
of
times
felt
like
we
haven’t
been
good
enough.”
He
said
testing
at
Mid-Ohio
made
sense
to
him,
especially
com-
pared
to
the
other
road
courses
that
teams
use
now
that
testing
is
banned
on
tracks
where
the
NASCAR
circuits
actually
race.
“None
of
[the
road
courses]
are
anywhere
close
to
the
tracks
that
we
go
to,”
he
said.
“VIR
(Virginia
International
Raceway)
–
it’s
a
nice
track
and
there
are
some
hard
brak-
ing
sections,
so
if
you
want
to
go
test
out
your
transmission
and
get
used
to
doing
some
shifting
and
down
shifting
and
check
out
your
brakes,
great,
go
to
VIR.


“If
you
want
to
try
to
get
han-
dling
characteristics
for
Watkins
Glen
or
Sonoma,
forget
it.

We
got
to
Road
Atlanta
because
it’s
a
faster
road
course,
which
is
more
like
Watkins
Glen,
which
is
a
fast
road
course.

Again,
handling
char-
acteristics
I
think
are
really
mini-
mal.”
Gordon
said
that
Sonoma
is
a
low-grip
road
course
with
a
lot
of
elevation
changes,
and
he
feels
that
Mid-Ohio
offers
some
of
the
same
challenges.
“It’s
not
Sonoma,
but
I
kind
of
like
some
of
the
transitions
in
the
corners
and
some
of
the
elevation
changes
that
I
thought
could
help
us
for
Sonoma,”
he
said.
“We’ll
find
out.”
Not resting on laurels, Gordon preps for Infineon
road race
Jeff Gordon at Infineon Raceway in 2010 (NASCAR photo)
NUMERICALLY
SPEAKING
Laps led by Kyle Busch in
the past six Sprint Cup
races at Infineon Raceway, top
among drivers
Fastest laps posted by Tony
Stewart in the past six Cup
races at Infineon, the most of any
driver
Points separating Nationwide
leader Ricky Stenhouse Jr. and
3rd-place Reed Sorenson (Elliott
Sadler is 2nd, two points behind 1st)
Points positions lost by Jimmie
Johnson, to fifth place, the most
of any driver in Sunday’s Cup race at
Michigan (He finished 27th)
68
88
3
4
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 30
Avalon offers Lexus luxury at a Toyota Price
It’s
been
sixteen
years
since
Toyota
first
introduced
the
Avalon
–
a
true
American
car
that
was
built
exclusively
in
America
at
Toyota’s
manufac-
turing
plant
in
Georgetown,
Kentucky.

That
car
was
merely
a
Toyota
Camry
with
a
slightly
longer
wheelbase
and
optional
seating
for
six.

Not
a
bad
idea,
just
nothing
to
get
too
excited
about.

Five
years
later
in
2000,
the
Avalon
was
redesigned
–
straying
further
away
from
its
Camry
roots,
but
still
not
a
car
to
raise
a
lot
of
hoopla
about.

2005
brought
us
the
third
genera-
tion
Avalon
and
the
car
you
see
now
–
and
it
has
raised
some
eyebrows.
From
its
inception,
the
Avalon
has
combined
truly
impres-
sive
interior
room
and
com-
fort
with
a
powerful
engine
in
a
contemporary
package.
Still
built
in
Georgetown,
for
2011
the
Avalon
receives
new
front
and
rear
end
styling
as
well
as
a
nicer
dash.

And
if
the
Avalon
gets
any
nicer,
you
might
as
well
just
call
it
a
Lexus.

This
car
is
that
good.
The
Avalon
exudes
a
power-
ful
stance,
but
at
the
same
time
is
elegant
and
sleek.

It
is
still
very
conservative
(with
the
exception
of
the
dual
ex-
haust
outlets
which
add
a
bit
of
flair
to
the
car)
and
won’t
cause
any
double-takes
as
it
goes
down
the
street.

With
a
length
of
197
inches,
it’s
within
an
inch
of
a
Chrysler
300,
yet
it’s
still
a
good
5
inches
shorter
than
a
Ford
Taurus.


Inside,
things
go
from
good
to
great.

Hints
of
Lexus
are
all
around,
especially
in
the
high-
end
Limited
model.

Upfront
there
is
an
abundance
of
wood
and
leather
that
sur-
rounds
the
newly
designed
dashboard
and
center
console,
which
houses
the
JBL
12-
speaker
sound
system
and
dual
climate
controls.

While
planted
in
the
luxurious
seats,
I
often
felt
as
though
I
were
sitting
behind
a
desk
in
a
big
cozy
office
chair
-
except
these
seats
had
full
power
ad-
justments,
memory
settings,
and
were
heated
and
venti-
lated
at
the
touch
of
a
button.
Those
riding
in
back
have
it
made
with
the
huge
backseat
thanks
to
the
Avalon’s
111
inch
long
wheelbase.

Not
only
is
the
backseat
big,
but
it’s
very
comfortable
with
a
flat
floor,
seats
that
recline
10
degrees,
and
a
rear
sunshade.
And
of
course,
being
a
Toy-
ota,
the
build
quality
of
the
Avalon
is
impeccable,
and
the
attention
to
detail
is
stunning.
But
while
the
interior
is
im-
pressive
and
Lexus-like,
where
the
Avalon
really
shines
is
with
its
powerplant
and
the
way
the
car
drives.
The
sole
engine
for
this
big
Toyota
is
the
popular
3.5
liter
24-valve
V6
engine
matched
up
to
a
6-speed
sequential
shifting
automatic
transmis-
sion.

This
engine
puts
out
an
impressive
268
horsepower
and
248
lb.-ft.
of
torque,
mak-
ing
the
Avalon
leap
to
60
mph
in
about
6
and
half
seconds.
Not
only
is
the
engine
power-
ful,
but
the
Avalon
is
actually
somewhat
rewarding
to
drive.
The
Avalon
lets
you
engage
in
the
driving
experience
as
much
as
any
other
Toyota
sedan
has
ever
done.

The
steering
is
still
Toyota
numb,
but
the
suspension
lets
you
take
corners
at
a
good
clip,
yet
still
delivers
a
supple
ride.
The
nice
handling
and
ride
characteristics
are
due
to
the
large
17”
wheels
the
Avalon
uses.
Prior
years,
Toyota
has
of-
fered
up
to
four
different
trim
levels.

That
has
been
reduced
for
2011
to
just
two
–
the
base
model
and
the
Limited.

The
base
model
is
nicely
decked
out
with
leather
interior,
a
backup
camera,
sunroof,
dual
zone
climate
control
and
a
power
driver’s
seat.

The
Limited
adds
to
that
Xenon
headlights,
automatic
wipers,
power
passenger
seat,
up-
graded
audio
system
and
the
heat/vent
features
for
the
seats.
The
Limited
Avalon
that
I
was
using
had
every
option
box
checked
and
came
out
to
a
total
sticker
price
of
$37,884
–
pretty
much
in
line
what
with
the
competition
–
so
Toyota
has
its
flagship
car
priced
right
in
the
ballpark.
In
my
time
with
the
Avalon,
I
tried
to
determine
what
more
the
car
needed
to
be
called
a
Lexus.

Besides
a
higher
price
tag,
I
had
a
hard
time
figuring
it
out.

It
provides
great,
com-
fortable
transportation
for
all
riding
in
it.

The
Avalon
is
a
great
choice
for
someone
who
needs
a
car
larger
than
a
Camry,
but
doesn’t
want
to
go
with
an
all-out
luxury
sedan.

-- Christopher A. Randazzo
By
The
Numbers:
2011 Toyota Avalon Limited
Base
Price: $35,485.00
Price
as
Tested: $37,884.00
Layout: front-engine
/
front-wheel
drive
Engine: 3.5
liter
V6
Transmission: 6
-
speed
automatic
Horsepower: 268
hp
Torque: 248
ft/lbs
EPA
Fuel
Economy:20
city
/
29
highway
mpg
[Questions/Comments/Feedback
can
be
sent
via
email
to
car@delorean.net]
1. Carl Edwards
532; Leader
2. Kevin Harvick
512; behind -20
3. Dale Earnhardt Jr.
505; behind -27
4. Kyle Busch
503; behind -29
5. Jimmie Johnson
503; behind -29
6. Matt Kenseth
491; behind -41
7. Kurt Busch
491; behind -41
8. Ryan Newman
456; behind -76
9. Denny Hamlin
455; behind -77
10. Clint Bowyer
455; behind -77
SPOTLIGHT EP NEWS JUNE 24, 2011 PAGE 31
24/ 7
www.suncitybiker.com
Continued from page 28
“You want your guys at the shop push-
ing every edge of the rule book,” he said.
“That is what you want.”
And he said that it doesn’t hurt, from
a competitive standpoint, for the Gibbs
teams to be under some extra scrutiny
from NASCAR officials. (Gibbs also had
a problem at Pocono where Kyle Busch’s
car was found to be too low in a post-
race inspection.)
“It is good for us because NASCAR
will be watching those [Gibbs] guys
harder and paying attention to their
cars a little more,” Edwards said. “That
is good for the rest of us.”
Denny Hamlin, who drives the No. 11
Toyota at Gibbs, went on to win at
Michigan, breaking a 16-race winless
skid by capitalizing on a quick pit stop
that put him in position to lead the final
eight laps. In his pre- and post-race in-
terview sessions, he found himself in the
awkward spot of answering questions
about his team’s issues with the rules.
“For me, I don’t know a whole lot
about it, to be honest with you,” he said
during his regular pre-race press confer-
ence. “We continue to evolve our cars
and things like that through the course
of a season. It’s just, all teams do. And
usually when you have something new –
a new part – sometimes you submit it
and sometimes you don’t and I feel like
this is probably one of the parts
NASCAR wants you to submit.”
Hamlin’s crew chief Mike Ford said
the team’s victory on Sunday, after the
controversy related to the oil pans, says
a lot about the team.
“I think it speaks volumes to the expe-
rience and the resilience of this 11 car
that you can start the week off with a
down note and put that behind you, and
make sure that it doesn’t affect what’s
getting ready to happen,” he said. “We
turned a negative for us to a positive,
and we’ll see where it goes from there.
“This team usually comes out swing-
ing when its back is against the ropes.
Sometimes we connect and sometimes
we get dotted in the eye.”
Carl Edwards, driver of the No. 60 Ford, crosses the
finish line to win Saturday’s Nationwide Series race
at Michigan International Speedway. (NASCAR
photo)
“Gray” mattErs...

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