SANCTICITY

John Scofield guitar solo
from the live CD
Jim Hall & Friends, Live at Town Hall, Volumes 1 & 2
Jazz Heritage CD 522980L

Sancticity, a tune by Coleman Hawkins, is based on the same harmonic progression as the standard Stompin’ at the Savoy.
This transcription comes from a recording of a live concert at Town Hall with Jim Hall in 1989. This solo provides an
opportunity to examine John Scofield’s individual approach to improvisation applied to a standard progression. In this
improvisation, Scofield referred to the melody of both tunes that share this progression. He played a balance of simple
melodic figures and angular contemporary lines. He used
1
common jazz/bebop melodic vocabulary addressing har-
monically clear pitches and contrasted those lines with some side slipping and unexpected leaps and note choices. He set
up the listener’s expectations and delivered several harmonic, rhythmic and melodic surprises. He played things indige-
nous to the guitar: bluesy figures, bends, and harmonics. All these elements add up to a swinging solo and provide a les-
son in balance and contrast between traditional and contemporary melodic vocabulary.

THE SOLO:

Scofield established the D
b
tonality by beginning on the dominant and moving up the scale to the tonic in m.1 and then
played around the dominant using its lower neighbor tone G
n
in m.2. In order to modulate from the key of D
b
(5
b
s) to
the key of E
b
minor (6
b
s) coming up in m.5, one flat must be added (C
b
) and the seventh degree of the E
b
minor scale
must be raised creating a leading tone (D
b
becomes D
n
). The B
b
7 chord is the secondary dominant (V7/ii) that points to
E
b
minor. Scofield played the two tones necessary to modulate and put them in prominent places in the line in mm.3-4.
The D
b
, shown as a C
#
changed to the D
n
, the third of the B
b
7 and the leading tone to E
b
minor. The C
b
is at the top of
the line and resolved through the lower neighbor A
n
to the B
b
.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
1

j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
D
b

J
œ ‰
j
œ

j
œ n

j
œ œ
œ
Œ Œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ b
œ n
œ
œ b
B
b
7
b
9

A cyclical pattern moved the F to the G
b
. The G
b
for a moment sounded like the third of E
b
minor, but Scofield played
the G
n
below making the G
b
sounds like the
#
9 of an E
b
7 chord. Several times throughout the solo Scofield played with
the expectations in this measure of the form. Scofield adhered to voice leading principles and resolved the seventh of the
E
b
chord (D
b
) to the third of the A
b
chord. (C). Over the A
b
7 chord, Scofield played a B
bb
, the flat ninth of the A
b
7
chord, a borrowed note from the parallel minor key of D
b
minor. In mm.7-8, Scofield appears to have referred to
Stompin’ at the Savoy.

&
b
b
b
b
b
5
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ b
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ ∫
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
ÿ
Œ
D
b
Ó
. œ
j
œ

Scofield used the harmonically clear third and seventh of the D
b
major chord in mm.9-11. The C
b
in m.12 signaled the
modulation to E
b
minor, but the G
n
makes it an E
b
7 chord (V7/V) in m. 13. The F
b
is resolved back to the F
n
a measure
later and up an octave. The blues-like figure in m.14-15 recurs and is based on a D
b
major pentatonic scale.

1
Some of the common jazz melodic vocabulary he used includes what I call outlines. These three common melodic outlines are dis-
cussed in detail in the book: Connecting Chords with Linear Harmony, Houston Pub., Inc. There is a brief explanation and ex-
amples of these outlines in the second part of the article.
Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.2
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
&
b
b
b
b
b
9
œ
œ
¿
œ œ

j
œ
D
b
Œ ‰
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ b œ
œ
œ b
œ
œ
œ n
œ #
B
b
7
b
9
&
b
b
b
b
b
13
œ n
œ
œ
¿
œ b
.
Œ
E
b
m7
Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ n
3
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
Ó ‰
J
œ #

J
œ n


I have chosen to notate the B sections using the enharmonic F
#
7, B7, E7 and A7 rather than go too far using double
flats. Scofield played around the C
#
, which now has become the fifth of the F
#
7 chord and not the tonic of the original
key. There is an implied outline no.3 followed by outline no.1 in mm.18-19. A chromatic line (C-B-A
#
) is implied. The
lines all lead to the important third and seventh chord tones. Over both the F
#
7 and the B7, a
#
11 is implied: the C
n
over
the F
#
7 and the F
n
over the B7.

&
b
b
b
b
b
17

J
œ n

J
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ n
F
#
7
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
-
œ
œ n
B7
. ˙
œ #
œ #

Scofield continued to use the
#
11 over the E7. The chromatic line in mm.17-18 (C-B-A
#
) is echoed in mm.21-22 (A
#
-A-
G
#
). The important chord tones seem to be the goal of these lines.

&
b
b
b
b
b
21
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
œ
E7
œ n
.
œ n
œ #

j
œ n
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ
œ
.
A7
œ
œ b
œ
œ b
œ b
.
œ
œ
A
b
7

A D
b
triad is the basic material used in mm.25-27. This is related to the Sancticity melody. The D
b
and E
b
in m.27 change
their roles from being the root and second degrees of D
b
to the upper and lower neighbor tones of the D
n
in m.28.

&
b
b
b
b
b
25

J
œ

J
œ
œ
-
œ œ
D
b
œ
œ

j
œ
œ

j
œ

j
œ

j
œ n
œ
-
œ
œ b

j
œ #
œ n
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.3
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
Again Scofield suggested an E
b
7
b
9 rather than E
b
m7. The F
b
is left unresolved and Scofield ended this chorus with a
common dance band era cliché that recalls a Count Basie figure.

&
b
b
b
b
b
29
œ n
œ b
Œ Ó
E
b
m7
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
.
œ
œ n
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
∑ Œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
œ


The second chorus began ahead of the downbeat is playfully ambiguous for a moment using stop and go rhythms. The
D
n
on the downbeat is heard as the lower neighbor tone to the E
b
, but helps sustain the ambiguity. Scofield may have
been thinking of an Fm7 or Fø7 in m.35 as the tones A
b
and E
b
would be the third and seventh. The E
b
did resolve to
the D
n
in m.36 as expected.

&
b
b
b
b
b
33
œ n
.
œ
œ
œ b
.
œ
œ
D
b
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ
Œ
œ
-
œ
œ
œ
œ n
‰ j
œ ˙
B
b
7
b
9


All the stop and go, stepwise logical motion in the previous phrase set up the surprise in m.37. By this time, we are not
surprised that the chord is an E
b
7 and not an E
b
m7. The surprise is in the angular statement of the chord tones. The G
on the downbeat followed by the D
b
clarify the E
b
7, but the leap up to the
b
9 is inspired. The D
b
and the F
b
at once
sound like the seventh and
b
9 of the E
b
7 and the root and bluesy flatted third of D
b
. The F
b
gets resolved to the E
b
in
m.38. Scofield played a traditional turnaround in mm.39-40 using outlines no.3 and 1, then moving to the third of D
b
.

&
b
b
b
b
b
37
œ n
œ

J
œ b ˙
E
b
m7
Ó Œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ b
œ
œ
D
b
B
b
m7
œ n
œ b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
E
b
7 A
b
7

Scofield played the pretty notes (3-5-6-7) in mm.41-44 emphasizing the third and seventh. The tones needed to modu-
late, the D and the C
b
, are the first ones played in m.44, and this time Scofield plays an E
b
m7 chord, anticipating the
third.

&
b
b
b
b
b
41
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ
D
b
. œ
J
œ

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ ˙
Œ
œ n
œ b
œ
œ
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

Outline no.2 is implied in m.45, and the seventh of E
b
m7 resolved to the third of A
b
including a chromatic approach
from below. Outline no.1 occurred beginning on the C and takes the line to the third of the D
b
in m.47. This line is simi-
lar to clichés from the solos of hundreds of jazz artists. The circled E
n
signaled the beginning of outline no.1 of the next
phrase.

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.4
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
&
b
b
b
b
b
45
œ
œ
.
œ
œ œ n
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ n
œ œ b
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
.
. œ
J
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ

J
œ
œ
œ n

Beginning with the circled E
n
from m.48 is outline no.1 leading to the A
#
as if the progression were C
#
m7 - F
#
7. This line
ended with the leap up to the root of F
#
7. This 3-1 resolution occurs again in m.53 without the octave displacement.

The third of B7 is approached chromatically, then after side-slipping up to the C7, Scofield used outline no.3 to get to
the third of E7.

&
b
b
b
b
b
49
œ #
œ n œ #
œ
œ n
œ n
œ #
F
#
7
œ #
Œ Œ ‰ j
œ n œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
œ n
œ
B7
œ #
œ n œ #
œ n
œ n
œ
?

Scofield used an extended D major 9 arpeggio over the E7, which created a mixolydian sound. This contrasted with the
lydian dominant sound used previously. The A
#
returned in m.54, but may sound more like a lower neighbor tone in-
volved in the encircling of the B
n
. Scofield chromatically approached the third of A7 and played chord tones. The third
of A
b
is prominently placed in m.56. The last notes of m.56 and the next few in the following phrase recall the melodic
material of Stompin’ at the Savoy again.

?
b
b
b
b
b
53
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ n
E7
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ œ n
œ n
œ
&
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ
.
A7
j
œ b
j
œ n
. œ
œ b
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7

Scofield melodically superimposed triads in mm.59-60. There is an A
b
triad in m.59 followed by a G major triad in m.60.
If Scofield thought of m.59 as an Fm7 then the A
b
triad contains the third, fifth and seventh tones of Fm7. All of these
tones resolve chromatically to the G major triad. The tones of the G major triad are the third, and the colorful
b
9 and
thirteenth over the B
b
7 chord. The use of the
n
thirteenth suggests a resolution to E
b
major, but again, Scofield chose the
unexpected resolution. Triadic superimposition returns in mm.91-92 with some other surprises.

&
b
b
b
b
b
57
œ
œ
œ
˙
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
.

. œ
œ
œ

j
œ
œ
-
œ
œ n

J
œ n
œ n
B
b
7
b
9

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.5
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
Scofield pointed to the G
b
using the lower and upper neighbor tones and then encircled the E
b
in the same manner in
m.61. The end of this chorus is primarily major pentatonic material.

&
b
b
b
b
b
61
œ
œ
œ
¿ n
œ
œ
Œ
E
b
m7

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ b
œ
œ
D
b
œ
Œ Ó

Scofield began the third chorus with the same major pentatonic material as he ended the last chorus, even beginning on
the same pitch. The F
b
in m.66 and the encircling of the F
n
in m.67 give the line a bluesy feeling. The C
b
and the D
n
in
m.68 are the tones that modulate the line to E
b
minor. This time, as before, Scofield went for the unexpected in m.69
and sounds the E
b
7 using the G
n
. The last four notes of m.68 are outline no.3 leading to the G in m.69.

&
b
b
b
b
b
65

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
D
b
œ b
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ n
œ
œ
.
œ
œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

Listen to the clever resolution of this angular melody. The 3-1 leap heard before in mm.49 and 53 is used in m. 69. The
seventh resolved to the third of A
b
, but a little late. Scofield leaped from the third of A
b
to the
#
9 and then
b
9 and left
them both unresolved for a moment. The
b
9 is finally resolved in m.71 with the pentatonic material returning. The four
notes in m.71 are also the last notes in m.72, only then they are in retrograde and in a lower octave.

&
b
b
b
b
b
69
j
œ n
.
œ œ
œ
.
E
b
m7

j
œ
œ n
œ n œ
Œ
A
b
7
œ b
œ
œ
j
œ n
œ œ
Œ
D
b
Œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ

Beginning on B
b
, Scofield climbed up the scale to the G
b
in m.76 pivoting around the D
b
-C-D
b
in m.77. The D
n
is
sounded and the seventh of the B
b
chord points to the third of the E
b
chord. But what E
b
chord did he choose this
time?

&
b
b
b
b
b
73
. œ
j
œ
Œ
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

In the most ambiguous E
b
measure to this point Scofield played the G
n
then the G
b
obfuscating the definition of major
or minor; the G sounding like an upper neighbor to the G
b
. The D
b
-C-D
b
pivot is heard again in m.77. The arpeggio
figure in m.78 is common in jazz improvisations and is found in some popular songs from the early part of this century.
Part of its attraction is the leap from the
b
7 to the thirteenth, a leap of a major seventh. Scofield ends this section with
more pentatonic material.

&
b
b
b
b
b
77
œ n
œ
œ b
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ n
j
œ b
. œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ ‰
j
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
-
Œ

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.6
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu

The encircling of the C
#
returns in mm.81-82, followed by a clear F
#
triad. The next phrase is all guitar material. The D
n
s
were bent in varying degrees to find that bluesy third in-between a major and a minor third. The rest of the B7 is typical
bluesy material, encircling the third. The lowest open string, E, is sounded and then followed by arpeggio of chord tones
played as harmonics. (They are notated as they sounded, not as they were played). The line in mm.87-88 resembles out-
line no.3. One would expect the E-G-B-D in m.87 to resolve to a C
#
as if the chords were Em7–A7. The chord is an A
b

in m.88, so the D resolves to the C
n
, and is followed by a typical be-bop 3-5-7-
b
9 arpeggio, which continues as outline
no.1 to the third of D
b
in m.89.

&
b
b
b
b
b
81
œ #
œ #
œ
.
œ n
.
¿ n
œ
F
#
7
œ
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
Œ
?
œ n
œ n
œ n
!
œ
!
œ
!
œ
œ # œ n
B7
œ n
œ n œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
o
&
&
b
b
b
b
b
85
j
œ
œ n
o
j
œ n
o
j
œ
.
œ n
o
E7
?
Ó Œ ‰
J
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ
A7
&
œ
œ
œ
œ ∫ œ
œ
œ
A
b
7

The triadic superimposition in mm.91-92 is closely related to that of mm.59-60. The A
b
in m.91 in this phrase is fol-
lowed by a G
b
triad over the B
b
7 chord. The notes of the G
b
triad yield the color tones
#
9, root and
b
13 over the B
b
7
chord. The D
b
and G
b
notes also suggest the resolution to E
b
minor, over which Scofield has several times substituted an
E
b
7.

&
b
b
b
b
b
89
œ
œ
Œ Œ ‰
j
œ
œ
D
b

j
œ
œ

J
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Œ ‰
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

This time, rather than raise the third for the surprise effect, Scofield went the other direction and lowered the fifth of the
E
b
suggesting an E
b
ø7, the iiø7 chord in the parallel key of D
b
minor. This chorus ends moving chromatically from the F
to the A
b
, encircled the third of the B
b
chord and E
b
minor chords in a similar fashions.

&
b
b
b
b
b
93
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
n
n
Ó
E
b
m7
Ó
œ
œ œ n
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
œ n
œ
D
b
B
b
7
œ b
.
Œ Ó
E
b
m7 A
b
7


The unresolved G
b
at the end of the last chorus is resolved in m.97 in an upper octave. Scofield played around the third
and fifth of the D
b
triad in mm.97-98. He suggested the Fm7 chord again in m.99 by emphasizing the E
b
and A
b
, its
third and seventh. The box shows a common chromatic approach to the third of the B
b
7 chord. The notes needed to
modulate from D
b
to E
b
minor are again, as in m.44, clearly stated at the beginning of m.100. The last five notes of
m.100 are ambiguous after the specific statement of the third,
b
9 and root of the B
b
7. The notes could be labeled in rela-
tionship to the B
b
7 chord (13,
#
5,
#
11, 4,
#
9), but it would explain little. The notes seem to have been chosen for their
ambiguity.

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.7
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
&
b
b
b
b
b
97

J
œ n
œ
.
œ
.
œ
œ
D
b

J
œ
‰ J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ b
œ
œ n
œ #
œ n œ b
œ b
B
b
7
b
9

There has been a pattern of ambiguity throughout the solo when approaching the fifth measure of the A section. He has
pointed to E
b
minor and substituted E
b
7 instead; pointed to E
b
major and resolved it to E
b
minor; pointed to E
b
minor
and suggested E
b
ø7. In m.101, the A
n
(enharmonic B
bb
) suggested an E
b
ø7 chord. What followed was a simple triadic
bluesy idea in mm.102-103. There is a simple step line (show with circled notes) suggested beginning with the C
b
, that
continues to the C
n
in m.105 using octave displacement between the G
b
and the F in the higher octave. Scofield followed
voice leading principles in m.104. The D
b
, the seventh of E
b
m resolves to the C
n
, the third of A
b
; the F, the 9th of E
b
m
resolves to the E
b
, the fifth of A
b
.

&
b
b
b
b
b
101
œ n

j
œ
Ó
E
b
m7
Ó œ
œ b
œ
œ n
A
b
7
œ
œ b
œ
œ n
ÿ
œ
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7 A
b
7

Scofield side-slips to D major briefly in mm.105-106 and returns moving up the D
b
major scale with one accented
chromatic passing tone (G) in m.107. The common chromatic approach, heard in m.99, is used again to point to the D
n
,
the third of B
b
. Outline no.1 is the simplest step progression, but in the example beginning with the D
n
(shown with
circled notes) is angular and interesting. The E
n
moving to F interrupts the step line, but ultimately they meet at the G
b
,
the third of the E
b
minor chord in m.109. In effect there are two lines pointing to the G
b
: (1) D-C
b
-B
b
-A
b
-G
b
and (2) E-
F-G
b
.

&
b
b
b
b
b
105
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ #
œ n
D
b
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n œ b
œ b
œ n
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ
œ b
-
œ
œ n

j
œ

j
œ
B
b
7
b
9

After pointing to the E
b
minor, the A
n
suggested an E
b
ø7 chord as it did in mm.93 and 101. Scofield ends this section
with pentatonic patterns heard before in mm.14, 63-66, and 79-80. The last three repeated E
b
s were bent sharp pointing
to the E
n
in m.113.

&
b
b
b
b
b
109
œ
œ
œ n œ
Œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
-
Œ
œ
œ œ œ

Scofield played with three notes over the F
#
7 chord: the 5-6-7, which are the root second and minor third of the home
key of D
b
. He played around chord tones over the B7. The long scale passage indicates the key of 4
#
s, as contrasted with
the lydian dominant sound he suggested earlier in the solo.

&
b
b
b
b
b
113
œ n
œ #
œ #
‰ j
œ
œ
œ #
F
#
7
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ
œ
œ
.
œ #
œ #
‰ j
œ n œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
B7
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ n

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.8
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu

There is a sequence of outline no.1 over mm.117-118 and answered in m119. The F
#
in m.120 followed by the A
b
in
m.121 suggest the opening of Stompin’ at the Savoy again.

&
b
b
b
b
b
117
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
E7
œ #
ÿ
œ n
.

j
œ
œ #
œ n

j
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n œ #
œ n
A7
œ
œ n
œ
œ b

j
œ n
œ
-
A
b
7

Stompin’ at the Savoy is further suggested by the melodic material in mm.122-123 which leads to the modulating tone C
b

over the B
b
7 chord in m.124.

&
b
b
b
b
b
121
œ
.
Œ Ó
D
b
J
œ
œ b
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ b
¿
œ
œ œ
œ
¿ #
B
b
7
b
9


The use of the C
b
over the B
b
7 chord again points to E
b
minor, but the previous three times he had chosen to resolve to
an E
b
ø7. In m.125, he returned instead to an E
b
7 chord heard clearly as he approached the G
n
from above and below
from the preceding measure, arpeggiated 3-5-7-
b
9, and continued down the scale to the C, the third of A
b
. The resulting
outline no.1 is shown with circled notes.

Scofield played very general D
b
triadic material in m.126, nothing specific to the A
b
chord. He then sounded as if he was
going to end the solo with the Duke Ellington ending, turned it into a bluesy line and ends on the E
b
, the 9th of the D
b

chord. Ending on the unresolved 9th and not the tonic allows the second soloist to begin his solo with a sense of con-
tinued motion.

&
b
b
b
b
b
125
œ n
œ
œ
.
œ b
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
.
A
b
7
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
.
œ
œ
3
œ b
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
w w

COMMON OUTLINES:

There are three common outlines that connect adjacent chords when the root movement is down in fifths. Root move-
ment in downward fifths is the most common, so these melodic frameworks occur often. The outlines include the most
significant and harmonically clear notes and follow basic voice leading principles.

Outline no.1 begins on the third of a chord and moves down the scale to the seventh. The seventh, a dissonant tone,
resolves to the third of the chord that follows. Outline no.1 can be sequenced through a progression where chord roots
continue to move down in fifths. Outline no.1 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major.

Outline no.2 begins with the 1-3-5 arpeggio and then adds the dissonant seventh. The seventh resolves to the third of
the chord that follows. Because the seventh resolves to the next third, outline no.2 is often followed by outline no.1 that
begins on the third. Outline no.2 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major.

Outline no.3 begins with the descending arpeggio 5-3-1 and then adds the dissonant seventh. The seventh resolves to
the third of the chord that follows. Because the seventh resolves to the next third, outline no.3 is also often followed by
Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.9
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
outline no.1 which begins on the third. Since the seventh resolves to the third of the chord that follows, a 3-5-7-9 arpeg-
gio also may follow outline no.3. Outline no.3 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major.

These outlines are shown over a ii7 - V7 - I in C major, but will work with any chord quality when the roots move down
in fifths. This can be illustrated by changing the key signatures of the examples below.

Jazz and non-jazz improvisers and composer working with traditional harmony elaborate these outlines in numerous
ways using rhythmic variety, diatonic and chromatic additions and embellishments, octave displacement, and numerous
other devices. These three common melodic outlines are discussed in detail with hundreds of examples from great jazz
artists in the book: Connecting Chords with Linear Harmony, Houston Pub., Inc.

OUTLINES over ii7 - V7 IN C MAJOR

15.1 Outline no.1 Outline no.2 Outline no.3
&
?
c
c
œ
œ
œ
œ
Dm7
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙ Ó
G7
˙
Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
Dm7
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙ Ó
G7
˙
Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
Dm7
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙
Ó
G7
˙
Ó


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.10
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
OUTLINES from SANCTICITY SOLO:

Scofield suggested outline no.3 in m.17 as if the F
#
7 was preceded by a C
#
m7. After arriving at the A
#
, he used outline
no.1 to connect the F
#
7 to the B. To the right of the excerpt is the basic setting of the outline without elaboration.

&
c
œ #
œ
C
#
m7
œ n
œ #
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ
F
#
7
j
œ #
B7
œ #
œ
œ #
œ
C
#
m7
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ
F
#
7
œ #
B

Scofield suggested a common chromatic motion (C
#
-C-B-A
#
) in the excerpt above that resembles this:

&
c
œ #
œ #
œ
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ
C
#
m7
œ
œ #
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ
F
#
7
œ #
B


Scofield played a similar line over the second half of the first B section. The chromatic motion is implied, skipping the B
but including the A
#
-A-G
#
. A simplified version is shown to the right.

mm.21-23:
&
c
œ #
œ
œ #
œ #
œ
œ
œ
Bm7
œ
œ n
œ #

j
œ
œ
œ
E7
j
œ #
A7
œ #
œ
œ
œ
Bm7
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
E7
œ #
A

The same combination of outline no.3 followed by outline no.1 occurred again in m.39. In this instance with the har-
monic rhythm of half notes, there is no room for any chromatic additions or rhythmic variations, and the line was played
simply.

mm.39-40
&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ b
œ
œ
B
b
m7
œ n
œ b
œ
œ
j
œ
E
b
7 A
b
7


Outline no.2 is followed by outline no.1 without embellishment is shown in the following example.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ ∫
œ b
œ
A
b
7
œ
D
b


Scofield did not play the low E
b
, but his line seems to follow the basic shape shown above in this excerpt from mm.45-
46. He included a chromatic approach to the C
n
and a common turn around the flat and sharp ninth over the A
b
7, and
resolved it to the third of the D
b
.

mm.45-47
Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.11
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ
.
œ
œ œ n
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ n
œ œ b
œ
A
b
7
j
œ
D
b


Scofield used outline no.3 to connect the B7 to the E7 in this excerpt from mm.52-53. He added only a leading tone the
D
#
and an escape tone before resolving to the G
#
, the third of E.

&
c
œ #
œ n œ #
œ
œ
œ
B7
œ #
E7


Another example of a simple outline no.3 occurred in mm.68-69. The only change is the use of the
b
13 replacing the
fifth of the B
b
7.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ n
œ
œ
B
b
7
œ n
E
b
7


Scofield uses outline no.2 followed by outline no.1 in mm.87-88. The circled notes indicate the implied Em7. The E is
chromatically approached, the G approached from its upper and lower neighbor. This measure appears to point to A7 as
in the progression Em7-A7. But the time ran out on the line and instead of resolving to the C
#
, Scofield resolved to C
the third of A
b
7. Outline no.1 begins on the C and after a 3-5-7-
b
9 arpeggio, continues down the scale to the third of D
b
.

V
c ‰ j
œ #
œ
œ
œ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
Em7
œ
œ b
œ b
œ ∫ œ
œ b
œ
A
b
7
œ
D
b


Scofield sequenced two versions of outline no.1 in this excerpt from mm.117-119.

&
c œ
œ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Bm7
œ #
ÿ
œ
.

j
œ
œ #
œ n
E7

j
œ #
œ
œ
œ n œ #
œ
A7


!"#$%&$&%', Scofield solo analysis, p.12
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
)*&+,#-.,/"0%12$1345
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b
= %;"% >"2 &43#%&$"* %, %;3 3?$307% )3*,> 60,. .19@A 3?$37%
6,0 %;3 0;'%;.B " CDAD=D
b
E "073++&, "#4 432$3#4&#+ 2$"*3 .,%&,# %, %;3 %;&041

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ n
œ
œ
.
œ b
œ
œ
œ
E
b
7 A
b
7


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b
&2 4&27*"$34 %, %;3 57730 ,$%"831 F;3 J
b

4,32 032,*83 2%37 >&23 %, %;3 K
b
I )5% %;3 .,83 4,># %, %;3 <
b
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b
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032,*832 57>"04 %, %;3 L
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&.7*'&#+ "# M
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&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ n
œ
œ b
-
œ
œ n

j
œ

j
œ
B
b
7
b
9
œ
œ
œ n œ
Œ
E
b
m7


PENTATONIC & BLUES LINES:

!$,6&3*4 3#434 %;3 23$,#4 < 23$%&,# ,6 %;3 2,*, >&%; %;&2 )*532' 73#%"%,#&$ *&#3 60,. ..19SD9A1 F;3 ADTD9DC 7"%%30#
03$502 23830"* %&.32 &# %;3 2,*,1

&
b
b
b
b
b
c Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ n
3
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b


F;&2 73#%"%,#&$ )*532' *&#3 )3+"# %;3 %;&04 $;,052 "#4 3$;,32 2,.3 ,6 %;3 ."%30&"* 60,. ..19SD9A1 F;3 ADTD9DC 7"%%30#
"#4 %;3 3#$&0$*34 N
n
03%50#1

&
b
b
b
b
b
c ‰
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
D
b
œ b
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ n
œ
œ
.

F;3 ADTD9DC 7"%%30# "773"02 &# .1=9 "#4 &# 03%0,+0"43 &# .1=@1

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ b
œ
œ
j
œ n
œ œ
Œ
D
b
Œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
Œ
œ
D
b

!an$%i$i%'. ScoIield solo analysis. p.13
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
)li+on-mo/a0%12$1ed5
67e 8en%a%oni$ 8a%%e0n )elo9 a88ea02 de2$endin+ and a2$endin+ in m1::; $0ea%in+ a 8alind0ome1

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
-


!"O$ES ! (E)E(E*+ES,

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&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
.
œ
œ n
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7



?ABC6 @D!EF FCDECH:

&
&
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
c
c
Ó
œ
œ
Œ
Ó œ
œ
Œ
œ
œ n

J
œ
œ
Ó
œ
œ n

j
œ
œ
Ó


FJJECH6AC KBA6F:

!$o<ield 2eemed a)o5% %o end 7i2 2olo 9i%7 %7e Fllin+%on endin+ in mm1:LMN:LO1 67e $om8le%e Fllin+%on endin+ <ollo921

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
J
œ
. œ
>
œ
.
œ n
.
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
Ó


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.14
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
STOMPIN’ at t he SAVOY & SANCTI CI TY REFERENCES

Sancticity is based on the same harmonic progression as Stompin’ at the Savoy. Scofield made reference to Stompin’ at the
Savoy in his solo in the following excerpts. This first excerpt is the A section of Stompin’ at the Savoy.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c Ó
. œ
j
œ

j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
Œ
. œ
j
œ

j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
&
b
b
b
b
b
œ
Œ
. œ
j
œ

j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
Œ
. œ
j
œ


Scofield in mm.6-9:

&
b
b
b
b
b
c Ó
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
ÿ
Œ
D
b
Ó
. œ
j
œ œ
œ
¿
œ œ

j
œ
D
b

Scofield in mm.56-57:

&
b
b
b
b
b
c Ó œ b
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
˙
D
b


Scofield in mm.122-123:

&
b
b
b
b
b
c Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
j
œ


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.15
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
The A section of Sancticity is shown below. It is easy to hear the similarities between the main theme and Scofield’s
variation of the theme from mm.25-26.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ ˙
œ
D
b
œ
œ
Œ Ó
œ ˙
œ
œ
œ
Œ Ó
&
b
b
b
b
b
œ ˙
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
Œ Ó
A
b
7
˙ ˙
D
b
œ
œ
œ
Ó


Scofield in mm.25-26:

&
b
b
b
b
b
25

J
œ

J
œ
œ
-
œ œ
D
b
œ
œ

j
œ
œ


ENCIRCLING & APPROACHES:

This is a common way of elaborating a simple line. The essence of the line from m.5 over the E
b
m7 is F to G
b
. Scofield
made it more interesting when, after playing the F, he played the D
n
and comes up to the G
b
. He echoes this motion
later in mm.21-22.

m.5 mm.21-22

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ n
œ
œ
j
œ
E
b
m7
œ #
œ
œ n
œ
E7
œ n
.

This is a common pattern over a dominant chord. Scofield chromatically approached the seventh and encircles the C
#

with the upper neighbor tone D
#
and the lower neighbor tone C
n
in this excerpt from mm.16-17. The C
n
may imply
#
11
but in this particular context sounds like a lower neighbor or leading tone to the C
#
.

&
c ‰
J
œ #

J
œ

J
œ

J
œ #
J
œ #
F
#
7


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.16
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
Here is another common chromatic approach found in countless jazz improvisations that is heard in mm.99-100 and
m.107.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ
œ œ #
Fm7
J
œ n
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
c
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ
Fm7
J
œ b
B
b
7
b
9


TRIADIC SUPERIMPOSITIONS

There are two interesting contrasting uses of triadic superimposition. They occur in the same part of the form, in the
third and fourth measures of the last A section.

An A
b
triad was used over the D
b
(or Scofield could have been implying the 3-5-7 of an Fm7 chord.) In the second cho-
rus in m.60, Scofield played a G triad over the B
b
7 chord suggesting the 13th,
b
9 and third of the B
b
7 chord. The pres-
ence of the G
n
suggested resolution to a E
b
major, but Scofield resolves instead to an E
b
m.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c ‰
. œ
œ
œ

j
œ
Fm7
œ
-
œ
œ n

J
œ n
œ n
B
b
7
b
9
œ
œ
œ
¿ n
œ
œ
Œ
E
b
m7


At the end of Scofield’s second chorus he played an A
b
triad again, but this time, in m.92, he played a G
b
major triad
over the B
b
7 chord yielding the
#
9, Root, and
b
13. The presence of the G
b
implies a resolution to E
b
minor, but again
Scofield went for the unexpected and suggested E
b
ø7.

&
b
b
b
b
b
c ‰
j
œ
œ

J
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
D
b
maj7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Œ ‰
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
n
n
Ó
E
b
m7


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.17
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
This example shows the relationship of the superimposed triads to the underlying chords.

&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
c
c
w
w
w
D
b
maj9
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
w
w
w
n
n
n
B
b
13
b
9
w
w
w
n
w
w
w
D
b
maj9
˙
˙
˙
˙
˙
w
w
w
b
b
b
B
b
7
b
13
#
9
w
w
w
n


This improvisation gives the listener a chance to hear Scofield out of the usual context of playing over his own composi-
tions. Scofield exhibited the respect for the past in his imaginative use of common jazz melodic vocabulary and his ref-
erences to the melodic material from Sancticity and Stompin’ at the Savoy. There is his comic dramatic flair for setting up
one expectation a giving another shown in the different approaches and resolutions to what would be E
b
m, E
b
7 or E
b
ø7.
There is balance and contrast between traditional jazz vocabulary and Scofield’s individual vocabulary, between the blues
and pentatonic flavored lines and the more sophisticated harmonic specificity and triadic superimpositions. And: it all
swings.



Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.18
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu
Here is the entire solo without commentary:

FIRST CHORUS
&
b
b
b
b
b
c
1

j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
D
b

J
œ ‰
j
œ

j
œ n

j
œ œ
œ
Œ Œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ b
œ n
œ
œ b
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
5
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ b
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ ∫
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
ÿ
Œ
D
b
Ó
. œ
j
œ

&
b
b
b
b
b
9
œ
œ
¿
œ œ

j
œ
D
b
Œ ‰
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ b œ
œ
œ b
œ
œ
œ n
œ #
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
13
œ n
œ
œ
¿
œ b
.
Œ
E
b
m7
Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ n
3
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
Ó ‰
J
œ #

J
œ n

&
b
b
b
b
b
17

J
œ n

J
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ n
F
#
7
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ
œ #
œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
-
œ
œ n
B7
. ˙
œ #
œ #

&
b
b
b
b
b
21
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
œ
E7
œ n
.
œ n
œ #

j
œ n
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ
œ
.
A7
œ
œ b
œ
œ b
œ b
.
œ
œ
A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
25

J
œ

J
œ
œ
-
œ œ
D
b
œ
œ

j
œ
œ

j
œ

j
œ

j
œ n
œ
-
œ
œ b

j
œ #
œ n
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
29
œ n
œ b
Œ Ó
E
b
m7
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
.
œ
œ n
-
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
∑ Œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
œ


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.19
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu

SECOND CHORUS

&
b
b
b
b
b
33
œ n
.
œ
œ
œ b
.
œ
œ
D
b
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ
Œ
œ
-
œ
œ
œ
œ n
‰ j
œ ˙
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
37
œ n
œ

J
œ b ˙
E
b
m7
Ó Œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ b
œ
œ
D
b
B
b
m7
œ n
œ b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
E
b
7 A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
41
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ
D
b
. œ
J
œ

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ ˙
Œ
œ n
œ b
œ
œ
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
45
œ
œ
.
œ
œ œ n
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ n
œ œ b
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
.
. œ
J
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ

J
œ
œ
œ n

&
b
b
b
b
b
49
œ #
œ n œ #
œ
œ n
œ n
œ #
F
#
7
œ #
Œ Œ ‰ j
œ n œ #
œ #
œ
œ n
œ n
œ
B7
œ #
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œ n
œ n
œ
?

?
b
b
b
b
b
53
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ n
E7
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ œ n
œ n
œ
&
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ
.
A7
j
œ b
j
œ n
. œ
œ b
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
57
œ
œ
œ
˙
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ
.

. œ
œ
œ

j
œ
œ
-
œ
œ n

J
œ n
œ n
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
61
œ
œ
œ
¿ n
œ
œ
Œ
E
b
m7

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ b
œ
œ
D
b
œ
Œ Ó

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.20
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu

THIRD CHORUS

&
b
b
b
b
b
65

J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
D
b
œ b
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
œ n
œ
œ
.
œ
œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
69
j
œ n
.
œ œ
œ
.
E
b
m7

j
œ
œ n
œ n œ
Œ
A
b
7
œ b
œ
œ
j
œ n
œ œ
Œ
D
b
Œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ

&
b
b
b
b
b
73
. œ
j
œ
Œ
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
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œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
77
œ n
œ
œ b
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ n
j
œ b
. œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ ‰
j
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
-
Œ

&
b
b
b
b
b
81
œ #
œ #
œ
.
œ n
.
¿ n
œ
F
#
7
œ
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
Œ
?
œ n
œ n
œ n
!
œ
!
œ
!
œ
œ # œ n
B7
œ n
œ n œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
o
&

&
b
b
b
b
b
85
j
œ
œ n
o
j
œ n
o
j
œ
.
œ n
o
E7
?
Ó Œ ‰
J
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n
œ
A7
&
œ
œ
œ
œ ∫ œ
œ
œ
A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
89
œ
œ
Œ Œ ‰
j
œ
œ
D
b

j
œ
œ

J
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Œ ‰
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
93
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
n
n
Ó
E
b
m7
Ó
œ
œ œ n
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
œ n
œ
D
b
B
b
7
œ b
.
Œ Ó
E
b
m7 A
b
7

Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.21
transcribed by Bert Ligon-
bligon@mozart.sc.edu

FOURTH CHORUS

&
b
b
b
b
b
97

J
œ n
œ
.
œ
.
œ
œ
D
b

J
œ
‰ J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
¿
œ
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ b
œ
œ n
œ #
œ n œ b
œ b
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
101
œ n

j
œ
Ó
E
b
m7
Ó œ
œ b
œ
œ n
A
b
7
œ
œ b
œ
œ n
ÿ
œ
œ
D
b
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
E
b
7 A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
105
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ #
œ n
D
b
œ n
œ n
œ #
œ n œ b
œ b
œ n
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ œ #
œ n
œ
œ b
-
œ
œ n

j
œ

j
œ
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
109
œ
œ
œ n œ
Œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
A
b
7
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
-
Œ
œ
œ œ œ

&
b
b
b
b
b
113
œ n
œ #
œ #
‰ j
œ
œ
œ #
F
#
7
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ
œ
œ
.
œ #
œ #
‰ j
œ n œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
B7
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ n
œ #
œ #
œ n

&
b
b
b
b
b
117
œ n
œ #
œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
E7
œ #
ÿ
œ n
.

j
œ
œ #
œ n

j
œ #
œ n
œ n
œ n œ #
œ n
A7
œ
œ n
œ
œ b

j
œ n
œ
-
A
b
7

&
b
b
b
b
b
121
œ
.
Œ Ó
D
b
J
œ
œ b
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ b
¿
œ
œ œ
œ
¿ #
B
b
7
b
9

&
b
b
b
b
b
125
œ n
œ
œ
.
œ b
œ
œ
œ
E
b
m7
œ
œ
œ
.
œ
œ
œ
.
A
b
7
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
D
b
œ
.
œ
œ
3
œ b
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
w w


Sancticity, Scofield solo analysis, p.2 transcribed by Bert Ligon-

9

13

I have chosen to notate the B sections using the enharmonic F#7, B7, E7 and A7 rather than go too far using double flats. Scofield played around the C#, which now has become the fifth of the F#7 chord and not the tonic of the original key. There is an implied outline no.3 followed by outline no.1 in mm.18-19. A chromatic line (C-B-A#) is implied. The lines all lead to the important third and seventh chord tones. Over both the F#7 and the B7, a #11 is implied: the Cn over the F#7 and the Fn over the B7.

b ‰ j Œ ‰ œj œ œ œ œ & b bbb œ œ ¿ œ œ œ E bm7 A b7 ÿ . bbb œ œ Œ Ó œ œ &b b œ ¿ bœ nœ œ

D

b

œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ nœ #œ Db 3 œ œ nœ œ œ . Ó ‰ #œ ‰ nœ œœ J J

B 7 9

bb

17

Scofield continued to use the #11 over the E7. The chromatic line in mm.17-18 (C-B-A#) is echoed in mm.21-22 (A#-AG#). The important chord tones seem to be the goal of these lines.
A7 A b7 . . bœ . bb ‰ j nœ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ & b b b #œ nœ nœ nœ #œ nœ œ œ #œ nœ nœ #œ #œ œ nœ œ E7

bbb ‰ nœ ‰ #œ #œ #œ &b b J J #œ nœ #œ nœ nœ #œ nœ œ nœ ˙ . nœ nœ #œ #œ œ #œ #œ œ
F 7 B7

#

#œ #œ

21

A Db triad is the basic material used in mm.25-27. This is related to the Sancticity melody. The Db and Eb in m.27 change their roles from being the root and second degrees of Db to the upper and lower neighbor tones of the Dn in m.28.

25

œ œ b b b b b ‰ J ‰ J œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œj œ ‰ œj ‰ œj ‰ n œj œ b œ ‰ j & œ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ
D

b

B 7 9

bb

bligon@mozart.sc.edu

The Fb is left unresolved and Scofield ended this chorus with a common dance band era cliché that recalls a Count Basie figure. we are not surprised that the chord is an Eb7 and not an Ebm7.38. Scofield solo analysis. and the seventh of Ebm7 resolved to the third of Ab including a chromatic approach from below.1 occurred beginning on the C and takes the line to the third of the Db in m.47.edu .3 transcribed by Bert Ligon- Again Scofield suggested an Eb7b9 rather than Ebm7.sc. then moving to the third of Db. anticipating the third. The G on the downbeat followed by the Db clarify the Eb7. but the leap up to the b9 is inspired. but helps sustain the ambiguity. The Dn on the downbeat is heard as the lower neighbor tone to the Eb. bbb nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ &b b œ n œ œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ œ n œ ‰ œj ˙ D All the stop and go.3 and 1.36 as expected. The Fb gets resolved to the Eb in m. b B bm7 E b7 A b7 Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ D B 7 9 41 Outline no. The circled En signaled the beginning of outline no.44. Outline no. This line is similar to clichés from the solos of hundreds of jazz artists. are the first ones played in m. . The Eb did resolve to the D n in m. stepwise logical motion in the previous phrase set up the surprise in m. 37 bœ b & b bbb nœ œ ‰ J b E m7 b ˙ A 7 Ó b Scofield played the pretty notes (3-5-6-7) in mm. The surprise is in the angular statement of the chord tones. the D and the Cb. Scofield played a traditional turnaround in mm. The Db and the Fb at once sound like the seventh and b9 of the Eb7 and the root and bluesy flatted third of Db. œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ∑ œ œ œ œ œ Œ The second chorus began ahead of the downbeat is playfully ambiguous for a moment using stop and go rhythms.35 as the tones Ab and Eb would be the third and seventh.39-40 using outlines no. 29 & bbbb E m7 b b A 7 nœ bœ Œ Ó b . Scofield may have been thinking of an Fm7 or Fø7 in m.37.Sancticity.2 is implied in m. . 33 b b B b7 9 . œ ‰ œ œ œ J J œ ¿ œ œ ˙ bb Œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ bligon@mozart. b & b bbb œ œ œ ¿ œ œ D œ. The tones needed to modulate. By this time. p.41-44 emphasizing the third and seventh. and this time Scofield plays an Ebm7 chord.1 of the next phrase.45. .

All of these tones resolve chromatically to the G major triad. 57 b & b bbb D b œ œ œ ˙ .F#7. There is an Ab triad in m. œ œ ‰ œj . The last notes of m. This 3-1 resolution occurs again in m.sc. This contrasted with the lydian dominant sound used previously. p. The third of Ab is prominently placed in m.91-92 with some other surprises. j j ? b b #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ & nœ nœ #œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ . œ œ œ œ œ ‰œ œ œ œ nœ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ b œœ J J nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ E m7 A 7 D b .edu . This line ended with the leap up to the root of F#7. fifth and seventh tones of Fm7.60.59 as an Fm7 then the Ab triad contains the third.œ n œ ‰ n œ œ ‰ J nœ B 7 9 bligon@mozart.4 transcribed by Bert Ligon- 45 Beginning with the circled En from m. A7 A b7 nœ nœ #œ œ nœ nœ œ . Scofield chromatically approached the third of A7 and played chord tones. The tones of the G major triad are the third. The A# returned in m.3 to get to the third of E7. b b 49 Scofield used an extended D major 9 arpeggio over the E7.56 and the next few in the following phrase recall the melodic material of Stompin’ at the Savoy again. & bbbb . The third of B7 is approached chromatically.48 is outline no. then after side-slipping up to the C7.1 leading to the A# as if the progression were C#m7 . œ. but may sound more like a lower neighbor tone involved in the encircling of the Bn.56. Scofield chose the unexpected resolution. bœ œ œ œ bbb #œ nœ E7 b Œ Œ ‰ j & b bbb #œ œ nœ nœ #œ #œ nœ #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ nœ #œ F 7 # B7 #œ nœ #œ nœ œ nœ ? 53 Scofield melodically superimposed triads in mm. If Scofield thought of m. œ œ œ œ œ bb œ . The use of then thirteenth suggests a resolution to Eb major.Sancticity.59 followed by a G major triad in m.54. Scofield used outline no. Triadic superimposition returns in mm.59-60.53 without the octave displacement. which created a mixolydian sound. and the colorful b9 and thirteenth over the Bb7 chord. but again.. Scofield solo analysis.

69. œ œ nœ b A 7 jœ œ ‰ j nœ nœ œ Œ bœ œ œ nœ Œ Œ œ œœœ œ œ œ œ b D b 73 In the most ambiguous Eb measure to this point Scofield played the Gn then the Gb obfuscating the definition of major or minor.49 and 53 is used in m.sc. jœ.71 are also the last notes in m.67 give the line a bluesy feeling. Part of its attraction is the leap from the b7 to the thirteenth. The b9 is finally resolved in m.78 is common in jazz improvisations and is found in some popular songs from the early part of this century.77. . The arpeggio figure in m. but a little late. The 3-1 leap heard before in mm. Scofield leaped from the third of Ab to the #9 and then b9 and left them both unresolved for a moment. j œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ Œ b bligon@mozart. The Dn is sounded and the seventh of the Bb chord points to the third of the Eb chord.5 transcribed by Bert Ligon- Scofield pointed to the Gb using the lower and upper neighbor tones and then encircled the Eb in the same manner in m. A b7 . E m7 b & b bbb D jŒ œ. as before.Sancticity.61. b b ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ &bbb J œ nœ œ œ D B 7 9 b bb 69 Beginning on Bb.68 are the tones that modulate the line to Eb minor.72.edu . But what Eb chord did he choose this time? b & b bbb E m7 . ÿ bbbbb nœ œ bœ œ & œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œj œ . . the G sounding like an upper neighbor to the Gb.68 are outline no. 65 Listen to the clever resolution of this angular melody. This time. The last four notes of m. The Fb in m. only then they are in retrograde and in a lower octave. even beginning on the same pitch.69 and sounds the Eb7 using the G n. Scofield ends this section with more pentatonic material. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ B 7 9 b D 77 . 61 b & b bbb œ œ œ n¿ œ œ Œ E m7 b A 7 ‰ œ œ œ œ nœ œ J b D b œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ Œ Ó Scofield began the third chorus with the same major pentatonic material as he ended the last chorus. 69.71 with the pentatonic material returning.3 leading to the G in m.77.76 pivoting around the Db-C-Db in m. Scofield went for the unexpected in m. p. Scofield climbed up the scale to the Gb in m. œ œ b . The Cb and the Dn in m. œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bb . a leap of a major seventh. The seventh resolved to the third of Ab. The Db-C-Db pivot is heard again in m. The four notes in m.66 and the encircling of the Fn in m. Scofield solo analysis. The end of this chorus is primarily major pentatonic material.

encircled the third of the Bb chord and Eb minor chords in a similar fashions. the iiø7 chord in the parallel key of Db minor. The Db and Gb notes also suggest the resolution to Eb minor. Scofield solo analysis.97 in an upper octave. so the D resolves to the Cn.91-92 is closely related to that of mm. œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ nœ œ bœ Œ Ó D B 7 E m7 b A 7 bligon@mozart.97-98. The chord is an Ab in m.44. Scofield played around the third and fifth of the Db triad in mm.Sancticity. . The notes could be labeled in relationship to the Bb7 chord (13. nœ # œ n œ n œ n œ # œ n œ # œ& Œ? n œ bbbbb & #œ #œ œ nœ n¿ œ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ F 7 # 81 85 The triadic superimposition in mm. The line in mm. but it would explain little. root and b13 over the Bb7 chord. o o o j j n œ . not as they were played). The notes needed to modulate from Db to Eb minor are again. #5.89.6 transcribed by Bert Ligon- The encircling of the C# returns in mm. E. #11.? Ó bbbbb j & nœ œ œ nœ b E7 A b7 nœ œ nœ Œ ‰ #œ nœ nœ #œ nœ & œ œ ∫œ œ œ œ J œ A7 89 & bbbb j j œ ‰ œ ‰ nœ œ œ b œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ J œ œ D This time. The lowest open string. which continues as outline no. The rest of the B7 is typical bluesy material. He suggested the Fm7 chord again in m. over which Scofield has several times substituted an Eb7. 4.1 to the third of Db in m. and is followed by a typical be-bop 3-5-7-b9 arpeggio. followed by a clear F# triad.88. The Dns were bent in varying degrees to find that bluesy third in-between a major and a minor third.87 to resolve to a C# as if the chords were Em7–A7.59-60. The last five notes of m.91 in this phrase is followed by a Gb triad over the Bb7 chord.edu . œ œ œ Œ œ œ œ b B 7 9 bb j j œ œ œ œ œj ‰ œ œ œ œ œ b b 93 The unresolved Gb at the end of the last chorus is resolved in m. b9 and root of the Bb7.100 are ambiguous after the specific statement of the third.sc.87-88 resembles outline no. as in m.3. B7 o n! ! ! œ œœœ . One would expect the E-G-B-D in m.81-82. The box shows a common chromatic approach to the third of the Bb7 chord. clearly stated at the beginning of m. j j bbbbb œ œ nœ Ó & œ œ nœ E m7 b A 7 Ó b . The notes seem to have been chosen for their ambiguity. its third and seventh. #9). This chorus ends moving chromatically from the F to the Ab.100. The notes of the Gb triad yield the color tones #9. is sounded and then followed by arpeggio of chord tones played as harmonics. rather than raise the third for the surprise effect. (They are notated as they sounded. p. Scofield went the other direction and lowered the fifth of the Eb suggesting an Ebø7. encircling the third. The next phrase is all guitar material. The Ab in m.99 by emphasizing the Eb and Ab.

93 and 101. heard in m.œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ nœ b œ #œ nœ bœ œ nœ ‰ J‰ J & b bbb ‰ J #œ nœ bœbœ D There has been a pattern of ambiguity throughout the solo when approaching the fifth measure of the A section. In effect there are two lines pointing to the Gb: (1) D-Cb-Bb-Ab-Gb and (2) EF-Gb. as contrasted with the lydian dominant sound he suggested earlier in the solo. and 79-80. The long scale passage indicates the key of 4#s. the F. the An suggested an Ebø7 chord as it did in mm. pointed to Eb major and resolved it to Eb minor.109. What followed was a simple triadic bluesy idea in mm. but in the example beginning with the Dn (shown with circled notes) is angular and interesting. Œ œ œ œ œ œ 113 .14. the An (enharmonic Bbb) suggested an Ebø7 chord.102-103. is used again to point to the Dn.113. The En moving to F interrupts the step line. Scofield ends this section with pentatonic patterns heard before in mm. the third of Bb.105-106 and returns moving up the Db major scale with one accented chromatic passing tone (G) in m. The Db. p.107. bbb nœ & b b n œ # œ ‰ œj # œ # œ ‰ n œj # œ #œ œ #œ nœ #œ #œ œ œ œ # œ # œn œ# œ# œ nœ #œ #œ #œ nœ F 7 B7 bligon@mozart. which are the root second and minor third of the home key of Db. Scofield solo analysis.7 transcribed by Bert Ligon- 97 b b B b7 9 .101. that continues to the Cn in m. the third of the Eb minor chord in m.105 using octave displacement between the Gb and the F in the higher octave. the seventh of Ebm resolves to the Cn. .Sancticity. The common chromatic approach. the 9th of Ebm resolves to the Eb.104. Outline no.99.1 is the simplest step progression. pointed to Eb minor and suggested Ebø7. b b B b7 9 b œ œ ‰ œj ‰ œj bbbbb œ œ œ œ œ nœ #œ nœ nœ nœ #œ & nœ nœ bœ bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ D 109 b & b bbb œ œ E m7 b A 7 Scofield played with three notes over the F#7 chord: the 5-6-7. There is a simple step line (show with circled notes) suggested beginning with the Cb. the third of Ab. In m.sc. but ultimately they meet at the Gb. He has pointed to Eb minor and substituted Eb7 instead. 101 Scofield side-slips to D major briefly in mm. Scofield followed voice leading principles in m. . b & b bbb E m7 ‰ jÓ nœ œ b A 7 Ó b ÿ œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ D b E m7 b b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ A 7 105 After pointing to the Eb minor. The last three repeated Ebs were bent sharp pointing to the En in m.edu # . He played around chord tones over the B7. 63-66. nœ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b D ÿ b . the fifth of Ab.

Outline no. . He then sounded as if he was going to end the solo with the Duke Ellington ending. œ nœ œ E m7 œ bœ œ œ œ J J œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ ¿ œ œ œ œ #¿ B 7 9 bb b 125 j œ w w COMMON OUTLINES: There are three common outlines that connect adjacent chords when the root movement is down in fifths. Ending on the unresolved 9th and not the tonic allows the second soloist to begin his solo with a sense of continued motion.1 that begins on the third.1 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major. resolves to the third of the chord that follows. p. Outline no.2 begins with the 1-3-5 arpeggio and then adds the dissonant seventh. Because the seventh resolves to the next third. Outline no. nothing specific to the Ab chord.117-118 and answered in m119. The outlines include the most significant and harmonically clear notes and follow basic voice leading principles.2 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major. bbb nœ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ nœ j j # œ n œ ‰ # œj ‰ &b b #œ nœ ‰ œ nœ nœ nœ #œ nœ œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ E7 A7 A 7 b 121 . . The seventh.1 begins on the third of a chord and moves down the scale to the seventh.124.2 is often followed by outline no. Outline no. In m. outline no. bbb œ Œ Ó &b b D b The use of the Cb over the Bb7 chord again points to Eb minor. Root movement in downward fifths is the most common. œ œ œ œ œ &b b œbœ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ . Scofield played very general Db triadic material in m. .3 begins with the descending arpeggio 5-3-1 and then adds the dissonant seventh.125.edu .1 can be sequenced through a progression where chord roots continue to move down in fifths. 117 Stompin’ at the Savoy is further suggested by the melodic material in mm.120 followed by the Ab in m. outline no.8 transcribed by Bert Ligon- There is a sequence of outline no. 3 . Because the seventh resolves to the next third. arpeggiated 3-5-7-b9. The seventh resolves to the third of the chord that follows.1 is shown with circled notes.126. Outline no. Scofield solo analysis. the third of Ab. so these melodic frameworks occur often. the 9th of the Db chord.3 is also often followed by bligon@mozart. but the previous three times he had chosen to resolve to an Ebø7. ÿ . bbb œ œ.121 suggest the opening of Stompin’ at the Savoy again. The seventh resolves to the third of the chord that follows. a dissonant tone.Sancticity. turned it into a bluesy line and ends on the Eb.1 over mm.sc. A b7 Db . he returned instead to an Eb7 chord heard clearly as he approached the G n from above and below from the preceding measure. The F# in m. and continued down the scale to the C. Outline no. The resulting outline no.122-123 which leads to the modulating tone Cb over the Bb7 chord in m.

octave displacement.9 transcribed by Bert Ligon- outline no..3.sc.I in C major. but will work with any chord quality when the roots move down in fifths. These outlines are shown over a ii7 . and numerous other devices.1 which begins on the third. a 3-5-7-9 arpeggio also may follow outline no. These three common melodic outlines are discussed in detail with hundreds of examples from great jazz artists in the book: Connecting Chords with Linear Harmony. Scofield solo analysis.3 is shown below connecting the ii7 to the V7 chord in C major. Houston Pub.1 Dm 7 Outline no. Jazz and non-jazz improvisers and composer working with traditional harmony elaborate these outlines in numerous ways using rhythmic variety.1 Outline no. Outline no. p. This can be illustrated by changing the key signatures of the examples below. OUTLINES over ii7 .3 Dm 7 œ œ œ œ G7 ˙ &c œ œ œ œ ˙ ?c Ó Ó œ œ œ ˙ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ G7 Ó Ó Dm 7 œ œ œ œ ˙ œ œ œ œ ˙ G7 Ó Ó bligon@mozart. Since the seventh resolves to the third of the chord that follows.edu . Inc.V7 . diatonic and chromatic additions and embellishments.V7 IN C MAJOR 15.2 Outline no.Sancticity.

He included a chromatic approach to the Cn and a common turn around the flat and sharp ninth over the Ab7. but his line seems to follow the basic shape shown above in this excerpt from mm.1 occurred again in m. b & b bbb c E m7 Scofield did not play the low Eb.2 is followed by outline no.3 followed by outline no. Scofield solo analysis. mm. he used outline no.3 in m.edu . After arriving at the A#.sc. In this instance with the harmonic rhythm of half notes.10 transcribed by Bert Ligon- OUTLINES from SANCTICITY SOLO: Scofield suggested outline no.39. Scofield suggested a common chromatic motion (C#-C-B-A#) in the excerpt above that resembles this: &c C m7 nœ #œ œ #œ & c #œ #œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ #œ œ œ œ #œ Scofield played a similar line over the second half of the first B section. mm. there is no room for any chromatic additions or rhythmic variations.4546.1 to connect the F#7 to the B.17 as if the F#7 was preceded by a C#m7. and resolved it to the third of the Db.Sancticity.45-47 œ œ œ œ œ b ∫œ bœ œ D œ b bligon@mozart. mm.39-40 ‰ œj j & c #œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ nœ #œ œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ nœ œ œ #œ œ œ #œ b & b bbb c b B m7 b b œ bœ b œ œ œ œj œ œ nœ E 7 A 7 A 7 b Outline no. p.21-23: Bm7 E7 A7 Bm 7 E7 A C m7 # # F #7 B7 # œ œ # œ œ n œ # œ œ # œj nœ œ #œ F 7 C m7 # # F #7 B #œ œ nœ #œ œ #œ #œ œ #œ B The same combination of outline no. skipping the B but including the A#-A-G#. The chromatic motion is implied.1 without embellishment is shown in the following example. and the line was played simply. A simplified version is shown to the right. To the right of the excerpt is the basic setting of the outline without elaboration.

Another example of a simple outline no. p.52-53. Vc b Db bœ ∫œ œ bœ œ œ ‰ j œ œ #œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ #œ Em 7 A 7 E7 Scofield sequenced two versions of outline no.11 transcribed by Bert Ligon- b b j & b bbb c œ œ œ œ nœ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ E m7 A 7 D b .3 to connect the B7 to the E7 in this excerpt from mm. But the time ran out on the line and instead of resolving to the C#.117-119. Scofield resolved to C the third of Ab7. continues down the scale to the third of Db. Outline no.1 begins on the C and after a 3-5-7-b9 arpeggio.3 occurred in mm. A7 . & c #œ nœ #œ œ œ œ #œ b & b bbb c b B7 E7 B 7 œ nœ E 7 œ œ nœ b Scofield uses outline no.2 followed by outline no.1 in mm. Scofield solo analysis.edu . This measure appears to point to A7 as in the progression Em7-A7. œ œ j & c œ # œ œ œ œ œ # œ œ ‰ œj # œ n œ ‰ # œ œ œ n œ # œ œ Bm 7 ÿ bligon@mozart.sc. the G approached from its upper and lower neighbor. b Scofield used outline no.1 in this excerpt from mm. The only change is the use of the b13 replacing the fifth of the Bb7. The E is chromatically approached. He added only a leading tone the D# and an escape tone before resolving to the G#.68-69.87-88.Sancticity. The circled notes indicate the implied Em7. the third of E.

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b & b bbb c Ó bb &bbb Œ œ. This first excerpt is the A section of Stompin’ at the Savoy. j Œ œ . Scofield made reference to Stompin’ at the Savoy in his solo in the following excerpts.6-9: b & b bbb c Ó Scofield in mm. p.122-123: D A 7 b b œ œ œ ˙ b & b bbb c Ó b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œj bligon@mozart.56-57: b ÿ D œ œ œ œ œ œ œ D b ÿ Œ Ó œ.Sancticity. œj ‰ j œ œ ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ Scofield in mm. j Œ œ . œj ‰ j œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ A 7 œ. j ‰ j œ œ œ ¿ œ œ œ D b b & b bbb c Ó bœ œ œ œ Scofield in mm.edu .sc.14 transcribed by Bert Ligon- STOMPIN’ at the SAVOY & SANCTICITY REFERENCES Sancticity is based on the same harmonic progression as Stompin’ at the Savoy. Scofield solo analysis.

œ œ œ ‰ j œ &b b J Jœ œ œ D b This is a common way of elaborating a simple line.21-22 E7 . after playing the F.edu . p.Sancticity. j b & b bbb c œ nœ œ œ œ E m7 b mm.15 transcribed by Bert Ligon- The A section of Sancticity is shown below. The Cn may imply #11 but in this particular context sounds like a lower neighbor or leading tone to the C#. #œ œ nœ œ nœ &c # ‰ #œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ #œ #œ J J J J J F 7 bligon@mozart.16-17.5 over the Ebm7 is F to Gb. m. Scofield made it more interesting when. The essence of the line from m. Scofield solo analysis. b bb œ ˙ &b bb c E bm 7 b & b bbb œ ˙ D œ œ A 7 b œ œ Œ œ œ Œ Ó Ó D b ˙ œ ˙ ˙ œ œ œ œ Œ Ó œ œ Ó Scofield in mm.5 ENCIRCLING & APPROACHES: This is a common pattern over a dominant chord.sc.21-22. He echoes this motion later in mm. It is easy to hear the similarities between the main theme and Scofield’s variation of the theme from mm. Scofield chromatically approached the seventh and encircles the C# with the upper neighbor tone D# and the lower neighbor tone Cn in this excerpt from mm.25-26: 25 bbb ‰ œ ‰ œ .25-26. he played the Dn and comes up to the Gb.

Scofield played a G triad over the Bb7 chord suggesting the 13th. bb bb & b b b c nœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ bœ J Fm 7 b B b7 9 œ¿œœ œ bb œ #œ nœ &bbb c J Fm 7 B 7 9 TRIADIC SUPERIMPOSITIONS There are two interesting contrasting uses of triadic superimposition. and b13.b E bm7 j bbbbb c ‰ œ . b. œ œ ‰ œ œ œ nœ ‰ nœ nœ œ œ œ œ Œ & n¿ œ J Fm7 B 7 9 At the end of Scofield’s second chorus he played an Ab triad again.60.99-100 and m. Root. The presence of the G n suggested resolution to a Eb major. in the third and fourth measures of the last A section. in m.107. Scofield solo analysis. The presence of the Gb implies a resolution to Eb minor.Sancticity. They occur in the same part of the form. p. but again Scofield went for the unexpected and suggested Ebø7.16 transcribed by Bert Ligon- Here is another common chromatic approach found in countless jazz improvisations that is heard in mm. j bbb c ‰ œ ‰ nœ œ œ &b b œ J œ œ D m aj7 b bb E bm7 j j j j œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œj Ó œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ B 7 9 bligon@mozart.) In the second chorus in m. but this time.92. b9 and third of the Bb7 chord.sc.edu . but Scofield resolves instead to an Ebm. he played a Gb major triad over the Bb7 chord yielding the #9. An Ab triad was used over the Db (or Scofield could have been implying the 3-5-7 of an Fm7 chord.

sc. D bmaj9 w bb w &b b b c w ˙ ? bb b c ˙ bb ˙ ˙ ˙ b B b13 9 nnnw w w nw w w D bmaj9 w w w ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ #9 b7b 13 B bbbw w w nw w w This improvisation gives the listener a chance to hear Scofield out of the usual context of playing over his own compositions. There is balance and contrast between traditional jazz vocabulary and Scofield’s individual vocabulary.17 transcribed by Bert Ligon- This example shows the relationship of the superimposed triads to the underlying chords. bligon@mozart. p. Eb7 or Ebø7.Sancticity. Scofield exhibited the respect for the past in his imaginative use of common jazz melodic vocabulary and his references to the melodic material from Sancticity and Stompin’ at the Savoy.edu . Scofield solo analysis. between the blues and pentatonic flavored lines and the more sophisticated harmonic specificity and triadic superimpositions. There is his comic dramatic flair for setting up one expectation a giving another shown in the different approaches and resolutions to what would be Ebm. And: it all swings.

Sancticity. bbb ‰ j nœ #œ œ œ œ œ bœ bœ œ œ & b b #œ nœ nœ nœ #œ nœ œ œ #œ nœ nœ #œ #œ œ nœ œ b Db B b7 9 b b b b b ‰ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œj œ ‰ œj ‰ œj ‰ j œ ‰ j & J J nœ œ bœ #œ nœ œ œ œ œ E bm7 A b7 .edu . #œ #œ nœ #œ E7 A7 A b7 . . œj ∫œ œ œ œ & œ bœ nœ œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b Db B b7 9 j bbbbb œ œ ‰ j Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ & œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ bœ œ œ nœ ¿ œ œ œ #œ E bm7 A b7 Db ÿœ œ œ n œ œ 3 . Scofield solo analysis. p. b œ œ œ œ Ó ‰ #œ ‰ nJ Œ Ó œ œ œ & b bbb bœ J nœ œ œ ¿ F #7 B7 bbb ‰ nœ ‰ #œ #œ #œ &b b J J #œ nœ nœ #œ nœ nœ #œ œ #œ #œ #œ œ nœ œ nœ ˙ . . .18 transcribed by Bert Ligon- Here is the entire solo without commentary: FIRST CHORUS D 1 j j j j b & b bbb c ‰ œ œ œ œ nœ œ ‰ œ ‰ œ ‰ nœ ‰ œ œ œ Œ Œ nœ œ nœ œ œ bœ nœ œ bœ J #œ ÿ ÿ bbbbb œ Œ Ó œ .sc. œ œ œ œ œ bbb œ œ nœ œ œ ∑ Œ & b b bœ Œ Ó œ œ œ œ œ nœ E m7 A 7 D b B 7 9 bb b b b 5 9 13 17 21 25 29 bligon@mozart. bœ .

œ ‰ œ œ œ Œ J J nœ bœ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ ˙ œ E bm7 A b7 Db . . p. ? b b #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ #œ bœ œ œ bb b & nœ nœ nœ nœ œ bœ nœ #œ œ b Db B b7 9 .sc. .19 transcribed by Bert Ligon- SECOND CHORUS D 33 b b B b7 9 . j jœ. Scofield solo analysis. œ œ ‰ œj œ œ n œ ‰ n œ n œ b b œ & J œ œ œ œ œ ˙ E bm7 A b7 Db b nœ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ Œ Ó & b bbb œ œ œ n¿ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œ œ œ J b b B bm7 E b7 A b7 Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ nœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ b B b7 9 D bligon@mozart.. bbb œ œ ‰ œ .edu .Sancticity. . bbb œ œ œ œ œ ‰ œ œ &b b œ œ nœ nœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ J œœ J nœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ F #7 B7 b ? Œ Œ ‰ j & b bbb #œ #œ œ nœ nœ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ œ nœ nœ #œ #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ œ nœ E7 A b7 n œ n œ # œ œ n œ n œ œ A7 . bbb nœ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ b b Œ œ œ œ œ ‰ j & œ nœ œ œ œ nœ œ ˙ bœ ˙ b & b bbb nœ œ ‰ J b & b bbb œ œ œ ¿ œ œ D E m7 b A 7 Ó b 37 41 45 49 53 57 61 œ. œ.

. j b b b b b œ œ n œj Ó Ó œ œ nœ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ bœ Œ Ó & #œ nœ œ œ nœ b bb . Scofield solo analysis.sc. œ œ ‰ j nœ nœ œ Œ œ nœ Db . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ œ B 7 9 bligon@mozart. bbb ‰ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ &b b J D E m7 b 69 73 77 81 85 89 93 A b7 . œ œ œ œ œ F #7 B7 o n! ! ! œ œœœ . nœ # œ n œ n œ n œ # œ n œ # œ& bbbbb Œ? n œ & #œ #œ œ nœ n¿ œ œ #œ nœ #œ nœ #œ E7 A7 A b7 nœ œ o o nœ o bbbbb j j j . œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ E bm7 A b7 Db . b & b bbb j œ .Sancticity. œ œ œ nœ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ Db j œ œ nœ œ œ Œ Œ œ œ œ œ bœ œ œ œ b B b7 9 . . bbb &b b jŒ œ.20 transcribed by Bert Ligon- THIRD CHORUS 65 .? Ó Œ ‰ # œ n œ n œ # œ n œ ∫œ œ œ œ & & nœ œ nœ J œ œ œ œ nœ b Db B b7 9 j j bbb œ ‰ œ ‰ n œ œ œ œ œ œ Œ ‰ œ œj œj œ œj &b b œ œ Œ Œ ‰ œ œ J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ E bm7 A b7 Db B b7 E bm7 A b7 .edu . p. ÿ bbb j œ œ ‰ œ œ œ œ Œ & b b nœ œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ n œ b œj œ .

n œ # œ n œ œ œ œ œ n œ # œ n œ ‰ œj # œ n œ ‰ # œj n œ ‰ n œj œ nœ nœ #œ nœ œ nœ œ bœ b Db B b7 9 . œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œj w w œ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ J œ .sc. . œ œ œ nœ B7 # nœ œ Œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b D ÿ b . 3 .21 transcribed by Bert Ligon- FOURTH CHORUS D 97 b b B b7 9 . Œ œ œ œ œ œ bligon@mozart. œ œ. . .Sancticity. Scofield solo analysis. p. .edu .œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ¿ œ œ b nœ œ #œ nœ bœ œ nœ #œ ‰ J ‰ J & b bbb ‰ J nœ bœ bœ ÿ ‰ jÓ Ó œ bœ œ nœ œ bœ nœ œ œ œ nœ œ b Db B b7 9 b œ œ ‰ œj ‰ œj bbbbb œ œ œ œ œ nœ #œ nœ nœ nœ #œ & nœ nœ bœ bœ nœ œ nœ œ œ œ œ #œ nœ œ b & b bbb E m7 A 7 D E 7 A 7 b b b 101 b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b 105 109 b & b bbb œ œ b & b bbb b & b bbb b & b bbb b & b bbb F 7 E m7 b A 7 113 117 121 125 . nœ n œ # œ # œ ‰ œj œ # œ n œ # œ # œ œ œ œ # œ # œ ‰ n œj # œ n œ # œ # œn œ# œ# œ #œ #œ #œ nœ E7 A7 A b7 ÿ . . œ bœ œ œ Œ Ó J J œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ nœ œ œ bœ ¿ œ œ œ œ #¿ E bm7 A b7 Db .

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