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PHARMACOPCEIA
OF THE

UNITED STATES.

i

^^3^
THE

PHARMACOPCEIA
OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
FOURTH DECENNIAL REVISION.

BY AUTHORITY CP
THE NATIONAL CON^INTION FOR REVISING THE PHARMACOPEIA,

HELD AT WASHINGTON,

A. D. 1860.

J.

B.

PHILADELPHIA: L I P P I N C O T T & CO.
t864.

mi

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by

FRANKLIN BACHE, M.D.,
Chairman of the Committee of Revision and Publication,
in the OflBce of the Clerk of the District Court for the Eastern District of

Pennsylvania.

PROCEEDINGS
OF THE

NATIONAL CONVENTION OF 1860
FOR REVISING THE PHARMACOPCEIA.
FOUKTH DECENNIAL REVISION.

The Convention
on Wednesday,
gates at
its

for the fourth decennial revision of the

Pharmacopoeia of the United States met at Washington

May

2d, 1860, present the following dele-

several sessions

A.

I.

Fuller, M.D., and Henry T. Cummings, M. D.,

from the Maine Medical Association

Jacob Bigelow, M.D., and Ephraim Cutter, M. D.,
from the Massachusetts Medical Society;
Messrs.

Charles

T.

Carney and Robert R. Kent,
the Connecticut State

from the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy

Guerdon W. Russel, M.D., from
Medical Society;

Caleb Green, M. D., from
cal Society;
1*

the

New York

State MediV

VI

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.

Edward
cine

R. Squibb, M. D., from the

New York

State

Medical Society, and the
;

New York Academy

of Medi-

Messrs.

John Meakim, "William Hegeman, and Alexthe

ander CusHMAN, from
macy;

New York

College of Phar-

Joseph Carson, M. D., from the University of Pennsylvania
;

Franklin Bache, M.D., from
College of Philadelphia

the Jefferson Medical

George B. Wood, M. D., and Robert Bridges, M. D.,
from the College of Physicians of Philadelphia
Messrs.

William Procter,

Jr.,

Alfred

B. Taylor,

and

Edward Parrish,
F.

from the Philadelphia College of

Pharmacy

Henry

Askew, M. D., from

the Delaware

State

Medical Society;

William E. A. Aiken, M.
Maryland
Messrs.

D., from the University of

Alpheus

P.

Sharp and George W. Andrews,
Lincoln, M.D., from
;

from the Maryland College of Pharmacy

John

C.

Riley, M. D., and N.

S.

the National Medical College of Washington

Thomas Miller, M.D., Joshua Riley, M.
William
P.

D.,

and

Young, M.D., from

the Medical Society of

the District of Columbia

Lewis A. Edwards, M.

D., from

the United Statea

Army; and George Clymer, M. D., from

the United States

Navy.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.

Vll

The Convention was organized by the appointment of
the following officers

President.

George

B.

Wood, M.

D., of Pennsylvania.

First Vice-President.

Jacob Bigelow, M. D., of Massachusetts.

Second Vice-President.

Edward Warren, M. D.,
Thomas Miller, M.D.,
John
to those

of North Carolina.

Secretary.
of the District of Columbia.

Assistant Secretary.
C. Riley,

M.

D., of the District of Columbia.
resolution, extended an invitation

The Convention, by

members of Congress who are graduates of mediits

cine to attend
tions.

sessions,

and take part

in its delibera-

Dr. Wood, as Chairman of the Committee of Revision

and Publication of the Pharmacopoeia of 1850, presented
a report,
also a

made up

to the time of its publication in

1851

supplementary report in relation to the reprint of

the same work, which was called for in 1855.

These reports
to

were accompanied by his accounts, which were referred

an auditing Committee, and subsequently reported on as
correct.

The delegates from the

several medical and pharma-

ceutical bodies, represented in the Convention,

were then

called

upon

for contributions in aid of the revision of the

Pharmacopoeia; when communications were presented by
Drs. Bigelow and Cutter from the Massachusetts Medical

nil

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.

Society; by Dr. Squibb from the

New York

State Meiical
;

Society and the

Hegeman from
delphia

New York Academy of Medicine by Mr. the New York College of Pharmacy; by

Dr. Bridges from the College of Physicians of Phila;

and by Mr. Procter from the Philadelphia ColIn addition to these communications

lege of Pharmacy.

from bodies represented in the Convention, contributions
towards the revision were subsequently received from Dr.

Bigelow and Dr. Cutter, both of Massachusetts, from Mr.
Taylor, of Pennsylvania, and from Mr. William S.
son, of

Thomp-

Maryland.

Mr. Parrish presented a printed copy of the Proceedings of the

American Pharmaceutical Association

at its

eighth annual meeting, held at Boston in September, 1859,
as a contribution

from that body

in aid of the revision of

the Pharmacopoeia.

These communications were then referred
mittee, consisting of Dr. Bache,

to a

Com-

Mr. Parrish, Mr. Sharp,

Dr. Miller, and Dr. Bussel, with instructions to report a
plan for the revision and publication of the Pharmacopoeia. Dr. Bache, from this Committee, reported
tions,
five resolu-

embodying a plan of revision and publication, which,
up a blank
in the second resolution with the

after filling

name
lows
i.
:

of Philadelphia, were adopted unanimously as fol-

Resolved^ That a Committee of Revision and Publica-

tion be appointed, to consist of nine

members (including

the President of this Convention as one), to which shall be
referred all communications in relation to the revision of

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.

IX

the Pharmacopoeia, and that three of this Committee shall

form a quorum.
2.

Resolved, That the Committee shall meet in the city

of Philadelphia, and be convened as soon as practicable

by the Chairman.
3.

Resolved, That the Committee shall be authorized to
its

publish the work after

revision,

and

to take all other

measures that

may

be necessary to carry out the views

and intentions of the Convention.
4.

Resolved, That the Committee shall have power to

fill its

own

vacancies.
its

5.

Resolved, That, after the completion of
its

labours,

the Committee shall transmit a report of

proceedings

to the Secretary of this Convention, to be laid before the

next Convention.

The Convention decided

that the eight remaining

mem-

bers of the Committee of Revision and Publication should

be selected by a nominating Committee, formed of one
delegate from each State and District represented in the

Convention, and of one from the
spectively, to be appointed

Army and Navy

re-

by the President, who

selected

the following delegates

Dr. A.

I.

Fuller,

of Maine. of Massachusetts.
of Connecticut.

Br. Jacob Bigelow,
Dr. Guerdon

W.

Russel,

Mr. William Hegeman,

of

New

York.

Mr. Alfred B. Taylor,
Dr.

of Pennsylvania. of Delaware.

Henry

F. Askew,

Mr. Alpheus P. Sharp,

of Maryland.

X

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.
Dr. Josliua Riley,
Dr. Lewis A. Edwards,
of the District of Columbia.
of the United States

Army.

Dr. George Clymer,

of the United States Navy.
after a brief conference,

The nominating Committee,

reported the following eight gentlemen to be members of
the Committee of Revision and Publication, to act in con-

junction with the President appointed by resolution

Dr. Franklin Bache, Dr. Edward R. Squibb,

of Philadelphia. of

New

York.

Mr. Charles T. Carney,
Dr.

of Boston.

Henry

T.

Cummings, of Portland.
Jr.,

Mr. William Procter,
Dr. Joseph Carson,

of Philadelphia. of Philadelphia.

Mr. William

S.

Thompson, of Baltimore.
of Philadelphia.

Mr. Alfred B. Taylor,

These nominations were then confirmed by a vote of
the Convention.

The next

subject that engaged the attention of the Con-

vention was the

mode

of assembling the Convention of

1870, and the duty of reporting a plan was assigned to a

Committee, consisting of Drs. Bache, Squibb, Miller, and
Carson, and Mr. Andrews.

This Committee reported in

favour of adopting the rules which were passed in 1850
for

assembling the present Convention, merely making
This report having
for calling to-

the necessary changes in the dates.

been adopted, the following are the rules
gether the Convention of 1870
1.
:

The President of

this

Convention

shall,

on the

first

day of May, 1869, issue a

notice, requesting the several

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.
incorporated
State

XI

Medical Societies, the incorporated

Medical Colleges, the incorporated Colleges of Physicians

and Surgeons, and the incorporated Colleges of Pharmacy
throughout the United States, to elect a number of delegates, not exceeding three, to attend a General
tion, to

Oonvenin

be held at Washington on the

first

Wednesday

May, 1870.
2.

The

several

incorporated

bodies,

thus

addressed,

shall also

be requested by the President to submit the

Pharmacopoeia to a careful revision, and to transmit the
result of their labours, through their delegates or through

any other channel,
3.

to the next Convention.

The

several medical

and pharmaceutical bodies

shall
this

be further requested to transmit to the President of

Convention the names and residences of their respective
delegates, as soon as they shall have been appointed, a
list

of

whom

shall be published,

under

his authority, for the

information of the medical public, in the newspapers and

medical journals, in the month of March, 1870.
4.

In the event of the death, resignation, or inability to

act of the President of the Convention, these duties shall

devolve upon the Vice-Presidents in succession ;

or,

should

the Vice-Presidents also be prevented from serving,

upon

the Secretary or Assistant Secretary, the latter acting in

the event of the inability of the former.

Mr. Meakim, under instructions from the

New York

College of Pharmacy, submitted a proposition, which was
adopted, that the Index of the Pharmacopoeia shall have
its

names

so

marked

for the quantity of the syllables that

Xii

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION.
serve as a pronouncing vocabulary of the Materia

it

may

Medica.

Mr. Procter suggested

to the

Committee of Revision

and Publication the propriety of publishing the Pharmacopoeia in a cheap form, so as to insure
its

general use
of this

by physicians and
course

apothecaries.

The expediency

met with general approval, and the President

pledged the Committee to carry out the views of the
Convention.

An

informal discussion then arose on the subject of the

weights

and measures most suitable

for

the

Pharma-

copoeia; after which the Convention adjourned sine die.

Soon

after

the

adjournment of the Convention, Dr.
of Kentucky, presented to the Secre-

Thomas E. Jenkins,

tary his credentials as a delegate from the College of

Physicians and Surgeons of Louisville, Kentucky.

PREFACE.
The
decennial revision of the Pharmacopoeia of the United
it

States brings with

the necessity for numerous modifications
is

of the work.

This arises from the progress of science, which

very considerable in the interval of ten years.

The Committee

of Revision and Publication have realized this fact in the large

amount of labour they have encountered

in

duly examining the

mass of materials, manuscript and printed, bearing upon the
proper execution of their duties.

They have had

occasion to
alterations

make many

additions to the work, and also
its

many

both in the arrangement of

several parts

and

in the details,

most of which require to be
the reader.

briefly explained for the benefit of

Extended application has been made of the process of percolation or

displacement as an improved

mode of

extracting the

soluble parts of medicines;

and piore ample directions than
laid

have heretofore been given are

down

in the

Preliminary

Notices

for conducting

it

with success.

In many instances
;

percolation has been substituted for maceration
alternative processes are allowed, that
first,

and, wherever
is

by percolation

given

to indicate that it

should be preferred.

The
ders,

terms, heretofore used to designate the fineness of powindefinite.

were necessarily vague and

To remedy
xiu

this

XIV

PREFACE.
have been adopted, and are
strictJy

defect, five grades of fineness

defined

by the greater

or less closeness of the

meshes of a sieve

through which they

will severally pass.

In the Pharmacopceia of 1850 the strong mineral acids are
taken sometimes by weight and sometimes by measure.

There

appeared to the Committee an obvious propriety in estimating
their quantities in a uniform

manner ; and,

as

weighing

is

more

convenient than measuring in the instance of heavy, corrosive
liquids, these acids are always
oils,

taken by weight.

Four

fixed

namely, Oil of Sweet Almond, Neats-foot

Oil,

Flaxseed

Oil,

and Olive

Oil,

appear as ingredients in certain preparations

of the Pharmacopoeia of 1850, and are taken by measure, with the exception of Olive Oil in one preparation.

In the present

Pharmacopoeia these
called for

oils are

taken by weight, a change of plan

by

their adhesive nature,

which renders

it

more con-

venient to weigh than to measure them.

Clarified

Honey

is

another liquid which

is

uniformly estimated by weight in the

present Pharmacopoeia.

In that of 1850

it is

taken sometimes

by weight and sometimes by measure.

The

list

of the

Materia Medica

has undergone the usual
Fifty-five

modifications of introductions and dismissions.

medi-

cines have been introduced, and twenty-six dismissed, as will

appear by consulting the first and second
to the work.

Tables appended

The Preparations have been

increased by one hundred and

eleven additions, while the dismissions have been only thirtyseven, as
is

shown by the third and fourth Tables.
still

The

Preparations are

thrown into

classes

;

but these have been

modified in the revision.

The

classes,

containing metals, are

uniformly designated by the metal present, thus removing the

PREFACE.
exceptioiMil headings, in the Pharmacopoeia of 1850, of

XV

Alumen,
substi-

Calx, Magnesia, Potassa, and Soda,
tuted

for

which are

Aluminium, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, and
Other changes in the names of
classes are

Sodium.

Aqu^

for for

Aqu^

Medicat-(E,

Carbo

for

Carbo Animalis, and Vina

Vina Medicata. The classes introduced are Aloe, Atropia, Cadmium, Cinchonia, Collodium, Liquores, Oleoresin^,
Resins, and Santoninum.
of 1850, was not the
title

Collodium, in the Pharmacopoeia
of a
class,
is

but was placod under

^THEREA.

The

class

Liquores

peculiar to the

Pharma-

copoeia of 1860.
fifteen out of the

It contains twenty-one preparations, comprising

former nineteen Solutions, which, in the Phar-

macopoeia of 1850, were arranged in various places, together
with six new ones.

Of

the four

Solutions which disappear

as such, one has been dismissed,

Liquor Potassse Carbonatis,

one has been classed with Syrupi under the changed name of

Syrupus Ferri lodidi^ and one with

Aqu^

under the changed
its

name of Aqua Ammonix ; while
place,

the fourth takes

alphabetical
Fortior, in

under the changed name of

Aqua Ammonise
it

the

list

of the Materia Medica, where

stood before.

When
they

the Solutions were scattered through the

diflferent classes,

could not be readily made to conform to an alphabetical arrange-

ment, which has always been one of the features of the Pharmacopoeia, adopted at the period of its first publication,

and intended

to facilitate reference.

The two

classes

Oleoresin^ and Hetheir introduction will

sin^ have

well defined characters,

and

meet with general approval.

Of

the five Oleoresins, those of

Capsicum, Lupulin, and Ginger are newly introduced;

while

those of Cuheh and Black Pepper were formerly classed with

the Fluid Extracts.

The

three Resins, those, namely, of Jalapf

XVI

PREFACE.

May-apple, and Scammoni/, appear in the Pharmacopoeia for the
first

time.

The

dismissed classes of preparations are

Alcohol, Aqua,

Glycerina, Pulp^, Spongia, Stannum, and Styrax.
members of the
first

The

three classes mentioned have been placed

elsewhere, and those of the last four have been omitted.

In several instances there has been a change of position of
preparations from one class to another, in order to effect a
strictly

more
not

alphabetical

arrangement.

Thus, those
all

Spirits,

placed heretofore under Spiritus, have
that class.
Spirits,

been transferred to

This has caused a change in position of certain

formerly arranged

under

^therea
of

and Ammonia.
Tlnctura Ferri

The same

principle of arrangement has placed

Chloridi under

Tincture

instead

Ferrum, and Vinum
Again, the

Antimonii under Vina instead of Antimonium.

Tincture of Camphor, and the Tinctures of the Oils of Pepper-

mint and Spearmint have, under the changed names of
been placed in the same
class.

Spirits,

Another example of change
is

of position with change of of the Infusions

name

afforded

by the transfer

of Sassafras Pith and of Slippery Elm
to the class

Bark, under the altered names of Mucilages,

of

MUCILAGINES.

Some
in the

explanation seems proper in this place of the changes
certain Liquores to Aquse,

names of

and of several Tincto consider all

turse to Spiritus.

The Committee were disposed

aqueous solutions of gases or of
to the class

volatile substances as

belonging

Aqu^, and

to restrict the

term Liquores to solu-

tions of non-volatile substances, water being generally the solvent.

The

carrying out of these views did not remove any preparation
class

from the

Aqu^e, but transferred

to it the

former Liquor

PREFACE.

XVll

Ammonix, under

the changed

name of Aqua Ammomse.

The

same principle of nomenclature necessarily placed

in this class

the newly introduced aqueous preparations of Chlorine, Orange
Flowers, and Creasote, under the names of Aqua Chlorinii,

Aqua

Aurantii Florum, and
It
is

Aqua

Creasotl.

not easy to trace a sharp line of demarcation between

Tinctures

and

Spirits.

Tinctures

are

mostly medicines

pre-

pared with an alcoholic menstruum, in which they are only
partly soluble.

The Committee, though

not prepared to apply

this definition strictly in all cases,

were convinced of the proto alcoholic solutions of

priety of giving the
volatile
oils,

name Spiritus

whether concrete or

liquid.

Accordingly, they
to Spirit

have changed the name of Tincture of Camphor

of

Camphor, and those of the Tinctures of
and Spearmint
to Spirits, as already

the Oils

of Peppermint

mentioned.

The Committee

have, in every instance, discontinued the plan

of referring to model processes for the

way of conducting
to

or

completing certain formulas.

This plan tended

cause mis-

takes by requiring the manipulator to look elsewhere for directions,

which should be printed
to

in the

formula before him.

These
the

remarks apply particularly

the class

Extracta, where

plan objected to had the incidental disadvantage of destroying

the alphabetical arrangement of the whole class in one series, by

introducing sub-alphabets, which interfered with ready reference.

Most of the

Distilled Oils are prepared

by a general formula,

which may be properly referred

to as applicable to the greater
it

number

;

but this does not make

necessary to depart from the

plan of one continuous alphabetical arrangement for the whole
series.

In the Pharmacopoeia of 1850, the alphabetical arrangement
2*

XVlll

PREFACE.
scientific

]s

sometimes departed from, in order to give a

sequence

to

some of the preparations.

But the

alphabetical and scientific

arrangements are incompatible with each other;

and, as the

Committee had

to choose

between them, they decided in favour

of the former, both in reference to the classes and the

members

under each
utility.

class, as best fitted to

render the work of practical

The changes
FIFTH Table.
from masculine
This has given

in the Latin officinal

names are given
is

in the

The gender of
to feminine, as
rise to slight

the names of salts

changed
latinity.

conforming to the best

changes in several names, consist-

ing in making the adjectives agree with the gender adopted.

The termination "uretum", except
altered to

in

'^

Sidphui^etum" , has been
titles

"idum", which gives the new
.

" Ci/amdum" and
is

^'Ferroci/anidum"

Wherever the word
is

leaf

required to be

rendered in Latin, Folium
Latin

used.

Calumha,

as the prevalent

name

for this root, has been

substituted for Colomhay
et

and Pulvis Ipecacuanhse Compositus for Pulvis Ipecacuanha
Opii, to conform to the universal British usage,

and

to favour

the uniform application of the same
aration.

name

to

an important prep-

Sweet

spirit of nitre, the Spiritus jEtheris Nitrici of

the Pharmacopoeia of 1850, does not contain nitric acid.

It

is

assumed by the Committee

to contain

the teroxide of nitrogen,

called frequently hyponitrous acid, but
acid.

more properly nitrous
being preferred

The

latter

name

for the acid in question

by the Committee, the name of this ether has been changed

from Spiritus JEtheris Nitrici

to Spiritus jEtheris Nitrosi.

The Table under

consideration clearly exhibits the cases in
its

which one old name has
names.

equivalent in two or more

new

The

division of aloes into the three kinds, generally

PREFACE.

XIX

recognised, will give a precision to the prescriptions of physicians

which has usually been wanting, and
the embarrassment, felt on

relieve the apothecary

from

many

occasions, of

making the

choice.

Improvements have

also

been made in adopting the division of

Orange Peel

into the bitter

and sweet, and of Mustard into the

white and black.

The

cases of the consolidation of two

names

into one are also clearly

shown

in this Table.

It is highly im-

portant that the
stood
]

new Latin

ofl&cinal

names should be well under-

and that the old names should be constantly presented

to the eye of the reader in connexion with the

new

ones.

Actitles

cordingly, in the

list

of the Materia Medica, and in the

of the several formulas, the Latin names of the Pharmacopoeia of 1850 have been invariably subjoined to the

new names,

as

was

done in the

last

Pharmacopoeia.
in the

The changes
tabulated.
officinal

English

officinal

names have not been

In

many
as the

cases the

Committee adopted the Latin

names

English ones.

Examples of Latin names,

used as English, are Angiistura, Arnica, Calamus, CapsicuiUj
Cimicifuga, Cinchona, Digitalis, Dracontium, Gaultheria, Sabbatia, Serpentaria, Spigelia,

and

Stillingia.

By

these substi-

tutions a

number of undesirable

Enorlish

names

are ^ot rid of,

among which

are Leopard' s-bane. Sweet Flag, Cayenne Pepper,

Skunk

Cabbage,

Partridge-berry,

American

Centaury,

and

Queen's-root.

In carrying out the same plan of nomenclature,

thirteen English officinal

names of medicines, introduced

into

the Materia Medica

list,

have been made the same as the Latin
English nomenclature are Can-

names.

Other changes

in the

tharides for Spanish Plies, Elder for Elder Flowers, Pale Rose
for

Hundred-leaved Roses, and Sajfflower for Dyers' Saffron.
in the

Changes of minor importance have been made

English

XX
names of some of
tlie

PREFACE.
Cerates, Liniments, Mixtures,
Piij-s,

Plasters, and Ointments.
in

Two

plans were originally adopted
initial

naming these

preparations.

Sometimes the

word of
in

the officinal

title is
;

the

name of the chief substance present
it

the preparation

at other times

is

the

name of the

class to

which

it

belongs.

Thus, the Pharmacopoeia of 1850 has Cam-

phor Liniment and Liniment of Turpentine, Ammoniac Plaster
and Plaster of Ammoniac with Mercury, Stramonium Ointment
and Ointment of Belladonna, Sulj)hur Ointment and Ointment

of Iodine, &c.

In cases like these the Committee have pre-

ferred the nomenclature

which gives precedence
;

to the

name

of the class to which the preparation belongs

and, accordingly,

they have made about forty changes of this kind.
however, was not made absolute
in a
;

The

rule,

but exceptions were admitted
settled

few cases,

in

which the present names have been

by

so long usage as to

make

it

inexpedient to change them.
it,

Wherever the genius of the language would admit of
English
this
officinal

plural

names have been made

singular.

Instances of

change are Almond for Almonds, Cuheb for Cuhehs, Fig for

Figs, Nutgall for Galls,

Prune

for Prunes, Oil
^

of Lemon

for Oil

of Lemons, and Rose

for Roses.

The sixth Table

gives the changes in the position of medilist to

cines by transfer from one

another.

The

third head here

enumerates a few medicines, which have been transferred from
the Preparations to the Primary List of the Materia Medica.
is

It

probable that, in future revisions, the

list

of medicines, so

transferred, will be larger, on account of the
tions, increasing

number of prepara-

every year, which are made by the manufac-

turing chemist instead of the apothecary.

The seventh and last Table

presents an explicit state-

y,

PREFACE.
oflScinal

XXI

ment of the Latin
their meaning.

names which have been changed names with changed meanings
it

in
is

To

retain

always objectionable; yet sometimes
Influenced by the desire to

can hardly be avoided.

make the Pharmacopoeia more

convenient for ready consultation, the Committee have given but

one Index, including both the Latin and English names.

The

Latin names are accentuated in obedience to the directions of
the Convention.

A

Table of Contents

is

prefixed to the
is

work

for the first time.

A

Table of this kind
;

not strictly

necessary where the Index

is full

but

it

serves a useful purpose

by giving a view of the

divisions of the

work

at a glance.

The recurring
decennial periods

revisions

of our

national

Pharmacopoeia at

may now be
This

considered as a fixed rule of the

work.

The

last interval

has been one of great activity in Medifact, so creditable to science,

cine and Pharmacology.

has
no

been a cause of proportionate labour to the Committee.

On

former revision have the materials referred to the Revising

Committee been so voluminous and important

as

on the present.

These required careful comparison, and the exercise of deliberate

judgment

in selecting the parts best adapted to the improvein

ment of the work, and

reducing them to a consistent whole.

The

contributions of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia

and of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy comprise a revision
of the Pharmacopoeia of 1850 fully written out, and in a form
nearly ready for the press; while the printed Report of the Joint

Committee of the

New York

College of

Pharmacy and of the

New York Academy
hundred pages,
is

of Medicine, occupying more than two

rich in valuable observations

and suggestions

bearing upon the revision.

Besides these, important private

contributions were received, which required careful considera-

XXll

PREFACE.
This abundance of materials, while
it

tion.

increased the labours

of the Committee, tended greatly to the improvement of the

work.
rally

They held one hundred and nineteen meetings, geneonce a week, and performed a large part of their duties

through the agency of Subcommittees, who worked in the intervals,

and made one hundred and thirty-eight written
believe that they have exercised
all

reports.

The Committee

due

dili-

gence in the performance of their task, and think, considering
the multiplicity of the details, the numerous appeals to experi-

ment

that

were necessary, the
rise to

diflferences of opinion

among
and the

themselves which gave

numerous

discussions,

vigilance required to preserve the unities of the work, that the

labour devolved upon

them could not have been properly

ac-

complished in
avocations.

less

time, due regard being had to their private

The

subject of weights and measures was a perplexing one to

the Committee.

The

final

conclusion come to as to weights was

to use exclusively in the formulas the grain

and the troy ounce,

the latter always printed, troyounce, as one word.

The term,

pound, has been disused
to mistakes

in

them, in order

to avoid the liability

from confounding the troy and avoirdupois pounds;
distinctly indicates a weight of four

and the new word troyounce

hundred and eighty

grains,

which cannot be replaced by the

avoirdupois ounce through ignorance.
tofore, is

Wine
;

measure, as here-

employed

in all the formulas

the only change beiug
it

the disuse of the term " gallon," which measure, wherever

occurs in the Pharmacopoeia of 1850,

is

expressed in pints.
the ad-

The adoption of Imperial measure would have secured

vantages of uniformity with the liquid measures used through-

out the British Empire

;

but, so long as the United States con-

PREFACE.
tinue to legalize the wine measure,
it is
it.

Xxiii

proper that physicians

and apothecaries should conform

to

Notwithstanding the pains which have been taken to avoid
errors, some,

no doubt, have been overlooked, and an entire con-

gruity of the several parts of the work

may be found

to

be want-

ing;

still

the Committee have the satisfaction of knowing that

they have performed their duties with conscientious zeal, and with a sincere desire to present to the public an accurate and
trustworthy Pharmacopoeia.

Philadelphia, June, 1863.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
PAOl

Weights and Measures
Temperature
Specific Gravity

1

2
3 3

Saturation

Stoppage of Bottles
Percolation

3 3

Fineness of Powders

7

MATERIA MEDICA.
Primary List
Secondary List
9

56

PREPARATIONS.
Accta
65 09

Acida
Aconitia

82
84
89

^therea
Aloe

Aluminium

90
91

Ammonia
Antimonium
Aquae
3

92
97

XXV

XXVI

CONTENTS.
PAOB

Argentum
Arsenicum
Atropia

-.

104
107

108

Barium

110
Ill

Bismuthum

Cadmium
Calcium

115

110
119

Carbo
Cerata

119

Cinchonia Collodium
Confectiones

1-4
125
1*28
."

Cuprum
Decocta

130
131 135

Emplastra
Extracta
Extracta Fluida

142 102 180
195

Ferrum

Hydrargyrum
Infusa

202 214
210 231

Linimenta
Liquores

Magnesium
Mcllita

232
233 237
,

Misturse

Morphia
Mucilagines

240

Olea Destillata
Oleorcsinae
Pilulse

242
248
251

Plumbum
Potassium.'.

200
201
271

Pulvores

CONTENTS.

XXVU
274
278

Quiuia
Resinae

Santoninum

280 282
287
295

Sodium
Spiritus

Strychnia

Sulphur
Syrupi
Tincturae Trochisci

298

299

314
339

Unguenta
Veratria

344
353

Vina

355

Zincum

359

TABLES.
Table of Medicines introduced into the Materia Medica Table of Medicines dismissed from the Materia Medica
Table of Medicines introduced into the Preparations
Table of Medicines dismissed from the Preparations 365

367 368 371

Table of Changes in the Latin Officinal
Table of Changes Table of Changes

Names

372 374
376

in the Position of Medicines
in the

Meaning of Names

Index

377

*

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
Weights and Measures.

The weights and measures used by
and apothecaries
scribing
in the United States,

physicians

when
the

prefol-

and

preparing

medicines,

are

lowing.
Weights.

— These
^
(

are

derived

from the

troij

pound, and are exhibited in the following
with their signs annexed:
The The The The
pound
ounce
ft)

table,

C twelve ounces,
contains
di'achms, < ^^»^^^ three scruples, j

^

drachm
scruple

C )

5 ^
gr.

\ twenty grains,

In order to avoid the danger of mistakes from
confounding the troy and avoirdupois pounds, the
term, pound,
is

disused in the formulas of tbis
desired

work, and the

weight

is

expressed

in

ounces, each containing four hundred and eighty
grains.

This ounce

is

always printed troyounce,
it

to guard

against the error of substituting for

the avoirdupois ounce, consisting of four hundred

and thirty-seven and a half

grains.

The drachm

2

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
*

and scruple are

also disused,

and replaced by their

equivalents in grains.
It is highly

important that persons engaged in

preparing medicines should be provided with troy
weights.

But those who

are not so provided can

make
42 "5

their avoirdupois weights available as sub-

stitutes for troy weights,

by bearing

in

mind that

grains,
it

added

to the avoirdupois ounce, will
;

make
reduce

equal to the troy ounce

and that 1240

grains, deducted
it

from the avoirdupois pound, will
pound.
are

to the troy

Measures.
gallon,

—These
"^

derived

from the wine
table,

and are given in the following

with

their signs annexed:
The The The The
gallon C pint fluidounce
eight pints, f ^'^^^^^^ fluidounces, < eight fiuidrachms, J \. sixty minims,

(

contains

f^ f^
Vf[

|

fluidrachm

)

In this work the term gallon

is

not used, that
pints.

measure being always expressed in

At

the temperature of 60°, a pint of distilled

water weighs 7291 -2 grains, a fluidounce 455-7
grains.

Temperature.

When

there

is

occasion to indicate the degree
is

of heat, the scale of Fahrenheit's thermometer

PRELIMmARY
employed.

NOTICES.
lieat, is

8

By

the term, gentle

meant any

temperature between 90° and 100°.
Specific Gravity.

When

the specific gravity of a substance
is

is

men-

tioned, its temperature

assumed

to be at 60°.

Saturation.

When

an acid or alkali

is

directed to be satu-

rated, the point of saturation is to be ascertained

by means of litmus and turmeric,
ally followed

in the

way

usu-

by chemists.
Stoppage of Bottles.

In

all

cases

in which

bottles

are directed to

be well stopped, they must be closed with glass
stoppers.

Percolation.

The kind

of filtration,

known

as percolation or

the process of displacement, directed in this Phar-

macopoeia, consists in subjecting a substance or
substances, in powder, contained in a vessel called

a p)ercolator, to the solvent action of successive
portions of a menstruum, in such a

manner that
in its de-

the liquid, as

it

traverses the

powder

scent to the recipient, shall become charged with

4

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
it,

the soluble portion of
lator free

and pass from the perco-

from insoluble matter.
the process
is

When
first

successfully conducted, the

portion of the filtered liquid, or percolate, will

be nearly saturated with the soluble constituents
of the substance treated
;

and,

if

the quantity of

menstruum be
last portion

sufficient

for its

exhaustion, the

will

be nearly destitute of colour,

odour, and taste.

The

percolator should

be

either

conical,

or

nearly cylindrical with a conical termination at
the smaller end, and provided internally with a

porous or colander-like partition or diaphragm,
resting transversely immediately above
for
its

neck,

the support of the powder.
in capacity

Ordinary glass

funnels, varying

from one to eight

pints, are to be preferred for

most of the operations

requiring percolation in this Pharmacopoeia; but
percolators

may

also be

made

of earthenware or

tinned iron, especially of the latter material
required of large
size.

when

Tinned

iron,

however,

should not be used when the liquid acts chemically

on the material.

In the several formulas

in

which percolators are used, their form and

material will always be designated
is

when

there

a preference

in

these

respects.

In cases

m

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
which these variations of the instrument are
different, the
ploj'ed.

5
in-

term percolator simply will be ema funnel
is

When

used, a circular piece
into
sides,

of muslin or of lint, pressed

the neck by

means of a cork with notched
diaphragm; but in
all

forms a good

cases

a similar piece of

muslin, moistened slightly with the menstruum,

should be interposed between the diaphragm and
the powder, to prevent the passage of the fine
particles of the latter.

The substance
after

to be

subjected to percolation,
sifting to a

having been reduced by

uniform

powder, of the fineness indicated in the formuUi,
is

to be

put into a basin with from one-fourth
its

to

one-half of

weight of the menstruum, and the
is

two rubbed together until the powder
moistened.

uniformly

A

portion of the powder

is

now

to be carefully

placed upon the
directed,

diaphragm, prepared as above
rest-

and pressed gently until the muslin,

ing against the sides of the percolator just above the neck,
is

covered with a uniform layer.
is

The

remainder of the powder
to

then to be transferred

the

percolator,

and compressed evenly and

firmly,

and the levelled surface covered with a
piece of moistened
1*

circular

muslin, so that the

6

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
upon
it

liquid poured

may

penetrate equably, and

not disarrange the powder.

The
with

percolator being

now

properly supported,
for

its

neck in a bottle previously marked

the quantity or quantities of liquid to be percolated, the

menstruum

is is

to be

poured on the muslin
filled
;

until the space above

nearly

and a layer

of

it

must be constantly maintained above the
air to its

powder, so as to prevent the access of
interstices, until all

has been added, or until the

requisite quantity of percolate has been obtained.
If the fineness of the

powder and

its

arrangement
to,

in the percolator

have been properly attended

the percolate will pass out, by drops, with greater
or less rapidity, according to the size of the percolator;
but,
if,

by reason of accidental imperthe neck of the per-

fection in the

powder, or in the packing, the liquid
this,

pass

more rapidly than

colator should be obstructed

by means of a cork

until the requisite slowness has been attained.

When

the dregs of a tincture are to be subjected

to percolation, after

maceration with

all

the menoff,

struum, the liquid portion should be drained

the solid portion packed in a percolator as before
described,
all

and the liquid gradually poured on until

has passed the surface, when, immediately, suffi-

PRELIMINARY NOTICES.
cient of the original

7

menstruum should be poured

on to displace the absorbed liquid, until the prescribed quantity of the tincture has been obtained.

Fineness of Powders.

As

different degrees of fineness are necessary

m
of

powders, according to their nature and
treatment, the
special

mode
is

degree required

desig-

nated in the several formulas.
the terms very
rately coarse,
fine, fine,

For

this

purpose

moderately

fine,

mode-

and coarse are used;

—the

powder

passed through a sieve of eighty or more meshes
to the linear inch being designated as very fine;

through one of sixty meshes, fine; through one of
fifty

meshes, moderately fine ; through one of forty

meshes, moderately coarse;

and through one of

twenty meshes,

coarse.

MATERIA MEDICA.*
PRIMARY
Absinthium.
LIST.

Wormwood.
and leaves of Artemisia Absinthium.
Arabic.

The
Acacia.

tops

Gum

The

concrete juice of Acacia vera, and of other

species of Acacia.

AcETUM.

Vinegar,
dilute acetic acid

Impure

prepared by

fer-

mentation.
* In the catalogue of Materia Medica, the names of medicinal
substances are given in Latin and English
;

and synonymes in
less famil-

English are added,
iar officinal

when they

serve to fix the

meaning of

names.

Such explanations as are necessary

to identify

the substances mentioned are also given, together with brief notes
indicating the

means

of ascertaining the purity

and genuineness
of the plants

of those most liable to be sophisticated.
referred
to,

The names

when

not otherwise indicated, are those of Willdenow's

edition of Linnaeus's Catalogus Specierum Plantarum,

and of the

animals, those of the R^gne Animdle of Cuvier.
is

When De CandoUe

cited as authority, reference is

had

to the

Prodromus Systematia

Nceturalis of that author.

10
Vinegar
is

MATERIA MEDICA.
not coloured by hydrosulphuric acid, and yields
^yith a solution of chloride of cal-

no precipitate when boiled
cium.

A fluidounce
from acrid

is

saturated by not less than thirty-five

grains of bicarbonate of potassa, and after saturation the liquid
is free

taste.

AciDUM AcETicuM.

Acetic Acid,

Acetic acid, of the specific gravity 1*047.

A

colourless liquid having a

pungent odour.

It is

wholly

volatilized

by

heat, yields

no precipitate with chloride of

barium or

nitrate of silver,

and does not change colour on the

addition of hydrosulphate of ammonia.

When

saturated with
If

ammonia,
silver

it

gives no precipitate with iodide of potassium.
it,

be digested in

and muriatic acid afterwards added, no

precipitate will

be formed.

Of

this acid

one hundred grains

saturate sixty grains of bicarbonate of potassa, and contain
thirty-six grains of

monohydrated

acetic acid.

AciDUM Arseniosum.
Arsenious Acid
is

Arsenious Acid.

Sublimed arsenious acid in masses.
entirely volatilized

by

heat, emits

an
is

alliaceous odour when thrown on ignited charcoal, and

completely dissolved

by

boiling water.

The

solution yields

a yellow precipitate on the addition of hydrosulphuric acid, a lemon-yellow precipitate on the addition
first

I

of

ammonia

and then of

nitrate of silver,

and a green precipitate with

potassa and sulphate of copper.
grains, boiled with dilute

Of

this acid

one hundred

muriatic acid and then treated

with hydrosulphuric acid, yield a deposit of tersulphuret of
arsenic,

weighing one hundred and twenty-four grains.

AciDUM Chromicum.

Chromic Acid.
When

In deep-red needleform crystals, deliquescent and very
soluble in water, forming an orange-yellow solution.

MATERIA MEDICA.
heated to a temperature between 356° and 374°,
it

11
melts into

a reddish-brown
opaque,
fall

liquid, which,

on cooling, becomes a red,

brittle

mass.

If a few drops of alcohol are allowed to

on a small portion of the Acid, a vigorous action takes
with an increase in bulk, and the liquid

place, attended

formed becomes yellowish-brown,

AciDUM CiTRicuM.

Cltric Acid,

In colourless crystals, wholly dissipated by a red heat,
freely soluble in water,
solution,

and soluble

in alcohoL

Its

aqueous
chloride

saturated with ammonia, produces with
is

of calcium a white precipitate, which
insoluble in boiling water.

soluble in cold, but

It affords

with acetate of lead

a

precipitate wholly soluble in nitric acid,

and yields no pre-

cipitate

when added

in excess to a solution of carbonate of

potassa.

One hundred grains
fifty

of Citric Acid saturate one

hundred and

grains of bicarbonate of potassa,

AciDUM Lacticum.

Lactic Acid.

A syrupy,
having a
cific

nearly transparent liquid, of a pale-wine colour,

slight,
is

bland odour, and a very sour

taste.

Its spe-

gravity

1'212,

It unites in all proportions

with water,,

alcohol,

and

ether.

It is not precipitated

by

solution of acetate

of lead, or of oxalate of

ammonia

;

and,

when

saturated with

ammonia,

affords

no precipitate with hydrosulphuric acid.
it

When
acid.

gently heated

yields no odour of acetic or butyric
less
it ia

Ninety grains of Lactic Acid are saturated by not

than seventy-five grains of bicarbonate of potassa.

When

treated with a caustic alkali in excess, the colour is not materially deepened.

AciDUM MuRiATicuM.

Mitriatic Acid.

An

aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid gas,

of the specific gravity 1*160.

12

MATERIA MEDICA.
A
colourless liquid, entirely volatilized
it

by

heat.

When

diluted with distilled water,

yields

no precipitate with

hydrosulphuric
excess,

acid,

chloride

tff

barium, or ammonia in
aid

and does not

dissolve gold-leaf, even with the

of heat.

AciDUM NiTRicuM.

Nitric Acid.

Nitric acid, of the specific gravity 1*420.

A
when

colourless liquid, entirely volatilized

by

heat.

It

dis-

solves copper with the disengagement of red vapours, and,

diluted with distilled water, yields no precipitate with
silver, or chloride of

hydrosulphuric acid, nitrate of

barium.

AciDUM Phosphoricum Glaciale.
plioric Acid,

Glacial

Phos-

In colourless, transparent, glass-like masses, slowly
quescent in the
air,

deli-

and soluble in water and

alcohol.

Its

aqueous solution

is

not precipitated by hydrosulphuric acid,

and

no precipitate takes place after the liquid has stood for
Chloride of barium causes a white precipi-

forty-eight hours.
tate,

which

is

readily dissolved

by an excess of the Acid.

Ammonia

in excess

produces but a slight turbidness, and

caustic potassa in excess evolves no

ammonia.

AciDUM SuLPHURicuM.

Sulpliuric Acid.

Sulphuric acid, of the specific gravity 1*843.

A
with

colourless, inodorous liquid,

having an oily consistence.
heat, and,

It is entirely volatilized
distilled water, is

by a strong

when

diluted

not coloured by hydrosulphuric acid.

AciDUM Tartaricum.
heat,

Tartaric Acid.

In colourless crystals, wholly or almost wholly dissipated by

and readily soluble

in water.

The

solution,

added in

MATERIA MEDICA.
of bitartrate of potassa.

13

excess to any neutral salt of potassa, produces a precipitate

With

acetate of lead

it

yields a pre-

cipitate wholly soluble in nitric acid.

One hundred grains

of Tartaric Acid saturate one hundred and thirty-three and a

half grains of bicarbonate of potassa.

AcoNiTi Folium.

Aconite Leaf,

Aconiti Folia, Pharm.^ 1850.

^

The

leaves of

Aconitum Napellus.

Aconiti Radix.

Aconite Root.

The
Adeps.

root of

Aconitum Napellus.

Lard.
fat of
free

The prepared
Lard should be
perature of 90°,
it

Sus Scrofa.
Below the temsoft solid.

from saline matter.

has the consistence of a

Alcohol.

Alcohol.

Spirit of the specific gravity 0*835.
Alcohol
is

colourless,

is

wholly vaporizable by heat, and

unites in all proportions with water

and

ether.

Diluted with
little

twenty parts of
foreign odour.

distilled water,

it

should yield

or no

Alcohol Amylicum.
Syn. Fusel
Oil.

Amylic Alcohol.

A

peculiar

alcohol, obtained

by

distillation

from fermented grain or potatoes by continuing the process after the ordinary spirit

has ceased to come over.

14

MATERIA MEDICA.
An
and
oily,

nearly colourless liquid, having a strong, offensive
Its speciiic gravity is 0'818,

odour, and acrid, burning taste.
its

boiling point between 268°

and

272°.

It is sparingly

soluble in vrater, but unites in all proportions with alcohol

and

ether.

It does not

take

fire

by contact with

flame, and,

when dropped on
stain.

paper, does not leave a permanent greasy

Alcohol Dilutum.
Water.

Diluted Alcohol.

Alcohol mixed with an equal measure of Distilled

The

specific gravity of Diluted

Alcohol

is

0*941.

Alcohol Fortius.

Stronger Alcolwl.

Spirit, of the specific gravity 0'817.
Stronger Alcohol, treated with a fev^ drops of solution of
nitrate of silver

and exposed

to

a bright light, either remains
Its

unchanged, or

lets fall

a very scanty, dark precipitate.

other properties correspond with those of officinal alcohol.

Allium.

Garlic,

The bulb

of Allium sativum.

Aloe Barbadensis.

Barhadoes Aloes.

The

inspissated juice of the leaves of Aloe

vulgaris [Lamarck).

Aloe Capensis.

Gape

Aloes.

The
Aloe.

inspissated juice of the leaves of Aloe

spicata {Thuriberg)^

and of other species of

MATERIA MEDICA.
Aloe Socotrina.
Socotrine Aloes.

15

The

inspissated juice of the leaves of Aloe

Socotrina [Lamarck),

Alth^a.

Marshmallow.

Altheese Radix, Pliarm.^ 1850.

The
Alumen".

root of Althaea officinalis.

Alum,
triturated with hydrate of lime or carbonate

Sulphate of alumina and potassa.

When Alum
of soda,
it

is

does not yield the odour of ammonia.

Alumina

et

Ammonle Sulphas.

Sulphate

of

Alumina and Ammonia.
Syn. Ammonia-alum.

Ammoniacum.

Ammoniac.

The

concrete juice of
T)'ans.

Dorema Ammoniacum

(Don,

of

the

Linn. Soc).

Ammonle Carbon as.
odour.
It is

Carbonate of Ammonia.

In white, translucent masses, having a pungent ammoniacal wholly dissipated by heat, and soluble without

residue in water.
falls into

On exposure

to the air, it

becomes opaque,

powder, and deteriorates by the loss of ammonia.

When it is saturated with nitric acid, neither chloride of barium
nor nitrate of silver causes a precipitate.

^

Ammonia Murias.
In

Muriate of Ammonia.
by
heat,

translucent masses, entirely volatilized

and

wholly soluble in water.

The

solution slightly reddens litmus,

16

MATERIA MEDICA.
and gives no precipitate with chloride of barium.

The

salt,

when rubbed with hydrate of lime
the smell of ammonia.

or hydrate of potassa, emits

Ammonia Sulphas.
and decomposed and

Sulphate of Ammonia.
totally dissipated

In colourless, prismatic crystals, freely soluble in water,

by a red

heat.

When
a white
it

rubbed with hydrate of lime or hydrate of potassa, the salt
emits the smell of ammonia.
Its

solution yields

precipitate with chloride of barium.

In dilute solution

is

scarcely precipitated

by

nitrate of silver.

Amygdala Amara.

Bitter

Almond,

The kernel

of the fruit of

Amygdalus com-

*munis, variety

amara [De

Candolle).

Amygdala

Dulcis.

Sweet Almond.

The kernel

of the fruit of

Amygdalus com-

munis, variety dulcis (De Gandolle),

Amylum.

Starch.

The

fecula of the seed of Triticum vulgare

(Kunth, Graminece, 438).

Angustura.

Angustura.
of

The bark

Galipea

officinalis
.

(Hancock,

Trans, of the Medico-Bot Soc.)

Anisum.

Anise.
fruit of

The

Pimpinella Anisum.

Anthemis.

Clvamomile.

The

flowers of

Anthemis

nobilis.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Antimonii Sulphuretum.

17

Sulphuret of Antimomj.

Native tersulphuret of antimony, purified by
fusion.
Sulphuret of Antimony
acid with the
evolved.
to
is

wholly dissolved by muriatic
acid gas being

aid of heat, hydrosulphuric

The
;

solution yields a white precipitate

when added
an

water

and the resulting

liquid, after filtration, affords

orange-red precipitate with hydrosulphate of ammonia.

Aqua.

Water.
state.

Natural water in the purest attainable

For signs of the purity of Water, see Aqua Destlllata.

Aqua Ammonia
monia.

Fortior.

Stronger Water of

Am-

Liquor Ammonise Fortior, Pliarm.^ 1850.

An
cific

aqueous solution of ammonia, of the spegravity 0*9 00, and containing twenty-six

per cent, of the gas.
Stronger Water of

Ammonia
It

has a very pungent odour of

ammonia,

is

wholly volatilized by heat, and gives no precipidoes not effervesce on the addition

tate with lime-water.

of dilute nitric acid, and,

when

saturated with thafacid, does

not yield a precipitate with carbonate of ammonia, nitrate of
silver, or chloride of

barium.

Argentum.

Silver.
metal, having the specific gravity 10*4.
"It is

A white

en-

tirely dissolved

by

dilute nitric acid

;

and the solution yields

with chloride of sodium a white precipitate, wholly soluble
in

ammonia.

The

solution, deprived of silver

by means of

18

MATERIA MEDICA.
chloride of sodium,

and

filtered, is

not coloured nor precipi-

tated

by hydrosulphuric
Arjiica.

acid.

Arnica.

The

flowers of Arnica montana.
Arsenic.
dark hue, but exhibiting a

Arsenicum.

A

brittle metal, usually of a

steel-gray colour

and

brilliant lustre

when

recently broken or

sublimed.
it

Its specific gravity is 5 "88.

When

exposed to heat

sublimes without melting, giving rise to white vapours

having a garlicky smell.

AsSAFCETiDA.

Assafetida.

The

concrete juice of the root of Narthex

Assafoetida (Falconer, Royles Mat. Med.).

AuRANTii Amari Cortex.

Bitter

Orange

Peel.

The

rind of the fruit of Citrus vulgaris.
Sioeet

AuRANTii DuLCis CoRTEX.

Orange

Peel.

The

rind of the fruit of Citrus Aurantium.

AuRANTii Flores.

Orange Flowers.

The

flowers of Citrus Aurantium, and of Citrus

vul^raris. 'to*

AvENiE Farina.

Oatmeal.
the seed of

The meal prepared from
sativa.

Avena

MATERIA MEDICA.
Balsamum Peruvianum.
Balsam of Peru,

19

The prepared

juice of

Myrospermum

Peruife-

ruin [De Gandolle).

Balsamum Tolutanum.

Balsam of

Tolu.

The

juice of

Myrospermum Toluiferum {De

Gandolle)

Baryt^e Carbonas.
The
solution formed

Carbonate of Baryta.
is

Entirely soluble in dilute muriatic acid with effervescence.

not coloured nor precipitated by am-

monia

or hydrosulphuric acid.

"When sulphuric acid

is

added

in excess, the solution yields no precipitate with carbonate

of soda.

Belladonna Folium.

Belladonna Leaf

Belladonna, Pharm.^ 1850.

The

leaves of Atropa Belladonna.

Belladonna Eadix.

Belladonna Root.

The

root of Atropa Belladonna from plants
old.

more than two years
Benzoinum.
Benzoin.

The concrete
BiSMUTHUM.

juice of Styrax Benzoin.

Bismuth.

Commercial bismuth of good quality.

a

brittle crystalline metal,
tint,

having a white colour with a
lustre.
Its specific

reddish
gravity

and possessing considerable

is 9"8,

and

its melting point 507°.

It dissolves readily

and almost

entirely in moderately strong nitric acid, forming

20

MATERIA MEDIC A.
a solution, which,

when added

to distilled water, gives rise to

a white precipitate.

Bismuth, as met with in commerce, usually contains a small
proportion of arsenic, copper, and silver.

Brominium.
is

Bromine.
liquid having a strong, disagreeable odour.
It

A dark-red
gravity
alcohol,
is 3.

entirely volatilized
It is
still

by heat

in reddish vapour.

Its specific

sparingly soluble in water, more soluble in
so in ether.
It destroys the colour

and

more

of

sulphate of indigo, and renders starch yellow.

BucHU.

BucJiu.

The

leaves of

Barosma crenata, and of other

species of Barosma.

Cadmium.

Cadmium.
colour.
Its specific

A

malleable metal, nearly as volatile as mercury, and of
gravity
is

a tin-white

8*7.

It dissolves

readily in nitric acid, forming a colourless solution,
yields,

which

with hydrosulphate of ammonia, a lemon-yellow prein potassa,

cipitate, insoluble

and not

volatile at a red heat.

Its neutral solution in nitric acid, after

having been fully pre-

cipitated
filtrate

by carbonate of soda added
is

in slight excess, yields a

which

not afiected by hydrosulphate of ammonia.

Caffea.

Coffee.

The

seed of Caffea Arabica.
Cliloride

Calcii Chloridum.

of Calcium.

'

Fused chloride of calcium.
In colourless, slightly translucent masses, hard and friable,
deliquescent,

and entirely soluble in water.

The

solution

MATERIA MEDICA.
yields white precipitates with nitrate of silver

21
and oxalate of

ammonia, and no precipitate with ammonia, with chloride of
barium, or with ferrocyanide of potassium dissolved in a large
quantity of water.

Calumba.

Columho.

Colomba, Pharm.^ 1850.

The
Calx.

root of Cocculus palmatus {De Candollc)

.

Lime.
recently prepared by calcinatioD.
the addition of water,

Lime
Upon

Lime cracks and

falls

into
it

powder with the evolution of

heat.

Muriatic acid dissolves

without effervescence, and the solution yields no precipitate

with ammonia.

Calx Chlorinata.

Chlorinated Lime,

Syn. Chloride of Lime.

A

compound

resulting

from the action of

chlorine on hydrate of lime, and containing
at least twenty-five per cent, of chlorine.

A grayish- white

substance, in powder or friable lumps, dry

or but slightly moist, and wholly dissolved
acid with the escape of chlorine.

by

dilute muriatic

Its solution
it,

quickly destroys
triturated with a

vegetable colours.

When

forty grains of

fluidounce of distilled water, are well shaken with a solution

of seventy-eight grains of crystallized sulphate of protoxide of iron and ten drops of sulphuric acid in two fluidounces of
distilled water, a liquid is

formed which does not yield a blue
potassium
(red prussiate

precipitate with ferridcyanide of

of potassa).

22

MATERIA MEDICA.
Camphor.

Camphor A.

A

peculiar concrete substance derived from

Camphora

officinarum

(Nees,

Laurin.,

88),

and purified by sublimation.
Canella.
Canella,

The bark
Canna.

of Canella alba.

Canna.
les

Syn. Tous

Mois.

The

fecula prepared from the rhizoma of

an

undetermined species of Canna.
Cantharis.
Cantliaiides.

Cantharis vesicatoria.

Capsicum.

Ca^psicum,

Syn. Cayenne Pepper.

The

fruit of

Capsicum annuum, and of other

species of Capsicum.

Carbo Animalis.

Animal Charcoal,

Charcoal prepared from bone.

Carbo Ligni.

Charcoal.

Charcoal prepared from wood.

Cardamomum.

Cardamom.

The

fruit of Elettaria

Cardamomum

(Maton,

Act. Linn., 254).

MATERIA MEDICA.
Carum.
Caraway.
fruit of

28

The

Carum
Cloves,

Carui.

Caryophyllus.

The unexpanded

flowers of Caryophyllus aro-

maticus {De CandoUe).
Cascarilla.
Cascarilla.

The bark

of Croton Eleuteria.

Cassia Fistula.

Parging Cassia.

The

fruit of Cassia Fistula.

Cassia Marilandica.

American Senna,

The

leaves of Cassia Marilandica.
Castor.

Castoreum.

A peculiar
Castor

concrete substance obtained from

fiber.

Cat ARIA.

Catnej).

The
Catechu.

leaves of Nepeta Cataria.
Cateclm.

An

extract

prepared

principally from

the

wood

of Acacia Catechu.
Wliite

Cera Alba.

Wax.

Yellow wax, bleached.

24

MATERIA MEDICA.
Yellow Wax.

Cera Flava.

A

peculiar concrete isubstance
mellifica.

prepared by

Apis
Cetaceum.

Spermaceti.

A peculiar
Cetraria.

concrete substance obtained from

Physeter macrocephalus.
Iceland Moss.

Cetraria Islandica (Acbarius, Liclienog. Univ.).

Chenopodium.

Wormseed.

The

fruit of

Chenopodium anthelminticum.

Chimaphila.

Pi]Dsisseioa.

The

leaves of Chimaphila umbellata (Pursh/

Flor. Amer. Sept.).

Chiretta.

Cliiretta.

The herb and

root of Agathotes Chirayta.

Chloroformum Yenale.

Commercial Chloroform.
to

A colourless liquid,
1'49.

varying in specific gravity from 1'45

Shaken

vrith

an equal volume of officinal sulphuric acid
it

in a bottle closed with a glass stopper,
vrhich separates
less,

forms a mixture,

by

rest into

two layers

;

the upper one colour-

and the lower, consisting of the

acid, of a

brownish hue,

which, after the lapse of twenty-four hours, becomes darker,

but never quite black.

Chondrus.

Irish Moss.

Chondrus crispus

(Greville,

Mg.

Brit.),

MATERIA MEDICA.
CiMlClFUGA.
Oimicifuga.

25

Syn. Black Snakeroot.

The

root of Cimicifuga racemosa (Torrey and
.

Gray, Flor. of N. Amer.)

Cinchona Flaya.

Yellow CincJwna.

The bark

of

Cinchona Calisaya (Weddell,
Qidnquin., 30), called in comless

Hist. Nat. des

merce Calisaya harh, and containing not

than two per cent, of alkaloids yielding crystallizable salts.

Cinchona Pallida.

Pale Cinchona.

The bark

of Cinchona Condaminea
i.

(Humb.
and of

and Bonpl., Plant. Equinoct.,

33),

Cinchona Micrantha (Ruiz and Pavon, Flo7\
Per'uv.,
ii.

52).

Cinchona Rubra.

Bed

Cinchona.
species of CinharJc,

The bark of an undetermined
chona, called in commerce red

and con-

taining not less than two per cent, of alkaloids

yielding crystallizable salts.

CiNNAMOMUM.

Cinnamon.
of

The bark
Laurin.),

Cinnamomum Zeylanicum (Nees, and of Cinnamomum aromaticum
6*

(Nees, ibid.).

26

MATERIA MEDICA.
Cochineal,

Coccus.

Coccus Cacti.
CoLCHici Radix.

Cohliicum Root.
of Colchicum autumnale.

The cormus
CoLCHici Semen.

Colchicum Seed.

The

seed of Colchicum autumnale.
Colocyilth.

COLOCYNTHIS.

The

fruit,

deprived of

its

rind, of Citrullus

Colocynthis (Hoyle, Mat. Med.).

CoNiUM.

Hemloch.

Conii Folia, Pkarm., 1850.

The
Copaiba.

leaves of
Copaiba.

Conium maculatum.

The juice

of Copaifera multijuga, and of other

species of Copaifera.
CoPTiS.

Goldthread.

The

root of Coptis trifolia.

CoRlANDRUM.

Coriander.

The

fruit of

Coriandrum sativum.
Dogicood.

CoRNUS Florida.

The bark
Creasotum.

of Cornus Florida.

Creasote.

A

peculiar substance obtained from wood-tar.

MATERIA MEDICA.
A
is

27

colourless, oily, neuter liquid,

having a strong, charactaste.

teristic odour,

and an

acrid,

burning

Its specific gravity-

1*046.

When

dropped on

filtering paper, it causes a grcasjy

stain,

which

-wholly disappears, in ten minutes,
It boils

upon being

exposed to a heat of about 212°.
397°,

without alteration at
It is

and does not congeal

at 17°

below

zero.

sparingly

soluble in water, but mixes in all proportions with alcohol
ether.
It dissolves

and

wholly and readily in an equal volume of

acetic acid.

'^Creta.

Chalh.

Native, friable carbonate of lime.
Chalk
is

entirely soluble in dilute muriatic acid with effer-

vescence, and the solution yields no precipitate with ammonia.

Crocus.

Saffron,

The stigmas
CuBEBA.
Cuheh.

of Crocus sativus.

The

berries of Piper Cubeba.

CuPRi SuBACETAS.
Syn. Verdigris.

Suhacetate of Copper

Impure suhacetate of copper.
In masses of a pale-green colour, almost wholly soluble, with
the aid of heat, in dilute sulphuric acid.

Ammonia, added
is

to

the solution, produces a precipitate, which
solved by an excess of the alkali.

entirely dis-

CuPRi Sulphas.

Sulpliate of Copper.
air,

In blue crystals, slightly efflorescent in the
tirely soluble in water.

and enthe

Ammonia throws down from
is

solution a precipitate,
alkali is

which

wholly dissolved -when the

added in excess.

28
Digitalis.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Digitalis.

The

leaves of Digitalis purpurea, from plants

of the second year's growth.

Dulcamara.

Bittersweet

The

stalks of

Solanum Dulcamara.

Elaterium.

Elaterium.

A

substance deposited by the juice of the
of

fruit

Momordica

Elaterium,

Ecbalium

agreste {RicJiard)

Ergota.

Ergot,

The

diseased seed of Secale cereale.

Erigeron.

Fleahane.
of Erigeron heterophyllum, and of

The herb

Erigeron Philadelphicum.

Erigeron Canadense.

Canada Fleahane.

The herb
EuPATORiUM
.

of Erigeron Canadense.
ThoroughiDort.

The

tops and leaves of

Eupatorium

perfolia-

tum, gathered after flowering has commenced.

ExTRACTUM Cannabis.

Extract of Hemp.

An

alcoholic extract of the dried tops of Can-

nabis sativa, variety Indica.

ExTRACTUM Glycyrriiiz^e.

Llqiwrke.

The

extract of the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Fermentum.
Yeast.

29

A

peculiar insoluble product of the fermenta-

tion of malt liquors.

Ferri Sulphuretum.

SidpJiuret of Iron.

Protosulphuret of iron, prepared by melting
together Iron in small pieces and Sublimed

Sulphur.

Ferrum.

Iron.
malleable and very ductile metal, having the specific
It

A

gravity 7*8.

has a fibrous texture, and requires

a*

high

heat for

its fusion.

The wire drawn from

it is

flexible

and

without

elasticity.

Ficus.

Fig.
dried fruit of Ficus Carica.

The

FiLix Mas.

Male Fern.
of Aspidium Filix mas.

The rhizoma
FcENicuLUM.

Fennel.

The

fruit of

Foeniculum vulgare {De Can-

dolle).

Galbanum.

Galhanum.

The
Gall A.

concrete juice of an undetermined plant.

Nutgall.

A morbid excrescence upon Quercus infectoria.

30

MATERIA MEDICA.
Gamboge,

Gambogia.

The

concrete juice of an undetermined tree.
Gaidtlieria,

Gaultheria.

The

leaves of Gaultheria procumbens.
Gentian,

Gentiana.

The

root of Gentiana lutea.
Cranesbill,

Geranium.

The rhizoma
GiLLENiA.

of

Geranium maculatum.

Gillenia.

The

root of Gillenia trifoliata, and of Gillenia

stipulacea.

Glycerina.
having the

Glycerin,
inodorous, syrupy liquid, of a sweet taste,
It is soluble in
to

A colourless,

and

specific gravity 1"25.

water and in
it

alcohol, but not in ether.
fire,

Exposed

a

full

red heat,

takes

and burns with a blue flame.
with
air,

It is destroyed

by

distilla-

tion in contact

but

may

be distilled unchanged with

steam.

It

combines with potassa and baryta, and also with

sulphuric acid.
cipitate

AVhen diluted with water,

it

affords

no pre-

with hydrosulphatc of ammonia or ferrocyanide of

potassium.

Glycyrriiiza.

Liquorice Root.

The

root of Glycyrriiiza glabra.
Cotton.

GossYPiuM.

A

filamentous substance separated from the

MATERIA MEDICA.

31

seed of Gossypium herbaceum, and of other
species of Gossypium.

Granati Fructus Cortex.

Rrmegranate Rind.

The

rind of the fruit of Punica Granatum.

Granati Radicis Cortex. Baric ofPomegranate Root.

The bark

of the root of Puniea Granatum.

GuAiACi Lignum.

Guaiacum Wood.

The wood

of

Guaiacum
Guaiac.

officinale.

GuAiACi Resina.

The

concrete juice of

Guaiacum

officinale.

Gutta-percha.

Gutta-percJia.

The

concrete juice of Isonandra gutta (Hooker,

Loudon s Journal of Botany, 1848).

H^matoxylox.

Logwood.
of Hsematoxylon

The wood
Hedeoma.

Campechianum.

Hedeoma.

Syn. American Pennyroyal.

The herb
Helleborus.

of

Hedeoma

pulegioides.

Black Hellehore.

The
Hordeum.

root of Helleborus niger. Barley. decorticated seed of

The

Hordeum

distichon.

32

MATERIA MEDICA.
Hops.
strobiles of

HUMULUS.

The

Humulus Lupulus.

Hydrargyrum.

Mercury.
common
It is

A
heat,'

silver-white metal, liquid at
specific gravity 13*5.
is

temperatures, and

having the

wholly volatilized by

and

dissolved without residue
to roll over

by

nitric

acid.

A

globule

made

white paper occasions no trace.

Pure sulphuric

acid, agitated

with

it

and afterwards evap-

orated, leaves no residue.

Hyoscyami Folium.
Hyoscyami

Henhane Leaf.

Folia, PJiarm.^ 1850.

The

leaves of

Hyoscyamus

niger,

Hyoscyami Semen.

Henhane Seed.
niger.

The seed
ICHTHYOCOLLA.

of

Hyoscyamus
IsuigloSS.

The swimming bladder
and of other species of
Ignatia.
Ignatia.

of Acipenser Huso,

fish.

Syn. Bean of Saint Ignatius.

The

seed of

Strychnos

Ignatia

(Lindley,

Flor. Med.). lODiNiUM.
Iodine.

In bluish-black, crystalline scales, having the metallic lustre.
Its specific gravity is 4*9.

When

heated

it

first

melts,

and

then rises in purple vapour.

It is

very slightly soluble in

water, but freely so in alcohol and ether.

Shaken with

dis-

MATERIA MEDICA.
tilled

33
brown
tinge.

water,

it

should communicate only
it

a slight

With

starch in cold solution
in a

produces a blue colour.
adheres

When

shaken

dry glass

bottle, it scarcely

to the surface.

Ipecacuanha.

IpecacuanJia.

The
dolle)

root of Cephaelis Ipecacuanha [De Can.

J Ala PA.

Jalap.
root

The

of

Exogonium Purga (Benthain,

Botanical Register), Ipoma3a Jalapa {Nuttall).

JuGLANS.

Butternut.

The inner bark
JuNiPERUS.

of the root of Juglans cinerea.

r
Juniper.

The
Kino.

fruit of

Juniperus communis.

Kino.
inspissated juice of Pterocarpus MarsuCandolle),

The

pium {De
Krameria.

and of other

plants.

Bliatany.

The

root of

Krameria triandra (De Gandolle)

.

Lactucarium.

Lactucarium.

Tiie concrete juice of Lactuca sativa.

Lavandula.

Lavender.

The

flowers of

Lavandula vera {De Gandolle)

34

MATERIA MEDICA.
Leptandra.

Leptandra.

The

root of Veronica Yirginica (Linn.), Lep-

tandra Yirginica {Nuttall).
LiMONis Cortex.

Lemon

Peel,

The

rind of the fruit of Citrus

Limonum {De

Candolle)

LiMONis Succus.

Lemon

Juice.

The

juice of the fruit of Citrus
.

Limonum {De

Candolle)

LiNi Farina.

Flaxseed Meal.
seed of

The meal prepared from the
usitatissimum.

Linum

Linum.

Flaxseed.
seed of

The

Linum

usitatissimum.

LiTiii^ Carbonas.

Carhonate of Liiliia.
It dissolves

A white

powder, sparingly soluble in water, and having a

feeble alkaline reaction.
dilute sulphuric acid,

with effervescence in
salt.

and forms a freely soluble

It

im-

parts to the flame of burning alcohol a carmine-red colour.

Lobelia.

Lohelia.

The herb
Lupulina.

of Lobelia inflata.

Lupulin.
to the strobiles

The yellow powder attached
of Ilumulus Lupulus.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Lycopodium.

85

Lycopodium.

The

sporules of

Lycopodium clavatum, and

of other species of Lycopodium.

Macis.

Mace.
arillus of the fruit of Myristica fragrans
Hist.).

The

(Houttuyn, Nat.

Magnesia Carbon as.

Carbonate of Magnesia.
forming a solution which
Dis-

A white
dissolved

substance in powder or pulverulent masses, wholly
dilute sulphuric acid,

by

does not afford a precipitate with oxalate of ammonia.
tilled

water which has been boiled with

it

does not change the

colour of turmeric, and yields no precipitate with chloride of

barium or

nitrate of silver.

Magxesi/E Sulphas.
to the air,

Sidpliate of Magnesia.

In colourless crystals, which slowly effloresce on exposure

and are very soluble in water.

The

solution

is

not

coloured nor precipitated by ferrocyanide of potassium, and
gives off no muriatic acid

upon the addition of sulphuric
salt,

acid.

One hundred grains
with
pose

of the

dissolved in water, and

mixed

sufficient boiling solution of
it

carbonate of soda to decom-

completely, yield a precipitate of carbonate of magnesia,

which,

when washed and

dried,

weighs thirty-four grains.

Manganesii Oxidum Nigrum.
Manganese.

Blach

Oxide of

Native impure deutoxide of manganese in
powder.
This Oxide should contain at least sixty-six per cent, of
deutoxide of manganese.

36

MATERIA MEDICA.
Sulphate of Manganese.

Manganesii Sulphas.
which,

In colourless, or pale rose-coloured, transparent crystals,

when

deposited from a solution at a temperature be86°,

tween G8° and

have the form of right rhombic prisms, and
This
salt is

contain four equivalents of water.

very soluble in

water.

The

solution

is

not disturbed by tincture of nutgall,

but affords with caustic alkalies a white precipitate, which
soon becomes brown by exposure to the
of
air.

Hydrosulphate

ammonia throws down a

flesh-coloured precipitate,

and

ferrocyanide of potassium, a white one.

Manna.
The

Manna.
concrete juice, in
flakes, of

Fraxinus

Ornus, and of Fraxinus rotundifolia.

Maranta.

Arroic-root.

The

fecula of the rhizoma of

Maranta arun-

dinacea.

Marmor.

Marble.

Native, Avhite, granuhir carbonate of lime.
Marble
is
;

wholly dissolved by dilute muriatic acid with

effervescence

and the

solution yields no precipitate with

am-

monia, or with an aqueous solution of sulphate of lime.

Marrubium.

Uoreliound.
of

The herb
Masticiie.

Marrubium

vulgare.

Mastic.

The
Matico.

concrete juice of Pistacia Lentiscus.
Matico.

The

leaves of Artanthe elongata {Miquel).

MATERIA MEDICA.
Matricaria.

87

German Chamomile,

The
Mel.

flowers of Matricaria Chamomilla.

Honey.

A

liquid prepared

by Apis

mellifica.

Mentha Piperita. Peppermint. The herb of Mentha piperita.

Mentha

Yiridis.

Spearmint.

The herb
Mezereum.

of

Mentha

viridis.

Mezereon.

The bark of Daphne Daphne Gnidium.
MoNARDA.
Horsemint.
of

Mezereum, and

of

The herb
MoscHus.

Monarda punctata.

MusTc.

A

peculiar concrete substance obtained from

Moschus moschiferus.
Myristica.

Nutmeg.
of the fruit of Myristica fragrans
Hist.).

The kernel

(Houttuyn, Nat.

Myrrha.

Myrrh.
concrete juice of Balsamodendron

The

Myrrha

(Nees, Beschreih. Officinal. Pflanzen).
6*

88

MATERIA MEDICA.
Nectandra,

NectandrA.

Syn. Bebeeru Bark.
^

The bark
Vomica.

of Nectandra Rodiei [Sclwmhurg)

Nux

Nux

Vomica.

The

seed of Strychnos

Nux

vomica.

Oleum Amygdalae Amarje.

Oil of Bitter

Almond.

The

oil

obtained by distilling with water the

kernels of the fruit of
variety

Amygdalus communis,

amara [De

Candolle).

Soluble in nitric acid at ordinary temperatures, "without the
evolution of nitrous acid fumes.
AVlien fifteen grains of

putassa are added to a solution of fifteen minims of the Oil in

two fluidrachms of
the potassa
is

alcohol,

and the mixture

is

heated until

dissolved,

and

the solution is reduced
its

by evap-

oration to about one-third of

original bulk, the resulting

liquid has a brownish-yellow colour,

and deposits no crystals

upon standing

for

an hour in a cool place.

Oleum Amygdala Dulcis.

Oil of Sweet

Almond.

Oleum Amygdalae, Pharm., 1850.

The

fixed oil obtained from the kernels of the

fruit of

Amygdalus communis, variety

dulcis

[De Candolle).

Oleum Bergamil

Oil of Bergamot.

The

volatile oil obtained

from the rind of the

fruit of Citrus

Limetta (De Candolle).

MATERIA MEDICA.
Oleum Bubulum.
Neats-foot Oil.

89

The

oil

prepared from the bones of Bos do-

mesticus.

Oleum Cajuputi.

Oil of Cajepiit.

The

volatile oil obtained

from the leaves of

Melaleuca Cajuputi (Roxburgh, Trans. Lond.
Medico-Bot. Society)

Oleum Camphorje.

Oil of
oil

Camphor.

The

volatile

obtained

from

Camphora

officinarum.

Oleum Cinnamomi.

Oil of Cinnamon.

Syn. Oil of Ceylon Cinnamon.

The

volatile oil

obtained from the bark of
(Nees, Laurin.).

Cinnamomum Zeylanicum
Oleum Llmonis.
Oil of Lemon.

The

volatile oil obtained

from the rind of the
Candolle)

fruit of Citrus

Limonum [De
Oil.

Oleum

Lini.
oil

Flaxseed

The

obtained from the seed of

Linum

usitatissimum.

Oj.EUM

MoRRHU^.

Cod-liver Oil.

The

fixed oil obtained from the liver of

Gadus

Morrhua, and of other species of Gadus.

40

MATERIA MEDICA.
MYRiSTiCyE.
Oil of Nutmeg.

Oleum

The

volatile oil obtained

from the kernels of
(Houttuyn,

the fruit of Myristica fragrans
'Nat Hist).

Oleum Olit^.

Olive Oil.

The

oil

obtained

from the

fruit

of

Olea

Europsea.

Oleum

Ricini.
oil

Castor Oih

The

obtained from the seed of Ricinus

communis.

Oleum Ros^.

Oil of Rose.

The
Rosa

volatile oil obtained
centifolia.

from the petals of

Oleum

Succini.

Oil of Amher.

The

volatile oil obtained

by the destructive

distillation of'

amber.
Oil of Turpentine.

Oleum TEREBiNTHiNiE.

The

volatile oil distilled

from the turpentine

of Pinus palustrisj and of other species of
Pinus.

Oleum Tiieobrom^.

Oil of Theohroma.

Syn. Butter of Cacao.

The concrete oil of Theobroma Cacao.

the kernels of the fruit of

MATERIA MEDICA.
Oleum Thymi.
Oil of

41

Thyme,
from

The
garis.

volatile oil obtained

Thymus

vul-

Oleu.m Tiglii.

Croton Oil.

The

oil

obtained from the seed of Croton

Tiglium.

Opium.

Opium.
concrete juice of the unripe capsules of

The

Papaver somniferum.
Opium should
yield at least seveu per cent, of morphia

by

the ofl&cinal process.

Os.

Bone.

Ovum.

Egg.
of Phasianus Gallus.

The egg
Papaver.

Poppy.
ripe capsules of

The
Pareira.

Papaver somniferum.

Pareira Brava.
root of Cissampelos Pareira.
Seed.

The
Pepo.

Pumpkin

The seed
Phosphorus.

of Cucurbita Pepo.

Phosplwrus.

a translucent, nearly colourless solid, resembling wax, without taste, but having a peculiar smell.
1'8.

Its specific gravity is

It is

extremely inflammable, and should be kept under

40

MATERIA MEDICA.
Oil of Nutmeg.

Oleum Myristic^.

The
the

volatile oil obtained
fruit

from the kernels of
(Houttuyn,

of

Myristica fragrans

Nat
Oleum

Hist.).

OLiViE.
oil

Olive Oil.

The

obtained

from the

fruit

of

Olea

Europsea.

Oleum

Ricini.
oil

Castor OiL

The

obtained from the seed of Ricinus

communis.

Oleum

RosiE.

Oil of Rose.

The
Rosa

volatile oil obtained
centifolia.

from the petals of

Oleum

Succini.

Oil of Amher,

The

volatile oil obtained

by the destructive

distillation of-

amber.
Oil of Turpentine.

Oleum

Terebintiiin.^.

The

volatile oil distilled

from the turpentine

of Pinus palustris; and of other species of
Pinus.

Oleum TiiEOBROMiE.
Sifn.

Oil of Theobroma.

Butter of Cacao.

The concrete oil of Theobroma Cacao.

the kernels of the fruit of

MATERIA MEDICA.
Oleum Thymi.
Oil of

41

Thyme.
from

The
garis.

volatile oil obtained

Thymus

vul-

Oleum Tiglil

Croton Oil.

The

oil

obtained from the seed of Croton

Tiglium.

Opium.

Opium.
the unripe capsules of

The concrete juice of Pap aver somniferum.
Opium should
the officinal process.

yield at least seveu per cent, of morphia

by

Os.

Bone.

Ovum.

Egg.
of Phasianus Gallus.

The egg
Papaver.

Poppy.
ripe capsules of

The
Pareira.

Papaver somniferum.

Pareira Brava.
root of Cissampelos Pareira.
Seed.

The
Pepo.

Pumpkin

The

seed of Cucurbita Pepo.

Phosphorus.

Phosphorus.

a translucent, nearly colourless solid, resembling wax, without taste, but having a peculiar smell.
1'8. It is

Its specific gravity is

extremely inflammable, and should be kept under

42

MATERIA MEDICA.
water, and protected from the light.
air
it

When

exposed to the

emits white fumes, which are luminous in the dark.

PiMENTA.

Pimento.
berries of

The unripe
CandoUe),
Piper.

Eugenia Pimenta {De

Black, Pepper.

The

berries of Piper nigrum.

Pix BuRGUNDiCA.

Burgundy

Pitch.

The prepared

concrete juice of Abies excelsa

(Lamarckj Encyc. Method.).

Pix Canadensis.

Canada

Pitch.

Syn. Hemlock Pitch.

The prepared

concrete juice of Abies Cana-

densis (Michaux^ N.

Am.

Sylva)

Pix Liquida.

Tar.

The impure

turpentine procured by burning
palustris,

from the wood of Pinus
species of Pinus.

and of other

Plumbi Acetas.

Acetate of Lead.

Syn. Sugar of Lead.
In colourless crystals, which effloresce on exposure to the
air.

It is dissolved

by

distilled water,

with a slight turbiddistilled vinegar.

ness,

which
its

is

removed by the addition of

With

solution, carbonate of soda produces a white, iodide

of potassium a yellow,

and hydrosulphuric acid a black

pre-

MATERIA MEDICA.
cipitate.

43
vapour
is

Upon

the addition of

sulphuric acid,

evolved having the smell of vinegar

Plumbi Caebonas.
Syn. White Lead.

Garhonate of Lead,

A
acid.

white substance, in povrder or pulverulent masses,

in-

soluble in water, but soluble with effervescence in dilute nitric

Potassa, added to the solution, produces a white pre-

cipitate,

which
it

is

wholly dissolved by an excess of the alkali.

Heat renders
it

yellow, and, with the aid of charcoal, reduces

to the metallic state.

Plumbi Nitras.
the
air,

Nitrate of Lead.

"

In white, nearly opaque, octohedral crystals, permanent in

and of a sweet, astringent

taste.

It is soluble in

seven

and a half parts of cold water, and in
precipitated black

alcohol.

Its solution is

by hydrosulphate of ammonia, white by ferro-

cyanide of potassium, and yellow by iodide of potassium. "When
triturated with sulphuric acid
it

forms a mixture, which colours

morphia

red, and,

on being heated, evolves nitrous fumes.

Plumbi Oxidum.
Syn. Litharge.

Oxide of Lead.

Plumbi Oxidum Semivitreum, PJiarm.^ 1850.

In small, yellowish or orange-coloured

scales, insoluble in

water, but almost wholly soluble with slight effervescence in
dilute nitric acid.

The

solution is affected

by potassa

like that

of carbonate of lead in the
it is

same
state.

acid.

Heated with charcoal

reduced to the metallic

Podophyllum.

May-apple.

The

rliizoma of

Podophyllum peltatum.
Bichromate of Potassa.

PoTASSiE BiCHROMAS.

U

MATERIA MEDICA.
In orange-red, anhydrous, tabular crystals, soluble in ten
parts of cold, and in
solution having

much

less of boiling water,

forming a
heat
it

an acid

reaction.

Exposed

to a red

evolves oxygen

;

neutral chromate of potassa and sesquioxide
left.

of

chromium being

When

the residue

is

acted on

by

water, the sesquioxide remains undissolved.

PoTASSJE BiTARTRAS.

Bltartvate of Potassa.

Syn. Cream of Tartar.
Bitartrate of Potassa
freely
is

dissolved sparingly

by water, but
it

by a hot

solution of potassa,
acid.
is

which deposits

again

upon the addition of an

Whatever remains undissolved
impurity.

by the

alkaline solution
its

The

precipitate prois

duced with

aqueous solution by chloride of barium
It

soluble in nitric acid.
is

reddens litmus, and by a red heat

converted into carbonate of potassa.

Potass^ Carbonas Impura.
Potassa.
Potassae Carbonas Impurus,

Impure Carbonate of
Pharm., 1850.
of potassa,
of
in

The impure carbonate commerce by the name
The soluble matter, contained
izes not less

known

in

j[)eaTlasli.

one hundred grains, neutral-

than

fifty-eight grains of officinal sulphuric acid.

PotasStE Ciiloras.

Chlorate of Potassa.
in distilled water.
silver.

In colourless, tabular crystals, which have a pearly lustre,

and are wholly soluble

The

solution yields

no precipitate with nitrate of
the salt
first
;

When
olF

strongly heated

melts,

and afterwards gives

abundance of puro
is

oxygen

the evolution of which having ceased, the residue

chloride of potassium.

When

a

little

sulphuric acid

is

dropped

on the

crystals, they

become

first

yellow and then red.

MATERIA MEDICA.
PotasStE Nitras.
Nitrate of Potassa.

45

In colourless, prismatic crystals, unalterable in the wholly soluble in water.

air, ajid

The

solution yields no precipitate
silver.

with chloride of barium or nitrate of
of platinum
the salt
it

"With bichloride

gives a yellow precipitate.

By

a strong heat

is first

melted and then decomposed, oxygen escaping,

and a

salt

remains which emits orange-coloured fumes on
If one

the addition of sulphuric acid.

hundred grains of

Nitrate of Potassa, previously dried, be mixed with sixty

grains of officinal sulphuric acid, and the mixture be kept at

a red heat until the

salt ceases to lose weight, the residue will

weigh eighty-six grains.

PoTASSiE Permanganas.

Permanganate of Potassa,
It is

In needle-shaped crystals, of a deep-purple colour.

soluble in sixteen parts of cold water, with the exception of a scanty,

brown matter.

A

very dilute solution has a rose
is

colour, free

from green tinge, and

instantly decolorized

by

the officinal solution of arsenite of potassa, with the formation
of a

brown

precipitate.

Potass^ Sulphas.
In hard, colourless
soluble in cold water,
is
it

Suljphate of Potassa.
crystals, unalterable in the air, sparingly

and insoluble

in alcohol.

The

solution

not precipitated

by ammonia.

With

bichloride of platinum

yields a yellow precipitate,

and with chloride of barium a

white one, insoluble in nitric acid.

PoTASSii Ferrocyanidum.
sium.
Potassii Ferrocjanuretunij

Ferrocyanide of Potas-

Pharm.^ 1850.

In crystals of a lemon-yellow colour, wholly soluble in
water.

The

solution yields with most of the salts of sesqv^^oxide

46

MATERIA MEDICA.
of iron a deep-blue precipitate, and with the salts of copper a

brown

one.

Exposed

to a gentle heat, it

becomes white, and

loses twelve

and a half per

cent, of water.

Prunum.

Prune.
dried fruit of Prunus doraestica.
Wild-cJierrij Baric,

The

Prunus Virginiana.

The bark
Quassia.

of Cerasus serotina {De Gandolle).

Quassia.

The wood
QuERCUS Alba.

of Simaruba excelsa [De CandoIIe).
White-oaJc Baric.

The bark

of Quercus alba.
Black-oalc Barh.
tirictoria.

QuERCUS TiNCTORiA.

The bark of Quercus
Kesina.
Resin.

The

residue after the distillation of the vola-

tile oil

from the turpentine of Pinus
species of Pinus.

palustris,

and of other

Rheum.

Rliuharb.
root of

The

Rheum palmatum, and
Pale Rose.

of other

species of

Rheum.

Rosa Centifolia.

The

petals of

Rosa

centifolia.

Rosa Gallic a.

Red

Rose.

The

petals of

Rosa Gallica.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Rosmarinus.
Rosemary.

47

The
RuBUS.

tops of Rosmarinus officinalis.

Elachherry Root.
root of

The

Rubus Canadensis, and of Rubus

villosus.

Sabadilla.

Cevadilla.

The
Sabixa.

seed of Yeratrum Sabadilla {Retzlus).
Savine.

The

tops of Juniperus Sabina.

Saccharum.

Sugar.
of Saccharum officinarum, refined.

The sugar

Sacch ARUM Lactis.

Sugar of MiUc.
from whey.
and the speand
dissolves

A

crystalline substanoe obtained
In hard, -white masses, having a sweet

taste,

cific

gravity 1*5.

It is gritty

between the

teeth,

slowly in six parts of cold and in three of boiling water, without forming a syrup.
soluble in alcohol.
It is insoluble in ether,

and but

slightly

Sago.

Sago.
fecula of the

The prepared

pith of Sagus

Rumphii, and of other species of Sagus.
Salvia.
Sage.

The

leaves of Salvia officinalis.

48

MATERIA MEDICA.
Elder.

Sambucus.

The

flowers of

Sambucus Canadensis.

Sanguinaria.

Eloodroot.

The rhizoma
Santalum.

of Sanguinaria Canadensis.

Red Saunders.
of Pterocarpus santalinus.

The wood
Santonica.

Santonica.

Syn, Levant Wormseed.

The unexpanded
Artemisia.
Sapo.
Soap.

flowers

and peduncles of
of

Artemisia Contra^ and of other species

Soap made with soda and olive
Sarsaparilla.
Sarsaparilla.

oil.

The

root of Smilax officinalis [Humboldt

and

Bonpland), and of other species of Smilax.

Sassafras Medulla.

Sassafras Pith.

The

pith of the stems of Sassafras officinale

(Nees, Laurin.).

Sassafras Radicis Cortex.
Moot.

Baric of Sassafras

The bark

of the root of Sassafras officinale

(Nees, Laurin.).

MATERIA MEDICA.
ScAMMONiUM.

49

Scammony.

The

concrete juice of the root of Convolvulus

Scammonia.
^Scammony
does not effervesce on the addition of dilute

muriatic acid, and the decoction, -when cold, does not assume

a blue colour on the addition of tincture of iodine.
solves at least seventy-five per cent, of
it
;

Ether

dis-

and,

when

the ether

has been evaporated, the residue, dissolved in a hot solution
of caustic potassa,
is

not precipitated by dilute sulphuric acid.

SciLLA.

Squill,

The bulb
ScoPARius.

of Scilla maritima.

Broom.

The
Senega.

tops of Cytisus Scoparius [De Gandolle),

Seneka.
root of Polygala Senega.

The
Senna.

Senna.
leaflets of

The

Cassia acutifolia [BeUle), of

Cassia obovata {Be GandoUe), and of Cassia

elongata (Lemaire, Journ. de PTiarm.

vii,

345).

Serpentaria.

Serpentaria.

Syn. Virginia Snakeroot.

The

root of Aristolochia Serpentaria, of Aris-

tolochia reticulata,
Aristolochia.

and of other species of

Sevum.

Suet.

The prepared

suet of Ovis Aries.
7*

50

MATERIA MEDICA.
White Mustard.
of Sinapis alba.

SiNAPis Alba.

The seed

SiNAPis Nigra.

Black Mustard.

The seed
SoD^ AcETAS.

of Smapis nigra.
Acetate of Soda.
effloresce in

In white or colourless crystals, which

dry

air,

and are wholly soluble
cipitate

in water.

The

solution yields no pre-

with carbonate of soda, bichloride of platinum, or
is

chloride of barium, and, if dilute,

not precipitated by nitiate
acid,

of silver.

The

salt is

decomposed by sulphuric

with the

production of an acetous odour.

SoD^ Boras.

Borate of Soda.

Syn. Borax.
In colourless crystals, which slightly
effloresce in

dry

air,

and are wholly
reaction.

soluble in water.

The

solution has

an alkaline

Sulphuric acid, added to the saturated solution,

causes a precipitate in crystalline scales, which impart a

green colour

to the

flame of alcohol.

SoDiE Carbonas.
the

Garhonate of Soda.
effloresce

In colourless crystals, which rapidly
to
air,

on exposure

and

fall into

a white powder.

It is

very soluble in

water, and insoluble in alcohol.
reaction,

The

solution has

an alkaline
acids.

and

is

decomposed with effervescence by
its

The

precipitate produced with
is

solution

by

chloride of barium

wholly soluble in

nitric acid.

SoD^ Sulphas.
to

Sul_phate of Soda.

In colourless crystals, which rapidly effloresce on exposure
the
air,

and ultimately

fall

into a white

powder.

It ia

wholly dissolved by water.

The

solution does not alter the

MATERIA MEDICA.
colour of litmus or turmeric.

51
it

AYith chloride of barium

yields a white precipitate insoluble in nitric acid.

A

dilute

solution affords little or no precipitate -with nitrate of silver.

One hundred grains of the

crystals lose fifty-five

and a half

grains by exposure to a strong heat.

SoD^

SuLPHis.
In white,

Sulphite of Soda.
effloresceirt,

prismatic crystals, soluble in four
It

parts of cold, and in less than one part of boiling water.

has a sulphurous

taste,

and a feeble alkaline

reaction.

Sul-

phuric acid, added to

its solution,

gives rise to the odour of

burning sulphur, without impairing the transparency of the
liquid.

The

salt

must be kept in well-stopped

bottles.

SoDn Chloridum.
Syn.

Clilorkle
Salt.

of Sodium,

Common
white
salt,

A

permanent

in the air,

and almost equally

soluble in cold
cipitate

and boiling water.

The

solution yields no pre-

with carbonate of soda, chloride of barium, or ferro-

cyanide of potassium.

Spigelia.

Spigelia.

Syn. Pinkroot.

The

root of Spigelia Marilandica.
Whislcy.

Spiritus Frumenti.
Spirit obtained
tillation,

from fermented grain by

dis-

and containing from forty-eight
per cent, of absolute alcohol.
for medicinal use, should
less

to

fifty-six

Whisky,

be free from disagreeable

odour, and not

than two years

old.

52

MATERIA MEDICA.
Spirit of Myrcia.

SriRiTUS Myrci^.
Syn. Bay-rum.

The

spirit

obtained by distilling

rum with

the

leaves of Myrcia acris {Scliwartz).

Spiritus Vini Gallici.

Brandy.

The

spirit

obtained from fermented grapes by

distillation^
fifty-six Brandy,

and containing from forty-eight

to

per cent, of absolute alcohol.
for

medicinal use, should be free from disagreeable

odour, and not less than four years old.

StATICE.

Marsh Rosemary.
root of Statice

The

Limonium, variety Caro-

liniana.

StilliNGIA.

Stlllingia,

The

root of Stillingia sylvatica.

Stramonii Folium.

Stramonium Leaf.

Stramonii Folia, Pharm., 1850.

The

leaves of Datura Stramonium.

Stramonii Semen.

Stramonium

Seed.

The
Styrax.

seed of Datura Stramonium.
Storax.

The prepared
{Lamarck)

juice of

Liquidambar orientale

MATERIA MEDICA.
Sulphur Lotum.
Waslied Sulphur.

53

Sublimed Sulphur, thoroughly washed with
water.
Washed Sulphur
is

wholly volatilized by heat, and,

wheu

moistened with water, does not change the colour of litmus.

Sulphur Subldiatum.
Sublimed Sulphur
is

Sublimed SulpJmr,

Sulphur, Pharm.^ 1850.
wholly volatilized by heat.

Syrupus Fuscus.

Molasses.

The impure, dark-coloured

syrup, obtained in
officinarum.

making sugar from Saccharum
Tabacum.
Tobacco.

The commercial
Tabacum.
Tamarindus.

dried

leaves of

Nicotiana

Tamarind.
fruit of

The preserved
Tapioca.
Tapioca.

Tamarindus Indica.

The

fecula of the root of Janipha

Manihot

{Bat Mag. 3071).

Taraxacum.

Dandelion.

The

root,

gathered in the autumn, of Taraxa-

cum

Dens-leonis [De GandoUe).
Turpentine.

Terebinthina.

The

concrete juice of Pinus palustris, and of

other species of Pinus.

54

MATERIA MEDICA.
Canada
Turpentine,

Terebinthina Canadensis.
Syn. Balsam of Fir.

The

juice of Abies balsamea (Lindley, Flor,

Med.),

Testa.

Oyster-sJielL

The

shell of Ostrea edulis.

Tragacantha.

Tragacanth.

The
vier) y

concrete juice of Astragalus verus [Oli-

and of other

species of Astragalus.

Ulmus Fulva.

Slippery-elm Baric.

Ulmus, PJiarm.^ 1850.

The

inner bark of
Raisins.

Ulmus

fulva [MlcJiaux).

UvA
Uya

Passa.

The

dried fruit of Vitis vinifera.

Ursi.

Uva

Ursi.

The
gel,

leaves of Arctostaphylos

Uva Ursi

(Spren-

Syst

ii.

287).

Valeriana.

Valerian.

The
Vanilla.

root of Valeriana officinalis.
Vanilla.

The

prepared, unripe capsules of Vanilla aro-

matica.

Veratrum Album.

White

Ilellchore.

The

rliizoma of

Veratrum album.

MATERIA MEDICA.
Yeratrum
'Yiride.

55

American

Hellebore.

The

rliizoina of

Yeratrum

viride.

YiNUM PoRTENSE.

Port Wine.
1850.

Yinum Rubrum, Pharm.,

YiNUM Xericum.
Yinum Album,
ZiNCi Sulphas.

Slierry Wine.
PJiarm., 1850.

Sulphate of Zinc.
effloresce

In colourless crystals, which
air.

on exposure

to the

It is soluble in water,

and the solution

affords white pre-

cipitates

with ammonia, chloride of barium, ferrocyanide of

potassium, and hydrosulphate of ammonia.

The

precipitate,

thrown down by ammonia,
the alkali.

is

wholly soluble in an excess of

ZiNCUM.

Zinc.
having the
specific gravity 6'8.
It is

A bluish-white metal,
colourless solution,

almost entirely dissolved by dilute sulphuric acid, forming a

which yields white precipitates with

ferro-

cyanide of potassium and hydrosulphate of ammonia.

Am-

monia throws down from
which
is

this solution a
is

white precipitate,

wholly dissolved when the alkali

added

in excess.

Zingiber.

Ginger.

The rhizoma

of Zmgiber officinale (Roscoe,

Trans. Linn. Soc).

56*

MATERIA MEDICA.

SECONDARY
Achillea.
Yarrow.

LIST.

The herb and
Aletris.

flowers of Achillea millefolium.

Star Grass.
root of Aletris farinosa.
Angelica.

The

Angelica.

The

root of Angelica Archangelica.

Apocynum Andros^emifolium.

Dogs-bane.

The

root of

Apocynum

androscemifolium.

Apocynum Cannabinum.

Indian Hemp.

The

root of

Apocynum cannabinum.
False Sarsaparilla.

Aralia Nudicaulis.

The

root of Aralia nudicaulis.

Aralia Spinosa.

Aralia Bark.

The bark
Arum.

of Aralia spinosa.

Indian Turnip.
of

The cormus
AsARUM.

Arum

triphyllum.

Wild
root of

Ginger.

The

Asarum Canadense.

ASCLEPIAS.

Batter -weed. fly

Asclepias Tuberosa, Pliarm., 1850.

The

root of Asclepias tuberosa.

MATERIA MEDICA.
AzEDARACH.
Azedavacli.

.

57

The bark
Berberis.

of the root of Melia Azedarach.

Barherry,
of the root of Berberis vulgaris.

The bark
Brayera.

IQ)osso.

The

flowers

and unripe

fruit of

Brayera

anthelmintica.

Calamus.

Calamus.
of Acorus Calamus.

The rhizoma
Carota.

Carrot Seed.
fruit of

The

Daucus Carota.

Carthamus.

Safflawer.

The

flowers of

Carthamus
'

tinctorius.

CoRNUS CiRCiNATA.

Round-leaved Dogwood.

The bark

of Cornus circinata.

CoRXUS Sericea.

Swamp

Dogiuood.

The bark
CoTULA.

of Cornus sericea.

May-iceed.

The herb

of Antheniis Cotula,

Maruta Cotula

(De Candolle).

Curcuma.

Turmeric.

The rhizoma

of

Curcuma

longa.

58*

^

MATERIA MEDICA.
Quince Seed.
of Cydonia vulgaris (Persoon, EncJur,

Cydonium.

The seed
ii.

40).

Cypripedium.

Cyprij)edium,

The

root of Cypripedium pubescens.

Delphinium.

Larkspur.

The

seed of Delphinium Consolida.

DiosPYROS.

Persimmon.
fruit of

The unripe
Dracontium.

Diospyros Yirginiana.

Dracontium.
of

The

root

Dracontium foetidum, Ictodes
Symplocarpus
foetidus

foetidus

[Bigeloio),
.

{Salishury)

EUONYMUS.

Walioo.

The bark

of

Euonymus

atropurpureus.

Euphorbia Corollata.

Large-flowering Spurge,

The

root of Euphorbia corollata.

Euphorbia Ipecacuanha.

Lpecacuanlia Spurge.

The
Frasera.

root of Euphorbia Ipecacuanha.

American Columho.
root of Frasera Walter! [Michaux).

The

Gelsemium.

Yellow Jasmine.

The

root of

Gelsemium sempervirens (Gray,

Manual of Botany).

MATERIA MEDICA.
Gentiana Catesb^i.
Blue Gentian,

59

The
Geum.

root of Gentiana Catesba3i {Elliot).

Water Avens.
root of

The

Geum

rivale.

GossYPii Radix.

Cotton Root.

The

root of

Gossypium herbaceum, and of

other species of Gossypium.

Helianthemum.

Frostwort.

The herb
cJiaux)

of

Helianthemum Canadense

[Ml-

Hepatic A.

Liverwort.

The
dolle)

leaves of Hepatica

Americana [De Can-

Heuchera.

Alum-root.

The

root of

Heuchera Americana.

Hydrastis.

Hijdrastis.

The
IxuLA.

root of Hydrastis Canadensis.

Elecampane.
root of Inula Helenium.
*

The

Iris Florextina.

Florentine Orris.

The rhizoma
Iris Yersicolor.

of Iris Florentina.

Blue Flag.
of Iris versicolor.

The rhizoma

60

MATERIA MEDICA.
Red
Cedar.

JuNiPERUS YiRGiNiANA.

The
Lappa.

tops of Juniperus Yirginiana.

Burdock.
root of

The

Lappa minor (De
Tulip-tree

Candolle),

LiRiODENDRON.

Barh.

The bark
Lycopus.

of Liriodendron tulipifera.

Bugle-weed.
of Lycopus Yirginicus (Michaux).

The herb
Magnolia.

Magnolia.
of Magnolia ghauca, Magnolia acu-

The bark

minata, and Magnolia tripetala.

Melissa.

Balm.
of Melissa officinalis.

The herb
MucuNA.

Cowliage.

The

hairs of the pods of

Mucuna

pruriens {De

Gandolle)

Oleum Sesami.

Benne

Oil.

The
of

oil

of the seed of
orientale.

Sesamum Indicum, and

Sesamum

Panax.

Ginseng.
root of

The

Panax quinquefolium.
Parsley Root.

Petroselinum.

The

root of Petroselinum sativum (Lindley,

Flor. Med.).

MATERIA MEDICA.
PhytolACCJE Bacca.

61

Poke Berry.

Phytolaccse Baccae, Pharm., 1850.

The

berries of Phytolacca decandra.

Phytolacca Radix.

Poke Boot.

The

root of Phytolacca decandra.
Bitter Pohjgala.

PoLTGALA Rubella.

The
Prinos.

root

and herb of Polygala

rubella.

Black Alder.
of Prinos verticillatus.
PeUitory.

The bark
Pyrethrum.

The
dolle)

root of Anacyclus
.

Pyrethrum (Be Can-

Ranunculus.

Crowfoot.

The cormus and herb

of Ranunculus bulbosus.

Rhus Glabrum.

Sumach.

The

fruit of

Rhus glabrum.

RoTTLERA.

Kameela.
hairs obtained from the cap.

The powder and

sules of Rottlera tinctoria (EoxhurgJi)

RUBIA.

Madder.
root of Rubia tinctorum.

The
RuMEX.

Yellow Dock.
root of

The

Rumex

trispus.

62

MATERIA MEDICA.
Rue.
leaves of

RuTA.

The
S ABB ATI A.

Ruta graveolens.

^

Sabhatia,

Syn. American Centaury.

The herb
Amer.
Salix.

of Sabbatia angularis (Pursh; Flor,

Sept.),

Willow.
of Salix alba.
Scullcap.

The bark
Scutellaria.

The herb

of Scutellaria lateriflora.

Sesami Folium.

Benne Leaf.

^esami Folia, Pliarm.^ 1850.

The

leaves of

Sesamum Indicum, and
^

of Sesa-

mum
SiMARUBA.

orientale.

Simaruha.
of
the.,

The bark

root of Simaruba officinalis

{De Candolle).
SoLiDAGO.
Golden-rod.

The
Spiraea.

leaves of Solidago odora.

Hardhach.
root of Spiraea tomentosa.

The

Tanacetum.

Tansy.
of

The herb

Tanacetum

vulgare.

MATERIA MEDICA.
ToRMENTiLLA.
Tormentil.

63

The
dolle)

root of Potentilla Tormentilla {De Can.

Toxicodendron.

Poison-oah.

The

leaves of

Rhus Toxicodendron.
.

Triosteum.

Fever-root.

The
Viola.

root of Triosteum perfoliatum.
Yiolet

The herb

of Viola pedata.
Yelloio-root.

Xanthorrhiza.

The

root of Xanthorrhiza apiifolia.

Xanthoxylum.

Prichly Ash.
of

The bark

Xanthoxylum fraxineum.

PREPARATIONS.

A C E T A.
ACETUM
COLCHICI.

Vinegar of Golcliicmn.

Take of Colchicum Koot;
troy ounces

in fine powder,

two

Diluted Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Acetic Acid, allow
it to

stand for half an hour,

pack

it

firmly in a conical glass percolator, and
it

gradually pour upon

Diluted Acetic Acid until

the filtered liquid measures two pints.

Vinegar of Colchicum

may

also be prepared

by

macerating the Colchicum Root, in moderately
fine

powder, with two pints of Diluted Acetic
;

Acid, in a close glass vessel, for seven days

then

expressing the liquid, and filtering through paper.
65

66

ACETA.
AcETUM Destillatum.

^

Distilled Vinegar.

Take of Vinegar
Distil,

eight pints.
glass

by means of a sand-bath, from a
Vinegar

retort into a glass receiver, seven pints.
Distilled

may

be substituted for Diluted

Acetic Acid in the preparation of the officinal
vinegars.
Distilled

Vinegar

is

wholly volatilized by heat, yields no precipitate
silver,

with acetate of lead or nitrate of

and does not change colour
or

upon the addition of hydrosulphuric acid
digested in
it,

ammonia.

If silver be

and muriatic acid afterwards added, no precipitate

will be produced.

One hundred grains saturate not

less

than seven

and six-tenths grains of bicarbonate of potassa.

AcETUM Lobelia.
Vinegar of Lobelia.

Take

of Lobelia, in moderately coarse powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Acetic Acid, pack
glass percolator,
it

firmly in a conical
it

and gradually pour upon

Diluted

Acetic Acid until the filtered liquid measures two
pints.

Vinegar of Lobelia

may

also be

prepared by

ACETA.

67

macerating the powder in two pints of Diluted
Acetic Acid for seven days, expressing the liquid,
«

and

filtering

through paper.

AcETUM

Opii.

Vinegar of Opium.
Black Drop.

Take of Opium,

dried,

and in moderately coarse

powder, five troyounces

Nutmeg,

in moderately coarse powder,

a troyounce
Saffron, in moderately coarse powder,

one hundred and

fifty

grains

Sugar eight troyounces
Diluted Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Macerate the Opium, Nutmeg, and Saffron with
a pint of Diluted Acetic Acid for twenty-four
hours.
colator,

Put the mixture
becomes

into a conical glass perfirst

and return the liquid which
clear.

passes

until the filtrate

Then gradually
filtered

pour on Diluted Acetic Acid until the
liquid measures twenty-six fluidounces.

In this

dissolve the Sugar, and, having strained the solution,

add

sufficient Diluted Acetic

Acid

to

make

the whole measure two pints.

68

ACETA.
ACETUM SaNGUINARI^.
Vinegar of Bloodroot.

Take of Bloodroot^

in moderately coarse pow-

der, four troy ounces

Diluted Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Acetic Acid, pack
glass percolator,
it

firmly in a conical
it

and gradually pour upon

Di-

luted Acetic Acid until the filtered liquid measures

two

pints.

Vinegar of Bloodroot

may

also be prepared

by

macerating the powder with two pints of Diluted
Acetic Acid for seven days, expressing the liquid,

and

filtering

through paper.

ACETUM
Take of

SciLLiE.

Vinegar of Squill.
Squill, in

moderately coarse powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Acetic Acid, pack
it

in a conical glass percolator,
it

and gradually pour upon
until the filtered liquid

Diluted Acetic Acid

measures two pints.

ACIDA.
Vinegar of Squill

69

may also

be prepared by mace-

rating the Squill with

two pints of Diluted Acetic

Acid

for seven

days, expressing the liquid, and

filtering

through paper.

ACIDA.
ACIDUM ACETICUM DiLUTUM.
Diluted Acetic Acid,

Take

of Acetic Acid a pint
Distilled

Water seven

pints.

Mix them.
Diluted Acetic Acid has the specific gravity 1*006
;

and one hun-

dred grains of
of potassa.

it

saturate seven

and six-tenths grains of bicarbonate
in the

It is affected

by reagents

same manner as Acetic

Acid.

(See

Acidum Aceticum.)

AciDUM Benzoicum.
Benzoic Acid.

Take of Benzoin,

in coarse powder, twelve troy-

ounces.

Spread the Benzoin evenly over the bottom of

an iron dish eight inches

in diameter, cover the

dish with a piece of filtering paper, and, by

means

of paste, attach

it

closely to the rim.

Then, having

prepared a conical receiver or cap of thick, well-

70

ACIDA.

sized paper, of rather larger diameter than the
dish, invert
it

over the

Latter, so as to fit closely

around the rim.

Next apply heat by means
of

of a

sand-bath, or of the iron plate of a stove, until,

without

much empyreuma, vapours
rise.

Benzoic

Acid cease to

Lastly, separate the receiver

from time to time, and remove the Benzoic Acid
from
it

and the paper diaphragm, as long as the
to be deposited.
is

Acid continues

Benzoic Acid, thus obtained,
peculiar, agreeable odour,

in white feathery crystals, of a
taste.

and warm, acidulous

It is fusible,

wholly volatilizable

if

cautiously heated, sparingly soluble in cold
it

water, more soluble in boiling water, which deposits
cooling,

in part

on

and very soluble in

alcohol.

It is dissolved

by

solutions of

potassa, soda,
it is

ammonia, and

lime, forming combinations
acid.

from which

precipitated

by muriatic

AciDUM Gallicum.
Gallic Acid.

Take

of Nutgall, in fine powder, thirty-six troy-

ounces
Purified
Distilled
tity.

;

Animal Charcoal,
Water, each, a
sufficient quan-

Mix
the
air,

the Nutgall with sufficient Distilled

Water

to form a thin paste,

and expose the mixture to

in a shallow, glass or porcelain vessel in a

ACIDA.

71
it

warm

plaxje, for

a month, occasionally stirring

with a glass rod, and adding from time to time
sufficient Distilled

Water

to preserve the semi-fluid

consistence.

Then submit

the paste to expression,

and, rejecting the expressed liquid, boil the residue
in eight pints of Distilled

Water

for a

few minutes,

and

filter

while hot through Purified Animal Char-

coal.

Set the liquid aside that crystals

may

form,

and dry them on bibulous paper.

If the crystals

be not sufficiently free from colour, they
purified

may

be

by dissolving them in boiling

Distilled

Water,

filtering

through a fresh portion of Purified
crystallizing.
a

Animal Charcoal, and again
Gallic

Acid

is

in small, silky, nearly colourless crystals, having
It is

slightly acid 'and astringent taste.

soluble in one

hundred

parts of cold,
litmus,

and

in three of boiling water.

The

solution reddens
gelatin,

and does not produce a precipitate with a solution of

or of sulphate of protoxide of iron.

With

solutions of the salts of

sesquioxide of iron,

it

occasions a bluish-black precipitate, the colour

of which disappears

when

the liquid

is

heated.

It is

decomposed by
iron.

a strong heat, and entirely dissipated when thrown on red-hot

AciDUM Hydriodicum Dilutum.
Diluted Htjdriodic Acid.

Take

of Iodine, in fine powder, a troyounce
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

thirty grains of the Iodine with five fluid-

72

ACIDA.
tall glass-stoppered

ounces of Distilled Water in a
bottle,

having the capacity of half a pint, and pass
until

into the mixture hydrosulphuric acid gas

the colour of the Iodine entirely disappears, and a
turbid liquid remains.

Detach the bottle from the

apparatus employed for introducing the gas, and
gradually add the remainder of the Iodine, stirring
at the

same time.

Then

reattach the bottle, and

again pass the gas until the liquid becomes colourless.
it is

Decant the liquid into a small matrass which
nearly sufficient to
fill,

boil it until it ceases

to emit the odour of hydrosulphuric acid,

and

filter

through paper.

Then pass sufficient Distilled Water
bring the filtered liquid to the
Lastly, keep the liquid

through the

filter to

measure of six fluidounces.
in a well-stopped bottle.

The hydrosulphuric
process,

acid gas, required in this

may

be obtained by mixing, in a suitable

apparatus, a troyounce and a half of Sulphuret of
Iron,

two troyounces of sulphuric

acid,

and

six

fluidounces of water.
Diluted Ilydriodic Acid
is

a sour liquid, colourless when recently
It is

prepared, and having the specific p;ravity 1-112.
tilized

wholly volaacids,
air, it

by

heat,

and

is

decomposed by

nitric

and sulphuric

with the liberation of iodine.

When

kept in contact with the

gradually becomes brown, and acquires an iodine odour.

ACIDA.
AciDUM Hydrocyanicum Dilutum.
Diluted HydroQijanic Acid,

73

Take

of Ferrocyanide of Potassium two troy-

ounces

;

Sulphuric Acid a troy ounce and a half;
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acid with four fluidounces of Distilled
cool, into

Water, and j^our the mixture, when
glass retort.

a

To

this

add the Ferrocyanide of

Potassium, dissolved in ten fluidounces of Distilled

Water.

Pour eight fluidounces of

Distilled

Water

into a cooled receiver, and, having attached this
to the retort, distil,

by means of a sand-bath, with
Lastly,

a moderate heat, six fluidounces.

add

to

the product five fluidounces of Distilled Water, or
as

much

as

may

be sufficient to render the Diluted

Hydrocyanic Acid of such a strength, that twelve

and seven-tenths* grains of
solved in distilled water,

nitrate of silver, dis-

may
Acid,

be accurately satu-

rated by one hundred grains of the Acid.

Diluted Hydrocyanic

when wanted

for

immediate

use,

may

be prepared in the following

manner.

Take

of Cyanide of Silver fifty grains

and a half;

Muriatic Acid forty-one grains
Distilled

Water a

fluidounce.

74

ACIDA.

Mix

the Muriatic Acid with the Distilled Water,
Silver,

add the Cyanide of

and shake the whole

together in a well-stopped vial.
cipitate
liquid,

When

the preclear

formed has subsided, pour
it for

off the

and keep

use.

Diluted

Hydrocyanic Acid must be kept in

well-stopped bottles, protected from the light.

A colourless liquid, having a peculiar odour, and -wholly volatilized
by
heat.
It

imparts a faint, evanescent red colour to litmus, and

is

not discoloured by hydrosulphuric acid.

With

solution of nitrate
it

of silver, added in slight excess, one hundred grains of

produce a

white precipitate, which, when washed with water until the washings
are tasteless, and dried at a temperature not exceeding 212°, weighs ten grains, and
is

wholly soluble in boiling nitric acid.
to the

The Diluted Acid, prepared according
tains

above processes, con-

two per

cent, of

anhydrous

acid.

ACIDUM MURIATICUM DiLUTUM.
Diluted Muriatic Acid.

Take of Muriatic Acid
Distilled

four troyounces
sufficient quantity.

Water a

Mix

the Acid, in a glass vessel, with sufficient

Distilled

Water

to

make

the Diluted Acid mea-

sure a pint.
The
specific gravity of Diluted

Muriatic Acid

is

1"038.

ACIDA.
ACIDUM NiTRICUM DiLUTUM.
Diluted Nitric Acid.

75

Take of

Nitric Acid three troyounces
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix
a pint.
The

the Acid, in a glass vessel, with sufficient

Distilled

Water

to

make

tlie

Diluted Acid measure

specific gravity of Diluted Nitric

Acid

is

1'068.

ACIDUM NiTROMURIATICUM.
Nitromurlatic Acid.

Take

of Nitric Acid three trovounces

Muriatic Acid five troyounces.

Mix

the Acids in a glass vessel, and,

when

effi^n^-

vescence has ceased, keep the product in a well-

stopped bottle, in a cool place, protected from the
light.

A
by

liquid,

having a deep golden-yellow colour, and the odour of
gold-leaf,

chlorine.
heat.

It readily dissolves

and

is

wholly volatilized

ACIDUM NiTROMURIATICUM DiLUTUM.
Diluted Nitromuriatic Acid.

Take of

Nitric Acid a troy ounce

and a half;

Muriatic Acid two troyounces and a
halfDistilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

^6

ACIDA.

Mix

the Acids in a well-stopped bottle, having

the capacity of a pint.

Shake theni together occaand then add
the
it

sionally during twenty-four hours,
sufficient

Distilled

Water

to

make

Diluted

x\cid

measure a

pint.

Lastly, keep
light.

in a cool

place, protected

from the

AciDUM Phosphortcum Dilutum.
Diluted Phosphoric Acid.

Take

of Phosphorus three

hundred and sixty

grains
Nitric Acid five troj^ounces, or a
cient quantity
Distilled
suffi-

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

five

troyounces of Nitric Acid with half a

pint of Distilled Water, in a porcelain capsule, of

the capacity of two pints.

Add

the Phosphorus,

and invert over

it

a glass funnel of such dimen-

sions that its rim

may

rest

on the inside of the
Place the

capsule, near the surface of the liquid.

capsule

on

a sand-bath, and apply a moderate
is

heat until the Phosphorus

dissolved,

and red

vapours cease to
violent,

arise.

If the reaction

become too
if

add a

little Distilled

Water; and,

the

red vapours cease to be evolved before the Phos-

phorus

is all

dissolved, gradually

add Nitric Acid,

ACIDA.

77

diluted to the same extent as before with Distilled

Water^ until the solution

is effected.

Then,

removing the funnel, continue the heat until the
excess of nitric acid
liquid, free
is

driven

off,

and a syrupy

from odour and weighing two ounces,
Lastl}^,

remains.

mix

this,

cient Distilled

Water
filter

to

when cold, with suffimake it measure twenty

fluidounces,

and

through paper.

Diluted Phosphoric Acid

may

also be prepared

by

dissolving a troyounce of Glacial
Distilled

Phosphoric

Acid in three fluidounces of

Water, add-

ing to the solution forty grains of Nitric Acid,
boiling
it

until reduced to a syrupj' liquid, free
nitric acid,

from the odour of
sufficient

and then adding
the

Distilled

Water

to

make

Diluted

Acid measure twelve fluidounces and a

half.
It is

A colourless,
either
is

inodorous liquid, of the specific gravity 1"05G.

not precipitated by chloride of barium or nitrate of silver, wlien

added

in small proportion.
is

It

has no action on pure silver

or copper, and

not discoloured by hydrosulphuric acid, added

before or after contact with either of these metals.

One bundled

grains of

it

are saturated by twenty-three and four-tenths' grains of
is

bicarbonate of potassa, and no precipitate

produced.

78

ACIDA.
ACIDUM SULPHURICUM ArOMATICUxM.
Aromatic Sulphuric Acid.
Elixir of Vitriol.

Take of Sulphuric Acid
Cinnamon,

six troyounces

Ginger, in coarse powder, a troyounce
in

coarse
5

powder, a troy-

ounce and a half

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Add

the Acid gradually to a pint of Alcohol,
to cool.

and allow the liquid

Mix

the Ginger and

Cinnamon, and, having put them into a percolator,

pour Alcohol gradually upon them until a
tincture
is

pint of

obtained.

Lastly,

mix

the

diluted acid and the tincture.

ACIDUM SULPHURICUM DiLUTUM.
Diliifed Sulphuric Acid.

Take of Sulphuric Acid two troyounces Distilled Water a sufficient quantity.

Add

the Acid gradually to fourteen fluidounces

of Distilled Water, and

mix them.

Then
Diluted

filter

through paper, and pass through
the
filter

sufficient Distilled

Water
Acid

to

make

the

measure a
The

pint.

specific gravity of this acid is 1"082.

ACIDA.
ACIDUM SULPIIUROSUM.
Sulphurous Acid.

79

Take

of Sulphuric Acid eight troyounces

Charcoal,

in

coarse

powder, a troy-

ounce
Distilled

;

Water

thirty-six fluidounces.

Pour the Acid upon the Charcoal, previously
introduced into
gether.
bottle,

a matrass, and shake

them
glass

to-

Connect the

matrass with a washing
tube

and

this,

by means of a bent
it,

reaching nearly to the bottom of

with a two-

necked bottle containing the Distilled Water.

To

the other neck of this bottle attach another bent
tube, and let
it

dip slightly into a solution of car-

bonate of soda.

All the joints having been properly

luted, apply, heat to the matrass until gas ceases to

be evolved, preventing the temperature of the Distilled

Water from

rising,

by means of cold water
it.

applied to the bottle containing

Lastly, pour

the Sulphurous Acid into half-pint bottles, w^iich

must be well stopped, and kept in a cool place. A colourless liquid, having the odour of burning sulphur, and
is

a

sulphurous, sour, and somewhat astringent taste. Its specific gravity

about 1'035.

When

saturated with ammonia, and then treated
it

with an excess of chloride of barium,

should afford a clear or

nearly clear solution on the addition of muriatic acid in excess.

80

.

ACIDA.
AciDUM Tannicum.
Tannic Acid.

^

Take of Nutgall,

in fine powder,

Ether, eacli, a sufficient quantity.

Expose the Nutgall
twenty-four hours,

damp atmosphere for and then mix it with sufficient
to a

Ether, previously washed w^ith water, to form a
soft paste.

Set this aside, covered closely, for six

hours;

then, having

quickly enveloped
it

it

in

a

close canvas cloth, express

powerfully between

tinned plates, so as to obtain the liquid portion.

Reduce the resulting cake
with
of
its

to powder,

and mix

it

sufficient

Ether, shaken with one-sixteenth
soft paste,

bulk of water, to form again a

and

express as before.

Mix

the liquids, and expose
it

the mixture to spontaneous evaporation until

assumes a syrupy consistence
glass or tinned plates,

;

then spread
it

it

on

and dry

quickly in a dry-

ing closet.

Lastly,

remove the dry residue from
it

the plates with a spatula, and keep

in a w^ell-

stopped bottle.
Tannic Acid, thus obtained, has a yellowish-white colour, and
strongly astringent taste.
It is

decomposed and entirely dissipated
It
is

when thrown on
less 80 in alcohol

red-hot iron.

very soluble in water, and

and

ether.

Its solution

reddens litmus, and pro-

duces with solution of gelatin a white, flocculent precipitate, with
the salts of

sesquioxide of iron

a bluish-black

precipitate,

and

ACIDA.

81

with solutions of the alkaloids white precipitates, very soluble ia
acetic acid.

AciDUxM Valerianicum.
Valerianic Acid.

Take of Valerianate of Soda,
eight troyounces

in coarse

powder,

Sulphuric Acid,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

To

the Valerianate of Soda

add,

first,

three

fluidounces of Water, and then three troyounces

and a half of Sulphuric Acid.
roughly, and

Mix them
after

tho-

from the mixture,

standing,

separate the oily acid liquid which rises to the
surface.

Agitate this repeatedly with small por-

tions of Sulphuric
is

Acid until

its

specific gravity
it

reduced below 0*950.
distil

Then

introduce

into

a retort, and
distillate so

nearly to dryness, rejecting the
it

long as

has a specific gravity above

0'940, and keeping the remainder for use.

The
to the
lation.

rejected

portion

of

the

distillate,

after

agitation with Sulphuric Acid,
retort during

may

be returned
distil-

the

progress of the

Valerianic Acid

is

a colourless liquid, of an oily consistence, a

penetrating disagreeable odour,
gravity
is

and

caustic

taste.

Its

speciiic

0-933.

It is soluble in thirty parts of cold

water, and,

by

10

82

ACONITIA.
up about twenty
It

agitation with a small quantity of that liquid, takes

per cent, of

its

weight, without losing

its oily

consistence.

mixes

in all proportions with alcohol

and

ether.

A

solution of Valerianic

Acid in

fifty

parts of hot water, saturated with hydrated carbonate

of zinc, yields a liquid which,
parts

when

filtered,

and evaporated

to ten

and

cooled, afibrds white pearly crystals of valerianate of zinc.

The mother-water, drained from

these crystals, should not yield, by
in
is

further evaporation and cooling, a salt crystallizing
tables,

six-sided
to

and very soluble

in water.

When

the Acid

added

a

concentrated solution of acetate of copper, the transparency of the
solution
is

not disturbed.

ACONITIA.
ACONITIA.
Aconitia.

Take of Aconite Eoot,
Diluted

in moderately fine

pow-

der, forty-eight troyounces

Sulphuric Acid a fluidounce

and a half
Alcohol,

Stronger Water of
Stronger Ether,
Distilled
tity.

Ammonia,
quan-

Water, each, a

sufficient

Digest the powder in eight pints of Alcohol, in

a close vessel, at the temperature of 120°, for
twenty-four hours.

Introduce the mixture into a

ACONITIA.
cylindrical percolator,

83

and gradually pour Alcohol
have slowly

upon

it

until twenty-four pints of liquid
Distil
off the
is

passed.

alcohol from the filtered

liquid until this
pint.

reduced to the measure of a

Then add

to the concentrated liquid a pint

of Distilled Water, to wdiicli has been added the

Diluted

Sulphuric

Acid,

and

mix

thoroughly.
oil

Remove from
four

the liquid the fixed

and resin
it

which separate on standing, and evaporate
fluidounces.
it

to

When

the

liquid

has cooled,

pour
it,

into a glass-stoppered pint bottle,

and wash
fluid-

by

agitation

and decantation, wdth six

ounces of Stronger Ether, to remove the remainder
of the fixed
oil

and

resin.

Now
after

add Stronger

Water
mains

of

Ammonia

until,

agitation, it re-

in slight excess.

Next, treat the resulting

mixture with six fluidounces of Stronger Ether,
and, having closed the bottle, agitate briskly for a

few minutes.
separates
into

Allow the liquid
two
layers, the

to stand until it

lighter being

an

ethereal solution of Aconitia.
fully,

Decant

this care-

and

treat

what remains, twice

successively,

with the same quantity of Stronger Ether, decanting each time as before.
solutions in

Mix

the several ethereal

a porcelain

capsule,

and allow the

mixture

to

evaporate

spontaneously to dryness.

84

iETHEREA.
and keep

Lastly, reduce the dry residue to powder,
it

in a well-stopped bottle.
Aconitia, thus obtained,
is

a yellowish-white powder, without
taste,

smell,

and of a
It

bitter,

acrid

accompanied with a sense of

numbness.
ture, is

melts at a moderate heat, and, at a high tempera-

decomposed and entirely dissipated, yielding the smell of
It

ammonia.
fifty

requires one hundred and fifty parts of cold and
solution,

of

boiling water for

and

is

readily

dissolved

by

alcohol, ether,

and chloroform.
salts.

It neutralizes acids,

forming with

them uncrystallizable

^THEREA.
Ether.

Take

of Stronger Alcohol six pints

Sulphuric Acid thirty-six troyounces
Potassa three hundred and sixty grains;
Distilled

Water three

fluidounces.

To two

pints of the Alcohol, contained in a sixstir-

pint tubulated retort, gradually add the Acid,
ring constantly during the addition.

By means

of

a cork fitted to the tubulure, adapt a long funnel-

shaped tube, with the lower end draAvn out so as
to form a

narrow

orifice,

and reaching nearly

to

the bottom of the retort, and also a thermometer
tube, graduated from 2G0° to

300% with

its

bulb

JETIIEREA.
reaching to the middle of
the liquid.
it

85

Having
with a

placed the retort on a sand-bath, connect
Liebig's
receiver.

condenser, and this with

a well-cooled

Then

raise the heat quickly until the

liquid

boils,

and attains a temperature between

266° and 280°.

By means

of a flexible tube, con-

nected with the stop-cock of an elevated vessel
containing the remainder of the Alcohol, introduce
that liquid into the retort, through

the funnelthe quantity

shaped tube, in a continuous stream

;

supplied being so regulated, that the temperature
of the boiling liquid shall continue between the

degrees mentioned.

After

all

the Alcohol has been

added, proceed with the distillation until the temperature rises to 286°,

when

the process should be dis-

continued.

To

the distilled liquid add the Potassa,

previously dissolved in the Distilled Water, and

shake them occasionally together.

At

the end of

twenty -four hours, pour
introduce
distil
it

off the

supernatant liquid,

into a retort, and, with a gentle heat,

into a well-cooled receiver three pints, or

until the liquid attains the specific gravity 0*750.

Lastly, keep the Ether in a well-stopped bottle.
Ether
0'750.
is

a very inflammable liquid, having the specific gravity
air,

It

wholly evaporates in the

and does not redden litmus.
it

When

shaken with an equal bulk of water,
its

loses

from

one-fifth to

one-fourth of

volume.
10*

F6

iETHEREA.

^THER
Take
of Ether,

FORTIOR.

Stronger Ether.

Water, each, three pmts,
Chloride of Calcium, in fine powder,

Lime, in

fine

powder, each, a troyounce.

Shake the Ether and the Water thoroughly
together, and,

when

the

Water has

subsided, sepa-

rate the supernatant ether.

Agitate this well with

the Chloride of Calcium and the
stojDpcd bottle,

Lime

in a well-

and allow the mixture

to stand for

twenty-four hours.
retort, and,

Then decant

the ether into a

having adapted thereto a Liebig's con-

denser, distil a pint and a half of Stronger Ether
into a receiver refrigerated with
ice-cold water.

Lastly, keep the liquid in a well-stopped bottle.

By

continuing

the

distillation,

a portion of

weaker ether may be obtained.
Stronger Ether has a specific gravity not exceeding 0-728.
It is

extremely inflammable, and does not redden litmus.

Shaken with

an equal bulk of water,
volume.

it

loses

from one-tenth

to one-eighth of its
it

It boils actively in

a test-tube, half-filled with

and en-

closed in the hand, on the addition of small pieces of glass.

Half a

fluidounce of the liquid, evaporated from a porcelain plate by causing
it to

flow to and fro over the surface, yields a faintly aromatic odour
off,

as the last portions pass

and leaves the surface without

taste or

smell, but covered with a deposit of moisture.

^TPIEREA.
Chloroformum Purificatum.
Purified Chloroform.
Chloroformunij Pharm.^ 1850.

87

Take

of Commercial Chloroform one hundred

and two troyounces
Sulphuric Acid seventeen troyounces
Stronger Alcohol six fluidrachms

Carbonate of Potassa two troyounces.

Add

the Acid to the Chloroform, and shake
occasionally

them

together

during

twenty-four hours.

Separate the lighter liquid from the heavier, and

mix
ness,

it

with the Stronger Alcohol.

Then add

the

Carbonate of Potassa, previously heated to red-

and rubbed, while warm, into powder.

Agi-

tate the mixture thoroughly, and,

by means of a

water-bath, distil to dryness from a retort fur-

nished with a condenser.

Lastly, keep the dis-

tilled liquid in well-stopped bottles.
Purified Chloroform
is

a colourless, volatile liquid, not inflammable,
Its
It is

of a bland ethereal odour, and hot, aromatic, saccharine taste.
specific gravity varies

from 1*490

to 1"494.

It boils at 140°.

slightly soluble in water,

and freely

so in alcohol
officinal
is

and

in

ether.

When
hand

mixed with an equal volume of

sulphuric acid, in a
perceptible to the

bottle closed
at the

by a

glass stopper, no

warmth

moment
imparted

of mixing
to

;

and,

when

the liquids have been
for twenty-four hours,
to the to

allowed to separate, and

remain in contact

no colour
acid,

is

to either, or

but a faint yellowish tinge
If a small quantity be

which forms the

inferior layer.

added

8S
distilled water, it

^THEREA.
forms transparent globules under the water, with-

out assuming a milky appearance.

When

three or four fluidrachms

of the liquid are evaporated from a porcelain plate, by causing them
to flow to

and

fro over the surface, the last portions

have a slightly
;

aromatic odour, free from pungency and
is left

empyreuma

and the platd

covered with a film of moisture, without odour or taste.

Oleum ^thereum.
Ethereal Oil.

Take

of Stronger Alcohol

two pints

Sulphuric Acid sixty-one troyounces
Distilled

Water a fluidounce

Stronger Ether a sufficient quantity.

Add

the Acid slowly to the Alcohol,

mix them

thoroughly, and allow the mixture to stand for

twelve hours.

Decant the clear liquid from the
retort, of
fill

sediment into a tubulated

such capacity
it.

that the mixture shall nearly

Adapt a

thermometer tube

to the tubulure

by means of a
immersed in

cork, so that the bulb shall be deeply

the liquid, and, having attached a Liebig's condenser,
distil,

by means of a sand-bath,

at a

tempe-

rature

between 312° and 322°, until the liquid

ceases to

come

over, or until a black froth begins

to arise in the retort.

Separate the yellow ethereal

liquid from the distillate,

and expose

it for

twenty-

four hours, in a shallow capsule, to evaporate spon-

ALOE.
taneously.

89

Then
;

transfer the remaining liquid to

a wet
drained
tlie

filter
off,

and^

when
oil

the watery portion has

wash the

which

is

left,

while on
this

filter,

with the Distilled Water.
off,

When
filter,

also has drained

transfer the oil to a graduated

measure, by perforating the point of the

and

add to

it

an equal volume of Stronger Ether.
Oil,

The Ethereal
Ethereal
Oil,

obtained by this formula, mea-

sures about six fluidrachms.
thus prepared,
is

a transparent, nearly colourless,

volatile liquid, of a peculiar, aromatic, ethereal odour,

and sharp,

bitter taste.

It is neutral to litmus
specific gravity 0'91.

paper not previously moistened,

and has the

ALOE.
Aloe Purificata.
Purified Aloes.

Take of Socotrine Aloes twenty-four troyounces
Stronger Alcohol four fluidounces.

;

Heat the Aloes, by means of a water-bath,
it is

until

completely melted.

Then add

the Alcohol,

and, having stirred the mixture thoroughlj', strain
it

through a

fine sieve,

which has just been dipped

into boiling water.

Evaporate the strained mixstirring,

ture

by means of a water-bath, constantly

90

ALUMINIUM.
becomes
brittle

until a thread of the liquid
cooling.

on

Lastly, break the product

when
it

cold into

pieces of a convenient size,

and keep

in a well-

stopped bottle.
Purified Aloes
is

in brittle pieces, of a dull-brown or reddish-

brown
Aloes.

colour,

and having the peculiar aromatic odour of Socotrine
powdered, and subjected
to the action of alcohol,
it is

When

dissolved with the exception of a slight residue.

ALUMINIUM.
Alumen Exsiccatum.
Dried Alum.

Take

of Alum, in coarse powder, four troyounces.
it,

Expose

in a suitable vessel, to a temperature

not exceeding 450° until the residue weighs two
troyounces and one hundred and twenty grains;

then reduce

it

when

cold to fine powder.

Alumina Sulphas.
Sulphate of Alumina.

Take

of Sulphate of

Alumina and Ammonia,
Soda,
each,

Carbonate of
ounces
;

four

troy-

Sulphuric Acid

a troyounce and one
fifty

hundred and

grains

Water a

sufficient quantity.

AMMONIA.

91

Dissolve the salts separately, each in six fluid-

ounces of boiling Water, and pour the solution of
the Sulphate gradually into that of the Carbonate

then digest with a gentle heat until the evolution
of carbonic acid ceases.
precipitate formed,

Collect
it

upon a

filter

the

and wash

with water until

the washings are no longer affected by chloride
of barium.

Next, with the aid of heat, dissolve

the precipitate in the Sulphuric Acid, previously
diluted with half a pint of Water, and, having
filtered the solution,

evaporate

it

until a pellicle
to a water-bath,
stir-

begins to form.

Then remove
salt remains.

it

and continue the evaporation, with constant
ring, until a

dry

Lastly, preserve

this in a well-stopped bottle.

AMMONIA.
Ammonia Yalerianas.
Valerianate of

Ammonia.

Take

of Valerianic Acid four fluidounces.

From

a mixture, placed in a suitable

vessel,

of Muriate of

Ammonia,

in coarse powder,

and an

equal w^eight of Lime, previously slaked and in

powder, obtain gaseous ammonia, and cause
pass, first

it

to

through a bottle

filled

with pieces of

92

ANTIMONIUM.

Lime, and afterwards into the Valerianic Acid,
contained in a
tall,

narrow, glass vessel, until the

Acid
cess,

is

neutralized.

Then

discontinue the pro-

and

set the vessel aside that the Valerianate
crystallize.

of

Ammonia may

Lastly, break the

salt into pieces, drain it in a glass funnel,

dry

it

on bibulous paper, and keep
bottle.
Valerianate of

it

in a well-stopped

Ammonia

is

a white

salt

in

the form of quad-

rangular plates, having the disagreeable odour of valerianic acid,

and a sharp, sweetish
effloresces in a
It is

taste.
is

It

deliquesces

in a moist air, but

dry one, and

very soluble in water and in alcohol.

decomposed by potassa with evolution of ammonia, and by the
to

mineral acids with separation of the valerianic acid, which rises
the surface in the form of an
oil.

ANTIMONIUM.
Antimonii et Potass^ Tartras.
Tartrate of

Antimony and
Tartar Emetic.

Potassa.

Take of Oxide

of Antimony, in very fine powder,

two troyounces
Bitartratc of Potassa, in very fine
der,

pow-

two troyounces and a

half;

Distilled

Water eighteen

fluidounces.

To

the Water, heated to the boiling point in a

ANTIMONIUM.
glass vessel,
boil for

98

add the powders, previously mixed, and
;

an hour

then

filter

the liquid while hot,
Lastly, dry

and

set it aside that crystals

may form.

the crystals, and keep

them

in a well-stopped bottle.

By
be

further evaporation the mother-water
to yield

may

made
salt

more

crystals,

which should be

purified
This

by a second
is

crystallization.
become white and

in transparent crystals, -which
to the air.
It is

opaque on exposure
of water.
or, if

wholly soluble in twenty parts

The

solution yields no precipitate with chloride of barium,
silver.

very dilute, with nitrate of

Hydrosulphuric acid gas

causes an orange-red precipitate.
in forty of water, is not disturbed

A

solution, containing one part

by an equal volume of a

solution
fifteen

of eight parts of acetate of lead in thirty-two of water of acetic acid.

and

Antimonii Oxidum.
Oxide of Antimony,

Take of Sulphuret of Antimony,

in very fine

powder, four troyounces
Muriatic Acid eighteen troyounces
Nitric Acid a troyounce

and one hun-

dred and twenty grains

Water
Water,

of

Ammonia

a fluidounce and

a half;

Distilled
tity.

Water, each, a
11

sufficient

quan-

'/'

94

^

ANTIMONIUM.
flask,

Introduce the Sulphuret into a
capacity of

of the

two

pints,

and.

having added the

Muriatic Acid, digest, by means of a sand-bath,
until effervescence ceases.

Then, having removed

the flask from the sand-bath, add the Nitric Acid

gradually

;

and,
off,

when

nitrous acid vapours cease
liquid has

to be given

and the

grown

cold,

add

to it half a ]3int of

Water, and

filter.

Pour the

filtered liquid gradually into

twelve pints of Water,
precipitate to

constantly stirring, and allow the
subside.

Decant the supernatant

liquid,

and wash

the precipitate twice by decantation, using, each
time, eight pints of Water.

Then

transfer

it

to a
is

muslin

filter

to drain, and, after the
it

draining

completed, wash

with Water until the washings

cease to have an acid reaction.
into a suitable vessel,

Next introduce
it

it

and subject
for
it

to the action
;

of the

Water of Ammonia
and wash

two hours

at the

end of which time, transfer
filter,
it

to a

moistened muslin

with Distilled Water as long as

the washings produce a precipitate with nitrate of
silver.

Lastly, dry the precipitate

upon bibulous

paper with the aid of a gentle heat.
Oxide of Antimony
is

a grayish-white powder, insohible in water,
It

but readily and wholly soluble in muriatic and tartaric acids.
fuses at a dull-red heat, forming a yellowish liquid,

which concretes,
Its solution

on cooling,

into a crystalline

mass of a pearl-colour.

ANTIMONIUM.

95

in tartaric acid in excess gives no precipitate with nitrate of silver,

or with ferrocyanide of potassium.

Antimonii Oxysulphuretum.
Oxysvlpliuret of Antimony,
Kermes Mineral.

Take of Sulphuret of Antimony,
powder, a troyounce

in very fine

Carbonate of Soda twenty-three troyounces
;

Water sixteen

pints.

Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in the

Water

previously heated to the boiling point, and, having

added the Sulphuret of Antimony,

boil for

an hour.

Then

filter

rapidly into a

warm

earthen vessel,

cover this closely, and allow the liquid to cool
slowly.

At

the end of twenty-four hours, decant

the supernatant liquid, drain the precipitate on a
filter,

wash

it

with boiled water previously allowed

to

become

cold,

and dry

it

without heat.

Lastly,

preserve the powder in a well-stopped bottle, protected from the light.
Oxysulphuret of Antimony
Hoft
is

a purplish-brown, tasteless powder,

and velvety

to the touch,

wholly and readily soluble in muriatic

acid with evolution of hydrosulphuric acid gas, and partly soluble in

a hot solution of potassa, leaving a residue soluble in tartaric acid.

P^

96

ANTIMONIUM.
Antimonium Sulphuratum.
Sidpliurated Antimcniy.

Antimonii Sulpliuretum Prsecipitatum, Pharm.j 1850.

Take of Sulphuret of Antimony,
powder, six troyounces

in very fine

Solution of Potassa four pints
Distilled

Water,
suffi-

Diluted Sulphuric Acid, each, a
cient quantity.

Mix
and

the Sulphuret of

Antimony with the
Distilled
fire for

Solu-

tion of Potassa
boil the

and twelve pints of

Water,

mixture over a gentle

two

hours, constantly stirring, and occasionally adding
Distilled
sure.

Water

so as to preserve the

same mea-

Strain the liquid

immediately through a
it,

double muslin strainer, and drop into
hot, Diluted Sulphuric

while yet

Acid so long as

it

produces

a precipitate.

Then wash

the precipitate with hot
it,

water to remove the sulphate of potassa, dry

and rub
water.

it

into a fine powder.
is

Sulphurated Antimony

a reddish-brown powder, insoluble in
its

When

treated with twelve times
it is

weight of

officinal

mu-

riatic acid,

with the aid of heat,

nearly

all dissolved,

with

effer-

vescence of hydrosulphuric acid.

The residue, after having been

washed and
a scanty ash.

dried,

burns with the characters of sulphur, and leaves
solution in muriatic acid,

The

when added

to

water,

deposits a white powder.

The

liquid filtered from this

powder yields

AQU^.
an orange-red
precipitate with hydrosulphate of

97
ammonia.

Watef

in which the preparation has been boiled should not yield a white
precipitate with chloride of barium, or with oxalate of

ammonia.

AQU^.
Aqua
Acidi Carbonicl
Oarhonic Acid Water,

By means

of a proper

apparatus, impregnate

Water, contained in a suitable receiver, with a
quantity of carbonic acid, equal to five times the

bulk of the Water,
Carbonic
acid

may

be obtained

from

Bicar-

bonate of Soda or from Marble by means of dilute
sulphuric acid.
Carbonic Acid Water
solution of ammonia,
is

not discoloured

by hydrosulphuric acid

or

and yields no precipitate with sulphate of

sod&,,

or with ferrocyanide of potassium.

Aqua Ammonijs,
Watei' of

Ammonia,

Liquor Ammonine, Pharm., 1850.
Solution of Ammojiia.

Take
"

of Muriate of

Ammonia,

in small pieces,

Lime, each, twelve troyounces

Water

six pints

Distilled

Water a
11*

sufficient quantity.

100

AQU^.
Aqua
Chlorinii.

Chlorine Water.

Take

of Black Oxide of Manganese, in fine powder, half a troyounce

Muriatic Acid three troyounces

Water four fluidounces
Distilled

Water twenty

fluidounces.

Introduce the Oxide into a
previously diluted with

flask,

add the Acid

two fluidounces of the
Conduct the

Water, and apply a gentle heat.

generated chlorine, by suitable tubes, through the

remainder of the Water contained in a small
mediate
vessel, to the

inter-

bottom of a four-pint bottle

containing the Distilled Water, and loosely stopped

with cotton.

When

the air has been entirely dis-

placed by the gas, disconnect the bottle from the
apparatus, and, having inserted the stopper, agitate the contents, loosening the stopper

from time
absorbed.

to

time,

until

the

gas

ceases

to

be

Lastly, pour the Chlorine

Water
it,

into a bottle, of

just sufficient capacity to hold

stop

it

securely,
light.
suffo-

and keep

it

in a cool place, protected
is

from the

Chlorine Water

a greenish-yellow liquid, possessinf; the

cating odour of chlorine.

When

a fluidounce of

it is

mixed with a
two

solution of ten grains of pure sulphate of protoxide of iron in

jfluidrachms of water, the mixture does not produce a blue precipitate

with ferridcjanide of potassium (red prussiatc of potassa).

AQUiE.

101

Aqua Cinnamomi.
Cinnamon Water.
Take of
Oil of

Cinnamon half a fluidrachm
Water two

Carbonate of Magnesia sixty grains
Distilled
pints.

Rub
nesia,
filter

the Oil,

first

with the Carbonate of Mag-

then with the Water, gradually added, and

through paper.
also be prepared

Cinnamon Water may

by mix-

ing eighteen troyounces of Cinnamon, in coarse

powder, with sixteen pints of Water, and
eight pints.

distilling

Aqua

Creasoti.

Creasote Water.

Take of Creasote a fluidrachm
Distilled

Water a

pint.

Mix them, and
Creasote
is

agitate the mixture until

the

dissolved.

Aqua
Take
Distil

Destillata.

Distilled Water.

of

Water eighty

pints.

two

pints, using a tin or glass condenser,
;

and throw them away

then

distil sixty-four pints,

and keep them

in glass bottles.

/

102
Distilled

AQU^.
Water
is

colourless
It is

and inodorous, and when evaporated

leaves no residue.

not affected by lime-water, hydrosulphuric

acid, chloride of barium, nitrate of silver, or oxalate of

ammonia.

Aqua
Take

Fceniculi.

Fennel Water.
of Oil of Fennel half a fluidrachm

Carbonate of Magnesia sixty grains
Distilled

Water two

pints.

Rub
nesia,
filter

the Oil,

first

with the Carbonate of Mag-

then with the Water, gradually added, and

through paper.

Fennel Water

may

also be prepared

by mixing

eighteen troyounces of Fennel, in coarse powder,

with sixteen pints of Water, and
pints.

distilling eight

Aqua Mentha
Take

Piperita.

Peppermint Water.
of Oil of Peppermint half a fluidrachm

Carbonate of Magnesia sixty grains
Distilled

Water two

pints.

Rub
filter

the Oil,

first

with the Carbonate of Mag-

nesia, then with the

Water, gradually added, and
be prepared by

through paper.
also

Peppermint Water may

mixing eighteen troyounces of Peppermint with
sixteen pints of Water, and distilling eight pints.

AQU^.
Aqua Mentha
Take
Yiridis.

103

Spearmint Water.
of Oil of Spearmint half a fluidrachra;

Cai'bonate of Magnesia sixty grains
Distilled

Water two

pints.

Rub
nesia,
filter

the Oil, first with the Carbonate of

Mag-

then with the Water, gradually added, and

through paper.

Spearmint Water

may

also be prepared

by mix-

ing eighteen troyounces of Spearmint with sixteen
pints of Water,

and

distilling eight pints.

Aqua
Take

Ros.e.

Rose Water.
of Pale Rose forty-eight troyounces

Water sixteen

pints.

Mix them, and

distil

eight pints.

When

it is

desirable to keep the Rose for
it

some

time before

distilling,

may
its

be preserved

by

being well mixed with half
of sodium.

weight of chloride

104

ARGENTUM.

ARGENTUM.
Argenti Cyanidum.
Cyanide of
Silver.

Argenti Cjanuretum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Nitrate of

Silver,

Ferrocyanide of Potassium, each, two
troyounces
Sulphuric Acid a troyounce and a half;
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Nitrate of Silver in a pint of Distilled

Water, and pour the solution into a tubuDissolve the Ferrocyanide

lated glass receiver.

of Potassium in ten fluidounces of Distilled Water,

and pour the solution into a tubulated
viously adapted to the receiver.

retort, pre-

Having mixed

the Sulphuric Acid with four fluidounces of Distilled

Water, add the mixture to the solution in
distil,

the retort, and

by means of a sand-bath,

with a moderate heat, until six fluidounces have
passed over, or until the distillate no longer pro-

duces a precipitate in the receiver.

Lastly,

wash
it.

the precipitate with Distilled Water, and dry
Cyanide of Silver
nitric acid,
it is

is

a white powder, insoluble in water and in cold

but soluble in that acid at the boiling temperature.

When

exj)osod to heat,

cyanogen

is

given

off,

and metallic

silver left.

ARGENTUM.
Argenti Nitras.
Nitrate of Silver,

105

Take

of Silver, in small pieces,
Nitric
half;
Distilled

two troyoimces
and
a

Acid

two

troyounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix
Water

the Acid with a fluidounce of Distilled
in a porcelain
it

capsule, add the Silver to

the mixture, cover
nel, resting

with an inverted glass fun-

within the edge of the capsule, and
is

apply a gentle heat until the metal

dissolved,
re-

and red vapours cease

to be

produced; then

move

the funnel, and, increasing the heat, evap-

orate the solution to dryness.

Melt the dry mass,
with a

and continue the heat,

stirring constantly
is

glass rod, until free nitric acid

entirely dissi-

pated.

Dissolve the melted

salt,

when

cold, in

six fluidounces of Distilled Water, allow the in-

soluble
solution.
Distilled

matter to subside, and decant the clear

Mix
Water,

the residue with a fluidounce of
filter

through paper, and, having
the decanted solution, evap-

added the

filtrate to

orate the liquid until a pellicle begins to form,
set it aside in a

and

warm

place to crystallize.

Lastly,

drain the crystals in a glass funnel until dry, and
preser^'e

them

in a well-stopped bottle.
12

106'

ARGENTUM.
the mother- water, more crystals

By evaporating may be obtained.
Nitrate of Silver
is

a heavy, colourless, anhydrous

salt,

wholly
Its

soluble in distilled water, and crystallizing in shining plates.
solution, treated
cipitate,

with muriatic acid in excess, yields a white pre;

wholly soluble in ammonia
is

and the

liquid, filtered

from

the precipitate,

not coloured by hydrosulphuric acid, and,

when

evaporated, leaves no residue.

Argenti Nitras Fusa.
Fused Nitrate of Silver.
Argenti Nitras Fusus, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Nitrate of
Melt
it

Silver a convenient quantity.

in a porcelain capsule,

and continue the

heat cautiously until frothing ceases; then pour
the melted salt into suitable silver moulds.

A small

portion of Fused Nitrate of Silver, rubbed into fine powits

der with twice

weight of sugar, forms a mixture, which, when
tasteless residue.

burned upon a surface of glass or porcelain, leaves a

When

treated with muriatic acid, as directed in the note to Nitrate
is

of Silver, the liquid, filtered from the precipitate formed,

totally

evaporated by heat.

Argenti Oxidum.
Oxide of Silver.

Take

of Nitrate of Silver four troyounces
Distilled

Water half a

pint

Solution of Potassa a pint and a half,
or a sufficient quantity*

ARSENICUM.

107

Dissolve the Nitrate of Silver in the Water, and
to the solution
it

add Solution of Potassa

so long as

produces a precipitate.

Wash

this repeatedly

with water until the washings are nearly tasteless.

Lastly, dry the precipitate, and keep

it

in

a well-stopped bottle, protected from the
Oxide of Silver
water.
left.
is

light.

an olive-brown powder, very
heat
it

slightly soluble in
silver is

Exposed

to

gives out oxygen,

and metallic
the solution
is

When

it is

dissolved in nitric acid, and

precipiis

tated

by chloride of sodium

in excess, the supernatant liquid

not

discoloured

by hydrosulphate of ammonia.

ARSENICUM.
Arsenici Iodidum.
Iodide of Arsenic.

Take

of Arsenic sixty grains

Iodine three hundred grains.

Rub
fine

the Arsenic in a mortar until reduced to a
;

powder

then add the Iodine, and rub them

together until they are thoroughly mixed.

Put

the mixture
loosely

into

a small

flask
it

or a test-tube,

stopped,

and heat

very gently until

liquefaction occurs.

Then

incline the vessel in

different directions, in order that

any portion of
it-s

the

Iodine,

which may have condensed on

108
surface,

ATROPIA.

may

be returned into the melted mass.

Lastly, pour the melted Iodide on a porcelain slab,

and,
it in

when

it is cold,

break

it

into pieces,

and keep

a well-stopped bottle.
is

Iodide of Arsenic
soluble in water,

an orange-red, crystalline
volatilized

solid,

entirely

and wholly

by

beat.

ATROPIA.
Atropia.
Atropia.

Take

of Belladonna Root, in fine powder, forty-

eight troyounces
Purified

Chloroform

four

troyounces

and a half;
Diluted Sulphuric Acid,
Solution of Potassa,

Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powder with a pint of Alcohol, and,

having introduced the mixture into a cylindrical
percolator, pour Alcohol gradually

upon

it

until

sixteen pints have passed.
obtained, distil
off*

From

the liquid, thus

twelve pints of alcohol.

To the

residue add sufficient Diluted Sulphuric Acid to

ATROPIA.
give
it

100

an acid reaction, and, having evaporated

the liquid to half a pint, add an equal bulk of

Water, and

filter

through paper.

To

the filtered

liquid add, first a troyounce

and a half of the

Chloroform, and then Solution of Potassa in slight
excess,

and shake the whole together,
an hour.

at intervals,

for half

When
it,

the heavier liquid has

subsided, separate

and, having added a troy-

ounce and a half of the Chloroform to the lighter
liquid, again

shake them together, and separate
lighter

the

heavier from the

liquid

as

before.

Add

to this lighter liquid

the remainder of the
separate

Chloroform,

and,

after

agitation,

the

heavier liquid for the third time.
liquids in a capsule,
until,

Mix

the heavier
aside
is

and

set

the mixture

by spontaneous evaporation, the Atropia
in

left dry.
Atropia, thus prepared,
crystals,
is

yellowish-white,

silky,

prismatic

without smell, but having a bitter and acrid
melts,

taste.

When

heated

it first

and afterwards, on increasing the
It is soluble in three

heat, is partly

volatilized

unchanged.

hundred parts of water
less alcohol.
salts

at 60°, in twenty-five parts of ether,

and in much

It

has

a strong alkaline reaction, and forms crystallizable
Atropia and
its salts

with acids.

are decomposed and rendered inert

by prolonged

contact with caustic potassa, and, if heated with that alkali, evolve

ammonia.

When

applied in

weak
12*

solution, they powerfully dilate

the pupil of the eve.

110

BARIUM.
Atropi^ Sulphas.
Sulphate of Atropia.

Take

of Atropia sixty grains

Stronger Ether four fluidounces and a
half;

Sulphuric Acid six grains
Stronger Alcohol a
flui drachm.

Dissolve the Atropia in the Ether;

then mix

the Acid and Alcohol, and add the mixture, drop

by
is

drop, to the ethereal solution until the Atropia
saturated.

Allow the liquid
is

to stand until the

precipitate formed
ether,

deposited.

Then decant the
to

and

expose

the

residue
is left

spontaneous

evaporation until the salt
Sulphate of Atropia
is

dry.

a white, slightly crystalline powder, very

soluble in water and in alcohol, insoluble in ether, and wholly dis-

sipated
cipitate

by

heat.

It is neutral to

litmus,

and gives a white pre-

with chloride of barium.

BARIUM.
Barii Chloridum.
Chloride of Barium.

Take

of Carbonate of Baryta, in small pieces,

Muriatic Acid, each, four troyounces

Water a

pint.

BISMUTHUM.
Mix

Ill

the Acid with the Water, and gradually

add the Carbonate of Baryta.

Towards the

close

of the effervescence apply a gentle heat, and,

when

chemical action has ceased,
evaporate so that crystals
Chloride of
aflfocted
is

filter

the liquid, and
it cools.

may form when
acid.
is

Barium

is

wholly soluble in water.

Its solution is not

by ammonia or hydrosulphuric
excess,

When

sulphuric acid

added in

no further precipitate

produced by the addition

of carbonate of soda.

BISMUTHUM.
BiSMUTHI SUBCARBONAS.
Suhcarhonate of Bismuth.

Take of Bismuth,

in pieces,

two troj^ounces
and a
half;

Nitric Acid eight troy ounces

Water of Ammonia
Distilled

five fluidounces

Carbonate of Soda ten troyounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

four troyounces and a half of the Nitric

Acid with four fluidounces of Distilled Water in a
capacious glass vessel, and, having added the Bis-

muth,

set the

whole aside

for twenty-four hours.

Dilute the resulting solution with ten fluidounces
of Distilled Water, stir
it

thoroughly, and, after

twenty-four hours,

filter

through paper.

To

the

filtered liquid, previously diluted

with four pints

112

BISMUTHUM.
Water of Am-

of Distilled Water^ slowly add the

monia, with constant

stirring.

Transfer the whole

to a strainer, and, after the precipitate has been

drained,

wash
again,

it

with two pints of Distilled Water,
as

drain

it

and press out

much

of the liquid

as possible.
vessel,

Then

place the precipitate in a proper

add the remainder of the Nitric Acid, and

heat nearly to the boiling point.
tion has

When
it

the soluDistilled

become

cold,

slowly add to
stirring,

Water, with constant

until the further

addition of this liquid begins to produce a permanent
milkiness.

Then

set the solution aside, and, at the
filter

end of twenty-four hours,

through paper.

Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in twenty fluid-

ounces of Distilled Water, with the aid of heat, and
filter

the solution through paper.

To this, when cold,

slowly add the solution of nitrate of bismuth, with
constant stirring.

Transfer the whole to a strainer,

and, after the precipitate has been drained,

wash

it

with Distilled Water until the washings pass
less.

tasteit

Lastly, press the precipitate so as to free

as far as possible

from water, dry
it

it

on bibulous

paper with a gentle heat, and rub
Subcarbonate of Bismuth
is

into powder.

a white or yellowish-white powder,
effer-

without taste or smell, insoluble in water, but soluble, with
vescence, in dilute nitric acid.
loses nine

Upon being heated

to redness, it

and a half per

cent, of its weight.

When mixed

with

BISMUTHUM.
dilute sulphuric acid in excess,

113
to

and subjected

Marsh's

test,

it

yields no arsenic, or merely a trace.

BiSMUTHI SUBNITRAS.
Suhnitrate of Bismuth.

Take

of Bismuth, in pieces,
Nitric Acid,

two troyounces

Carbonate of
ounces
;

Soda,

each,

ten

troy-

Water of Ammonia
Distilled

six fluidounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

four troyounces and a half of the Nitric

Acid with four fluidounces of Distilled Water, in
a capacious glass vessel, and, having added the

Bismuth, set the
hours.

whole

aside

for

twenty-four

Dilute

the

resulting

solution
it

with ten

fluidounces of Distilled Water, stir

thoroughly,

and, at the end of twenty-four hours,
paper.

filter

through

Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in twenty fluid-

ounces of Distilled Water with the aid of heat,

and

filter

the solution through paper.

To

this,

when
whole

cold, slowly

add the solution of nitrate of
stirring.

bismuth, with

constant

Transfer the

to a strainer, and, after the precipitate
it

has

been drained, wash

with Distilled Water until

114

BISMUTHUM.

the washings pass tasteless, and drain again as

completely as possible.

Then

place the moist pre-

cipitate in a capacious vessel, gradually

add the

remainder of the Nitric Acid, and heat nearly to
the boiling point.
cold, slowly

When
it

the solution has become

add to

Distilled

Water, with con-

stant stirring, until the further addition of this
liquid begins to produce a

permanent milkiness.
end of

Then

set the

solution aside, and, at the
filter

twenty-four hours,

through paper.

To the
of

filtered liquid, previously diluted

with four pints

of Distilled Water, slowly add the

Water

Ambeen

monia, with constant

stirring.

Transfer the whole

to a strainer, and, after the precipitate has

drained,

wash
again,

it

with two pints of Distilled Water,

drain

it

and press out as much of the liquid
it

as possible.

Lastly, dry

upon bibulous paper
it

with a gentle heat, and rub
Subnitrate of Bismuth
satiny appearance.
It
is

into powder.

a heavy, white powder, of a somewhat
taste,

has a faintly acid odour and

and,
It is

when moistened on
tion yields

litmus paper, a decidedly acid reaction.

entirely soluble, without effervescence, in nitric acid,

and the

solu-

no precipitate with dilute sulphuric
it

acid.
its

Upon being

heated to redness

loses

twenty per cent, of

weight.
to

When
Marsh's

mixed with
test, it

dilute sulphuric acid in excess,

and subjected

yields no arsenic, or merely a trace.

CADMIUM.

115

CADMIUM.
Cadmii Sulphas.
Sulphate of Cadmium.

Take of Cadmium,

in small pieces, a troyounce;

Nitric Acid

two troy ounces

Carbonate of Soda three troyounces
Sulphuric Acid four hundred and twenty
grains
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

To
tilled

the

Cadmium and two

fluidounces of Dis-

Water, introduced into a glass vessel, add

by degrees the Nitric Acid, and, when the action
slackens, apply a gentle heat until the metal
dissolved.
Filter the solution, and,
is

having

dis-

solved the Carbonate of Soda in six fluidounces
of Distilled Water,

mix

the solutions thoroughly.

Wash

the precipitate

obtained until the water
it

passes tasteless, and dissolve

in the Sulphuric

Acid, diluted with four fluidounces of Distilled

Water.

Then evaporate

the solution to one-third,
Lastly, dry the

and

set it aside to

crystallize.

crystals

on bibulous paper.
Cadmium
is

Sulphate of
rescent in the

in colourless, prismatic crystals,
Its solution,

efflo-

air,

and very soluble in water.

even when

116

CALCIUM.

rendered decidedly aoid, yields, on the addition of hydrosulphate
of ammonia, a yellow precipitate,
precipitant.

insoluble in an excess of

the

CALCIUM.
Calcis Carbonas Prjecipitata.
Precipitated Garhonate of Lime,
Calcis Carbonas Praecipitatus,

Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Solution of Chloride of Calcium ^yq
pints

and a half;

Carbonate of Soda seventy-two troyounces
Distilled
;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in six pints of
Distilled Water.

Heat

this solution

and the Solu-

tion of Chloride of Calcium, separately, to the boil-

ing point, and

mix them.
it

After the precipitate

has subsided, separate
liquid

from the supernatant

by

decantation, and

wash

it

with boiling

Distilled

Water

until

the washings cease to be
nitrate of silver.

affected

by a solution of

Lastly,

dry the precipitate on bibulous paper.
Precipitated Carbonate of

Lime

is

a very

fine,

white powder, free

from

grittiness, insoluble in water,

but wholly soluble in dilute mu-

riatic acid,

with copious effervescence of carbonic acid gas.

CALCIUM.
Calcis Phosphas Prjecipitata.
Precipitated Phosphate of Lime.

117

Take of Bone, calcined

to whiteness,

and

in fine

powder, four troyounces
Muriatic Acid eight troyounces

Water

of

Ammonia
Water a

twelve fluidounces,

or a sufficient quantity;
Distilled
sufficient quantity.

Macerate the Bone with the Acid, diluted with
a pint of Distilled Water, until
filter
it is

dissolved,

and

the solution.

Add

another pint of Distilled

Water, and then,
until

^-raduallj^.

Water

of

Ammonia
reaction.

the

liquid

acquires

an

alkaline

Mix
tilled

the precipitate

obtained, while yet in the
its

state of

magma, with twice

bulk of boiling Dis-

Water, and pour the whole upon a strainer.
the precipitate with boiling Distilled

Wash

Water
solu-

until the washings cease to be affected

by a

tion of nitrate of silver, acidulated with nitric acid.

Lastly, dry the precipitate with a gentle heat.
Precipitated Phosphate of
tasteless, fusible

Lime

is

a white powder, inodorous aud

without decomposition by an intense heat, insoluble
nitric, muriatic,

in water,

but freely soluble in

and

acetic acids.

Its

solution in dilute nitric acid yields a white precipitate with oxalate

of

ammonia

;

and the same

solution, neutralized as far as possible

without causing precipitation, gives a lemon-yellow precipitate with
solution of ammonio-nitrate of silver.
13

118

CALCIUM.
Creta Pr^parata.
Pi'epared Chalk.

Take

of Chalk a convenient quantity.

Add
nearly

a

little

water to the Chalk, and rub

it

into fine powder.
full

Throw

this into a large vessel

of water, stir briskly, and, after a short

interval, decant the supernatant liquid, while yet

turbid, into

another vessel.

Treat the coarser

particles of Chalk, remaining in the first vessel, in

a similar manner, and add the turbid liquid to
that previously decanted.
Lastly, set the liquid
subside,

by that the powder may
poured
off the water,

and, having

dry the powder.

Testa Pr^parata.
Prepared
Oyster-shell.

Take
wash
for

of Oyster-shell a convenient quantity.

Free the Oyster-shell from extraneous matter,
it

with boiling water, and, having reduced

it

to a fine powder, treat this in the

manner

directed

Prepared Chalk.

CARBO.— CERATA.

119

CARBO.
Carbo Andialis Purificatus,
PaHfied Animal Charcoal.

Take

of

Animal Charcoal,

in fine powder,

Muriatic Acid, each, twelve troyounces

Water twelve

fluidounces.

Pour the Muriatic Acid, previously mixed with
the AVater, gradually upon the Charcoal, and digest

with a gentle heat
ring the mixture.

for

two days, occasionally

stir-

Having allowed the undissolved

portion to subside, pour off the supernatant liquid,

wash the Charcoal frequently with water
of silver, and dry
Purified

until the

washings cease to afford a precipitate with nitrate
it.

Animal Charcoal does not
it

effervesce on the addition of

muriatic acid; nor does

impart

to the acid

anything capable of

yielding a precipitate with

ammonia

or

its

carbonate.

CERATA.
Ceratum
Adipis.
Cerate of Lard.

Ceratum Simplex, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Lard eight troyounces

White

Wax

four troyounces.

120

CERATA.
stir

Melt them together^ and
stantly until cool.

the mixture con-

Ceratum Cantharidis.
Cerate of GantJiarides.
Blistering Cerate.

Take of Cantharides,

in very fine powder, twelve

troyounces

Yellow WaXj
Resin, each, seven troyounces
5

Lard ten troyounces.

To

the

Wax,

Resin, and Lard, previously melted

together,

and strained through muslin, add the

Cantharides, and, by

means of a water-bath, keep

the mixture in a liquid state for half an hour,
stirring occasionally.

Then remove

it

from the

water-bath, and

stir it

constantly until cool.

Ceratum Cetacei.
Cerate of Spermaceti.

Take of Spermaceti a troyounce White Wax three troyounces
Olive Oil live troyounces.

Melt together the Spermaceti and

Wax;

then

add the Oil previously heated, and
ture constantly until cool.

stir

the mix-

CERATA.
Ceratum Extracti Cantharidis.
Cerate of Extrctct of Cantharides.

121

Take of Cantharides,
ounces
;

in fine powder, five troy-

Stronger Alcohol two pints and a half,
or a sufiicient quantity;

Resin three troyounces

Yellow

Wax

six troyounces

Lard seven troyounces.
Moisten the Cantharides with Stronger Alcohol,
]3ack

them

in a cylindrical percolator,

and gradually

pour on Stronger Alcohol, until the liquid passes
nearly colourless.

Evaporate the

filtered

liquid,

by means of a water-bath,
soft extract.

to the consistence of a

Mix

this

with the Resin, Wax, and

Lard, previously melted together, and keep the

whole at the temperature of 212°
minutes.
Lastly,
stir it

for

fifteen

strain

the

mixture

through

muslin, and

constantly until cool.

Ceratum Plumbi Subacetatis.
Cerate of Suhacetate of Lead,
Goulard's Cerate.

'

Take

of Solution of Suhacetate of Lead
fluidounces and a half;

two

White

Wax

four troyounces
13*

j

122

CERATA.
Olive Oil eight troyounces

Camphor

thirty grains.

Mix

the

Wax,

previously melted, with seven
Oil.

troyounces of the

Then remove
it

the mixture

from the

fire,

and,

when

begins to thicken,

gradually pour in the Solution of Subacetate of

Lead, stirring constantly with a wooden spatula
until
it

becomes

cool.

Lastly, add the

Camphor

dis-

solved in the remainder of the Oil, and

mix them.

CeRATUM RESINiE.
Resin Cerate.
Basilicon Ointment.

Take of Resin ten troyounces
Yellow

Wax

four troyounces

Lard sixteen troyounces.
Melt them together, strain the mixture through
muslin, and
stir it

constantly until cool.

Ceratum Resins Compositum.

Compound Resin

Cerate.

Take of

Resin,
Suet,

Yellow Wax, each, twelve troyounces
Turpentine six troyounces
Flaxseed Oil seven troyounces.

Melt them together, strain the mixture through
muslin, and
stir it

constantly until cool.

CERATA.
Ceratum Sabine.
Cerate of Savine.

123

Take of Savine,
Ether a

in fine powder, three troyounces;

Resin Cerate twelve troyounces;
sufficient quantity.
it

Moisten the Savine with Ether, pack
in

firmly

a cylindrical percolator, and pour on Etlier

until the filtered liquid passes nearly colourless.

Evaporate

this

spontaneously to the consistence

of syrup, add the concentrated liquid to the Resin
Cerate, softened

by a gentle

heat,

and mix them

thoroughly.

Ceratum Saponis.
Soap
Cerate.

Take of Soap

Plaster

two troyounces
two troyounces and a
half;

White

Wax

Olive Oil four troyounces.

Melt together the Plaster and Wax, add the
Oil, and, after
stir

continuing the heat a short time,

the mixture until cool.

Ceratum Zinci Carbonatis.
Cerate of Carbonate of Zinc.

Take of

Precipitated Carbonate

of Zinc

two

troyounces

Ointment of Lard ten troyounces.

Mix them.

124

CINCHONIA.

CINCHONIA.
CiNciiONi^ Sulphas.
Sulphate of Cinchonia.

Take of

the mother-water, remaining after the
crystallization of Sulphate of Quinia,

in the process for preparing that salt,

a convenient quantity;
Solution of Soda,

Alcohol,

Diluted Sulphuric Acid,

Animal Charcoal,

in fine powder, each,

a sufficient quantity.

To

the mother-water add gradually, with con-

stant stirring. Solution of Soda, until the liquid

becomes alkaline.
tate formed,

Collect on a filter the precipiit

wash

with water, and dry

it.

Then

wash
to

it

with successive small portions of Alcohol,

remove other alkaloids which may be present.
the residue with eight times
its

Mix

weight of

water, and, having heated the mixture, add gradually Diluted Sulphuric

Acid until

it

is

saturated

and becomes

clear.

Then
it

boil the

liquid with
it

Animal Charcoal,
aside
to

filter

while hot, and set

crystallize.

Lastly, drain the

crystals,

COLLODIUxM.
and dry tliem on bibulous paper.
the mother-liquid, more crystals
Sulphate of Cinchonia
is

125

By evaporating may be obtained.
having the form
melts at 212°,
It

in white, shining crystals,

of short, oblique prisms, with dihedral summits.
loses its

water of crystallization at a somewhat higher temperature,
It dissolves in fifty-four parts of cold

and

is

dissipated at a red heat.

water, in

much

less boiling water, in

seven parts of alcohol, and very

sparingly in ether. Its aqueous solution gives with terchloride of gold

a yellow precipitate, and with chloride of calcium a white one.
monia, added
cipitate.
to its solution in chlorine

Am-

water, causes a white pre-

If the salt be

rubbed with water of ammonia, and then

treated with ether, the cinchonia, separated

by the former,

will nut

be dissolved by the

latter.

COLLODIUM.
COLLODIUM.
Collodion.

Take of Cotton,

freed from impurities, lialf a

troyounce
Nitrate of Potassa, in fine powder, ten

troyounces
Sulphuric Acid fifteen troyounces and
^

a half;

Stronger Ether twenty-one fluidounces
Stronger Alcohol a suilicient quantity

Add the

Sulphuric Acid to the Nitrate of Potassa

in a glass or porcelain vessel, and stir

them together

126

COLLODIUM.

until they are uniformly mixed.

When

the tempe-

rature of the mixture

is

below 122°, add the Cotton,
glass rods,

and, by

means of stout

imbue

it

tho-

roughly with the mixture.

Then cover
lid,

the vessel

closely with a glass or porcelain
it

and allow

to stand for twenty-four

hours.

Transfer the
it,

Cotton to a larger vessel, and wash

first

with

cold water until the washings cease to have an
acid taste,

and then with boiling water.
it

Press

it

as dry as possible with the hand, pack

tightly

in a conical percolator,

and pour upon
is

it

Stronger

Alcohol, until the remaining water

dis|)laccd

then again press
hand.

it

as

dry as possible with the
fluid-

Mix

the

Stronger Ether with six

ounces of Stronger Alcohol in a suitable bottle,
and, having added the moist Cotton to the mixture,

agitate

occasionally

until

it

is

dissolved.

The

Cotton, prepared for solution by this formula,
at

and dried

212°,

weighs three hundred and

thirty-six grains.

Collodion

may

also be

made by

dissolving fifty-

six grains of Cotton, prepared as above^

and dried
and a

at 212°, in a mixture of three fluidounces

half of Stronger Ether and a fluidounce of Stronger

Alcohol.
Collodion
is

a colourless, opalescent liquid, of a syrupy consistence.

COLLODIUM.
By
long standing
it

127
and lyecomes

deposits a layer of fibrous matter,

more transparent.
tion, before the

This layer should be reincorporated, by agitais

Collodion

used.

"When applied

it

should form a

colourless, transparent, flexible,

and strongly

contractile film.

COLLODIUM CUM CaNTHARIDE.
Collodion
loitli

Cantliarides.

Cantharidal Collodion.

Take

of Cantliarides, in fine powder, eight troy-

oances
Cotton, prepared by the process for Collodion,

and dry, one hundred grains

Stronger Ether a pint and a half; Stronger Alcohol a sufficient quantity. Introduce the Cantliarides into a cylindrical percolator, and,

having pressed them firmly, gradually

pour on the Ether.

When fifteen

fluidounces have

passed, set aside the liquid in a close vessel, and

continue the

percolation with

Stronger Alcohol
is

until half a pint
this in a

more of

liquid

obtained.

Set

and,

warm place for spontaneous evaporation, when it is reduced to a fluidounce, mix it
liquid.

with the reserved
to the mixture,

Then add
solution

the Cotton
until
it is

and agitate occasionally

dissolved.

Lastly, keep the

in a well-

stopped bottle.

128

CONFECTIONES.

CONFECTIONES.
CONFECTIO ArOMATICA.

Aromatic Confection.

Take of Aromatic Powder
Clarified

four troyounces

Honey

four troyounces, or a

sufficient quantity.

Rub

the Aromatic

Powder with
is

Clarified

Honey

until a uniform
sistence.

mass

obtained of the proper con-

CONFECTIO AURANTII CORTICIS.
Confection of Orange Peel.

Take

of Sweet Orange Peel, recently separated

from the
troyounces

fruit

by

grating,

twelve

Sugar thirty-six troyounces.

Beat the Orange Peel with the Sugar, gradually
added, until they are thorouglily mixed.

CONFECTIO OpII.
Confection of Oj^iton.

Take of Opium,

in fine powder,

two hundred

and seventy grains
Aromatic Powder six troyounces
Clarified

Honey

fourteen troyounces.

CONFECTIONES.
Rub
the

129

Opium with

the Aromatic

Powder;

then add the Honey, and beat the whole together
until thoroughly mixed.

CONFECTIO RoSyE.
Confection of Rose.

Take

of

Red

Rose, in fine powder, four troy;

ounces
Sugar,

in
;

fine

powder, thirty troy-

ounces
Clarified

Honey

six troyounces

Rose Water eight fluidounces.

Rub
150°
;

the Rose with the Rose

Water heated

to

then gradually add the Sugar and Honey,
until

and beat the whole together
mixed.

thoroughly

CONFECTIO SeNN"^.
Confection of Senna.
'1

ake of Senna, in

fine

powder, eight troyounces
fine

Coriander, in

powder, four troy-

ounces

;

Purging Cassia, finely bruised, sixteen
troyounces

Tamarind ten troyounces
Prune,
sliced,

seven troyounces

Fig, bruised, twelve troyounces

130

CUPRUM.
Sugar, in coarse, powder, thirty troy-

ounces

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Digest, in a close vessel,

by means of a water-

bath, the Purging Cassia, Tamarind, Prune, and

Fig in three pints of Water for three hours.
rate the coarser portions with the hand,

Sepa-

and pass

the pulpy mass, by rubbing,

first

through a coarse

hair sieve, and then through a fine one, or a
cloth.

mushn

Mix

the residue with a pint of Water, and,

having digested the mixture for a short time, treat
it

as before,

and add the product

to the

pulpy

liquid first obtained.

Then, by means of a water-

bath, dissolve the Sugar in the pulpy liquid, and

evaporate the whole until
troy ounces, or
until
it

it

weighs ninety-six

has been brought to the
Lastly, add the

consistence of honey.

Senna and

Coriander, and incorporate

them thoroughly with

the other ingredients while yet warm.

CUPRUM.
Cuprum Ammoniatum.
Ammoniated Copper.

Take of Sulphate of Copper half a troyounce

DECOCTA.
Carbonate of

-

131

Ammonia

three hundred

and sixty

grains.
effer-

Rub them
vescence

together in a glass mortar until

ceases.

Then wrap

the
it

Ammoniated
with a gentle

Copper in bibulous paper, dry
lieat,

and keep

it

in a well-stopped bottle.

DECOCTA.
DeCOCTUM CETRARIiE.
Decoction of Iceland Moss.

Take of Iceland Moss half a troyounce

Water a
Boil the Iceland

sufficient quantity.

Moss

in a pint of

Water

for

fifteen minutes, strain

with compression, and add

sufficient

Water, through the strainer, to make

the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum Chimaphil^.
Decoction of Pipsisseiva.

Take of Pipsissewa,

bruised, a troyounce

Water

a sufficient quantity.

Boil the Pipsissewa in a pint of

Water

for fifteen

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water, through
the strainer, to

make

the decoction measure a pint.

132

DECOCTA.
Decoctum Cinchona Flav^.
Decoction of Yelloio Cinchona.

Take

of Yellow Cinchona^ bruised, a troyounce

Water a
fifteen

sufficient quantity.

Boil the Yellow Cinchona in a pint of

Water

for

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water,

through the strainer, to make the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum Cinchona Eubr^.
Decoction of

Red Cinchona.
bruised, a troyounce

Take

of

Red Cinchona,
Water a

sufficient quantity.

Boil the

Red Cinchona

in a joint of

Water

for

fifteen minutes, strain,

and add

sufficient

Water,

through the strainer, to make the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum Cornus Florida.
Decoction of Dogwood.

Take

of

Dogwood, bruised, a troyounce

Water a
Boil the

sufficient quantity.

Dogwood

in a pint of

Water

for fifteen

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water, through

the strainer, to
pint.

make

the

decoction

measure a

DECOCTA.
DeCOCTUM DULCAMARiE.
Decoction of Bittersweet.

133

Take of
Boil

Bittersweet, bruised, a troy ounce

Water a
the

sufficient quantity.

Bittersweet in a pint of

Water

for

fifteen minutes, strain,

and add

sufficient

Water,

through the strainer, to make the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum H^matoxyli.
Decoction of Logwood.

Take of Logwood, rasped, a troy ounce

Water a
Boil the

sufficient quantity.

Logwood

in a pint of

Water

for fifteen

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water, through
the strainer, to

make

the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum Hordei.
Decoction of Barley.

Take of Barley two troyounces

)

Water a
which adhere
pint of

sufficient quantity.

Having washed away the extraneous matters
to

the Barley, boil

it

with half a

Water

for a short time,

and throw away
it

the resulting liquid.

Then, having poured on

four pints of boiling Water, boil

down

to

two

pints,

and

strain.
11^

134

DECOCTA.
Decoctum Quercus Alb^.
Decoction of White-oak Baric.

Take of White-oak Bark,

bruised, a troyounce

Water

a sufficient quantity.

Boil the White-oak

Bark

in a pint of

Water

for

fifteen minutes, strain,

and add

sufficient

Water,

through the strainer, to make the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum SARSAPARiLLyE Compositum.

Gompoimd
Take of

Decoction of Sarsaparilla,
sliced

Sarsaparilla,

and bruised, six

troyounces

Bark of Sassafras Root,

sliced,

Guaiacum Wood,
ounce

rasped.

Liquorice Root, bruised, each, a troy;

Mezereon,

sliced,

one

hundred

and

eighty grains

Water a
hours

sufficient quantity.

Macerate with four pints of Water
;

for

twelve
strain,

then boil
sufficient

for a quarter of

an hour,

and add

Water, through the strainer, to

make

the decoction measure four pints.

EMPLASTRA.
Decoctum SeNEGvE.
Decoction of Senelca.

135

Take

of Seneka, bruised, a troyounce

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Boil the Seneka in a pint of

Water

for fifteen

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water, through
the strainer, to

make

the decoction measure a pint.

Decoctum UvyE Ursi.
Decoction of TJva Ursi.

Take

of

Uva
Uva

Ursi a troyounce
sufficient quantity.

Water a
Boil the

Ursi in a pint of Water for fifteen

minutes, strain, and add sufficient Water, through
the strainer, to

make

the decoction measure a pint.

EMPLASTRA.
Emplastrum Ammoxiaci.
Plaster of Aminoniac.

Take of Ammoniac
Dissolve the

five

troyounces

Diluted Acetic Acid half a pint.

Ammoniac

in the Diluted Acetic

Acid; and strain; then evaporate the solution by

136

EMPLASTRA.
stirring constantly, until it

means of a water-bath,

acquires the proper consistence.

Emplastrum Ammoniaci cum Hydrargyro.
Plaster of

Ammoniac with Mercury.
troy ounces

Take

of

Ammoniac twelve

Mercury three troyounces
Olive Oil sixty grains

Sublimed Sulphur eight grains.

Heat the

Oil,

and gradually add the Sulphur,
they unite
;

stirring constantly until

then add the

Mercury, and triturate until globules of the metal
cease to be visible.
Boil the
it,

Ammoniac with
sieve,

suffi-

cient water to cover

until they are thoroughly

mixed; then
evaporate,

strain

through a hair

and

by means of a water-bath,

until a small

portion taken from the vessel hardens on cooling.
Lastly, add the

Ammoniac, while yet

hot, gradually

to the mixture of Oil, Sulphur,

and Mercury, and

thoroughly incorporate

all

the ingredients.

Emplastrum Antimonii.
Plaster of Antimony.

Take

of Tartrate of
fine

Antimony and
5

Potassa, in

powder, a troyounce

Burgundy Pitch

four troyounces.

EMPLASTRA.

137

Melt the Pitch by means of a water-bath, and
strain
;

then add the powder, and

stir

them

well

together until the mixture thickens on cooling.

Emplastrum Arnica.
Plaster of Arnica.

Take of Alcoholic Extract of Arnica a troyounce
and a half;
Resin Plaster three troyounces.

Add

the

Extract to the

Plaster,

previously

melted by means of a water-bath, and mix them.

Emplastrum

Assafcetid.e.

Plaster of Assafetlda.

Take

of Assafetida,

Plaster

of
;

Lead, each,

twelve

troy-

ounces

Galbanum,
Yellow Wax, each, six troyounces
Alcohol three pints.
Dissolve the Assafetida and

Galbanum

in the

Alcohol by means of
liquid while hot,

a water-bath, strain

the

and evaporate

to the consistence

of honey;

then add the Plaster and Wax, prestir

viously melted together,

the

mixture

well,

and evaporate

to the proper consistence.

138

EMPLASTRA.
Emplastrum Belladonna.
Plaster of Belladonna.

Take of Alcoholic Extract of Belladonna a
ounce
;

troy-

Resin Plaster two troyounces.

Add

the

Extract to the

Plaster,

previously

melted by means of a water-bath, and mix them.

Emplastrum Ferri.
Planter of Iron,

Take

of Subcarbonate of Iron three troyounces

Plaster of Lead twenty-four troyounces

Burgundy Pitch

six troyounces.

Add
and

the Subcarbonate of Iron to the Plaster

and Burgundy Pitch, previously melted together,
stir

them

constantly

until

the

mixture

thickens on cooling.

Emplastrum Galbani Compositum.

Compound
Take
of

Plaster of Galhanum.

Galhanum

eight troyounces

Turpentine a troyounce

Burgundy Pitch
Plaster of

three troyounces
thirty-six troyounces.

Lead

To

the

Galhanum and Turpentine, previously
first

melted together and strained, add

the Bur-

EMPLASTRA.
gundy
Pitch,

139
Plaster, melted

and afterwards the
fire,

over a gentle

and mix the whole together.

Emplastrum Hydrargyri.
Plaster of Mercury.

Take of Mercury

six troyounces

Olive Oil,
Kesin, each, two troyounces;
Plaster of

Lead twelve troyounces.
rub the Mercury with
the

Melt the Oil and Kesin together, and, when
they have become
cool,

them

until

globules

of

metal cease to be
pre-

visible.

viously

Then gradually add the Plaster, melted, and mix the whole together.
Emplastrum
Opii.

Plaster of Ojpium.

Take

of Extract of

Opium

a troyounce

Burgundy Pitch
Plaster of

three troyounces;

Lead twelve troyounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the

Extract with

three

fluidounces

of

Water, and evaporate, by means of a water-bath,
to a fluidounce

and a

half.

Add

this to the Bur-

gundy Pitch and

Plaster,

melted

together by
for

means of a water-bath, and continue the heat

UO

EMPL ASTRA.

a short time, stirring constantly, that the moisture

may

be evaporated.

Emplastrum

Picis

Burgundic^.

Plaster of Burgundy Pitch.

Take

of

Burgundy Pitch seventy-two troyounces;
Yellow

Wax

six troyounces.
strain,

Melt them together,
until

and

stir

constantly

they thicken on cooling.

Emplastrum
Plaster of

Picis Canadensis.

Canada

Pitch.

Hemlock Pitch Plaster.

Take of Canada Pitch seventy-two troyounces
Yellow

Wax

six troyounces.
strain,

Melt them together,
until

and

stir

constantly

they thicken on cooling.

ExMplastrum Picis cum Cantharide.
Plaster of Pitch with Gantliarides.

Take

of

Burgundy Pitch

forty-eight troyounces

Cerate of Cantharides four troyounces.

Melt them together by means of a water-batb,

and

stir

constantly until the mixture thickens on

cooling.

EMPLASTRA.
Emplastrum Plumbi.
Plaster of Lead.

141

Take

of Oxide of Lead, in fine powder, thirty

trojounces
Olive Oil fiftj-six troyounces

Water a
Sift the

sufficient quantity.
Oil,

Oxide of Lead into the

contained in

a suitable vessel, of a capacity equal to twice the

bulk of the ingredients.
boiling Water,

Then add

half a pint of

and

boil the

whole together until
to time,

a plaster

is

formed; adding from time
little

during the process, a
first

boiling Water, as that

added

is

consumed.

Emplastrum Resin"^.
Resin Planter.
Adhesive .Plaster.

Take of Resin,

in fine powder, six troyounces

Plaster of

Lead

thirty-six troyounces.
fire,

To

the Plaster, melted over a gentle

add

the Resin, and

mix them.
Emplastrum Saponis.
Soap
Planter.

Take

of Soap, sliced, four troyounces

Plaster of

Lead
**

thirty-six troyounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

142

EXTRACTA.
the Soap with

Kub

Water

until brought to a

semi-liquid state ; then

mix

it

with the Plaster, pre-

viously melted, and boil to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTA.
In preparing the
directed, evaporate

Extracts,
as

unless

otherwise

quickly as possible, in a

broad, shallow vessel,
until they
for forming

by means of a water-bath,

have acquired the consistence proper
pills;

and, towards the end of the
spatula.

process, stir

them constantly with a

Sprinkle upon the softer il^tracts a small quantity of Alcohol.

EXTRACTUM ACONITI AlCOHOLICUM.
Alcoholic Extract of Aconite.

Take of Aconite

Leaf, recently dried and in fine

powder, twelve troyounces
Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
one-third of the Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and pour upon

it

the remainder of the Alcohol.
all

When

the liquid has

been absorbed by the

powder, pour on Diluted Alcohol until a pint of

EXTRACTA.
tincture has been obtained.

143

Set this aside in a
to

warm

place,

and

allow

it

evaporate

spon-

taneously

until

reduced

to

three

fluidounces.

Continue the percolation with Diluted Alcohol
until

two pints more of tincture have passed, or

until the

powder

is

exhausted

;

then evaporate, by

means of a water-bath,
the

at a temperature not ex-

ceeding 160°, to the consistence of syrup, and add
three

fluidounces of tincture

first

obtained.

Lastly, continue the

evaporation, at a tempera120°, until the whole
is

ture not exceeding

re-

duced

to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTUM Arnica Alcoholicum.
Alcoliolic Extract

of Arnica,

Take

of Arnica* in moderately coarse powder,
tAventy-four troyounces

Alcohol four pints

Water two

pints

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Alcohol and Water, and moisten the
;

powder with a pint of the mixture

then pack

it

firmly in a cylindrical percolator, and gradually

pour on the remainder of the mixture.
the percolation with
pints of tincture

Continue

Diluted

Alcohol until six
Lastly, evaporate

have passed.

144
this,

EXTRACTA.
by means of a water-bath,
to

the proper

consistence.

ExTRACTUM Belladonna.
Extract of Belladonna.

Take of Belladonna
ounces.

Leaf, fresh, twelve

troj-

Bruise the Leaf in a stone mortar, sprinkling

on

it

a

little

water, and express the juice; then,
this to the boiling point, strain,

having heated

and

evaporate to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTUM Belladonna Alcoholicum.
Alcoholic Extract of Belladonna.

Take of Belladonna

Leaf, in fine powder, twenty-

four troyounces

Alcohol four pints

Water two

pints

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Alcohol and Water, and moisten the
;

powder with a pint of the mixture
upon

then pack

it

firmly in a conical percolator, and gradually pour
it

the remainder of the mixture.

Continue

the percolation with Diluted Alcohol until six pints
of tincture have passed.
Lastly, evaporate this,

by

means of a water-bath,

to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTA.
ExTRACTUM Cannabis Purificatum.
Purified Extract of

145

Hemp.
troj^ounces

Take of Extract of Hemp two

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Rub
until

the Extract with two fluidounces of Alcohol
;

they are thoroughly mixed

and, having

added twelve fluidounces of Alcohol, allow the
mixture to macerate
filter

for twenty-four hours.

Then

the tincture through paper, passing sufficient
filter,

Alcohol, through the

to

exhaust the dregs

completely.

Lastly,

by means of a water-bath,

at a temperature not exceeding 160°, evaporate
to dryness.

EXTR ACTUM CiNCHONiE.
Extract of Cinchona.
Extractum Cinchonae Flavge, Pharm., 1850.

Take

of Yellow Cinchona, in fine powder, twelve

troyounces

Alcohol four pints

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
three fluidounces of Alcohol, into a conical glass
percolator,

and gradually pour upon

it

the re-

mainder of the Alcohol.
to pass,

When

the liquid ceases

pour upon the residue

sufficient

Water

to

keep

its

surface covered, until four pints of tincture

146

EXTRACTA.
Set this aside, and

have passed.

continue the

percolation until six pints of infusion are obtained.
Distil off the alcohol

from the tincture, and evap-

orate the infusion

until the liquids respectively

are brought to the consistence of thin

honey

;

then

mix them, and evaporate

to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM COLCHICI AcETICUM.
Acetic Extract of Colcliicum,

Take of Colchicum Root,

in moderately fine

pow-

der, twelve troy ounces

Acetic Acid four iluidounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

To the Acetic Acid add a pint of Water, and mix the resulting liquid with the Colchicum Root.
Transfer the mixture to a conical glass percolator,

and pour Water gradually upon
passes with
little

it

until the liquid

or no taste.

Lastly, evaporate
to the

the liquid, in a porcelain
consistence.

vessel,

proper

ExTRACTUM COLOCYNTniDIS AlCOHGLICUM.
AlcoJwlic Extract of Colocynth,

Take

of Colocynth forty-eight troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Dry the Colocynth, and, having removed the

EXTRACTA.
seeds and reduced
it

147

to coarse
it

powder by grindin

ing or

bruising,

macerate
for

eight

pints of

Diluted Alcohol

four

days,

with occasional

stirring; then express strongly,
flannel.

and strain through

Pack the

residue, previously broken

up

with the hands, firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
cover
it

with the strainer, and pour Diluted Alcoit,

hol upon

until the tincture

and expressed
pints.

liquid,

taken together, measure sixteen
tincture with the expressed

Mix

the

liquid,

and, having

recovered from the mixture ten pints of alcohol by
distillation,

evaporate the residue to dryness by
Lasth', reduce the dry

means of a water-bath.
to powder,

mass

and keep

it

in a well-stopped bottle.
this process

The Extract obtained by
about seven troyounces.

weighs

EXTRACTUM COLOCYXTHIDIS CoMPOSITUM.

Compound Extract of

Colocynth.
in fine

Take of Alcoholic Extract of Colocynth,

powder, three troyounces and a half;
Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder, twelve

troyounces

Resin of Scammony, in fine powder,
three troyounces

148

EXTRACTA.
Cardamom,
in fine powder, a troyounce;

Soap, in fine powder, three troyounces.

Mix

the powders thoroughly, and keep the mix-

ture in a well-stopped bottle.

EXTRACTUM

CONII.

Extract of Hemlock,

Take of Hemlock,
on

fresh,

twelve troyounces.

Bruise the Hemlock in a stone mortar, sprinkling
it

a

little

water, and express the juice

;

then,
it,

having heated

this to the boiling point, filter

and evaporate

to the proper consistence, either in a

vacuum with
of
air,

the aid of heat, or in shallow vessels,

at the ordinary temperature,

by means of a current

directed over the surface of the liquid.

EXTRACTUM CONII AlCOHOLICUM.
Alcoholic Extract of Hemloclc.

Take

of Hemlock, recently dried and in fine

powder, twelve troyounces;

Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
one-third of the Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and pour upon

it

the remainder of the Alcohol.

When

the liquid has all been absorbed by the

EXTllACTA.
powder, pour Diluted Alcohol upon
of tincture has been obtained.
it

149
until a pint

Set this aside in

a

warm

place,

and allow

it

to evaporate sponta-

neously until reduced to three iiuidounces.
tinue the percolation with Diluted Alcohol

Conluitil

two pints more of tincture have passed, or
the powder
liquid,
is

until
this

exhausted

;

then

evaporate

by means of a water-bath,

at a temperature

not exceeding 160°, to the consistence of syrup.

To

this

add the three iiuidounces of tincture

first

obtained, and continue the evaporation, at a tem-

perature not exceeding 120°, until the whole

is

reduced to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTUM Digitalis Alcoholicum.
AlcoJiolic Extract

of Digitalis.

Take of

Digitalis,

recently dried

and

in fine

powder, twelve troj^ounces

Alcohol a pint
Diluted xllcohol a
suflficient

quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
one-third of the Alcohol, into a percolator,

and

pour upon

it

the remainder of the Alcohol.
all

When

the liquid has

been absorbed by the powder,
it

pour Diluted Alcohol upon
has been obtained.

until a pint of tincture

Set this aside in a

warm

place,

150

EXTRACTA.
it

and allow
duced

to evaporate spontaneously until re-

to three lluidounces.

Continue the percola-

tion with Diluted Alcohol until

two pints more of

tincture have passed, or until the

powder

is

ex-

hausted

;

then evaporate this liquid, by means of
at

a water-bath,

a

temperature

not

exceeding
tliis

160°, to the consistence of syrup.

To
first

add

the

three fluidounces of tincture
at

obtained,

and continue the evaporation,

a temperature
is

not exceeding 120°, until the whole
the j^roper consistence.

reduced to

ExTRACTUM Dulcamara.
Extract of Bittersweet.

Take

of Bittersweet, in moderately fine powder,

twelve troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Bittersweet with four fluidounces
of Diluted Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and pour Diluted Alcohol gradually upon

until

the tincture passes but slightly impregnated witli
the properties of the Bittersweet.
Distil off the

alcohol from the tincture until reduced to onehalf; then strain, and,

by means of a water-bath,

evaporate to the proper consistence.

EXTKACTA.
EXTR ACTUM GENTIANyE.
Extract of Gentian.

151

Take of Gentian,

in

moderately coarse powder,

twelve troyounces

Water a
Water, pack
ually pour

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Gentian with four fluidounces of
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and grad-

Water upon

until the infusion passes

but slightly impregnated with the properties of the
Gentian.
Boil the liquid to three-fourths of its
strain, and,

bulk

;

then

by means of a water-bath,

evaporate to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM H^EMATOXYLI.
Extract of Logwood.

Take

of Logwood, rasped, twelve troyounces

Water
Boil

eight pints.

down
;

to four pints,

and strain the decoction

while hot

then evaporate to dryness.

EXTRACTUM HeLLEBORI AlCOHOLICUM.
Alcoholic Extract of Black Hellebore.

Extractum Hellebori, Pharm., 1850.

Take

of Black Hellebore, recently dried and in
fine

powder, twelve troyounces

152

EXTRACTA.
Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
one-third of the Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and pour upon

it

the remainder of the Alcohol.
all

When

the liquid has

been absorbed by the

powder, pour on Diluted Alcohol until a pint of
tincture has been obtained.

Set this aside in a
to

warm

place,

and allow

it

evaporate sponta-

neously until reduced to three fiuidounces.

Con-

tinue the percolation with Diluted Alcohol until

two

pints

more of tincture have passed, or
is

until

the powder

exhausted; then evaporate, by means

of a water-bath, at a temperature not exceeding
160°, to the consistence of syrup.

To
first

this

add

the

three

fiuidounces of tincture

obtained,

and continue the evaporation, at a temperature
not exceeding 120°, until the whole
to the proper consistence.
is

reduced

EXTRACTUM HyOSCYAMI.
Extract of Henbane.

Take of Henbane
ounces.

Leaf,

fresh,

twelve

troy-

Bruise the Leaf in a stone mortar, sprinkling on
it

a

little

water, and express the juice; then, having

EXTRACTA.
lieated this to the boiling point, strain,

153

and evap-

orate to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM HyOSCYAMI AlCOHGLICU.M.
Alcoholic Extract of Henbane.

Take of Henbane

Leaf, recently dried
fine

and in

moderately
troyounces

powder, twenty-four

Alcohol four pints
AVater two pints

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Alcohol and Water, and moisten the
;

powder with a pint of the mixture

then pack

it

firmly in a conical percolator, and gradually pour

upon

it

the remainder of the mixture.

Continue the

percolation with Diluted Alcohol until the tincture

measures six

pints.

Lastly, evaporate

this,

by

means of a water-bath,

to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTU.M IgNATI^ AlCOHOLICUM.
Alcoholic Extract of Ignatia.

Take

of Ignatia, in fine powder, twelve troy-

ounces

;

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
hol,

the Ignatia with four lluidounces of Alcoto stand for

and allow the mixture
16

an hour.

154

EXTRACTA.
introduce
it

Then
press

it

into a cylindrical

percolator,
it

firmly,

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

until three pints of tincture
Distil off the alcohol,

have slowly passed.

by means of a water-bath,

until the tincture

is

reduced to half a pint, and

evaporate this to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTUM Jalaps.
Extract of Jalap.

Take

of Jalap, in moderately fine powder, twelve

troyounces

Alcohol four pints

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
three fluidounces of Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and gradually pour upon

it

the remainder

of the Alcohol.

When

the liquid ceases to pass,

pour upon the residue

sufficient

Water

to

keep

its

surface covered, until four pints of tincture

have

passed.

Set this aside, and continue the percola-

tion until six pints of infusion
Distil off the alcohol

have been obtained.

from the tincture, and evap-

orate the infusion

until the liquids respectively
to

have been brought
honey;

the

consistence

of thin

then mix them, and evaporate to the

proper consistence.

EXTRACTA.
EXTRACTUM JUGLANDIS.
Extract of Butternut.

155

Take of Butternutj

in moderately coarse po vvder,

twelve troyounces

Water a
Water, pack
ually pour

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Butternut with four fluidounces of
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and grad-

Water upon

until the infusion passes

but sTightly impregnated with the properties of the
Butternut.
Boil the liquid to three-fourths of
its

bulk

;

then strain, and, by means of a water-bath,

evaporate to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTUM KrAMERI^.
Extract of RJiatany.

Take of Rhatany,

in moderately fine powder,

twelve troyounces;

Water a
Water, pack
ually pour

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and grad-

Water upon

until the infusion passes

but slightly impregnated with the astringent property of the Rhatany.

Heat the

liquid

to

the

boiling point, strain, and,

by means of a water-

bath, at a temperature not exceeding 160°, evaporate to the proper consistence.

156

EXTRACTA.
ExTRACTUM Nucis YoMic^ Alcoholicum.
Alcoholic Extract of

Nux

Vomica.

Extractum Nucis Vomici^, Pliarm.^ 1850.

Take of Nux Vomica,
troyounces

in fine powder, twelve

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
hour.
colator,

the

Nux Vomica
introduce

with four fluidounces of

Alcohol, and allow the mixture to stand for an

Then

it

into a cylindrical perit

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

until

the tincture passes without bitterness.

Distil off

the alcohol, by means of a water-bath, until the
tincture
is

reduced to half a pint, and evaporate

this to the proper consistence.

Extractum

Opii.

Extract of Opium.

Take

of

Opium twelve troyounces Water five pints.
pieces,

Cut the Opium into small

macerate

it

for twenty-four hours in a pint of the

Water, and

reduce

it

to a soft

mass by

trituration.

Express

the liquid, and treat the residue with each of the
four remaining pints of

Water successively

in the

same manner.

Having mixed the

liquids, filter

EXTRACTA.

157

the mixture, and evaporate, by means of a waterbath, to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM PODOPHYLLI.
Extract of May-apple.

Take of May-apple,

in moderately fine powder,

twelve troyounces

Alcohol four pints

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
three fluidounces of Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and pour upon

it

the remainder of the

Alcohol.

When

the tincture ceases to pass, pour

gradually upon the powder sufficient Water to

keep

its

surface covered, until four pints of tincture

have passed.

Set this aside, and continue the per-

colation until six pints of infusion
tained.
Distil off the alcohol

have been ob-

from the tincture,

and evaporate the

infusion, until the liquids re-

spectively have been brought to the consistence
of thin honey;

then mix them, and evaporate to

the proper consistence.
16«

158

EXTRACTA.
ExTR ACTUM Quassia.
Extract of Quassia.

Take

of Quassia, in

mode^^ately fine

powder,

twelve troyounces

Water a
Water, pack
ually pour

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Quassia with four fluidounces of
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and grad-

Water upon
Boil

until the infusion passes

but slightly impregnated with the properties of the
Quassia.
its

down

the liquid to three-fourths of

bulk

;

then strain, and, by means of a water-

bath, evaporate to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM RhEI AlCOHOLTCUM.
Alcoholic Extract of RJiuoarh,

Extractum Rhei, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Rhubarb, in moderately fine powder,

twelve troyounces

Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of the
Alcohol, pack
ually
it

in a conical percolator,
it,

and grad-

pour upon

first

the

remainder of the
until

Alcohol, and

afterwards

Dikitcd Alcohol,

twelve fluidounces of tincture have been obtained.
Set this aside in a

warm

place,

and allow

it

to

EXTRACTA.
evaporate spontaneously
ounces.
initil

159
fluid-

reduced to six

Continue the percolation with Diluted
tasteless.

Alcohol until the tincture passes nearly

Evaporate

this in a porcelain vessel,

by means of

a water-bath, at a temperature not exceeding 160°,
to

the consistence of syrup.
first

With

this

mix

the

tincture

obtained, and continue the evaporais

tion until the mixture
consistence.

reduced to the proper

ExTRACTUM Senega Alcoholicum.
Alcoliolic Extract

of Seneha.
fine

Take of Seneka,

in

moderately

powder,
*^

twelve troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
gradually pour upon
it

in a conical percolator,

and

it

Diluted Alcohol until three

pints of tincture have passed.

Evaporate

this,

by

means of a water-bath,

to the proper consistence.

EXTR ACTUM StRAMONII.
Extract of Stramonium.

Extractum Stramonii Foliorum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of
it

Stramonium Leaf twelve troyounces.
in a stone mortar, sprinj^ing

Bruise

on

it

a

160
little

EXTRACTA.
water^ and express the juice; then, having

heated this to the boiling point, strain, and evaporate,

at

a

temperature not exceeding 160°, to

the proper consistence.

EXTR ACTUM StRAMONII AlCOHOLICUM.
Alcoholic Extract of Stramonium.

Take of Stramonium
fine

Leaf, recently dried

and in

powder, twelve troyounces

Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce the powder, previously mixed with
one-third of the Alcohol, into a conical percolator,

and gradually pour upon
Alcohol.

it

the remainder of the
all

When

the liquid has

been absorbed
until a

by the powder, pour on Diluted Alcohol
pint of tincture has been obtained.
in a

Set this aside

warm

place,

and allow

it

to evaporate sponta-

neously until reduced to three fluidounces.

Con-

tinue the percolation with Diluted Alcohol until

two

pints

more of tincture have passed, or
is

until

the powder

exhausted;

then

evaporate,

by

means
this

of a water-bath, at a temperature not ex-

ceeding 160", to the consistence of syrup.

With
first

mix

"the

three fluidounces of tincture

obtained, and continue the evaporation, at a tern-

EXTRACTA.

161
is

perature not exceeding 120°, until the mixture

reduced to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTUM TaRAXACI.
Extract of Dandelion.

Take

of Dandelion, gathered in September, sixty

troyounces.
Slice the Dandelion,
tar,

and bruise
little

it

in a stone

mor-

sprinkling on

it

a

water, until reduced to

a pulp.

Then
it

express and strain the juice, and

evaporate

in a

vacuum, or

in

a shallow dish

over a water-bath, to the proper consistence.

ExTRACTU-Ai

Valeriana Alcoholicum.
of Valerian.
in fine powder, twelve troy;

AlcolioJlc Extract

Take of Valerian,
ounces

Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of
Alcohol, pack
it

in

a percolator, and gradually

pour upon

it

the remainder of the Alcohol.
all

When

the liquid has

been absorbed by the powder,

pour on Diluted Alcohol until a pint of tincture
has been obtained.
Set this aside in a

warm

place,
re-

and allow

it

to

evaporate spontaneously until

162

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
Continue th« perco-

duced to three fluidounces.

lation with Diluted Alcohol until

two pints more
this,

of tincture have passed,

and evaporate

by

means of a water-bath,
Lastly,

to the consistence of syrup.

mix

the two liquids, and continue the evap-

oration, at a temperature not exceeding 120°, until

the mixture

is

reduced to the proper consistence.

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
EXTRACTUM BUCHU FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Buchu,

Take of Buchu,

in

moderately

fine

powder,

sixteen troy ounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Buchu with six fluidounces of Alcohol, introduce it into a cylindrical percolator, press
it

firmly,

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

it

until

twelve fluidounces of tincture have passed.
aside,

Set this

and continue the percolation
tincture

until

two pints
Evaporate

more of
this,

have been obtained.

by means of a water-bath, at a temperature not
it

exceeding 150°, to four fluidounces, and mix
the reserved tincture.
for twenty-four hours,

with

Allow the mixture
and
filter

to stand

through paper.

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
EXTRACTUM ClMICIFUG^ FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of
GimicifiKja.

163

Take of Cimicifuga,
ounces
;

in fine powder, sixteen troy-

Stronger Alcohol a pint and a half;
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Cimicifuga with four fluidounces
of the Stronger Alcohol, introduce
percolator,
it

into a conical

"^

pour upon

it

the remainder of the
the whole of this

Stronger Alcohol, and,

when

has entered the powder, gradually add

Diluted

Alcohol until a pint and a half of tincture have
passed.

Set this aside, in a shallow vessel, in a

w^arm place, until reduced by spontaneous evaporation to twelve fluidounces.
colation

Continue the per-

with Diluted Alcohol, until two pints

more of tincture have been obtained.
this,

Evaporate

by means of a water-bath,

at a temperature

not exceeding 150°, to four fluidounces; then add
the tincture
first

obtained very gradually so as to

avoid j)recipitation, allow the mixture to stand for
twenty-four hours, and
filter

through paper.

164

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
EXTRACTUM CiNCHONiE FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Gincliona,

Take

of Yellow Cinchona, in moderately fine

powder, sixteen troyounces
Sugar, in coarse powder, twenty troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.
**

Moisten the Cinchona with ten fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, allow
it

to stand for half

an hour,

pack

it

firmly

in

a cylindrical
it

percolator,

and

gradually pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until four

pints of tincture have been obtained.
this,

Evaporate

by means of a water-bath,

to to

two pints; then
two
pints,

add the Sugar, evaporate again
strain the liquid while hot.

and

EXTRACTUM COLCHICI RaDICIS FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Colchicitm Root.

Take

of Colchicum Root, in fine powder, sixteen

troyounces
Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix two measures

of Alcohol with one of Water,

moisten the Colchicum Root with six fluidounces
of the mixture, press
percolator,
it

moderately in a conical
it

and gradually pour the mixture upon

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
until twelve fluidounces of tincture

165

have passed.

Set this aside, and continue the percolation until

two pints niore of tincture have been obtained.
Evaporate this to four fluidounces, mix
the reserved tincture, and
filter
it

with

through paper.

EXTRACTUM COLCHICI SeMINIS FlUIDUM.
Fluid
ExtvcLct

of Colcliicum Seed.
Seed,
in

Take of Colchicum
Alcohol,

moderately

fine

powder, sixteen troyounces

Water, each, a

sufiicient quantity.

Mix two measures

of Alcohol with one of Water,

moisten the Colchicum Seed with six fluidounces
of the mixture, press
ator,
it

firmly in a conical percoit

and pour the mixture upon
of
tincture

until twelve

fluidounces
aside,

have

passed.
until

Set this

and continue the percolation

two pints
Evaporate

more of tincture have
and

b^n
mix

obtained.
it

this to four fluidounces,

with the reserved

tincture,

filter

through paper.

EXTRACTUM CONII FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Hemlock.

Take

of Hemlock, recently dried and in fine

powder, sixteen troyounces;
17

166

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
Acetic Acid half a fiuidounce

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
hol,

the Acid with three pints of Diluted Alco-

moisten the powder with half a pint of the
it

mixture, pack

in a conical glass percolator,
it

and

gradually pour the mixture upon
fluidounces
aside,

until twelve

of

tincture

have

passed.
first

Set

this

and continue the percolation,

with the
w^ith

remainder of the mixture, and

afterwaids

Diluted Alcohol, until three pints more of tincture

have been obtained.

Evaporate

this,

by means of

a water-bath, at a temperature not exceeding 150°,
to four fluidounces,
ture,

mix

it

with the reserved

tinc-

and

filter

through paper.

EXTRACTUM DULCAMARiE FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Bittersiveet.

Take of

Bittersweet, in moderately fine powder,

sixteen troyounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, ten troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Bittersweet with half a pint of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,

and pour upon

it

Diluted Alcohol until three pints

of tincture have passed.

Evaporate

this,

by means

J

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.

167

of a water-bath, to a pint, add the Sugar, evaporate

agam

to

a pint, and strain the liquid while hot.

ExTRACTUM Ergots Fluidum.
Fluid Extract of Ergot,

Take of

Ergot, in

fine
;

powder, sixteen troy-

ounces

Acetic Acid half a fluidounce
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acid with three pints of Diluted Alco-

hol, and,

having moistened the Ergot with four
mixture, introduce
it

fluidounces of the

into a

conical glass percolator, pressing moderately,

and

gradually pour the mixture upon
fluidounces of tincture have passed.

it

until twelve

Set this aside,

and continue the percolation,
mainder of the mixture, and

first

with the

re-

afterwards with

Diluted Alcohol, until three pints more of tincture

have been obtained.

Evaporate

this,

by means of
150'',

a water-bath, at a temperature not exceeding
to four fluidounces,

mix

it

with the reserved

tinc-

ture,

and

filter

through paper.

168

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
ExTRACTUM Gentians Fluidum.
Fluid Extract of Gentian.

Take of Gentian,

in

moderately

fine

powder,

sixteen troy ounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Gentian with six fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, introduce
colator, pressing
it

into a conical perit

moderately, and pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until twelve fluidounces of tincture have passed.

Set this aside, and continue

the percolation until two pints more of tincture

have been obtained.

Evaporate

this,

by means of
it

a water-bath, to four fluidounces,
reserved tincture, and
filter

mix

with the

through paper.

EXTRACTUM HyOSCYAMI FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Henbane.

Take

of

Henbane
Alcohol,

Leaf, in fine powder, sixteen

troyounces;

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix two measures of Alcohol with one
mixture, pack
it

of Water,

moisten the powder with six fluidounces of the
firmly in a conical percolator, and
it

gradually pour the mixture upon
fluidounces of
tincture

until twelve

have passed.

Set this

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
aside,

169

and continue the percolation with the same
ui>til

mixture
ture

two pints and a half more of
obtained.

tinc-

have been

Evaporate

this,

by

means of a water-bath,
reserved tincture, and

at a temperature not ex-

ceeding 150°, to four fluidounces,
filter

mix

it

with the

through paper.

ExTRACTUM Ipecacuanha

FluidUxM.

Fluid Extract of Ipecacuanlia.

Take of Ipecacuanha,
troyounces

in fine powder, sixteen

Acetic Acid a fluidounce
Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Ipecacuanha with six fluidounces
of Alcohol, introduce
press
it it

into a conical percolator,
it

firmly,

and pour Alcohol upon

until

three pints of tincture have slowly passed, or until

the Ipecacuanha

is

exhausted.

Distil

ofi"

the alcohol
until

from the

tincture,

by means of a water-bath,

a syrupy liquid

is left.

Mix

this

with the Acetic
boil the

Acid and ten fluidounces of Water,
gently until
it is

mixture

reduced to half a pint, and the
Filter the liquid

resinous matter has separated.

when

cold,

and add

sufficient
17*

Water, through the

170
filter^

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
to

pint.

make the filtered liquid measure half a Lastly, mix this with half a pint of Alcohol.

EXTRACTUM LUPULIN^ FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Lupulin.

Take of Lupulin sixteen troyounces
Stronger Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce the Lupulin into a percolator, press
it

firmly, and,

having covered
it

it

with a piece of

muslin, pour upon
ually until twelve
passed.

Stronger Alcohol very grad-

fluidounces of tincture

have

Set this aside in a close vessel, and con-

tinue

the

percolation

until

twenty fluidounces
Evaporate

more of
this,

tincture have been obtained.

by means of a water-bath,

at a temperature

not exceeding 150°, to four fluidounces, and mix
it

with the reserved tincture.

EXTRACTUM PrUNI

YlRGINlANJ^. FlUIDUM.
Baric.
fine

Fluid Extract of Wild-cherry

Take of Wild-cherry Bark,
sixteen troyounces

in

powder,

Sweet Almond two troyounces
Sugar, in coarse powder, twenty-four

troyounces

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
Alcohol,

171

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Introduce the Bark, previously mixed with four
fluidounces of Alcohol, into a cylindrical percolator,
press
it
it

firmly,

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
have slowly passed.
alco-

until three pints of tincture
this distil off

From

two pints and a half of

hol, and,

having mixed the residue w4th a pint of
to

Water, evaporate, by means of a water-bath,
half a pint.

Beat the Almond into a paste, and rub
successive portions of

this

with

Water

until, after straining
all

through a coarse sieve or cloth, nearly
stance of the

the subinto an

Almond has been converted

emulsion, and twelve fluidounces of liquid have

been obtained.

Mix

this

with the liquid

first

ob-

tained, in a suitable

bottle, and,

having closely

stopped
hours.

it,

agitate occasionally during twenty-four

Then express quickly and
;

strongly through

a cloth

and,

if

the expressed liquid measure less

than eighteen fluidounces, add Water to the residue,

and again express

until that quantity

is

obtained.

Filter the expressed liquid through cotton flannel,

in a covered funnel, into a bottle containing the

Sugar.

Shake the

bottle occasionally during the
is

process until the Sugar

dissolved,

and continue

172

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.

the filtration until the syrupy liquid measures two
pints.

Lastly,

mix

the whole thoroughly together.

EXTRACTUM RhEI FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Rliuharh.

Take of Rhubarb,

in moderately fine powder,

sixteen troyounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, eight troy-

ounces

;

Alcohol a pint
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Rhubarb with four fluidounces of
the Alcohol, introduce
press
it

it

into a conical percolator,
it

gently,

and pour upon

the remainder of

the Alcohol.

When

the liquid has disappeared

from the surface, gradually pour on Diluted Alcohol until a pint of tincture has passed.
aside in a

Set this

warm

place until reduced

by sponta-

neous evaporation to six fluidounces, and continue
the percolation until two pints more of tincture

have been obtained.
heat to six fluidounces

Evaporate
;

this

by a gentle
and

then add the Sugar, and,

when

this is dissolved, the reserved tincture,
is

continue the heat until the whole
the measure of a pint.

reduced to

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
EXTRACTUM SaRSAPARILL^ FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of SarsapariUa.

173

Take of SarsapariUa,

in

moderately

fine

powder,

sixteen troyounces;

Sugar, in coarse powder, ten troyounces;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the SarsapariUa with half a
Diluted Alcohol, pack
percolator,
it

piiit

of

firmly in a cylindrical
it

and gradually pour upon

Diluted

Alcohol until four pints of tincture have been obtained.

Evaporate

this,

by means of a water-bath,

to a pint; then

add the Sugar, and continue the
the
liquid
is

evaporation

until
pint,

reduced to the
hot.

measure of a

and strain while

ExTRACTUM Sarsaparill^ Fluidum Compositum.

Compound Fluid Extract of Sarsaparilla.
Extractum Sarsaparillse Fluidum, Pharm., 1850.

Take of

Sarsaparilla, in moderately fine powder,

sixteen troyounces;

Liquorice

Root,

in

moderately

fine

powder.

Bark of
fine

Sassafras Root, in moderately

powder, each, two troyounces

Mezereon, in moderately fine powder,
three hundred and sixty grains;

174

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
Sugar twelve troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
pack
it

the powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with ten fluidounces of Diluted Alcohol,
firmly
in

a
it

cylindrical

percolator,

and

gradually pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until four

pints of tincture have been obtained.
this,

Evaporate
fluid-

by means of a water-bath,
;

to

twelve

ounces

then add the Sugar, and continue the
is

evaporation until the liquid

reduced to the mea-

sure of eighteen fluidounces, and strain while hot.

EXTRACTUM SeNNJE FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Senna.

Take of Senna,

in

moderately

fine

powder,

sixteen troyounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, eight troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten

the

Senna with six fluidounces of
it

Diluted Alcohol, introduce
lator, press it firmly,

into a conical percoj^our

and gradually

upon

it

Diluted Alcohol until a pint of tincture has passed.
Set this aside in a

warm

place until reduced

by

spontaneous evaporation to half a pint.

Continue

the percolation, until two pints more of tincture

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
have been obtained.
liaving evaporated
to half a pint,
it,

176

To

this

add the Sugar, and,

by means of a water-bath,
with the reserved tincture,

mix

it

and

strain.

EXTR ACTUM SeRPENTARI^ FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Serpentaria.

Take of

Serpentaria, in moderately fine powder,

sixteen troy ounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Serpentaria with
of Diluted Alcohol, introduce
colator, press
it

fixQ

lluidounces

it

into a conical perit

firmly,

and gradually pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until twelve fluidounces of tincture have
passed.

Set this aside, and continue

the percolation until two pints and a half more
of tincture have been obtained.

Evaporate this
it is re-

at a temperature not exceeding 150° until

duced

to four fluidounces,

mix

it

with the reserved

tincture,

and

filter

through paper.

ExTRACTUM Spigeli^ et Senx.e Fluidum.
Fluid Extract of Spigelia and Senna.

Take

of Fluid

Extract of Spigelia ten
;

fluid-

ounces

176

EXTRACTA FLUIDA.
Fluid Extract of Senna six fluidounces

Carbonate of Potassa half a troyounce;
Oil of AnisBj
Oil of

Caraway, each, twenty minims.
dissolve in

Mix

the Fluid Extracts, and

the
Oils,

mixture the Carbonate of Potassa and the
previously rubbed together.

EXTRACTUM SpIGELI^ FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Spigelia.

Take of

Spigelia, in fine

powder, sixteen troy-

ounces

;

Sugar, in coarse

powder, eight troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Spigelia with six fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, introduce
lator, press it firmly,
it

into a conical percoit

and gradually pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until a pint of tincture has passed.
Set this aside in a

warm

place until

it is

reduced

by spontaneous evaporation
ture have been obtained.

to half a pint.

Continc-

tinue the percolation until two pints

more of

To
it,

this

add the Sugar,

and, having evaporated
hath, to half a pint,
ture,

by means of a waterwith the reserved tinc-

mix

it

and

strain.

EXTRACTA

FLUIDxi.

177

EXTRACTUM TaRAXACI FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Dandelion.

Take of Dandelion,

in moderately fine powder,

sixteen troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Dandelion with four fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, introduce
lator, press it firmly,
it

into a conical percoit

and gradually pour upon

Diluted Alcohol until half a pint of tincture has
passed.

Set this aside, and continue the percola-

tion until

two pints and a half more of tincture
Evaporate this at a temit is

have been obtained.

perature not exceeding 120° until half a pint,
filter

reduced to

mix

it

with the reserved tincture, and

through paper.

ExTRACTUM

Uv^

Ursi Fluidum:.
Ursi.

Fluid Extract of Uva

Take

of

Uva

Ursi, in

moderately

fine

powder,

sixteen troyounces

Sugar, in

coarse

powder, eight troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the

Uva
it

Ursi with six fluidounces of
it

Diluted Alcohol, introduce
percolator, press
firmly,

into a conical glass

and gradually pour upon

18

178
it

EXTKACTA ELUIDA.

Diluted Alcohol until half a pint of tincture has
Set this aside, and continue the percola-

passed.

tion until

two pints and a naif more of tincture
Evaporate
this,

have been obtained.

by means

of a water-bath, to four fiuidounces, and, having
dissolved the Sugar in
it wdiile

hot,

mix

it

with

the reserved tincture, and strain.
orate the whole
to a pint.

Lastly, evapis

by a gentle heat

until it

reduced

EXTRACTUM YALERIANyE FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Valerian.

Take

of Valerian, in fine powder, sixteen troy-

ounces

;

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Valerian with six fiuidounces of
Alcohol,
press
it
it

introduce
firmly,

it

into

a conical percolator,

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
have passed.

until twelve fiuidounces of tincture

Set this aside, and continue the percolation until

two pints more of tincture have been obtained.
Evaporate this
to four fiuidounces at a

tempera-

ture not exceeding 120°,
tincture,

mix

it

with the reserved

and

filter

through paper.

EXTRxVCTA FLUIDA.
ExTRACTUM Veratri Yiridis Fluidum.
Fluid Extract of Ame7'lcan
Hellebore.

179

Take of American Hellebore,
sixteen troyounces

in fine

powder,

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Hellebore with six fluidounces of
Alcohol,

introduce

it

into

a cylindrical

perco-

lator, press it firmly,

and gradually pour Alcohol

upon

it

until half a pint of tincture has passed.

Set this aside, and continue the percolation until

two pints and a half more of tincture have been
obtained.
bath,
at

Evaporate

this,

by means of a water150°, to
tincture,

a temperature not exceeding

half a pint,

mix

it

Avith

the

reserved

and

filter

through paper.

EXTRACTUM ZiNGIBERIS FlUIDUM.
Fluid Extract of Ginger.

Take of Ginger,

in fine powder, sixteen troy;

ounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Ginger with four fluidounces of Alcohol, introduce it into a cylindrical percolator, press
it

firmly,

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

it

until

twelve fluidounces of tincture have passed.
aside,

Set this

and continue the percolation

until

twenty

180
fluidounces

FERRUM.
more of tincture have been obtained.
this to four fluidounces,
filter

Evaporate

mix

it

with the

reserved tincture, and

through paper.

FERRUM.
Ferri Chloridum.
Chloride of Iron.

Take

of Iron, in the form of wire and cut in
pieces,

two troyounces

Muriatic Acid twelve troyounces
Nitric Acid a troy ounce, or a sufficient
qua^itity.

To

eight troyounces of the Muriatic Acid, introflask,

duced into a two-pint

add the Iron, and
is

apply a gentle heat until the Acid

saturated

and
add

efiervescence has ceased.
to it

Filter the solution,

the remainder of the Muriatic Acid, heat

the mixture nearly to the boiling point in a fourpint
porcelain capsule, and

add Nitric Acid in

successive portions until red fumes are no longer

evolved, and a drop of the liquid ceases to yield

a blue precipitate with ferridcyanide of potassium.
Transfer the liquid to a smaller capsule, evaporate
it

by a gentle

heat,

on a sand-bath,

until reduced

FERRUM.
to eight troyounces
grains,

181

and three hundred and sixty
with
glass,

and

set

it

aside, covered
it

for

several days, in order that
crystalline mass.

may

form a

solid,

Lastly, break this into pieces,

and keep the fragments in a well-stopped bottle
protected from the light.
In orange-yellow, crystalline pieces, very deliquescent, and wholly
soluble in water, alcohol, and ether.
Its solution in

water affords

with ammonia a brown precipitate of hydrated sesquioxide of iron,

and does not yield a blue one with ferridcyanide of potassium (red
prussiate of potassa).

Ferei Citras.
Citrate of Iron.

Take

of Solution of Citrate of Iron a convenient

quantity.

Evaporate
spread
salt
it

it

to

the consistence of syrup, and
glass, so that,

on plates of

on drying, the

may

be obtained in scales.

Ferri et Ammonia Citras.
Citrate of Iron

and Ammonia..

Take

of Solution of Citrate of Iron a pint

Water

of

Ammonia

six fluidounces.

Mix
Water

the Solution of Citrate of Iron with the
of

Ammonia, evaporate the mixture
18*

at a

temperature not exceeding 150° to the consistence

182 of syrup, and spread

FERRUM.
it

on plates of

glass, so that,

on drying, the

salt

may

be obtained in scales.
The

In garnet-red translucent scales, of a slightly ferruginous taste,

and readily and wholly soluble

in water.

solution causes no

change in the colour of litmus or turmeric, and does not yield a
precipitate with ferrocyanide of potassium.

Solution of potassa pro-

duces with

it

a precipitate of sesquioxide of iron, with the evolution

of ammonia.

Ferri et Ammonia Sulphas.
Sulphate of Iron and Ammonia.

Ammo n io-fe

)

r ic

Alu m

Take

of Solution of Tersulphate of Iron
pints

two

Sulphate of

Ammonia

four troyounces

and a

half.

Heat the Solution of Tersulphate of Iron to the boiling point, add the Sulphate of Ammonia, stirring until
it is

dissolved,

and

set the liquid aside

to crystallize.

Wash

the

crystals

quickly with

very cold water, wrap them in bibulous paper, and

dry them in the open

air.

In octohedral crystals, of a pale-violet colour, soluble in one and a
half parts of water at 60°, and in less than their weight of boiling
water.
cipitate.

Potassa produces with the solution a reddish-brown pre-

When

rubbed with potassa and moistened, the

salt emits

the odour of ammonia.

FERRUM.
Ferri et Ammonite Tartras.
Tartrate of Iron

183

and Ammonia.
two

Take of Tartaric Acid twelve troyounces
Solution of Tersulphate of Iron
pints

and a half;

Carbonate of Ammonia,
Distilled
tity.

Water, each, a

sufficient

quan-

Dissolve six troyounces of the Tartaric Acid in

two pints of
fully

Distilled Water,

and saturate

it
;

care-

by means of Carbonate of Ammonia

then

add the remainder of the Acid, dissolved
pint of Distilled Water, and

in half a

mix

the solutions.

With
mula

the Solution of Tersulphate of Iron, prepare

the Hydrated Oxide of Iron according to the forfor that substance,

and add

it

gradually to

the solution of bitartrate of ammonia, kept at the

temperature of 150°, until

it is

no longer dissolved.

Then

filter

the solution, and evaporate to the conLastly, spread
salt
it

sistence of syrup.
glass, so that,

on plates of
be obtained

on drying, the

may

in scales.
In transparent, garnet-red scales, which have a saccharine
taste.
It
is

When

reduced

to

powder

it

assumes a rust-brown colour.
its

slowly soluble in rather more than
in alcohol and ether.
It is

weight of water, but insoluble
is

neutral to test paper, and
alkalies, nor

not precipi-

tated by solutions of the

jfixed

rendered blue by ferro-

184
cyanide of potassium.

FERRUM.
When
incinerated
it

yields twenty-nine per

cent, of sesquioxide of iron.

Ferri et Potass^ Tartras.
Tartrate of Iron

and

Pota^sa.

Take of Solution of Tersulphate of Iron a pint
Bitartrate of Potassa seven troyounces
Distilled

Water four

pints.

With

the Solution of Tersulphate of Iron, pre-

pare the Hydrated Oxide of Iron according to the

formula for that substance.

Mix

the Bitartrate

of Potassa with the Distilled Water, heat the mixture to 140°, and, keeping
it

at that temperature,
stir-

gradually add the Hydrated Oxide, frequently
ring, until it ceases to be dissolved.

Then

filter

the solution, evaporate

it

by means of a waterit

bath to the consistence of syrup, and spread

upon

plates of glass or porcelain, so that,

on dry-

ing, the salt

may

be obtained in scales.

In transparent scales, of a dark ruby-red colour, and wholly soluble
in water.

The

solution does not change the colour of litmus, and, at

common
soda, or

temperatures, does not yield a precipitate with potassa,

ammonia.

Ferrocyanide of potassium does not render

it

blue, unless

an acid be added.

FERRUM.
Ferri et Quini^ Citras.
Citrate of Iron

185

and Quinia.

Take of Solution of
ounces
;

Citrate of Iron ten fluid-

Sulphate of Quinia a troyounce
Diluted Sulphuric Acid,

Water of Ammoniaj
Distilled Water, each, a sufficient quantity.

Triturate the Sulphate of Quinia with six fluid-

ounces of Distilled Water, and, having added
cient Diluted

suffi-

Sulphuric Acid to dissolve

it,

cau-

tiously pour into the solution

Water
in

of

Ammonia,
excess.

with

constant
the

stirring,

until

slight

Wash

precipitated
it to

quinia on

a

filter,

and,

having added

the Solution of Citrate of Iron,

maintained at the temperature of 120° hy means
of a water-bath, stir constantly until
it is

dissolved.

Lastly, evaporate the solution to the consistence

of syrup, and spread

it

on plates of

glass, so that,

on djying, the
to

salt

may

be obtained in scales.

In thin transparent scales, varying in colour from redclish-bro-wn

yellowish-brown with a tint of green, according
Its taste is ferruginous

to the

thickness
bitter.
It

of the scales.
is

and moderately

slowly soluble in cold water, more readily so in hot water, but

insoluble in ether and officinal alcohol.

Ammonia, added

to the

aqueous

solution,

deepens

its

colour to reddish-brown, and causes a

186

FERRUM.

whitish, curdy precipitate of quinia; but no sesquioxide of iron is

thrown down.

Ferri Ferrocyanidum.
Ferrocyanide of Iron.
Ferri Ferrocjanuretum, Pliarm., 1850.
Pure Prussian Blue.

Take of Ferrocyanide
ounces
;

of Potassium nine troy-

Solution of Tersulphate of Iron a pint;

Water three

pints.

Dissolve the Ferrocyanide of Potassium in

two

pints of the Water, and add the solution gradually
to the Solution of Tersulphate of Iro^, previously

diluted with the remainder of the Water, stirring

the mixture during the addition.
liquid,

Then

filter

the

and wash the precipitate on the

filter

with

boiling water until the washings pass nearly tasteless.

Lastly, dry

it,

and rub

it

into powder.

A
acids,

tasteless powder, insoluble in

water and the dilute mineral
Dilute muriatic acid,

and having a

rich, deep-blue colour.
it,

after

having been boiled on

yields no precipitate on the addition

of

ammonia.

Ferri Lactas.
Lactate of Iron.

Take

of Lactic Acid a fluidounce

FERRUM.

187

Iron, in the form of filings, half a troy-

ounce
Distilled

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix
an iron

the Acid with a pint of Distilled
vessel,

Water

in

add the Iron, and digest the mixture

on a water-bath, supplying Distilled Water, from
time to time, to preserve the measure.
action has ceased,
filter

When

the

the solution, while hot,

into a porcelain capsule,
tallize.

and

set it aside to crys-

At

the end of forty-eight hours, decant
little alcohol,

the liquid, wash the crystals with a

and dry them on bibulous paper.

By

evaporating the mother-water in an iron

vessel to one-half, filtering while hot,

and setting

the liquid aside, more crystals

may

be obtained.

In greenish-white crystalline crusts or grains, of a mild, sweetish,
ferruginous taste, soluble in forty-eight parts of cold, and twelve of
boiling water, but insoluble in alcohol. up, gives out thick, white, acid fumes,

Exposed -to heat

it

froths

and becomes black; sesqui-

oxide of iron being

left.

If

it

be boiled for fifteen minutes with

nitric acid of the specific gravity 1"20, a white, granular deposit of

mucic acid

will occur

on the cooling of the liquid.

Ferri Oxidum Hydratum.

Hydrated Oxide of Iron.

Take of Solution

of Tersulphate of Iron a pint;

Water of Ammonia,
Water, each, a
sufficient quantity.

188

FERRUM.
the

To
Water

Solution of Tersulphate of Iron, pre-

viously mixed
of

with three pints of Water, add
stirring,

Ammonia, with constant

until

in slight excess.

Then pour

the whole on a wet

muslin strainer, and wash the precipitate with

water until the washings pass nearly
Lastly,
to

tasteless.

mix

the precipitate with sufficient

Water
which

make

the mixture measure a pint and a half,
it

and transfer

to a

wide-mouthed

bottle,

must be well stopped.

When Hydrated

Oxide of Iron

is

to be

made

in

haste for use as an antidote, the washing

may

be

performed more quickly, though

less perfectly,

by

pressing the strainer forcibly with the hands until

no more
cipitate

liquid passes,
sufficient

and then mixing the
to bring the
half.
'in

pre-

with

Water

mixture

to the

measure of a pint and a
is

Hydrated Oxide of Iron
effervescence.
loses,

wholly soluble

muriatic acid without
it

If dried at a heat not exceeding 180°,
to

afterwards

on exposure

a red heat, eighteen per cent, of water.

Ferri Phosphas.
PJiosphatG of Iron.

Take of Sulphate of Iron
Water eight

five

troyounces

Phosphate of Soda six troyounces
pints.

FERRUM.

189

Dissolve the salts separately, each in four pints

of the

Water

;

then mix the solutions, and set the
precipitate

mixture

by that the

may

subside.

Lastly, having poured off the supernatant liquid,

wash the

precipitate with hot water,

and dry

it

wuth a gentle heat.

A
in

bright slate-coloured

po-vT^der,
is

insoluble in water, but soluble

the

mineral acids.

It

dissolved

by

dilute

muriatic

acid,
insol-

forming a solution which yields with ammonia a precipitate,
uble in an excess of the alkali.

Ferri Pyrophosphas.
Pyrophosphate of Iron.

Take of Phosphate of Soda seven troyounces
and a half;
Solution of Tersulphate of Iron seven
fluidounces, or a sufficient quantity;
Citric

Acid two troyounces
of

Water

Ammonia

five

fluidounces

and a

half, or a sufficient

quantity;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Heat the Phosphate of Soda,
sule,

in a porcelain cap-

until it undergoes
it

the

watery fusion, and
Transfer
it

continue the heat until

becomes dry.

the dry salt to a shallow iron capsule, and heat
to incipient

redness, without fusion.
19

Then

dis-

190
solve
it

FERRUM.
in three pints of

Water, with the aid of

heat, and,
it

having

filtered the solution

and cooled

to the temperature of 50°,

add Solution of Ter-

sulphate of Iron until this ceases to produce a precipitate.

Stir the

mixture thoroughly, and pour

it

upon a muslin

strainer, and,
it

when

the precipitate

has drained, wash

with water until the washings
it

pass nearly tasteless, and transfer
porcelain capsule.

to a

weighed

To
sel,

the Citric Acid, contained in a suitable ves-

add Water of

Ammonia

until the

Acid

is

satu-

rated and dissolved.

Then add

the solution to
stir

the precipitate in the weighed capsule,
together,

them
is

and evaporate until the liquid
Spread

re-

duced to sixteen troyounces.

this

on

plates of glass or porcelain, so that, on

drying,

the salt
serve
it

may

be obtained in scales.

Lastly, pre-

in a well-stopped

bottle, protected

from

the light.
Pyrophosphate of Iron, thus prepared,
having an acidulous, slightly saline
soluble in water.
taste.
is

in apple-green scales,

It is

wholly and freely

Ferrocyanide of potassium,
to

when added

to the

dilute solution, gives rise
precipitate.

a jiRe-blue colour, but produces no

This preparation contains forty-eight per cent, of aniron.

hydrous pyrophosphate of

FERRUM.
Ferri Subcarbonas.
Suhcarhonate of Iron,
Precipitated Carbonate of Iron,

191

Take

of Sulphate of Iron eight troyounces

Carbonate of Soda nine troyounces

Water
of the

eight pints.

Dissolve the salts separately, each in four pints

Water;

then

mix

the
it

solutions,

and,
pre-

having stirred the mixture, set
cipitate

by that the
poured
off

may

subside.
liquid,

Having

the

supernatant

wash the

precipitate

with

water until the washings pass nearly

tasteless,

and dry

it

on bibulous paper without heat,
wholly dissolved by dilute muriatic acid

A reddish-brown powder,
oxide of iron
cess.
is

with slight effervescence, forming a solution from which the sesquicompletely precipitated by

ammonia added

in ex-

The

liquid

which remains

is

not coloured by hydrosulphuric

acid or ferrocyanide of potassium.

Ferri Sulphas,
Sul'phate of Iron.

Take

of I»on, in the form of wire
pieces,

and cut in

twelve troyounces

Sulphuric Acid eighteen troyounces

Water

eight pints.

Mix

the Sulphuric Acid and Water, and add

192 the Iron;

FERRUM.
then heat the mixture until efferves-

cence ceases.

Pour

off the solution, and,

having
filter

added

thirtji

grains

of

Sulphuric

Acid,

through paper, allowing the lower end of the funnel to touch the bottom of the receiving vessel.

Evaporate the

filtered

liquid in a matrass until
;

sufficiently concentrated

then set

it

aside in a

covered vessel to crystallize.
in a funnel, dry

Drain the crystals

them on bibulous paper, and keep
crystals, Trhich,

them
air,

in a well-stopped bottle.
on exposure
to the

In transparent, bluish-green
effloresce
;

and change
iron
is

their

colour.

It

is

wholly soluble in

water
is

and,

when

immersed in the

solution, a film of copper

not deposited upon

its

surface.

Ferri Sulphas Exsiccata.

Dried Sulphate of Iron,

Take

of Sulphate of Iron, in

coarse

powder,

twelve troy ounces.

Expose

it,

in

an unglazed earthen

vessel, to a
it

moderate heat, with occasional

stirring, until
Iffeat

has effloresced; then increase the

to 300°,
until

and maintain

it

at about that temperature

the salt ceases to lose weight.
residue
to
fine

Lastly, reduce the
it

powder, and keep
^

in a well-

stopped bottle.

FERRUM.
A

193

grayish-white powder, soluble in water with the exception of

a small residue, and corresponding, in chemical characters, with

Sulphate of Iron.

Ferrum Redactum.
Reduced
Iron.
Ferri Pulvis, Pharm,^ 1850.

Take

of Subcarbonate of Iron thirty troyounces.

Wash
until

the Subcarbonate thoroughly with water

no traces of sulphate of soda are indicated by
tests,

the appropriate

and calcine

it

in a shallow
it

vessel until free from moisture.

Then spread

upon a

tray,

made by bending an oblong
this into a

piece of

sheet-iron in the form of an incomplete cylinder,

and introduce

wrought iron reductionin

tube, of about four

inches

diameter.
;

Place
and,

the reduction-tube in a charcoal furnace

by

means of a

self-regulating generator of hydrogen,
it

pass through
purified

a stream of that gas, previously

by bubbling successively through Solution
its

of Subacetate of Lead, diluted with three times

volume of water, and through milk of

lime, seve-

rally contained in four-pint bottles, about one-third
filled.

Connect with the further extremity of the

reduction-tube, a lead tube bent so as to dip into

water.

Make
;

all

the junctions air-tight by appro-

priate lutes

and,

when

the hydrogen has passed
19*

1^2

JjERRUM.
;

the Iron
cence

thPo

fill

the whole of the apparatus to
air,

cea^'ion

of atmospheric

light the

fire,

and

added that part of the reduction-tube, occupied by
tie Subcarbonate, to a dull-red heat,

which must

be kept up so long as the bubbles of hydrogen,

breaking from the water covering the

orifice

of

the lead tube, are accompanied by visible aqueous

vapour.

When
fire,

the reduction

is

completed, reto cool to the
re-

move

the

and allow the whole

ordinary temperature, keeping up, during the
frigeration, a

moderate current of hydrogen through

the apparatus.

Withdraw the product from the
any portion of
it

reduction-tube, and, should

be

black instead of iron-gray, separate such portion
for use in a

subsequent operation.

Lastly, having
it

powdered the Reduced Iron, keep
stopped bottle.

in a well-

When

thirty troyounces of Subcarbonate of Iron

are operated on, the process occupies from five to

eight hours.

A tasteless

powder, of an iron-gray colour.
of one part of sulphuric acid

It is

wholly dissolved

by a mixture

and sixty of water,

without yielding the odour of hydrosulphuric acid.
tion of
it,

A

small porscale

struck on an anvil with a smooth

hammer, forms a

having a brilliant metallic lustre.

HYDRARGYRUM.

195

HYDRARGYRUM.
Hydrargyri Chloridum CorSosivum.
Corrosive Chloride of Mercury.
Corrosive Sublimate.

Take

of

Mercury twenty-four troy ounces
Sulphuric Acid thirty-six troyounces
Chloride of Sodium eighteen troyounces.

Boil,

by means of a sand-bath, the Mercury with
is left.

the Sulphuric Acid until a dry white mass

Rub

this,

when

cold,

with the Chloride of Sodium
j

in an earthenware mortar

then sublime with a

gradually increasing heat.
In colourless crystals or crystalline masses, which are fusible by
heat, sublime without residue,
alcohol,

and are entirely soluble in water,
its

and

ether.

Lime-water occasions with

solution a reddish

or yellow precipitate, and

ammonia

a white one.

HlTDRARGYRI ChLORIDUM MiTE.

Mild Chloride of Mercury.
Calomel.

Take

of

Mercury

forty-eight troyounces
;

Sulphuric Acid thirty-six troyounces

Chloride of Sodium eighteen troyounces
Distilled
Boil,

Water a

sufficient quantity.

by means of a sand-bath, twenty-four

troy-

ounces of the Mercury with the Sulphuric Acid

196

HYDRARGYRUM.
mass
is left.

until a dry white
cold,

Rub

this,

when

with the remainder of the Mercury, in an

earthenware mortar, until they are thoroughly
mixed.

Then add
it

the Chloride of Sodium, and,

having rubbed

with the other ingredients until

globules of Mercury cease to be visible, sublime the

mixture.
fine

Reduce the sublimed matter
it

to a

very

powder, wash

with boiling Distilled Water

until the washings afford

no precipitate with water

of ammonia, and dry

it. in-

A white or pale-buff

powder, wholly volatilizable by heat, and

soluble in water, alcohol, and ether.
precipitate of oxide of mercury,

With potassa
is

it

yields a black

which

reduced by heat to the
it,

metallic state.

Distilled water, after

having been boiled with

yields no precipitate with

ammonia

or nitrate of silver.

Hydrargyri Cy^anidum.
Cyanide of Mercury.
Hydrargyri Cyanuretum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Ferrocyanide
ounces
;

of Potassium five troy-

Sulphuric Acid four troyounces and

one hundred and twenty grains

Red Oxide

of Mercury, in fine powder,

AVater, each, a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Ferrocyanide of Potassium in twenty
fluidounces of Water, and add the solution to the

HYDRARGYRUM.

197

Sulphuric Acid, previously diluted with ten fluid-

ounces of Water, and contained in a glass retort.
Distil

the mixture nearly to dryness into a re-

ceiver, containing ten fluidounces of

Water and

three troyounces of
aside

Red Oxide

of Mercury.

Set

two fluidounces of the

distilled liquid,

and

to the

remainder add, with agitation,
to destroy the
filter

sufficient

Red Oxide
acid.

odour of hydrocyanic

Then

the solution, and, having added

the reserved liquid, evaporate the whole in a dark
place, in order that crystals

may

form.

Lastly,

dry the

crystals,

and keep them
from the
crystals,

in a well-stopped

bottle, protected
In white prismatic
muriatic acid
is

light.

wholly soluble in water.
hydrocyanic acid
is

When
evolved,

added
its

to the solution,

made
is

evident by

odour, and bichloride of mercury

is left,

which
is

entirely volatilized

by

heat.
off,

When

Cyanide of Mercury
is

he«.ted,

cyanogen

is

given

and a blackish matter

left

con-

taining globules of mercury.

Hydhargyri Iodidum Rubrum.

Red

Iodide of Mercury.
of

Take of Corrosive Chloride
ounce
;

Mercury a

troy-

Iodide of Potassium a troyounce and

one hundred and twenty grains
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

198

HYDRARGYRUM.
a

Dissolve the Corrosive Chloride of Mercury in

pint and a half, and the Iodide of Potassium in

half a pint of Distilled Water, and
tions.

mix

the solu-

Collect the precipitate
it

upon a

filter,

and,

having washed

with Distilled Water, dry
it

it

with

a gentle heat, and keep

in a well-stopped bottle.

A
when

red powder, which becomes yellow
cold.
It is

when

heated, and red again
scales,

wholly volatilized by heat, condensing in

which are

at first yellow, but afterwards
is

become

red.

It is insoluble

in water, but

dissolved

by

boiling alcohol, and

by

solutions of

iodide of potassium

and chloride of sodium.

Hydrargyri Iodidum Viride.
Green Iodide of Mercury.
Hydrargyri Iodidum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Mercury a troyounce
Iodine three hundred grains;

Stronger Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
hoi,

the Mercury and Iodine in a mortar, and,

havinor added half a fluidounce of Stronger Alcotriturate

the mixture until the ingredients
Stir

are

thoroughly incorporated.

the

mixture
trituit is

occasionally, and, at the

end of two hours,

rate again, with considerable pressure, until

nearly dry.

Then rub

it

up with Stronger Alcoreduced to a uni-

hol, gradually added, until it is

form thin paste

;

and, having transferred this to a

HYDRARGYRUM.
filter,

199

wash

it

with Stronger Alcohol until the

washings cease to produce a permanent cloudiness

when dropped
heat,

into

a large

quantity of water.

Lastly, dry the Iodide in the dark with a gentle

and keep

it

in a well-stopped bottle, pro-

tected from the hght.

A
is

greenish-yellow powder, which becomes red

when

heated.

It

insoluble in water and alcohol.
it

Officinal stronger alcohol,
filtration,

when

shaken with

and separated by

gives but a transient

cloudiness on being dropped into water, and,

when evaporated from

a porcelain surface, leaves only a faint-red

stain.

Htdrargyri Oxidum Kubrum.

Red Oxide of Mercury.
Red
Precipitate.

Take of Mercury

thirty-six troyounces

Nitric Acid twenty-four troyounces

Water two
heat, in the

pints.

Dissolve the Mercury, with the aid of a gentle

Acid and Water previously mixed,
to dryness.
it

and evaporate

Rub

the dry mass into

powder, and heat

in a very shallow vessel until

red vapours cease to arise.

An
heated

orange-red powder, entirely soluble in muriatic acid.
it

When
;

does not emit reddish fumes, but gives off oxygen
is

while

the mercury either runs into globules or

wholly dissipated.

200

HYDRARGYRUM.
IIydrargyri Sulphas Flava.
Yellow Sulphate of Mercury.
Hjdrargyri Sulphas Flavus, Pharm.^ 1850.
Turpetli Mineral.

Take of Mercury

four troyounces

Sulphuric Acid six troyounces.

Mix them Rub

in a glass vessel,

and

boil,

by means

of a sand-bath, until a dry white mass remains.
this into

powder, and throw
off the

it

into boiling

water.

Pour

supernatant liquid, wash the

yellow precipitate repeatedly with hot water, and

dry

it.

A lemon-yellow powder,
dissipated

sparingly soluble in water.

It is entirely

by

heat, sulphurous acid being evolved,

and globules of

mercury sublimed.

Hydrargtri Sulphuretum Rubrum.

Red Sulphuret of Mercury.
Cinnabar.

Take of Mercury

forty troyounces

Sublimed Sulphur eight troyounces.

To
tinue

the Sulphur, previously melted, gradually
stirring,

add the Mercury, with constant
the

and con-

heat until the mass begins to swell.
the vessel from the
fire,

Then remove
it

and cover

closely to prevent the contents

from inflaming.

HYDRARGYRUM.
When
In

201

the mass

is

cold,

rub

it

into powder,

and

sublime.
brilliant, crystalline masses, of a It
it

deep-red colour and fibrous
heat.

texture.

is

entirely

volatilized

by

When

heated with

potassa

yields globules of mercury.

It is not soluble in either

nitric or muriatic

acid^but

is

dissolved

by a mixture of these
it,

acids.

Acetic acid which has been digested with
cipitate

does not yield a pre-

with iodide of potassium.

Hydrargyrum Ammoniatum.
Ammoniated Mercury.
White
Precipitate.

Take of Corrosive Chloride of Mercury
ounces

six troy

Water

of

Ammonia

eight fluidounces
pints.

Distilled

Water eight

Dissolve the Corrosive Chloride of Mercury in

the Distilled Water, with the aid of heat, and to

the solution,

when

cold,

add the Water of

Am-

monia, frequently

stirring.

Wash

the precipitate

with water until the
tasteless,

washings

become nearly

and dry

it.

In white powder or pulverulent masses, decomposed and entirely
dissipated

by a strong

heat, insoluble in water

and

alcohol, but dis-

solved without effervescence

by muriatic

acid.

Acetic acid which

has been digested with

it,

does not yield with iodide of potassium
It is

either a yellow or blue precipitate.

not blackened
it

when rubbed

with lime-water.

Heated with solution of potassa,
20

becomes yellow

and evolves ammonia.

202

INFUSA.

Hydrargyrum cum Creta.
Mercury with Chalk.

Take of Mercury three troyounces
Prepared Chalk
five troyounces.

Rub them
visible,

together until the globules cease to be

and the mixture acquires a uniform gray
When
it is

colour.

A gray
is

powder, partly dissipated by heat.

a small portion

treated with dilute acetic acid in excess,

pautly dissolved,

nothing remaining but mercury in the form of minute globules,
visible

by the

aid of a magnifying glass.
is

The
;

solution,

on tho
filtered

addition of muriatic acid,
after this addition,

rendered opalescent

and,

when

and treated with hydrosulphuric

acid, does not

yield a black precipitate.

INFUSA.
InFUSUM ANGUSTURiE.
Infusion of Angustura.

Take of Angustura,

in moderately coarse

pow

der, half a troyounce

Water a
"Water, pack

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidrachms of
it

firmly in a conical percolator, and
it

gradually pour Water upon
liquid measures a pint.

until the filtered

INFUSA.
This Infusion

203

may

also be prepared

by mace-

rating the Angustura in a pint of boiling Water,
for

two hours, in a covered

vessel,

and

straining.

Infusum Anthemidis.
Infusion of Chamomile.

Take of Chamomile half a troyounce
Boiling

Water a

pint.

Macerate

for ten

minutes in a covered vessel,

and

strain.

Infusum Buchu.
Infusion of Bacliu.

Take of Buchu a troyounce
Boiling

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate
strain.

for

two hours in a covered

and

Infusum Calumb^.
Infusion of Columho.

Infusum Colomb?e, PJiarm., 1850.

Take of Columbo,

in moderately coarse powder,

half a troyounce

Water
Water, pack

a sufficient quantity.
ol

Moisten the powder with two iluidrachms
it

firmly in a conical percolator,

and

I
204

INFUSA.
*

gradually pour "Water upon
liquid measures a pint.

it

until the filtered

This Infusion
rating the

may

also be prepared

by mace-

Columbo

in a pint of boiling Water, for

two hours,

in a covered vessel,

and

straining.

Infusum Capsici.
Infusion of Capsicum,

Take of Capsicum,
Boiling

in

coarse

powder, half a

troyounce

Water

a pint.
in a covered vessel,

Macerate
strain.

for

two hours

and

Infusum Caryophylli.
Infusion of Cloves.
of Cloves, bruised, one hundred and twenty

Take

grains

Boiling

Water a

pint.

Macerate
strain.

for

two hours

in a covered vessel,

and

Infusum CASCARiLLiE.
Infusion of Cascarilla.

Take

of Cascarilla, in moderately coarse powder, a troyounce
;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

INFUSA.

205

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of

Water, pack

it

firmly in a conical percolator, and
it

gradually pour Water upon
liquid measures a pint.

until

the filtered

This Infusion

may

also be prepared

by mace-

rating the Cascarilla with a pint of boiling Water,
for

two hours,

in a covered vessel,

and

straining.

Inpusum Catechu Compositum.

Compound

Infusion of Catechu.

Take of Catechu, in fine powder, half a troyounce
Cinnamon, in moderately
sixty grains
fine

powder,

Boiling

Water a

pint.

Macerate for an hour in a covered vessel, and
strain.

Infusum Cinchona Flav^.
Infusion of Yellotv Oincliona,

Take of Yellow Cinchona,

in moderately fine

powder, a troyounce

Aromatic Sulphuric Acid a fluidrachm

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acid with a pint of Water.

Then

moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of the
mixture, and, having packed
20*

it

firmly in a conical

206

INFUSA.
upon
it

glass percolator, gradually pour

the re-

mainder of the mixture, and afterwards Wat^r,
until the filtered liquid measures a pint.

Intusum Cixchon^e Rubr^.
Infusion of

Red Cinchona.
in moderately fine

Infusum Cinchonas Compositum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of

Eed Cinchona,
der, a

pow-

troyounce

Aromatic Sulphuric Acid a fluidrachm;

Water

a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acid with a pint of Water.

Then

moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of the
mixture, and, having packed
glass
it

firmly in a conical

percolator, gradually pour

upon

it

the re-

mainder of the mixture, and afterwards Water,
until the filtered liquid measures a pint.

IxFusuM Digitalis.
Infusion of Digitalis.

Take

of Digitalis, in coarse powder, sixty grains

Tincture of Cinnamon a fluidounce
Boiling

;

Water half a

pint.

Macerate the DigitaUs with the Water for two
hours in a covered vessel, and strain; then add
the Tincture of Cinnamon, and mix.

INFUSA.
IXFUSUM EUPATORII.
Infusion of Thoroughwort.

207

Take of Thoroughwort
Boiling

a troyounce a pint.
vessel,

Water

Macerate for two hours in a covered
strain.

and

Intusum Gentianje Compositum.

Compound

Infusion of Gentian.

Take

of Gentian, in moderately coarse powder,

half a troyounce
Bitter Orange Peel, in moderately coarse

powder.
Coriander, in moderately coarse powder,
each, sixty grains

Alcohol two fluidounces

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the xAlcohol with fourteen lluidounces of

Water, and, having moistened the mixed powders

with three fluidrachms of the menstruum, pack

them firmly

in a conical percolator,
first

and gradually

pour upon them

the remainder of the men-

struum, and afterwards Water, until the filtered
liquid measures a pint.

208

INFUSA.
Infusum Humuli.
Infusion of Hops.

Take of Hops half a troyounce
Boiling

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate for two hours in a covered
strain.

and

Infusum Juniferi.
Infusion of Juniper.

Take of Juniper,
Boiling

bruised, a troyounce
pint.
vessel,

Water a

Macerate
strain.

for

an hour in a covered

and

Infusum Krameri^.
Infusion of Rhatany.

Take of Rhatany,

in moderately coarse powder,

a troyounce

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of

Water, and, having packed
glass

it

firmly in a conical

percolator, gradually pour

Water upon

it

until the filtered liquid measures a pint.

INFUSA.
Infusum Lini Compositum.

209

Compound Infusion of Flaxseed.
Take of Flaxseed half a troyounce
and twenty grains
Boiling
;

Liquorice Root, bruised, one hundred

Water a

pint.

Macerate for two hours in a covered vessel, and
strain.

Infusum Pareir^.
Infusion of Pareira Brava.

Take

of Pareira Brava, bruised, a troyounce

Boiling

Water a

pint.

Macerate for two hours in a covered vessel, and
strain.

Infusum Picis Liquids.
Infusion of Tar.
Tar Water.

Take of Tar a pint

Water

four pints.

Mix them, and shake
infusion,

the mixture frequently

during twenty-four hours.

Then pour

off

the

and

filter

through paper.

210

INFUSA.
Infusum Pruni Virginians.
Infusion of Wild-cJierry Bark.

Take of Wild-cherry Bark,
Water a
Water,

in moderately coarse

powder, half a troy ounce
sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with six fluidrachms of
let it

stand for an hour, pack

it

gently in a

conical glass percolator,

and gradually pour Water
measures a pint.

upon

it

until the filtered liquid

Infusum Quassia.
Infusion of Quassia,

Take of

Quassia,

rasped,

one

hundred

and

twenty grains

Water a
and

pint.
vessel,

Macerate for twelve hours in a covered
strain.

Infusum Ehei.
Infusion of Rliuharb.

Take of Rhubarb,
Boiling

bruised, one

hundred and

twenty grains

Water half a

pint.

Macerate
strain.

for

two hours

in a covered vessel,

and

INFUSA.
InFUSUM RoSiE COMFOSITUM.

211

Compound Infusion of Rose.

Take

of

Red Rose half a troyounce
Diluted

Sulphuric

Acid

three

flui-

drachms
Sugar, in coarse powder, a troyounce

and a half;
Boiling

Water two

pints

and a

half.

Pour the Water upon the Rose
glass or porcelain vessel; then

in a covered

add the Acid, and
Lastly, strain

macerate for half an hour.
liquid,

the

and

in

it

dissolve the Sugar.

Infusum Salvia.
Infusion of Sage.

Take

of Sage half a troyounce

^

Boiling

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate

for half

an hour in a covered

and

strain.

Infusum Senn^.
Infusion of Senna.

Take of Senna a troyounce
Coriander, bruised, sixty grains;

Boihng Water a

pint.

212

INFUSA.
vessel,

Macerate for an hour in a covered
strain.

and

Infusum Serpentari^.
Infusion of Serpejitaria.

Take of

Serpentaria, in moderately coarse powder, half a troyounce

Water a
Water, pack

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidrachms of
it

firmly in a conical percolator, and
it

gradually pour Water upon
liquid measures a pint.

until

the filtered

This Infusion

may

also be prepared

by mace-

rating the Serpentaria with a pint of boiling Water,
for

two hours, in a covered

vessel,

and

straining.

Infusum Spigeli^.
Infusion of Spigelia.

Take of

Spigelia half a troyounce

Boiling

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate for two hours in a covered
strain.

and

INFUSA.
Infusum Tabaci.
Infusion of Tobacco.

213

Take of Tobacco sixty grains
Boiling

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate
strain.

for

an hour in a covered

and

Infusum Taraxaci.
Infusion of Dandelion.

Take of Dandelion,
Boiling

bruised,

two troyounces

Water a

pint.

Macerate for two hours in a covered vessel, and
strain.

Infusum Valerianae.
Infusion of Valerian.

Take of Valerian,

in moderately coarse powder,

half a troyounce

Water a
Water, pack

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidrachms of
it

firmly in a conical percolator, and

gradually pour

Water upon

it

until the filtered

liquid measures a pint.

This Infusion

may

also be prepared

by mace-

rating the Valerian with a pint of boiling Wat^r,
for

two hours,

in a oovered vessel,

and

straining.

214

LINIMENTA.
Infusum Zingiberis.
Infusion of Ginger.

Take of Ginger,
Boiling

bruised, half a troyounce

Water a

pint.
vessel,

Macerate for two hours in a covered
strain.

and

LINIMENTA.
LiNiMENTUM Ammonite.
Liniment of Ammonia.

Take of Water of Ammonia a

fluidounce

Olive Oil two troyounces.

Mix them.
LiNIMENTUM CaLCIS.

Lhue Liniment.

Take of Solution of Lime

eight fluidounces

Flaxseed Oil seven troyounces.

Mix them.
LiNIMENTUM Camphors.
Liniment of Camphor.

Take

of

Camphor

three troyounces

Olive Oil twelve troyounces.
Dissolve the

Camphor

in the Oil.

LINIMENTA.
LiNIMENTUM CaNTHARIDIS.
Liniment of Caniliarides.

215

Take

of Cantharides, in fine powder, a troy ounce
Oil of Turpentine half a pint.

Digest the Cantharides with the Oil for three

hours in a close vessel, by means of a water-bath,

and

strain.

^

LiNIMENTUM ChLOROFORMI.
Liniment of Chloroform,

Take of

Purified Chloroform three troyounces

Olive Oil four troyounces.

Mix

them.

LiNIMENTUM SAPONIS.
Soa^ Liniment
Tinctura Saponis Camphor ata, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Soap,
Oil of

in shavings, four troyounces

Carnphor two troyounces

Rosemary half a fluidounce

Water four fluidounces
Alcohol two pints.

Mix the Alcohol and Water, digest
dissolved

the Soap with
it is

the mixture, by means of a water-bath, until
;

then

filter,

and, having added the

Cam-

phor and

Oil,

mix the whole thoroughly

together.

216

LIQUORES.
LiNIMENTUM TeREBINTHIN^.
Liniment of Turpentine.

Take of Eesin Cerate tweb^e troy ounces
Oil of Turpentine half a pint.

Add

the Oil to the Cerate previously melted,

and mix them.

LIQUORES.
Liquor Ammonia Acetatis.
Solutiwi of Acetate of
Spirit

Ammonia,
pints

of Mindererus.

Take of Diluted Acetic Acid two
Carbonate of
quantity.

Ammonia

a

sufficient

Add
this
is

the Carbonate gradually to the Acid until
saturated,

and

filter.

This preparation,

when dispensed, should be freshly made. A colourless liquid, which is not darkened by the action of
or chloride of barium.

hydro-

sulphuric acid, and does not yield a precipitate with nitrate of silver

Liquor Arsenici et Hydrargyri
Solution of Iodide of Arsenic

Iodidi.

and Mercury.

Take

of Iodide of Arsenic,

LIQUORES.
Red

217

Iodide of Mercury, each, thirty-five

grains
Distilled

Water half a

pint.

Rub

the Iodides with half a fluidounce of the

Water, and, when they have dissolved, add the remainder of the Water, and
filter

through paper.

Liquor Barii Chloridi.
Solution of Chloride of Barium,

Take of Chloride of Barium a troyounce
Distilled

Water three

fluidounces.

Dissolve the Chloride in the Distilled Water,

and

filter

through paper.

Liquor Calcii Chloridi.
Solution of Chloride of Calcium.

Take

of Marble, in small pieces, six troyounces

Muriatic Acid twelve troyounces
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acid with half a pint of Distilled Water,

and gradually add the Marble.

Towards the

close

of the efiervescence apply a gentle heat, and,

when

the action has ceased, pour

off"

the clear liquid, and

evaporate to dryness.

Dissolve the residue in one

and a half times
filter

its

weight of Distilled Water, and
21*

through paper.

t218

LIQUORES.
Liquor Calcis.
Solution of Lime.
Idme-^ater.

Take of Lime four troyounces
Distilled

Water eight

pints.
little

Upon
Distilled

the Lime,

first

slaked with a

of the

Water, pour the remainder, and

stir

them

together.
set it

Then immediately cover the vessel, and Keep the solution, aside for three hours.

together with the undissolved Lime, in a well-

stopped bottle, and pour off the clear liquid

when

wanted

for use.
free

Water
purity,

from saline or other obvious imdistilled,

though not

may

be employed in

this process.
Solution of
cooling.

Lime becomes turbid when

heated, and clear again on

Its alkaline reaction disappears entirely,
it,

when an

excess

of carbonic acid has been passed through
expelled

and the excess has been

by

boiling.

Liquor Ferri Citratis.
Solution of Citrate of Iron.

Take of

Citric Acid, in coarse

powder,

five troy-

ounces and three hundred and sixty
grains

f

Solution of Tersulphate of Iron a pint;

LIQUORES.
Water
of

219

Ammonia,

Distilled Water, each, a sufficient quantity.

Dilute the Solution of Tersulphate of Iron with

two pints of
of

Distilled

Water, add a slight excess
stirring,

Water of Ammonia, with constant
the
precipitate
it

transfer
strainer,

formed

to

a

muslin

and wash

with water until the wash-

ings are nearly tasteless.

When

the precipitate

is

drained, put half of

it

in a porcelain capsule on a

water-bath, heated to 150°, add the Citric Acid,

and

stir

the mixture until the precipitate

is

nearly

dissolved.
cipitate as

Then add

so

much

of the reserved pre-

may

be necessary fully to saturate the

Acid.

Lastly, filter the liquid,

and evaporate
it

it,

at a temperature not exceeding 150°, until

is

reduced to the measure of a pint.

Liquor Ferri Nitratis.
Solution of Nitrate of Iron.

Take of

Iron, in the form of wire
pieces,

and cut in

two troyounces and a half;
;

Nitric Acid five troyounces
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix
tilled

the Iron with twelve fluidounces of Disin a

Water

wide-mouthed

bottle,

and add

to

220

LIQUORES.
fre-

the mixture, in small portions at a time, with

quent agitation, three troyounces of the Nitric
Acid, previously mixed with
Distilled

six

fluidounces of
set-

Water, moderating the reaction by

ting the vessel in cold water, in order to prevent

the occurrence of

red fumes.

When

the

effer-

vescence has nearly ceased, agitate the solution

with the undissolved Iron until a portion of the
liquid,

on

being

filtered,

exhibits

a pale-green

colour.
it

Then

filter

the liquid, and, having poured
it

into a capacious porcelain capsule, heat

to the

temperature of 130°, and add the remainder of the
Nitric Acid.

When

the effervescence has ceased,

continue the heat until no more gas escapes, and

then add sufficient Distilled Water to bring the
liquid to the measure of thirty-six fluidounces.

A

transparent liquid, having a pale-amber colour, and a specific
It

gravity between 1'060 and 1*070,
cipitate

does not afford a blue pre-

with ferridcyanide of

iron.

A

fluidounce of

it,

on the

addition of

ammonia

in excess, yields a reddish-brown precipitate,
dried,

which,

when washed,

and

ignited,

weighs between eight and

ten grains.

Liquor Ferri Subsulphatis.
Solution of Suhsidpliate of Iron.
Solution of Persulphate of Iron.

— Monsel's Solution.
coarse

Take

of Sulphate of Iron, in

powder,

twelve troyounces

LIQUORES.

221

Sulphuric Acid a tro jounce and thirty
grains
Nitric

Acid a troyounce

and three

hundred grains
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix
Water

the Acids with half a pint of Distilled
in

a

capacious

porcelain

capsule,

and,

having heated the mixture to the boiling point,

add the Sulphate of Iron, one-fourth
stirring
after

at a time,

each

addition

until

effervescence

ceases.

Then keep

the solution in brisk ebullition
are no longer
perceptible,
tint.
suffi-

until nitrous vapours

and the colour assumes a deep ruby-red
Lastly,

when

the liquid

is

nearly cold, add
it

cient Distilled

Water

to

make

measure twelve

fluidounces.

An

inodorous, syrupy liquid, of a ruby-red colour, and of an
taste,

extremely astringent
is 1'552.

without causticity.

Its specific
all

gravity

It

mixes with water and with alcohol in

proportions

without decomposition, and yields, with ammonia, a bulky reddish-

brown

precipitate.

By

evaporating a portion of

it

on a glass sur-

face with a moderate heat, the salt
scales,

may

be obtained in transparent

which are deliquescent, and readily soluble in water.

222

LIQUORES.
Liquor Ferri Tersulphatis.
Solution of TersuJpliate of Iron.

Take

of Sulphate of Iron, in coarse powder,

twelve troyounces
Sulphuric Acid two troyounces and
sixty grains
Nitric

Acid a troyounce and three

hundred and sixty grains

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Acids with half a pint of

Water

in a

capacious porcelain capsule, and, having heated

the mixture to the boiling point, add the Sul-

phate of Iron, one-fourth at a time, stirring after

each addition until effervescence ceases.

Then

continue the heat until the solution acquires a

reddish-brown
odour.
Lastly,

colour,

and

is

free
is

from nitrous
nearly cold,

when

the liquid
to

add

sufficient
half.

Water

make

it

measure a pint

and a

A

dark, reddish-brown liquid, nearly devoid of odour, and of an
Its specific gravity is 1*320.
all

acid and extremely styptic taste.

It

mixes with water and with alcohol in
composition.
in excess, a

proportions without de-

A

fluidounce of

it

yields, on the addition of
is

ammonia
free

bulky reddish-brown precipitate, which

from

black discoloration, and which,

when washed,

dried,

and

ignited,

weighs sixty-nine grains.

LIQUORES.
Liquor Gutta-perchje.
Solution of Gutta-percha.

223

Take of Gutta-percha^
and a half;
Purified

in thin slices, a troyounce

Chloroform
;

seventeen

troy-

ounces

Carbonate of Lead, in
troy ounces.

fine

powder, two

To twelve troyounces
occasionally until
it is

of the Chloroform, con-

tained in a bottle, add the Gutta-percha, and shake

Carbonate of

Then add the Lead, previously mixed with the redissolved.

mainder of the Chloroform, and, having several
times shaken the whole together at intervals of
half an hour, set the mixture aside, and let
it

stand for ten days, or until the insoluble matter

has subsided, and the solution become limpid, and
either colourless or of a pale-straw colour.

Lastly,

decant the liquid, and keep
bottle.

it

in a well-stopped

Liquor Hydrargyri Nitratis.
Solution of Nitrate of Mercury.

Take

of Mercury three troyounces
Nitric Acid five troyounces
Distilled

Water

six fluidrachms.

224

LIQUORES.

Dissolve the Mercury, with the aid of a gentle
heat, in the Acid, previously
tilled

mixed with the

Dis-

Water.

When
it

reddish
to

vapours cease to
seven troyounces

arise,

evaporate the liquid
half,

and a

and keep

in a well-stopped bottle.

A

transparent, nearly colourless, acid liquid, having the specific
It is not precipitated

gravity 2*165.

by the addition of

distilled

water

;

and the diluted solution

affords

with potassa, a dirty-yellow
one, soluble

precipitate,

and with iodide of potassium, a bright-red

in an excess of the precipitant.

When

dropped on a bright sur-

face of copper, the diluted solution instantly deposits a coating of

mercury.

Liquor Iodinii Compositus.

Compound
Take

Solution of Iodine.

of Iodine three hundred and sixty grains

Iodide of Potassium a troyounce and a
half;
Distilled

Water a

pint.

Dissolve the Iodine and Iodide of Potassium in

the Distilled Water.

Liquor Magnesia Citratis.
Solution of Citrate of Magnesia.

Take

of Magnesia

one

hundred and twenty

grains

LIQUORES.
Citric

225

Acid four hundred

and

fifty

grains

Syrup of

Citric

Acid two fluidounces

Bicarbonate of Potassa forty grains

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Citric Acid in four fluidounces of

Water, and, having added the Magnesia,
it
is

stir until

dissolved.

Filter the solution into a strong

twelve-ounce bottle, containing the Syrup of Citric
Acid.

Then add
Water

the Bicarbonate of Potassa, and
to nearly
fill

sufficient

the bottle, which

must be

closed with a cork, secured with tw^ine.

Lastly, shake the mixture occasionally until the

Bicarbonate

is

dissolved.

Liquor Morphine Sulphatis.
Solution of Sulphate of Morphia.

Take of Sulphate
Distilled

of

Morphia eight grains
pint.

Water half a

Dissolve the Sulphate of Morphia in the Distilled

Water.

Liquor Plumbi Subacetatis.
Solution of Suhacetate of Lead.

Take

of Acetate of

Lead sixteen troyounces
22

226

LIQUORES.
Oxide of Lead, in
fine

powder, nine

troyounces and a half;
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Boil the Acetate and Oxide with four pints of
Distilled
for

Water, in a glass or porcelain vessel,
occasionally

half an hour,

adding Distilled

Water
paper.
bottle.

to preserve the measure,

and

filter

through

Lastly, keep the liquid in a well-stopped

A

colourless liquid, of the specific gravity 1'267.
to the air,

It is

decomposed

by exposure
added
to

carbonate of lead being formed.
it

When

a solution of gum,
it

occasions a dense white precipitate.

In other respects

possesses the properties of an aqueous solution

of acetate of lead.

(See

Plumbi

Acetas.)

Liquor Plumbi Subacetatis Dilutus.
Diluted Solution of Suhacetate of Lead.
Lead-water,

Take of Solution of Subacetate of Lead three
fluidrachms
Distilled

Water a

pint.

Mix them.
Liquor Potass^.
Solution of Potassa.

Take

of Bicarbonate

of Potassa

fifteen

troy-

ounces

;

LIQUORES.
Lime nine troyounces
Distilled

227

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Bicarbonate in four pints of Distilled

Water, and heat the solution until

effer-

vescence ceases.

Then add
boiling

Distilled

Water

to

make up
solution

the loss by evaporation, and heat the
to

the

point.

Mix

the

Lime

with four pints of Distilled Water, and, having
heated the mixture to the boiling point, add
it

to

the alkaline solution, and boil for ten minutes.

Then transfer the whole to a muslin strainer, and, when the liquid portion has passed, add sufficient
Distilled

Water, through the strainer, to
liquid

make

the

strained

measure seven

pints.

Lastly, keep the Uquid in well-stopped bottles of

green glass.
Solution of Potassa, thus prepared, has the specific

gravity 1'065, and contains five and eight-

tenths per cent, of hydrate of potassa.

Solution of Potassa
following manner.

may

also be prepared in the

Take

of Potassa a troyounce
Distilled

Water

a pint.

Dissolve

the

Potassa in the Distilled Water,
to

and allow the solution

stand until the sedioff

ment

subsides.

Then pour

the clear liquid,

228

LIQUORES.
it

and keep
glass.

in a

well-stopped bottle

of

green

A colourless
acid,

liquid,

having an extremely acrid

taste,

and a strong

alkaline reaction.

It causes

no effervescence when added to a dilute

and yields a yellow precipitate with bichloride of platinum.
saturated with dilute nitric acid,
it

When

gives no precipitate, or

only a slight one, with carbonate of soda, chloride of barium, or
nitrate of silver.

Liquor PoTASSiE Arsenitis.
Solution of Arsenite of Potassa.

Take

of Arsenious Acid, in small pieces,

Bicarbonate of Potassa, each, sixty-four
grains

Compound
Distilled

Spirit of

Lavender half a

fluidounce

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Boil the

Arsenious Acid and Bicarbonate of

Potassa, in a glass vessel, with twelve fluidounces

of Distilled Water, until the Acid
solved.

is

entirely dis-

To

the solution,

when
it

cold,

add the Comsufficient

pound

Spirit of Lavender,

and afterwards
measure a

Distilled

Water

to

make

pint.

Liquor Potass^e Citratis.
Solution of Citrate of Potassa.

Take

of Citric Acid half a troyounce

LIQUORES.

229

Bicarbonate of Potassa three hundred

and thirty grains

Water half a
and
strain the solution

pint.

Dissolve the Acid and Bicarbonate in the Water,

through muslin.

Liquor Sod^.
Solution of Soda.

Take of Carbonate of Soda twenty-six
ounces
;

troy-

Lime
Dissolve

eight troyounces

Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

the

Carbonate in three pints and a

half of Distilled Water, and heat the solution to

the boiling point.

Mix

the

Lime with three

pints

of Distilled Water, and, having heated the mixture to the boiling point, add
it

to the solution of

the Carbonate, and boil for ten minutes.
transfer the whole to a muslin strainer, and,

Then

when

the liquid portion has passed, add sufficient Distilled

Water, through the strainer, to make the
Lastly, keep

strained liquid measure six pints.

the liquid in well-stopped bottles of green glass.
Solution of Soda has the specific gravity 1*071,
22*

230

LIQUORES.
five

and contains

and seven-tenths per
an extremely acrid

cent,

of

hydrate of soda.

A
*

colourless liquid, having
It

taste,

and a strong
to

alkaline reaction.
acid,

causes no effervescence

when added

a dilute

and yields no precipitate with bichloride of platinum.
it

When

saturated with dilute nitric acid,

gives no precipitate, or only a

slight one, with carbonate of soda, chloride of barium, or nitrate

of silver.

Liquor Sod^ Chlorinate.
Solution of Chlorinated Soda.

Take of Chlorinated Lime twelve troyounces
Carbonate of Soda twenty-four troyounces
;

"Water twelve pints.
Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in three pints
of the Water, with the aid of heat.

Triturate the

Chlorinated Lime, a

little

at a time,

with small

portions of the Water, gradually added, until a

smooth, uniform mixture

is

obtained.

Mix

this

intimately with the remainder of the Water, and
set the

mixture aside

for twenty-four hours.

Then

decant the clear liquid, and, having transferred
the residue to a muslin strainer, allow
until
sufficien^t
it

to drain

liquid has passed to

make, with
this

the decanted liquid, eight pints.

Mix

tho-

roughly with the solution of Carbonate of Soda,

MAGNESIUM.
transfer the mixture to a muslin strainer,
it to

231

and allow

drain, adding water, if necessary, towards the

close, until

eleven pints and a half of liquid have

passed.

Lastly, keep the liquid in well-stopped

bottles, protected

from the

light.
having a slight

A transparent
1'045.
It

liquid, of a greenish-yellow colour,
taste.

odour of chlorine, and a sharp, saline

Its specific gravity is

rapidly decolorizes solution of indigo, and produces a

copious, light-brown precipitate with solution of sulphate of iron.

MAGNESIUM.
Magnesia.
Magnesia.

Take of Carbonate of Magnesia a convenient
quantity.

Put

it

into an earthen vessel,

and expose

it

to

a red heat for two hours, or until the carbonic acid
is

entirely expelled.
Magnesia
is
;

wholly dissolved, without effervescence, by dilute

muriatic acid
of

and the solution yields no precipitate with oxalate

ammonia

or chloride of barium.

232

MELLITA.

MELLITA.
Mel Despumatum.
Clarified Honey.

Take
Melt

of
it

Honey a convenient

quantity.
re-

by means of a water-bath, and then

move

the scum.

Mel Ros^.
Honey of Rose.

Take of Red Rose,

in moderately fine powder,

two troyounces
Clarified

Honey

twenty-five troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
percolator,
it

firmly in a conical glass

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol
six

upon

it

until

fluidrachms of filtered liquid

have passed.

Set this aside, and

continue the
liquid
is

percolation until half a pint
obtained.

more of

Evaporate

this,

by means of a waterHoney.

bath, to ten fluidrachms, add the reserved liquid,

and mix the whole with the

Clarified

^

MISTUR^.
Mel
Take
Sodje Boratis.

233

Honey of Borate of Soda.
of Borate of Soda, in fine powder, sixty
grains
Clarified

Honey

a troy ounce.

Mix them.

MISTUR^.
MiSTURA AmMONIACI.
Mixture of Ammoniac.

Take

of

Ammoniac one hundred and twenty
grains

Water half a

pint.

Rub
added,
strain.

the

Ammoniac with
they
are

the Water, gradually

until

thoroughly mixed,

and

MiSTURA Amygdala.
Mixture of Almojid.

Take of Sweet Almond half a troyounce

Gum

Arabic,

in

fine

powder, thirty

grains

Sugar one hundred and twenty grains
Distilled

Water

eight fluidounces.

234

MISTURiE.
it

Having blanched the Almond, beat

with the

Gum

Arabic and Sugar, in a mortar, until they are
;

thoroughly mixed

then rub the mixture with the

Distilled Water, gradually added,

and

strain.

MiSTURA ASSAFCETID^.
Mixture of Assafetida.

Take

of Assafetida one

hundred and twenty

grains

Water half

a^pint.

Rub

the Assafetida with the Water, gradually

added, until they are thoroughly mixed.

MiSTURA Chloroformi.
Mixture of Chloroform.

Take of

Purified Chloroform half a troyounce

Camphor

sixty grains

The yolk
Water

of one

Egg
by
then

six fluidounces.
first
itself,

Rub

the yolk in a mortar,

with the Camphor, previously dissolved in the
Chloroform, and, lastly, with the Water, gradually
added, so as to

make

a uniform mixture.

MISTUR^.
MiSTURA CrET^.
Clialh Mixture.

235

Take

of Prepared Chalk half a troyounce

Sugar,

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder, each, one

hundred and twenty grains

Cinnamon Water,
Water, each, four fluidounces.

Rub them
mixed.

together until they are thoroughly

MiSTURA Ferri Composita.

Compound Mixture of Iron. Take of Myrrh,
Sugar, each, sixty grains

Carbonate of Potassa twenty-five grains;
Sulphate of Iron, in coarse powder,

twenty grains
Spirit of

Lavender half a fluidounce

Rose Water seven fluidounces and a
half.

Rub

the Myrrh, Sugar, and Carbonate of Potassa

with the Rose Water, gradually added, then with
the Spirit of Lavender, and, lastly, with the Sul-

phate of Iron
into a bottle,

;

and pour the mixture immediately

which must be well stopped.

236

MISTUR^.
MiSTURA Glycyrrhiz^ Composita.

Compound Mixture of Liquorice.
Brown
Mixture.

Take

of Liquorice, in fine powder,

Sugar, in coarse powder.

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder, each, half

a troyounce

Camphorated Tincture of Opium two
fluidounces

Wine

of

Antimony a fluidounce
Ether half a
fluid-

Spirit of Nitrous

ounce

;

Water twelve

fluidounces.

Kub

the Liquorice, Sugar, and
;

Gum Arabic

with

the Water, gradually added
ingredients,

then add the other

and mix the whole together.

MiSTURA Potass^

Citratis.

Mixture of Citrate of Potassa.
Liquor Potassae Citratis,* Pharm.^ 1850.
Neutral Mixture.

Take

of

Lemon
name

Juice, fresh, half a pint
by the

* The former

of this preparation, as prepared

first

formula given in the Pharmacopoeia of 1850.
the

It is still retained as

name

of the preparation

when made by

the second formula, as

amended

in the present revised edition.

See page 228.

MORPHIA.
Bicarbonate
quantity.

237

of

Potassa

a

sufficient

Add

the Bicarbonate gradually to the
is

Lemon

Juice until the acid

completely saturated; then

strain through muslin.

MORPHIA.
Morphia.
Morphia.

Take of Opium,

sliced,

twelve troyounces
six fluidounces

Water of Ammonia
Animal Charcoalj
Alcohol,

in fine powder,

Distilled Water, each, a sufficient quantity.

Macerate the Opium with four pints of Distilled

Water
it

for twenty-four hours, and,

having worked
for twenty-four

with the hands, again macerate

hours,

and

strain.

In like manner, macerate the

residue twice successively with the

same quantity
the infusions,

of Distilled Water, and strain.

Mix

evaporate to six pints, and
pints of Alcohol,

filter;

then add five

and afterwards three fluidounces
23

of the Water of

Ammonia, previously mixed with

238

MORPHIA.
After twenty-four hours,

half a pint of Alcohol.

pour in the remainder of the Water of Ammonia,
mixed, as before, with half a pint of Alcohol, and
set the

liquid

aside for twenty-four hours

that

crystals

may

form.

To

purify these, boil

them

with two pints of Alcohol until they are dissolved,
filter

the

solution,
it

while

hot,

through Animal

Charcoal, and set

aside to crystallize.
is

Morphia, thus prepared,

in colourless crystals,

which are inflam-

mable, and wholly dissipated by a red heat.

It is scarcely soluble
i

in cold water, slightly soluble in boiling water, and freely so boiling alcohol.
it

Nitric acid first reddens

it,

and afterwards renders
it

yellow.

With

solution of sesquichloride of iron

assumes a

deep-blue colour.
viously reddened

Its solution restores the colour of litmus, pre-

by an

acid.

Morphia Acetas.
Acetate of Morphia.

Take

of Morphia, in fine powder, freed

from

narcotina by the action of Ether, a

troyounce
Distilled

Water half a pint
Distilled

Acetic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the

Morphia with the
Morphia

Water;

then carefully drop in Acetic Acid, constantly
stirring, until the
is

saturated and dis-

solved.

Evaporate the solution, by means of a

MORPHIA.

239
it

water-bath, to the consistence of syrup, and set
aside until
it

concretes.
it

Lastly, dry the salt with
into powder.
and
in alcohol.
is

a gentle heat, and rub

A white powder, wholly
solution potassa throws

soluble in water
precipitate,

From

its

down a

which

dissolved by

an

excess of the alkali.

It is affected

by

heat, nitric acid,

and sesquisulphuric

chloride of iron in the

same manner as Morphia.

When

acid

is

added

to the salt, acetous

vapours are evolved.

Morphia Murias.
Muriaie of Moiyhia.

Take of Morphia,
Distilled

in fine powder, a troyounce

Water half a pint
Distilled

Muriatic Acid a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Morphia with the

Water;

then carefully drop in Muriatic Acid, constantly
stirring, until the

Morphia

is

saturated and dis-

solved.

Evaporate the solution, by means of a
it

water-bath, so that on cooling
Lastly, drain the crystals,

may

crystallize.

and dry them on bibu-

lous paper.
In snow-white, feathery crystals, wholly soluble in water and in
alcohol.

Potassa, added to the solution, throws

down a

precipitate,

which
it

is

dissolved

by an excess of the

alkali.

With

nitrate of silver

yields a precipitate, insoluble in nitric or muriatic acid, but soluble
It is affected

in an excess of ammonia.
eesquichloride of iron in the

by

heat, nitric acid,

and

same manner as Morphia.

240

MUCILAGINES.
Morphine Sulphas.
Sulphate of Morphia.

Take 'of Morphia,
Distilled

in fine powder, a troyounce

Water half a pint
Sulphuric

Diluted

Acid

a

sufficient

quantity.

Mix

the

Morphia with the

Distilled

Water;

then carefully drop in Diluted Sulphuric Acid,
constantly stirring, until the Morphia
is

saturated

and

dissolved.

Evaporate the solution, by means
it

of a water-bath, so that on cooling
lize.

may

crystal-

Lastly, drain the crystals, and dry

them on

bibulous paper.
In snow-white, feathery crystals, which are wholly soluble in
water.
Potassa, added to the solution, throws
is

down a
With

precipitate,

which

dissolved

by an excess

of the alkali.

chloride of
It

barium

it

yields a white precipitate insoluble in nitric acid.

is affected

by

heat, nitric acid,

and sesquichloride of iron

in tho

same manner

as Morphia.

MUCILAGINES.
MuciLAGO Acacia.
Mucilage of

Gum
pint.

Arabic.

Take

of

Gum Arabic, in pieces,
Water half a

four troyounces;

MUCILAGINES.

241
agitate occa-

Add

the

Water
it is

to the

Gum Arabic,
and

sionally until

dissolved,

strain.

MuciLAGO Sassafras.
Mucilage of Sassafras,
Infusum Sassafras Medullas, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of

Sassafras Pith one

hundred and twenty

grains

"Water a pint.

Macerate

for three hours,

and

strain.

MuciLAGO Tragacanth^.
Mucilage of Tragacanth.

Take

of Tragacanth a troyounce

Boiling

Water a

pint.

Macerate the Tragacanth with the Water for
twenty-four hours, occasionally stirring
;

then rub

them together

so as to render the

mixture uni-

form, and strain forcibly through muslin.

MuciLAGO Ulmi.
Mucilage of Slippery-elm Bark.
Infusum Ulmi,
Pliarni,^ 1850.

Take

of Slippery-elm Bark, sliced

and bruised,

a troyounce
Boiling

Water a
23*

pint.

242

OLEA DESTILLATA.
vessel,

Macerate for two hours in a covered
strain.

and

OLEA DESTILLATA.
The
Distilled Oils,
stain,

when dropped on

paper, pro-

duce a greasy

which entirely disappears on

exposure to a moderate heat.

When

shaken with

water in a graduated tube and allowed to separate,
they are not diminished in volume.
of potassa, or solid chloride of calcium,
fied

Dry
is

acetate

not lique-

on being agitated with them.
Distilled Oils are prepared

Most of the

by the

following general formula.

Put the substance from which the
and add enough water

Oil

is

to be

extracted into a retort, or other vessel suitable for
distillation,

to cover

it;

then

distil

by a regulated heat

into a large re-

frigeratory.

Separate the Distilled Oil from the
it.

water which comes over with

Oleum

Anisi.

Oil of Anise,

Prepare this Oil from Anise, bruised, by the
general formula given above.

OLEA DESTILLATA.
Oleum
Oil of

243

Cari.

Caraway.

Prepare this Oil from Caraway, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Caryophylli.
Oil of Cloves.

Prepare this Oil from Cloves, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Chenopodii.
Oil of Wormseed.

Prepare this Oil from Wormseed by the general

formula given at page 242.

Oleum Copaiba.
Oil of Copaiha.

Take of Copaiba twelve troyounces

Water

sixteen pints.

Add

the Copaiba to the

Water

in a tinned

still,

and, having adapted a proper refrigeratory, distil

twelve pints.

Separate the Oil which comes over
still,

from the water, return this to the
distil

and again

twelve pints.

Lastly, separate the Oil prodistillation,

cured in the second

add

it

to

that

244
first

OLEA DESTILLATA.
obtained, and

keep the whole in a well-

stopped bottle.

Oleum Cubeb^.
Oil of Cuheb.

Prepare this Oil from Cubeb, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Erigerontis Canadensis.
Oil of

Canada Fleahane.

Prepare this Oil from Canada Fleabane by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum

Fgeniculi.

Oil of Fennel,

Prepare this Oil from Fennel, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Gaultheri^.
Oil of Qaultlieria.

Prepare this Oil from fresh Gaultheria by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Hedeom^.
Oil of Hedeoma.

Prepare this Oil from

Hedeoma by

the general

formula given at page 242.

OLEA DESTILLATA.
Oleum Juniperi.
Oil of Juniper.

245

Prepare this Oil from Juniper, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Lavandula.
Oil of Lavender.

Prepare this Oil from Lavender by the general

formula given at page 242.

Oleum Mentha Piperita.
Oil of Peppermint.

Prepare this Oil from fresh Peppermint by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Mentha

Yiridis.

Oil of Spearmint.

Prepare this Oil from fresh Spearmint by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Monard^.
Oil of &>rsemint.

Prepare this Oil from fresh Horsemint by the
general formula given at page 242.

246

OLEA DESTILLATA.
Oleum Pimento.
Oil of Pimento.

Prepare this Oil from Pimento, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Rosmarini.
Oil of Rosemary.

Prepare this Oil from Rosemary by the general

formula given at page 242.

Oleum Sabine.
Oil of Savine,

Prepare this Oil from Savine, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

Oleum Sassafras.
Oil of Sassafras.

Prepare this Oil from Bark of Sassafras Root,
bruised,

by the general formula given

at page 242.

Oleum Succini Rectificatum.
Rectified Oil of

Amber,

Take

of Oil of

Amber

a pint

Water

six pints.

OLEA DESTILLATA.
Mix them
receiver;
in a glass retort,

247
four

and

distil until

pints of water

have passed with the Oil into the

then separate the Oil from the water,
it

and keep

in a well-stopped bottle.

Oleum Tabaci.
Oil of Tobacco.

Take of Tobacco,
Put

in coarse powder, twelve troy-

ounces.
it

into a retort of green glass, connected
is

with a refrigerated receiver, to which a tube

attached for the escape of the incondensible products.

Then, by means of a sand-bath, heat the

retort gradually to dull redness,

and maintain
oil

it

at that temperature until to

empyreumatic
separate

ceases

come

over.

Lastly,

the

dark oily

liquid in the

receiver from the watery portion,

and keep

it

in a well-stopped bottle.

Oleum Valeriana.
Oil of Valerian.

Prepare this Oil from Valerian, bruised, by the
general formula given at page 242.

248

OLEORESIN^.

OLEORESIN^.
Oleoresina Capsici.
Oleoresin of Capsicum.

Take of Capsicum,
ounces
;

in fine powder, twelve troy-

Ether a

sufficient quantity.

Put the Capsicum
press
it

into a cylindrical percolator,
it

firmly,

and gradually pour Ether upon

until twenty-four fluidounces of filtered liquid

have
on a

passed.

Recover from

this,

by

distillation

water-bath, eighteen fluidounces of ether, and ex-

pose the residue, in a capsule, until the remaining
ether has evaporated.
ing, the fatty

Lastly, remove,

by

strain-

matter which separates on standing,
bottle.

and keep the Oleoresin in a well-stopped

Oleoresina Cubeb^e.
Oleoresin of Guheh.

Extractum Cubebse Fluidum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Cubeb, in fine powder, twelve troyounces;
Ether a
sufficient quantity.

Put the Cubeb
press
it it

into a

cylindrical percolator,

moderately, and gradually pour Ether
until twenty-four fluidounces of filtered

upon

OLEORESIN.E.
liquid

249
this,

have passed.

Recover from

by

dis-

tillation

on a water-bath, eighteen fluidounces of
in a capsule, until

ether,

and expose the residue,

the remaining ether has evaporated.
the Oleoresin in a well-stopped bottle.

Lastly, keep

Oleoresina Lupulin^.
Oleoresin of Lupulin.

Take

of Lupulin twelve troyounces;

Ether a

sufficient quantity.

Put the Lupulin
upon

into a

narrow cylindrical per-

colator, press it firmly,
it

and gradually pour Ether

until thirty fluidounces of filtered liquid

have passed.

Recover from

this,

by

distillation

on a water-bath, eighteen fluidounces of ether, and
expose the residue, in a capsule, until the remaining ether has evaporated.
resin

Lastly, keep the Oleo-

m

a wide-mouthed bottle, well stopped.

Oleoresina Piperis.
Oleoresin of Blaclc Pepper.

Extractum Piperis Fluidum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Black Pepper, in fine powder, twelve

troyounces

Ether a

sufficient quantity.

Put the Black Pepper into a cylindrical perco24

250
lator, press
it

OLEORESIN^.
firmly,

and gradually pour Ether

upon

it

until twenty-four fluidounces of filtered

liquid have passed.

Recover from

this,

by

distilla-

tion on a water-bath, eighteen fluidounces of ether,

and expose the

residue, in a capsule, until the re-

maining ether has evaporated, and the deposition
of piperin in crystals has ceased.
rate the Oleoresin from the piperin

Lastly, sepa-

by expression
it

through a muslin strainer, and keep
stopped bottle.

in a well-

Oleoresina Zingiberis.
Oleoresin of Ginger,

Take of Ginger,

in fine powder, twelve troy;

ounces

Stronger Ether twelve fluidounces

Alcohol a suflicient quantity.

Put the Ginger
press
it

into a cylindrical percolator,
it

firmly,

and pour upon
this

the

Stronger

Ether.

"When

has been absorbed by the

powder, add Alcohol until twelve fluidounces of
filtered liquid

have passed.

Recover from

this,

by

distillation

on a water-bath, nine fluidounces of
residue, in a capsule, until

ether,

and expose the

the volatile part has evaporated.
Oleoresin in a well-stopped bottle.

Lastly, keep the

PILULiE.

251

PILULE.
PiLULyE Aloes.
Pills of Aloes,

Take

of Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder,

Soap, in fine powder, each, a troy ounce.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass, to be divided into

two hundred and

forty

pills.

w Pilule Aloes et Assaf(etid^.
Pills of Aloes

and

Assafetida.

Take

of Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder,
Assafetida,

Soap, in fine powder, each, half a troyounce.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass, to be divided into one

hundred and

eighty

pills.

Pilule Aloes et Mastiches.
Pills of Aloes

and

Mastic.

Take

of Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder, a troy-

ounce and a half
Mastic, in fine powder,

252

PILULiE.

Red Rose,

in fine powder, each, half a

troyounce.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass, to be divided into four

hundred

pills.

Pilule Aloes et Myrrh js.
Pills of Aloes

and Myrrh.
two

Take of Soco trine
Myrrh, in

Aloes, in fine powder,

troyounces
fine

powder, a troyounce

Saffron, in fine powder, half a troy-

ounce

;

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.

Beat the whole together so as to form a pilular
mass, to be divided into four hundred and eighty
pills.

Pilule Antimonii Composite.

Compound

Pills of Antimony,
Pills.

Plummer's

Take of Sulphurated Antimony,
Mild Chloride of Mercury, each, one

hundred and twenty grains
Guaiac, in fine powder.
Molasses, each, half a troyounce.

Rub

the Sulphurated

Antimony

first

with the

PILULE.

253

Mild Chloride of Mercury, and afterwards with the
Guaiac and Molasses, so as to form a pilular mass,
to be divided into

two hundred and forty

pills.

Pilule Assafcetidje.
Pills of Assafetida.

Take

of Assafetida a troyounce and a half;

Soap, in fine powder, half a troyounce.

Beat them together with water so as
pilular mass, to be divided into

to

form a

two hundred and

forty pills.

PiLULiE Cathartics Composite.

Compound
troyounce

Cathartic Pills.

Take of Compound Extract of Colocynth half a
Extract of Jalap, in

fine

powder.

Mild Chloride of Mercury, each, one

hundred and eighty grains

Gamboge, in

fine

powder, forty grains.

Mix the powders
eighty
pills.

together; then with water form

a pilular mass, to be divided into one hundred and

PiLULJE Copaiba.
Pills of Copaiba.

Take of Copaiba two troyounces
24*

254

PILULE.
Magnesia,
grains.

recently

prepared,

sixty

Mix them
until
it

together,

and
a

set the

mixture aside
mass,
to

concretes

into

pilular

b^

divided into two hundred

pills.

Pilule Ferri Carbonatis.
Pills of Carbonate of Iron.

Take of Sulphate of Iron

eight troyounces

Carbonate of Soda nine troyounces
Clarified

Honey

three troyounces

Sugar, in

coarse

powder, two

troy-

ounces
Boiling

;

Water two

pints

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the salts separately, each in a pint of

the Water, a fluidounce of Syrup having been previously added to each pint.

Mix

the two solutions,

when

cold, in a bottle just large
it

enough

to hold
it

them, close

accurately with a stopper, and set
subside.

by that the carbonate of iron may
off

Pour

the

supernatant liquid,

and,

having mixed

water, recently boiled, with Syrup in the proportion of a pint to the fluidounce,
cipitate

wash the

pre-

with the mixture until the

v\^ashings

no

longer have a saline taste.

Place the precipitate

PILULE.
on a flannel cloth
as
to drain, and,

255

having expressed

much

of the water as possible,

mix

it

immeSugar.

diately Lastly,

with

the

Clarified

Honey and
it

by means of a water-bath, evaporate the
is

mixture, constantly stirring, until
to the weight of eight troyounces.

brought

Pilule Ferri Composite.

Compound
Take of Myrrh,

Pills of Iron.

in fine powder, one

hundred

and twenty grains
Carbonate of Soda,
Sulphate of Iron, each, sixty grains

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.
first

Rub

the Myrrh,

with the Carbonate of

Soda, and afterwards with the Sulphate of Iron,
until they are thoroughly

mixed

;

then beat them

with Syrup so as to form a pilular mass, to be
divided into eighty
pills.

PiLULJE Ferri Iodidi.
Pills of Iodide of Iron.

Take of Iodine half a troyounce
Iron, in the
pieces,

form of wire and cut in

one

hundred

and

twenty

grains

256

PILULE.
Sugar, in fine powder, a troyounce

Marshmallow, in
troyounce

fine

powder, half a

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder,
Iron, each, sixty grains

Eeduced

Water ten fluidrachms.

Mix
them

the Iodine with a fluidounce of the
bottle,

Water
ob-

in a thin-glass

add the Iron, and shake
is

together until a clear, green solution

tained.

Mix
and
first

the powders in a small porcelain
filter

capsule,
filter,

upon them, through a small
previously heated,

the

solution

and

afterwards the remainder of the Water in order
to

wash the

filter.

Then, by means of a water-

bath, with constant stirring, evaporate the whole
to a pilular consistence,

and divide the mass into

three hundred

pills.

Dissolve sixty grains of Balsam of Tolu in a

fluidrachm of Ether,
solution
until

shake the
are

pills

with the

they

uniformly coated,

and

put them on a plate to dry, occasionally stirring

them
the
These

until the drying

is

completed.

Lastly, keep

pills in

a well-stopped bottle.
devoid of the smoll of iodine
;

pills are

and

distilled water,

rubbed with them and
or gives
it

filtered, does not colour solution of starch,
tint.

only a slight blue

PILULiE.
PiLULiE Galbani Composite.

257

Compound

Pills of

Galhanum.

Take of Galbanum,
Myrrh, each, three hundred and sixty
grains

Assafetida one
grains

hundred

and twenty

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.

Beat them together so as to form a pilular mass,
to be divided into

two hundred and forty

pills.

Pilule Htdrargyri.
Pills of Mercury.
Blue
Pills.

Take of Mercury a troyounce
Confection of Rose a troyounce and a
half;

Liquorice Root, in fine powder, half a
troyounce.

Rub

the Mercury with the Confection until the
;

globules cease to be visible

then add the Liquorice

Root, and beat the whole into a pilular mass, to be

divided into four hundred and eighty

pills.

258

PILULE.
PlLULuE OpII.
Pills of

Opium.

Take of Opiunij

in fine powder, sixty grains

Soap, in fine powder, twelve grains.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass, to be divided into sixty pills.

PiLULiE
Pills

Quim^

SULPHATIS.

of Sulphate of Quinia.
of Quinia a troyounce

Take of Sulphate

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder, one hun-

dred and twenty grains
Clarified

Honey

a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Sulphate of Quinia and

Gum

Arabic

then beat them with Clarified Honey so as to form
a pilular mass, to be divided into four hundred

and eighty

pills.

Pilule Rhei.
Pills of Rhubarb.

Take

of Rhubarb, in fine powder, three hundred

and sixty grains
Soap, in fine powder, one hundred and

twenty

grains.

Beat them together with water so as to form a

PILULE.
pilular mass, to be divided into one

259

hundred and

twenty

pills.

Pilule Rhei CoMPOSiTyE.

Compound Take of Rhubarb,

Pills of

Rhuharh.

in fine powder, a troy ounce;

Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder, three

hundred and sixty grains
Myrrh, in
Oil of
fine

powder, half a troyounce

Peppermint half a fluidrachm.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass, to be divided into

two hundred and

forty

pills.

PiLULiE Saponis Composite.

Compound
Take of Opium,

Pills of Soap.

in fine powder, sixty grains

Soap, in fine powder, half a troyounce.

Beat them together with water so as to form a
pilular mass.

Pilule Scill^e Composite.

Compound Take

Pills of Squill.

of Squill, in fine powder, sixty grains

Ginger, in fine powder.

Ammoniac,

in fine powder, each, one

hundred and twenty grains

260

PLUMBUM.
Soap, in fine powder, one hundred and

eighty grains

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powders; then beat

them with Syrup

so as to form a pilular mass, to be divided into

one hundred and twenty

pills.

PLUMBUM.
Plumbi Iodidum.
Iodide of Lead.

Take of Nitrate of Lead,
Iodide of Potassium, each, four troy-

ounces
Distilled

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

With the
Lead

aid of heat, dissolve the Nitrate of

in a pint

and a

half,

and the Iodide of Po-

tassium in half a pint of Distilled Water, and mix
the
solutions.

Allow the precipitate formed

to

subside, and, having poured off the supernatant
liquid,

wash

it

with Distilled Water and dry

it

with a gentle heat.

A bright-yellow, heavy, inodorous powder, fusible and
by
heat,

volatilizable

and soluble

in twelve

hundred and

thirty-five parts of cold,

and one hundred and ninety-four parts of boiling water.

A

hot,

saturated solution, on cooling, deposits the salt in brilliant golden
scales.

POTASSIUM.

261

POTASSIUM.
POTASSA.
Potassa.

Take of Solution of Potassa eight
Evaporate
fire,

pints.

it

rapidly in an iron vessel, over the

until ebullition ceases

and the Potassa melts.

Pour

this into suitable moulds,

and keep

it,

when

cold, in a well-stopped bottle.
Potassa
is

very deliquescent, and dissolves in water and alcohol,
Its

with the exception of a slight residue.

aqueous solution has the

properties mentioned under Solution of Potassa.

Potassa cum Calce.
Potassa
loith

Lime.

Take of

Potassa,

Lime, each, a troyounce.

Eub them
keep
it

together so as to form a powder, and

in a well-stopped bottle.

a

grayish-white powder, which,

when mixed with

water, does not

effervesce

on the addition of an acid.

Potass^ Acetas.
Acetate of Potassa.

Take of Acetic Acid a pint
25

262

POTASSIUM.
Bicarbonate
quantity.
of

Potassa

a

sufficient

Add

the
is

Bicarbonate
saturated;

gradually to the Acid

until this

then

filter

the solution,

and evaporate cautiously, by means of a sandbath, until a dry salt remains.
in a well-stopped bottle.

Lastly, keep this

A
The

white deliquescent

salt,

wholly soluble in water and alcohol.

solution does not change the colour of litmus or turmeric,

and

yields no precipitate with chloride of

barium or ferrocyanide of

potassium.
if

If dilute
it

it is

not precipitated

by

nitrate of silver
is

;

but

concentrated

gives with that salt a precipitate, which

redis-

solved

by water

or dilute nitric acid.

Bichloride of platinum occa-

sions a yellow precipitate,

and sulphuric acid a copious disengage-

ment

of acetous vapours.

Potass^ Bicarbonas.
Bicarhonate of Potassa.

Take of Carbonate of Potassa
ounces
Distilled
;

forty-eight troy-

Water ten

pints.

Dissolve the Carbonate in the Distilled Water,

and pass carbonic acid through the solution
it

until

is

fully saturated.

Then

filter

the liquid, and

evaporate that crystals

may

form, taking care that
Lastly, pour off

the heat does not exceed 160°.

the supernatant liquid, and dry the crystals on

bibulous paper.

POTASSIUM.
Carbonic acid

263

may

be obtained from Marble

by

the addition of dilute sulphuric acid.
In white
"water.
It

crystals,

permanent in the
taste,

air

and wholly soluble in
affects the colour
it

has a slightly alkaline

and feebly

of turmeric.

When

treated with nitric acid in excess,
Its

yields

little

or no precipitate with nitrate of silver.

aqueous solution, unless

heated, does not yield a precipitate with sulphate of magnesia.
crystals lose thirty

The
a red

and seven-tenths per

cent,

by exposure

to

heat

Its other properties are the

same as those mentioned under

Pure Carbonate of Potassa.

PotasstE Carbonas.
Carbonate of Potassa.

Take

of

Impure Carbonate of Potassa
troyounces
"Water two pints and a half.

thirty-six

Dissolve the Impure Carbonate in the Water,

and

filter

the solution

;

then pour

it

into
fire
fire,

an iron
until
it

vessel,

and evaporate over a gentle
Lastly,

thickens.

remove

it

from the

and

stir

constantly with an iron spatula until

it

forms a

granular
a

salt.

Carbonate of Potassa, treated with nitric acid in excess, exhibits
faint cloudiness on the addition of chloride of barium,
silver.

and

affords

a slight precipitate with nitrate of

Its

aqueous solution,

when

saturated with an acid, slowly deposits a slightly gelatinous

precipitate.

In other respects

its

properties correspond with those

of Pure Carbonate of Potassa.

264

POTASSIUM.
Potass^ Carbonas Pura.
Pure Carbonate of Potassa.
Potassse Carbonas Purus, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Bicarbonate
Put

of Potassa, in coarse pow-

der, twelve troyounces.
it

into a capacious iron crucible

;

heat gradis

ually until the water of crystallization
off;

driven

then raise the heat to redness, and maintain

that temperature for half an hour.

Having taken
it to cool,

the crucible from the

fire,

and allowed

dissolve its contents in Distilled Water,

and

filter

the solution.

Then pour
it

it

into an iron vessel,
fire

and evaporate over a gentle
Lastly,

until it thickens.
stir

remove

from the

fire,

and

constantly

with an iron spatula until
salt.

it

forms a granular

A white,

deliquescent

salt,

wholly soluble in water.
to

It effervesces Its solu-

with acids, and changes the colour of turmeric

brown.

tion yields with bichloride of platinum a yellow precipitate,

and

with sulphate of magnesia a precipitate which effervesces with When saturated with an acid, it deposits nothing upon acids.
standing
;

and,

when

treated with pure nitric acid in excess,

it is

not precipitated by carbonate of soda, chloride of barium, or nitrate
of silver.

One hundred grains of

the salt lose sixteen grains by

exposure to a red heat.

POTASSIUM.
Potass^ Citras.
Citrate of Potassa.

265

Take of

Citric

Acid ten troyounces

Bicarbonate of Potassa fourteen troy-

ounces

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Citric Acid in two pints of Water,

add the Bicarbonate gradually, and, when

effer-

vescence has teased, strain the solution and evaporate to dryness, stirring constantly, after a pellicle

has begun to form, until the salt granulates.

Then

rub

it

in a mortar, pass
it

it

through a coarse sieve,

and keep

in a well-stopped bottle.
salt,

A

white, granular, deliquescent

wholly and readily soluble

in water.

Its solution does not affect the colour of litmus,

and yields
it

no precipitate with muriatic

acid.

When

heated to redness

affords

a residue of pure carbonate of potassa.

Potass^ et Sod^ Tartras.
Tartrate of Potassa

and Soda,

Sodae et Potassae Tartras, Pharm., 1850.
RocheUe
Salt.

Take

of Carbonate of Soda twelve troyounces

;

Bitartrate of Potassa, in fine powder,

sixteen troyounces

Boiling

Water

five pints.

25*

266

POTASSIUM.

Dissolve the Carbonate of Soda in the Water,

and gradually add the Bitartrate of Potassa.
ter

Fil-

the

solution,

and evaporate
then set
it

until a pellicle

begins to form;

aside to crystallize.

Pour

off the

mother-water, and dry the crystals
Lastly, evaporate the mother-

on bibulous paper.
water that
air,

it

may

furnish

more

crystals.
effloresce slightly in

In colourless, transparent crystals, which

dry

and are wholly and readily soluble in

five parts of boiling
»

water.

The

solution does not affect the colour of litmus,

and yields no pre-

cipitate
silver.

with chloride of barium or a dilute solution of nitrate of

From a

strong solution the mineral acids throw

down a

crystalline precipitate of bitartrate of potassa.

Potass^ Tartras.
Tartrate of Potassa.

Take of Carbonate of Potassa
ounces
;

sixteen

troy-

Bitartrate of Potassa, in fine powder,
thirty-six troyounces, or a sufficient

quantity
Boiling

Water

eight pints.

Dissolve the Ci^rbonate of Potassa in the

Water

then gradually add Bitartrate of Potassa to the
solution until
it is

completely saturated, and

boil.

Filter the liquid, evaporate until a pellicle forms,

and

set it aside to crystallize.

Lastly, pour off the

POTASSIUM.

267

mother-water, and, having dried the crystals on
bibulous paper, keep

them

in a well-stopped bottle.

In white crystals, which are somewhat deliquescent, and are

wholly and readily soluble in four parts of boiling water.
tion yields a crystalline precipitate of bitartrate of potassa

The

solu-

upon the

addition of most of the acids.
precipitate,

Acetate of lead occasions a white

wholly soluble in dilute nitric acid.

POTASSII BrOMIDUAT.

Bromide of Potassium.

Take

of

Bromine two troyounces
Iron, in the form of filings, a troy ounce;

Pure Carbonate of Potassa two troyounces and sixty grains
Distilled

Water

four pints.

Add

the Iron, and afterwards the Bromine, to

a pint and a half of the Distilled Water, stirring
the mixture frequently with a glass rod for half

an hour.

Apply a

gentle heat, and,

when

the

liquid assumes a greenish colour,

add gradually
dis-

the

Pure Carbonate of Potassa, previously

solved in a pint and a half of the Distilled Water,
until
it

ceases to produce a precipitate.

Continue

the heat for half an hour, and then

filter.

Wash
the
fil-

the precipitate with the remainder of the Distilled

Water
tered

boiling hot,
liquids,

and again

filter.

Mix

and evaporate that crystals

may

268
forin.

POTASSIUM.
Lastly, pour off the

mother-water, and,

having dried the crystals on bibulous paper, keep

them

in a well-stopped bottle.

In white crystals, wholly soluble in water, but sparingly soluble
in alcohol. or turmeric,
Its

aqueous solution does not
is

affect the colour of litmus

and

not precipitated by chloride of barium.
acid,
it

When
Ten

mixed with starch and treated with sulphuric
low.

becomes yel-

The
it

salt,

when

subjected to heat, does not lose weight.

grains of

require, for complete precipitation, fourteen and^iree;

tenths grains of nitrate of silver

and the precipitate formed has a

yellowish colour.

POTASSII CyANIDUM.

Cyanide of Potassium.
Potassii Cyanuretum,

Pharm., 1850.

Take of Ferrocyanide
troyounces

of Potassium, dried, eight

Pure Carbonate of Potassa,
troyounces.

dried, three

Mix
ness.

the salts intimately, and throw the mixture

into a deep iron crucible, previously heated to red-

Maintain the temperature until effervescence

ceases,

and the fused mass concretes, of a pure

white colour, upon a
it.

warm

glass rod dipped into

Then pour out

the liquid carefully into a shal-

low dish

to solidify, ceasing to

pour before the

salt

becomes contaminated with the precipitated

iron.

POTASSIUM.

2G9

Break up the mass while yet warm, and keep the
pieces in a well-stopped bottle.
Cyanide of Potassium, thus prepared,
phous
taste,
is

in white, opaque,

amor-

pieces,

having a sharp, somewhat alkaline and bitter-almond
reaction.
It is deliquescent in

and an alkaline

moist

air,

readily soluble in water
soluble in alcohol.

when reduced

to

powder, and sparingly

Its solution

exhales the odour of hydrocyanic

acid

when exposed

to the air, effervesces

on the addition of an acid,
silver,

and,

when added

to

a solution of nitrate of

yields a pre-

cipitate

wholly soluble in ammonia.

POTASSII lODIDUM.
Iodide of Potassium.

Take

of Potassa six troy ounces
Iodine,

in

fine

powder, sixteen troy-

ounces, or a sufficient quantity.

Charcoal, in

fine

powder, two

troy-

ounces
Distilled

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

To
tilled

the Potassa, dissolved in three pints of Dis-

Water

boiling hot, gradually

add the Iodine,

stirring after

each addition until the solution be-

comes

colourless,

and continue the additions

until

the liquid remains slightly coloured from excess
of Iodine.

Evaporate the solution to dryness,

stir-

ring in the Charcoal towards the close of the operation, so that it

dried

salt.

may be Rub this

intimately mixed with the
to

powder, and heat

it

to

270

POTASSIUM.

dull redness in an iron crucible, maintaining that

temperature for

fifteen

minutes;

then, after

it

has cooled, dissolve out the saline matter with
Distilled

Water,
it

filter

the

solution,

evaporate,
additional

and

set

aside

to

crj^stallize.

An

quantity of crystals

may

be obtained from

the

mother-water by evaporating and crystallizing as
before.
Iodide of Potassium
soluble in water
is

in white or transparent crystals, wholly
It

and

alcohol.

produces no change in the colour
Its solution,

of litmus, and

little if

any in that of turmeric.
acid,

mixed

with dilute sulphuric

and afterwards with
tint,

solution of starch,

gradually assumes a purple

which
to

at length

becomes blue.
it

When

tartaric acid is freely

added
;

a strong solution,

occasions a

white crystalline precipitate

and the supernatant
first

liquid, if

mixed
Bi-

with solution of starch, becomes
chloride of

purple and finally blue.

platinum colours

its

solution

reddish-brown without

causing a precipitate, chloride of barium
sulphate of iron occasions no change.

afi*ects it

but slightly, and
of Po-

Ten grains of Iodide
silver,

tassium
cipitate,

yield,

with an excess of nitrate of

a yellow pre-

which,

when washed and

dried,

weighs fourteen and one-

tenth grains.
nitric acid

If this precipitate be treated with
to the clear liquid,

ammonia, and

be added
to

no precipitate will be pro-

duced.

Exposed

a dull-red heat. Iodide of Potassium melts, and
into a crystalline pearly mass, without loss
it is

on cooling concretes
of weight
;

but, at a full-red heat,

slowly volatilized without

decomposition.

I

rULVERES.
POTASSII SULPHURETUM.

271

Sulphuret of Potassium.

Take

of Sublimed Sulphur a troyounce

Carbonate of Potassa two troyounces.

With
dried,

the Sulphur rub the Carbonate, previously
in a covered

and heat the mixture gradually
it

crucible until

ceases to swell and

is

completely

melted.
slab, and,

Then pour out

the liquid on a marble
is

wdien the mass

cold,

break

it

into

pieces,

and keep these in a well-stopped
of a brownish-yellow

bottle of

green glass.
Sulphuret of Potassium
freshly broken.
residue,
is

colour

when

It dissolves in water, with the exception of a slight

and forms an orange-yellow

solution,

which exhales the
is

odour of hydrosulphuric acid.

When
and,

the solution
it

boiled with

an

excess of muriatic acid and filtered,

gives a yellow precipitate

with bichloride of platinum
it,

;

when

the same acid

is

added

to

hydrosulphuric acid

is

evolved,

and sulphur deposited.

P U L V E R E S.
PULVERES EfFERVESCENTES.
Effervescing Powders.
Soda Powders.

Take

of Bicarbonate of Soda, in fine powder,

three hundred and sixty grains

Tartaric Acid, in fine

powder, three

^

hundred

grains.

272

PULVERES.

Divide each of the powders into twelve equal
parts,

and keep the

parts, severally, of the Bi-

carbonate and of the Acid in separate papers of
diiferent colours.

PuLVERES EfFERVESCENTES ApERIENTES.
Aperient Effervescing Powders,
Seidlitz Powders.

Take

of Bicarbonate of Soda, in fine powder,

a troyounce
Tartrate of Potassa and Soda, in fine

powder, three troyounces
Tartaric

Acid,

in

fine

powder, four

hundred and twenty

grains.

Mix

intimately the Bicarbonate of Soda with

the Tartrate of Potassa and Soda, and divide this

mixture into twelve equal
Tartaric
parts.

parts.

Then

divide the

Acid into the same number of equal

Lastly, keep the parts, severally, of the

mixture and of the Acid in separate papers of
different colours.

PuLYis Aloes et Canellje.

Powder of Aloes and

Canella.

Take of Socotrine Aloes,
troyounces \

in fine powder, twelve

#

PULVERES.
Canella,
in
fine

273

powder, three troy-

ounces.

Rub
mixed.

tliem together until they are thoroughly

PULYIS ArOMATICUS.
Aromatic Powder.

Take

of Cinnamon, in fine powder,

Ginger, in fine powder, each, two troy-

ounces

;

Cardamom, deprived
and
in fine powder,

of the
r

capsules

Nutmeg,
ounce.

in fine powder, each, a troy-

Rub them
mixed.

together until they are thoroughly

PuLYis Ipecacuanha Compositus.

Compound Powder of Ipecacuanha.
Pulvis Ipecacuanhse et Opii, Pharm., 1850.
Dover's Powder.

Take of Ipecacuanha,

in fine powder,
fine

Opium, dried and in
sixty grains

powder, each,

Sulphate of Potassa a troyounce.

Rub them

together into a very fine powder.
26

274

QUINIA.
PuLvis Jalapjs Compositus.

Compound Powder of Jalap.

Take of

Jalap, in fine powder, a troyounce
Bitartrate of Potassa, in fine powder,

two troyounces.

Rub them
mixed.

together until they are thoroughly

PuLvis Rhei Compositus.

Compound Powder of Rliuharh.
Take
of Rhubarb, in
fine

powder, four troy-

ounces

;

Magnesia twelve troyounces
Ginger, in fine powder, two troyounces.

Rub them
mixed.

together until they are thoroughly

QUINIA.
QuiNiiE Sulphas.

Sulphate of Quinia.

Take of Yellow Cinchona,

in

coarse

powder,

forty-eight troyounces

Muriatic Acid three troyounces and

a half;

QUINIA.
Lime, in
fine

275
five

powder,

troyounces

Animal Charcoal,
Sulphuric Acid,
Alcohol,

in fine powder,

Water,
Distilled

Water,

each,

a

sufficient

quantity.
Boil the Cinchona in thirteen pints of Water,

mixed with one-third of the Muriatic Acid, and
strain

through muslin.

Boil

the

residue

twice

successively with the

same quantity of Water and
strain.
is

Acid as

before,

and

Mix

the decoctions,

and, while the liquid

hot, gradually

add the

Lime, previously mixed with two pints of Water,
stirring constantly, until the quinia is completely

precipitated.

Wash

the precipitate with Distilled

Water, and, having pressed, dried, and j)owdered
it,

digest

it

in boiling Alcohol.

Pour

off the liquid,

and repeat the digestion several times until the
Alcohol
liquids,
is

no longer rendered
distil ofi"

bitter.

Mix

the

and

the alcohol until a

brown
Water,

viscid

mass remains.

Upon

this,

transferred to a

suitable vessel, pour four pints of Distilled

and, having
point,

heated the mixture to the boiling
a^s

add as much Sulphuric Acid

may

be

necessary to dissolve the quinia.

Then add a

troy-

276

QUINIA.
boil the liquid
it

ounce and a half of Animal Charcoal,
for

two minutes,

filter

while hot, and set

aside

to crystallize.

Should the

liquid, before filtration,
it

be entirely neutral, acidulate
Sulphuric Acid
;

very slightly with

should

it,

on the contrary, change

the colour of litmus paper to a bright red, add

more Animal Charcoal.
from the
liquid, dissolve

Separate

the

crystals

them

in boiling Distilled

Water
add a

slightly acidulated
little

with Sulphuric Acid,
filter

Animal Charcoal,

the solution,

and

set it aside

to crystallize.

Lastly, dry the

crystals on bibulous paper with a gentle heat,

and
an
pre-

keep them in a well-stopped

bottle.

The mother-water may be made
cipitating

to yield

additional quantity of Sulphate of Quinia

by

the

quinia with

Water

of

Ammonia,

and treating the precipitated alkaloid with Distilled

Water, Sulphuric Acid, and Animal Char-

coal, as before.

A

colourless salt, in silky, very light crystals,

which arc entirely

dissolved by about seven hundred and forty parts of cold, and thirty

of boiling water, are readily soluble in alcohol, and in water acidulated with sulphuric acid,
solution,

and are insoluble

in ether.

The aqueous

upon the addition of chlorine and afterwards of ammonia,

assumes a green colour.

By

a moderate heat, the crystals lose from

eight to ten per cent, of water of crystallization, and at a red heat

are wholly dissipated.

When

ten grains of the salt are agitated in
officinal

a

test-tube with ten

minims of

water of ammonia and sixty

QUINIA.

277

grains of ether, and allowed to rest, the resulting liquid separates
into

two transparent and colourless

layers, without

any white or

crystalline matter at the surface of contact.

QuiNi^ Yalerianas.
Valerianate of Quinia.

Take of Valerianic Acid half a troyounce
Sulphate of Quinia two troy ounces
Diluted Sulphuric Acid,

Water of Ammonia,
Water, each, a
Dissolve the
sufficient quantity.

Sulphate of Quinia in a pint of

Water, with the aid of Diluted Sulphuric Acid
then add Water of

Ammonia

in slight excess,

and

wash the
freed

precipitated

quinia with water until
Dissolve

from sulphate of ammonia.

the

Valerianic Acid in five pints of Water, heated to
180°, add the quinia to the solution, and,
is

when

it

dissolved, set the

whole aside

for several

days

to crystalHze.
crystals,

Decant the mother-water from the

dry them on bibulous paper, and keep

them

in a well-stopped bottle.

By

evaporating the mother-water at a tempera-

ture not exceeding 120°,

more

crystals

may

be

obtained.

A colourless

salt,

crystallizing in rhomboidal tables,

and having a
it

peculiar, repulsive odour,

aud

bitter taste.

When

heated

fuses,

26«

278
and gives
off

RESINiE.
white vapours.
It is soluble in

one hundred and ten
six parts of cold

parts of cold and forty parts of boiling water,

and in

and one part of boiling

alcohol.

It is also soluble in ether.

RESINS.
Resin A Jalaps.
Resin of Jalap.

Take of

Jalap, in fine

powder, sixteen troy-

ounces
Alcohol,

;

Water, each, a
Moisten the Jalap
Alcohol, pack
it

sufficient quantity.

with

four

fluidounces

of

firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

until

four

pints have passed, or until the filtered liquid ceases
to occasion turbidness

when dropped
by

into water.
distilling off

Reduce the tincture
the alcohol,

to half a pint

mix

the residue with four pints of

"Water, separate the precipitate formed,

wash

it

thoroughly with Water, and dry
heat.
Resin of Jalap
is

it

with a gentle

partly soluble in ether, and the residue,
is

when

dissolved in officinal solution of potassa,

not precipitated by the

addition

oi'

dilute muriatic acid in excess.
/

RESINiE.
Resina Podophylli.
Resin of May -apple.

279

Take of May-apple,
Alcohol,

in

fine

powder, sixteen

troyounces

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the May-apple with four fluidounces of
Alcohol, pack
it

firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
pints

until

four

have passed, or until the

filtered liquid ceases

to occasion turbidness

when dropped
by

into water.
distilling off

Reduce the tincture
the alcohol,

to half a pint

mix

the residue with four pints of
it

Water, separate the precipitate formed, wash
thoroughly with Water, and dry
heat.
Resin of May-apple
is

it

with a gentle

,

partly soluble in ether,
is

and the residue,

when

dissolved in officinal solution of potassa,

precipitated

by the

addition of dilute muriatic acid in excess.

Resina Scammonii.
Resin of Scammony.

Take

of

Scammony,
ounces
Alcohol,
;

in fine powder, six troy-

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

280

SANTONINUM.
Scammony with
successive portions

Digest the

of boiling Alcohol until exhausted.
tures,

Mix

the tincconsist-

and reduce the mixture

to a

syrupy

ence by distilling off the alcohol.

Then add

the

residue to a pint of Water, separate the precipitate formed,

wash

it

thoroughly with Water, and

dry

it

with a gentle heat.
is

Resin of Scammony

wholly soluble in ether.

It dissolves in

officinal solution of potassa,

and the heated

solution is not precipi-

tated

by the addition

of dilute muriatic acid in excess.

SANTONINUM.
Santoninum.
Santcniin.

Take of Santonica,

in moderately coarse

pow-

der, forty-eight troyounces

Lime, recently slaked and in
der, eighteen troyounces

fine

pow-

Animal Charcoal,
Diluted Alcohol,
Acetic Acid,

in fine powder,

Alcohol, each, a sufficient quantity.

Digest the

Santonica and Lime with

twelve

pints of Diluted Alcohol for twenty-four hours,

SANTONINUM.
and express.

281

Repeat the digestion and expression

twice with the residue, using the same quantity
of Diluted Alcohol.

Mix

the tinctures, and redistilling off

duce the mixture to eight pints by
the alcohol.

Then, having

filtered,

and evaporated

to one-half, gradually

add Acetic Acid until in

slight excess, stirring during the addition,

and

set

the whole aside for forty-eight hours.
resulting crystalline

Place the

mass upon a funnel loosely
it.

stopped,
boil the

wash
and,

it

with water, and dry
its

Next,

dry residue with ten times

weight of

Alcohol,

having digested the tincture for

several hours with
hot,

Animal Charcoal,

filter it

while

and add

sufficient

hot Alcohol, through the
;

filter, to

wash the Charcoal thoroughly

then set
Lastly,

it

aside in a dark place to crystallize.

dry the crystals on bibulous paper in the dark,

and keep them in a well-stopped
from the
light.

bottle, protected

By evaporating may be obtained.
A colourless
but afterwards

the mother-water, more crystals

substance, crystallizing in shining, flattened prisms,

without smell, and nearly tasteless
bitter.

when

first

put into the mouth,
air,

It is not altered It melts

by the

but becomes

yellow on exposure to light.
cooling, a crystalline mass.

when

heated, and forms, on
its

When

heated somewhat above

melt-

ing point,

it

rises

unchanged in dense, white,

irritating vapours.

282

SODIUM.
it

Nearly insoluble in cold water,
fifty parts of

is

dissolved

by two hundred and

boiling water.

It is soluble in forty-three parts of cold

and three parts of boiling
Its alcoholic

alcohol,

and in seventy-five parts of

ether.

and ethereal

solutions are intensely bitter.

SODIUM.
SODJE BiCARBONAS.

Bicarhonate of Soda.

Take of Carbonate of Soda a convenient quantity.

Put the Carbonate, previously broken in
into a

pieces,

wooden box, having a horizontal

partition

near the bottom, pierced with numerous small
holes,

and a cover which can be tightly

fitted

on.
filled

To

a bottle, having two tubulures, and half;

with water, adapt two tubes

the

first

pass-

ing from
acid,

an apparatus

for

generating carbonic

through one tubulure, to a point below the
in

surface of the water

the

bottle

;

the second

reaching from the other tubulure to an opening

near the bottom of the box, beneath the partition.
Ttien lute
all

the joints, and cause a stream of

carbonic acid to pass through the water into the

box

until the Carbonate is fully saturated.

Lastly,

I

SODIUM.

283

remove the product from the box, and, having
dried
it,

rub

it

into powder.

Carbonic acid

may

be obtained from Marble by

the addition of dilute sulphuric acid.

A
heat

white, opaque powder, wholly soluble in water.
it is

By

a strong

converted into anhydrous carbonate of soda.

It slightly

affects the colour of turmeric,

and

is

decomposed with effervescence

by

acids.

It does not yield

a precipitate with bichloride of platinum,

nor, unless heated, with sulphate of magnesia.

The

precipitate

pr(?-

duccd by chloride of barium

is

wholly soluble in nitric acid.

SoD^ Carbonas Exsiccata.
Dried Carbonate of Soda.
Sodse Carbonas Exsiccatus, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Carbonate of Soda a convenient quantity.

Expose

it

to heat, in

an iron

vessel, until it is

thoroughly dried, stirring constantly with an iron
bpatula
;

then rub

it

into powder.

SoD^ Phosphas.
Phosphate of Soda.

Take of Bone,

calcined to whiteness

and

in fine

powder, one hundred
troyounces

and twenty

Sulphuric Acid seventy-two troyounces

284

SODIUM,
Carbonate of Soda,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powder with the Sulphuric Acid in an
;

earthen vessel

then add eight pints of Water,

and, having stirred the mixture thoroughly, digest
for three days, occasionally

adding a

little

Water

to replace that

which

is lost

by evaporation, and

frequently stirring the mixture.

At

the expira-

tion of that time, pour in eight pints of boiling

Water, and strain through muslin, gradually adding more boiling Water until the liquid
passes

nearly tasteless.
the dregs

Set by the strained liquid that

may

subside, and, having poured off the
it

clear solution, boil

down

to eight pints.

To

the concentrated liquid, poured off from the newly

formed dregs, and heated in an iron
degrees

vessel,

add by

Carbonate of Soda, previously dissolved

in hot Water, until effervescence ceases,

and the
then
fil-

phosphoric acid
ter

is

completely saturated
set
it

;

the

liquid

and

aside

to

crystallize.

Having removed the
so as to render

crystals, add, if necessary, a

small quantity of Carbonate of Soda to the liquid,
it

slightly alkaline;

then

alter-

nately evaporate and crystallize so long as crystals are

produced.

Lastly, keep the crystals in a

well-stopped bottle.

SODIUM.

285

In colourless, transparent crystals, which speedily effloresce and

become opaque when exposed

to the air.

It is

wholly soluble

in

water, but insoluble in alcohol.
action,
silver

The

solution has
It yields

an alkaline

re-

and does not

effervesce with acids.

with nitrate of
o)ic,

a yellow precipitate, and with chloride of barium a white

both soluble in nitric acid.

SoDJE Valerianas.
Valerianate of Soda.

Take of Bichromate of

Potassa, in fine powder,

ten troyoiinces

Sulphuric Acid fourteen troy ounces

Amylic Alcohol four fluidounces

Water

four pints

Solution of Soda a sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Bichromate, with the aid of heat,
in three pints of the Water,

and add

to the solu-

tion seven troyounces of the Sulphuric Acid, pre-

viously diluted with the remainder of the Water.

Pour the
a receiver

liquid into a tubulated retort, to
is

which
the
Sul-

attached without luting.

Mix

Amylic Alcohol with the remainder of the

phuric Acid, gradually added, and, by means of a

funnel-shaped tube, passing through a cork in the

tubulure of the retort and dipping into the liquid,
introduce the mixture,

when
27

cool, into the retort,
it is

in small portions at a time, until

all

added.

286

SODIUM.

Return to the retort any liquid which

may have

spontaneously distilled over, and agitate the whole
until the reaction has subsided,

and the temperaThen, by means

ture has fallen to about 100°.

of a sand-bath,

distil

the liquid nearly to dryness.
liquid

Introduce the
glass matrass,

distilled

into

a capacious

and add

to it Solution of Soda,
it is

with

frequent agitation, until

accurately saturated.

Separate the

oil

that

floats

on the

liquid,

and

evaporate the latter until aqueous vapour ceases
to escape,

and nothing remains but the

salt in

a

state of fusion.

Lastly, pour the fused salt on a
it

porcelain slab, and, after

has concreted, break

the mass while yet

warm
salt,

in pieces,

and keep these

in a well-stopped bottle.

A deliquescent,

very soluble

in soft, white, crystalline pieces,
acid,

having a faint odour of valerianic

and a

taste at first styptic,

but afterwards sweetish.
concretes on cooling.

It

melts without loss of acid at 285°, and

If one

hundred grains of
to 200°,

it,

dissolved in six"

hundred grains of water heated

be mixed with a solution

of one hundred grains of sulphate of zinc in the

same quantity of

water, crystals of valerianate of zinc will be formed on the surface
of the mixture before
it

cools.

SPIRITUS.

287

SPIRITUS.
Spiritus jEtheris Compositus.

Comjpound Spirit of Ether.
Hoffmann's Anodyne.

Take

of Ether half a pint

Alcohol a pint
Ethereal Oil six fluidrachms.

Mix them. A colourless, volatile,
ethereal odour, and
a.

inflammable liquid, having an aromatic,
taste.

burning, slightly sweetish

Its specific
It

gravity

is

0*815.

It is neutral or

but slightly acid

to litmus.
;

gives only a slight cloudiness with chloride of

barium

but,

when a
test,

fluidounce of
it

it is

evaporated to dryness with an excess of this

yields a precipitate of sulphate of baryta, which,
dried,

when washed

and

weighs

six

and a quarter grains.
is

When

a few drops are

burned on glass or porcelain, there
face will be left with

no visible residue, but the surreaction.

an acid

taste
is

and

A pint of

water,

by the admixture of

forty drops,

rendered slightly opalescent.

Spiritus

^theris

Nitrosi.

Spirit of Nitrous Ether.
Spiritus ^theris Nitrici,
Sioeet Spirit

Pharm.^ 1850.

of Nitre.

Take

of Nitric Acid nineteen troyounces and a
half;

Stronger Alcohol nine pints

Carbonate of Potassa a troyounce.

288

SPIRITUS.

Introduce four pints of the Alcohol into a retort,

having the capacity of eight

pints^

and contain-

ing some pieces of glass, and add the Nitric Acid.

Adapt the

retort

to

a Liebig's

condenser,

and

apply heat by means of a water-bath so arranged
that the water
cess.

may

be drawn off during the pro-

When
all

the mixture boils briskly, draw off

almost

the water of the bath, and allow the dis-

tillation to

proceed spontaneously until

it

begins to

slacken.

Then

cautiously reapply heat by

means

of the water-bath, and continue

the distillation

until four pints of the distilled liquid

have passed

over.

Having thrown away the

residue, rinse the

apparatus thoroughly, return the liquid to the retort,

add the Carbonate of Potassa to
distil

it,

agitate

the mixture, and again
bath, slowly at
first,

by means of a waterand a half

until three pints

of distilled liquid have been obtained.

With

this

mix thoroughly
transfer

the remainder of the Alcohol, and

the mixture to half-pint bottles, which

must be well stopped, and protected from the
light.
Spirit of Nitrous Ether is a volatile, inflammable liquid, of a pale-

yellow colour inclining slightly to green, having a fragrant, ethereal
odour, free from pungency, and a sharp, burning taste.
It slightly

reddens litmus, but does not cause effervescence w^hen a crystal of
bicarbonate of potassa
is

dropped into

it.

AVhcn mixed with half

ita

SPIRITUS.
volume of
officinal solution of potassa,
it

289

previously diluted with an

equal measure of distilled water,
slightly

assumes a yellow colour, which

deepens, without becoming brown, in twelve hours.
it,

A

portion of the Spirit in a test-tube half-filled with

plunged into

water heated

to 145°,

and held there until

it

has acquired that tem-

perature, will boil distinctly on the addition of a few small pieces

of glass.
Spirit of Nitrous Ether has the specific gravity 0"837,

and contains
It

from four and three-tenths
should not be long kept, as

to five
it

per cent, of

its

peculiar ether.

becomes strongly acid by age.

Spiritus
Spirit of

Ammonia.

Ammonia.
in small j)ieces,

Take

of Muriate of

Ammonia,

Lime, each, twelve troy ounces

Water

six pints

Alcohol twenty fluidounces.

Upon
bring
it

the Lime, in a convenient vessel, pour a

pint of the Water, and stir the mixture so as to
to

the

consistence of a

smooth

paste.

Then add
it

the remainder of the Water, and

mix

well with the Lime.

Decant the milky liquid
retort, of the

from the gritty sediment into a glass

capacity of sixteen pints, and add the Muriate
of

Ammonia.
to

Place the retort on a sand-bath,
it

and adapt

a receiver, previously connected

with a two-pint bottle containing the Alcohol, by

means of a

glass tube reaching nearly to the bot27*

290
torn of the bottle.

SPIRITUS.
Surround the bottle with
ice-

cold water
until

;

and apply a gradually increasing heat
ceases
to

ammonia

be given
bottle,

off.

Lastly,

remove the liquid from the
it

and introduce

into small bottles,

which must be well stopped.

Spiritus

Ammonia Aromaticus.

Aromatic Spirit of Ammonia.

Take of Carbonate of Ammonia a troyounce

Water of Ammonia
Oil of

three fluidounces

Lemon two
Nutmeg
forty

fluidrachms and a

half;
Oil of
Oil of

minims
minims

Lavender

fifteen

Alcohol a pint and a half;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Carbonate in the

Water of Am-

monia, previously mixed with four fluidounces of

Water.

Dissolve

the

Oils in

the Alcohol,

mix
to

the two solutions, and

add

sufficient

Water

make

the whole measure two pints.

SPIRITUS.
Spiritus Anisi.
Spirit of Anise.

291

Take of

Oil of Anise a fluidounce

Stronger Alcohol fifteen fluidounces.
Dissolve the Oil in the Stronger Alcohol.

Spiritus Camphors.
Spirit of

Camphor.

Tiuctura Camphoroe, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of

Camphor

four troyounces

Alcohol two pints.
Dissolve the

Camphor

in the Alcohol,

and

filter

through paper.

Spiritus Chloroformi.
Spirit of Chloroform.

Take of

Purified Chloroform a troyounce

Stronger Alcohol six fluidounces.
Dissolve the Chloroform in the Stronger Alcohol.

Spiritus Cinnamomi.
Spirit of

Cinnamon.

Take of

Oil of

Cinnamon a fluidounce

Stronger Alcohol fifteen fluidounces.
Dissolve the Oil in the Stronger Alcohol.

292

SPIRITUS.
Spiritus Juniperi Compositus.

Compound
Take
Oil of

Spirit of Juniper.

of Oil of Juniper a fluidrachm and a half;

Caraway,

Oil of Fennel, each, ten

minims

Diluted Alcohol eight pints.
Dissolve the Oils in the Diluted Alcohol.

Spiritus

Lavandula.
twenty-four troyounces

Spirit of Lavender.

Take of Lavender,

fresh,

Alcohol eight pints

Water two
eight pints.

pints.

Mix them, and with

a regulated heat

distil

Spiritus Lavandulae Compositus.

Compound

Spirit of Lavender.

Take

of Oil of Lavender a fluid ounce
Oil of

Rosemary two fluidrachms
fine

Cinnamon, in moderately

powder,

two troyounces
Cloves, in moderately fine powder, half

a troyounce

Nutmeg,

in moderately fine powder, a

troyounce

SPIRITUS.

293

Red Saunders,
der, three

in moderately fine

pow-

hundred and sixty grains

Alcohol six pints

Water two

pints

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.
Dissolve the Oils in the Alcohol, and add the

Water.

Then mix

the

powders,

and,

having

moistened the mixture with a fluidounce of the
alcoholic solution of the Oils,

pack

it

firmly in a
it

conical percolator,

and gradually pour upon

the

remainder of the alcoholic solution, and afterwards
Diluted x\lcohol, until the filtered liquid measures
eight pints.

Spiritus Limonis.
Spirit of

Lemon,

Essence of Lemon.

Take of

Oil of

Lemon two fluidounces Lemon Peel, freshly grated,
ounce
Stronger Alcohol two pints.

a troj-

Dissolve the Oil in the Stronger Alcohol, add

the

Lemon
filter

Peel, macerate for twenty-four hours,

and

through paper.

294

SPIRITUS.
Spiritus Menth^e Piperita.
Spirit of Pepi:ermint.

Tinctura Olei Menthae Piperitae, Pharm.^ 1850.
Essence of Peppermint.

Take

of Oil of Peppermint a fluidounce

Peppermint,

in

coarse

powder,

one

hundred and twenty grains
Stronger Alcohol fifteen fluidounces.
Dissolve the Oil in the Stronger Alcohol, add

the Peppermint, macerate for twenty-four hours,

and

filter

through paper.

Spiritus

Mentha

Yiridis.

Spirit of Spearmint.

Tinctura Olei Menthae Viridis, Pharm.^ 1850.
Essence of Spearmint.

Take of

Oil of

Spearmint a fluidounce

Spearmint, in coarse powder, one hun-

dred and twenty grains
Stronger Alcohol fifteen fluidounces.
Dissolve the Oil in the Stronger Alcohol, add

the

Spearmint, macerate for twenty-four hours,
filter

and

through paper.

STKYCIINIA.
Spiritus Myristic^.
Spirit of

295

Nutmeg.

Take

of

Nutmeg,

bruised,

two troyounces

Diluted Alcohol eight pints

Water a
eight pints.

pint.

Mix them, and with

a regulated

heat

distil

STRYCHNIA.
Strychnia.
Strychnia.

Take

of

Nux

Vomica, rasped, forty-eight troy;

ounces

Lime, in

fine

powder, six troyounces

Muriatic Acid three troyounces and a
half;

Alcohol,

Diluted Alcohol, Diluted Sulphuric Acid,

Water

of

Ammonia,
sufficient quantity.

Purified

Animal Charcoal,
for twenty-four hours,

Water, each, a

Macerate the

Nux Vomica,

in sixteen pints of Water, acidulated with one-third

296

STRYCHNIA.
;

of the Muriatic Acid

then boil for two hours, and

strain with expression through a strong muslin bag.

Boil the residue twice successively in the same

quantity of acidulated Water, each time straining
as before.

Mix

the decoctions, and evaporate to
;

the consistence of thin syrup previously
for

then add the Lime
boil

mixed with a pint of Water, and

ten

minutes, frequently stirring.

Pour the

whole into a double muslin bag, and, having thoroughly washed the precipitate, press, dry, and

powder

it.

Treat the

powder repeatedly with

Diluted Alcohol, in order to remove the brucia,
until the washings are but faintly reddened
nitric acid.

by

Then

boil it repeatedly

with Alcohol

until deprived of bitterness,
tures,

mix

the several tinc-

and

distil

off the

alcohol

by means of a
residue,

water-bath.

Having washed the

mix

it

with a pint of Water, and, applying a gentle heat,
drop in
tralize fied sufficient Diluted

Sulphuric Acid to neu-

and dissolve the

alkaloid.

Then add

Puri-

Animal Charcoal, and, having
filter,

boiled the mix-

ture for a few minutes,
aside to crystallize.

evaporate, and set

Dissolve the crystals in Abater,

and add

sufficient

Water of Ammonia

to precipi-

tate the Strychnia.

Lastly, dry this on bibulous

paper, and keep

it

in a well-stopped bottle.

STRYCHNIA.
Strychnia, thus prepared,
is

297

a white or grayish-white powder, of

an intensely

bitter taste, nearly insoluble in water, slightly soluble

in cold alcohol,
it

and readily soluble in boiling
is

alcohol.

"When heated
but slightly
it,

melts,

and by a strong heat

wholly dissipated.

It is

or not at all reddened

by

nitric acid.

A

small portion of

dissolved

in officinal sulphuric acid, yields, on the addition of a
tity of

minute quan-

bichromate of potassa, a splendid violet colour.

Strychnia Sulphas.
Sulphate of Strychnia.

Take of Strychnia a troy ounce
Diluted

Sulphuric

Acid

nine

flui-

drachms, or a sufficient quantity
Distilled

Water a

pint.

Mix

the Strychnia with the Distilled Water,

heat the mixture gently, and gradually add Diluted Sulphuric Acid
tralized

until

the alkaloid

is

neu-

and

dissolved.

Filter the

solution,

and

evaporate with a moderate heat, so that crystals

may form on
crystals,

cooling.

Lastly, having drained the

dry them rapidly on bibulous paper, and
bottle.

keep them in a well-stopped

A white

salt,

in colourless, prismatic crystals,

which are without

odour, exceedingly bitter, readily soluble in water, sparingly soluble in alcohol, and insoluble in ether.

They

effloresce

on exposure

to

the

air,

and melt when heated, losing nearly fourteen per

cent, of

their weight of water of crystallization.

By

a strong heat they arc

wh..lly volatilized.

In other respects they answer to the tests for
28

Strychnia.

298

SULPHUR.

SULPHUR.
Sulphur Pk^cipitatum.
Precipitated Sulphur.

Take

of Sublimed Sulphur twelve troyounces

Lime eighteen troyounces
Muriatic Acid,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Pour

sufficient

Water on the Lime
Avith
it,

to slake

it,

and, having
pints of

mixed the Sulphur
to the

add

fifteen

Water

mixture

;

then boil for two
to preserve the

hours, occasionally adding

Water

same measure, and

filter.

Dilute the filtered liquid
it

with an equal bulk of Water, and drop into
Muriatic Acid so long as a precipitate
Lastly,
is

produced.

wash the Precipitated Sulphur repeatedly
taste-

with Water until the washings are nearly
less,

and dry

it.
is

Precipitated Sulphur

entirely dissipated

by

heat.

SULPHURIS lODIDUM.
Iodide of Sulphur.

Take of Iodine four troyounces
Sublimed Sulphur a troyounce.

Rub them

together until they are thoroughly

SYRUPI.
mixed.
Introduce the mixture into a

299
flask, close

the orifice loosely, and apply a gentle heat so as
to

darken the mass without melting

it.

When

the colour has become uniformly dark throughout,
increase the heat so as to produce liquefaction.

Then

incline the flask in difierent directions, in

order to return into the liquid any portions of

Iodine which

may have

been condensed on the
Lastly,

inner surface of the vessel.
heat, and,

withdraw the

when

the liquid has congealed, remove
it

the mass by breaking the flask, reduce

to pieces,

and keep these in a well-stopped

bottle.

SYRUPI.
Syrupus.
Syrup.

Take of Sugar,

in

coarse

powder, thirty-six

troy ounces.
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Sugar, with

the aid of heat, in

twenty fluidounces of

Distilled

Water, raise the

temperature to the boiling point, and strain the
solution while hot.
»

Then add

sufficient Distilled

Water, through the strainer, to make the Syrup

300

SYRUPL
and twelve
fluidounces,

measure two pints

or

weigh

fifty-five

troyounces.

Lastly, incorporate

the Water, added through the strainer, with the
solution.

Syrup, thus prepared, has the specific

gravity 1*317.

Syrupus Acacia.

Syrup of

Gum

Arabic,

Take of

Gum

Arabic, in pieces, two troyounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, fourteen troy-

ounces

;

Water eight

fluidounces.
first

Dissolve in the Water,

the

Gum

Arabic

without heat, then the Sugar with a gentle heat,

and

strain.

Syrupus Acidi

Citrici.

Syrup of

Citric Acid.

Take of

Citric Acid, in fine

powder, one hundred
-,

and twenty grains
Oil of

Lemon

four

minims

Syrup two

pints.

Rub

the Citric Acid and Oil of
;

Lemon with

a

fluidounce of the Syrup

then add the mixture to

the remainder of the Syrup, and dissolve with a
gentle heat.

SYRUPL
Syrupus Allii.

301

Syrup of

Garlio.

Take of

Garlic,

sliced
;

and bruised,

six

troy-

ounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, twenty-four
troy ounces

Diluted Acetic Acid a pint.

Macerate the Garlic with ten fluidounces of the
Diluted Acetic Acid, in a glass vessel, for four
days, and express the liquid.

Then mix

the resi-

due with the remainder of the Acid, and again
express until sufficient additional liquid has been

obtained to
sure a pint.

make

the whole,

when

filtered,

mea-

Lastly, introduce the Sugar into a
it

two-pint bottle, pour upon

the filtered liquid,

and

agitate until it

is

dissolved.

Syrupus Amygdala.

Syrup of Almond.

Take of Sweet Almond twelve troy ounces
Bitter

Almond

four troyounces

;

Sugar, in coarse powder, seventy-two

troyounces

Water three
mortar to a very

pints.

Having blanched the Almonds, rub them
fine paste, adding,
28»

in a

during the

302
trituration, three

SYRUPI.
fluidounces of the

Water and
the paste

twelve troyounces of the Sugar.

Mix

thoroughly
strain

with the remainder of the Water,

with strong expression, add to the strained

liquid the remainder of the Sugar,

and dissolve

it

with the aid of a gentle heat.

Lastly, strain the
it

solution through muslin, and, having allowed
to cool, keep
place.
it

in well-stopped bottles in a cool

Syrupus Aurantii Corticis.

Syrup of Orange Peel. Take of Sweet Orange Peel, recently dried and
in moderately fine powder,

two

troy-

ounces

;

Carbonate of Magnesia half a troyounce
;

Sugar, in coarse powder, twenty-eight

troyounces
Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Orange Peel with half a fluidounce
of Alcohol, introduce
it

into a conical percolator,
it

and pour Alcohol upon
tincture have passed.

until six fluidounces of
this, at

Evaporate

a tem-

perature not exceeding 120°, to two fluidounces,

SYRUPL

303

add the Carbonate of Magnesia and a troyounce
of the Sugar, and rub

them

together, gradually

adding half a pint of Water during the trituration.

Then

filter,

and, having added sufficient

Water
it

to

make
heat,

the liquid measure a pint, dissolve in

the

remainder of the Sugar with the aid of a gentle

and

strain.

Syrupus Aurantii Florum.

Syrup of Orange Flowers.

Take of Orange Flower Water
Sugar,
in

five fluidounces

coarse

powder,

thirty-six

troyounces
Distilled

Water

fifteen fluidounces.

Dissolve the Sugar in the Distilled Water, with

the aid of a gentle heat, and raise the temperature
to the boiling point.
cold,

When

the solution

is

nearly

mix thoroughly with
strain.

it

the Orange Flower

Water, and

Syrupus Ferri

Iodidi.

Syrup of Iodide of Iron.
Liquor Ferri Iodidi, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Iodine

two troyounces
form of wire and cut iu

Iron, in the

pieces, three

hundred grains

3

304
Distilled

SYRUPI.

Water three

fluidounces

Syrup a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Iodine, Iron, and Distilled

Water

in a

flask of thin glass, shake the

mixture occasionally
ac-

until the reaction ceases,

and the solution has

quired a green colour and lost the smell of iodine.

Then, having introduced a pint of Syrup into a
graduated bottle, heat
to 212°, and,
it

by means of a water-bath
the solution
passed, close

through a small funnel inserted in
filter

the

mouth

of the bottle,

into

it

already prepared.
the bottle, shake

When
it

this has

thoroughly, and,

liquid has cooled, add sufficient

when the Syrup to make
Lastly,
its

the whole measure twenty fluidounces.

again shake the bottle, and transfer

contents to

two-ounce

vials,

which must be well stopped.
It deposits

A transparent

liquid, of a pale-green colour.

no sedi-

ment by keeping, and
with sulphuric acid
it

does not tinge solution of starch blue.

Mixed
violet

becomes brown, and the mixture emits

vapours when heated.

Syrupus Ipecacuanha.

Syrup of Ipecacuanlia. Take of Fluid Extract of Ipecacuanha two
ounces
;

fluid-

Syrup thirty fluidounces.

Mix them.

SYRUPI.
Syrupus Krameri^.

305

Syrup of Rhatany. Take of Khatany, in moderately
twelve troyounces

fine

powder,

Sugar, in coarse powder, thirty troy-

ounces

;

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the

Khatany with half a pint of Water, and,
for

having allowed the mixture to stand
introduce
it

two hours,

into a glass percolator,
it

and gradually

pour Water upon
are obtained.

until four pints of filtered liquid
this,

Evaporate

by means of a water-

bath, to seventeen fluidounces, and, having added

the Sugar, dissolve

it

with the aid of a gentle heat,

and

strain the solution while hot.

This Syrup
ing manner.

may

also be prepared in the follow-

Take of Extract of Rhatany two troyounces
Sugar, in coarse powder, thirty troy-

ounces

;

Water a

pint.

Dissolve the Extract in the Water, and filter;
then, having added the

Sugar, dissolve

it

with

the aid of a gentle heat, and strain the solution

while hot.

306

SYRUPI.
Syrupus Lactucarii.

Syrup of Lactucarium, Take of Lactucarium a troy ounce
Syrup fourteen fluidounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Rub

the Lactucarium with sufficient Diluted
it

Alcohol, gradually added, to bring
consistence.
colator, and,

to a

syrupy

Then

introduce

it

into a conical per-

having carefully covered the surface

with a piece of muslin, gradually pour Diluted
Alcohol upon
passed.
it

until half a pint of tincture has
this,

Evaporate

by means of a water-

bath, at a temperature not exceeding 160°, to two
fluidounces,

mix

it

with the Syrup, previously

heated, and strain while hot.

Syrupus Limonis.

Syrup of Lemon,

Take of Lemon

Juice, recently expressed,

and

strained, a pint

Sugar,

in

coarse

powder,

forty-eight

troyounces

Water a

pint.

Mix

the

Lemon

Juice and Water, and, having

added the Sugar

to the mixture, dissolve it

with

the aid of a gentle heat, and strain the solution

while hot.

SYRUri.
Syrupus Pruni Virginians.
Syrurp of Wild-cherry Baric.

307

Take of

Wild-clierry Bark, in coarse
five

powder,

troyounces

Sugar, in coarse powder, twenty-eight

troyounces

Water a
allow
vessel

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the Bark thoroughly with Water, and
it
;

to stand for twenty-four hours in a close

then pack

it

firmly in a glass percolator,
it

and gradually pour Water upon
filtered liquid is obtained.

until a pint of

To

this, transferred to

a bottle, add the Sugar, and agitate occasionally
until
it is

dissolved.

Syrupus Rhei.
Syrup of Rliiibarh.

Take

of Fluid Extract of

Rhubarb three

fluid-

ounces

;

Syrup twenty-nine fluidounces.

Mix them

thoroughly.

Syrupus Rhei Aromaticus.
Aromatic Syrup of Rliuharh.

Take of Rhubarb,

in moderately fine powder,
half;

two troyounces and a

308

SYRUPI.
Cloves, in moderately fine powder,

Cinnamon,

in fine powder, each, half a

troyounce

Nutmeg, in moderately

fine

powder,

one hundred and twenty grains

Syrup six pints
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with two fluidounces of Diluted Alcohol,
introduce
it

into a conical percolator,
it

and pour

Diluted Alcohol upon

until a pint of tincture

has passed.
heated, and

Add

this

to the

Syrup, previously

mix them thoroughly.
Syrupus Rosje Gallics.

Syrup of Red Rose.

Take of Red Rose,

in moderately fine powder,

two troyounces
Sugar, in coarse powder, eighteen troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.
it

Moisten the Rose with Diluted Alcohol, pack

firmly in a conical glass percolator, and gradually

pour Diluted Alcohol upon
tincture has passed.

it

until a fluidounce of

Set this aside, and continue

SYRUPI.

309

the percolation until five fluidounces more of tincture are obtained.

Evaporate this with a gentle
half,

heat to a fluidounce and a

and mix

it

with

seven fluidounces of Water.
the Sugar, dissolve
it

Then, having added

with the aid of a gentle heat,
Lastly,

and

strain the solution while hot.
is

when

the solution
tincture,

cold,

add the fluidounce of reserved

and mix them thoroughly.

Syrupus Rubi.
Syrup of BlacJcberry Root

Take of Blackberry Root,

in

moderately

fine

powder, eight troyounces

Syrup a pint and a half;
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Introduce

the

powder, previously

moistened

with four fluidounces of Diluted Alcohol, into a
glass percolator,
it

and pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until a pint

and a half of tincture have passed.

Evaporate

this,

by means of a water-bath,

at

a

temperature not exceeding 160°, to half a pint;
then

mix

it

while hot with the Syrup previously

heated, and strain.
29

310

SYRUPL
Syruptjs Sarsaparill^ Compositfs.

Compound Syrup of Sarsaparilla. Take of
Sarsaparilla, in moderately coarse
der, twenty-four troy ounces

pow-

Guaiacum Wood,

in moderately coarse

powder, three troyounces
Pale Kose, in moderately coarse powder, Senna, in moderately coarse powder,
Liquorice Eoot, in moderately coarse

powder, each, two troyounces
Oil of Sassafras,

Oil of Anise, each, five Oil of Gaultheria three

minims

minims
ninety-six

Sugar,

in

coarse

powder,

troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the solid ingredients, except the Sugar,

with three pints of Diluted Alcohol, and allow the

mixture to stand
transfer
it

for

twenty-four

hours;

then

to a cylindrical percolator,
it

and grad-

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon
of tincture have passed.

until ten pints
this,

Evaporate

by means

of a water-bath, to four pints,

filter,

and, having

added the Sugar, dissolve

it

with the aid of heat,
Lastly, rub the

and

strain the solution while hot.

Oils with a small portion of the solution,

and mix

them thoroughly with the remainder.

SYRUPL
Syrupus Scill^,
Syrup of SquUL

311

Take of Vinegar

of Squill a pint

Sugar, in coarse
troyounces.

powder, twentj-four

Dissolve the Sugar in the Vinegar of Squill, with

the aid of a gentle heat, and strain the solution

while hot.

Syrupus Scill^ Compositus,

Compowid Syrup of Squill,

Take of

Squill, in

moderately coarse powder,

Seneka, in

moderately

fine

powder,

each, four troyounces

Tartrate

of

Antimony

and

Potassa

forty-eight grains

Sugar,

in

coarse

powder,

forty-two

troyounces
Diluted Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix

the Squill and Seneka, and, having moist-

ened the mixture with half a pint of Diluted Alcohol, allow it to stand for
it to

an hour.

Then

transfer

a conical percolator, and pour Diluted Alcoit

hol upon
passed.

until

three

pints of tincture

have
it

Boil this for a few minutes, evaporate

312

SYRUPI.
to a pint,
filter.

by means of a water-bath
Sugar in the

add six

fluid-

ounces of boiling Water, and

Dissolve the

filtered liquid, and,

having heated
it

the solution to the boiling point, strain
hot.

while

Then

dissolve the Tartrate of
still

Antimony and
hot,

Potassa in the solution while
sufficient boiling

and add

Water, through the strainer, to
pints.

make

it

measure three

Lastly,

mix

the

whole thoroughly together.

SyRUPUS SENEGiE.

Syrup of

Senelca.

Take of Seneka,

in moderately fine powder, four

troyounces
Sugar, in coarse

powder,

fifteen

troy-

ounces

;

Diluted Alcohol two pints.

Moisten the Seneka with two fluidounces of the
Diluted Alcohol
colator,
;

then transfer

it

to a conical per-

and gradually pour on

it

the remainder

of the Diluted Alcohol.

When
it,

the tincture has

ceased to pass, evaporate

by means of a water-

bath, at a temperature not exceeding 160°, to half

a pint; then
dissolve
it

filter,

and, having added the Sugar,

with the aid of a gentle heat, and strain

the solution while hot.

SYRUri.
Syrupus Tolutanus.

313

Syrup of

Tolu.

Take of Tincture

of Tolu two fluidouncevS

Carbonate of Magnesia one hundred

and twenty grains
Sugar,
in

coarse

powder, twenty-six

trovounces

Water a

pint.
first

Rub

the Tincture of Tolu

with the Car-

bonate of Magnesia and two troyounces of the
Sugar, then with the Water, gradually added, and
filter.

To

the filtered liquid add the remainder
it

of the Sugar, and, having dissolved

with the aid

of a gentle heat, strain the solution while hot.

Syrupus Zingiberis.
Syrup of Ginger.

Take

of Tincture of Ginger six fluidounces

Carbonate of Magnesia half a troy-

ounce

;

Sugar, in coarse powder, one hundred

and eight troyounces

j

Water

four pints.
to

Evaporate the Tincture

three
it

fluidounces

with a gentle heat; then rub
29*

first

with the

Carbonate of Magnesia and two troyounces of the

314

TINCTURiE.

Sugar, and afterwards with the Water, gradually

added, and

filter.

To

the filtered liquid add the
it

remainder of the Sugar, and, having dissolved

with the aid of a gentle heat, strain the solution
while hot.

TINCTURJE.
When
Tinctures
are prepared

by

percolation,

great care should be taken to observe the directions

given at page 3

;

so that the substances treated

may

be, as far as possible,

exhausted of their soluble

principles,

and a perfectly clear liquid obtained.

When

prepared by maceration, they require to be

frequently shaken during the process, which should

be conducted in glass bottles, well stopped.

TiNCTURA ACONITI

FOLII.

Tincture of Aconite Leaf.
Tinctura Aconiti FoHorum, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Aconite Leaf, recently dried

and

in fine

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
it

firmly in a conical per-

TINCTURiE.
colator,
it until

815

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

two pints

of»

tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA ACONITI RadICIS.
Tincture of Aconite Root.

Take of Aconite Root,
troyounces

in fine powder, twelve

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with six fluidounces of
Alcohol, pack
it

firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
pints of tincture are obtained.

until

two

TiNCTURA Aloes.
Tincture of Aloes.

Take

of Socotrine Aloes, in fine powder, a troy-

ounce

;

Liquorice three troyounces

Alcohol half a pint
Distilled

Water a

pint and a half

Macerate
paper.

for fourteen days,

and

filter

through

TiNCTURA Aloes et Myrrhs.
Tincture of Aloes

and Myrrh.
in

Take

of Socotrine

Aloes,

moderately fine

powder,

316

TINCTURE.
Myrrh, in moderately
fine

powder,

each, three troypunces;
Saffron, in moderately coarse powder,

a troyounce Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powders, and, having moistened the
it

mixture with two fluidounces of Alcohol, pack

moderately in a conical percolator, and gradually

pour Alcohol upon
are obtained.

it

until

two pints of tincture

This Tincture

may

also be prepared

by mace-

rating the powders with two pints of Alcohol for

fourteen days, and filtering through paper.

TiNCTURA Arnica.
Tincture of Arnica.

Take

of Arnica six troyounces

Alcohol a pint and a half;

Water half a

pint

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
it

the Alcohol and Water, and, having moist-

ened the Arnica slightly with the mixture, bruise
thoroughly in a mortar.

Then pack

it

firmly
it,

in a cylindrical percolator,

and pour upon

first

the

remainder of the

mixture, and afterwards

TINCTURE.
sufficient

317

Diluted Alcohol
pints.

to

make

the tincture

measure two

TiNCTURA ASSAF(ETID/E.
Tincture of Assafetida.

Take of

Assafetida, bruised, four troyounces

Alcohol two pints.

Macerate
paper.

for fourteen days,

and

filter

through

TiNCTURA Belladonna.
Tincture of Belladonna.

Take of Belladonna
fine

Leaf, recently dried

and in

powder, four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it
it

firmly in a conical per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA Benzoini Composita.

Compound

Tincture of Benzoin.
in coarse powder, three troy:

Take of Benzoin,
ounces

318

TINCTURE.
Socotrine Aloes, in coarse powder, half

a troyounce

Storax two troyounces

Balsam of Tolu a troyounce
Alcohol two pints.

Macerate for fourteen days, and
paper.

filter

through

TiNCTURA CaLUMBJE.
Tincture of Columho.
Tinctura Colombse, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take

of Columbo, in moderately fine powder,
four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, transfer
it

to a conical percolator,
it

and
two

gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon
pints of tincture are obtained.

until

Tinctura Cannabis.
Tincture of

Hemp.

Take

of Purified Extract of

Hemp

three hun-

dred and sixty grains

Alcohol a pint.
Dissolve the Extract in the Alcohol, and
filter

through paper.

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA CaNTHARIDIS.
Tincture of CantJiarides.

319

Take

of Cantharides, in fine powder, a troyounce;

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.
TiNCTURA CapSICI.
Thicture of Capsicum,

Take

of Capsicum, in fine powder, a troyounce

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.
TiNCTURA CarDAMOMI.
Tincture of

Cardamom.

Take

of

Cardamom,
ounces
;

in fine powder, four troy-

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
percolator,
it

firmly in a cylindrical

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol two pints of tincture are obtained.

upon

it

until

820

TINCTURE.
TiNCTURA Cardamomi Composita.

Compound Tincture of Cardamom. Take of Cardamom, in moderately fine powder,
three hundred and sixty grains

Caraway, in moderately

fine

powder,

one hundred and twenty grains

Cinnamon, in moderately
three hundred grains

fine

powder,

Cochineal, in moderately fine powder,
sixty grains
Clarified

Honey two troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
pack
it

the powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with half a fluidounce of Diluted Alcohol,
in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually

pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints and
Lastly,
filter

six fluidounces of tincture are obtained.

mix

this

with the Clarified

Honey, and

through paper.

TiNCTURA CaSTOREI.
Tincture of Castor.

Take of

Castor, bruised,

two troyounces

Alcohol two pints.

Macerate

for

seven days, express,

and

filter

through paper.

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA Catechu.
Tincture of Catechu.

321

Take of Catechu,

in moderately coarse powder,

three troyounces

Cinnamon,
der,

in moderately coarse

pow-

two troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
pack
it

the powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with a fluidounce of Diluted Alcohol,
in a conical glass percolator,
it

and gradually

pour Diluted Alcohol upon
tincture are obtained.

until

two pints of

TiNCTURA Cinchona.
Tincture of GincJiona.

Take of Yellow Cinchona,

in moderately fine

powder, six troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the pow^der with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
lator,
it

firmly in a glass percoit

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.
TiNCTURA Cinchona Composita.

Compound

Tincture of Cinchona.
in moderately fine
,

Take

of

Red Cinchona,

pow-

der, four troyounces
30

322

TINCTURE.
Bitter Orange Peel, in moderately fine

powder, three troyounces
Serpentaria, in moderately fine powder,

three hundred and sixty grains
Saffron, in moderately coarse powder,

Red Saunders,
der, each,

in moderately fine

pow-

one hundred and twenty

grains

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
pack
it

the

powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with four fluidounces of Diluted Alcohol,
firmly in a glass percolator, and gradually
it

pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two

pints

and

a half of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA CiNNAMOMI.
Tincture of Cinnamon.

Take of Cinnamon,
ounces
Alcohol,
;

in fine powder, three troy-

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix Alcohol and Water

in the proportion of

two measures of the former to one of the latter. Then moisten the powder with a fluidounce of the
mixture, pack
it

moderately in a conical perco-

TINCTURE.
lator,

323
it

and gradually pour the mixture upon

until

two pints of

filtered liquid are obtained.

TiNCTURA COLCHICI.
Tincture of Colchicum.
Tinctura Colchici Seminis, Pharm.^ 1850.

Take of Colchicum Seed,

in

moderately fine

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and

gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon
pints of tincture are obtained.

until

two

Tinctura Conii.
Tincture of Hemloch.

Take

of Hemlock, recently dried

and

in fine

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it it

firmly in a conical per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

824

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA CUBEB^.
Tincture of Cubeh,

Take of Cubeb,

in moderately fine powder, foui

troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradtwo pints

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA Digitalis.
Tincture of Digitalis,

Take of

Digitalis, recently dried

and in

fijje

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it
it

firmly in a conical per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA FeRRI ChLORIDI.
Tincture of Chloride of Iron.

Take of

Iron, in the

form of wire and cut in

pieces, three troyounces

Muriatic

Acid

seventeen
'

troyounces

and a half;

TINCTURiE.
Alcohol three pmts
Nitric Acid,
Distilled
tity.

325

Water, each, a

sufficient

quan-

Introduce the Iron into a flask of the capacity
of two pints, pour

upon

it

eleven troy ounces of the

Muriatic Acid, and allow the mixture to stand
until efiervescence has ceased.

Then heat

it

to

the boiling point, decant the liquid from the undissolved Iron,
filter it

through paper, and, having
little

rinsed the flask

with a
it

boiling
filter.

Distilled

Water, add this to

through the

Pour the

filtered liquid into a capsule

of the capacity of

four pints, add

the

remainder of the Muriatic

Acid, and, having heated the mixture nearly to

the boiling point, add a troyounce and a half of
Nitric Acid.

When

efiervescence has ceased, drop
it

in

Nitric

Acid,

constantly stirring, until
Lastly,

no
the
to

longer produces efiervescence.
liquid
is it

when
Water

cold,

add

sufficient Distilled

make

measure a

pint,

and mix

it

with the

Alcohol.

A yellowish-brown
an
ounce of
it,

liquid,

having a harsh,

acid, styptic taste,

and

agreeable ethereal odour.

Its specific gravity is 0*990.

A

fluid-

diluted with water, and treated with

ammonia

in excess,

afibrds a precipitate of sesquioxide of iron, which,

when washed,

dried,

and

ignited,

weighs twenty-nine grains.
30*

826

TINCTURE.
TiNCTURA GaLLJE.
Tincture of Nutgall.

Take

of Nutgall, in moderately fine
four troyounces

powder,

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a glass percolator,
it

and gradtwo pints

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA Gentians Composita.

Compound Take of Gentian,
Bitter

Tincture of Gentian.
in moderately fine

powder,

two troyounces
Orange
Peel, in moderately fine

powder, a troyounce

Cardamom,

in moderately fine powder,

half a troyounce

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the

powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with a fluidounce and a half of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradtwo pints

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon of tincture are obtained.

until

TINCTURE.
TiNCTURA GUAIACI.
Tincture of Quaiac.

327

Take of Guaiac,

in moderately coarse

powder

six troyounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powder thoroughly with an equal bulk

of dry sand, pack the mixture moderately in a
conical percolator, and, having covered
it

with a
it

layer of sand, gradually pour Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA GUAIACI AmMONIATA.

Ammoniated Tincture of Guaiac.

Take

of Guaiac, in moderately coarse powder,
six troyounces

Aromatic Spirit of
Macerate for seven
paper.

Ammonia two
filter

pints.

days, and

through

TiNCTURA HeLLEBORI.
Tincture of Blach Hellebore

Take

of Black

Hellebore, in

moderately

fine

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted

328

TINCTURiE.
it

Alcohol, pack

in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and
two

gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon
pints of tincture are obtained.

until

TiNCTURA HUMULI.
Tincture of Hops.

Take of Hops,

in

moderately coarse powder,

five troy ounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
drical percolator,
it it

very firmly in a cylingradually

and
until

pour

Diluted

Alcohol upon
obtained.

two pints of tincture are

TiNCTURA HyOSCYAMI.
Tincture of Henbane.

Take

of

Henbane

Leaf, in

fine

powder, four

troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it
it

firmly in a conical per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TINCTURE.
TiNCTURA
lODINir.

329

Tincture of Iodine.

Take of Iodine a troyounce
Alcohol a pint.
Dissolve the Iodine in the Alcohol.

TiNCTURA

lODINII COMPOSITA.

Compound

Tincture of Iodine,

Take

of Iodine half a troyounce

Iodide of Potassium a troyounce

Alcohol a pint.
Dissolve the Iodine and Iodide of Potassium in

the Alcohol.

TiNCTURA Jalaps.
Tincture of Jalap.

Take

of Jalap, in fine powder, six troyounces

Alcohol,

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix two measures of Alcohol with one of Water. Then moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
the mixture, pack
percolator,
it
it

moderately in a cylindrical

and gradually pour the mixture upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

330

TINCTURE.
TiNCTURA Kino.
Tincture of Kino.

Take of Kino,

in fine powder, three

hundred

and sixty grains
Alcohol,
(

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

Mix two measures of Alcohol with one of Water. Then mix the powder thoroughly with an equal
bulk of dry sand, and, having introduced the mixture into a conical glass percolator, gradually pour

the menstruum upon
ture
is

it

until half a pint of tinc-

obtained.

TiNCTURA KrAMERI^.
Tincture of Rhatany.

Take of Rhatany,

in moderately fine powder,

six troy ounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it
it

in a cylindrical glass per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon
two pints of tincture are obtained.

until

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA LoBELIiE.
Tincture of Lobelia.

331

Take

of Lobelia, in fine powder, four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Diluted Alcohol, pack
colator,
it it

firmly in a conical per-

and gradually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA LuPULINiE.
Tincture of Lupulin.

Take of Lupulin

four troyounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Pack the Lupulin
colator,

in a

narrow cylindrical perit

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA Myrrhs.
Tincture of Myrrh.

Take

of Myrrh, in moderately coarse powder,

three troyounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.
Introduce the powder into a conical percolator,
press it moderately,

and gradually pour Alcohol

upon

it

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

332

.

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA Nucis Vomica.
Tincture of Nux Vomica.

Take of Nux Vomica,
ounces

in fine powder, eight troy-

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix

the powder with a pint of Alcohol, and

digest for twenty-four hours, in a close vessel, with

a gentle heat

;

then transfer the mixture to a cylin-

drical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon

until

two pints of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA

Opii.

Tincture of Opium.
Laudanum.

Take of Opium,
Water,

dried,

and in moderately

fine

powder, two troy ounces and a half;
i

Alcohol, each, a pint
^

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Macerate the Opium with the Water for three
days, with frequent agitation
hol,
;

then add the Alcofor three

and continue the maceration

days

longer.

Introduce the mixture into a percolator,
the liquid has ceased to pass, pour Diit

and,

when

luted Alcohol upon
are obtained.

until

two pints of tincture

TINCTURE.
TiNOTURA OpII AcETATA.
Acetated Tincture of Opium.

.

33S

Take of Opium,

dried,

and in moderately

fine

powder, two troyounces

Vinegar twelve fluidounces
Alcohol half a pint.

Rub
express,

the

Opium with
filter

the Vinegar;

then add

the Alcohol, and, having macerated for seven days,

and

through paper.

TiNCTURA OpII CaMPHORATA.
Camphorated Tincture of Opium.

Take of Opium,

dried,

and in moderately

fine

powder,
Benzoic Acid, each, sixty grains

Camphor
Clarified

forty grains

Oil of Anise a fluidrachm

Honey two troyounces
filter

Diluted Alcohol two pints.

Macerate
paper.

for

seven days, and

through

TiNCTURA OpII DeODORATA.
Deodorized Tincture of Opium.

Take of Opium,

dried,

and in moderately

fine

powder, two troyounces and a half;
31

334
Ether,

TINCTURiE.

Alcohol, each, half a pint

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Macerate the Opium with half a pint of "Water
for twenty-four hours,

and express; then repeat

the

operation twice with the same quantity of

Water.

Mix
cold,

the expressed liquids, and, having

evaporated the mixture to four fluidounces, shake
it

when

in a bottle, repeatedly with

the

Ether.

Pour

off the ethereal solution

when

it

has

separated by standing, and evaporate the remain-

ing liquid until
peared.

all

traces of ether

have disap-

Mix

this

with
the

twenty fluidounces of
through
paper.

Water, and

filter

mixture

When
liquid

the liquid has ceased to pass, add sufficient
filter,

Water, through the

to

make

the filtered

measure a pint and a half

Lastly, add the

Alcohol, and

mix them

together.

TiNCTURA Quassia.
Tinctw^e of Quassia,

Take of

Quassia,

in

moderately fine powder,

two troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in

a percolator, and gradually

TINCTURiE.
pour Diluted Alcohol upon
tincture are obtained.
it

335
until

two pints of

TiNCTURA Rhei.
Tincture of Rhubarb.

Take of Rliubarb,

in moderately coarse powder,

three troy ounces

Cardamom,

in moderately fine powder,

half a troyounce

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix
it

the powders, and, having moistened the

mixture with a fluidounce of Diluted Alcohol, pack
moderately in a conical percolator, and gradually
it

pour Diluted Alcohol upon
tincture are obtained.

until

two pints of

TiNCTURA Rhei et Sennjs.
TiTwture of Bhuharh

and Senna.

Take

of Rhubarb, in moderately coarse powder,

a troyounce
Senna, in moderately coarse powder.

Red Saunders,
powder,
each,

in

moderately coarse
one

hundred

and

twenty grains
Coriander, in moderately coarse powder.

336

TINCTURE.
Fennel, in moderately coarse powder,
each, sixty grains
Saffron, in moderately coarse powder.

Liquorice, in moderately coarse powder, each, thirty grains

Kaisins,

deprived of their seeds, six

troyounces
Diluted Alcohol three pints.

Macerate for fourteen days, express, and

filter

through paper.

TiNCTURA SaNGUINARI^.
Tincture of Bloodroot.

Take of Bloodroot,

in moderately fine powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and grad-

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA SCILL^.
Tincture of Squill.

Take of

Squill, in

moderately coarse powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

TINCTURiE.

337

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradtwo pints

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA SeRPENTARLE.
Tincture of Serpentaria.

Take of

Serpentaria, in moderately fine powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator,
it

and gradtwo pints

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA StRAMONII.
Tincture of Strammiium,

Take

of

Stramonium Seed,

in moderately fine

powder, four troyounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a percolator,
it

and gradually

pour Diluted Alcohol upon
tincture are obtained.
31*

until

two pints of

338

TINCTURiE.
TiNCTURA TOLUTANA.
Tincture of Tolu.

Take of Balsam

of Tolu three troyounces

Alcohol two pints.

Macerate the Balsara with the Alcohol until
is

it

dissolved

;

then

filter

through paper.

TiNCTURA Valeriana.
Tincture of Valerian.

Take of

Valerian, in moderately fine powder,

four troyounces

Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Diluted
Alcohol, pack
it

in a conical percolator, and gradit

ually pour Diluted Alcohol upon

until

two pints

of tincture are obtained.

TiNCTURA Valerianae Ammoniata.

Ammoniated Tincture of

Valerian.

Take

of Valerian, in moderately fine powder,

four troyounces

Aromatic
Macerate
for

Spirit of

Ammonia two

pints.
filter

seven

days, express, and

through paper.

TROCIIISCI.

339

TiNCTURA VeRATRI ViRIDIS.
Tincture of American Hellebore.

Take

of

American Hellebore,

in

moderately fine

powder, sixteen troyounces
Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of
Alcohol, pack
it

firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
of tincture are obtained.

until

two pints

TiNCTURA ZiNGIBERIS.
Tincture of Ginger.

Take of Ginger,

in fine powder, eight troyounces

Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with two fluidounces of
Alcohol, pack
it

firmly in a cylindrical percolator,
it

and gradually pour Alcohol upon
of tincture are obtained.

until

two pints

TROCHISCI.
Trochisci Cret^.
Troches of Chalh.

Take

of Prepared Chalk four troyounces

340

TROCHISCL

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder, a troy;

ounce

Nutmeg,

in fine powder, sixty grains

Sugar, in fine powder, six troyounces.

Rub them
mixed
;

together until they are thoroughly

then with water form a mass, to be divided

into troches, each weighing ten grains.

Trochisci Cubeb^.
TrocJies

of Cuheb.

Take of

Oleoresin of

Cubeb a fluidounce

Oil of Sassafras a fluidrachm

Liquorice, in fine powder,

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder,

Sugar, in fine powder, each, three troy-

ounces

;

Syrup of Tolu a

sufficient quantity.

Rub

the powders together until they are thoOil,

roughly mixed; then add the Oleoresin and

and incorporate them with the mixture.

Lastly,

with Syrup of Tolu form a mass, to be divided
into troches, each weighing ten grains.

TROCHISCI.
Trochisci Ferri Subcarbonatis.
Troches of Suhcarhonate of Iron.

341

Take of Subcarbonate of Iron
Vanilla sixty grains
Sugar,
in
fine

five

troyounces

powder,

fifteen

troy-

ounces

Mucilage of
quantity.

Tragacanth

a

sufficient

Eub

the Vanilla

first

with a part of the Sugar

into a uniform powder,

and afterwards with the

Subcarbonate of Iron and the remainder of the

Sugar until they are thoroughly mixed.
.

Then

with Mucilage of Tragacanth form a mass, to be
divided into troches, each weighing twenty grains.

Trochisci Glycyrrhiz^ et Opii.
Troches of Liquorice

and Opium.

Take

of Opium, in fine powder, half a troyounce;
Liquorice, in fine powder.

Gum

Arabic, in fine powder.

Sugar, in fine powder, each, ten troy-

ounces

;

Oil of Anise a fluidrachm.

Eub

the powders together until they are tho;

roughly mixed
incorporate
it

then add the Oil of Anise, and
with the mixture.
Lastly, with

342

TROCHISCI.
to

water form a mass,

be divided into troches,

each weighing six grains.

Trochisci Ipecacuanha.
Troches of Ipecacuanha.

Take of Ipecacuanha,
troyounce

in

fine

powder, half a

Arrow-root, in fine powder, four troy-

ounces

;

Sugar, in fine powder, fourteen troy-

ounces

;

Mucilage of Tragacanth a sufficient
quantity.

Rub

the powders together until they are tho-

roughly mixed;

then with Mucilage of Traga-

canth form a mass, to be divided into troches,

each weighing ten grains.

Trochisci Magnesi^e.
Troches of Magnesia.

Take of Magnesia
Nutmeg,
Sugar,
in

four troyounces
in fine powder, sixty grains
fine

powder, twelve troy-

ounces

;

Mucilage of
quantity.

Tragacanth

a sufficient

TROCIIISCL

343

Eub

the Magnesia and

tlie

powders together
;

until they are thoroughly
cilage of

mixed

then with

Mu-

Tragacanth form a mass,

to be divided

into troches, each weighing ten grains.

Trochisci Menthje Piperita.
Troches of Peppermint.

Take

of Oil of Peppermint a fluidrachm

Sugar,

in
;

fine

powder, twelve

troy-

ounces

Mucilage

of

Tragacanth a

sufficient

quantity.

Rub

the Oil of Peppermint with the Sugar until

they are thoroughly mixed; then with Mucilage
of Tragacanth

form a mass, to be divided into

troches, each weighing ten grains.

Trochisci Sodje Bicarbonatis.
Troclies

of Bicarhonate of Soda.
four troyounces

Take of Bicarbonate of Soda
Sugar, in
fine

powder,

twelve

troy-

ounces

;

Mucilage of Tragacanth
quantity.

a

sufficient

Rub

the Bicarbonate of Soda with the Sugar

344

UNGUENTA.
mixed; then with Mu-

until they are thoroughly
cilage of

Tragacanth form a mass, to be divided

into trocheS; each weighing ten grains.

Trochisci Zingiberis.
Troches of Ginger.

Take of Tincture of Ginger a fluidounce
Tragacanth, in fine powder, one hun-

dred and twenty grains
Sugar,
in
;

fine

powder, twelve

troy-

ounces

Syrup of Ginger a

sufiicient quantity.

Mix

the Tincture of Ginger with the Sugar,

and, having exposed the mixture to the air until
dry, reduce
it

to ^\\q
it

powder;

to this

add the

Tragacanth, and mix

thoroughly.

Lastly, with

Syrup of Ginger form a mass,
troches, each weighing

to be divided into

twenty

grains.

UNGUENTA.
Unguentum Acidi Tannici.
Ointment of Tannic Acid.

Take of Tannic Acid

thirty grains

UNGUENTA.
^yater half a fluidrachm

345

Lard a troyounce.

Rub

the Acid

first

with the Water, and then

with the Lard, until they are thoroughly mixed,
avoiding the use of an iron spatula.

Unguentum

Adipis.

Ointment of Lard.

Unguentum Simplex, Pharm., 1850.

Take of Lard

eight troyounces

White

Wax

two troyounces.

Melt them together with a moderate heat, and
stir

the mixture constantly while cooling.

Unguentum Antimonii.
Ointment of Antimony.

Take

of Tartrate of

Antimony and

Potassa, in

very

fine

powder, one hundred and

twenty grains

Lard a troyounce.

Rub

the powder with a

little

of the Lard

;

then

add the remainder, and thoroughly mix them.

'346

UNGUENTA.
Unguentum Aqu^ Eos^.
Ointment of Rose Water.

Take of

Oil of

Sweet Almond three troyounces

and a half;
Spermaceti a troyounce

White

Wax

one hundred and twenty

grains

Rose Water two fluidounces.

Melt together, by means of a water-bath, the
Oil,

Spermaceti, and

Wax;
stir

then gradually add

the Rose Water, and

the mixture constantly

while cooUng.

Unguentum Belladonna.
Ointment of Belladonna.

Take of Extract of Belladonna sixty
Water half a fluidrachm
Lard a troyounce.

grains

Rub

the

Extract

first soft,

with the Water until

rendered uniformly

then with the Lard, and

thoroughly mix them.

Unguentum Benzoini.
Ointment of Benzoin.

Take

of Benzoin, in moderately coarse powder,

a troyounce

Lard sixteen troyounces.

UNGUENTA.
Heat them
for

347

together,

by means of a water-bath,
stirring
;

two hours, with occasional
stir

then strain

without pressure, and
while cooling.

the product constantly

Unguentum
Ointment of

Creasoti.
Orecisote.

Take

of Creasote half a fluidrachm;

Lard a troy ounce.

Mix them.
Unguentum
Take of Nutgall,
ounce
;

Galljs.

Ointment of Nutgall,
in very fine powder, a troy-

Lard seven troyounces.

Mix them.
Unguentum Hydrargyri.
Ointment of Mercury.

Take

of Mercury twenty-four troyounces

Lard,
Suet, each, twelve troyounces.

Rub

the Mercury with a troyounce of the Suet

and a small portion of the Lard until the globules
cease to be visible
;

then add the remainder of the

848

UNGUENTA.

Lardj and of the Suet softened with a gentle heat,

and thoroughly mix them.

Unguentum Hydrargyri Ammoniati.
Ointment of Ammoniated Mercury.

Take of Ammoniated Mercury,
der, forty grains

in very fine pow-

Ointment of Lard a troyounce.

Mix them.
Unguentum Hydrargyri

Nitratis.

Ointment of Nitrate of Mercury.

Take of Mercury a troyounce and a
Nitric
half;

half;

Acid three troyounces and a

Neats-foot Oil twelve troyounces

Lard four troyounces and a
Dissolve the Mercury in the Acid;

half.

then heat

together the Oil and Lard in an earthen vessel,
and,

when

the temperature reaches 200°, remove
fire.

the mixture from the

To

this

add the merspatula, stir

curial solution, and, with a

wooden

constantly so long as effervescence continues, and

afterwards occasionally until the ointment

stiffens.

UNGUENTA.
Unguentum Hydrargyri Oxidi Rubri.
Ointment of Red Oxide of Mercury,

349

Take

of

Red Oxide

of Mercury, in very fine

powder, sixty grains

Ointment of Lard a troy ounce.

Add

the

Oxide of Mercury

to

the

Ointment

previously softened with a gentle heat, and tho-

roughly mix them.

Unguentum

Iodinii.

Ointment of Iodine,

Take of Iodine twenty

grains

Iodide of Potassium four grains

Water

six

minims

Lard a troyounce.

Rub

the Iodine and Iodide of Potassium

first

with the Water, and then with the Lard
they are thoroughly mixed.

until

Unguentum

Iodinii Compositum.

Compound Ointment of Iodine.
Take of Iodine
Water
fifteen grains

Iodide of Potassium thirty grains
thirty

minims
32*

Lard a troyounce.

850

UNGUENTA.
the Iodine and Iodide of Potassium
first

Rub
"with

the Water, and then with the Lard

until

they are thoroughly mixed.

TJnguentum Picis Liquids.
Tar Ointment,

Take of Tar,
Suet, each, twelve troyounces.

Mix

the Tar with the Suet previously melted

with a moderate heat, and, having strained the

mixture through muslin,
cooling.

stir it

constantly while

Unguentum Plumbi Carbonatis.
Ointment of Carbonate of Lead.

Take of Carbonate

of Lead, in very fine powder,

eighty grains

Ointment of Lard a troyounce.

Add

the Carbonate of Lead to the OintraeiiL

previously softened with a gentle heat, and tho-

roughly mix them.

Unguentum
Take

Potassii Iodidi.

Ointment of Iodide of Potassium.
of Iodide of Potassium, in fine powder,

sixty grains

UNGUENTA.
Water a fluidrachm
Lard a troyounce.

351

Dissolve the Iodide of Potassium in the Water,

and mix the solution with the Lard.

Unguentum
Take of Extract
of

Stramonii.

Ointment of Stramonium.

Stramonium sixty grains

Water half a fluidrachm
Lard a troyounce.

Kub

the Extract

first

with the Water until ren-

dered uniformly

soft,

then with the Lard, and

thoroughly mix them.

Unguentum Sulphuris.
Ointment of Suljphur.

Take of Sublimed Sulphur

a troyounce

Lard two trovounces.

Mix them.
Unguentum Sulphuris
Take of Iodide
Iodidi.

Ointment of Iodide of Sulphur.
of Sulphur thirty grains

Lard a troyounce.

Rub
fine

the Iodide of Sulphur,
little

first

reduced to a

powder, witli a

of the Lard, then

add

the remainder, and thoroughly

mix them.

352

UNGUENTA.
Unguentum Tabaci.
Ointment of Tobacco.

Take of Tobacco,
ounce
;

in fine powder, half a troy-

Lard eight troy ounces

Water a
duce

sufficient quantity.
little

Moisten the Tobacco with a
it

Water, intro-

into a conical glass percolator, and, having
it

pressed

firmly,

pour Water upon

it

until four

fluidounces of filtered liquid have passed.

Evap-

orate this to the consistence of a soft extract,

and

mix

it

thoroughly with the Lard.

Unguentum Yeratri^.
Ointment of Veratria.

Take of Veratria twenty

grains

Lard a troy ounce.

Rub

the Veratria with a

little

of the Lard

;

then

add the remainder, and thoroughly mix them.

Unguentum

Zinci Oxidi.

Ointment of Oxide of Zinc.

Take of Oxide of Zinc eighty
Lard a troyounce.

grains

',

Mix them.

VERATRIA.

353

VERATRIA.
Yeratria.
Veratria.

Take of

Cevadilla, in moderately fine powder,

twenty-four troyounces
Alcohol,

Sulphuric Acid,

Magnesia,

Water of Ammonia,
Purified

Animal Charcoal,
sufficient quantity.

Water, each, a

Digest the Cevadilla with eight pints of Alcohol, for

four hours, in a distillatory apparatus,
boiling,

with a heat approaching to
the liquid.
of Alcohol

and pour

off

To

the residue add eight pints more
distilled,

mixed with the portion
for

and,

having digested
before.

an hour, pour

off the liquid as

Digest for a third time with the same

quantity of Alcohol, together with the portion last
distilled,

and again pour

off*.

Press the remains

of the Cevadilla,

mix and
or

strain the liquids, and,
off"

by means

of a water-bath, distil

the alcohol.

Boil the residue three

four

times in

Water
strain

acidulated with Sulphuric Acid,

mix and

354

VERATRIA.

the liquids, and evaporate to the consistence of
syrup.

Add Magnesia

in slight excess,

shake the

mixture frequently, then express, and wash what
remains.
or

Kepeat the expression and washing two
times,

three
it

and,

having dried the residue,

digest
hol,

with a gentle heat several times in Alcoafter

and strain

each digestion.

Distil off the

alcohol from the
for fifteen

mixed

liquids, boil the

residue
little

minutes in Water mixed with a

Sulphuric Acid

and Purified Animal Charcoal,
re-

and

strain.

Having thoroughly washed what

mains,

mix

the washings with the strained liquid,

evaporate with a moderate heat to the consistence
of thin
syrup, and drop in
to
sufficient

Water of
Lastly,
it

Ammonia
wash the

precipitate

the

Veratria.

alkaloid with water,

and dry

with a

gentle heat.
Veratria, thus prepared,
is

pulverulent, grayish-white, inodorous

but very irritant

to the nostrils,

and of an

acrid, bitter taste,

causing

a sensation of tingling with numbness in the tongue.
slightly soluble in water, but readily
hol.
It

It is

very
alco-

and wholly dissolved by
is

has an alkaline reaction, and
nitric acid
it

entirely dissipated

by a red

heat.

With

forms a yellow solution, and, by contact

with concentrated sulphuric acid, becomes intensely red.

VINA.

355

VINA.
ViNUM
ALOfiS.
Aloes.

Wine of Take of Socotrine
ounce
;

Aloes, in fine powder, a troy-

Cardamom,
Ginger,
in

in moderately fine powder,

moderately

fine

powder,

each, sixty grains

Sherry Wine a pint.

Macerate
tion,

for

seven days, with occasional agita-

and

filter

through paper.

ViNUM Antimonii.
Wine of Antimony.

Take of Tartrate

of

Antimony and Potassa
Water a fluidounce

thirty-two grains

Boiling Distilled

Sherry Wine a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the salt in the Distilled Water, and,

while the solution

is

hot,

add
pint.

sufficient

Sherry

Wine

to

make

it

measure a

'656

VINA.

ViNUM COLCHICI

RadICIS.

Wme of
Take

Colchicum Boot.
Root, in

of Colchicum

moderately

fine

powder, twelve troyounces;

Sherry Wine a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with four fluidounces of
Sherry Wine, pack
lator,
it

firmly in a conical percoit

and gradually pour Sherry Wine upon

until

two pints of

filtered liquid are obtained.

YiNUM COLCHICI
Take of Colchicum

SeMINIS.
Seed.

Wine of Colchicum

Seed, in moderately coarae

powder, four troyounces

Sherry Wine two

pints.
agi-

Macerate for fourteen days, with occasional
tation
;

then express, and

filter

through paper.

ViNUM Ergots.

Wine of Ergot.

Take of Ergot,

in

moderately

fine

powder, four

troyounces

Sherry Wine a

sufficient quantity.

Moisten the powder with a fluidounce of Sherry

Wine, pack

it

in a conical percolator,

and grad-

VINA.
ually pour Sherry

357
until

Wine

u})on

it

two pints of

filtered liquid are obtained.

ViNUM Ipecacuanhjs.
Wine of Ipecacuanha.

Take of Ipecacuanha,
der,

in moderately fine

pow-

two troyounces
sufficient quantity.

Sherry Wine a

Moisten the powder with half a fluidounce of

Sherry Wine, pack
colator,

it

moderately in a conical perit

and gradually pour Sherry Wine upon
filtered liquid are obtained.

until

two pints of

ViNUM

Opii.

Wine of Opium.
Take of Opium,
dried,

and

in

moderately fine

powder, two troyounces

Cinnamon,

in moderately fine powder,

Cloves, in moderately fine powder, each,

sixty grains

Sherry Wine a

sufficient quantity.
fifteen

Mix

the

powders with

fluidounces of

Sherry Wine, and macerate for seven days, with
occasional agitation
;

then transfer the mixture to
33

a conical percolator, and, when the liquid has

358

VINA.

passed the surface, gradually pour on Sherry
until a pint of filtered liquid
is

Wine

obtained.

YiNUM Rhei.
Wine of Rliuharh. Take
of Rhubarb, in moderately coarse powder,

two troy ounces
Canella,
in

moderately fine

powder,

sixty grains

Sherry Wine fourteen fluidounces
Diluted Alcohol a sufficient quantity.

Mix two

fluidounces of Diluted Alcohol with

the Sherry Wine, and moisten the powders, previously rubbed together, with half a fluidounce of

the mixture
lator,

;

then transfer them to a conical perco-

and gradually pour upon them the remainder

of the mixture, and afterwards Diluted Alcohol,
until a pint of filtered liquid
is

obtained.

YiNUM Tabaci.
Wine of
Tobacco.

Take

of Tobacco, in moderately fine powder,

a trovounce

Sherry Wine a

pint.

Macerate
tion
)

for

seven days, with occasional agitafilter

then express, and

through paper.

ZINCUM.

359

Z I N C U M.
ZiNCI ACETAS,
Aoetate of Zinc,

Take

of Acetate of Lead twelve troyounces
Zinc, granulated, nine troyounces
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the Acetate of
Distilled

Lead

in three pints of
to

Water, and

filter.

Then add the Zinc

the solution, and agitate the mixture occasionally,
in a stopped bottle, for five or six hours, or until

the liquid yields no precipitate with a solution of
iodide of potassium.
it

Filter the liquid, evaporate
one-fifth, acidulate it

with a moderate heat to

slightly with acetic acid,
tallize.

and

set it aside to crys-

Pour

off"

the liquid, and dry the crystals

on bibulous paper.
Should the crystals be coloured, dissolve them
in a pint

and a half of

Distilled

Water, and, having
it,

heated the solution to ebullition, drop into

while

boiling, recently precipitated carbonate of zinc, in

successive portions, until a small quantity of the
liquid,
filter

on being

filtered, passes colourless.
it

Then

the liquid, acidulate

slightly

with acetio
form.

acid,

and evaporate that

crystals

may

360

ZINCUM.
eflOioresce in

In white, micaceous crystals, which

a dry atmosphere,

and are very soluble

in water.

The

solution yields white precipitates

with ferrocyanide of potassium and hydrosulphate of ammonia.
salt is

The

decomposed by sulphuric acid with the escape of acetous

Tapours.

ZiNCI CarBONAS PRiECIPITATA.
Pi^ecipitated Carhoyiate
Zinci Carbonas Praecipitatus,

of Zinc.
Pharm., 1850.

Take

of Sulphate of Zinc,

Carbonate of Soda, each, twelve troyounces
;

Water eight

pints.

Dissolve the salts separately, with the aid of
heat, each in four pints of the Water.

Then mix
Lastly,

the solutions, and, having stirred the mixture, set
it

by that the

precipitate
off

may

subside.

having poured

the supernatant liquid,

wash

the precipitate with hot water until the washings
are nearly tasteless, and dry
it

with a gentle heat.

ZiNCi Chloridum.
Chloride of Zinc,

Take of

Zinc, in small pieces,

two troyounces

and a half;
Nitric Acid,

Prepared Chalk, each, sixty grains;

ZINCUM.
Muriatic Acid,

361

Water, each, a

sufficient quantity.

To

the Zinc, in a glass or porcelain vessel, add
it;

gradually sufficient Muriatic Acid to dissolve

then strain the solution, add the Nitric Acid, and
evaporate to dryness.
five

Dissolve the dry mass in

fluidounces of Water, add

the

Chalk, and

allow the mixture to stand for twenty-four hours

then

filter

into

an evaporating basin, and again
Lastly, fuse the dry

evaporate to dryness.

mass

in the basin, pour out the liquid on a flat stone,

and,

when

it

has congealed, break the mass in
in a well-stopped

pieces,

and keep the fragments

bottler*

A white,
ether.
Its

deliquescent

salt,

wholly soluble in water, alcohol, and

aqueous solution yields with nitrate of silver a white preIt

cipitate insoluble in nitric acid.

forms white precipitates also

with ferrocyanide of potassium and hydrosulphate of ammonia.

ZiNCI OXIDUM.

Oxide of Zinc.

Take

of Precipitated Carbonate of Zinc twelve

troyounces.

Expose
until

it,

in a shallow vessel, to a low-red heat,

the water and carbonic
S3»

acid

are

wholly

expelled.

362

ZINCUM.

A yellowish-white powder, insoluble in water, but soluble in dilute
•jilphuric

and muriatic acids without

effervescence.

The

solutions,

when

neutral, yield white precipitates with ferrocyanide of potassium

and hydrosulphate of ammonia.

ZiNCi Yalerianas.
Valerianate of Zinc.

Take of Valerianate

of Soda two

troyounces

and a half;
Sulphate of Zinc two troyounces and
four hundred and twenty grains
Distilled

Water a

sufficient quantity.

Dissolve the

salts

separately, each in

twenty

fluidounces of Distilled Water, and, having heated

the solutions to 212°,
ture
aside
to

mix them, and

set the

mix-

crystallize.

Decant the

mother-

water from the
filter in

crystals,

and put them upon a

a funnel to drain.

Mix

the mother- water

and the drainings, evaporate

at a heat not ex-

ceeding 200° to four fluidounces, and again set
aside to crystallize.

Add

the crystals, thus ob-

tained, to those in the

funnel,

wash the whole

with a

little Distilled

Water, and, having removed
spread them on bibulous

them with
200°.

the

filter,

paper, and dry

them with a heat not exceeding

ZINCUM.

363

A white,
solves in one

anhydrous

salt, in

the form of pearly scales, having a

faint odour of valerianic acid,

and a

metallic, styptic taste.

It dis-

hundred and sixty parts of -water, and

in sixty of alcohol

of the specific gravity 0'833.

The

solutions have an acid reaction,
clear again on cooling.
distillate,

and become turbid when heated and
the salt
is

When
to

distilled

with sulphuric acid, the

added

a
its

concentrated solution of acetate of copper, does not disturb
transparency.

TABLES.
TABLE OF MEDICINES INTRODUCED INTO THE MATERIA MEDICA.
Primary
Acidum Chromicum.
Aciduin Lacticum. Acidum Phosphoricum Glaciale,
Alcohol Amylicum. Alcohol Fortius.
List.

Chromic Acid.
Lactic Acid.
Glacial Phosphoric Acid.

Amylic Alcohol.
Stronger Alcohol.
f

Aluminge

et

Ammoniae Sulphas.

Sulphate of Alumina

and

Am-

1

monia.
Sulphate of Ammonia.

Ammoniae Sulphas.
Aurantii Floras.
Belladonnae Radix.

Orange Flowers. Belladonna Root.

Cadmium.
Caffea.

Cadmium.
Coffee.

Canna.
Chiretta.

Canna.
Chiretta.

Chloroformum Venale. Fermentum. Fcrri Sulphuretum.
Gutta-percha.
Jgnatia.

Commercial Chloroform.
Yeast.

Sulphuret of Iron.
Gutta-percha.
Jgnatia.

Leptandra.

Leptandra.

Limonis Succus.
Lini Farina.
Lithioe Carbonas.

Lemon

Juice.

Flaxseed Meal.

Carbonate of Lithia.

Lycopodium. Manganesii Oxidum Nigrum.

Lycopodium. Black Oxide of Manganese.
36&

366
Manganesii Sulphas.
Mastiche.
Matico.

TABLES.
Sulphate of Manganese.
Mastic.

Matico.

Nectandra.
Oil of Camphor.
Oil of Theobroma. Oil of

Nectandra. Oleum Camphorse.

Oleum Theobromae. Oleum Thymi.
Pepo. Phosphorus. Potassse Bichromas.
Potassae Permanganas. Saccharum Lactis.

Thyme. Pumpkin Seed.
Phosphorus.

Bichromate of Potassa.

Permanganate of Potassa
Sugar of Milk,
Santonica.

Santonica.

Sodae Sulphis.
Spiritus Frumenti.
Spiritus Myrciae.

Sulphite of Soda.

Whisky.
Spirit of Myrcia.

Syrupus Fuscus.
Vanilla.

Molasses.
Vanilla.

Secondary
Achillea.

List.

Yarrow.
ArchAngelica [root of Angelica
angelica).

Angelica.

Barberry.
Berberis.

Koosso.

Brayera.

Cypripedium.
(seed).

Cypripedium.

Delphinium

Larkspur.

Euonymus.
Gelsemium.
Gossypii Radix.
Hydrastis.
Rottlera.

Wahoo.
Yellow Jasmine.
Cotton Root. Hydrastis.

Rumex.
Scutellaria.

Kameela. Yellow Dock.
Scullcap.

TABLES.

367

II.

TABLE OF MEDICINES DISMISSED FROM THE MATERIA MEDICA.
Primary
List.

Altha^se Flores.

Marshmallow Flowers.
Horse-radish.

Armoracia.
Calamina.
Cantharis Vittata.

Calamine.
Potato Flies.

Cinchona.*
Conii Semen.

Peruvian Bark.*

Limon. Origanum. Sapo Vulgaris.
Spongia.

Hemlock Lemon.

Seed.

Origanum.

Common
Sponge.
Tin.

Soap.

Stannum.
Stramonii Radix.

Succinum.

Stramonium Root. Amber.

Secondary
Angelica
[root

List.

and herb of An-

Angelica.
Flesh-coloured Asclepias.

gelica atropurpurea)

Asclepias Incarnata.

Asclepias Syriaca.
Castanea.

Common

Silk-weed.

Chinquapin.
Contrayerva.

Contrayerva.

Convolvulus Panduratus.

Wild

Potato.

Delphinium [root). Eryngium. Erythronium. Heracleum.

Larkspur.

Button Snakeroot. Erythronium.
Masterwort.

Humes Rumex

Britannica.
Obtusifolius.

Water Dock.
Blunt-leaved Dock.

"Wintera.

Winter's Bark.

* Dismissed

as a

name denoting any one

of the officinal varieties of Peru-

Tian bark indifferently.

368

TABLES.

III.

TABLE OF MEDICINES INTRODUCED INTO THE PREPARATIONS.

^Vinegar of Lobelia. Acetum Lobeliae. Vinegar of Bloodroot. Acetum Sanguinariae. Acidum Hydriodicum Dilutum. Diluted Hydriodic Acid. Acidum Nitromuriaticum Dilu•

Diluted Nitromuriatic Acid.
Acid.

tum.

Acidum Phosphoricum Dilutum. Diluted Phosphoric Sulphurous Acid. Acidum Sulphurosum. Valerianic Acid. Acidum Valerianicum. Stronger Ether. ^ther Fortior.
Aloe Purificata. Aluminse Sulphas.
Purified Aloes.

Sulphate of Alumina.
Valerianate^^f

AmmonisB Valerianas.
Autimonii Oxidum. Antimonii Oxysulphuretum.

Ammonia.

Oxide of Antimony. Oxysulphuret of Antimony.

Aqua Aqua

Aurantii Florum.
Chlorinii.

Orange Flower Water.
Chlorine Water.
Creasote Water.
Atropia.

Ac^ua Creasoti.
Atropia. Atropiae Sulphas.

Sulphate of Atropia.

Bismuthi Subcarbonas. Cadmii Sulphas. Calcis Phosphas Praecipitata.

Subcarbonate of Bismuth. Sulphate of Cadmium.
Precipitated Phosphate of Lime.

Ceratum Extract! Cantharidis.
Cinchonias Sulphas.

Cerate of Extract of Cantharides.

Sulphate of Cinchonia.
Collodion with Cantharides.
Plaster of Antimony.

Collodium

cum

Cantharide.

Emplastrum Antimonii. Emplastrum Arnicoe.

Plaster of Arnica.

Plaster of Canada Pitch. KiUplastrum Picis Canadensis. Extractum Arnicae Alcoholicum. Alcoholic Extract of Arnica. Fluid Extract of Buchu. Extractum Buchu Fluidum.

Extractum Cannabis Purificatum. Purified Extract of Hemp. Extractum Cimicifuga3 Fluidum. Fluid Extract of Cimicifuga. Fluid Extract of Cinchona. Extractum Cinchonas Fluidum.
ExtractumColchici Radicis Flui"j

Fluid Extract of Colchicum Root.
J

dum.

TABLES.
Extractum
Fluidum.
Colchici

369

Seminis

|
J
)

Fluid Extract of Colchicum Seed.
Alcoholic Extract of Colocynth.

Extractum Colocynthidis Alco
holicum.

)

Extractum Conii Fluidum. Extractum Digitalis Alcoholicum. Extractum Dulcamara3 Fluidum. Extractum Ergotae Fluidum. Extractum Gentiance Fluidum. Extractum Hyoscyami Fluidum. Extractum Ignatise Alcoholicum. Extractum Ipecacuanha) Fluidum. Extractum Lupulinre Fluidum. Extractum Pruni Virginianse ] Fluidum. j Extractum Sarsaparillte Flui-

Fluid Extract of Hemlock.
Alcoholic Extract of Digitalis.

Fluid Extract of Bittersweet.

Fluid Extract of Ergot. Fluid Extract of Gentian. Fluid Extract of Henbane.
Alcoholic Extract of Ignatia.

Fluid Extract of Ipecacuanha.
Fluid Extract of Lupulin.

Fluid Extract of Wild-cherry Bark.
Fluid Extract of Sarsaparilla.

dum

[simple fluid extract).

J

Extractum Extractum Extractum Extractum cum. Extractum Extractum Extractum cum. Extractum dum, Extractum
Ferri et

Senegse Alcoholicum. Alcoholic Extract of Seneka.
Serpentariae Fluidum. Fluid Extract of Serpentaria.
Spigelioe

Fluidum.
]
*

Fluid Extract of Spigelia.
Alcoholic Extract of Stramonium.

Stramonii Alcoholi-

)

Taraxaci Fluidum.

Fluid Extract of Dandelion. Fluid Extract of

Uvae Ursi Fluidum.
Valerianae Alcoholi-

Uva

Ursi.

Alcoholic Extract of Valerian.
j

Veratri Viridis Flui- Fluid Extract of American Hellebore.

Zingiberis Fluidum.

Fluid Extract of Ginger.
Chloride of Iron.

Forri Chloridum.

Ammonias

Citras.

Ferri et Ferri et

Ammonia
Ammonias

Sulphas.
Tartras.

Ferri et Quinia) Citras.
Ferri Lactas. Ferri Pyrophosphas. Ferri Sulphas Exsiccata.

and Ammonia. Sulphate of Iron and Ammonia. Tartrate of Iron and Ammonia. Citrate of Iron and Quinia.
Citrate of Iron

Lactate of Iron.

Pyrophosphate of Iron.
Dried Sulphate of Iron.
Infusion of Juniper.

Infusum Junipcri. Tnfu«um Pareirae.

Infusion of Pareira Brava.
34

370
Infusum Picis Liquidae. Infusum Salvias. Linimentum ChlorofGrmi.
Liquor Ferri
Citratis.

TABLES.
Infusion of Tar.
Infusion of Sage.

Liniment of Chloroform.
Solution of Citrate of Iron.

Liquor Ferri Subsulphatis. Liquor Ferri Tersulphatis. Liquor Gutta-perchae. Liquor Hydrargyri Nitratis. Liquor Sodae.

Solution of Subsulphate of Iron.
Solution of Tersulphate of Iron.
Solution of Gutta-percha. Solution of Nitrate of Mercury.

Solution of Soda.

Mel Sodae

Boratis.

Honey

of Borate of Soda.

Mistura Chloroformi.
Oleoresina Capsici.

Mixture of Chloroform.
Oleoresin of Capsicum.

Oleoresina Lupulinae.
Oleoresina Zingiberis.

Oleoresin of Lupulin.
Oleoresin of Ginger.
Oil of

Oleum Erigerontis Canadensis.
Pilulae Aloes et Mastiches. Pilulae

Pills of

Canada Fleabane. Aloes and Mastic.
Pills of

Anti^onii Compositae.
Effervescentes

Compound

Antimony.

Pulveres EfFervescentes.

Effervescing Powders.

Pulveres
entes.

Aperij-

Aperient Effervescing Powders.

Pulvis Rhei Compositus.
Quiniae Valerianas.

Compound Powder
Resin of Jalap.

of Rhubarb.

Valerianate of Quinia.

Resina Jalapas. Resina Podophylli. Resina Scammonii.
Santoninura.
Sodae Valerianas.
Spiritus Anisi.
Spiritus Chloroformi.
Spiritus

Resin of May-apple.
Resin of Scammony.
Santonin.

Valerianate of Soda.
Spirit of Anise.
Spirit of Chloroform. Spirit of

Cinnamomi.

Spiritus Limonis.

Spirit of

Cinnamon. Lemon.

Strychnioe Sulphas.

Sulphate of Strychnia.

Syrupus Aurantii Florum. Syrupus Lactucarii. Syrupus Rosae Gallicae. Syrupus Rubi.
Tinctura Arnicas. Tinctura Cannabis.

Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup

of

Orange Flowers.

of Lactucarium. of

Red Rose.

of Blackberry Root.

Tincture of Arnica. Tincture of

Hemp.

Tinctura Opii Deodorata.

Deodorized Tincture of Opium.

TABLES.
Tinctiira Veratri Viridis.

371

Tincture of American Hellebore.

Trochisci Cubebae. Truchisci Ferri Subcarbonatis. Trochisci Zingiberis.

Troches of Cubeb.
Troches of Suboarbonate of Iron.

Troches of Ginger.

Unguentum Aeidi Tannici. Unguentum Beuzoini. Unguentum Veratriae.
Zinci Valerianas.

Ointment of Tannic Acid. Ointment of Benzoin.

Ointment of Veratria.
Valerianate of Zinc.

IV.

TABLE OF MEDICINES DISMISSED FROM THE PREPARATIONS.
Prepared Calamine. Pulp of Purging Cassia. Calamine Cerate.
Extract of Aconite. Extract of Red Bark. Extract of Sarsaparilla. Extract of Stramonium Seed.
Iodide of Iron.

Calamina Pragparata.
Cassise Fistulse Pulpa.

Ceratum Calaminae. Extractum Aconiti. Extractum Cinchonas Rubrae. Extractum Sarsaparillse. Extractum Stramonii Seminis.
Ferri lodidum.

Ferrum Ammoniatum. Ammoniated Iron. Hydrargyri Oxidum Nigrum. Black Oxide of Mercury. Hydrargyri Sulphuretum Nigrum. Black Sulphuret of Mercury.
Infusum Armoracioe. Infusum Cinchonse
[simple infusion).

Infusion of Horse-radish.

Rubrse

]

Infusion of

Red Bark.

j

Infusum Sarsaparillae. Liuimentum Saponis Camphoratum.

Infusion of Sarsaparilla.
]

Camphorated Soap Liniment.
Solution of Carbonate of Potassa.
Oil of

j

Liquor Potassoe Carbonatis.

Oleum Origani. Oxymel Scillae.
Piluk\3
,

Origanum.
of Squill.

Oxymel

Hydrargyri Chloridi Mitis. Pills of Mild Chloride of Mercury. Pruui Pulpa. Pulp of Prunes. Spiritus Piment?e. ~ Spirit of Pimento.
Spiritus Rosmarini.
Spirit of

Rosemary.

872
Spongia
TJsta.

TABLES.
Burnt Sponge.

Stanni Pulvis.

Powder

of Tin.

Styrax Puriiicata.

Purified Storax.

Syrupus Senuge. Tamarindi Pulpa.
Tinctura Cinnamomi Composita.

Syrup of Senna. Pulp of Tamarinds.

Tinctura Rhei Tinctura Rhei

et Aloes, et Gentianse.

Compound Tincture of Cinnamon. Tincture of Rhubarb and Aloes. Tincture of Rhubarb and Gentian.
Tincture of Senna and Jalap. Ointment of Spanish Flies. Ointment of Subacetate of Copper. Ointment of Mezereon.
[

Tinctura Sennae et Jalapae.

Unguentum Cantharidis. Unguentum Cupri Subacetatis. Unguentum Mezerei. Unguentum Sulphuris Compositum.

Compound Sulphur Ointment.
Ointment of White Hellebore.

Unguentum

Veratri Albi.

Vinum

Veratri Albi.

Wine

of

White Hellebore.

V.

TABLE OF CHANGES IN THE LATIN OFFICINAL NAMES.
Names
of the Pharmaoopceia of 1850.

New
Aconiti Folium.
r

Names.

Aconiti Folia.
Aloe.
Althoeae Radix.

Aloe Barbadensis.

|
(

Aloe Capensis. Aloe Socotrina.
Althaea.

Antimonii
cipitatum.

Sulphuretum

PraeI

Antimonium Sulphuratum.
Argenti Cyanidum.
Argenti Nitras Fusa.
Asclepias.

Argenti Cyanuretum.
Argcnti Nitras Fusus.
Asclepias Tuberosa.
f

Aurantii Amari Cortex.
Aurantii Dulcis Cortex.
Belladonnye Folium.
Calcis Carbonas Praecipitata.

Aurantii Cortex.
(

Belladonna.
Calcis Carbonas Praecipitatus.

Ceratum Simplex.
Chloroformum.

Ceratum Adipis. Chloroformum Purificatum.

TABLES.
Names of thb Pharmacoiheia or
1850.

373
Nrw
Namxs.

Colomba.
Conii Folia.

Calumba. Conium.
)

Erigeron Heterophyllum. Erigeron Philadelphicum.

Erigeron.
j

Extractum Cinchonae Flavae. Extractum Cubeboe Fluidum. Extractum Hellebori.

Extractum Cinchonae.
Oleoresina Cubebae.

Extractum Nucis Vomicae.

f (

Extractum Hellebori Alcoholicum. Extractum Nucis Vomicae Alcoholicum.

Extractum Piperis Fluidum. Oleoresina Piperis. Extractum Rhei Alcoholicum. Extractum Rhei. Extractum Sarsaparillse Flui- Extractum Sarsaparillae Fluidum Compositum. dum. Extractum Stramonii. Extractum Stramonii Foliorum. Ferri Ferrocyanuretum. Ferri Ferrocyanidum.

Ferri Filum.

1

Ferri Ramenta. Ferri Pulvis.

Ferrum.
j

Hydrargyri Cyanuretum. Hydrargyri lodidum. Hydrargyri Sulphas Flavus.

Ferrum Redactum. Hydrargyri Cyanidum. Hydrargyri lodidum Viride.
Hydrargyri Sulphas Flava.

Hyoscyami Folia. Hyoscyami Folium. Infusum Cinchonas Compositum. Infusum Ciachonae Rubrae. Infusum Colombae. Infusum Calumbae. Infusum Sassafras MeduUae. Mucilago Sassafras. Infusum Ulmi. Mucilago Ulmi. Liquor Ammonias. Aqua Ammoniae. Liquor Ammonias Fortior. Aqua Ammoniae Fortior.
Liquor Ferri lodidi.
Liquor Potassae
Citratis.

Oleum Amygdalae.
Phytolaccae Baccas.

Syrupus Ferri lodidi. Mistura Potassae Citratis. Oleum Amygdalae Dulcis.
Phytolaccae Bacca.

Plumbi Oxidum Semivitreum. Potassae Carbonas Impurus. Potassae Carbonas Purus. Potassii Cyanuretum.
Potassii Ferrocyanuretum.

Plumbi Oxidum.
Potassae Carbonas Impura. Potassae Carbonas Pura.
Potassii

Cyanidum.

Potassii Ferrocyanidum.

Pulvis Ipecacuanhas et Opii.

Pulvis Ipecacuanhas Compositue.
34*

874
Names
op the

TABLES.
Pharmacop<eu or
1850.

New Namu. Rubus.
Sesami Folium. Sinapis Alba.
Sodae Carbonas Exsiccata.
Potassse et Sodae Tartras.
Spiritus -i^Etheris Nitrosi.

Rubus Rubus
Sesami

Trivialis.

Villosus.
Folia.

:}
(

Sinap IS.
Sodie Carbonas Exsiccatus.

1 Sinapis Nigra.

Sodce et Potassae Tartras.
Spiritus .(Etheris Nitrici.

Stramonii Folia.
Sulphur.

Stramonii Folium.

Sulphur Sublimatum,
Tinctura Aconiti
Folii.

Tinctura Aconiti Foliorum. Tinctura Camphorae.
Tinctura Colchici Seminis. Tinctura Colomba3. Tinctura Olei Menthas Piperitas. Tinctura Olei Menthse Viridis. Tinctura Saponis Camphorata.

Spiritus Camphorae.

Tinctura Colchici.

Tinctura Calumbae.
Spiritus Menthse Piperitae.
|

Spiritus Menthse Viridis.

Ulmus.

Unguentum Simplex. Vinum Album. Vinum Rubrum.
Zinci Carbonas Praecipitatus.

Linimentum Saponis. Ulmus Fulva. Unguentum Adipis.

Vinum Xericum. Vinum Portense.
Zinci Carbonas Praecipitata.

VI.

TABLE OF CHANGES IN THE POSITION OF MEDICINES.
from
the

Medicines transferred

Primary

to

the

Secondary List

of the Materia Medica.
Calamus.
Sabbatia.

Sweet Flag.* American Centaury.

* English
f English

ofiBcinal

officinal

name changed name changed

to

Calamus,

to Sabbatia.

TABLES.

375

Medicines transferred

from
the

the

Secondary

to the

Primary List

of
Arnica.
Cataria.
Coptis.

Materia Medica.
Leopard's-bane.*
Catnep.
Goldthread.

Erigeron Canadense.
Erigeron Heterophyllum.
f

Canada Fleabane.
Various-leaved Fleabane.

Erigeron Philadelphicum

.h

1 Philadelphia Fleabane.

Extractum Cannabis Filix Mas.
Macis.

Extract of

Hemp.

Marrubium.
Matricaria.

Male Fern. Mace. Horehound. German Chamomile.
Cajeput
Oil. J

Oleum

Cajuputi.

Pareira.

Pareira Brava.
f

Rubus Rubus
Salvia.

Trivialis

Dewberry-root.
Blackberry-root.

Yillosus

:v

(

Sage.

Sambucus.
Scoparius.

Elder Flowers.

||

Broom.

Medicines transferred

from

the Preparations

to

the

Primary

List of the Materia Medica.

Alcohol Dilutum.

Diluted Alcohol.

Ammoniae Carbonas.
Glycerina.

Carbonate of Ammonia.
Glycerin.
Oil of

Oleum

Succini.

Amber.

Zinci Sulphas.

Sulphate of Zinc.

* English

officinal

name changed

to Arnica.

f Consolidated, in their new position, under the lish officinal name, Fleabane.

name

of Erigeron

;

Eng-

X English officinal name changed to Oil of Cajeput. § Consolidated, in their new position, under the name of Rubus; English
officinal
II

name, Blackberry Root.
officinal

English

name changed

to Elder.

3T6

TABLES.

VII.

TABLE OF CHANGES IN THE MEANING OF NAMES.
Name of the dismissed medicine,
defined to be the root and herb of

Angelica atropurpurea, now given
Angelica.
to the introduced medicine, defined

to

be the root of Angelica Arch-

angelica.

Name of the dismissed medicine,
defined to be the root of Delphi-

Delphinium.

nium

Consolida,

now

given to the

introduced medicine, consisting of
the seed of the same plant.

Name
Extractum dum.
Sarsaparillae

disused as applied to the
fluid extract,

compound
Flui-

now

called

Extractum

Sarsaparillae

Fluidum
to the in-

Compositum, and given

troduced simple fluid extract.

Name
infusion

of the dismissed simple

of

red

cinchona,

now

Infusum Cinchonae Rubrae.

given to the
called

infusion,

formerly

Infusum Cinchonae Com-

positum.

INDEX. *

A
PAOE

Absinth'ium
Aca'cia

9

9

ACETA
Acetate of Lead
Acetate of Morphia
Acetate of Potassa

65

42 238
261
60

Acetate of Soda

Acetate of Zinc

359

Acetated Tincture of Opium
Acetic Acid Acetic Extract of Colchicum

333
10

146
9

Ace'tum Ace'tum Col'chici Ace'tum Destiila'tum Ace'tum Lobe'liae Ace'tum Opii Ace'tum Sanguina'riije Ace'tum Scillse AghlUea

65

66 66 67
68 68

56
69
10

AciDA Acidum Acidum Acidum Acidum Acidum Acidum Acidum

Ace'ticum Ace'ticum Dilu'tum Arsenio'sum Benzo'Icum

69 10 69 10
11

Chro'mlcum
Ci'trlcum

Gal'licum

70

378

INDEX.
PAGE 141 PAOB

Adhesive Plaster JEther

84
86

Ammoniac Ammoni'acum
Ammo'niae Carbo'nas Ammo'nia) Mii'rias Ammo'niae Sulphas Ammo'niae Valeria'nas

15 15
15
15
16

^ther For'tior jEtherea
Al'cohol
Al'cohol Amyl'icum

84
13

13

91

Al'c5hol Dilu'tum

14 14
142
143

Al'cohol For'tius
Alcoholic Extract of Aconite Alcoholic Extract of Arnica Alcoholic Extract of Black Helle-

Ammonlited Copper Ammoniated Mercury Ammoniated Tincture of Guaiac. Ammoniated Tincture of Valerian
Ammonio-ferric

130

201

327
338 182
16
16 13

Alcoholic Extract of Belladonna.. 144

Alum

bore
Alcoholic Extract of Digitalis
Alcoholic Extract of Alcoholic Extract of

151

Alcoholic Extract of Colocynth... 146

Amy^'dala Ama'ra Amy^'dala Dul'cis Amylic Alcohol

149 148 153
153

Amylum
Angel'ica
Angustii'ra

16

Hemlock Henbane

56 16 22
16 16 16
et Potas'soe Tartras...

Alcoholic Extract of Ig.natia

Animal Charcoal
Anise

Alcoholic Extract of

Nux Vomica

165

Alcoholic Extract of Rhubarb.... 158
Alcoholic Extract of Seneka

159
161
56

Ani'sum Anthemis
Antimo'nii Antimo'nii Ox'idum

Alcoholic Extract of Stramonium 160

92 93 95
17

Alcoholic Extract of Valerian
Al'etris

Al'lium

14
89

Antimo'nii Oxysulphure'tum Antimo'nii Sulphure'tum
Antlmo' nil Sulphure'tum Prsecipltd'tum

Aloe
Al'oe Barbaden'sis
Al'oe Capen'sis Al'oe Purifica'ta Al'oe Soc'otri'na

14 14 89

96

Antimonium Antimo'nium Sulphura'tum

92 96

^

15
15

Althiea
Althsese Rcl'dix

Aperient Effervescing Powders... 272 Apof'ynum Androsaemifo'lium ... 56

15
15

Apog'ynum Cannab'inum
Aq'ua Aq'ua Acidi Carbo'nici Aq'ua Ammo'niae Aq'ua Ammo'niae For'tior Aq'ua Amyg'dalae Ama'rae Aq'ua Auran'tii Flo'rum Aq'ua Cam'pliorae Aq'ua Chlorin'ii Aq'ua Cinnamo'mi Aq'ua Creaso'ti Aq'ua Destilla'ta Aq'ua Foenic'uli Aq'ua Mcnthao Piperi'tae Aq'ua Monthae Vir'idis

56
17

Alum
Alum-root Alu'men Alu'men Exsicca'tum Alu'min83 et Ammo'nia) Sulphas Alu'minyc Sulphas

59
15 90

97
97
17

15 90

99
99 99

Aluminium
American American American American American
Centaury

90
62
58 55
31

100
101 101

Columbo
Hellebore

Pennyroyal

101

Senna

23 91
15

102

Ammokia Ammonia-alum

102
103

I

INDEX.
PAOK

879
PAoa

Aq'ua R5's8B

103
97

Aqd^
Aralia Bark
Arfi'lia Nudicaul'is

Bal'samum Periivia.'num Bal'samum Toluta'num
Barbadocs Aloes Barberry Ba'rii Chlo'ridum

19 19

56
56 56

14
57
110 110
31

Ara'lia Spi'nosa

Argenti Cyau'idum
Argcnti Cyunure'tum

104

Barium
Bark of Pomegranate Root Bark of Sassafras Root
Barley
Bary'tie Carbo'nas

104
105 106

Argenti Ni'tras
Argenti Ni'tras Fu'sa Anjenti Ni'tras Fu'sua..
Argenti Ox'idum

48
31
19

106 106
10-1

Basilicon Ointment

122 52

AUGENTUM
Argentum
Ar'nica

17

18

Bay-rum Bean of Saint Ignatius Beboeru Bark
Belladon'na

32
38 19
19

Aromatic Confection Aromatic Powder Aromatic Spirit of Ammonia Aromatic Sulphuric Acid Aromatic Syrup of Rhubarb Arrow-root
Arsenic
Arscn'ici lo'didum

128

273 290
78

307
36
18

Belladonna Leaf Belladonna Root Bclladon'nte Fo'lium Belladou'nte Ra'dix

19 19
]<J

Benne Leaf. Benne Oil
Benzoic Acid

62
CO

107
107
18 10

69

Arsenicum....,

Benzoin

19
19 57

Arsen'icum Arsenious Acid

Benzo'inum
Ber'beris

Arum
As'arum
Ascle'pias Ascle'pian Tubero'sa

56
56
56

Bicarbonate of Potassa

262

Bicarbonate of Soda

56
18
IS

Assafetida
Assafoetlda

Bichromate of Potassa Bismuth Bismu'thi Subcarbo'nas Bismu'thi Subni'tras

282 43
19

Ill
ll.'i

Atropia
Atro'pia
Atro'piae Sulphas

108
108

BiSMUTHUM
Bismfi'thum
Bitartrate of Potassa
Bitter Bitter Bitter

Ill
19

110
18

44
16
99
18

Auran'tii Ama'ri Cortex
Auran'tii Dul'cis Cortex

18
18 18

Almond Almond

"Water

Auran'tii Flo'res

Orange Peel

Ave'niB Fari'na

Bitter Polj'gala

61
28
61

Azed'arach

57

Bittersweet

B
Balm
Balsam of Fir Balsam of Peru Balsam of Tolu
60

54
19

Black Black Black Black Black Black

Alder

Drop
Hellebore

67 31
50

Mustard Oxide of Manganese Pepper

35

19

Black Snakeroot

42 25

380

INDEX.
PAGE PAOB

Blackberry Root Black-oak Bark
Blistering Cerate

47

46
120

Canada Pitch Canada Turpentine
Canel'la
CSin'na

42 54 22
22

Bloodroot Blue Flag Blue Gentian Blue Pills..

48
59
69

Cantharidal Collodion

127
22

Cantharides
Can'tharis

257
41
50

22

Bone
Borate of Soda

Cape Aloes
Cap'sicum

14

22 23
119
22

Borax Brandy
Braye'ra

50

62
57

Caraway Carbo
Car'bo Anima'lis Car'bo Anima'lis Purifieii'tus

Bromide of Potassium Bromine Bromin'ium

267
20 20

119
22
15
''^

Car'bo Llgni

Carbonate of

Ammonia

Broom Brown Mixture
Bue'bu Bugle-weed Burdock

49

Carbonate of Baryta Carbonate of Lead

236
20
60
60

43 34
35

Carbonate of Lithia Carbonate of Magnesia
Carbonate of Potassa

263
50

Burgundy Pitch
Butter of Cacao
Butterfly-weed

42
40
56

Carbonate of Soda
Carbonic Acid Water

97 22
22 57
57

Butternut

33

Cardamom Cardamo'mum
Caro'ta
Carrot Seed

C
Cad'mii Sulphas
115
115
20
20
57

Car'thamus Car'um
Caryophyl'lus
Cascaril'la

57

23 23

Cadmium Cad'mium
CafFe'a

23
23 23 23

Cassia Fis'tiila

Cal'amus Calcii Chlo'ridum Calcis Carbo'nas Praecipita'ta
CaJein (Jdi-JxVnns Pi feclpltd'tns..,,

Cassia Mariland'ica

20

Castor
Castor Oil

116

40 23 23 23
23

116
117

Casto'reum
Cata'ria

Calcis Phos'phas Praecipita'ta

Calcium
Calomel

116 195
21

Cat'echu

Catnep

Culum'ba
Calx Calx Chlo'rina'ta

Cayenne Pepper
Ce'ra Al'ba Ce'ra Fla'va

22 23 24
119

21 21
,

Camphor Camphor Water
Cam'phora

22 99 22

Cerata
Cerate of Cantharides
Cerate of Carbonate of Zinc

120
123 121

Camphorate<l Tincture of Opium. 333 28 Canada Fleabane

Cerate of Extract of Cantharides
Cerate of Lard

119

INDEX.

381
PAQB

Cerate of Savine

123 120
121

Cerate of Spermaceti
Cerate of Subacetate of Lead

Cinnamon Cinnamon Water
Citrate of Iron

25
101
181

Cera'tum Ad'ipis
CcriL'tum Canthar'idis

119

120
120 121 121

and Ammonia Citrato of Iron and Quinja
Citrate of Iron
Citrate of Potassa
Citric

181 185

Cera'tum Ceta'ci5i Cera'tum Extract! Canthar'idis... Cera'tum Plumbi Subaceta'tis.... Cera'tum Rcsi'nse

265
11
2;i2

Aoid

Clarified

Honey

122
123 123

Cloves
Coc'cus

23 26 26
39

Cera'tum Cera'tum Cera'tum Cera' tnm

Resi'nje Compos'itum.. 122

Sabi'nac

Cochineal
Cod-liver Oil....
Coffee

Sapo'nis

Simplex

119
123

20 26 26

Cera'tum Zinci Carbona'tis
Cetii'ceum
Cetra'ria

Col'chici Ra''dix Col'chici

24
24 47
27

Cevadilla

Se'men Colchicum Root Colchicum Seed
t

26
26

Chalk Chalk Mixture Chamomile
Charcoal

Collodion

125
127 125

235
16

Collodion with Cantharides

COLLODIUM
Collo'dium Collo'dium

22

125

jChenopo'dium
jChi'maph'Ila
jChl'ret'ta

24 24 24

cum Canthar'ide

127

Colocynth
Colocyn'this

26
26 21 21
24 51

Chlorate of Potassa
Chloride of Barium

44
110
20

Colom'ba

Columbo
Commercial Chloroform

Chloride of Calcium

Chloride of Iron
Chloride of Lime

180
21
51

Common

Salt

Chloride of Sodium
Chloride of Zinc

Compound Cathartic Pills Compound Decoction of
parilla.

253
Sarsa-

360
21
100

134

Chlorinated Lime
Chlorine Water

Compound Extract of Colocynth.. 147 Compound Fluid Extract of Sarsaparilla

Chloroform! um

87
87

173
Infusion of Catechu...
2i)5

Chloroform'ura Purifica'tum

Chloroform'um Vena'le Chondrus Chromic Acid
Cim'ifif 'liga

24 24
10

25 25
25 25

Cingho'na Fla'va CinQho'na Pal'lida Cingho'na Ru'bra

ClNCHOXIA
Cingho'niae Sulphas

124 124 200
25
35

Cinnabar

Cmnam5'mum

Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound Compound

Infusion of Flaxseed.. 209
Infusion of Gentian... 207

211 Mixture of Iron 235 Mixture of Liquorice.. k236 Ointment of Iodine... 349
Pills of
Pills of

Infusion of Rose

Antimony Qalbanum

252
257
255

Pills of Iron
Pills of
Pills of

Rhubarb
Soap

259

259

382

INDEX.
PAGE PAOS

Compound Pills of Squill Compound Plaster of Galbanum.. Compound Powder of Ipecacuanha Compound Powder of Jalap Compound Powder of Rhubarb.., Compound Resin Cerate Compound Solution of Iodine Compound Spirit of Ether Compound Si>irit of Juniper Compound Spirit of Lavender Compound Syrup of Sarsaparilla Compound Syrup of Squill Compound Tincture of Benzoin... Compound Tincture of Cardamom Compound Tincture of Cinchona.. Compound Tincture of Gentian... Compound Tincture of Iodine
Confec'tio Aromat'ica

259
138

Creaso'tum
Cre'ta Cre'ta Pra^para'ta

26 27
118
27

273

274
274
122

Cro'cus

Qroton Oil

41
01

Crowfoot

224
2S7
292

Cubeb Cube'ba
Cu'pri Subace'tas
Cu'pri Sulphas

27
27
27

292
310

27

Cuprum
Cu'prum Ammonia'tum.
Cur'cuma...

130
130
."i7

311
317
320 321

326
329
128

Cyanide of Mercury Cyanide of Potassium Cyanide of Silver...

196

208
104
58

Cydo'nium
Cypripe'dium

58

Confec'tio Auran'tii Corticis
Confec'tio Opii

128

128
129
129
128

D
Dandelion
53
131

Confec'tio Ro'sae
Confec'tio Sen'nte

Confection of

Opium

Decocta
Decoction of Barley
Decoction of Bittersweet

Confection of Orange Peel

128

133
133 132
131

Confection of Rose
Confection of Senna

129
129

Decoction of

Dogwood

COXFECTIOXES ConVi Fo'lia
€oni'ura

128
26

Decoction of Iceland Moss

Decoction of Logwood
Decoction of Pipsissewa Decoction of

133
131

26 26
26

Copai'ba
Cop'tis

Red Cinchona

132
135'

Decoction of Seneka

Coriander
Corian'drura

26
26 57 26
57

Decoction of

Uva

Ursi

135

Decoction of White-oak Bark

134
131
131

Cornus CircTna'ta Cornus Flo'rida Cornus Serif'ea
Corrosive Sublimate

Decoction of Yellow Cinchona.... 132

Corrosive Chloride of Mercury .... 195

195
30

Cotton Cotton Root
Cot'ula
CowhajGje Cranesbill

59
57

Decoc'tum Decoc'tum Decoc'tum Decoc'tum Decoc'tum Decoc'tum Decoc'tum

Cetra'riic

Chi'maph'ilae

Cincho'nse Fla'vaD
Cincho'naj Rubrae
Cor'nfis Flo'rida}

132
132

132
133

Dulcamri'ra2

Hivmatox'yli

133 133

60

DScoc'tutu Ilor'dei

30
,..

Cream

of Tartar

44
26

Decoc'tum Quercfls Alba3 Decoc'tum Sarsaparil'lae
pos'itum

134

Com134

Creasote
Creasote Water

101

Decoc'tum Sen'egse

135

INDEX.
PAQE

383
PAOB

135 Decec'tuM Uvae "Urai..... 58 Delphi'nium Deodorized Tiacture of Opium..,. 333 28 Digita'lis 69 Diluted Acetic Acid

Emplas'trum Ilydrarg'yri
Euiplii-s'trum Opii

139
139

Emplas'trum Emplas'trum Emplas'trum
thar'idc

Pi'cis Burguu'dicae 140
Pi'cis Canaden'sis.. 140

Pi'cis

cum Can110 141
141
141

Diluted Alcohol
Diluted Hydriodic Acid

14
71

Diluted Hydrocyanic Acid

73

Diluted Muriatic Acid
Diluted Nitric Acid Diluted Nitromuriatic Acid

74
75 75

Emplas'trum Plum'bi Emplas'trum Resi'nae Emplas'trum Sapo'nis Ergot
Ergo'ta
Erig'erou

28

28

Diluted Phosphoric Acid Diluted Solution of Subacetate of

76

«

28 28 293

Eri^'eron Canaden'se

Lead
Dios'pyros
Distilled

,

,

226
78

Essence of

Lemon

Diluted Sulphuric Acid

Essence of Peppermint

294

58 68

Vinegar

Essence of Spearmint Ether
Ethereal Oil

294 84
88 58 28
58
58
,

Distilled

Water Dogs-bane

101
56

Dogwood
Dover's Powder

26

Euon'yraus Eupato'rium
Euphor'bia CoroUata Euphor'bia Ipecaeiian'ha Extract of Belladonna
Extract of Bittersweet

273

Dracon'tium
Dried

91

58 90

Alum

144
-..,.

Dried Carbonate of Soda Dried Sulphate of Iron

283
192
., .,.

150

Extract of Butternut.^
Extract of Cinchona

155 145
..,!
^

Duleama'ra

2S

Extract of Dandelion

161 151 14S
2^

E
Effervescing Powders
«....,.

Extract of Gentian

Extract of Hemlock
271
41

Extract of

Hemp

Egg
Elate'rium

^
_.
^.

Extract of Henbane Extract of Jalap

152

28 48
59

154
151

Elder

Elecampane
Elixir of Vitriol

Extract of Logwood Extract of May-apple Extract of Opium Extract of Quassia Extract of Rhatany Extract of Stramonium

157
156

78
^..

Emplastra
Emplas'trum Ammoni'acL Emplas'trum Ammoni'aci
Hydrarfr'yro

135
135

158

155
159

cum
13)6

Emplas'trum Emplas'trum Emplas'trum Emplas'trum

Antimo'nii
Ar'nica?
Assafcetidas

^..

136 137
137 138

EXTRACTA ExTRACTA Fltjida
Extrac'tum
Aeoni'ti
Aleohoi'i-

142

162

Belladon'nae

'5«mplas'trum Ferris

138
138

Ximplas'trum Gal'bani Compos'i-

tum

^

142 Extrac'tum Ar'nicae Alcohol'icum 143 Extrac'tum Belladon'nae 144 Extrac'tum Belladon'nae Alc5hol'icum 144

cum

384

IND^X.
PAGE

Extrac'tum Bug'hu Flu'idum 162 Extrac'tum Can'nabis 28 Extrac'tum Can'nabis Purifica'tum 146 Extrac'tum Cim'iyif uga3 Flu'-

idum
Extrac'tum CinghC'nas Extrac'tum Cincho'nse Fld'vse

163
145 145

Extrac'tum Cingho'nae Flu'idum. Extrac'tum Col'chici Ace'ticum... Extrac'tum Col'chici Radi'cis Flu'idum Extrac'tum Col'chici Sem'inis Flu'idum Extrac'tum Colocynth'idis Alcohol'icum

164 146 164
165

Extrac'tum Krame'riae Extrac'tum Liipuli'nse Flu'idum Extrac'tum Nu'cis Vom'lcse Extrac'tum Nu'cis Vom'icaj Alcohol'icum Extraj'tum Opii Extrac' turn Pi'peria Flu'idum Extrac'tum Po'dophyl'li Extrac'tum Pru'ni Virginia'nge Flu'idum Extrac'tum Quassias Extrac'tum Rhe'i Extrac'tum Rhe'i Alcohol'icum... Extrac'tum Rhe'i Flu'idum Extrac'tum Sarsaparil'lse Flii'-

F>4> 155

170

156
156 156

249
167

170 168 158 158

172
173

146
147
Coni'i

idum
Extrac'tum
Sarsajjuril'lse

Extrac'tum Colocynth'idis Compos'itum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum
148

Flu'-

idum
Extrac'tum
Sarsaparil'lae

173
Flu'-

Coni'i Alcohol'icum.. 148
Coni'i

Flu'idum

165

idum Compos'itum Extrac'tum Sen'e^ae

173
Alcohol'i-

Cuhe'hge

FhVidum

248
149 150

cum

159

Digita'lis Alcohol'i-

cum
Extrac'tum Dulcama'rae Extrac'tum Dulcama'rse
idtim
Flu'-

174 Extrac'tum Sennse Flu'idum Extrac'tum Serpenta'riae Flu'175 idum Extrac'tum Spige'liae et Sennae 175 Flu'idum Extrac'tum Spige'liae Flu'idum.. 176 159 Extrac'tum Stramo'nii Extrac'tum Stramo'nii Alcohol'i160 cum Extrac'tum Stramo'nii Fo'lio'rum 159 161 Extrac'tum Tarax'aci Extrac'tum Tarax'aci Flu'idum.. 177 Extrac'tum Uva; Ursi Flu'idum.. 177 Extrac'tum Valeria'nae Alcohol'i-

166
Ergo'tae Flu'idum.... 167
(xentia'nae

Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum Extrac'tum

151
28
151

(^entia'nse Flu'idum. 168

Gly^'yrrhi'zae

Haematox'yli
Helleb'ori

161

Helleb'ori Alcohol'i-

cum
Extrac'tum Hyoscy'ami Extrac'tum Hyoscy'ami
hol'icum
Alco-

151 152
153

cum

161

Extrac'tum

Hyoscy'ami

Flu'-

Extrac'tum Valeria'nae Flu'idum 178 Extrac'tum Vcra'tri Vir'idis Flu'-

idum
Extrac'tum Igna'tiaa
Alcohol'i-

168

idum

179

Extrac'tum Zingib'eris Flu'idum 179
153

cum
Extrac'tum Ipecacuan'hoe Flu'-

F
169

idum
Extrac'tum Jala'p:c

154
155

False Sarsaparilla

56

Extrac'tum Juglan'dis

Fennel

29

INDEX.
PAOE

385
PAOB

Fcnnol Water

102
29

Fluid Extract of Ginger
Fluid Extract of Hemlock

179 165

Fermen'tum
Ferri Chlo'ridum Ferri Ci'tras.
Ferri et
Ferri et

180
181
181

Fluid Extract of Henbane Fluid Extract of Lupulin
Fluid Extract of Rhubarb

168 170
172
173

Fluid Extract of Ipecacuanha.... 169

Ferri et

Ammo'niao Ci'tras Ammo'niiB Sulphas Ammo'niae Tartras

182

183

Ferri et Potas'sae Tartras

184
185
^186 "186

Fluid Extract of Sarsapariila Fluid Extract of Senna
Fluid Extract of Serpentaria Fluid Extract of Spigelia

174
175

Forri et Qui'niae Ci'tras
Ferri Ferrocyan'idum

176

Ferri Ferrocyanure' turn
Ferri Lactas

Fluid Extract of

Spigelia

and
175
177

186
,

Senna
Fluid Extract of

Ox'idum Hydra'tum Ferri Phosphas
Ferri

187

Uva
of

Ursi

188
193

Fluid Extract of Valerian Fluid

178
170
29 58
59

Ferri Pulvis
Ferri Py'rophosphas.

Extract

Wild-cherry

189 191
,

Bark
FceniQ'uluxa

Ferri Subearbo'nas
Ferri Sulphas
Ferri Sulphas Exsicca'ta

191

Frase'ra

,

192
29

Frostwort

Ferri Sulphure'tum

,

Fused Nitrate of Silver
Fusel Oil

106
13

Ferrocyanide of Iron Ferrocyanide of Potassium
,

186
45
1§0

Ferrum
Ferrum Ferrum Redae'tum
Fever-root
Fi'cus
,

G
Gal'banum
Galla
Gallic Acid

29

193
63

29 29
70
30

,

29 29

Fig
Fi'lix

Gamboge
Gambo'gia
Garlic

Mas

29
7

30

Fineness of Powders
Flaxseed Flaxseed Meal Flaxseed Oil

14
30

34
34
,

Gaulthe'ria

(^elsem'ium

58
30
30

39

Gentian
^entia'na
(^entia'na Catesbaei

Fleabane
Florentine Orris

,

28
59

59

Fluid Extract of American Hellebore

179

^eru'nium German Chamomile

30
37
59

Flu Flu Flu Flu Flu

d Extract of Bittersweet d Extract of Buchu d Extract of Cimicifuga

166 162
163

^e'um
^ille'nia

30
55
60
12

d Extract of Cinchona 164 d Extract of Colchicum Root 164 d Extract of Colchicum Seed 165 d Extract of Dandelion d Extract of Ergot
177

Ginger Ginseng Glacial Phosphoric Acid
Glycerin

Flu Flu Flu Flu

30

Glyg'erlna
Glyg'yrrhi'za
Golden-rod...*.
•#...

30

167
168

30 62

d Extract of Gentian

35*

386

INDEX.
PAGE

rAcn

eoldthread
Gossyp'ii Ra'dix Gossyp'ium

26
59
30

Goulard's Cerate
Grana'ti Fructus Cortex. Grana'ti Radi'cis Cortex

121

Hydrarg'yri Sulphas Fla'va 200 Hydrarg'yri Sulphas Fld'vus 200 Hydrarg'yri Sulphure'tum Ru'brum 200

31
31

Hydrargyrum
Hydrarg'yrum Hydrarg'yrum Ammonia'tum Hydrarg'yrum cum Cre'ta
Hydras'tis

195 32

Green Iodide of Mercury Guaiac
Guai'aci

198
31

Lignum

31 31
31

Guai'aci Resl'na

Hydrated Oxide of Iron
Hyoscy'iuni Fo'lia

Guaiacum Wood

201 202 59 187 32
32 32

Gum

Arabic

9 31

Gutta-percha

Hyoscy'ami Fo'lium Hyoscy'ami Se'men

H
Haematox'ylon
31

I
Iceland Moss
I^hthyocol'la
Igna'tia

Hardback Hedeo'ma Helian'tbemum
Helleb'orus

62
31

24 32

32
44
56

59
31

Impure Carbonate of Potassa
Indian Hemp Indian Turnip

Hemlock Hemlock Hemlock Henbane Henbane
Hepat'ica

26
Pitch Pitch Plaster

42
140
32

Infusa
lijfusion of

Angustura

Leaf Seed

Infusion of

Buchu

56 202 202 203

32
59

Infusion of Capsicum Infusion of Cascarilla Infusion of Chamomile

Heu'chera Hoffmann's Anodyne

59

287
37

Infusion of Cloves
Infusion of Columbo
Infusion of Dandelion

Honey Honey of Borate Honey of Rose Hops Hor'deum
Horehound
Horsemint

of

Soda

233

204 204 203 204 203 213 206 214 208 208 209
210

232
32
31

Infusion of Digitalis
Infusion of Ginger

Infusion of

Hops

36
37 32

Infusion of Juniper
Infusion of Pareira Brava

Hu'mulns
Hydrar^'yri Chlo'ridum
si'vum
Corro-

Infusion of Quassia Infusion of Infusion of

195
196

Red Cinchona Rhatany

Hydrarfr'yri Chlo'ridum Mi'te.... 195

Infusion of Rhubarb....: Infusion of Sage
Infusion of Senna Infusion of Serpentaria Infusion of Spigelia
Infusion of Tar

Hydrarg'yri Cyan'idnm Ihjdrarff'yri Cyanure'tum Hydrarij'yri lo'dldum Hydrarfr'yri lo'didum Ru'brum.. Hydriirfr'yri lo'didum Vir'ide....
Jlydrarg'yri

206 208 210 211
211

196
198 197 108

212 212
209

Ox'idum Ru'brum... 199

Infusion of Thoroughwort

207

INDEX.

387
PAGE

Infusion of Tobacco Infusion of Valerian
Infusion of Wild-cherry Bark Infusion of Yellow Cinchona

213
213
210

Ipecacuan'ha Ipecacuanha Spurge
Iris Florcnti'na

33
58 59 59

205

Iris VersiQ'olor

Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum

Angustu'ra3

202 203
203 203
204:

Irish

Moss

24
29

Anthem'idis

Iron
Isinglass

Buc'hu
Calum'baj
Cap'sici

32

J
Jalap
Jala'pa
33

Caryophyl'li
Cascaril'lae

204
33 33 33
33
60

204 CatcQhu Compos'itum.. 205 Cincho'nse Compos'itum.. 206
Cingho'nae Fla'vas

205

Cingho'na) Ru'brae
Digita'lis

206 203
206

Juglans Juniper Junip'erus
Junip'erus Virginia'na

Infu'sum Colom'bse

Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum

Eupato'rii
(^entia'nae

.-

207 208
208

K
Kameela Kermes Mineral..
Ki'no
61 95 33 57 33

Compos'itum 207

Hil'muli
Junip'eri

Krame'riae
Parei'rae
Pi'cis Liq'uidae

208 209
209

Infii'sum Li'ni Compos'itum

Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum
Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum Infu'sum

Koosso Krame'ria

209 210
210 210
211 211 241 211

Pru'ni Virginia'nse
Quas'sia)
Rhi3'i

L
Lactate of Iron
Lactic Acid

186
II 33
60 13 58 58

Ro's^ Compos'itum
Sal'viffi

Lactuca'rium

Infu'aum Sas'sufras Medul'lx
Sennoe
Serpenta'riffi

Lappa
Lard
Large-flowering Spurge

212

Spige'lijB

212
213

Larkspur

Taba'ci

Laudanum
Lavan'dula Lavender Lead-water

332
33

Tarax'aci

213
241
213

Infu'sum Ulmi

33

Infu'sum Valeria'na3 Infu'sum Zingib'eris Inula
Iodide of Arsenic

226

214
59

Lemon Lemon

Juice
Peel

34 34 34 48 21

107

Leptan'dra

Iodide of Lead Iodide of Potassium
Iodide of Sulphur
Iodine

260

269
298

Levant Wormseed Lime Lime Liniment
Lime-water Limo'nis Cortex

214
218

32
32

lodin'ium

34

388

INDEX.
PAGE PAGK

Limo'nis Succus Li'ni Farl'na Liniment of Ammonia

34 34

Lirioden'dron

60

Litharge
Lith'iae Carbo'nas Liverwort

43
34

Liniment of Camphor... Liniment of Cantharides Liniment of Chlorofoi-m Liniment of Turpentine LiNIMENTA Linimen'tum Ammo'niae Linimen'tum Calcis Linimen'tum Camph'orae Linimen'tum Canthar'idis Linimen'tum Chloroform'i Linimen'tum Sapo'nis Linimen'tum Terebinth'inae

214 214
215
215

59

Lobe'lia

34
31

Logwood
Lupulin
Liipuli'na

216

34
34
35 60

214 214 214 214
215
215

Lycopo'dium
Ly'copus

M
Mace
Ma'cis
35 35 61

215 216

Li'num
Liq'uor Ammo'nise

34
97

Madder
Magne'sia
Magne'siaa Carbonas
Magne'siae Sulphas

231
35 35

Liq'uor Ammo'nias Aceta'tis

216
17

Liq'uor Ammo'nise For'tior Liq'uor Arsen'ici et Hydrarg'yri
lo'didi

Magnesium
216
217 217 218

231
60

Magno'lia

Liq'uor Ba'rii Chlo'ridi Liq'uor Calcii Chlo'ridi

Male Fern
Mangane'sii Ox'idum Ni'grum... Mangane'sii Sulphas

29 35
36

Liq'uor Calcis
Liq'uor Ferri Citra'tis
Liq'uor Ferri lo'didi Liq'uor Ferri Nitra'tis.

218
303

Man'na
Maran'ta Marble

36 36 36 36

219 220 222 223 223

Liq'uor Ferri Subsulpha'tis

Marmor
Marru'bium Marsh Rosemary Marshmallow
Mastic
Mas'tiche

Liq'uor Ferri Tersulpha'tis
Liq'uor Gutta-pcrchse Liq'uor Hydrarg'yri Nitra'tis Liq'uor lodin'ii Compos'itus Liq'uor Magne'sia; Citra'tis
Liq'uor Mor'phiae Sulpha'tis

36 52
15

224

36
30
9

224
225 225 226

Materia Medica
Mati'co
Matrica'ria

Liq'uor Plumbi Subaceta'tis Liq'uor Plumbi Subaceta'tis Dilu'tus

36
37 43

May-apple

Liq'uor Potas'sae

226
228 228

May-weed
Measures

67
2

Liq'uor Potas'sao ArSeni'tis Liq'uor Potas'sa) Citra'tis Liq'uor Potas'ase Citra'tis Liq'uor So'dae Liq'uor So'dae Chl5rina'tae

236
229 230 216
28 30

Mel Mel Despuma'tum Mel Ro'ssD Mel Sodse Bora/tis
Melis'sa

37

232

232
233
60

LiQUORES
Liquorice
Liquorice Root

Mkllita Mentha Pi'peri'ta

232
37

J

INDEX.
PAGE

389
PAQB

Mentha

Vir'idis

37

Myrrh
Myr'rha

37
37

Mercury Mercury with Chalk Mezercon Meze'reum Mild Chloride of Mercury Mistu'ra Ammoni'aci Mistu'ra Amyg'drihc
Mistu'ra Assafoetidaj Mistu'ra Chloroform'! Mistu'ra Cre'toe

32

202
37
37
^

N
Neats-foot Oil

195

39

233

233

Ncctan'dra Neutral Mixture
Nitrate of Lead
Nitrate of Potassa

38

236

234 234
235

Nitrate of Silver
Nitric Acid

43 45 105
12

Mistu'ra Ferri Compos'ita
Mistu'ra
pos'ita

235

Glyg'yrrhi'zae

Com
236 236
233
233

Nitromuriatic Acid

75 29 37 38

Nutgall

Mistu'ra Potas'sae Citra'tis

Nutmeg

MiSTURjE
Mixture Mixture Mixture Mixture
of

Nux Yom'ica

Almond of Ammoniac

233

234 234 Mixture of Citrate of Potassa...., 236 Molasses 53
of Assafetida

of Chloroform

Oatmeal
Oil of

18

Amber
Anise

40
242
38
38

Oil of Oil of

Monar'da
Monsel's Solution

37

Bergamot

220
,

Oil of Bitter

Almond

Morphia
Mor'phia
Mor'phiae Ace'tas.;

237 237 238
239 240
37

Oil of Cajeput
Oil of

39
39
2-:^4

Oil Oil
Oil Oil

Mor'phiaa Mu'rias
Mor'phioe Sulphas

Moschus
Mucilage Mucilage Mucilage Mucilage
Mucila'go
of

,

Camphor of Canada Fleabane of Caraway of Ceylon Cinnamon of Cinnamon
Copaiba

243
39 39

Gum

Arabic
,

240 241 241 241 240
,

Oil of Cloves Oil of Oil of
j i

243 243 244
244

of Sassafras of Slippery-elm Bark..

Cubeb
Fennel

of Tragacanth

,

Oil of

MUCILAGIXES
Acil'eire

:

Oil of Gaultheria

244

240 241 241 241
I

OilofHedeoma
Oil of Oil Oil

Mucila'go Sas'safras Mucila'go Tragacan'thae Mucila'go Ulmi

,

,

Horsemint of Juniper of Lavender

Mucu'na

f.

,

60
I

Oil of

Muriate of Ammonia Muriate of Morphia Muriatic Acid

,

15
I

Oil of
Oil of
j

Lemon Nutmeg

239
,

11

Oil of
Oil

Musk
Myria'tica

,

37

Peppermint Pimento of Rose

244 245 245 245 39 40 245 246 40

37

Oil of

Rosemary

246

33*

390

INDEX.
PAGE PAOK

Oil of Sassafras Oil of Savine Oil of Oil of Oil of
Oil of

240 246
215
38 40
41

Oleum

Aiiii/g'dulse

38

Spearmint Sweet Almond

Theobroma

Thyme

Tobacco Oil of Turpentine
Oil of

247
40

Oil of Valerian
Oil of

247 243 348

Wormseed

Ointment of Ammoniated Mercury

Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment Ointment
cury

of

Antimony

345 346 346
347

of Belladonna

of Benzoin

of Carbonate of Lead... 350
of Creasote

of Iodide of Potassium 350 of Iodide of Sulphur... 351 of Iodine

349
345

Lard of Mercury
of
of Nutgall of Oxide of Zinc of

347 347 352
of

of Nitrate of Mercury.. 348

Red Oxide

Mer349 346
351

Ointment of Rose Water Ointment of Stramonium Ointment of Sulphur Ointment of Tannic Acid Ointment of Tobacco Ointment of Veratria Olea Destillata Olcoresin of Black Pepper Olcoresin of Capsicum Olcoresin of Cubeb Olcoresin of Ginger Olcoresin of Lupulin
Oleoresi'na Cap'sici Oleoresi'na Cube'bae Oleoresi'na LupGli'naj

351

344
352 352
242 249

248 248
250

249 248
248 249 249 250

Oleoresi'na Pi'peris Oleoresi'na Zin^ib'Sris

38 Oleum Amy^'dalaj Ama'rie Oleum Amyg'dalte Dul'cis 38 Oleum Ani'si 242 Oleum Berga'mii 3S Olei'.m Bu'bulum 39 Oleum Cajiipu'ti 39 Oleum Cara'phora* 39 Oleum Car'i 243 Oleum Caryophyl'li 213 Oleum Chenopo'dii 243 Oleum Cinnamo'mi 39 Oleum Copai'bae 243 Oleum Ciibe'btB .244 Oleum Eri^eron'tis Canaden'sis... 244 Oleum Foenig'uli 244 Oleum Gaulthe'riaj 244 Oleum Hedeo'mee 244 Oleum Junip'eri 245 Oleum Lavan'diilae 245 Oleum Limo'nis 39 Oleum Li'ni 39 Oleum Mentha} Pi'peri'tse 245 Oleum Menthffi Vir'idis 245 Oleum Monar'dae 245 Oleum MorrhujB 39 Oleum Myris'ticae 40 Oleum Oli'vse 40 Oleum Pimen'tse 246 4C Oleum Ri§'ini 40 Oleum Ro'sa? 246 Oleum Rosmari'ni 246 Oleum Sabi'na 240 Oleum Sas'safras 60 Oleum Se'sami 40 Oleum Sug'cini 246 Oleum Suc'cini Rectifica'tum 247 Oleum Taba'ci 40 Oleum Terebinth'inaj 40 Oleum Thcobro'maj 41 Oleum Thy'mi 41 Oleum Tig'lii 247 Oleum Valeria'nae
Olive Oil

40
«

Oleouesin^ Oleum iEthe'rcum

248
88

Opium
Orange Flowers

41
18

i

INDEX.
PAGE

301
PAGE

Orange Flower Water Os

99

Pil'ultB Al'oes

251
251

41 41
93

Pil'ula) Al'oes et Assafoetidu;
Pil'ulie Al'oes et

O'vum
Oxide of Antimony Oxide of Lead
Oxide of Silver Oxide of Zinc

Mas'tiches

251

Pil'ulae Al'oes et Pil'ulae

43
106 361
95

Myr'rhac 252 Antlmo'nii Compos'itai... 252

Pil'ula) Assafcetidoe Pil'ulae Cathart'icae Compos'itae.. Pil'ulae Copai'baj
Pil'ulae Ferri Carbona'tis

253
253
25.?

Oxysuh)huret of Antimony
Oyster-shell

54

254 255
255

Pil'ulae Ferri Compos'ita)

P
Piile

Pil'ulae Ferri lo'didi
Pil'ula)

Gal'bani Compos'ita)

257
257

Cinchona

25

Pil'ulae

Hydrarg'yri
Qui'niae Sulpha'tis

Pale Rose

46
60

Pil'ulae Opii
Pil'iila;

258
258 258

Pa'nax
Papa'ver
Parei'ra

41

Pil'ula)

Rhe'i

41
41 60
61

Pil'ulEe
Pil'iilae

Pareira Brava

Rhe'i Compos'itae Sapo'nis Compos'itse

259
259

Parsley Root
Pellitory

Pil'ulae Scil'lse Compos'ita)

Pi'menta

259 42
42
51

Pe'po

.*

41
37

Pimento
Pinkroot
Pi'per

Peppermint Peppermint Water

102
3

42

Percolatiox Permanganate Persimmon

of Potassa

45
5S
60

Petruseirnum Phosphate of Iron.. » Phosphate of Soda Phos'phorus
Phy'tolaccse Bac'ca
I'hij'tolaccse Bac'c.x

Pipsissewa Pix Burgun'dica Pix Canaden'sis Pix Liq'uida
Plaster of

24 42 42 42

188

283
41
61
61

Plaster

Ammoniac 135 of Ammoniac with Merl."6

cury
Plaster of

Antimony

136
137 137

Plaster of Arnica

Phy'tolaccae Ra'dix
Pills of

61

Plaster of Assafetida
Plaster of Belladonna Plaster of

Aloes

251

138 140
140

Pills of Aloes Pills of Pills of

and Assafetida

251

Aloes and Mastic
Aloes and Myrrh

251
252

Plaster of

Burgundy Pitch Canada Pitch
Lead Mercury Opium

Plaster of Iron

138
141 139

Pills of Assafetida....
Pills of Pills Pills

253

Plaster of

Carbonate of Iron of Copaiba of Iodide of Iron

254
253
255 257

Plaster of
Plaster of

139

Plaster of Pitch with Cantharides 140

Pills of
Pills of

Mercury

Pills of Pills of

Opium Rhubarb
Sulphate of Quinia

258 258

258
251

Plum'bi Plum'bi Plum'bi Plum'bi

Ace'tas

Carbo'nas

lo'didum
Ni'tras

42 43 260
43 43

Pilule

Plum'bi Ox'idum

392

INDEX.
PAGE PAOJ

Plum'bi Ox'ldum Semlvit'reum....

43
260 252

Plumbum
Plummer's Pills Po'dophyl'lum
Poison-oak
i

Prepared Chalk Prepared Oyster-shell
Prickly Ash Primary List
Pri'nos

118

118
63
9

43
63 61 61 61 31 41 55

61 46
46

oke Berry

Poke Root
Polyg'ala Rubel'la

Prune Pru'num
Pru'nus Virginia'nse

46 271
271

Pomegranate Rind

PULVERES
Pulveres Effervescen'tes
Pulveres
en'tes

Poppy Port Wine
Potas'sa POtas'sa

Effervescen'tes

Aperi272 272

261

cum

Calce

261

Pulvis Al'oes et Canel'lai Pulvis Aromat'icus
Pulvis Ipecacuan'hse

Potassa with Lime
Potas'sae Ace'tas

261 261

273

Pulvis Ipecacuan'hae Compos'itus 273
et

Potas'sae Bicarbo'nas.
Potas'sifi

Bichro'mas

^ 262 43 44 263 44
44

Opii

273 274 274
41

Pulvis Jala'pae Compos'itus
Pulvis Rhe'i Compos'itus

Potas'sae Bitar'tras

Potas'sae Carbo'nas Potas'sae Carbo'nas Impu'ra
Pdtan'sse Carbo'nas Impu'rus

Pumpkin Seed
Pure Carbonate of Potassa Pure Prussian Blue Purging Cassia
Purified Aloes
Purified
"..

264
186
23 89

Potas'sae Carbo'nas Pu'ra
Ptltas'fise

264 264

Carbo'nas Pii'rus

Potas'sae Chlo'ras
Potas'sae Ci'tras

44 265
265 45
45
45

Animal Charcoal

119
87

Purified Chloroform Purified Extract of

Potas'sae et So'dae Tartras
Potas'sae Ni'tras

Hemp

145
61

Potas'sae

Perman'ganas

Pyreth'rum Pyrophosphate of -Iron

189

Potas'sae Sulphas

Potas'sae Tartras
Potas'sii
Pdtas'sii

266
267

Bro'midum Cyan'idum
Ferrocyan'idum

Q
Quas'sia

268 268 45
45

46

Potas'sii Cyuntire'tum
Potas'sii

Quer'cus Al'ba

46

Quer'cus Tincto'ria

46
58

Potas'sii Ferrocyanure'tum
Potas'sii

Quince Seed

lo'didum Potas'sii Sulphure'tum Potassium Powder of Aloes and Canella Precipitated Carbonate of Iron... Precipitated Carbonate of Lime... Precipitated Carbonate of Zinc... Precipitated Phosphate of Lime.. Precipitated Sulphur Preliminary Notices

269 271
261

QuiNiA
Qui'niae Sulphas

274 274
277

Qui'niae Valeria'nas

272
191

R
Raisins

116
360

117 298
1

Ptanun'culus
Rectified Oil of

Amber

54 61 246
60

Preparations

65

Red Cedar Red Cinchona

25

INDEX.
PAGE

393

Red Red Red Red Red Red

Iodide of Mercury

197

Sa'go
Sal'ix

47
62
47

Oxide of Mercury
Precipitate

199
199

Sal'via

Rose Saunders
Sulphuret of Mercury

46

Sambu'cus
Sanguiua'ria

48
48

48 200
193

Reduced Iron
Resin Resin Cerate Resin of Jalap

46
122

San'talum Santon'ica Santonin

48
48 2S0 2S0 280
48

Santoninum
Santoni'num
Sap'o
Sarsaparil'la

278
apple

Resin of
Resin of
Resi'na

May

279

Scammony

279
141

48 48 48 48
3

Resin Plaster
Resi'na Jala'paj Resi'na Po'dophyl'li Resi'na Scammo'nii

Sas'safras Medul'la

46
278 279 279 278

Sassafras Pith
Sas'safras Radi'cis Cortex

Saturatiox.. Savine

47 49
49

Resix^
Rochelle Salt

Scammo'nium

265
33

Scammony
Scilla

Rhatany

49
49
62

Rhc'um Rhubarb Rhus Glab'rum
Ro'sa Centifo'lia

46

Scopa'rius

46
61

Scullcap
Scutella'ria

62
56

46 46 47
103

Secondary List
Seidlitz

Ro'sa Gal'lica

Powders

272
49
49

Rosemary Rose Water

Sen'ega Seneka
Sen'na
Serpenta'ria
Sesaini Fo'lia

Rosmarinus
Rottle'ra

47
61

49 49
62
62

Round-leaved Dogwood Ru'bia Ru'bus

57
61

47
62 61
62

Sesami Fo'lium Se'vum
Sherry Wine
Silver

49
55

Rue Ru'mex
Ru'ta

17

Simaru'ba Sina'pis Al'ba
Sina'pis Ni'gra

62 50 50

S
Sabadil'la

Slippery-elm Bark
47

54 48
123 215
141
15

Sabba'tia

62

Sabl'na
Sac'chiirum

47 47
47
57

Soap Soap Cerate Soap Liniment Soap Plaster
Socotrine Aloes

Sac'gharum Lac'tis
Safflower
SaflFron

Soda Powders
So'doe Ace'tas So'dsc Bicarbo'nas

271
50
2ii2

27
'.

Sage

47

36

394

INDEX.
PAGE

TXQM
Spirit of Spirit of

So'dje Bo'ras So'dae Carbo'nas

50

Lemon

293

50

So'dse Carbo'nas Exsicca'ta

283
283

Mindererus Spirit of Myrcia
Spirit of Nitrous

216
52

SO'dx Carbo'nas Exaiccd'tus
So'dse et Potas'sx Tartras

Ether

287

265
283
50 51

Spirit of

Nutmeg

295

So'dse Phosphas So'dae Sulphas So'dse Sulphis
So'dae Valeria'nas
So'dii Chlo'i-idum

Peppermint Spirit of Spearmint Spiritus
Spirit of

294 294
287 287
287

285
51

Spl'ritus uEtheris Compos'itus.... 287

Sjn'rUus JEtheris Ni'trlci
Spi'ritus Spi'ritus
Spi'ritus

Sodium
Solida'go
Solution of

282
62

Athens

Nitro'si

Solution of Acetate of Ammonia.. 216

Ammo'niae 289 Ammo'nia) Aromat'icus 290
291 291 291 291
51

Ammonia

97

Spi'ritus Ani'si
Spi'ritus Cam'phoroe
Spi'ritus Chloroform'!

Solution of Arsenite of Potassa... 228 Solution of Chloride of Barium... 217

Solution of Chloride of Calcium... 217 Solution of Chlorinated Soda Solution of Citrate of Iron

Spi'ritus

Cinnamo'mi

230 218
228 223

Spi'ritus Frumen'ti

Spi'ritus Junip'eri Compos'itus... 292 Spi'ritus Lavan'diilae

Solution of Citrate of Magnesia... 224

292

Solution of Citrate of Potassa Solution of Gutta-percha
Solution of Iodide of Arsenic and

Spi'ritus Lavan'diilse Compos'i-

tus
Spi'ritus Limo'nis

292
293

Mercury
Solution of

216

Lime
...

218
219

Menthse Pi'peri'tae Spi'ritus Menthse Vir'idis
Spi'ritus

294 294
52

Solution of Nitrate of Iron
Solution of Nitrate of Mercury

Spi'ritus Myr'cise

223 226
229 220

Spi'ritus Myris'ticas
Spi'ritus Vi'ni Gal'lici

295
52 49
16

Solution of Persulphate of Iron... 220

Solution of Potassa
Solution of Soda Solution of Subsulphate of Iron

Squill

Starch
Star Grass
Stat'ice
Stilling'ia

Solution of Subacetate of Lead... 225
..

56 52

Solution of Sulphate of Morphia 225 Solution of Tersulphatc of Iron... 222

52
3

Stoppage op Bottles
Storax
Stramo'nii Fo'lia

Spearmint Spearmint Water Specific Gravity
fepcrmA,ceti

37 103
3

52

52 52 52
52 52

Stramo'nii Fo'lium
Stramo'nii Se'men

24
51

Spige'lia

Spirasa
Spirit of

62

Stramonium Leaf Stramonium Seed
Stronger Alcohol
Stronger Ether

Ammonia
Camphor
Cinnamon Laveudor

289
291
291 291

14 86

Spirit of Anise

Spirit of

Spirit of Chloroform
Spirit of

Stronger Water Strychnia
Strych'nia

of

Ammonia

17

295

291

295
297

Spu4t of

292

Strysh'niao Sulphas

INDEX.
PAGE

395
PAOE

Sty 'rax, Bubacetate of Coppei'

62
27

Syrup
Sj'rup of

299

Almond

301

Subcarbonate of Bismuth
Sul)carbonate of Iron
,

111 191
53 113

.Syrup of Blackberry Hoot

309

Sublimed Sulphur Subnitratc of Bismuth
Suet

49
47

Sugar Sugar of Lead Sugar of Milk Sulphate of Alumina
Sulphate of Alumina and

42
47
90

Am
.

monia
Sulphate of
Sulphate of

15
16

Ammonia
Cadmium

Sulphate of Atropia Sulphate of Cinchonia

110

115

124
27 191

Sulphate of Copper

Sulphate of Iron Sulphate of Iron and Ammonia..
Sulphate of Magnesia Sulphate of Manganese

182
35 36

Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup Syrup

of Citric Acid of Garlic
of Ginger

300
301

313

of

Gum

Arabic

300
303

of Iodide of Iron

of Ip.ecacuanha
of Lactucarium

304 306

of

Lemon

306
303 302 308 305
307

of Orange Flowers of Orange Peel
of

Bed Rose
Rhatany Rhubarb Seneka

of of
of

312 311
313

of Squill

of Tolu of Wild-cherry

Bark

307
299 299
300 300

SvRUPi
Syru'pus

Sulphate of Morphia

240
45

Syru'pus Aca'ciae
Syru'pus Acidi
Ci'trici

Sulphate of Potassa Sulphate of Quinia Sulphate of Soda
Sulphate of Strychnia

274
50

Syru'pus

Al'lii

301
301

Syru'pus Am3-g'dalae

297
55
51

Sulphate of Zinc
Sulphite of Soda

Syru'pus Auran'tii Cort'icis Syru'pus Auran'tii Flo'rum Syru'pus Ferri lo'didi
Syru'pus Fus'cus

302
303

303
53

Sulphur
Siil'phur

298
53 53

Syru'pus Ipecacuan'ha3 Syru'pus Krame'rlse

304
305

Sul'phur Lo'tum
Sul'phur Praecipita'tum

298
53 96
17

Sul'phur Sublima'tum

Antimony Sulphuret of Antimony
Suliihurated

Syru'pus Lactucar'ii Syru'pus Limo'nis Syru'pus Prii'ni Virginia'nae
Syru'pus Rhe'i

306 306 307 307

Sulphuret of Iron

29

Sulphuret of Potassium
Sulphuric Acid
Sul'phuris lo'didum

271
12

298
79
61

307 Syru'pus Rhe'i Aromat'icus 308 Syru'pus Rosse Gal'licae 309 Syru'pus Ru'bi Syru'pus Sarsaparil'lae Compos'itus

Sulphurous Acid

310

Sumach

Syru'pus Scil'l» Syru'pus
I

311

Swamp Dogwood
Sweet Almond Sweet Orange Peel Sweet Spirit of Nitre

57 16

Scil'lne

Compos'itus

311

18
I

Syru'pus Sen't5gaj Syru'pus Toluta'nus
Syru'pus Zingib'eris

312 313 313

287

896

INDEX.
PAGE
PAOB

T
Taba'cum
Table of Changes in the Latin
Officinal

Tincta'ra Al'oes et Myr'rhae

315 316
317 317

Tinctu'ra Ar'nlcae
53

Tinctu'ra Assafoetidae
Tinctu'ra Belladon'nse

Names
in the

372

Tinctu'ra Benzd'ini Compos'ita... 317

Table of Changes
of

Meaning
376

Tinctu'ra Calum'bae
Tinctu'ra Cam'phorse

318
291

Names

Table of Changes in the Position 374 of Medicines Table of Medicines dismissed from 367 the Materia Medica Table of Medicines dismissed from
the Preparations

Tinctu'ra Can'nabis
Tinctu'ra Canthar'idis

31S
319
31:)

Tinctu'ra Cap'sioi

Tinctu'ra Cardamo'mi

319
320

Tinctu'ra Cardamo'mi Compos'ita 320

371

Tinctu'ra Casto'rei
Tinctu'ra Cat'eghu
..>.

Table of Medicines introduced 365 into the Materia Medica Table of Medicines introduced
into the Preparations

321

Tinctu'ra Cincho'na?
Tinctu'ra Cinnamo'mi

321
322
323

Tinctu'ra Cingho'nge Compos'ita. 321 Tinctu'ra Col'chici
Tinctu'ra Col'chici Sem'inis

368 365
53

Tables Tamarind
Tamarind'us Tanace'tum Tannic Acid

323 318 323

53
62 80

Tinctu'ra Colorn'bse

Tinctu'ra Coni'i

Tinctu'ra Cube'bje
Tinctu'ra Digita'lis
Tinctu'ra Ferri Chlo'ridi

Tansy
Tapio'ca

62
53

324 324 324
326

Tar Tar Ointment Tar Water Tarax'acum Tartar Emetic
Tartaric Acid

42
350 209
53
92
12

Tinctu'ra Gal'lse

Tinctu'ra Oentia'noe Compos'ita.. 326

Tinctu'ra Guai'aci
Tinctu'ra Hcllcb'ori

327
327 328

Tinctu'ra Guai'aci Ammonia'ta... 327

Tinctu'ra Hu'muli Tinctu'ra Hyoscy'ami Tinctu'ra lodin'ii Tinctu'ra lodin'ii Compos'ita

Tartrate of
tassa

Antimony and Po92

328
329 329 329

Tartrate of Iron and Ammonia... 183 Tartrate of Iron and Potassa

184

Tinctu'ra Jala'pae
Tinctu'ra Ki'no Tinctu'ra Krame'riaD

Tartrate of Potassa
Tartrate of Potassa and Soda

266
265
2

330
330

Temi'krature
TGrebinth'ina Terebinth'ina Canaden'sis
Tes'ta
Tcs'ta Proepara'ta

Tinctu'ra Lobe'liaj
Tinctu'ra Lupuli'nae

331
331

53

54
54
118
28

Tinctu'ra Myr'rhte Tinctu'ra Nu'cis Vom'icno

331

332

Tinctu'ra Olei Men'thm Pi'peri'tse 294
Tinctu'ra OJei Men'thm Vir'idia,. 294

Thorough wort
Tinctu'ra Aconi'ti Fo'lii
Titictu'ra Acuiii'ti

314

Tinctu'ra Opii

332 333 333

Fo'Uu'rum

Tinctu'ra Aconi'ti RadT'cis
Tinctu'ra Al'oes

314 315
315

Tinctu'ra Opii Aceta'ta

Tinctu'ra Opii Cam'phSrii'ta
Tiuct&'ra Opii Deodora'ta

333

INDEX.
PAGE

397
PAGE

Tinctu'ra Quas'siac
Tiuctu'ra Rhe'i

334
3S5 335 336 336
337 337

Tincture of Lobelia
Tincture of Lupulin Tincture of Myrrh Tincture of Nutgall

331 331
331

Tinctu'ra Rhe'i et Sen'nae
Tinctu'ra Sanguina'rise Tinctu'ra

326
332 332 334
330

Tinctu'ra SapO'nia Camphord'ta.- 215
Scil'lae

Tincture of
Tincture of

Nux Vomica
Opium

Tinctu'ra Serpcnta'riae

Tincture of Quassia

Tinctu'ra Stramo'nii

Tincture of Rhatany Tincture of Rhubarb
Tincture of Scrpentaria

Tinctu'ra Toluta'na

338
338

335

Tinctu'ra Valeria'na;
Tinctu'ra
nia'ta

Tincture of Rhubarb and Senna.. 335

Valeria'nae

Ammo338 339
339

337
336
337

Tincture of Squill
Tincture of Stramonium
Tincture of Tolu

Tinctu'ra Vera'tri Vir'idis

Tinctu'ra Zingib'eris

Tincture
Tincture of Aconite Leaf
Tincture of Aconite Root Tincture of Aloes

314

Tincture of Valerian

338 338
53
63

314
315
315

Tobacco
Tormentil
Tormentil'la

63
63

Tincture of Aloes and
Tincture of Arnica
Tincture of Assafctida

Myrrh

315

Tincture of American Hellebore.. 339

316
317

Toxicoden'dron Tragacanth Tragacan'tha
Trios'teum

54

54 63

Tincture of Belladonna

317
327

Tincture of Black Hellebore
Tincture of Bloodroot

Troches of Bicarbonate of Soda... 343 339 Troches of Chalk Troches of Cubeb
340

336

Tincture of Cantharides
Tincture of Capsicum Tincture of

319
319 319

Troches of Ginger

Troches of Ipecacuanha
Troches of Liquorice and Opium Troches of Magnesia Troches of Peppermint Troches
Iron
of

344 342
341

Cardamom

Tincture of Castor
Tincture of Catechu Tincture of Chloride of Iron

320 321

342

343
of

324
321

Subcarbonate

Tincture of Cinchona
Tincture of Cinnamon Tincture of Colchicum

341 339

322

Trochisci
Troghis'ci Cre'tse
Tr6(»his'ci Cube'baj

323 318

339
340

Tincture of Columbo
Tincture of Cubeb

324
324
339
327

Troghis'ci Ferri Subcarbona'tis... 341
Troghis'ci Glyj'yrrhizae et Opii... 341

Tincture of Digitalis
Tincture of Ginger Tincture of Guaiac Tincture of Hemlock
Tincture of

Troghis'ci Ipecacuan'hae

342
342 343

Troghis'ci Magne'sise

323 318
328 328

Troghis'ci Menthte Pi'peri't£e

Hemp

Troghis'ci So'dae Bicarbona'tis... 343
Troghis'ci Zingib'eris

Tincture of Henbane Tincture of Hops

344
60
57

Tulip-tree

Bark

Tincture of Iodine
Tincture of Jalap Tincture of Kino

Turmeric 329 Turpentine 330 Turpeth Mineral 36*
329

53

200

398

INDEX.
PAGE

PAGB

u
Ulimts

Veratria
Vera'tria

353
353
54

54 54

Uliuus Ful'va

Vera'trum Album Vera'trum Vir'ide
Verdigris

55
27

Unguenta
Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Uuguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum
nia'ti

344 Acidi Tan'nici
Ad'ipis

344
345 345
346 346

Vina
Vinegar Vinegar of Bloodroot Vinegar of Colchicum Vinegar of Lobelia Vinegar of Opium Vinegar of Squill Vi'num Al'bum

355
9

Antimo'nii
Aq'uae Ro'sas
Belladon'nae

68
65

66
67

Benzo'ini
Creaso'ti
Gal'lae

346
347 347
347

68
55

Hydrarg'yri Hydrarg'yri

Ammo348
Nitra'-

Unguen'tum Hydrarg'yri
tis

348 349

Unguen'tum Hydrar^'yri Ox'idi
Ru'bri

Unguen'tum lodin'ii Unguen'tum lodin'ii Compos'itum Unguen'tum Picis Liq'uidte Unguen'tum Plum'bi Carbona'tis Unguen'tum Potas'sii lo'didi
Unc/uen'ttim Sim'plex

349
349
350 350 350

Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num Vi'num
Viola
Violet

Al'oes

355 355
356

Antimo'nii
Col'chici Radi'cis

Col'chici Sem'inis

356 356

Ergo'tae

Ipecacuan'hse
Opii

357 357
55

Porten'se

Rhe'i

358
55

Eu'hrum
Taba'ci

358
55
63 63

Xer'icum

345
351

Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum Unguen'tum

Stramu'nii
Sul'phuris

Virginia Snakeroot

49

351 352
352

Sul'phuris lo'didi... 351

Taba'ci
Vera'tria;
Zin'ci Ox'idi

W
Wahoo Washed Sulphur
Water Water Avens Water of Ammonia
Weights
58
53
17

352
54 54

Uva Passa Uva Ursi

59
.'....

97
1 1

V
Valerian
Valeria'na
Valerianate of
54 54

Weights AND Measures
AVhisky White Hellebore

51

Ammonia

91

Valerianate of Quinia
Valerianate of Suda

277

285 362
81

Valerianate of Zinc
Valerianic Acid
Vanil'la

54

White Lead White Mustard White Precipitate White Wax. White-oak Bark Wild-cherry Bark

54 43
50

201 23 46

46

INDEX.
PAGE

399
PAGE

Wild Ginger
"Willow

56
62

Yeast

29

Wine

of Aloes

W^ine of

Antimony

355 355 356
356 356 357

Wine of Colchicum Root Wine of Colchicum Seed Wine of Ergot Wine of Ipecacuanha Wine of Opium Wine of Rhubarb Wine of Tobacco Wormseed

Yellow Yellow Yellow Yellow Yellow

Cinchona

25
61 58

Dock
Jasmine
Sulphate of Mercury

200
21 63

Wax

Yellow-root

357
358 358

Z
Zino
Zin'ci Ace'tas
Zin'ci Carbo'nas Prsecipita'ta

55

24
9

359
860

Wormwood

Zin'ci Carbo'nas Prsecipitd'tus.... 360

X
Xanthorrhi'za
63 63

Zin'ci Chlo'ridum Zin'ci

360
361
55

Ox'idum

Zin'ci Sulphas Zin'ci Valeria'nas

Xanthox'ylum

362 359
55

ZiNCUM

Y
Yarrow
56

Zin'cum
Zin'giber

56

THE END.

RS

m
2

The Pharmacopeia of the United States of America

P5 1864
Biological

& Medical

PLEASE

DO NOT REMOVE
FROM
THIS

CARDS OR

SLIPS

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UNIVERSITY

OF TORONTO

LIBRARY

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