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Photographed on location:
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By
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1070 Thomas Jefferson St., N.W. By Appointment
4/May 1981/Dossier
PubUsher
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Columbia Federal plus
First Federal equals
Columbia
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Almost half as old (74 years) as the industry itself (150 years),
Columbia First is young and innovative enough to offer the newest
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Washington's First Insured Savings Association, with assets in
excess of $925-million and with reserves of more than $60-million,
is ready to serve you at any of its fifteen conveniently located offices,
including one in Maryland.
Main Office· 730 11th Street, N.W • Washington, D.C. 20001 ·Telephone (202) 637-7111
A Free Exhibit At
The john E Kennedy Center For The Performing Arts, May 9-]uly 5, 1981.
Vol. 6 No. 12 May 1981
----------------------------------------------------- ---- --
FEA1URES
17 Senator Hugh Scott: From the Art of Politics to the
Glories of Chinese Art By Viola Drath
Former Senator Hugh Scott Discusses His Much Lauded
CoUection of Oriental art
20 Retirement-A New Beginning By Sofia Yank Bassman
Two Active Washington Couples Share Their Secret -------'--
Formula for a Rich Retirement
24 Slowing Down-The Retirement Home Alternative.
A Positive Look at the Area's Retirement Homes
26 Trust Your Banker. He'l.l Trust "Yours"
By Lauryn L. Franzoni
An Overview of Bank Trust Departments and
How They Manage Your Funds
DEPARTMENTS
8 Annabell 's File
11 Poet's Comer
Four Area Poets: Linda Pastan,
Dolores Kendrick, Margo Stever and
Henry Taylor
13 Design for Living
By Lauryn L. Franzoni
Kitchens Alive: Gadgets, Gimmicks
and Gizmos-What's New in Kit-
chens
29
Along Party Lines
Jameson's Tour de Force, Another
Ford Spectacular, Reflections on
Madame Sadat, Orfila Fetes Bob
Gray, Brazilian's " Kiss" Kissinger
5
1 Fashion Calendar
Cacharel's CoUection
59 The Educated Palate
By Bette Taylor
A Look at Some of the Area's
Newest Restaurant
69 Real &tate Transactions
76 Social Calendar By Maggie Wimsatt
76 Curtain Going Up By Anne Blair
Without missing a beat, Sen. Hugh Scott changed hor es in mid-
career and now actively practices law and devotes hi s spare time to his
magnificent collection of Chinese art. An acknowledged expert in the
field, he began hi collection in 1936 when he and his wife were fur-
nishing their first house in Pennsylvania. Seven trip to the People'
Republic of Chi na have not only embellished his collection, but have
given him valuable insights into Chinese thought s and aspirations.
(Photographed by Fred Ward/ Black Star)
INVESTMENT
Your purchase of a fine Oriental
rug from the collection at
HECHT'S
offers more than meets the eye.
It is a superbly wise investment
at an unus'Jally attractive price.
Oriental rugs increase in value
as they mature. Offering you a
lifetime of reword as you reap
the pleasures of their beauty.
Our rugs ore of
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Examine them for their
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We invite you to our gallery to
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· ~ ·
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For Information About
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Call (703) 893-3003
Dossier/May 1981/7

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8/ May J98J/Dossier
AnnabellS File
THE DOSSIER OF WASHINGTON COMMENT
Dummies:
Apparently nobody told our prominent
Washingtonians who agreed to serve
on the Inchon Premiere committee that
a Moonie front group produced the
film. The worst offender: Defense
Department officials who knew it from
the beginning and didn't lift a finger,
making us wonder if the military in-
telligence community has the com-
petence to fulfill its mission. The
military is supposed to be the defender
of our cherished values, not blatant
supporters of cult groups who tear
American families apart, brainwash
young people and generally foment
dissension between Americans. The
movie, reported to be a monumental
bore, and a glorification of Korea, now
a dubious cause at best, has some
famous stars who took the money and
ran. Punishment for the military who
helped nurture this monstrosity would
be to sit through the film until they cry
for mercy.
Peep ling:
Jody Powell, Carter's former pressec
spending most of his time these days
not making appointments ... Another
pressec, Ron Nessen, deep into his new
novel about a television show, not
unlike 60 minutes ... Big John Connal-
ly was also saved by a bullet that
bounced off a rib. And look at the way
Big John came back. Maybe there is
something to this sex-in-Congress bit:
Liz Ray now lives in a swanky Park
Avenue apartment complete with Rolls
Royce and is about to take another
shot at acting ... Love, incidentally is
in bloom everywhere, especially in the
Big Apple where Barbara Howar has
found a new beau as well as sister-in-
law Nancy Howar ... It also happens in
Malibu where Lucy Johnson Nugent is
romancing . . . Not to be outdone,
Washington claims both the Aniko
Gaal and Nash W. Scott and the Lisa
Brandt and David Deckelbaum court-
ships, with Debra Munitz and Jeffrey
Linowes tying the knot this month.
Happening all over ... Must be
something in the soup 'cause even
Washington triangles makes news as
they did in Suzy's column in the Daily
News last month . . . actually it was a
quartet. Speaking of triangles, the one
inyolving a prominent Washington real
estate lady will scrape the fur off a
Dalmatian.
Asideins!
The late Hobart Taylor, Jr, a popular
Washington figure carefully planned
his own funeral events ·including a par·
ty at his house iri which he was present,
both in body and spirit. Hobart was
tops and we'll all miss him ... Elna Bar·
ros' table -designations at a Chilean
Embassy dinner honoring -Sen. StroJJI
Thurmond had Sen. Ed Zorinsky
e9 at the Arizona table and Sen. Dell·
nis DeConcini at the Nebraska table · ··
Doug Wick, 26 year old movie
ducer son of the Charles Wicks JUS
landed a fal_mlous production deal wi.tb
United Artists, with at least two p!Cd
tures in the works ... Betsy Rea an
Maryanne Smith now in P.R. .. .
Kauffmann has sold her

house on the Potomac . . . Robl
Moore, the author, said to be runninS
into problems as he's talked up as Arn;
bassador to Jamaica. Looks like ave\
long shot . . . Mel Estrin,
young businessman; now the . Jl
largest stockholder at Amenca
Security and Trust . . . Kitty
back iri town after submitting
book to her publisher, her JackJ_e in
tome to be shot for a movie
Washington in early May. Shu
jani, neice of the former Jordan':n
Ambassador who married her Bar e
de Shillaz in Paris without a siD:gl.e

of her relatives present is now bvJng )e
Georgetown ... That decorating couP at
who bought the Pomponio e·
auction are said to be niNo
teen palaces in Saudi ArabJa.

wonder they could afford it ...
copies of the President's

bY
report at G. W. Hospital a
the car load . . . Miz Lillian . '\s
recuperating home. Rosalynn bnn.gJ ..
down to Plains to do her
That Cult leader who lives in our auld
and preaches death to everyone shO SiS
be taken very, very seriously ...
Apple rumor persists about Mur 't be
takeover of N.Y. Daily News. f?
0
n tbe
surpris.ed if he also dips his toe tnto j\b"
Washington .... in
dullah, after political
Mauritania, heading back to D. ·
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Today, American Security manages over $600
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Poets Corner
SELECTED VERSE BY AREA P08S
Hate
The eyes smiled outside of their sockets.
II.
Looking into himself he saw nothing.
/IJ.
He spilled his unbelief over the table.
IV.
Crying, she could not hear herself
v.
The wind gave resurrections
Which the heart rejected.
VI.
Gouge out your eyes for me, he said.
They are too bright.
VIJ.
only what is furtive.
Y/IJ.
Jhe song came but could not sing.
X.
hay while the dark shines.
ihe gave him an apple.
I.
7hy couldn 'I he laugh?
t Was a good joke.
XII.
DXown the avenue came another.
III.
X
What if they recognized each other?
IV.
I:liroshima: The Bomb blew bones
Into silent kitchens.
Dolores Kendrick
Kendrick recently read her poetry in the
li
1
rary of Congress' Gertrude Whittall Series.
b er book, Through The Ceiling, was published
Y Paul Breman, London, England, in 1975.
Hand
Cell and bone structure
more servant
than the elbow,
and more bird-like than the nose
Fingers fan out
like spokes on a half-moon wheel
or the toes of a balled Chippendale claw.
It is a monastery whose
fingers bend in repose,
a slaughterhouse
where nothing is safe.
Margo Stever
Margo Taft Stever is a Harvard graduate living in
Chevy Chase who has worked on the staff of a
U.S. Senator and is published in numerous an-
thologies including Doubleday' No More
Masks.
Not Working
Whatever he was doing, he looks up
and stares past whatever there is-a lamp,
a window, trees, the shingled
garden shed-
as if he were about to think of something
that might have happened to him once,
and now
refuses to occur to him again.
He stares, then, doing absolutely nothing
for minutes, hours, or a whole afternoon,
as the lamp burns, and sunlight
on the shed
brightens and fades; the trees put out
their leaves
and let them fall, and seasons wear away
the days when what he wanted
had a name.
Henry Taylor
Henry Taylor is a Professor of Literature at the
American University, presently on leave doing a
history of Loudon County, Virginia. He is the
author of four collections of poems, including
Desperado and An Afternoon of Pocket
Billiards.
Who Is It Accuses Us?
Who is it accuses us of safety,
as if the family were soldiers
instead of hostages,
as if the gardens were not mined
with explosive peonies,
as if the most common death
were not by household accident?
We have chosen the dangerous life.
Consider the pale necks of the children
under their colored head scarves,
the skin around the husbands' eyes, flayed
with guilt and promises.
You who risk no more than your own skins
I tell you household Gods
are jealous Gods.
They will cover your window sills
with the dust of sunsets;
they will poison your secret wells
with longing.
Linda Pastan
The poem is from Linda Pastan's new book,
Waiting For My Life, published by W. W. Norton,
New York. She teaches a poetry writing workshop
at the American University and has read her work
at the Smithsonian's Barney Studio House.
Dossier/May 1981111
CREATORS OF FI NE JEWELRY
Sapphire Splendor- That most elegant gem coupled with pearls and diamonds
in a collection of jewelry for the elegant woman. All set in eighteen karat gold.
You are invited to call or write for the 1981 Pampillonia catalogue of fine jewelry.
Foremost Purchasers of Estate Jewelry
1213 Conn. Ave. 628·6305 • Mazza Gallerie 363·6305 • The Homestead
l<itl
Zab
cor.
cle:
hot
act
rea
ton
Wo1
Phi
foe
the
ket
Sus
the
use
ty ~
is n
tiot
to
1
\
afi<
ran
fro
l3ic
Co
We
ha,
I<itchen boutiques-where
Zabaglione pots blend in-
conspicuously with self-
cleaning garlic presses and
home espresso-makers are
actually mundane-find a
ready clientele in Washing-
ton where much-traveled
w I '
or dly customers have so-
Phisticated tastes both in
foods and in the appliances
they use to prepare them.
''I '
k t s a very good mar-
et," says Blanche
kitchen buyer for
e China Closet. "We
Used to be the only speciai-
shop in town but there
IS '
. more and more competi-
hon. Now everybody is in-
to gourmet cooking."
af\\:' ashington 's culinary
tctonados have a wide
of stores and items
;om which to select.
Cloomingdale's, the Hecht
Wo., Garfinckel's and
h oodward & Lothrop all
ave expanded houseware
and gourmet departments.
Independent retailers such
as the China Closet, Kitch-
en Bazaar and Haymarket
Ademas have been follow-
ed into the market by
Iberian Imports, What's
Cooking and Country Liv-
ing.
Most recently, San Fran-
cisco's Williams-Sonoma
selected Washington as its
first East Coast outlet.
"Our mail-order business
here indicated that Wash-
ington was a good
market," says Mark Ger-
mond, manager of Wil-
liams-Sonoma in the Maz-
za Galierie.
Washington's kitchen re-
tailers carry merchandise
ranging from the practical
to the whimsical. The fol-
lowing is a selection of
popular items, including
the manufacturer's sug-
gested price, which are
available from local stores.
This year's bestselling
cookware is the French
Calphalon. Made of thick
restaurant-weight aluminum,
it has a tough, glasslike
coating fused to the alumi-
num. It doesn't chip, crack,
peel or rust. A three piece
starter set retails for $125.
Extras include the new 6-qt.
couscousier ($85) and the
15 %" x 2 Y2" paella pan
($68), shown.
Pretty and practical : a
Stoneware Taco Rack will
hold four tortillas while you
add the fillings . Safe for oven
and dishwasher. A pair, $21.
The Eks Beam Balance Scale
gives precise weights from Y2
oz. to 26 lbs. Perfect for
Washingtonians on diet .
Imported from Sweden, the
scale with removable tray,
$42.50.
Dossier/May 1981/JJ
Beginners and professional
chefs will enjoy Jane Salzfass
Freiman's The Art of Food
Processor Cooking, with
instant conver ion chart.
$14.95.
Mandoline Cutter and
Pusher/Holder. When a
Cuisinart isn't enough, try this
chopping device. Constructed
of heavy-gauge stainless steel,
the unit has high-carbon steel
blades. Julienne and wider
French-fry cutter come with
the unit. $122.50.
The "ultimate Mixer" from
Kitchenaid with pasta
extruder, bread hooks, a food
processor pack and food
grinder attachments. The basic
model, $309.95, with mixing
bowls and attachments.
Both 36" six-burner and 60 '
six-burner ranges are available
in the Garland Restaurant
Range. Constructed with a
standard gun-metal enamel
finish, (custom stainless tee!
and black finishes also), the
design uses 9" burners for
better heat distribution and
gas energy savi ngs. Sold
exclusively by Williams-
Sonoma, also available in
electric. Models from $1,070.
to $3,100.
Kitchen Clock: Design Linque
makes one with a "high-tech"
grid face, quartz movement.
A beauty of glass and rubber
trim and white enamel hands,
it runs on one AA battery.
$42.95.
14/May 1981/Dossier
Maxim Convection Oven:
Speedy but better for baking
than microwave. However,
you won't soften butter in 3
seconds in one. These brushed
chrome ovens do everything a
standard oven does, but 30
percent faster. Using less
energy, a fan keeps the heat in
constant motion around food
for uniform cooking on all
sides. You can do up to a 17
lb. turkey in this oven and it
can be used as a slow cooker
and dehydrator for fruits and
vegetables. It continuously
cleans and is portable. From
$240 to $260.
SfMAC Pastamatic: Made in
Italy, this electric appliance
mixes the ingredients, kneads
the dough and extrudes the
finished product in any one of
seven different pasta shapes.
Comes with 8 discs, 10 more
available by special order.
$250.
The Solait Creme Fraiche
Maker is just what today's
French chef needs for creme
fraiche, yogurt, buttermilk or
sour cream. The non-electric
two-piece culture insulator, I
qt. glass container, dairy
thermometer and packet of
culture starter, $24.
An Espresso Machine needn't
require the space generally
allotted in restaurants. AMA
offers a 10 ~ " high machine
with a 2-4 cup capacity. It also
has a vaporizer for cappuc-
cino, a safety thermostat, and
an in-operation light. From
Milan, it's constructed of all
brass and stainless tee!. $295.
The Braun Coffee Mill gives
you nine settings for grind
control. Measures from one to
twelve cups. $55.
Handcrafted Yogurt Pots,
made for the China Closet by
a local potter, come with
recipes and instructions for
homemade yogurt. $13.99.
Hamilton Beach offers a pro-
fessional Milkshake Mixer
which can double at your bar
for margaritas and daiquiris.
The machine has a four-fold
agitator, stainless steel and
baked enamel aluminum hous-
ing, 3-speed control and
automatic on/off switch.
$199.50. Additional Milk
hake Containers, $12 each.
The Spanek Verticle Roaster
won prizes at the Paris
Gourmet Fair. The metal
frame acts as an internal
heating element to seal in the
natural juices and permit even
cooking. Includes basting tray
and shish-kabob skewers. $17.
The Leyse Wok et include a
large 15" aluminum wok with
flat bottom for direct use on
electric stoves. Available with
burner ring for gas stoves,
perforated steam plate, 10 qt.
cover and recipe booklet.
$31.50.
The Belgian Waffle Iron from
Nordic Ware will brighten anY
brunch menu. It's cast
aluminum with non-stick
coating and two temperature
gauges. $29.50.
Pizzelle Irons: Delightful
Italian cookies are best made
in cast aluminum irons.
Round, floral and wavy
designs available from
Vitantonio Manufacturers.
About $22.
Proctor-Silex Electric Juicer:
One of the best values in
electric juicers, a powerful
motor turns on automaticallY
when the fruit is pressed to the
reamer. $25 .
Waldow's Copper Double
Boiler with thick china in en
adds beauty and efficiencY to
the kitchen. I -l/.1 cup capacitY·
$74.
Professional Baker's Pans:
Constructed of heavy black
20-gauge steel, these pans
produce particularly crisp
crusts. Made by WallcamP
Industries, the essential pieces
include: 2-loaf French bread
pan, $14.50; jelly roll pan.
$10.; and bread loaf pans,
$7.50 and $12.50.
A country chicken for the
kitchen is really a Coated rke
Wire Egg Ba ket. Shaped
1
a chicken, perfect for eggs or
other foods. Wings are
handles for easy carrying.
$9.95.
Fru
cie
ere;
env
pro
car
v a ~
rip1
qt.
om
anY
re
Je
r:
t
0
y.
Fruit Ripening Bowl
scientifically designed to
create "orchard-like"
environment by controlling
Production of ethylene gas,
carbon dioxide and water
vapor needed for natural
ripening. By Jareen. $14.95.
Copco's Five Piece Food
Saver Set, dishwasher safe.
$13.50.
A Copco Tea Kettle, 2 quart
capacity. The porcelainized
with teak
andles and knobs in white,

Yellow, brown, biscuit or
ue. $26.
Pepper Mills are plentiful in a
variety of shapes and sizes .
gourmet-line pair is the
rench-made Perfex mill with
an easy to operate grinding
rnechanism. $30.
Deluxe Hardwood Rolling
Pins ball bearings keep
Pastnes smooth. Every kitchen
should have three: 10!12", 15"
;nd 18". By Thorpe, from
7.50-$24.
Pizza crusts are crisper and
evenly cooked when the cook
has a Superstone Pizza Brick.
The stoneware disc conducts
heat like a brick oven. It'
also great for light breads and
cookies. Foods won't tick
even without greasing. $13.
Long the best graters, the
Mouli Cheese Grater and the
Parsley Mincer are back in
metal. For almost a decade
Mouli constructed the graters
in plastic, but now have
returned to the preferred
stainless steel. Good for
chocolate and nuts, too. Both
can be reversed for right or
left-handed cooks. Each, $9.
Copco's 18-boltle Spice Rack
with 24 labels and available in
a variety of colors. $26.
Washington's favorite food
processor is still the Cuisinar(.
The deluxe DLC7E has a
powerful motor, steel chop-
ping blade, plastic dough
blade, shreddi.ng disc, a 3-mm
slicing disc and wide funnel
cover with a small and large
pusher for $260. To keep the
dust out, a quilted Cuisinart
Cover in wheat piped with
brown costs $13.
Sabatier Knives: Made of
carbon steel they are "fully
guaranteed to rust" and so
require care in handling. A
full set should include at least
one paring knife, one chef's
utility knife, one ham/ turkey
slicer and a chef's cook knife.
They retail from $6.95 for a
small paring knife to $32 for a
12" chef's cook knife.
For your knives, a Tommer
Knife Holder in hardwood has
room for eight knives and a
sharpening steel. Slant style.
$26.95.
The DMT Dinmond Whet-
stone is a thin laye,r of
perforated steel covered with
diamond particles in a nickel
coating to keep knive harp.
Five sizes available from
Diamond Mining Technology,
lnc. from $15 to $62.
Veille-lail: That translate to
an end to boilovers. The
Corning glass disc sits at the
bottom of your pot and keeps
the contents from boiling
over. $3.50.
The Joyce hen tninless
Clcnvcr: Thi s stainle tecl
cleaver keep a razor- harp
edge, never ru ts or
$25.
The stackable idea return in
do-it-your elf wine rack.
Vermont Birch Stocking Wine
Racks keep pace with your
supply. Hold three bottle
across. 12-bottle rack, $24.;
40-bottle rack, $60.
A Single Turn Corkscrew
save time. Knob handle with
screw inside remove cork
with one turn. $8.50.
English Trifle Bowl holds four
quarts of England's popular
dessert. Also makes a great
punchbowl. $11.50.
No kitchen hould be without
a Kitchen Witch, who watche
your kitchen to prevent burns
and spill-overs. In a variety of
sizes, the average price, $6.
(Continued on Page 67)
Dossier/May 1981 I 15
With Ford's
Consmper Appeals Board,
your voice has more power
than you think.
You have the power 'to write a wrong. Because
your written word carries considerable weight
with the Board. Ford's Consumer Appeals Board
has an impressive record of success in reviewing
your side of a service-related problem, then
reaching a fair settlement.
Its fairness is assured because this is an
independent Board; three of its five volunteers
are consumer representatives with no affiliation
with Ford Motor Company or its Dealers.
The Board considers complaints involving Ford
Motor Company vehicles and Metro Washington
and Maryland Ford and Lincoln-Mercury Dealers.
The Board will not review: complaints currently
in litigation or cases that involve alleged
personal injury or property damage, or complaints
involving requests for consequential damages.
After you've discussed the problem with your
Dealer and the Company-and if it remains
unsolved-the Ford Consumer Appeals Board will
review your case; then it will make a fair and
just decision.
Its decision is binding on Ford Motor CompanY
and your Ford or Lincoln-Mercury Dealer. But
it is not binding cin you. We think that's more
than fair.
Call toll-free:
1-800-241-8450
[
Whe1
day,
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D
on't let the massive door with
the heavy ironwork from John
Hay's house, once located
Where the Hay-Adams Hotel stands to-
day, deceive you. Attorney Hugh and
Marian Scott's beautiful residence is
not filled with Americana or the kind of
rnemorabilia piled up by prominent
former U.S. senators.
Even though Scott was Chairman of
the Republican Party from 1948-49,
Wrote books with titles Hke "How to
Go Into Politics" and "How to Run
For Public Office and Win!" and was
elected Republican Minority Leader of
the U.S. Senate twenty years later,
of his poHtical past are bare-
y In evidence. Unlike so many other
Politicians in this town lingering in the
of power after having relin-
or lost their place in the ego-
S Oostmg political spectrum, Hugh
cott, now a partner in the law firm
Barnett, Alagia & Carey, had his mind
on other things.
I_f law and politics are his profession,
Ch1nese art proved to be his ever-lasting
Vocation. In contrast to a number of in-
ternationally renowned collectors,
among them Eugene Bernat whose leg-
endary collection of Chinese ceramics
auctioned off last year for more
t an 3 million dollars, Scott did not
, on the brilliant art of the
,,u_ng Dynasty (960 - 1270) but the
hvely" art of the earlier T'ang Dynas-
ty (618 - 906), a period regarded by
Scholars as one of the unrivalled "flor-
• of the arts. Fascinated by the
vlt r
'f• a 1ty of the arts and crafts of the
1
ang Dynasty he began to collect and
barn about it and eventually wrote a
AOok, "The Golden Age of Chinese
rt," that was published in 1966.
When it comes to the history and the
of the T'ang, the politician from
thennsylvania, who was first elected to
lJ e 77th Congress in 1941 and left the
Y .S. Senate undefeated in 1976 after 34
ears of public service, ranks among
IDR
HUGH
SCOTT
From 1he
Art of Politics
1o1he
Oories of
Chinese Art
By Viola Drath
the experts. His remarkable collection,
rich in mirrors, gold and silver objects,
bronzes, whiteware, multi-colored
"san t'sai" glazed pottery and ceram-
ics, terra-cotta figures, carved jades,
glass and textiles, was accumulated in
the good old days when people col-
lected for pleasure.
"I did not grow up with antiques . My
first purchase of oriental art was a
"kakemono," a Japanese ancestor
portrait," Scott confesses. "That was
in 1935. I was a young lawyer and we
were in the process of furnishing our
first house in Philadelphia." Looking
back, he guesses that the art objects in
John Wanamaker's antique shop had
something to do with his interest in the
arts of Japan.
As an officer of the U.S. Navy in
World War II, Scott belonged to the oc-
cupation forces bound for Japan. Still,
his attention was soon diverted to
Chinese art. It happened during a trip
to pre-Communist China in 1947. What
in particular attracted him to the art of
the T'ang Dynasty, described by him as
"lusty," was not just the mastery of
form and technique, but a quality that
relates to the social and political
outlook of that epoch.
"It was a cosmopolitan period,"
Scott explains. ''For the first time,
Westerners were encouraged to live
there. The influx of foreigners had a
most invigorating effect on the arts.
They came from Greece, Persia, Ara-
bia, India, Korea and Japan. The
Emperor's court became a place where
scholars, poets, painters and musicians
gathered and the arts flourished."
Scott, a Phi Beta Kappa with a law
degree from the University of Virginia,
is a quiet, scholarly man rather than a
flamboyant politician. In order to illus-
trate his observations he guides the
visitor to the tomb figures, mostly
modeled of buff pottery, in his study: a
"Turkic type" guardian, a Semitic
merchant with traces of pigment on
Dossier/May 1981117
The proud collector surrounded
by his distinguished collection of
precious carved objects of jade
and lapis lazuli.
/. Lion and cup, rhodonite,
modern
2. Amber Kuan-yin, 18th C.
3. Green jade plate, 17th C.
4. Jade figure of Shu Lao, 18th C.
5. Jade tripod, 18th C.
6. Jade bird, 18th C.
7. Yellow jade bowl, 18th C.
8. Pair birds, lapis lazuli, 19th C.
9. Spinach jade brush holder, Pi
Tung, 18th C.
/0. Jade vase, with poem by
Emperor Chien Sung, 1775.
II. Jade bowl, ivory stand, 18th C.
12. Jadefigure, 19th C.
/3. White jade carved stem cup,
Ming.
14. Carved carnelian group,
19th c.
15. Mutton fat jade koro, 18th C.
16. Jade Bowl, 18th C.
17. Moghul spinach jade bowl.
Very rare.
18. Pair jade figures, 19th C.
19. Figure of old man, late
19th c.
20. Carved opal snuff bottle,
modern.
21. Jade carved snuff bottle,
19th c.
22. Jade snuff bottle,
19th/20th(:.
23. Archaic jade dog, lOth C.
or earlier.
FRED WARD/BLACK STAR
clothing of Sassanian or Persian in-
spiration, a Christian missionary, a
Persian groom, the small dark-green
glazed figure of a court jester with Tar-
tar cap, the camels from far away coun-
tries and the imported horses from
Feraghan. Among the court ladies and
dancers with their elaborate head-
dresses, often with pigment on the buff
clay, an equestrian figure of gray clay
from the earlier Wei Dynasty attracts
attention. At close inspection she turns
out to be a lady in topknot carrying a
musical instrument with infinite grace.
With pride the collector points to
various silver objects with decorative
Sassanian motifs: the splendid oval-
shaped cup with its high stemmed foot
of hammered silver, chased with gilt
and embellished with scrolls and ten-
drils and wonderful birds in flight, or
the striking hexafoil covered box, gold-
decorated with an intricate leaf and
floral design, from the beginning of the
8th century.
''You know, there was a Silver Street
in Peking, a Jade and even an Embroi-
18/May 1981/Dossier
dery Street," he says. The collector
visibly enjoys touching these precious
objects. "Their early value was estab-
lished by the Arabs who controlled the
sea trade," he comments, resting his
eyes on a bronze teapot of perfect pro-
portions, elegantly decorated with gold
and lacquer-flying birds, flowers,
lotus plants and a gold phoenix, the
symbol of the Empress-applied per-
haps in niello technique. Enhanced by
an earlier design in copper by a dif-
ferent artist beneath the sumptuous
gold decor, this exquisite example of
T'ang craftsmanship is-like so many
other objects in this notable collec-
tion-a museum piece that has been ex-
hibited around the country.
However, the oldest and most extra-
ordinary items are the jades from the
Shang Dynasty (1500 - 1050 B.C.): a
support of a box in pale luminous jade
and a delicately carved fish and rabbit.
A flat ritual disk of reddish greenish
jade, one of the religious pieces sym-
bolizing heaven with a slight imperfec-
tion along the edge, is meant to demon-
The 1
1
niturE
1
slend
1
from
be on

ChipJ
With 1
Mar;,
strat
tion.
fron
A.D
chas
a se
figu1
Oflu
touc
and
the :
unp,
Tl
fron
erate
• With
Pick,
Ill iss
Ill itt,
''Lei
on s
Ill en·
State
hors
over

B
16
The living room with its fine examples of fur-
niture from the Ming period is graced by a
slender table of honey-colored "Padouk" wood
from Borneo, dating from 1450, that may well
be one of the oldest examples in this country.
The vi trine, a splendid specimen of English
Chippendale of Georgian chinoiserie is filled
With all sorts of art treasures. (Below left)
I Marian Scott in her favorite Chinese robe with
:orne of her beloved lmari porcelain in her din-
Ing room.
that only God can create perfec-
fton. A small carved pig of white jade
torn the Han Dynasty (206 B.C. - 220
belongs among Scott's latest pur-
e ases. Yet of all these wondrous things
semi-translucent flying Buddhist
1
fure holding a lotus blossom, carved
lustrous greenish jade with brownish
ouches along the curved outer edges
no more than 2 inches high, from
u e Sung Dynasty (960 -1279), has an
nparatleled esthetic appeal.
f The translucent green jade screen
erorn the Ming period, with the delib-
: .ate gold leaf design of a garden scene
• p·•th scholars and maidservants, was
up by Scott on one of his early
for the Civil Aviation subcom-
of the House in Kyoto in 1949.
0
etters by the emperors were written
n such thin sheets of jade," he com-
At the same time he acquired a
h ately 21-inch terra-cotta saddled

in a static pose, coated with an
• b erall glaze in green, yellow and
rown and adorned with molded flor-
(Continued on Page 53)
Top: Flanking the important dishes of whitish clay, covered with unctuous white gla<.e, some of the
earliest examples of T'ang whiteware, are the funerary figures of a dancer and a dwarf. The
perfectly shaped horse with straw colored glaze and bright blue <.ebra-like stripes is coveted by a
number of museums.
Middle: The pri<.ed silver objects include a silver plate with a border showing the Hui Wen
(everlasting scroll design}, ornamented with repousse borders of styli<.ed fish, frogs and turtles, each
holding a weapon; a silver stem cup, decorated with birds and floral sprays, scrolls and palmetto;
and a Sassanian type oval-shaped cup, hammered in silver, chased in gilt.
Bottom: Among the collector's favorite examples of T'ang ceramics are (front-row) a funerary
figure of a falconer of gla<.ed clay; a rare white ewer with a pear-shaped body resting on a circular
ungla<.ed foot modeled of lavigated porcellanous ware, circa 8th century A.D.; the tomb figure of a
cock, excavated at Lo Yang in the province of Hunan, with an unusual transparent gla<.efaintly
tinged with green; and an artist's handrest in brown, green and yellow gla<.e, supported by a sleepy
looking curled up bull.
Dossier/May 1981119
20/ May 1981/Dossier
I
f you are a believer in the old
Spanish toast Pesos, Salud, Amor,
y el Tiempo para Gustarlos
(Money, Health, Love and Time to
Enjoy Them), you can agree with our
Washington couples' assertion that
retirement is not an end, but a begin-
ning . Both the Ditzens and the
Kellys share those precious ingre-
dients-a zest for life and pleasure in
each other's company-that keep them
coming back for more of whatever they
do best.
The former Eleanor Davies Tydings,
now Mrs. Lowell Russell Ditzen, will
easily bring up her age. She just turned
77 in April. Married to Senator Millard
Tydings in 1935 until his death in 1961,
she remained a widow for five years.
"Then the Reverend came to town"
from his New York, Westchester Coun-
ty parish, swept her off her feet and
married her in 1966. During the winter,
they reside in their elegant Calvert
Street apartment resplendent with Ori-
ental cabinets from the Imperial Palace
in Peking, a Louis XVI desk-one of
over a dozen that the King had made
for his ladies-in-waiting-and a display
case highlighting a monogrammed
cigarette case that once belonged to
Nicholas II. There is china tucked
away, a former possession of RussiaO
ruler Catherine the Great, and RussiaO
artwork throughout the apartment, ar·
tifacts collected, in part, during her
father, Joseph E. Davies' tenure as
U.S. Ambassador to Russia froro
1936-38. In the summer and on soroe
winter weekends, the Ditzens travel to
"Oakington," the 400-acre DavieS
family estate since 1935, on the bankS
of Chesapeake Bay.
As his wife looked for something
misplaced, Dr. Ditzen laughed an
said, "My wife was asked what
do when they're retired. Well, we spen
half of our time looking for .

glasses!'' Hardly. The Ditzens do 1t al ·
play bridge and golf, host dinner par·
ties, lunch with friends and spend even;
ings dancing. "Lowell is the best danced
in the world, except for me," note e
Mrs . Ditzen. In spite of an active
life, she was quick to point out t
be·
"We don't want to be written up as
ing old retired people who
anything but dance and play bridge.
101
have great interests and we spend a
of time on them." ns
Anyone who has met the
would be hard pressed to
them as such. Since the Reverend
5

tired in 1975, he' s served as the prote
-
" •
W}
rel
sp

. gl.
tan1
one
lyo
tive
oft
Sen
can
Col
tee
Diti
St.
Ma
E
flai
reti
reJi
1
Wri1
nat:
ogr,
VUIJ
bac
Wa
,,
for
jok,
c
Gui
Dul
na;
But
B!e;
SWiJ
sian
ssiaO
t, ar·
, her
:e as
'ror!l
;orne
el to
1
vie5
ank
, she
'and
,
0
pJe
Jend
oor
t aJ]:
par·
ven·
ncer
0
ted
sore
that
; be·
· dO
·we

'' ... what people do
when they're
retired. Well, we
spend half our times
looking for our
· glasses. "
tant chaplain on cruise ships, including
one world cruise. Dr. Ditzen is current-
ly on the Board of Trustees, the Execu-
tive Committee and serves as Secretary
or the Board for the Union Theological
Seminary in Richmond, Virginia. Lo-
cally, he's a member of the District of
Columbia Medical Society's Commit-
on Religion and Medicine. Eleanor
Dttzen is on the Board of Directors for
St. John's College in Annapolis,
Maryland.
a busy schedule, a literary
flatr runs rampant in the family. Before
retiring, Dr. Ditzen authored nine
religious books and his wife is currently
Writing two: one on the history of her
native Maryland, the other, an autobi-
ography, in which she promises to di-
''What Ike said the night he got
from France at the close of the
vvar."
f ''I'm going to get excommunicated
. Or sure when the book comes out,"
Joked Dr. Ditzen.
<?n their future agenda, a Theatre
gutld trip that will include stops in
Ublin, Copenhagen, Budapest, Vien-
and London is scheduled in the fall.
E Ut for just everyday, according to
leanor Ditzen "Lowell says we're
sw· '
tnging on the garden gate. "
Reflecting their sense of joyous busy living Dr.
and Mrs. Lowell Russell Ditzen and her hus-
band live a fulfilling life of activity and travel.
Dossier/ May 1981121
''Mr. President
I would expect you
to say that you
won 't go to the
dinner unless women
are invited. ''
11/ May /981/Dossier
T
here's another Washington cou-
ple ''swinging on the garden
gate," Rear Admiral and Mrs.
(Virginia Weldon) Kelly. She was 14
years old at the time she met young
Lieutenant Kelly while visiting her older
sister Violet and her husband. Two
young girls lived next door to her sister
and at the last minute needed someone
to round out the table at a dinner party
the next night. By her account, all they
wanted was an extra body to "make the
table." "1 ust let her breathe in and
out,'' the girls instructed her older sister.
Mrs. Kelly reminisced, "I saw this
tall fellow winding the Victrola and I
thought 'Goodness, he is so attractive.'
Anyway, when we were at the table, he
said to me, 'Miss Weldon, how old are
you?' Well now, would you have said
you were fourteen? I don't think so. So
I thought about saying sixteen, then
thought, 'That's not good enough.' So
I said, 'I'm seventeen' and he said,
'You don't look it.'"
Lieutenant Kelly was instantly smit-
ten. But he waited until she was 17 Yz
before asking her father for her hand
and married her three months later,
when she was 18.
Many years later (Mrs. Kelly is very
superstitious about "happiness" and
refuses to arouse evil spirits by revealing
either her age or how long they've been
married), they're still in lov.e.
"Although we have very spirited dts·
agreements and discussions ... we have
always loved each other," she said. A
repeated refrain from Admiral Kelly
constant, "I love her with all my heart.
Over the years, they've traveled
3
great deal, he at first with his naval
career, she independently. When the
Admiral retired from the Navy in 19)0,
after 33 years of service which included
a stint on the carrier "Houston," he
went to work for Mobil Oil CompanY
as the Assistant to the Chairman of the
Board and stayed for 15 Yz years. M?re
recently, he served as an
consultant to Mercedes-Benz of Nort
America and represented Max Factor
as well. Now, he continues his busine
interests and according to Mrs. KellY•
remains "busy as a birddog."
1
The Admiral isn't the family's

"busy birddog." Mrs. Kelly' s schedll
would intimidate anyone. In 1980,

received a B.A. "with distinction''
French language and literature fro
George Washington University.
she's been studying philosophy at


Georgetown University and Amen.ca
University. "Learning is so absorbti1S•
so thrilling; it extends your knowledge
o f yourself." r
Added to her university classes is.he.
continuing responsibility as WashtnS
tor
tar
Ca
Jo,
wo
WJ
tio
ist'
in
the
tra
COt
an1
Pe1
dir:
fin

&re
&01
I
to
sec
do1
wo
tiel
the
tra
ha,
or
rnu
int1
dif
rne
but
lh
0
ve.
t dis·
have
1d. A
y is a
,,
art.
ted a
naval
n the
)950.
luded
" }le
;paliY
)f tbe
More
:erill8
.Jortll
·actor
;iness
(eliY•
onlY
edule
) sbe
',, jO
l
frorO
ateiY•
botll
:rica
0
billg,
!edge
is per
.hing·
ton correspondent and editorial consul-
tant for newspapers in Long Beach,
California, and other places. When
John Kennedy was President, as a
Working journalist and member of the
House Correspondents Associa-
the self-proclaimed "born femin-
corrected a troubling discrepancy
In the Association's annual dinner. At
the time, no women were invited to the
traditionally stag party. But Mrs. Kelly
cornered the young President one day
and said, "Mr. President, I would ex-
You to say that you won't go to the
unless women are invited." Her
stance, coupled with a little lobby-
Ing on the part of a California Con-
gressman whom she also confronted,
&ot her an invitation.
If You mention "hobbies" and travel
to Virginia Kelly, it will take her a few
seconds to respond, as if she just
doesn't understand the meaning of the
Though they both have season
ICkets for the symphony and opera,
there is little time left over for either
travel or going to the theater. "I don't .
have that much time to go to the theater
or travel 'cause there just isn't that
time," she said. Admiral Kelly's

of "hobbies" is a little
different, however. "She looks after
honey. She not only keeps busy,
Ut she keeps me busy.'' D
Another busy couple who resent the word
"retired" are Rear Admiral and Mrs. Weldon
1
. Kelly. The Admiral is already working on his
hrrd career while Mrs. Kelly, shown here on the
Georgetown University campus continues her
studies in philosophy.
Dossier/ May 1981113
I
n a catalog from one of Washing-
ton's exclusive Connecticut Avenue
shops there is a photo of a needle-
point pillow on which the inscription
reads "Live long enough to be a burden
to your children."
The message is obviously meant in a
light vein, but it rings with an element
of truth. Burdening their children is not
the goal of the elderly and should a
parent need a little extra care, there are
alternatives for all family members: re-
tirement homes .
The Washington area offers a wide
selection of choice facilities. In most
homes mentioned, dining and house-
keeping services come with the accom-
modations, beauty shops may be on the
premises, nurses are readily available
and all have places of worship for all
denominations.
One major feature of all the homes is a
round of almost non-stop, planned social
activities . Arts and crafts, exercise
classes, bridge, bingo, cookouts and
cocktail parties, ranging from Friday
night "happy hours" to simple wine and
cheese or pizza and beer, dominate many
homes. Some even boast regular live
entertainment and first run movies.
A sampler of area retirement and nurs-
ing homes follows .
Chevy Chase House (5420 Connecticut
Avenue, N.W., Washington) is noted as one
of the "luxury retirement houses, complete
with a dining room that shows off with pink
linens, fresh flowers on the table and wine
served with dinner. Chauffeur driven limou-
sines will take you around town. A full time
recreation director keeps the residents busy
with planned activities every day of the
week, including a Wednesday night cocktail
party, bingo, outings to the Kennedy Center
and live entertainment, which could be
opera, ballet or Irish dancers, if it's St.
Patrick's Day. Residents look forward to
Memorial Day when the outdoor "sidewalk
cafe" opens for summer cookouts. One of
the more familiar names in residence is
Robert Lincoln Todd Beckwith, the great,
great grandson of Abraham Lincoln; Mr.
Beckwith is in his early 90's. Meg McGeogh
is the Director of the House.
The Georgetown (2512 Que Street, N.W.,
Washington) which opened last May is run
by the same management as Chevy Chase
House and has the same variety of programs
and facilities. Executive Director John J.
Walsh emphasizes that being there is "a
continuation of a lifestyle." Citing a gamut
of activities similar to Chevy Chase House,
he stresses that the residents "enjoy every
day here because there's always something
going on."
Westwood Retirement Home (5101 Ridge-
field Road, Bethesda) has a special patch of
241 May 1981 I Dossier
SLOWING
DOWN-
Edith Bettigole, Lloyd G. Henbest and Mrs. Bernard Van Rensselaer enjoy a champagne toast during tht
special cocktail hour which takes place every Thursday evening at the Georgetown when guests are in·
ground in the back reserved for confirmed
gardeners in the home who delight in grow-
ing their own tomatoes, lettuce and cucum-
bers. Last year, they even put a scarecrow in
the garden. Sandra Wood, the Administra-
tor, describes the food-the product of two
chefs-as "classy" with filet mignon, a
steamship round of beef and ice carvings
crammed with fruit available. There is a
Club Room that serves as the focal point for
social activities that can range from belly
r's
dancers, imported for last year's Fathe tb
Day, to exercise classes. Westwood h ~ b ~ o r
an activities and assistant activities d1reciJld
to check regularly with the residents to ~ e d
out what they enjoy most. A chauffell ell'
limousine is on hand for trips to the J{red
nedy Center or just a quick stop at a favo
store for food or gifts.
cellter
Bethesda Retirement and Nursing ) js
(8700 Jones Mill Road, Chevy Chase
1
f
l
j
Ill a
&r<
lie
lie
sto
eel
Fei
bei
bet
or
Wh
n-
THE
RETIREMENT
HOME
ALTERNATIVE
By Sofia Yank Bassman
a program of entertainment. The 10-month-old facility allows residents to lead the lifestyle they
ad tn their own home, but with relief from the loneliness syndrome so common among the elderly.
managed by Homewood Health Care, a
also runs Westwood, Fernwood
li ouse Bethesda) and Fairland Nursing
st orne (m Silver Spring). Zachariah Blacki-
one, a well-known Washington florist,
his 110th birthday there in
b and holds the special distinction of
b etng the only person in the world who has

a Mason for 85 years. Special features
home include a Residents' Council,
tch meets monthly and offers suggestions
to the management, a poetry group that has
published a booklet of their poems, a news-
paper that residents contribute regularly to
called The Bethesda Breeze and frequent
entertainment. Jeanetta Manuel is the Ad-
ministrator.
The Wisconsin Avenue Nursing Home (3333
Wisconsin Avenue, Washington) has six
people on its activities staff and is sup-
plemented by local volunteers. They offer
group trips by van to ee Wa hington's
" pecial events" like a rc cnt outi ng to sec
the cherry blo som in bloom. Admiral S.
Walter Anderson, whom Home
Admini trator Bruce Boyer claim i the
"oldest living graduate of the U. . Naval
Academy," i in residence.
Uiff Nursing Home (8000 Iliff Drive, Dunn
Loring) offers a rustic setting with six acres
of grounds. In addition to the usual assort-
ment of activities, Iliff has an unusual facili-
ty on the grounds: a day care center. The
children come up to mix with the elders at
scheduled events, according to Administra-
tor Cam Hall, and it provides a healthy in-
terchange of young and old. Iliff also en-
courages the surrounding community to
become involved with the home's people.
Fairfax Nursing Center (10701 Main Street,
Fairfax) has seven full-time staffers com-
plemented by an extensive volunteer group
to arrange in-house programs for the resi-
dents. Popular events include a history class
and weekly news discussion group and
Peter Hackes from NBC News recently
stopped by to head the class. Grounds are
extensive and complete with a gazebo, an
aviary with what Administrator Charmaine
Bainun calls "quite an assortment of exotic
birds," and a summertime "farm," where
rabbits, sheep and small animals roam in
nice weather. They've also got a "Century
Club" for the three residents who are 100
and older.
Carriage Hill of Arlington (1785 South
Hayes Street, Arlington), which also has
locations in Bethesda and Silver Spring,
recently had a trendy "Western Day" com-
plete with fiddlers and dancing. Denny G.
Dennis, Director of Operations for Carriage
Hill Nursing Centers and Administrator for
the Arlington home, noted the nice relation-
ships that have developed between some of
the staff and residents, where staffers have
invited residents to their homes for dinner
and have taken them to World Series ball-
games and the movies.
Manor Care Arlington Nursing Center (550
South Carlin Springs Road, Arlington) is
one of five "Manor Care" residences, the
others are in Adelphi, Hyattsville, Largo
and Wheaton, Maryland. Administrator
Carol Gordon says people are immediately
cheered when they come in because of the
"homelike atmosphere," provided by the
antiques and early American furnishings.
Outside is lovely as well, with spacious
grounds with a pond and two stone wells.
They've also got a round of activities of
cooking classes, group sings and cocktail
hours.
ln making a deci sion for yourself or a
member of your family, it's best to give
each a long hard look to see what is just
right for the person involved. D
Dossier/May 1981115
TRUS T A C R £E.t1,t.)IT
___ ,,.
'
By Lauryn L. Franzoni
26/May 1981 /Dossier
C
ommercial bank trust officers
are almost as low-key and
tight-lipped as intelligence
agents when it comes to discussing their
customers. The officers are privy to
more than investment information;
they often serve as surrogate parents,
foster families, and even analysts.
"0 I''
ur approach is very persona ,
says George E. Flather, Jr., Executive
Vice President/trust officer at First
American Bank, N.A. "The custorner
can call on us at any time for invest·
,,
ment help or any other kind of advice.
The trust banking business is based
on setting and attaining personal goals.
The trust department officials in
ington say their involvement in indt·
vidual accounts is as varied as the
number of customers they serve.
"Estate planning is becoming verY
flexible, very affirmative and
creative," says Lee C. Tashjian, Vtce
President and trust officer at the Riggs
National Bank.
"Instead, the officers now have
become much better educated, rnuch
more sophisticated and are specialists
in the trust and investment area."
Trust funds have often carried the
aura of services only for the verY
wealthy. This is no longer true todaY·
World travelers, retirees, widows,
children and, increasingly, young pro·
fessionals and divorced persons are tur·
f
. an·
ning to the trust officers here for tO
cial and personal counseling. he
Three District banks hand!e the
lion's share of trust funds tn t i
metropolitan market: American
ty Bank, Riggs and National savtn
and Trust. . v·ce
Sidney Cousins is the Sentor / st
President for trusts at NS&T. In the a a
30 years, he notes there has
significant change in the sef\'
1
art
rendered by trust officers. "It's all
of a long-range movement t? be
0
ve
direct investments in order to trnPr
the c
n
local
$5(}()
reco:
men1
these
Pool
the b
an ir
Tl
and
CUst
thro1
elim:
trust
tend
thro
01
tage1
inhe
thro
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thro
n

ed a:
they
Olde1
au h
says
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n
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at AI
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lis he
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Ill on
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tag
0

n
rene
surv1
term
M:
done
icers
and
ence
their
y tO
:ion;
ents,
sts.
,al,' '
JtiVC
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1
rner
vest·
,,
ce.
a sed
)aJs.
·ash·
indi·
the
verY
verY
Vice
jggS
tbC
verY
aY·

prD'
ttlr·
,an-
the customers' personal tax status."
The average trust fund managed by
local banks has assets of $300,000 to
$500,000. Most trust officers do not
recommend a trust fund for invest-
ments less than $150,000. However,
these smaller investments are often
Pooled into common trust funds which
the bank manages on a group instead of
an individual basis.
The trust fund is both a tax-saving
and time-saving vehicle for the
customer. Estates left to families
through trusts can reduce and often
eliminate the family's estate tax bill. A
trust insures that the funds go to the in-
tended recipients and do not have to go
through probate.
One of the most important advan-
of the trust to many investors is its
Inherent privacy An estate which goes
through becomes part of the
PUblic record. A trust fund may pass
through generations in total privacy.
b The trust officers at all three major
anks note that trust funds are manag-
as much by investor personality as
ey are by investment goals. "If an
O:der woman is still sharp and handling
a I her own stock transactions well,"
Flather, "I'd never propose to take
t at independence away from her."
The trust industry is one of the most
stable in business. As one trust officer
atAm ·
,, encan Security Bank commented,
r Once the trust relationship is estab-
is tends to stay with you. Unlike a
ecking account customer who may
ecome angered over an error in the
monthly statement and move the ac-
you really have to an-
I gontze a trust customer to have him
eave Your bank."
r "{he per.sonnel of trust departments
e lect thts stability. In every bank
the trust officers are long-
errn employees.
d Most prospecting for new clients is
one among the individual bank's
customers involved with other bank
services. The degree of personal atten-
tion required of each account promotes
this process. Fee structures among the
banks are fairly standard and are deter-
mined on a percentage basis of the
assets involved.
It is becoming more common for
younger professionals to turn to the
bank to manage their portfolios. Trust
officers note that many individuals
prefer the convenience of a trust and
will later convert that trust fund into
some sort of estate plan.
There can be pitfalls to this method
of investment. According to Rigg's
Vice President George R. Adams, "The
horror stories arise when people don't
expect the unexpected. You have to
plan to try to cover as many contingen-
cies as possible.
"Sometimes people try to do their
own planning. A homemade plan is like
trying to take out an appendix without
a surgeon."
There are many factors which will
have a dramatic impact on the evolu-
tion of the trust industry in the 1980s.
Adams cites, for example, the pressures
from within the banking community to
reduce regulations.
"What we are striving for is the ex-
pansion of the services we can offer as a
broad-based financial institution with-
out losing the quality of a prudent in-
vestment approach," Adams says.
Trusts can be maintained as fairly ac-
tive and liquid investments. Every trust
officer smiles at the remembrance of a
teenager living off a trust who asked for
stereo equipment or the customer who
increased her charitable trust benefit to
the local animal shelter.
"Our trust operations give people
more time for other things and help
them reduce the amount they worry
about their investments," Flather said.
"We are directly involved in our custo-
mers' lives." 0
Trust management is generally handled on a
fee basis, however individual may con ult with
bank trust officers for no charge. Mo 1 all
banks have orne ort of trust ervice available,
however the following i a listing of major fi.
nancial in titution in our area with tru t
departments.
The assets listed represent tho e funds held
under management in the e banks a of Decem-
ber 31 , 1980.
D.C.
American Security Bank: Parker E. Niel on,
Senior Vice President, Trust and lnve tment
Division - $2.1 billion.
First American Bank N.A. of Washington:
George E. Flather, Jr., Executive Vice
President / Trust Officer- $1.2 billion.
National Bank of Washington: Donald .
McVitty, Senior Vice President / Trust Officer
- $500 million.
National Savings & Trust: Sydney C. Cousins,
Senior Vice President and Trust Officer -
$650 million.
The Riggs Bank: Francis J . Lyons, Executive
Vice President- $1.6 billion.
Maryland
Citizens Bank and Trust: Roger M. Steuart,
Jr., Vice President / Trust Officer- $23.5
million. •
Equitable Trust: John C. Ruxton, Senior Vice
President - $173 million. •
First National Bank of Maryland: Leslie Lee,
Senior Vice President - $650 million. •
Maryland National Bank: George V. Hankins,
Senior Vice President and Senior Trust Of-
ficer - $1.3 billion. •
Suburban Trust Bank: Thomas S. Lawson,
Executive Vice President - $231 million. •
Union Trust: Armand H. Levin, Senior Vice
President - $425 million. •
Virginia
Bank of Virginia: William W. Huffman, Vice
President- $290 million. •
Burke & Herbert Bank & Trust: W. Laird
Warwick, Vice President and Trust Officer -
$20 million.
Central Fidelity Bank: Charles H. Flynn,
Senior Vice President- $600 million. •
First American Bank of Virginia: James R.
Ayers III , Senior Vice President and Trust Of-
ficer - $275 million. •
First and Merchants: Charles H. Gardner, Jr.,
Vice President and Trust Officer (regional) -
$1.5 billion. •
First Virginia Bank: A. Paul Lanzillotta, Ex-
ecutive Vice President-Trust Service - $100
million.•
National Bank of Fairfax: James L. Nance,
Vice President, Trust/Investment - $22
million.
Northern Virginia Bank: Robert E. Duvall,
Senior Vice President and Senior Trust Of-
fi cer - $30 million.
Virginia National Bank: Roy L. Collins III ,
Vice President and Regional Trust Officer -
$1.2 billion. •
United Virginia Bank: Malcolm S. Under-
wood, Senior Vice President-Trust - $1.9
billion.•
• Indicates a state-wide figure.
Dossier/May 1981117
No. 209 would be
£Or Asst. Secretary
There's a new place in Georgetown
ideally suited for all the VJP"s headed
for Washington.
james Place. A particularly digni-
fied condominium residence on the side
of Georgetown nearest the White
!louse- and farthest from the
congestion.
While all 77 residences are unus-
ually large and well-designed, o. 209
seems especially Right for a new ap-
pointee. Besides a nice, quiet library off
the living room. there are two generously
sized bedrooms, a breakfast-area
kitchen. plenty of room for a grand
old pa1iy, plus many small
(but exceedingly civilized) touches -
from the custom door mouldings to the
brass bath fixtures. Price: A conserva-
tive $196,800.
isit our decorated models at the
Sales Office. on 29th Street. South of
M.just below the canal (guest-parking
in garage). 1, 2. and 3 bedroom plans
available early 19 l. Open 11 to 6
e ery da . Phone 338-0990. Sales by
Brenneman Associates. Inc. ~
Developed by a subsidiary of l.!:J
Watergate Development, Inc. :=.=
}
fon
Far
In tl
rno:
$50
due
rnu.
anc
Prlr
anc
the
tale
Cal
Bill
I Along Party Lines
SOCIAL AFFAIRS IN THE WORLD OF WASHINGTON
f ressed tables for party were arranged by Gretchen Posten,
Former ite House Social Secretary. Musical strings accompany Harold and Caroline
arb from Texas as they descend the grand stairway, right.
ANOTHER FORD SPECTACULAR
In the new "mix" of celebrities from the worlds of show biz, politics and corporations, the
most successful fundraiser for Ford's Theatre combined the three to the tune of

committed by almost 100 sponsors from Alcoa to Xerox for the Theatre' s pro-
uctlon fund. As a showy example of President Reagan' s philosophy that private money
must supplant federal bucks for the arts, the two-day extravaganza of parties, receptions
dinners culminated with a three-hour TV "Festival at Ford' s. " Talent ranged from
Pnma ballerina Natalia Makarova to country music's Johnny Cash. Mrs. Howard Baker
Mrs. "Tip" O'Neill as Co-chairman, along with Mrs. Reagan as honorary, made for
t Perfect combo to attract big congressional and White House names as well as top
ent. Regional Chairman helping to raise funds included New York' s Bernard Lasker,
Lew Wasserman, Texan Rob Mosbacher, Jr., Kentucky's Barney Barnett and
1
Ragan from Washington.
Joe Cates, the show's producer, and enter-
tainers Juliet Prowse and Rodney Dangerfield
pause at the Corcoran dinner.
Dossier/May 1981129
The perfect interior .. .
one that fits your lifestyle best, blending the
elements that express your taste and
personality. A trained professional designer
can create the ideal setting for your
Georgetown pied-a-terre or rustic country
home. Call our Studio of Interior Design:
Washington, Chevy Chase, Wheaton Plaza,
Tysons Corner, Montgomery Mall
f.·
and Annapolis
WOODWARD & LOTHROP
JO/ May 1981/ Dossier

Seated In the OAS grand ballroorn{r rePB
mogul Abe Poll In and Irene enjoy th
9
on the tul ip bedecked table.
enjo . the occasion's festive air is this shot ot the President,
the ~ l n g the music in the OAS ballroom. They danced into Sen. Paul Laxalt and Nancy
ee hours. Reynolds chat.
Georgetown
337·3600
Soups,
Salads,
Sandwiches,
Hot Entrees,
and
Desserts.
Capitol Hill
547-8200
Visa, MasterCard welcome
Harborplace
962-8400
Dossier/May 1981131
JUNE HIGHLIGHTS
Count Basie,
Preservation Hall
Jazz Band, -tl
Bill Monroe,
Jane Olivor,
Oscar Peterson,
The Persuasions,
Shirley Verrett,
Doc Watson,
Sydney Dance
Company, r>
1}
Symphony,
Jazz I}
Greats in Festival
For information call :
703/938-2900 {1
Wolf Trap Farm Park
for the Performing Arts J
Vienna. Virginia !}
22180 I
32/ May 1981 / Dossier
L!VY
They were all survivors of the Great societY
and, despite his absence, the spirit of Lyndon
Johnson hovered ubiquitously over the event, a
preview of a film about Ladybird titled,
First Lady, a Portrait of Lady Bird Johnson·
1
Narrated and filmed by Charles Guggenheim, I
was underwritten by Johnson friend LeW
serman of MCA and will be shown at the L
Library in Austin. " I'm overwhelmed," MrS·
Johnson told guests at the Washington
view, her eyes misted with nostalgia. Tom Johnf
son, former White House aide and now

the Los Angeles Times introduced the film
81
1
the star filled audience which Included
cabinet members Dean Rusk and Bob McNarn
·
0
ri ti
Wearing her spectacular emeralds, the star of " The Little Foxes" chats with MaJ cliP'
Leader Howard Baker and wife, Joy as Sen. John Warner listens intently. Mrs. warner
tfvated Washington audiences despite mixed reviews.
-
w
the 1
Con
1
sent
rang
of Cc
aw,
rehe:
With

Prevl
Play
the
1
Play.
Three of Mrs. Johnson's grandchildren
Pose in front of beaming mother/Aunt Lyn-
da Robb. (L to R) Catherine Robb, Nicole
Nugent and Lucinda Robb.
Am Wcos CONGRESS
With sharp cutbacks anticipated as per
the Reagan budget, some massaging of
Congressional benefactors seemed es-
sential. Cultural events toward that goal
ranged from a KenCen reception for wives
of Congressmen to private dinner parties,
a Washington Opera reception and dress
rehearsal for "Madame Butterfly," a night
With the National Symphony with buffet
supper following at the Watergate and a
Preview of "The Little Foxes" and post-
Play party to meet Liz Taylor Warner and
the Other actors in the Lillian Hellman
Play.
Playwright Lillian Hellman, who fought
great battles, with Senator and Mrs. Harri-
son Williams, now fighting his own battle.
5asil
Traditional American and Continental Cuisine
Elegant, Comfortable and Intimate Dining
"YOU ARE WHERE YOU EAT". "The elegant green ambiance of BASIL is at-
tracting Congressmen. It is destined to become the steak house of Capitol Hill . ..
They even serve coffee grown in the United States (Hawaii). "
Bette Taylor, Dossier
"BASIL stresses prime meats, fresh seafood and fresh vegetables . .. cappuccino pie
is a delightful ending. " Dossier
"BASIL restaurant on the Hill has become a distinguished address. One of the
federal city's newest dining meccas. Underscoring the very best is an immaculate
restaurant. BASIL has a sleek, smart look. Of course the food at BASIL is the
thing. " Don Hearn, Roll Call
CAPITOLffiLL
First and D Streets, Southeast
Reservations (202) 546-4545
AFTER THEATER DINING
Valet Parking After 7 PM
Lunch & Dinner Mon. to Fri. 11 :30AM to Midnight
Sat. 6:00PM to Midnight
Sundays & Holidays closed
Proper Attire-Jackets Requested
Small Executive Rooms
American Express, M.C. & V.
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WATERGATE OPTICIANS, INC.
Under New Ownership
Offering EXCLUSIVE EYEWEAR and
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2558 Virginia Avenue, NW
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965-4686
Major Credit Cards Accepted
Dossier/May 1981/JJ
When it has to
bepedect,
it lias to be
Hyatt.
Weddings, Rehearsal dinners,
Receptions, Bar Mitzvahs. We
put a lot of love into making
each one perfect. Because we
know how much each one means
to you.
The Hyatt Regency has a vari ety
of elegant accommodati ons to
host large gatherings as well as
intimate groups . Our pastry chef
will create the mmt delight ful
confecti ons to your fa ncy. And
our consult ant will suggest
special touches to make thi s
once-in-a-lifetime trul y one-of-a-
ki nd.
Your wedding or bar mitzvah at
the Hyatt will be perfectl y
simple. And simpl y perfect. One
you and your guests will
remember for a very long ti me.
J4/ May 1981/Dossier
Wyatt Dickerson chats with Mrs. Edward Mayor Barry and Star editor Murray Gart ~
Hilson of New York. Mrs. Hilson entertained Gray party. Among other media blggles VI
the Reagan' s in New York. Rowland Evans, Carl Rowan and Bill Satire.
Bot
din!
hon
tan I
---
0
--- y
Wa!
ase
hoi a
soel
It
co.e
e)(tr:
Peo
1
Seer
A
tise
Was
fleet
Heal
Sch\
Marl
Mas1
Srnit
Darn
f:lep,
CartE
ner, I
Jose
Quer
Hurn
loyal
Co
and
8
Peet
()f thl
and t
neutr
••
1
8
ha11
f
rll'. erna
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Gray, Bob' s brother, and Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon's
0
15
T n
secretary share a joke duri ng the cocktail hour that preceded the dinner. Woods says s11
8
bal he
touch with " the boss" at least two or three times a week. ~
B?b Gray sweeps Helga Into the OAS
dining room as eighty guests assembled to
the veteran public relations consul-
ant who has just started a new firm.
0RFILA FETES tJJB GRAY
You might dub it the quintessential
Washington transitional party. Republicans
ascending, Democrats diminished but
holding, journalists gloriously neutral and
Socialites still glittering.
It was all in honor of Robert Keith Gray,
co·chairman of the Inaugural and PR man
extraordinaire, put together by the master
himself, Alejandro Orfila,
ecretary-General of the OAS and his Helga.
E A former secretary of the cabinet under
Isenhower, Gray is an old hand at the
game and the guest list re·
it. Sen. Paul Laxalt; Secretary of
ealth and Human Resources Richard
tchwelker; former Nixon Secretary Rose
ary Woods; Nancy Reynolds; Morgan
Attorney General William French
D rnlth; and Reagan Secretary Helen Van
arnm were among many others on the

side. Anne Wexler, former
Carterite, mysteriously to Gray's right at din-
Bruce Sundlun, Mayor Marion Barry and
0
Seph Duffey, Chairman of the belea·
National Endowment for the
1
urnanities were representatives of the
0
Yal opposition.
a Columnists William Satire, Carl Rowan
8
no Rowland Evans, representing a wide

of political opinion were also part
a the group as were Bill and Buffy Cafritz
the Jeff Davises. Attesting to the total
Sh Utrality of the event were hotelmen Mar·
email Coyne of the Madison and John Col·
an of the Fairfax.
baJhe dinner for eighty was held on the
Cony of the Pan American Union.
Jurg L.mzrein debutS his elegant r'rfm sp'ing
lineofcolorcoordinatoo poltety dishes.
CUstom ploce seltings t'( special ordoc.
D. POOtaJit sp'ing line of fine li001S CJ1d
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Dossier/ May 1981135
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36/May 1981/Dossier
THE EYES HA \IE IT!
The dance floor at the posh Four
Seasons Hotel looked much like Rehobeth
Beach on Saturday night with civic tigers
by the dozens bouncing with abandon to
the Sammy Ferro beat. The occasion was
the 15th annual Eye Ball which supports
the International Eye Foundation and helps
promote peace by restoring sight and
preventing blindness in 35 countries from
Honduras to Peru and Egypt to Indonesia.
IEF's Medical Director Dr. John Harry
King and blonde wife Helen received with
Chairmen "Cosy" Baker, Mrs. Vincent
Henry Walker and Louis Boland. Special
Guest of Honor Senator Barry Goldwater
with Peggy on his arm, held court during
cocktails with Sam and Joan Scrivener,
Natalie and George Bunker, "Trapper"
and Betty Drum, the Ken Crosbys and Lt.
Generals Bill Quinn and Betty and Art
Trudeau and Rosalie.
Steven Montgomery told Anna Maria
Via that he and Beth will host a dinner
dance cruise down the Potomac in June
for the younger-set supporters of the Eye
Foundation. At midnight the joint was still
jumping-sign of a successful benefit!
DANCING FOR THE ARTS
Ginger Rogers (72 and holding!) made
the day when she danced with
everybody's husband (George Bush, Ken
Crosby, Alan Randall and Patrick Hayes'
stepson to name a few) at the livelY
Crystal Tea Dance sponsored by the
Women's Committee of the Washington
Society for the Performing Arts. The Sun·
day afternoon terpsichore to fund the
Concerts-in-Schools Program, packed the
Grand Ballroom of the Mayflower Hotel
with $100 ticket holders who sipped "high
tea" (wine and vodka martinis) and mun-
ched on scones and crepes flambe.
Chairman Barbara Gordon kept the par·
ty moving from receiving line to 9 p.m.
finale with assists from Vice Chairman
Coral Schmid, Mrs. Joseph D'Edmidio,
Mrs. John Fitzpatrick and Mrs. James
Harkless-proof that tea dances pay and
may be the new "In" way to play in
Washington this year.
The morning after the Crystal Tea
Dance found the WPAS Women's Com·
mittee back on their feet again for a 10 till
noon "Mix 'n Mingle" Reception at the
Phillips Gallery for First Lady NancY
Reagan and her partner Barbara Bush·
The event drew over 250 distaff volunteers
from a variety of arts programs.
As a group it was ultra-suede incest, as
most of the pastel clad volunteers had
several arts affiliations such as Mrs.
Theodore Bedwell (Symphony and Ballet)
and Mrs. James R. Patton, Jr. (Smithso·
nlan and Phillips Counci l ). Esther
Coopersmith boosted the
Museum ... Lilly Guest wore a Friends o
the Kennedy Center tag.
Best quote honors went to Barbara Bush
who commented that " public service and
volunteerism is really the rent you pay tor
living on this earth." -ARAMINTA
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1.
s
s
d
;.
t)
) •
tf
s
,f
WPAS volunteers, including Chairman of the Crystal Tea Dance Barbara Gordon and
Jeanine Clark, are congratulated by Nancy Reagan at the Phillips Gallery reception. At the
tea dance, Ginger Rogers whirls with Rep. Robert McClory.
Dossier/May 1981137
At a Meridian House luncheon, Mrs. Sad at saw Egyptian Admiring glances turned on Jehan Sadat by all at the tea given by Egyp·
costumes, rugs and basketry. Greeting her are Ambassador John tian Ambassador's wife Amal Ghorbal, left, at the embassy.
Jova and Leonard Marks.
Mrs. Sadat arrives at the benefit with Ambassador and Mrs. Ghorbal. The AFL·CIO President Lane Kirkland, David Brinkley and Carter's Mid·
ball raised nearly $1 mill ion for Cairo' s Faith and Hope Hospital. East negotiator, Robert Strauss, are among Jehan-admirers.
38/ May 1981/Dossier
Jeh
dent,
arts.
eventJ
tlon, e
nian IT
cial ac
l tlonal
OfWa:
Quentl
With b
QagerT
sure n
1 hosts,
• A
-Rog
OfAmt
J drawir
Peditil
trans!,
live ar
• Sh
liked
co re-f,
linen-•
SUppo
We/1.-
Galler
' Sh
the T/
severe
a/so
Pres
1
Mahn
White1
Piece,
Hirsh I
' Sli
so we:
ties, c;
Pora'l
Sad at
' Sli
1 costu
1
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mark
I came
Of Afr
• M,
Kids
Childt
&aid:
I han
rnuct
Whon
Childi
easi/)
this <
Adele
Child
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l'hrot
• TJ
Worlo
1
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and'
Sens1
from
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Who I
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hi bit
S o i r ~
'--

REFLECTIONS ON
MM)AJV1E SM)AT
Jehan Sadat , wife of the Egyptian Presi-
dent, is a true soldier in the service of the
arts. Her rigorous three-day schedule of
events to herald the " Egypt Today" exposi-
lion, encompassing exhibits at six Smithso-
nian museums, ceremonies and related so-
Cial activities at the White House, the Na-
lional Academy of Science and other pillars
Of Washl ngton's cultural establishment , fre-
Quently left Egypt's indefatigable First Lady
With but 30 minutes between speaking en-
gagements. But she never lost her compo-
sure nor her good humor, according to her
1 hosts, some of whose comments were:
• A delightful person. Very pleasant .
-Roger Kennedy, director of the Museum
I
Of American History whose exhibit comprised
drawings by members of pre-Napoleonic ex-
;:gyp· Peditions showing Egyptian life and their
translation to architecture and the decora-
live arts.
3
El
'v1id·
• She's a patient listener. She especially
liked the way we mounted our exhibit of
core-formed glass cosmetic containers on
ltnen-covered blocks with inconspicuous
supports to permit small items to be seen
Wefi.-Dr. Tom Lawton, Director of the Freer
Gallery.
• She wanted to walk around the rest of
the Third Floor Ambulatory and picked out
several modern pieces to comment on. She
atso talked about the elegance of our
p,resentation (of Egyptian sculptor
•YJahmoud Moukhtar's works) and the
Whiteness of the museum against which the
showed to such advantage.- The
'llrShhorn's Abram Lerner.
• She was delighted that Americans, who
s? warmly welcomed the King Tut antiqui-
1
ttes, are finally getting to see some contem-
IJorary things.-Ambassador John Jova, Mrs.
Sadat's host at a Meridian House luncheon.
I
• She thought our exhibit of contemporary
Costumes and jewelry of Egypt quite beauti·
fut and asked a number of questions, re-
marking on the areas from which they
came.-Director Warren Robbins, Museum
Of African Art.
I(·· Mrs. Sadat spoke to us after the Met-
Ids Chorus, a group of neighborhood
Children, sang about peace and love. She
Said she felt more at home with this group
than with any other because she spent so
much time with her own grandchildren
Whom she was missing. She noted that
Children have the gift of loving one another
easily, and said she hoped they would carry
this ability into adult life.-Effi Barry and
cid?le Alexander, coordinator of the Capital
hlldren' s Museum exhibit of tapest ries
ioven by tiny fingers depicting " Egypt
hrough the Eyes of Her Children."
• The most marvellous woman in the
without exception. This enormously
'mPressive and clever woman is capti vating
:nd that rare person who has something
1
ensible to say about almost everything
D?m restoration to people to schools.-S.
... Ilion Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian,
"ho introduced Mrs. Sadat at the Renwick
dinner, the Smithsonian Castle ex-
s

and the National Academy of Science
__...-/ 01ree.
------------------------------'


\ .
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Dossier/May /98//39
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40/May 1981/Dossier
THE GEORGETOWN
, ..
din1
11
g
Four tables of ten graced the paneled ~ e r e
room of the Metropolitan Club shown
15
.
before the arrival of the Jameson's gues
JAJ
Fe
Tc
Mrs.
fort)
fore,
he a<
lllos
WerE
At
laud
new
ernp
Stat
I! an
bea1
M
lam
P r e ~
Pan
corr
rem
s
eve
1
Hai,
the
dat•
vlgc
vlgc
thai
T
Qre:
fray
l l l o ~
A
sad
bas
Iris!
Bn1
Her
f:av
Pnr
Hu
1
Mr.
Jim
Anc
Ny
la AI·
. ,Arfl'
.audl Ill•
3rasse
rt
JAJv1ESON'S TOUR DE
FoRCE
To most of the guests present, Mr. and
Mrs. Frank Jameson's black tie dinner for
forty at the Metropolitan Club was a tour de
Ioree. There were no honored guests, no
head table and no long speeches, although
most of the men and some of the women
Were all called upon to speak.
And speak they did. Mostly the guests
lauded the Reagan administration and the
new spirit it had given the country as ex·
ernpllfied by one of the guests, Secretary of
State AI Halg, who with Sen. Charles Percy
Mrs. Jameson, the spectacularly
eautlful Eva Gabor.
Many of the men were members of the
larned "Conquistadors," a social club for
Presidents and Chairmans of major com·
Panies and shouts of "Viva" were not un·
common as each guest concluded his
remarks, which were all spontaneous.
Sen. Percy's remarks concluding the
evening described the ordeal of Secretary
confirmation hearings opining that
he anguish was worth the candle and vall·
dated the American system. Secretary Halg
Vigorously nodded assent, although equally
VIgorously denied, when it was suggested,
1
hat he was Interested in any future office.
The lone Democrat present was Con·
Fred Richmond who kept the
rayed banner of liberalism waving in the
mostly conservative crowd.
s Among the guests were Tunisian Ambas·
bador and Mrs. Ali Hedda, Hungarian Am·
1
and Mrs. Ferenc Esztergalyor,
s'Sh Ambassador and Mrs. Sean Donlon,
f.trltish Ambassador and Mrs. Nicholas
f: anderson, Jordan Ambassador and Mrs.
p Sharaf, Admiral Thomas Hayward,
f.tr
1
nce and Princess Youka Troubetzkoy,
M lJghes' Alrcrafts' Jack Winkel and Babette,
Jr and Mrs. Harry Coombs, Mr. and Mrs.
rn Shepley, Admiral and Mrs. George
Anderson and the Albert Grassellls.
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41/May 1981/Dossier
"'
Bill McCann, just nominated as Ar11;
bassador to Ireland, beams delightedlY a
the Irish Embassy as he Is offered
gratulations by White House Aide RI C
Ahearn while others applaud.
LEPRECHAUNS HIT TOWN
'Twas a great day for the Irish, what
Himself at the Irish Embassy for lunch onS i
Paddy's Day and bringing with him a Jar
0
9
jelly beans in an Irish Waterford and th
1
.
Finance Minister Gene FitzGerald presen
5
ing an ancestral chart proving Himself an
pure as the Livey itself. Ambassador seao
Donlon' s lass sang ditties while others,

claim the old sod, like Tip O'Neill and
15
Halg whose authent icity comes through hbB
mum, broke bread with the gang. Not to
1
outdone, the Maguires, in the person
Rose, now Zalles, donated 1800 historic
tomes to Georgetown University' s Ceitd
Book Collection with Hurd Maguire
Rose' s nephew, reading Don Juan and
1
0
Devil In honor of the occasion. Took
days to finish the celebration what WIn
talks b.y Burke Wilkinson and Mor9
8
15
Llewellyn and Thomas O' Canaln playi nQ
pipes. And over on Capitol Hill
6
8
Congressman Bob Wilson and his Shirl y
flung their annual St. Paddy's event
plate with bagpipers and a bevy of co
5
gressmen past and present, Irish or not/'r
always, Bob Michel, now Minority Lea
sang "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" a
there wasn' t a dry eye in the house.
'" •
Mrs. Rose Zalles escorted by her neP
1
1
o
actor Hurd Hatfield, enter Gaston HaJteid
celebrate her presentation. Mr. Hat
read selections from Don Juan in Helf.
H
b;
b;
as Arfi '
htediY at
,red con·
ide Rick
WN
____...
vhat w i t ~
1Ch onSt;
n a jar o
and th8
present·
mself as
:lor sean
w ~ o
1ers, •I
11 and "
ough nls
~ o t t o bB
arson of
historiC
's CeltiC
Hatfield.
and tne
·ook two
hat with
Morgan
iyin9 hiS
Hi II e ~ ·
l Shirl eY
mt corn·
of con·
r not. AS
Leader,
ng" and
J
I
Himself, clutching his jelly beans in a Waterford jar and flanked by other Irishmen, the Am-
bassador, Sean Donlon and Irish Fi nance Mini ster Gene FitzGerald enter the Irish Em-
bassy for St. Paddy' s Day lunch.
1777 Columbia Rd., N.W.
Washington, D. C. 20009
265-7273 265-0322
Dossier/May 1981143
WA HI GTON PREMI ERE
ANDRE GISSON
Oil on Canvas 30" x 40"
"The Champs-Eiysees"
Exquisite Exhibiti on
MARCH 20th - MAY 20th
THE DENT
COLLECTION
5232 - 44th Street, N. W.
(202) 363-4425
Near Nei man Marcus
The Dent Gallery is
open Tuesday to Saturday
from 1:00 to 5:00
44/ May /981 /Dossier
cJII,ev
WHITE FLINT 301 -881 -1900
Threadneedle Street
FI NE DRESSMAKING FABRICS
DANCE
INTO
SUMMER /
IN
FABRICS
FOR
SUNSHINE

• Sensible Prices "
• Dressmakers Referred ;pt'
1
& f/M
I ,. ,1
POTOMAC Promenade Mall (I nside Mall)
9812 Fall s Road, Potomac, MD (301)299-3370
25th & L Streets, N. W.
Reservations: 965-2209
Valet Parking at Dinner
Decorat ive Diane Adams shares the spotlight
with Hexagon President Pat O' Rourke and
Kiwanis prexy Doug Van Der Linden.
HEXJ\GON SATIRES AGAJN
The Kiwanis Club' s Children' s OrthopediC
Clinic is richer by some $80,000, thanks
the Hexagon Club' s 27th annual musica
revue, "Civil Circus," report Co-chairmen
Nancy Dorman and C. Jackson Ritchie, Firs_!
American Bank' s new President. The bust·
ness community and especially t he bankers
were out in force to applaud the hi-ji nks at
Trinity Theatre and later at the Marriott
catered gala in Georget own University' s new
South Hall.
The show's evenhanded spoofs of th
8
Washington scene, sparing neither JimmY
Carter nor Ronald Reagan-with some light·
handed swipes at " Queen Nancy" thrown in
seemed to del i ght First American
Chairman Francis Addison and his wife, Na·
tional Savings & Trust's Joe Riley, Gar--
finckel ' s David Waters and his bride Barbara,
Elwood and Eleanor Davis and Neil Otten.
·on
All smiles at the 17th annual benefit tashl ne
show-luncheon which netted $41 ,000 tor
1
n
Mult iple Sclerosis Society, Susan LondO d
and Eileen Freedman, Co-chairmen,
5
Cheryl Theismann, wife of the Redsk n
quarterback, at a pre-luncheon recept ion-
Piau
She I
-.pediC
1
ks to
;sica!
irrnen
First
' busi·
.nkers
lks at
trriotl
sneW
,f the
irnrTIY
light·
1
wn in
sank
e,
Na·
Gar-
rbara.
fen.
Martha Manning and Gordon Peterson, laugh-getters with periodic " newsbreaks, " and
Other cast members Renee Saltier, Neil McElroy, Diane Adams and Sheldon Lipson.
Col. and Mrs. Stacy Reed and the Daniel Gribbons at the premiere showing of Andre
Glsson's works in Washington, held at the Dent Collection on 44th St., N.W. Behind them is
the artist's Nude on the Balcony. Others attending the popular opening included Dolly and
Marvin Kay, who bought Glsson' s Wash Day, the Sander Vanocurs and the Ford Kallis.
Track Lights
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Dossier/May 1981145
46/ May 198l/Dossier
For
lng
ner
It ~
Pre
De;
Pat
Pia•
bas
to a
in 1
bee
spc
Wit I
LL
Na
Davit
Bus
Ruth
Vi ted
the J
Pres I
Pat r
repre
Ia
lilies
In Ci
In
f.1rs.
from
Warrl
'' It' s
from
Ot
Burg
Garn
Pegg
f.1ex
Braz
scusses her favorite subject, Wolf Trap, with Barbara Bush as hostess Pegg
Ruth Espll listens i ntently. Arge,
Mrs. da ilvelra shows Mrs. to
her seat where 50 guests dined on tiny quail
Washed down with Chateau Mouton
Rothschild, 1972.
Br"<AZILIANS 'KISS'
kiSS INGER
Former Secretary of State, Dr. Henry Kiss-
inger, was the center of attention at a din-
ner in his honor at the Brazilian Embassy.
It was a time for administration officials
Present, such as White House aide Mike
Deaver and U.N. Ambassador Jeane Kirk-
Patrick to compare notes with the former
Player of palace politics. As Brazil 's Am-
bassador Antonio da Silveira said in his
toast at dinner, "Henry Kissinger and I met
In 1974 and I felt right away that we would
become good friends." Henry the K re-
sponded by recalling that he once lunched
With the Ambassador in Atlanta instead of
accepting the invitation of Georgia's
Governor Jimmy Carter for the same time.
''The rest was history," Kissinger noted,
and they drank to that.
LLO<Y 13 FOR LUNCH
Nancy Kissinger couldn't make it. Mrs.
Rockefeller couldn't make it. Barbara
lJsh could, but only on Friday the 13th. So
Espil threw superstition aside and in-
Vited a stellar group of women to lunch at
Argentine residence to honor the Vice
President ' s wife. Pat Haig, Lee Annenberg,
atricia Allen and Mar cia Carlucci
represented the administration.
111
.Tall oriental floral arrangements of white
1
les on the table recalled Mrs. Bush' s time
n China and her love of Asian arts.
MIn the living room for coffee afterward,
1
rs. Espil gave Mrs. Bush a typical poncho

the north, worn by Argentine gaucho-
.,1arnors. The Vice-President's wife noted,
1
l's Nancy-red. She'll have to borrow it
rom me."
B Others at the table included Mrs. Warren
G urger, Peggy Crosby, Deena Clark, Ethel
Parrett, Renee Robinson, Rosemary Cod us,
Megg.y LeBaron, Lorraine Percy, the wives of
B Ambassador Margain and
Praz11 1an Ambassador da Silveira, and
A. eggy in, wife of former Ambassador to
rgentma Edwin Martin.
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In the nation's capital, it's
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Dossier/ May 1981147
CREATIVE LIFE STYLE MANAGEMENT PROGRAM
We are pleased to announce the establishment of the area's
newest and most complete program in cardiovascular rehabilita-
tion. The Creative Lifestyle Management Program is designed to
meet the needs of those individuals who seek an improvement in
their general health and to improve the health status of those in-
dividuals at high risk of or suffering from heart disease and a
variety of other chronic diseases.
Individuals will be accepted on a referral basis. Complete
diagnostic evaluation will be performed by members of our
multidisciplinary rehabilitation group.
A prescription tailored to meet the needs of the individual will
include: a specific exercise regime, an educational program for the
individual and family, nutritional rehabilitation, psychosocial
counseling, smoking cessation and other specialized behavior
modification programs.
Located on the campus of the Southern Maryland Hospital
Center, 7501 Surratts Road, Clinton, Maryland, the program will be
implemented over a six-month-to-one-year period.
For futher information contact our
Program Director at 301/899-4164_
Those who know Washington
say it has
many great
Those who know great restaurants
say it has only
Haute cuisine in the European tradition of service.
In the Madison Hotel
15th and M Sts. , .W. , Washington, D.C. 20005
Reservations suggested (202) 862-1600 Free interior parking
Marshalf B. Coyne, Proprietor
48/May 1981/Dossier
sl li
The Canterbury, Washington's ne.W
8
0
t Onig
hotel, celebrated its opening with a sene
5
119
I 1
dinners to show their 99 suites, all with e)(
88
Conr
touches of continental luxury like

0
llctior
sheets on every bed. Managing partner Sonall
ak' s home included many new ad-
ministration figures , ambassadors and
90od friends, Sen. Strom Thurmond and
Sen. Hollings, from South Carolina, the
Srnoaks' and Edwards' home state.
Honig and his wife show guests Tina Par-
~ ~ n e l i and longtime Democratic activist Pat
Connor, right, one of the antique repro-
ductions, located throughout the hotel , per-
Sonally cr aft ed for the Canterbury.
service or vi it u
between 10 and 6,
Monday through Saturday.
Chris Fotos'
f o ~
OUR ANNUAL ROYAL VIKING LINE CRUISE
FEATURING
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For descriptive brochure phone (301) 656-1 700
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Dossier/May 1981149
Now's the time to start
thinking about subscriptions
for the 81-82 season. For
outstanding live theater, the
choice is clear.
ARENA STAGE
6th and Maine Avenue, S.W.,
just minutes from the Capitol on
the Washington waterfront.
For a colorful brochure, mail the
coupon today, or call
488-3300.
arne ---------
Address ---------
_____ Zip-----
Mark Hammer and Ann alee Jefferieo in TM Man
Who CarM to Dinner. George de Vincent photo
Phone ________ _
50/ May 198J/Dossier
D
"The most Sf"'ctLlcular Restaurant vin¥ in th" country."
- John RO<son, The IVashmgron Scar
The Top 0' The Town is still the best view of the Capital, wi th
it 's famous glass elevator to the penthouse ofThe Prospect House.
Furniture
leasing
far
Lunch
Monday-Friday 11 :30 AM- 2:30PM
Champagne Brunch
Sunday II :30 AM- 2:30 PM
Dinner
Sunday- Thursday 6- 1 0 PM
Friday & arurday 6- 11 PM
l'a/er Parkmg. ,lfaJOr CrediC Card wekome
For Reservations call 525-9200
TOP 0' THE TOWN
O•·erlooking the Mall at 14th and onh Oak treet
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ANTIQUE <m. CONTEMPORARY
LEASING INC.
the
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3401 K Street. N.W -Rear Entrance
(Under the Whitehurst Freeway)
Washmgton. D.C. 20007
202-338-6312
Hours: 9:00-5:30 Monday- Fnday
10:00-2:00 Saturday
JJ
STATE FETES DONORS
"Lend me your ears .. . your dollars
and antiques, too!" implored Clement
Conger, Chairman of the State Depart-
ment Fine Arts Committee.
More than I 000 donors and lenders
turned out for a lavish reception in their
honor, hosted by Secretary of State and
Mrs. Haig. Midway through receiving
line duties, the Haigs were joined by
Vice President and Mrs. Bush and the
guests had a chance to rub elbows with
top-level Reagan appointees plus long·
time local supporters of the project
which, in 1980, netted nearly a million
dollars in funds and antiques.
Started 10 years ago, Conger's highlY
successful project has transformed the
once motel-style reception rooms atoP
the State Department into a showcase
of exquisite and authentic Americana.
A dozen flower-bedecked buffets
dispensed everything from oysters and
caviar to flaming blueberry crepes. ln
the crowd were Presidential Counsellor
Edwin Meese ill, Mrs. Dean Acheson
strolling among the new acquisitions on
the arm of her son, David, white-haired
Paul Nitze, the Daniel Boorstins,
sculptor Felix deWeldon, Evangeline
Bruce with the George Renchards and
Dorothy Clagett. Meanwhile prettY
Lianne Conger kept a wary eye on
numerous lighted candles highlighting
the furnishings, lest heat or flame corne
too near for the comfort of some of the
"new" antiques. -ANNE BLAIR
Lady Parkinson, wife of the Australian ArTl;
bassador, talks over plans for the annu?
"Merry Evening," June 11 in the
Garden to benefit the Cathedral Chor
8
1
Society, with Mrs. David Curfman and pau
Calaway, the Society' s Director.
R
AG
MA\'
Fashio
dria, 7
12 noo
In rom
Alexan
Iunche,
2 thro•
to Ca/1
design,
sports

for lL
Hotel,

Congrt
I 1:30 t
9-Acl
\VomeJ
Shop,
lion, I
9-YOI
tnodelj
. ars
ent
ut-
lers
1eir
md
·ing
by
the
lith
ng-
ject
ion
·.hlY
the
toP
:ase
Ja.
:ets
md
In
nor
son
:on
red
ns,
line
A GUIDE TO AREA SHOWS
MAY
Fashion Shows at "219" Restaurant, Alexan-
dria, Tuesdays and Thursdays throughout May,
12 noon- 2 p.m. Fashions by Frankie Welch.
Informal Modeling at La Bergerie Restaurant,
Alexandria, Thursdays throughout May at
luncheon. Fashions by Slightly Laced.
2 through 16-California Fever. A 2-week salute
to California at I. Magnin, featuring California
designers, wine tasting, avocado recipes and
sports demonstrations.
2-Rose Williams. Luncheon and fashion show
for Julia West Hamilton League, Shoreham
Hotel, 12 noon.
6-Rose Williams. Luncheon and fashion show,
Congressional Country Club, for club members,
II:30 a.m.
9-Active Wear Sports Fashions for Men and
Women. /. Magnin, lower level Active Wear
Shop, show includes wind-surfing demonstra-
tion, 1:30 p.m.
9-Young New Yorker. Fashion show by teenage
lllodels, Lord & Taylor, White Flint. 4 p.m.
9-Junior People in Action. Seventeen, Wood-
ward & Lothrop, Montgomery Mall, Tyson's
Corner, Annapolis. 12 noon- 2 p.m.
13-Dabi Informal Modeling. Beller Sports-
wear, I. Magnin, with personal appearance by
designer. 12 noon- 3 p.m.
14-Summerwear Show. Woodward & Lothrop,
Fair Oaks, 7 p.m.
15-Summerwear Show. Woodward & Lothrop,
Wheaton Plaza, 7:30p.m.
16-Rose Williams. Luncheon and fashion
show, Shoreham Hotel, Vermont Ave. Baptist
Church Friendship Council. 12:45 p.m.
16-Summer Fashion Show. Glamour editors,
Perspective sportswear, Woodward & Lothrop,
Tyson's Corner, 2 p.m.
16-Fashion Show. /. Magnin, Jeanne Marc
Designer Sportswear, 1:30 p.m. Informal model-
ing of Elizabeth Stewart swimwear collection
with special representative, 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
17-Biack, Starr & Frost presents fine jewelry
exhibit by Piaget and Parisian designer Roger
Lebenstein. Cocktails 5-10 p.m., Sheraton
Carlton, Music by Peter Duchin. For informa-
tion call 683-3345.
Cacharel's snug stretch-fabric
and shirts which Brigitte
Bardo/ made famous, are now
supplemented with other sports-
wear items for men, women and
children. Comfort with chic are
the trademark of the 5 million ar-
ticles of his couture sold world-
wide annually. Prel/y good for a
$135 million firm begun with
some reject fabrics he found on
the floor of a Swiss showroom.
A dinner to honor the designer
was held at Dominique's after the
shows. Among 50 guests were
Senators Metzenbaum and Hud-
dleston, Ina Ginsburg and
"Slava" Rostropovich.
Jeane ($\dy ltd .
Polyester double chiffon blouse $160.00
Swiss cotton souffle skirt $225.00
3251 Prospect Street N.W.
GEORGETOWN
(202) 338-3556
Monday thru Saturday 10- 6
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DOAS
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DOES
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Dossier/May /981151
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A service of Video Services ond Coaching. In'
HUe
(COJ
ettes
furn
late
AI
the l
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SCOTT
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(Continued from Page 19)
ettes that used to be part of the tomb
furnishings of dignitaries during the
late seventh or eighth century.
All in all, the ardent collector visited
the People's Republic seven times. He
remembers well the forties when the
dealer in Chinese art, Duncan & Dun-
can, imported the most wonderful col-
lectibles in wooden barrels and one
could find things for ten or fifteen
dollars.
"I have found these objects all over
the world, though not recently," he
adds. The elegant black lacquered 18th
century screen, enchantingly decorated
With exotic birds and fanciful oriental
floral motifs, comes from an antique
shop in Louisville. The beautifully
carved screen of lapis lazuli is from the
collection of the Duke of Gloucester.
The gorgeous "brush washer," a work
Of art carved out of pine green jade that
once graced the library of an empress,
Was bought at auction at Adam Wesch-
ler & Son in 1976.
"Today's prices are just too high. By
and large, I stopped buying several
Years ago," Scott continues. "When I
started out with random purchases
Which eventually led me into a very
specialized field, I bought for my own
Pleasure. The thought of buying for in-
Vestment never occurred to me. I fol-
lowed my own tastes and occasionally I
rnay have gotten the wrong pieces."
Scott's smile is as modest as his de-
rneanor. Pipe in hand, he strolls across
the spacious living room to what may
Well be one of the oldest dining tables in
the country. It is a slender, long table
&learning in honey-colored "Padouk"
Wood from Borneo. Actually, it is a
Prayer table from a temple, dating back
to 1450, that once belonged to George
Vanderbilt and had served time in a
rnuseum in Honolulu. Altogether, the
Scotts own 13 pieces of furniture from
the Ming period.
"Ming furniture with its simple un-
cluttered lines was the inspiration of
banish modern. The Scandinavians
have studied them well," Scott declares
lllatter of factly. He discovered his fa-
Vorite pair of 17th century side tables,
With upturned edges to hold up scrolls,
forty years ago in Philadelphia. An in-
laid chair from about 1680 is another
treasure on display in this unique living
room that doubles, as every room in
liugh and Marian Scott's house, as a
llluseum. The phenomenon is that its

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8019 Wisconsin Avenue • Bethesda, Maryland 20014 • 657-2124
Open 7 Days A Week • Free Parking In Rear
Dossier/May 1981/53
YOU'RE INVITED TO
EVERYONE'S THERE.
MS. PARKER

LAf!.!]SSlOn
wc;tiog
in a sleek and sophisticated si lhouette
that will delight the most discriminating
woman. • Soft, glowing satin finish ·
stainless steel with an engraving area
for monogram, to be personalized
always. With Parker's newest way
to write ... a liquid ink ball pen that
glides effortlessly across paper.
To order either item, send
$23 for Rollerball (No. 101) or
$38 for Fountain (No. 102) post-
paid (Md. residents add 5% sales
tax) in check or money order
(sorry no COD's) or charge to
your MasterCard or VISA (include
card name, all digits, expiration date
and signature). If you wish mono-
gramming, speci fy up to three
initials, add $2 and allow 3 to 4
weeks for del ivery. Mail to:
54/ May 1981/Dossier
5530 Wisconsin Ave.
Chevy Chase MD. 20015
(301 )652-9470
Find the beauty
of Paris on the
faces of Washington.
The doors of
Tatiana Demian
are now open.
With 25 years
experience, Tatiana
offers a very
special skin care.
@
Experience the delicate touch and
pampered approach that Europeans enjoy.
Facials, waxing, make-up and make-overs
... all by Tatiana and her· staff.
Orlane lnstitut de Beaule
Complete line of Orkme products and other perfumes
& gi.fiartides
Call for appointments & consultation
652-6250
4550 Montgomery Avenue, Bethesda, Md.
Air Rights North Building International Mall
Wed. , Fri. & Sat. 10-6, 1\Jes. & Thurs. 10-8
owners have managed to retain a home-
like atmosphere.
Despite the English Chippendale
vitrine, a fine specimen of Georgian
chinoiserie, acquired from the widoW
of Senator Robert Kerr of Oklahoma,
which is filled to the brim with T'ang
ceramics and pottery and other art ob-
jects, the elegant living room has a
decidedly lived-in look.
Somewhere among the vessels, vases,
large and small dishes, wine cups and
jars, the bird-headed ewer, saki bottles
and high-necked amphoras, the ancient
gold cup with the finely incised lotus
flower, the filigree hairpins, camels and
chimeras, in a small velvet box lies the
James Smithson silver medal from the
Smithsonian Society. It is an award,
bestowed upon donors of more sub·
stantial gifts. Donations worth
$100,000 or more are rewarded with a
gold medal, and it is no secret that
Hugh and Marian Scott are strong con·
tenders .
Not surprisingly, Scott, a moderate
Republican, was in favor of establish·
ing relations with the People's RepubliC
of China.
"In the long run, one could not ig·
nore 800 million people," says Scott,
stressing the fact that their numbers
have meanwhile increased to 960 mil·
lion. Together with then Senate Majori·
ty Leader, Mike Mansfield, who alsO
served on the Senate's foreign relations
committee in 1972, Scott was the first
Republican U.S. Senator to be received
by Premier Chou En-lai, some
weeks after President Nixon's historic
state visit.
Since his retirement from the Senate
four years ago, Scott's involvement
with the People's Republic has becorne
more pronounced. As a corporate law·
yer dealing in international trade and
law, he has undertaken four trips to the
mainland, representing various clientS
whose interests range from arts, craftS
and wickerware to the export of coal·
He belongs to the legal committee of
the National Council for U.S.-China
Trade as well as the Japan-U.S. Foun·
dation chaired by Angier Biddle Dulce
and the Pan-Pacific Community Asso·
dation.
As a collector, he seems to be more
surefooted in his assessment of Chinese
art than the politician was in his judS'
ment of the political events
China. Interestingly, in the spring o
1971, the influential Senator seriouslY
doubted the possibility of formal reeDS'
nition of "Red China" within thll
1
decade.
I
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10me-
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trgian
tid ow
1oma,
f'ang
rt ob-
:1aS a
tases,
sand
ottles
1cient
lotUS
ls and
the
n the
.vard,
sub·
·ortb
fith a
that
; con·
lerate
blish·
IUbllC
ot ig·
)cott.
nbers
I mil·
ajori·
1
a}sO
ttions
: first
eived
e
storic
enate
ment
corne
:JaW·
! and
:o the
lients
;rafts
coal·
ee of
:hinll
<oun·
Dulce
<\.sso·
more
1inese
juds·
rninS
Jg of
0
uslY
ecos·
thllt

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3301 New Mexico Avenue, NW
Suite 310
Washington, D.C. 20016
(202) 363-8016
56/May 1981/ Dossier
Asked about the reasons for giving
up his Senate seat, certainly a note·
worthy decision in this power·
conscious town, Scott simply replies,
"Sooner or later one reaches the point
when one wants to be one's own per·
son, when one wants some freedom and
not quite so much pressure."
How important is it for him to re·
mind others that he left the Senate
undefeated becomes clear when he in·
sists that voluntary retirees are referred
to as "former" Senators while those
who get out too late-like Jake Javits-
and wind up their public careers in in·
glorious defeat have to make do with
the prefix "ex. " That a room was
recently named after him in the Senate
wing obviously fills him with great
pride and joy.
His wife Marian wistfully suggests
that his collection played a considerClble
part in the smooth transition fro!ll
public to private life. In a way, Scott
has embraced a two-track career where
the political honors and advances are
balanced by about as many manifesta·
tions of respect where discriminating
taste and scholarly knowledge count.
Throughout his life, the collection
and the people and activities connected
with it-be that on the board of the
Freer Gallery of Art, the Board of Re·
gents of the Smithsonian, the Oriental
Ceramic Society in the U.K., · Asia
House or the Advisory Committee on
Oriental Art of the Philadelphia Mu·
seum-formed a continuous thread.
And if Hugh and Marian, who collects
small Russian boxes, have one concern.
it happens to be the lack of interest on
the part of their eight grandchildren in
their grandparents' magnificent obses·
sion.
Meanwhile, upgrading the collection
keeps them busy. ''All collectors knoW
one another," Scott beams. "We are in
constant touch, comparing and eJ'·
changing information. Like any other
knowledgeable person, I get letters
every month from somebody whose
grandfather has left a Chinese snuff
bottle or a celadon bowl which, the cor·
respondent guesses, must be worth a
fortune. What is it worth, they want to
know. Of course, I do not do apprais·
als," he chuckles. .
What about the museums and the
1
r
curators? What is their attitude? 0°
they hover, court and cajole the colJec·
tor into parting with some of his most
prized possessions? .
Scott's somber voice takes on a diS·
tinctly mischievous note: "They pay a
0
tention! They pay attention!"
;iving
note·
wer·
plies,
point
1 per·
nand
.o re·
en ate
ae in·
erred
those
·its-
.n in·
with
was
enate
great
gests

fro!ll
Scott
1here
s are
·esta·
ating
mt.
::tioll

f the
Re·
ental
Asia
:e on
Mu·
·ead·
Jects
;ern,
;ton
in
bses·
:tioll
noW
re ill
ex·
,ther
tters
hose
nuff
cor·
th a
nt to
rais·
their
oo
nee·
nost
dis·
y at·
CJ
Great homes,
like art,mdkea
grrind investment.
The world, unfortunately, will never receive
another painting from Monsieur Renoir:
All that will ever be now exi t.
This District, in the same kind of way,
will have no more chances to live at Georgetown
on green, wooded acres, simply surrounded
by space.
There won't be any more forty-two acre
ires di covered at Georgetown.
H ilJandale at Georgetown has begun
accepting contracts on the thirty-four new
residences in our Chancery section.
These grand new homes offer spacr to 'Mish-
ingtonians who require a great deal of space.
Inside, homes in the Chancery have over
four thousand square feet and offer
three, four, and five bedrooms.
Dramatic design features in the Inverness
House model include a living room which soars
three stories high ... et off by a glass wall two
stories high ... and, above it all, a skylight lets
in sunlight and starlight.
An elevator, at your option, will whi k you
smoothly and quickly from your underground
garage to your third-story library ... where you
may enjoy the magnificent view.
Outside, homes in the Chancery rise three
and four stories out of the hill ide, front on the
District's most delightful park and court, and
like all of the Hillandale community ... are but a
brisk ten minutes' walk from the delights of
Georgetown.
HILLAND ALE
Spacious, graceful homes in a ecure
location at Georgetown do not come along
everyday.
But the. have, today.
That makes today th best possible time
to set an appointment to ee th e new h in
the hancery. Becau e today the election i as
large as the homes them elves. nd fi ed-ratc
financing is available.
Brokers, too, are welcome to call 3 -6600
to view, preview, and di u any of the thirty-
four grand new homes which appear on the
market when you need an investment
that won't let you down.
Great art\ on't. And neith r
will your town home in
H illandale at Georgetown.
Dossier/May 1981/57
ABI
Wh
snails
meal?
what
The
founc
starteJ
diners
sleeve
A pia1
Gar
bee on
lheb:
to the
set of
White
beef a
the ve
cakes
overst
apart
stated
Ina1
lingo
NatioJ
A.meri
Co min
N.w. ,
Pianis·
also d.
black
drop f
Arneri
and a
-
The Educated Palate
A BRIEF LOOK AT "NEW RESTAURANTS"
Where can you find the most ethereal
snails? Want a bit of magic with your
meal? Where can you eat a Feijoada-
What is a Feijoada anyway?
The answers to these questions are all
found in the following sampling of new
restaurants that have been hitting the
Washington area faster than federal
budget cuts.
Just above the Farragut North Metro
Perches Charley's Crab, the latest in a
lively chain of restaurants that will
answer the fish-lovers craving for the
chargrilled fresh catch. The handsome
beige and mirrored Art Deco setting is
highlighted by stuffed geese and orchid
and green needlepoint banquettes;
table linens are white over dark pin-
stripe cloths. Besides poached, char-
grilled or broiled fresh scrod or bass, a
Spanish paella and a lusty bouillabaisse
are offered at night, and all manner of
crab in season. The Mussels ala Muer-
mussels steamed in a wine sauce and a
chilled raw bar platter-are unique
starters. Despite the cushy ambiance,
diners are encouraged to roll up their
sleeves to enjoy the "down east feast."
A. piano bar is featured nightly.
Gary's at 1800 M St., N.W., is also
becoming a businessman's favorite.
l'he bar is to the right; diners step down
to the left into an elegant dining room
set off by stained glass windows and
White linens. This restaurant knows its
beef and lobster; the pasta is fresh and
the veal especially fine. Try the crab-
Cakes. The tables are flanked by
overstuffed chairs and are far enough
apart so one can truly dine in under-
stated elegance.
Inaugural-goers had an early samp-
ling of Number's she-crab soup at the
National Visitors' Center's "Taste of
America" extravaganza and have been
coming back for more at 1330 19th St.,
N.w., ever since. A jazz trio and a
Pianist entertain nightly, and diners can
also dance in the Club Room. The chic
black and white decor serves as a back-
drop for a limited menu of Continental-
American cuisine, like sauteed scallops
and assorted lamb dishes. Dessert-
fanciers will gravitate toward the fried
Haagen Dazs ice cream as well as the
German chocolate cake.
Basil's restaurant, a mix of basil
green, brass and crystal, is becoming an
elegant restaurant for Hill notables.
Owner Mario Basil has been in the food
business for over 30 years, and this res-
taurant is the culmination of his tastes
acquired worldwide-f: om t a ~ 1 g y cream
of sorrel soup to Veal Chop a la
Pescador (glazed with pesto sauce). The
finest cuts of aged prime steak in a glass
cooler greet diners at the door. Save
room for the frozen cappuccino pie, a
mix of bitter coffee, cream and choco-
late at its finest.
Pendleton's at 501 2nd St., N.E., is
an eclectic melange of oak antiques and
a Mexican feeling in the downstairs din-
Dossier/ May 1981/ 59
60/ May 1981/ Dossier
ing room. The lime-baked chicken and
fish specials are very popular .' Sit out-
side for a summer choice of six novel
salads and other light offerings.
Mel Krupin's at 1120 Connecticut
Avenue is as New Yorky as Washington
will ever get with host Mel Krupin
greeting people at the door with his wry
Brooklyn wit. The food is strictly
American with kosher pickles and crisp
rolls on the table, setting the stage for
tasty, copious portions and the clubbY
ambience created by Washington polit-
ical and sports stars and entertainers.
Georgetown has seen the old Aldo's
of yesteryear resurrected at 1201 28th
St., N.W. White and silver foil wall·
paper make the intimate dining roo!Il
most appealing. Small seating (84 in
two rooms) can mean increased expec·
tations, and diners won't be disap·
pointed with appetizers like a luxuriant
antipasto (big enough for lunch) or the
Trout alla Livornese, frest trout
sauteed with caper sauce.
The West End Cafe stands in FoggY
Bottom at 1 Washington Circle. Both
the Garden Room, filled with greenerY
to set off the beige decor, and the Piano
Room/Bar offer a spirited, casual at·
mosphere. The barbecued sesame duck
or zucchini-stuffed chicken offer the
diner light, tasty entrees. Happy hour
has an ethnic twist, with Mexican hors
d'oeuvres one day and fresh eggrolls
the next.
What is a Feijoada anyway? It's the
national dish of Brazil, a kind of steW
with black beans and assorted cured
meats arid sausages. The Cafe de
lpanema, 1524 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.,
serves it with rice, manioc meal, shred·
ded kale and orange slices arranged on
a plate. The sopa de siri, a lovely crearn
of crab soup, is an alluring beginning,
and if the tasty Vatapa is a special, bY
all means try the shellfish and shrirnP
melange. Service is earnest and friendl Y
in this spare diner with bright green and
yellow primitive scenes of Brazilian
life. Until a liquor license is granted,
the bar serves as coat storage!
Also, from south of the border
comes Las Pampas, 3291 M St., N.W·
The Argentinian steak house Jets
passers-by get hungry by lookin8
through the window into the kitchen
with its beef and sausage laden grillS·
Meat isn't aged, it's marinated. Try the
Churrasco-a thick slab of beef at a
bargain price-or the Parrillada, all
Argentine mixed grill.
Peppino's of Georgetown, at 1075
Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., is a
small, cozy New York type bistro, ac·
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Black Horse
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LUNCH
DINNER • DANCING
VALET
PARKING
1236 20TH ST., N.W.
RESERVATIONS 659-2007
"Beautiful and Romantic"

" In a class by itself, but intimate."
III I North 19th St., Rosslyn, Va.
Re&enations: 522-4553
There's no
restaurant like
this one south of
New York City
(The pickles are sensational)
OPEN
SATURDAY
LUNCH
12 to 3


[lllll\}tF ':'
Krupitt's

1120 Connecticut Avenue
331-7000
Valet Parking at 6 p.m.
'Famous
\..
u
\
G
1,
c:,
AE, CB,
D, V, MC
Owned by one family
since 1943
We know Luigi's is still
the best pizza in town.
Luigi's also knows
230 ways to make pasta!
1132-19th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.
Tel. 331 -7574
4919 Fairmont Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland
Tel. 656-5882
6723 Richmond Highway
Al exandria, Virginia
Tel. 765-5900
IJ89
French Cuisine in
Historic Georgetown
Setting.
" The ' 89 is a jewel "
Dresden. Washington Post
Valet Parking
1226 36th -Street , N.W.
965-1789
WashingtQn's
most attractt'ttt
restaurant .. ,
note<lfor
fine
French Cui#ne

785-8877
1990 M St. NW
corner 20th & M Streets
Pre- Th..at re Dinnt•r 6 to 7 pm Sl 2. 9S
OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA
Martini Glasses by Riedel
Herend China
Ginori China
H utschenreuther
RoyaiCopenhagen
St. Louis Crystal
Orrefors
Tiffany Silver
Fine Gifts
Bridal Registry
320 King Street ALEXANDRIA, VA 22314
(703) 548-4543


hand-crocheted for your
special occasions
our two-piece
cotton creation
in white or
taupe, $104.
most
major
credit
cards
=
=
=
=
c::::J
c::::J
Rubini
=
Sterling Silver & 18 K
Gold Jewelry
=
Hand Cut Gems
=
Pre-Columbian Ceramic
Replicas
=
Peruvian Wall Weavings
=
Jewelry Repair, Design,
& Re-design c==J
222
0
p
\ OLD TOWN ALE X AND R lA
EAST WIND
Uittnamrst Culinary Art
in Historic Old Town
Open 7 days for
Luncheon, Dinner
and Cocktails
809 King Street
Old Town, Alexandria
For Reservations:
836-1515
Major Credit Cards Honored
Parking available behind Restaurant
• WEAVIN • TAINEDGLASS
ANDlf • LEATHER GOOD
JEWELRY • MLTAL 5
AMERICAN
ARTISAN
Old Town
201 Kl G STREET 836-9252
ALEXANDRIA, VIRGINIA 22314
(OVTV& FABRICS
of ALJ:XAND.RJA
SALE
25o/o to 50o/o off ALL FABRICS
MAY 7th THRU MAY 24th
WE'VE MOVED TO 320 KI NG STREET
548-7709
i :30 TO 5:30 Sun 1 :00 to 5:00
J

The finest in
Northern Italian
Cuisine
548_-0088
724 King Street
Alexandria, Virginia
218 N. Lee St.
Old Town,
Alexandria
836-2666
Secondhand
Rose
Resale Shop
for Women
De•igner
Fa•hions. Furs
and Acce••ories
Consignments
Accepted Dolly
10 am- 4 pm
337-3378
1516 Wisconsin Ave.
In Georgetown
between P & Q)
Now you can enjoy
good coffee
without feeling guilty.
Ours is decaffeinated in Switzerland
by a unique pure water process that
leaves no chlorinated hydrocarbon
residues.

J FOOD SHOP
A Natural Food Supermarket
1015 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Georgetown
338-1700
64/ May 1981/ Dossier
cented in red, black and gold. I found
especially enticing the Veal Saltimboc-
ca with savory cheese and spinach,
savored in a Marsala sauce. Another
very popular dish is their Shrimp
Marinara. They make their own lovely
cannollis for dessert.
Place Vendome-Rive Droite has
taken over the spot where Rive Gauche
was for nearly 25 years. Michel Burkle
has created an airy oak-paneled bras-
serie-with romantic Art Deco green lan-
terns and a masterful luminist painting
of Place Vendome by Jose Fabricante.
Prices are competitive but the food is
extraordinary. Four original pates are
offered at $2.95; the Terrine Fondante
de Foie de Canard is special. Entrees in-
clude duck breast with cider-basked
turnips or scallions, sauteed with en-
dives. The place promises to be a chic
after-theater and late-night spot;
they're open until 4 a.m. By all means
save room for Place Vendome nouga-
tine ice cream in raspberry sauce or the
assorted pastries, little culinary art
treasures in themselves.
Annie Oakley Saloon has just opened
upstairs from Place Vendome on M St.;
Georgetown finally has a real western
bar! Hamburgers, chili, nachos and
other western treats are offered. The
Texas State Society has already claimed
it as their own.
Great restaurants try not to die, but
(ew can move as artfully as has the Rive
Gauche to the Georgetown Inn at 1320
Wisconsin Ave., N.W. Michel Laudier,
the chef who made it great, is serving
many of the same superb dishes, like
the lobster souffle or salmon with sorrel
sauce. The restaurant has been trans-
formed into beige and crystal elegance,
and new masterpieces can be expected
from Chef Laudier.
Talk about gimmicks! The Brook
Farm Inn of Magic, 7101 Brookville
Rd., Chevy Chase, presents a magic
comedy cabaret with a prix fixe dinner
like prime rib, tenderloin with Burgun-
dy sauce, tropical house salad and
dessert. The show is entertaining and
professional. On Saturday a magic
show for kids offers all-they-can-eat
pizza and spaghetti. There's a magician
and fire-eater in the brown-paneled in-
terior.
Le Vagabond, 7315 Wisconsin Ave.,
Bethesda, presents some fabulou" cu-
linary alternatives. First of all, owtlers
Mike and Norma Mayo make guests
feel really welcome in this cozy brown
and wood downstairs niche. And their
Danish chef has created the most suc-
culent tender Salmon Graavlax ever en-
countered. The menu is a gourmet tour,
from the Russian blini with caviar, the
Roumanian mixed grill of beef sausage,
liver, lamb and pork to Pheasant au
Port and Beef Wellington. A strolling
musician completes the romance on
weekends.
The East Wind restaurant, 809 King
St., Alexandria, offers some of the best
Vietnamese cooking in Washington.
The dining room is a tasteful and gentle
brown and blond wood stage where the
Oriental masterpieces keep coming
from the spotless kitchen. Owner Khai
Nguyen has taken many pains to create
the peaceful decor; the Pho (beef soup),
flounder with special sauce or Bo
Dun-chargrilled beef strips cradling
onion pieces-speak volumes about the
subtly complex flavors of Vietnamese
cuisine.
And where are the best escargots in
town? They're actually in Rosslyn at
Moo Paris, 1111 19th St. Joined bY
mushroom chunks, the snails were
cooked in delicate sauce, though corn-
posed by a blend of heady garlic,
parsley and other ingredients. A white
dining room with gold woodwork and
dark draped cornices is the backdroP
for other specialties like duck sauced in
kiwi, fruit, grapes and flambeed in
cassis. Lunch offers La Salade Moll
Paris, with duck and lobster. The ser-
vice needs some ironing out, but the of-
ferings are well worth a visit.
Barclays, 9910 Main St., Fairfax,
presents a nautical theme carried
into fresh fish offerings and fettucinl·
Barclays' bucket is filled with crab legs,
mussels, clams, new potatoes, corn-on·
the-cob and lobster, and the homemade
biscuits are downright addicting.
Prime beef is found at Chateaubri·
and in Old Town, 112 North Asaph St .•
Alexandria. The orange, beige and rust
surroundings are highlighted by a spiral
staircase, and a pianist plays nightiYd·
Accoutrements like Caesar salad an
crab-stuffed mushrooms do not go un·
noticed. Do you dare leave room for
the chocolate cheesecake?
Finally, Quigley's, 3201 New MexicO
Ave., N.W., is a funky fun saloon. The
mesh of Tiffany, brass and wood is just
right for the raw bar, salads and hafl1'
burgers that are offered. Night time of·
fers Chicken Marsala and other en·
trees. It's a cozy way to cap off the daY·
With few exceptions, these
rants have all opened within the
months. Notwithstanding some soull
competition, the restaurants maY be
new, but they can stand on their own·
- BETTE T A
....
.our,
, the
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Finally,
a dining guide that
snuggles inside evening bags.
Slides into tuxedo pockets .
And slips out discreetly for perusal
between acts at the theatre.

It's Dossier's Indispensable Guide to Washington
Area Restaurants.
Laden with who has the best borscht. Where to find a
waiter in a kilt or a gypsy with a violin. And how late it's safe to
crave Coquilles St. Jacques on a Thursday night .
Simply look for this, the creme de le creme of guides, at
your newsstand. It costs a mere seventy-five cents.
And it lets you indulge. Intelligently.
For Association and Convention bulk orders call 362-5 94.
Purse and compact courtesy of Garfinckel's. Lighter courtesy of I. Magnin .
Dossier/ May 198/ / 65
Certain names are synonymous with top quality. Their pro·
ducts are highly prized by affluent families. Unfortunately,
they' re also in great demand by those who prey on gracious
homes, stealing valued possessions and threatening the lives
of loved ones.
That ' s where Dictograph comes in. Our name has been
synonymous with quality in residential security for 35 years.
Today, over three quarters of a million families from coast to
coast enjoy the greater peace of mind thanks to a Dictograph
66/ May 198//Dossier
Overheard in one of America's Loveliest Homes:
" ... the piano is a Steinway,
there's a Cuisinart in the kitchen,
our crystal is by Waterford···
and of course, it's all protected by
a Dictograph burglar
alarm system.
11
alarm system. Our security specialists won't recommend any
more protection than you need ... but they won' t sell you any
less, either! And no matter how valuable your material posses·
sions may be, at Dictograph, LIFE SAFETY comes first! That ' s
all part of the ' Dictograph Difference'.
You work hard to enjoy the good life. We work hard to help you
protect h. Learn more about the 'Dictograph Difference' . Write
for our FREE brochure .. .'What Every Family Should Know' ... or
call in MD. (301) 652-1990
in VA. (703) 684-1990
GUARDIAN ALARM SALES, INC.
4850 Rugby Ave, Bethesda, MD 20014
(Co
Ta)
Go1
F o ~
and
pro
stee
cutt
pas1
coil
fr01
-
-
...
by
rar
J/'
y
y
;-
s
KITCHENS
(Continued from Page 15)
Taylor Woodcraft offers Le
Gourmand Baker's Table,
Food Processor Table, below,
and Pasta Tables. The food
processing cart has a stainless
steel dry sink and removable
cutting board/cover. The
pasta table features a
collapsible drying rack. Priced
from $470 to $550.
Gravy Strain/Souper Strain:
Measuring cups separate the
fat that rises to the top from
soups and gravies. The secret's
in the spout. Dishwasher safe,
the 1 Y2 -cup size, $7.; 4-cup
size, $13.
Long a partner in country
kitchens, the Bon Ami
Kitchen Cleansing Bar has
been available since 1886. It
contains no detergents or
bleach and will not scratch.
Just rub a wet sponge across
it, then clean and polish your
whole kitchen including glass.
A set of soap bar and soap
dish, $12.
From the gadget tray, a long
thin Bottle Scraper from
Hoan will let you get to the
last drop in any bottle. 99¢.
Cordless Flour Sifter: This is a
new baking item that take all
the work out of sifting flour.
It 's got a 4V2-CUP capacity.
Battery operated, you just
press a button. From Rowoco,
$12.
The Eggrite Eggtimer indicates ·
the softness or hardness of the
eggs while they're boiling by
gradually changing color from
the outside to the center as the
egg cooks. Made of plastic by
Wahl Instruments, $5.95.
The Joyce Chen Cutting Slab:
Of polyethylene that won't cut
or chip. Available in four sizes
from $8 to $33.
Hanging Baskets are making
better use of the space above
your counters. ln a variety of
colors, basket combinations
vary from a single tier to
6-tiers. To $14.
And ifyoutl Ime to ... ~
send
When you d1oose a homesite at Prospect Bay, you can
wake up to a Chesapeake Bay inlet in front, and an U H l O I I ~ ~
golf course in the back.
And in between, a complete private country
swimming, tennis, eve11'thing. It'
all on an unspoiled Eastern Shore
peninsula, just beyond the Bay
Bridge, 20 minutes from
Annapolis and within an
hour ofWashington
and Baltimore.
So if you're still look-
ing out at the same dull
lawn, write today. Come
secusorcaU 301-827-6166.
Attractive financing available.
Dossier/May 1981167
If you think
the bathrooms are
spectacular, just wait
ti II you see the rest of
these luxurious new
condominiums.
From $200,000.
Across the Potomac,
overlooking downtown
Washington, with Metro,
restaurants and shopping
at your front door.
In Crystal City,
Arlington, Va.
R
A
Real Estate
Properties
ROUND BAY ON SEVERN
..
IDEAL FOR FAMILY COMPOUND!. . .
Mini-estate in prestigious community ... charm-
ing older five bedroom home with gorgeous
grounds and waterview of both the Severn and
Magothy Rivers ... Seller financing at below
market interest. .. Package including seven lots,
offered at $299,000 (76909) 261-2116 or (301)
647-6112. .
Annapolis
261 -2626
(30 I) 263.{)400
Severna Park
261-2116
(301)
Arnold
261-2477
(301) 974-0410
ST. MICHAELS WATERFRONT
5 Acres w/f. Secluded three bedrooms.
2Y2 baths. 600' on cove off Broad Creek.
$257,500.00
Overlooking Eastern . Bulkhead
dock. 4 to 6 bedrooms, 2 Y2 baths. Pool,
tennis and golf. $275,000.00 owner anxious.
St. Micha·eJs Realty
200 Talbot St. • St. Michaels, Md.
301-7 45-9872
$375,000
Quality and Location
This stately Georgian is situated on two
beautiful wooded acres providing privacy
and location in desirable Woodside
Estates. The home features custom in-
terior decorating, exquisite crown
moulding, and marble foyer. A family
room with stone fireplace and laundry
room are both on the main level. The ex-
cellent noor plan provides easy entertain-
ing for all seasons. Included are 4 large
bedrooms, 3 V2 baths, library, and a large
recreation room. (Space for tennis court
and pool). Shown by appointment only.
Harper & Company, REALToRs
(703) 821-1777
Evenings: Contact Spence Rivett at (703) 256-7240
BETHESDA CLEWERWALL $585.00>
French Colonial - Builder's home- Large formal living
rm. & dining rm. 5 Bdrms, 4 Baths. Complete apt. in lower
level. Swimming pool. 2 acres. Near Congressional
Country Club. Joan Kerrigan 299·5566
MOUSSA 0
MOAADEL . .
REALTORS 365-2626
Oakwood, c.1803,
in historic hauquier County ...
5 minutes from War-renton & less than I hour
from D.C .. 1his historic
Thoroughbred farm with magnificently rc; 1ored
Georgian mansion commands endless vista. of the
unsurpassed hunt country of Virginia's Piedmont.
The equestri an complex a large new
stable 11i1h center galloping track. 3 tcn,lJH houses
& additional 19th C. dcp ndencics. l l·acre lake:
heated pool & tennis court.
lirochure It WD 2-26.
Please contact lis for broch11rl!
a11d [ 11rther i11jormatiou Oil these t111d
s i111 i Ia routs I a ndi ng fJ/'operl ies.

International Realty
2903 M Street NW
Washington, DC 20007
Telephone (202) 2980-8405
Dossier/May 1981169
LEESBURG $485,000
Magnificent Williamsburg Colonial finely
detailed and perfectly sited on 7 of Mt.
Gilead's choicest acres- within one hour
of Washington- 30 minutes from Dulles
Airport. Sweeping, panoramic views of
the Virginia countryside from the 70'
brick terrace. Unsurpassed construction
and amenities including indoor olympic
pool and 3 bedroom guest house. Truly, a
one-of-a-kind property for those who can
afford the very best in country estates.
"Three Generations of Quality Brokerage"
(703) 356-0100 • McLean, Virginia
KENWOOD AREA
A truly magnificent residence custom
designed with high ceilings, beautiful
moldings and spacious reception rooms for
gracious entertaining and wonderful family
living. The drawing room with solid teak
floorings opens to a glorious swimming
pool and pool house complete with dressing
rooms, bath, and wet bar. For entertaining,
the dining room opens to terrace and ad-
joins a Florida Room that is spectacular
and invites large scale entertaining. A
library with walnut book shelves completes
the first floor. The luxurious master suite
with marble bath has every convenience
plus other family bedrooms. An exquisite
interior which must be seen to be fully ap-
preciated. Price in upper brackets.

INGHAM &..
ASSOCIATES
INCORPORATED
REALTORS
Foxhall Square
330 I New Mexico Ave. N.W.
Washington, D. C.
70/May 1981/Dossier
LAKE BARCROFT Lakeside Living- 15 Min. From D.C. VIRGINIA
From the spacious entrance foyer, step into a huge dramatic living room and adjoining dining
room, both overlooking the lake. Stunning lake views from all rooms. Enjoy a true gourmet's kit-
chen. The master bedroom suite has its own fireplace and sliding glass doors to a lakeside deck.
There are five fireplaces, and five additional bedrooms, 4 Vz baths, and a lovely walk-out recrea-
tion room with terrazo flooring plus two additional "activity" rooms. Private parking for 10/12
cars. Even an equipped dark room.
Walk out to your own party barge for a cruise around the 130-acre lake, or enjoy swimming,
fishing, canoeing and sailing from your own dock.
THIS STUNNING CUSTOM-BUILT RESIDENCE OFFERS THE ULTIMATE IN
PURE ENJOYMENT AND RECREATION.
Call us today for an appointment to see it. $495,000.
(]JawM-/l dne.
5827 Columbia Pike, Bailey's X-Rds, VA 22041
Tel: 931-5000

An architect specializing in beautiful terrain creating
privacy and seclusion designed this conte)11porary home.
On more than one acre of rolling hillside with special land-
scaping, each room is exceptionally spacious. Rare detail
for comfort and low maintenance. $395,000.
Shown by appointment with
Virginia Keating
229-0174 656-2300
CBS Realty, Inc.
5480 Wisconsin Avenue
Chevy Chase, Maryland 20015
A full service Real Estate Company for 25 years
Lar!
Pote
Poss
out

IIA
1ing
kit -
eck.
rea-
1/ 12
ing,
IN
-
· I:
d.'
,.
... o d1st1nct1vely
creot1ve and
spoc1ous three-level
contemporary home
surrounded by
towenng trees and lush custom londscop1ng. A
mo1ntenonce free extenor of sol 1d cedar comb1ned w1th
energy eff1c1ent orch1tecturol features. Un1que d1n1ng room
of tnongulor des1gn w1th cathedral ceil1ng prov1des o
spectacular v1ew. F1ve bedrooms. four f1reploces. family
room on mo1n level and f1n1shed recreot1on room.
$415,000.
SHOWN BY APPOINTMENT.
TELEPHONE: 356-1323
Super Location!
Large townhouse with tremendous
Potential, 5 or 6 bedrooms, 3 baths
Possible, or separate apt. in walk-
out basement. Off-street parking.
$225,000.
GBEGG Inc.
Alexandria Office
683-3600
LEESBURG
Large, historic home on half-acre lot
with lovely boxwood garden, early
brick smokehouse, and log cabin said
to be oldest in County. Main house
has 7/ 8 bedrooms, 3 baths, double
living room, dining room, library, 14
fireplaces, much more. $260,000,
owner financing possible.
KINGAND
CORNWALL, INC.
REALTORS
Leesburg, VA 703-777-2503
Metro Area 471-5400 (no toll)
Eastern 'hore
WATERFRONT
ESTATE
of26 acres on the beautiful Miles Ri ver
near St. Michael . Gracious manor
hou e, guest hou e, tennis court, pool,
garage & barns. Brochure available.


(301) 822-9000
6 Glenwood Avenue, Easton, MD 21601
MOUNT VERNON REALTY, INC.
announces the
April 1st opening
of our
Leesburg Office
320 Market Street
703-777-3977
Metro 435-1661
Leesburg joins our Warrenton,
Stafford and Fredericksburg
branches specializing in fine
homes and estates.
20 Sales Offices in Virginia
I

6000 Stevenson Avenue
Alexandria, Virginia 22304
370-4600
Dossier/ May 1981/71

Truly an
American Palace
This fabulous estate, located just
minutes from Washington, D.C., is
comprised of four acres of exquisite
grounds surrounding the gracious
manor house. Built to accommodate
family and guests, this brick home
contains seven bedrooms, ten baths,
a St. Charles kitchen, covered decks
and a total security system. Gardens
and patios lead to a pool and
pavilion. There is a carriage house
and three car garage. Priced at
$1,800,000 it may be seen by
appointment; please contact
Manarin Odie
and Rector Realtors
277 South Washington Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
(703) 549-8200
PRIZED POTOMAC ESTATE
Congressional
Club Area
One of the rare 5-acre parcels
in this close-in area is now
available. Large manor house
\Vilh spacious room sizes,
gucsthouse, greenhouse, pool,
tennis court and stables.
3875,000.
By Appointment Only
M.rs. Reynolds 983-1375
Elizabeth Ca.dell, r.roke:r
10200 RowrRoad. Potomac. Md. (301) 983· 0200
72/May 198//Dossier
CONDOMINIUMS
COOPERATIVES
Nobody knows this unique
market like we do.
We at BN R Realty have all the facts,
figures and floor plans to facilitate your
next purchase and expedite your next sale.
As the specialists in the condominium
and cooperative field, our representatives
are highly trained for your special needs.
CALL US TODAY!
656-7700
BNR INC.
THE CONDO & CO-OP PROFESSIONALS
North Arlington
French doors leading from the
living room to a delightful brick
patio banked with azaleas are
but one of the long list of excep-
tional features in this unusually
spacious 4 bedroom, 3 bath
home. Below market financing
available. Offered at $220,000.
Better Homes
6845 Elm St reet, Suite 100 •
McLEAN
Realty, Inc
PAM BAKER OR CAROLINE ROCCO
Mclean , Virginia 22101 790-5100
SECLUDED ACRE
NEAR CHAIN BRIDGE
Custom crafted Contemporary with superior
amenities, well proportioned rooms, excellent
design for formal entertaining or informaJliV·
ing. This fine property is perfect for those wh
0
demand quality, desire privacy, need a close-in
location, appreciate excellence and seek a con·
temporary environment.
TYSONS CORNER
81 50 LEESBURG PIKE
TYSONS CORNER, VIRGI NIA 22180
821-1227
I
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The Gold Page
DOSSIER'S CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS
PHONE 362-5894
ANTIQUES
Sue Okun, Antique Consultant.
Consultations in buying, selling antiques,
auction buying. Personal shopping service.
Specializing in 18th & 19th century American
and English furniture, accessories and
202-363-7845.
Antiques can be restored In your home.
Refinishing services available: repairs, touch
ups, caning, gold leafing and paintings. IM-
MEDIATE SERVICE - Moving Cos., int.
decorators & embassies. Pebblebrook Anti·
que Restoration of Chevy Chase. Mon-Fri 9-7
593-1165.
Christ Child Opportunity Shop
F=ine China, silver, jewelry, paintings, prints.
1427 Wisconsin Avenue, Georgetown, D.C.
333-6635

BALLOONS

EXECUTIVE BAR SERVICES
you' re having a party & would like to
lOin guests call us for bartenders/walters &
0
8
r Waitresses. Catering services available.
23-3477
...._ BOOKS
THE BOOK CELLAR for out-of-print
1
oks to read & collect. All subjects &
8227 Woodmont Ave., Bethesda,
Open 7 days, 11-5.
...__ CALLIGRAPHY
hand-lettered announcements,
flVItatlons, dinner party menus. Fortune 500
Dept. Clientele. Prof., reas. 370-8173.
B-. ELEGMJG FOR SALE
n eauttful fabrics at sensible prices. Basics,
S Otlons for dressmaking. Thread needle
98
treet, Potomac Promenade. (inside mall)
--E._Falls Rd. Potomac. 299-3370
ENTERTAINMENT
CASINO
Monte Carlo Events-great fundraisers,
company parties or private parties. Profes-
sional Croupiers. (See Washington Dossier
- Jan. issue, p.48; Feb. Issue, p.41). Call
Steve Phillips, Show-Biz Productions
723-4215. •
PIANIST available for spring parties.
'75 Princeton Grad., Senior thesis:
The Plano Style of Erroll Garner
484-1780.
ESCAPES
Discover the Yachting World of Greece
Our fifth season in the service of
discriminating travelers to Greece
PONTOS SHIPPING
:::;::=- & TRADING, INC.
.L 104 E. 40th St., N.Y. 212·682·2575
INTERIORS
INTERIOR BY AUGUST
Residential
Mr. August-544-2999
ARCHITECTURAL INTERIORS
Office Renovation, Residences/Additions
Geoffrey Tinkham (301) 927-9170
ORIENTAL RUGS
Will pay cash for your old rugs. Appraisals,
cleaning & repairing. Hadeed Oriental Rug
Emporium. 1504 Mt. Vernon Ave. , Alexandria,
Va. 549-0991 .
PHOTOGRAPHY
Portrait photography In your home/garden.
On-location portraiture for executives,
authors, artists. 893-2486.
SERVICES
ESTATE & HOUSEHOLD SALES
Martin Chadwick
Licensed agents
892-0856
THE LANDSCAPE GROUP
A Design/ Build Company
!I! 1979-1980 Awards
Residential Development
Steven L Mackler 270-6721
MEET EDUCATED, INTERESTING SINGLES
-on a one to one basis. We will match your
requirements with those of other important
singles. Share your free time with someone
you are going to like. Send for free informa-
tion. QUEEN OF HEARTS, P.O. Box 34881,
Bethesda, MD (301) 983-1028 after 6 p.m.
Rent·a·Mommy, Inc.
" Loving care when you' re not there."
Babysitters day, evening & overnight.
656-1620
Executive & family portraiture. Oils from life
or old photos. International commissions.
Sally Stockdale. 966·7099
TENSE? Enjoy a thoroughly pleasureful &
relaxing nonsexual massage. Given by a
trained/referenced masseuse. Call Jennifer
at 483-5363 before 7 p.m.
Bartender available for parties/receptions.
Handles military/political receptions plus
private parties. $10.00 per hour, $12.50 after
the 1st 4 hours. References avail. 362-3700.
SPORTING DOGS
English Pointer-Eihew Misty Maid Litter.
Whelped 2/81. Tops in field or trial. $400.
700-250-9728.
TUBS
HOT TUBS-COOL TUBS-Rent or Buy,
Jacuzzis, Spas, Saunas, Steam Baths, Wood
Stoves also on display. HOME SWEET
HOME, 815 Hungerford Drive, Rockville,
Maryland. 424-1144.
Bought & Sold
We invite you to visit our
comprehensive collection of
50,000 reasonably priced
used, rare and out-of-print
paperbacks and hardbacks.
llam - 7pm daily
lpm- 7pm Sundays
(open late Friday and Saturday)
363-0581
In two locations a t
Wisconsin & Chesapeake Streets
4 702 Wisconsin A venue
4725 Wisconsin Avenue
W ash.ington, DC
Dossier/ May 1981173
WE'VE MADE YOUR SECURITY
OUR BUSINESS FOR OVER A QUARTER CENTURY
Si nce 1954, Dictograph has dedicated itself to providi ng life safety for hundreds of
thousands of American fami l ies. In the past our biggest job was convincing people they
were in danger. But that's all changed.
Wi t h break- ins and f ace-to-face confrontations at an all-time hi gh and t he t hreat from
fire mounti ng year af t er year, today' s fami l ies know t hey need prot ection. The best prot ec·
tion comes from a company that won' t cut corners and won' t gamble with your l i fe .. . a
company that places your personal securit y first , while planni ng sensi bl e prot ection for
your val uable property as wel l.
DICTOG RAPH . .. Because you already know you can't afford
anything less.
GUARDIAN ALARM SALES., INC.
4850 Rugby Avenue • Bethesda, Maryland
652-1990
74/May 1981/Dossier
Real Estate
Transactions
A GUIDE TO AREA
PROPER1Y EXCHANGES
WASHINGTON, D.C
2901 Cortland Place, N.W .. L.R. Raicht to Linda
S. Nash & Randall Grams · $235,000.
3333 Dent Place, N.W. · W.T. Lake to Suzanne D.
Kuser · $335,000.
2907 Garfield Street, N.W .. J. Walker to Peter c.
& Pamela C. Walker· $255,000.
4935 Millbrook Lane, N.W. · P.C. Walker to ThB
0
'
dore E. Rhodes· $315,000.
3922 Ingomar Street, N.W. · J.A. Williamson, Jr.
to Phi lip G. Schrag· $251 ,000.
5161 Palisades Lane, N.W .. C.W. Duncan, Jr. to
Peter McCoy · $460,000.
3405 R Street, N.W. · M.L. Dickey to Joaquin de
Pombo & Graciela Palacios· $210,000. .
3525 Sprlngland Lane, N.W .. J.O. Berry to Davi d
0 . & Joan P. Maxwell · $457,500.
1417 27th Street, N.W . . R.G. Harper to Evel yn
Nef · $210,000.
2601 31st Street, N.W . . P.W. Amram to Bernard
Carl · $550,000.
4211 48th Place, N.W . • W.C. & A.N.
Development Company to Wi l liam K. Dabaghl &
Marilyn A. Harris.
4125 52nd Street, N.W . . T.M. Johnson to
Leonard Garment · $350,000.
4715 Berkley Terrace, N.W . . B. Oeding to John
Waterston · $303,000.
3408 0 Street, N.W. · R.J. Bradley to Paul s.
Quinn· $235,000. .
2810 R Street, N.W. · M.K. Ege to Will i am Mi l·
chell · $375,000.
4920 Van Ness Street, N.W .. D.M. Louie to
Roger S. Williams, Jr. & Joseph G. KrePP
5
·$265,000. tO
1124 East Capitol Street, N.E. · J.S. Scallan
Theodore F. Stevens · $335,000. .
1117 Independence Avenue, S.E .. H.E. Whit·
taker to Jeffrey P. Galland & Elizabeth c.
Matheson · $200,000.
2529 P Street, N.W. · S.T. Chichester, Jr. to Hugh
N. Jacobsen · $206,000.
2025 Q Street, N.W. · D.R. Payne to Vincent A·
LaBella· $310,000.
5
1301 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W .. H.L. Wessel
to Caryl F. Conner · $202,000.
5011 Sedgwick Street, N.W. · H.E. zuPaP'
penheim to Ross F. Hamachek · $470,000. ter
2737 Devonshire Place, N.W. #220 . C.A. DoC
to William H. Zietz · $287,500.
4200 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. #910A · s.l3·
Lubcher to Edward F. Connors · $425,000. 'd J
2526 17th Street, N.W. ·. A.B. Askin to DaVI .
Rea and Maricruz Gisbert · $200,000. to
5024 Garfield Street, N.W. · W.H. Allen
Charles LePaul · $260,000. D
1718 Hoban Road, N.W. · W. Mitchell to John ·
Val iante · $375,000. d
2023 Que Street, N.W .. V.A. LaBella to Donal
R. Payne · $330,000. to
3104 Que Street, N.W. · O.L. Johnston, Jr.
Jean P. Mayer · $395,000.
5
4980 Quebec Street, N.W. · K.H. Evans to Jarfl
8
L. Buckley · $350,000. F
2739 Unicorn Lane, N.W. · R.A. Brown to John ·
O' Leary & Hazel R. Rollins· $290,000. n
1319 28th Street, N.W . . H.B. Lee to Kathl ee
A.H. Evans · $249,000.
1535 28th Street, N.W .. F.A. Well to Nolan
Bushnell · $642,500. If/
3101 34th Street, N.W. · R.E. Kays to ReX ·
Cowdry · $225,000.
213 E Street, N.E. · S.L. Cymrot t o James
St i ner, Jr. · $262,000.
MM
430:3
to Tho
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to Edg
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Kennec
8100
Willian
1010
Bahrar
1321
Albert

Krooth
111C
to Sal'
108C
Robert
571::
Home
581E
Home
104(
McFar
5305
Christ<
710(
to Stu;
5801
Corpo1
580<
Corpo1
581:
Corpo1
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Corpo1
u 5701
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100•
Ruben
480!
Shen t
430(
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Mlcha
490(
Mil ler
. $289,
BOOt
Richa1
-
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-
66o:
Me Lea
. $275
681\
MeLee
. $285
•• 662\
'VIC Lee
107
Cumbc
402!
Peter 1
311
to Ma1
412
lng & :
639
';:'las hi
Por
102
Cham I
107!
to Edv
620•
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200:
Devel<
811
Josep
122
Josep
610
Neal r
400
to Artl
From a
-
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Linda
nne D.
lterC-
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, Jr. to
uln de
David

Jrnard
Mill er
lghl &
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aul s.
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MARYLAND
4303 Stanford Street, Chevy Chase · O.M. Rei d
to Thomas W. Ki rby . $200,000.
5209 Worthington Drive, Bethesda · C.S. Jones
to Edgar P. Heurtematte · $220,000.
K
5308 Falmouth Road, Westmoreland Hills · J.
ennedy to Carleton S. Jones · $246,000.
'" 8100 Horseshoe Lane, Potomac · L. Prieto to
"Ill lam D. Keough· $247,000.
B
10104 Iron Gate Road, Potomac· J.M. Seidel to
ahram Ertan · $662,500.
A
13213 Moran Drive, Potomac · T.R. Shi pp to
lbert W. Neal · $200,000.
K
9105 Potomac Station Lane, Potomac · J.D.
rooth to Charles Luria · $675,000.
11108 Stackhouse Court, Potomac · B.Y. Chan
to Salvatore R. Deleva · $210,000.
10800 Stanmore Drive, Potomac· R.T. Foley to J.
Robert Schultz· $500,000.
5713 Magic Mountain Drive, Rockville · U.S.
Home Corporat ion to Marvi n M. Gi bson · $222,467.
5816 Magic Mountain Drive, Rockville · U.S.
Home Corporation to Watson T. Scott · $222,806.
,, 10401 Grosvenor Place, Rockville · W.F.
,.,cFarl i n to Philip I. Wolf· $220,000.
C
5309 Cardinal Court, Bethesda · F. Ramon to
hrlstopher T. Boland II · $350,000.
t
7100 Longwood Drive, Bethesda · R.D. Cudahy
o St uart L. Bindeman · $395,000.
C
5801 Cartlna Terrace, Rockville · U.S. Home
orporation to Phi ll i p A. Prager· $221 ,233.
5804 Cartlna Terrace, Rockville · U.S. Home
Corporation to Shaktl P. Kapur · $227,130.
5812 Cartlna Terrace, Rockville · U.S. Home
Corporation to Gilbert C. Miller · $240,382.
C 1 Magic Mountain Court, Rockville · U.S. Home
orporation to Barry N. Friedman · $219,419.
C 5 Magic Mountain Court, Rockville . U.S. Home
orporation to Arnold C. Friedman· $215,814.
5701 Magic Mountain Court, Rockville · U.S.
Home Corporation to Alan H. Gott l ieb· $221 ,667.
,., 10012 Carter Road, Bethesda · J.C. Greene to
"Uben P. Rabadan · $265,000.
4805 Cumberland Avenue, Chevy Chase· A. Hlr·
Shen to Jon P. Moynihan · $230,000.
N 4300 East-West Highway, Chevy Chase · M.L.
ails to Wayne McDonald · $350,000.
,,.4 W. Klrke Street, Chevy Chase · N. Glassie to
• .,,chael W. Slammer · $356,000.
4900 Rockmere Court, Bethesda · W.C. & A.N.
Miller Development Company to Alfred W. Eller
. $289,779.
,., 8008 Riverside Drive, Cabin John· M.D. Rubin to
"lchard T. Harris · $264,000.
VIRGINIA
,, 6603 Madison-Mclean Drive, Mclean· Madi son·
,.,$clean Associ ates to Irving R. Obenchain, Jr .
. 275,000.
M 6613 Madison-Mclean Drive, Mclean· Madison·
$
cLean Associates to Wi ll iam A. Creager
. 285,000.
,, 6627 Madison-Mclean Drive, Mclean· Madison·
'"'Clean Associ ates to Garo A. Partoyan -$227,000.
10711 Meadowood Drive, Vienna · R.F.
Cumberland to Jack R. Mulford · $815,000.
P 4025 38th Place, N. Alexandria · B. Waxman to
eter H. Orvis . $270,000.
t 311 Pitt Street, N. Alexandria· R.S. Wil li ams, Jr .
o Mary J. Gil chri st · $210,000 .
. 412 Union Street, N. Alexandria · Robert Bann·
'ng & Son to Henry C. Curti s · $355,000.
W 639 South Washington Street, Alexandria ·
E: ashi ngton Development Corporation to Stanley
· Portny . $205,302.
10220 Cedar Pond Drive, VIenna · A.T.
Chambers, Jr. to Robert E. Douglas· $234,088.
t 1075 Spring Hill Road, Mclean· Mclean Homes
o Edwin Meese Ill · $265,000.
P 6204 Vernon Palmer Court, Mclean · P.K.
Ollvka to James 0 . Mayo. $307,000.
E: 1108 Dunaway Drive, Mclean · Development
nterprises to Patricia K. Polivka . $276,405.
D 2007 Lorraine Avenue, Mclean · Sprlngwood
evelopment Company to Rolf C. Schou · $230,000.
J 811 Balls Hill Road, Mclean · C.D. Andrus to
oseph M. Rougeau · $220,000.
J 122 Tollgate Way, Falls Church · W.M. Baski n to
oseph P. Landy· $231 ,000.
N 610 Notabene Drive, Alexandria· L.E. Herman to
ea1 D. Glassman & Joan L. Rhodes · $200,000.
t 400 Madison Street, Alexandria · D.L. Jackman
o Arthur L. Nl ms Ill- $235,000.
rJt' From a report by Rufus S. Lusk & Son. Inc. PubliSher>
"""'
Contemporary on 7
1
12
acres, ideal for the nature
lover. 20 minutes from
the White House.
$800,000.
McLean
Unsurpassed
View of
Potomac River
Shown by appointment with
John Y. Millar or Welene Goller
362-4480
MGMB, inc. Realtors
FOXHALL SQUARE
3301 New Mexico Avenue, N.W. • Washi ngton, D.C. 20016
We sell investments to live in.

J8llole
of Georgetown
UNIQUE GIFTS
Located in the new Prospect Place (Just West of Wisconsin Avenue)
3222 N Street • 333-3222
Dossier/May 1981/75
Social Calendar
THE FORTHCOMING EVENTS OF THE CI1Y
l
f you're planning an event, please call
Maggie Wimsall at 652-7574 well in advance
of publication. We regret that not every item
can be published for reasons of space. However,
private parties will be placed on a special list that
will not appear in this column.
MAY
May 1, 2 and 3: Third Annual "Week End with
the Arts" - Williamsburg Hospitality House,
Williamsburg, VA - by invitation - Chairman,
Mrs. Thomas Broyhill.
May 2: Fifty-sixth running of The Virginia Gold
Cup - Broadview Course, Warrenton, VA - post
time I :30 p.m.
May 2: Fifty-fourth Annual Benefit Tea and Sale
- sponsored by the Ladies' Board of the Religious
of the Eucharist - Embassy of Brazil - 2 to 5:30
p.m. -admission $10- Chairman, Mrs. John Van
Ever a.
May 2: "Kentucky Derby Party" for the benefit
of The Frontier Nursing Service - at the residence
of Mrs. Jefferson Patterson - 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
- by invitation - Chairman, Mrs. Ralph E. Becker.
May 3: Seventeenth Annual Market Day - "A
Celebration of Caring" for the benefit of Friend-
ship House- 619 D St., S.E. - noon to 6 p.m.
May 2 and 3: Fifty-fourth Annual Georgetown
House Tour sponsored by St. John's Church,
Georgetown Parish - 12 noon to 5 p.m. - tickets
$10 each per day - Chairpersons, Miss Mollie
McMurray, Ms. Gloria Monteiro.
May 3 through May 6: Annual Meeting of all Na-
tional Chapters, ARCS Foundation, Inc. - The
Four Seasons - for members - Meeting Chairman,
Mrs. George C. Gerber.
May 4: Gala Benefit Dinner honoring Recipients
of Awards for Outstanding Contributions to the
Performing Arts in the Nation's Capital -Atrium,
Kennedy Center- 7 p.m. - black tie- by invitation
-General Chairman, Roy 0 . Harris, Jr.
May 5: Society of Sponsors of the United States
Navy Annual Spring Luncheon - The Mayflower
- noon - by invitation - Chairman, Mrs. M.
Russell Kelley.
May 6: Reception benefit of Homemaker Health
Aide Service - Embassy of Saudi Arabia - by in-
vitation- Chairmen, Mrs. George Pend.leton, Mrs.
Calvin Cobb, Jr., Mrs. Roberts De Graff.
May 8: Annual Flower Mart sponsored by All
Hal.lows Guild benefit of the Washington Cathe-
dral - II a.m. to 6 p.m. - no admission
-Chairman, Mrs. James G. Dougherty.
May 9: Thirty-fifth Annual Embassy Tour benefit
of Davis Memorial Goodwill Industries Guild - II
a. m. to 5:30 p.m. - tickets $12 each - Honorary
Chairman, Mrs. Ronald Reagan - Tour Chair-
man, Mrs . Thomas M. Cahill .
May 9: Fifth Annual Northern Virginia Cancer
Ball - dinner dance at Oatlands Plantation,
Leesburg, VA- 6:30p.m.- black tie- by invitation
76/May 1981/Dossier
- $150 a couple - Chairman, Mrs. Samuel
McMichael.
May 9: Annual Spring Auction and Dinner Dance
benefit of Georgetown Day School - Pension
Building-6:30p.m. -by invitation- Chairperson,
Mrs. Hunter Malloy.
May 9: Cancer Bal.l - Annual Dinner Dance spon-
sored by American Cancer Society, D.C. Division
- Washington Hilton - black tie - by invitation
-$200 each- Guest of Honor, Jack Lemmon- Bal.l
Chairman, Alan I. Kay.
May 10: Mother's Day.
May 10: Twenty-fourth Annual Capitol Hill
House and Garden Tour - I to 6 p.m. -sponsored
by Capitol Hill Restoration Society - Tickets $9
advance, $10 day of tour - Chairman, Mrs.
Rosalie Troube.
May 10: "Cocktai.l Concert" by the McLean
Chamber Orchestra - at the residence of Mr. and
Mrs. Raymond Lecraw - 3 p.m. - by reservation
- $30 each - Chairman, Mrs. Linwood Holton.
May U: Women's Board American Heart Associ-
ation, Nation' s Capital Affiliate Spring Meeting
and Election of new officers- members- II a.m. -
at the residence of the chairman, Mrs. Charles A.
Camalier, Jr.
May 13: CARE - Thirty-fifth Anniversary Even-
ing - at the OAS - Chairmen, Mrs. John Davis,
Mr. Oakley Hunter.
May 16: "A New Beginning- A Second Hundred
Years" - Twenty-ninth Annual Salvation Army
Garden Party Benefit - Embassy of Switzerland
- II a.m. to 4 p.m. - tickets $4 at door - Co-
chairmen, Mrs. Bruce E. Clark, Mrs. Charles
Lammond.
May 16: "Tales of a Thousand and One Nights,
Volume II" - benefit of the Capital Children's
Museum - Embassy of Morocco - dinner, enter-
tainment, dancing - 8 p.m. -by invitation- $125
each -Chairman, Mrs. Joseph D. Tydings.
May 17: First Kalorama Triangle House Tour - I
to 5 p.m. - tickets $6 day of tour- Chairman, Jef-
frey Jacobson.
May 20: "American Spirit" presents watercolors
by Bill Mangum, Jr. - benefit Wolf Trap Associ-
ates- Les Champs, Watergate- 6 to 8 p.m. -by in-
vitation- Chairman, Mrs. John W. Crutcher.
May 20: "A Stop on the Orient Express"- dinner
dance benefit of the Textile Museum - at the
Museum- 7 p.m. -black tie- by invitation- $125
each - Chairman, Mrs. Joseph Henderson III.
May 21: The Travelers Aid Bal.l - annual dinner
dance benefit of Travelers Aid Society - at FNMA
- black tie - by invitation - $125 each - Chairman,
Mrs. John E. Pflieger.
May 21: "Stepping Back in Time" - USO Fortieth
Birthday Party - Washington Hilton - canteen
style dinner- dancing and USO show-7:30p.m.
- by subscription - $75 each - dress of the period
- Co-chairmen, Mrs. Caspar Weinberger, The
Honorable J. William Middendorf.
May 22: International Polo Benefit Dinner Dance
- OAS - to benefit The Paralysis Cure Research
Foundation and the OAS Special Project for Han-
dicapped Children of the Americas - black tie - bY
invitation - $150 a couple - Bal.l Chairmen, Tht
Hon. and Mrs. Marion H. Smoak.
May 22: Gala Salute to Dina Merrill - dinner
benefit of Juvenile Diabetes Foundation - by in·
vitation - $200 each - Houston, Texas - Chairmen.
Dr. and Mrs. Michael De Bakey.
May 23: International Polo Benefit - Thirty-five
goal match at Potomac Polo Club, Poolesville,
MD - 3 p.m. - Polo Chairmen, Joseph A. Mul·
doon, Jr. , Dr. Christian Zimmerman.
May 23: Costume Ball -The Victorian Society - at
"Roseclifr• - Newport, Rl - by invitation
- Society President, Richard Hubbard Howland.
May 23: The Wiener Jeunesse Bal.l - paJais
Auesperg, Vienna, Austria.
May 25: Memorial Day Observance.
May 28: Reception at Friendship House, 619 D
St., S.E. - 6 to 9 p.m. - by invitation - Contribu·
tion $20 - Honorary Chairpersons, Mrs. Effi
Barry, Mr. Bobby Mitchell, Ms. Evelyn Gunn.
May 30: Traditional Memorial Day.
May 30: "Dance-in-the-Park" benefit of The Art
Barn Gal.lery - 2401 Tilden St., N.W. - 6 to II
p.m. - country casual - Chairman, Mrs. Williafll
D. Garner - Co-chairmen, Dr. Joan Ellert, Mrs-
Richard Powell, Mrs. William M. Preston.
Curtain Going LP
May (that spring-into-summer month) blooms
with colorful cultural offerings: In the Concert
Hall, Rostropovich conducts the NSO with tile
Choral Arts Society (Norman Scribner, director)
in an all Beethoven program, May 5,6,7,8 . · ·
WP AS closes this season with pianist Alfred
Brendel, May 2 (8:30) and the Met's reignin8
diva, mezzo Renata Scotto, May 3 (7:30) . · ·
while the final concert of this year's Handel
Festival brings Belshazzar, May 9 (8:30) ... In the
Eisenhower, a revival of Terrance Rattigan' s Tbe
Winslow Boy, plays Apr. 28-May 23 ... In t ~ e
Opera House, Remak Ramsay stars in Willie
Stark, Carlisle Floyd's musical version of Robert
Penn Warren's" All the King's Men" playing onlY
12 performances in a 3-week run: May 9,10,12,
14,16,17,19,21,23,26,28,29 . .. and, in the rer·
race Theater, WPAS brings Bella LewitzskY's
Dance Company May 8,9,10 (7:30) ... and tbe
Folger Theatre Group presents a new play (to bt
announced) May 20 - June 4 ... Meanwhile,
Love's Labours Lost continues at the Folger
Theatre through May 24 .. . Children of a LesSer
God continues through May 9 at the Nationa.l · · ·
I'm Getting My Act Together and Taking It on
the Road stays at Ford's Theatre all month, and
God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, a musical, plaYS
at Arena Stage May 14 through June 14 while
Pantomime by Derek Walcott plays May 15
through June 7 in the Kreeger . (Get set for Bal'
num arriving in the Opera House some time i n ~
June!) -ANNE 8LA
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Cadillac

Fine Jewelers Since 1810
Parisian designer Roger Lebenstein encircles
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