COMMUNITY NAME BOONTON, TOWN OF BOONTON, TOWNSHIP OF BUTLER, BOROUGH OF CHATHAM, BOROUGH OF CHATHAM, TOWNSHIP OF CHESTER, BOROUGH OF CHESTER

, TOWNSHIP OF DENVILLE, TOWNSHIP OF DOVER, TOWN OF EAST HANOVER, TOWNSHIP OF FLORHAM PARK, BOROUGH OF HANOVER, TOWNSHIP OF HARDING, TOWNSHIP OF JEFFERSON, TOWNSHIP OF KINNELON, BOROUGH OF LINCOLN PARK, BOROUGH OF LONG HILL, TOWNSHIP OF MADISON, BOROUGH OF MENDHAM, BOROUGH OF MENDHAM, TOWNSHIP OF

COMMUNITY NUMBER 340335 340336 340337 340338 340504 345534 340555 345292 340340 340341 340342 340343 340344 340522 340345 345300 340356 340347 340540 340511

COMMUNITY NAME MINE HILL, TOWNSHIP OF MONTVILLE, TOWNSHIP OF MORRIS PLAINS, BOROUGH OF MORRIS, TOWNSHIP OF MORRISTOWN, TOWN OF MOUNT ARLINGTON, BOROUGH OF MOUNT OLIVE, TOWNSHIP OF MOUNTAIN LAKES, BOROUGH OF NETCONG, BOROUGH OF PARSIPPANY-TROY HILLS, TOWNSHIP OF PEQUANNOCK, TOWNSHIP OF RANDOLPH, TOWNSHIP OF RIVERDALE, BOROUGH OF ROCKAWAY, BOROUGH OF ROCKAWAY, TOWNSHIP OF ROXBURY, TOWNSHIP OF VICTORY GARDENS, BOROUGH OF WASHINGTON, TOWNSHIP OF WHARTON, BOROUGH OF

COMMUNITY NUMBER 340556 340349 340351 340350 340352 340541 340353 340161 340354 340355 345311 340358 340359 345315 340360 340362 340162 340363 340364

EFFECTIVE Month Day 2010

PRELIMINARY APR 30 2010

FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY NUMBER 34027CV001A

TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 1 PAGE
1.0 INTRODUCTION ..............................................................................................1 1.1 Purpose of Study.......................................................................................1 1.2 Authority and Acknowledgments .............................................................1 1.3 Coordination .............................................................................................9 AREA STUDIED ................................................................................................10 2.1 Scope of Study..........................................................................................10 2.2 Community Description ............................................................................13 2.3 Principal Flood Problems..........................................................................50 2.4 Flood Protection Measures .......................................................................69 ENGINEERING METHODS .............................................................................69 3.1 Hydrologic Analyses ................................................................................70 3.1.1 Pre-countywide Analysis ..............................................................70 3.1.2 This Countywide Study ................................................................90 3.2 Hydraulic Analyses...................................................................................106 3.2.1 Pre-countywide Analyses .............................................................107 3.2.2 This Countywide Study ................................................................128 3.2.3 Parameter Estimation for This Study ............................................128 3.3 Vertical Datum .........................................................................................130 FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS .......................................132 4.1 Floodplain Boundaries ..............................................................................132 4.2 Floodways ................................................................................................132 INSURANCE APPLICATION ..........................................................................134 FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP ..................................................................135 OTHER STUDIES ..............................................................................................135 LOCATION OF DATA ......................................................................................136 BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES ..........................................................142

2.0

3.0

4.0

5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - continued PAGE Tables and Figures
Table 1 – COO Coordination Meetings .........................................................................9 Table 2 – Detailed Study Streams ..................................................................................10 Table 3 – Stream Name Changes ...................................................................................11 Table 4 – Scope of Revision ............................................................................................12 Table 5 – Population Estimates......................................................................................14 Table 6 – Stream Gage Information ..............................................................................90 Table 7 – Summary of Discharges .................................................................................92 Table 8 – Manning’s “n” Values ....................................................................................129 Table 9 – Floodway Data Table .....................................................................................Vol. 2 Table 10 – Community Map History .............................................................................137

Figure 1 – Floodway Schematic .....................................................................................134

VOLUME 2
Table 9 – Floodway Data Table

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - continued

Exhibits Exhibit 1 – Flood Insurance Rate Map Exhibit 2 – Flood Profiles VOLUME 3 Beaver Brook A Beaver Brook B Beaver Dam Brook Black Brook B Black Cat Ditch Budd Lake Tributary Burnett Brook Conlon Pond Brook Crooked Brook Crooked Brook Tributary Dawsons Brook Den Brook Drakes Brook Drakes Brook Overflow Channel East Ditch VOLUME 4 Eastmans Brook Electric Brook Fish’s Brook Fox Brook Gladstone Brook Great Brook Green Pond Brook Harmony Brook Hatfield Creek Hibernia Brook Indian Brook Jackson Brook Jaquis Brook Lamington River Malapardis Brook Mill Brook Panels 89-95P Panels 96-105P Panels 106-107P Panels 108-113P Panels 114-120P Panels 121-129P Panels 130-134P Panels 135-141P Panels 142-143P Panels 144-152P Panels 153-155P Panels 156-157P Panel 158P Panels 159-167P Panels 168-169P Panels 170-177P Panels 01-04P Panels 05-09P Panels 10-12P Panels 13-14P Panels 15-16P Panel 17P Panels 18-26P Panels 27-37P Panels 38-47P Panels 48-54P Panels 55-56P Panels 57-70P Panels 71-84P Panel 85P Panels 86-88P

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TABLE OF CONTENTS - continued Exhibit 2 – Flood Profiles - continued VOLUME 5 Musconetcong River North Branch Raritan River Northern Tributary Passaic River Peapack Brook VOLUME 6 Pequannock River Pinch Brook Pompton River Primrose Brook Ramapo River Rockaway River Silver Brook VOLUME 7 South Branch Raritan River Southern Tributary Spring Garden Brook Stephensburg Brook Stonehouse Brook Stony Brook A Stony Brook B Stony Brook C Succasunna Brook Tanglewood Brook Tanners Brook Tributary 1 to Musconetcong River Tributary 1 to Whippany River Tributary 2 to Rockaway River Tributary 5 to Rockaway River Tributary 5-1 to Rockaway River Tributary 6 to Rockaway River Tributary 7 to Rockaway River Panels 333-365P Panel 366P Panels 367-372P Panels 373-377P Panels 378-384P Panels 385-387P Panels 388-391P Panel 392P Panel 393P Panels 394-395P Panels 396-400P Panels 401-405P Panels 406-407P Panels 408-410P Panels 411-414P Panels 415-418P Panels 419-420P Panels 421-430P Panels 262-277P Panels 278-279P Panels 280-281P Panels 282-286P Panel 287P Panels 288-329P Panels 330-332P Panels 178-208P Panels 209-215P Panels 216-217P Panels 218-257P Panels 258-261P

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VOLUME 8 Tributary to Beaver Brook A Tributary to Great Brook Tributary to Lake Hopatcong Tributary to Pequannock River Tributary to Spring Garden Brook Troy Brook Watnong Brook Weldon Brook West Brook West Ditch Western Tributary Whippany River White Meadow Brook Wills Brook Panel 431P Panels 432-433P Panel 434P Panel 435P Panels 436-437P Panels 438-448P Panels 449-461P Panels 462-466P Panels 467-470P Panels 471-475P Panels 476-477P Panels 478-496P Panels 497-516P Panels 517-524P

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NOTICE TO FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY USERS Communities participating in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) have established repositories of flood hazard date for floodplain management and flood insurance purposes. This Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report may not contain all data available within the Community Map Repository. Please contact the Community Map Repository for any additional data. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) may revise and republish part of all of this FIS report at any time. In addition, FEMA may revise part of the FIS report by the Letter of Map Revision process, which does not involve republication or redistribution of the FIS report. Therefore, users should consult with community officials and check the Community Map Repository to obtain the most current FIS report components. Selected Flood Insurance Rate Map panels for this community contain information that was previous shown separately on the corresponding Flood Boundary and Floodway Map panels (eg: floodways, cross sections). In addition, former flood hazard zone designations have been changed as follows: Old Zone(s) Al through A30 VI through V30 B C New Zone AE VE X X

Initial Countywide FIS Effective Date: TBD First Revised Countywide FIS Revision Date: TBD

FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY MORRIS COUNTY, NEW JERSEY ALL JURISDICTIONS 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Purpose of Study This flood insurance study (FIS) revises and supercedes information on the existence and severity of flood hazards in the geographic area of Morris County, including the Boroughs of Butler, Chatham, Florham Park, Lincoln Park, Madison, Mendham, Morris Plains, Netcong, Riverdale, Rockaway and Wharton, the Townships of Chatham, Chester, Denville, East Hanover, Hanover, Harding, Jefferson, Long Hill, Mendham, Mine Hill, Montville, Morris, Mount Olive, Parsippany-Troy Hills, Pequannock, Randolph, Rockaway, Roxbury and Washington, and the Towns of Dover and Morristown. The Borough of Kinnelon was not participating in the Flood Insurance Study program at the time of publication. This FIS aids in the administration of the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as well as the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973. This study has developed floodrisk data for various areas of the community that will be used to establish actuarial floor insurance rates and to assist the community in its efforts to promote sound floodplain management. Minimum floodplain management requirements for participation in the NFIP are set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations at 44 CFR, 60.3. In some states or communities, floodplain management criteria or regulations may exist that are more restrictive or comprehensive than the minimum Federal requirements. In such cases, the more restrictive criteria take precedence and the State (or other jurisdictional agency) will be able to explain them. 1.2 Authority and Acknowledgments The sources of authority for this FIS report are the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968 and the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973. Butler, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated October 15,1985 were prepared by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, under Contract No. H-3959. The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses were performed by O’Brien and Gere Engineers, Inc., under subcontract to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. This work was completed in December 1983. (Reference 1)

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Chatham, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIRM dated February 14, 1976 were prepared by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The analyses for the FIS report dated July 19, 2001 were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0126. This work was completed November 1998. (Reference 2) Florham Park, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated March 1979, and the FIRM dated September 14, 1979, were prepared by Dames & Moore for FEMA under Contract No. H-3744. That work was completed in 1974. The analyses for the FIS report dated March 1, 1984 were prepared by Dewberry & Davis LLC under agreement with FEMA. The revised analyses were computed by Century Engineering, Inc. The revised study was completed in May 1983. For the FIS report dated June 6, 2001, analyses for the Passaic River were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associated for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. That work was completed in November 1998. For the FIS report dated December 20, 2002, the analyses for Spring Garden Brook were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associated for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed in October 1999. (Reference 3) Lincoln Park, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated August 19, 1986 were prepared by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) for FEMA under Contract No. H-3959. The analyses were computed by O’Brien & Gere Engineers, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in December 1983. (Reference 4) Madison, Borough of: For the original FIS, the hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated July 16, 1979 were prepared by Dames & Moore for FEMA, under Contract No. H3744. The updated analyses for the FIS report dated March 15, 1984, were prepared by Dewberry & Davis LLC. That work was completed in May 1983. The FIS report dated April 15, 2002, incorporated the Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) effective on June 12, 2001, which reflected channelization, more up-to-date and more detailed topographic information, and revised hydrologic and hydraulic analyses along Spring Garden Brook. Analyses for the 2002 FIS report, including the portion of Spring Garden Brook revised through the LOMR were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed October 1999. (Reference 5)

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Mendham, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated November 4, 1992 were prepared by the US Geological Survey (USGS) for FEMA, under Inter-Agency Agreement No. EWM-85-E-1823, Project Order No. 23. This work was completed in February 1991. (Reference 6) Morris Plains, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated December 1, 1980, and the FIRM dated June 1, 1981, were performed by the NJDEP for the Federal Insurance Administration (FIA), under Contract No. H-3959. That work was completed in September 1978. The FIS report dated July 5, 2000 incorporated the Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) effective on March 4, 1998, which reflected the channelization and replace of the Mountain Way Bridge along the Watnong Brook. The analyses for the LMOR were prepared by Medina Consultants, P.C., on July 11, 1997. In addition, updated hydrologic and hydraulic analyses were prepared by Dewberry & Davis LLC for the entire reach of Watnong Brook to tie in with the analyses submitted for the LOMR. (Reference 7) Netcong, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated February 2, 1982 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959 and were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Co. under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in September 1980. (Reference 8) Riverdale, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated October 15, 1985 were prepared for the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959 and were conducted by O’Brien and Gere Engineers, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in December 1983. (Reference 9) Rockaway, Borough of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for this study were published by the USACE New York District in Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report, June 1972, and Supplemental Report to Passaic River Survey Report for Water Resources Development, April 1973. Except for the Rockaway River, the analyses for the FIS report dated December 19, 1984 were prepared for the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. The analyses were conducted by URS Company, Inc., under subcontract to NJDEP. This work was completed September 1982. Dewberry & Davis prepared the updated hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Rockaway River. This updated portion of the study was completed in March 1984. (Reference 10)

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Wharton, Borough of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated February 19, 1987 were prepared by the RBA Group for FEMA under Contract No. EMW-83-C-1195. The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for portions of Green Brook were prepared by NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. This work was completed in September 1985. (Reference 11) Boonton, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses in this study represent a revision of the original analyses by Dames & Moore for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), under contract No. H-3744. This revised study was prepared by Dewberry & Davis under agreement with FEMA. The revised study was completed in January 1984. (Reference 12) Chatham, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated November 1979, and the FIRM dated May 15, 1980, were prepared by the NJDEP for the Federal Insurance Administration (FIA), under Inter-Agency Agreement No. H-3959. That work was completed in January 1978. For the FIS report dated July 19, 2001, the analyses for the Passaic River were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed November 1998. (Reference 13) Chester, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated October 1, 1981 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA under Contract No. H-4546. The hydrologic and hydraulic computations for this study were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in January 1979. (Reference 14) Denville, Township of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for this study were conducted by the USGS for FEMA. Except for Rockaway River, the analyses for the FIS report dated October 17, 1984, were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA under Contract No. H4546. The analyses were computed by URS/MSR Engineers under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in June 1980. The analyses for the Rockaway River were prepared by Dewberry & Davis LLC. This portion of the study was completed in March 1984. (Reference 15)

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East Hanover, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated April 16, 1979 were prepared by Dames and Moore Consulting Engineers for FEMA, under contract H3744. This work was completed in December 1974. The April 1, 1983 FIS report was prepared to incorporate redelineations of the flood boundaries. Analyses for the FIS report dated January 17, 1986 were prepared by the RBA Group under agreement with FEMA. That work was completed September 1984. For the FIS report dated June 6, 2001 the analyses for the Passaic River were completed by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed in November 1998. (Reference 16) Hanover, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated June 1, 1977, and the FIRM dated December 1, 1977, were prepared by Dames and Moore Consulting Engineers for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3744. That work was completed in December 1974. The March 5, 1982 FIS report was revised to reflect the new format, as well as the new FEMA logo. For the FIS report dated June 6, 2001, the analyses for the Whippany River and Black Brook were taken from the FIS report for the Township of East Hanover, dated January 17, 1986. (Reference 17) Harding, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated September 15, 1981, and the FIRM dated March 15, 1982, were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959. That work was completed in November 1978. For the FIS report dated December 6, 2001, the analyses for the Passaic River were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed in November 1998. (Reference 18) Jefferson, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for FIS report dated January 5, 1983 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. The analyses were performed by URS Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in December 1980. (Reference 19) Long Hill, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated October 14, 1977 were prepared by Dames and Moore for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3905. That work was completed in 1977. For the FIS report dated September 21, 2001, the analyses for the Passaic River were prepared by Leonard Jackson Associates for FEMA, under Contract No. EMN-96-CO-0026. This work was completed in November 1998. (Reference 20)

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Mendham, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated January 5, 1982 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. The analyses were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in 1980. (Reference 21) Mine Hill, Township of: For the FIS report dated May 3, 1993, the hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Lamington River were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Roxbury, dated June 15, 1982. The analyses for the Roxbury FIS report were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. The analyses were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in October 1980. (Reference 22) Montville, Township of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for this study were conducted by the NJDEP Division of Water Resources for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3855. The original analyses were completed in November 1977. For the FIS report dated August 19, 1985, the analyses of the Passaic River were prepared by the NJDEP Division of Water Resources, under agreement with FEMA. The revised analyses of the Rockaway River were prepared by Dewberry & Davis under agreement with FEMA. The revised analyses were completed in January 1984. (Reference 23) Morris, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated December 1, 1980November 15, 1984 were performed by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959. This work, which was completed in November 1978, covered all significant flooding sources affecting the Township of Morris. (Reference 24) Mount Olive, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated November 15, 1984 were performed by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959. The analyses were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in May 1981. (Reference 25) Parsippany-Troy Hills, Township of: For the FIS report dated February 19, 1986, the hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the detailed studied streams, except the Rockaway River and the Whippany River, were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. 24, Project R. The

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analyses were conducted by the URS Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in December 1980. The analyses of the Rockaway River were prepared by Dewberry & Davis under agreement with FEMA. The analyses of the Whippany River were prepared by the RBA Group under agreement with FEMA. The work for the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers was completed in January 1984. (Reference 26) Pequannock, Township of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated July 1, 1971 was conducted by the Soil Conservation Service. Analyses for the FIS report dated July 3, 1986 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959. The analyses were computed by O’Brien & Gere Engineers, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. That work was completed in December 1983. For the FIS report dated September 17, 1992, the analyses for the most upstream portion of East Ditch, Northern Tributary, Southern Tributary, and Western Tributary were prepared by Boswell Engineering. This work was completed in June 1991. (Reference 27) Randolph, Township of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses in the FIS report dated June 18, 1987 was conducted by Dames and Moore Consulting Engineers for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3744. The analyses for the Rockaway River for this report were prepared by The RBA Group for FEMA, under Contract No. EMW-83-C-1195. This work was completed in September 1985. (Reference 28) Rockaway, Township of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for this study were performed by Dames and Moore Consulting Engineers for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3744. The original work was completed in May 1979. For the FIS report dated September 18, 1986, the analyses for portions of Beaver Brook, Green Pond Brook, and Fox Pond were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. Analyses for all other studied streams were prepared by The RBA Group for FEMA, under Contract No. EMW-83-C-1195. This work was completed in February 1985. (Reference 29) Roxbury, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated June 15, 1982 were prepared by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-4546. The analyses were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. This work was completed in October 1980. (Reference 30)

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Washington, Township of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the FIS report dated December 15, 1984 were prepared New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), under Contract No. H-3959. This work was completed in April 1984. The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses were conducted by Anderson-Nichols and Company, Inc., under subcontract to the NJDEP. (Reference 31) Boonton, Town of: The hydrologic and hydraulic analyses in this study represent a revision of the original analyses by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), under Contract No. H-3959. The revised study of the Rockaway River was prepared by Dewberry & Davis under agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The revised study was completed in January 1984. (Reference 32) Dover, Town of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for this study were conducted by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3855. The work for the original study was completed in May 1977. For the FIS report dated July 4, 1989, the analyses were computed by The RBA Group for FEMA, under Contract No. EMW-83-C-1195. This work was completed in September 1985. The RBA Group also conducted analyses on the Rockaway River. This work was completed in May 1987. (Reference 33) Morristown, Town of: The original hydrologic and hydraulic analyses in this study were conducted by the NJDEP for FEMA, under Contract No. H-3959. The original work was completed in August 1978. For the FIS report dated July 3, 1986, the analyses were performed by Conklin Associates for FEMA. The revision reflects modifications to a portion of Great Brook, including widening the stream channel to create a pond and constructing two culverts. This work was completed in January 1985. (Reference 34) For this countywide revision, new hydrological and hydraulic analyses were conducted for portions of the Fox Brook in both the Township and the Borough of Rockaway; Harmony Brook in the Township of Chester and the Township of Mendham; Hibernia Brook in the Township of Rockaway; Indian Brook in the Township of Chester and the Township of Mendham; Burnett Brook in the Township of Chester and the Township of Mendham; Whippany River in the Township of Chester and the Township of Mendham; Passaic River in the Township of Chester and the Township of Mendham; and West Ditch in the Borough of Lincoln Park and the Township of Pequannock. The work on this restudy was performed by Natural

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and Technological Hazards Management Consulting, Inc. for FEMA, under Contract No. EMW-2003-C0-5006. This work was completed in September 2009. For the Lamington River and Peapack Brook, flooding in the Township of Chester was delineated on new mapping by Natural and Technological Hazards Management Consulting, Inc. in a joint venture with AVF Design, Inc. using previously adopted hydraulic data. All flood elevations for these two streams were adjusted to the North American Vertical Datum 1988. In accordance with a prior agreement between the NJDEP and FEMA, the hydrologic and hydraulic analyses for the Lamington River in the Township of Mine Hill used for this study were taken from the FIS report for the Township of Mine Hill published September 10, 1982. 1.3 Coordination The community base map selection and the identification of streams requiring detailed study for the original studies were performed in Consultation Coordination Officer (CCO) meetings within each community. The results of the studies were reviewed at the final CCO meetings. All problems raised during the final meetings have been addressed in this study. The dates of the initial and final CCO meetings for Morris County are shown in Table 1, “CCO Coordination Meetings”. For this countywide FIS, final CCO meetings were held on xxxxxxx xx, 20xx. These meetings were attended by representatives of the Study Contractors, the communities, the State of New Jersey, and FEMA. Table 1 -- CCO COORDINATION MEETINGS Community Name Boonton, Town of Boonton, Township of Butler, Borough of Chatham, Borough of Chatham, Township of Chester, Township of Denville, Township of Dover, Town of East Hanover, Township of Florham Park, Borough of Hanover, Township of Harding, Township of Jefferson, Township of Lincoln Park, Borough of Long Hill, Township of Initial CCO Date * * March 11, 1976 April 5, 1999 May 19, 1976 June, 1977 June 2, 1977 April 2, 1984 April 7, 1983 April 5, 1999 August 2, 1999 * January, 1978 March 11, 1976 June 14, 1999 Final CCO Date October 5, 1978 April 7, 1978 October 2, 1984 May 22, 2000 March 15, 1979 May 7, 1981 April 21, 1982 March 21, 1986 May 2, 2000 December 20, 2001 May 2, 2000 October 20, 1999 August 11, 1982 December 19, 1984 May 16, 2000

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Table 1 -- CCO COORDINATION MEETINGS - continued Community Name Madison, Borough of Mendham, Borough of Mendham, Township of Mine Hill, Township of Montville, Township of Morris Plains, Township of Morris, Township of Morristown, Town of Mount Olive, Township of Netcong, Borough of Parsippany-Troy Hills, Township of Pequannock, Township of Randolph, Township of Riverdale, Borough of Rockaway, Borough of Rockaway, Township of Roxbury, Township of Washington, Township of Wharton, Borough of *date not available For this countywide FIS, Morris County was notified by FEMA in a letter dated July 2, 2003, that the FIS and FIRMs would be revised and updated. 2.0 AREA STUDIED 2.1 Scope of Study This FIS covers the geographic area of Morris County, New Jersey. Table 2 shows flooding sources that were studied in detail in previously published pre-Countywide FISs within Morris County. TABLE 2 - DETAILED STUDY STREAMS Beaver Brook Black Cat Ditch Burnett Brook Crooked Brook Tributary Drakes Brook Eastman’s Brook Beaver Dam Brook Budd Lake Conlon Pond Brook Dawsons Brook Drakes Brook Overflow Channel Electric Brook Black Brook Budd Lake Tributary Crooked Brook Den Brook East Ditch Fish’s Brook Initial CCO Date February 8, 2001 June 26, 1985 June, 1977 January 15, 1992 May 9, 1975 May 19, 1976 May 19, 1976 May 19, 1976 September, 1976 September, 1976 November, 1978 March 11, 1976 April 2, 1984 March 11, 1976 June 1, 1977 April 14, 1983 June, 1977 September, 1976 April 2, 1984 Final CCO Date * December 19, 1991 July 29, 1981 April 3, 1992 November 15, 1978 December 7, 1978 March 13, 1979 November 29, 1978 November 3, 1983 September 15, 1982 July 18, 1984 October 10, 1984 March 21, 1986 October 22, 1984 August 9, 1984 November 20, 1985 January 20, 1982 November 3, 1983 March 21, 1986

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TABLE 2 - DETAILED STUDY STREAMS - continued Fox Brook Green Pond Brook Hatfield Creek Indian Lake Lake Estling Lamington River Musconetcong River Passaic River Pinch Brook Ramapo River South Branch Raritan River Stonehouse Brook Tanglewood Brook Tributary No. 2 to Lake Hopatcong Tributary No. 6 to Rockaway River Tributary of Great Brook Tributary to the Whippany River West Ditch Wills Brook Gladstone Brook Harmony Brook Hibernia Brook Jackson Brook Lake Hopatcong McKeel’s Brook North Branch Raritan River Peapack Brook Pompton River Rockaway River Spring Garden Brook Stony (Malapardis) Brook Tanners Brook Tributary No. 5 to Rockaway River Tributary No. 7 to Rockaway River Tributary to Rockaway River Troy Brook Weldon Brook Whippany River Great Brook Hassock Brook Indian Brook Jaquis Brook Lake Openaki Mill Brook Northern Tributary Pequannock River Primrose Brook Silver Brook Stephensburg Brook Succasunna Brook Tributary No. 1 to Lake Hopatcong Tributary No. 5-1 to Rockaway River Tributary B Tributary to Spring Garden Brook Watnong Brook West Brook White Meadow Brook

Table 3 lists streams that have names in this countywide FIS other than those used in the previously printed pre-countywide FISs for the communities in which they are located: TABLE 3 - STREAM NAME CHANGES Old Name Beaver Brook Beaver Brook Beaver Brook Beaver Brook Beaver Brook Black Brook Stony (Malapardis) Brook Stony Brook Stony Brook Stony Brook McKeels Brook McKeels Brook Community Township of Boonton Borough of Rockaway Township of Denville Township of Rockaway Township of Montville Township of East Hanover Township of Hanover Township of Washington Township of Montville Township of Boonton Town of Dover Township of Rockaway New Name Beaver Brook A Beaver Brook C Beaver Brook C Beaver Brook C Beaver Dam Brook Black Brook B Malapardis Brook Stony Brook A Stony Brook B Stony Brook C Tanglewood Brook Tanglewood Brook

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TABLE 3 - STREAM NAME CHANGES - continued Old Name Tributary B Unnamed Tributary to Whippany River Tributary to Rockaway River Unnamed Creek Tributary No. 2 to Lake Hopatcong Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook West Branch Community Township of Washington Township of Hanover Township of Denville Township of Boonton Township of Jefferson Borough of Florham Park Borough of Madison Township of Montville New Name Tributary 1 to Musconetcong River Tributary 1 to Whippany River Tributary 2 to Rockaway River Tributary to Beaver Brook A Tributary to Lake Hopatcong Tributary to Spring Garden Brook Tributary to Spring Garden Brook West Brook A

As part of the countywide FIS, updated analyses were included for the flooding sources shown in Table 4, “Scope of Revision”. TABLE 4 - SCOPE OF REVISION Stream Burnett Brook Limits of Detailed Study Confluence with North Branch Raritan River to the upstream corporate limits of the Township of Mendham Confluence with Rockaway River in the Borough of Rockaway to the upstream Zone A limits in the Township of Rockaway Confluence with Whippany River to just upstream of Woodland Road in the Township of Mendham Confluence with Beaver Brook to the upstream Zone A limits in the Township of Rockaway Confluence with Burnett Brook to the upstream confluence with Burnett Brook

Fox Brook

Harmony Brook

Hibernia Brook

Indian Brook*

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TABLE 4 - SCOPE OF REVISION - continued Stream Passaic River Limits of Detailed Study The entire length of the Passaic River within the corporate limits of the Township of Mendham Confluence with Beaver Dam Brook in the Borough of Lincoln Park to the upstream corporate limits in the Township of Pequannock Downstream corporate limits of the Township of Mendham to the confluence with Harmony Brook

West Ditch

Whippany River

*split flow situation affecting the Townships of Mendham and Chester All or portions of numerous flooding sources in the county were studied by approximate method. Approximate analyses were used to study those areas having a low development potential or minimal flood hazards. The scope and methods of the study were proposed to and agreed upon by FEMA and the affected Morris County community at the time of study. This FIS also incorporates the determinations of letters issued by FEMA resulting in map changes (Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) or Letter of Map Revision Based on Fill (LOMR-F)). For this countywide study, no LOMRs were incorporated into the new map revision. 2.2 Community Description Morris County is located in central New Jersey. Its county seat, Morristown, is located approximate 32 miles west of New York City, and 49 miles north of Trenton, New Jersey. The climate of this region is mostly a temperate continental climate with some moderate maritime influences. Winter climate is controlled by polar continental air masses; summer climate by tropical air masses moving up over the United States from the Gulf of Mexico. Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed from month to month with an average of 3 to 4 inches per month in fall, winter and spring. The average annual precipitation is 44.1 inches, which is relatively high when compared to many sections of the North American continent. Average seasonal temperatures range from 29.2 degrees Fahrenheit (oF) in January to 74.5 oF in July. Up to date population estimates are listed below in Table 5, “Population Estimates”.

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TABLE 5 – POPULATION ESTIMATES Community Boonton, Town of Boonton, Township of Butler, Borough of Chatham, Borough of Chatham, Township of Chester, Borough of Chester, Township of Denville, Township of Dover, Town of East Hanover, Township of Florham Park, Borough of Hanover, Township of Harding, Township of Jefferson, Township of Kinnelon, Borough of Lincoln Park, Borough of Long Hill, Township of Madison, Borough of Mendham, Borough of Mendham, Township of Mine Hill, Township of Montville, Township of Morris Plains, Borough of Morris, Township of Morristown, Town of Mount Arlington, Borough of Mount Olive, Township of Mountain Lakes, Borough of Netcong, Borough of Parsippany-Troy Hills, Township of Pequannock, Township of Randolph, Township of Riverdale, Borough of Rockaway, Borough of Rockaway, Township of Roxbury, Township of Victory Gardens, Borough of Washington, Township of Wharton, Borough of
1

Population Estimate1 8,482 4,400 8,090 8,266 10,151 1,640 7,795 16,528 17,997 11,427 12,389 13,653 3,319 21,737 9,582 10,703 8,652 6,046 5,073 5,539 3,612 21,150 5,534 21,103 19,122 5,698 25,934 4,276 3,241 51,144 16,658 25,346 2,870 6,313 25,411 23,360 1,499 18,469 6,127

Data obtained from US Census Estimates for 2007

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Town of Boonton Boonton is located in northern Morris County in north-central New Jersey. The town is situated approximately 35 miles west of New York City. The town is bordered by the Township of Boonton to the north, the Township of Montville to the east, the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills to the south, and the Borough of Mountain Lake to the west. Boonton has an area of approximately 2.4 square miles. The town is traversed by U. S. Route 202, Interstate Route 287 and Conrail. State Route 46 and Interstate Route 80 are located in the vicinity of the town. Settlement in the Boonton area began in the colonial days when ironworks were built along the Rockaway River to utilize the available water power. Boonton grew from the settlement established by the ironworkers and their families in 1761. The town was named in honor of the colonial governor, Thomas Boone. It was relocated to its present site in 1818 when the forges stopped operating. The Morris Canal, which was constructed to transport coal and iron, helped to attract heavy industry to the area. The discovery of molded plastics by a local chemist in the 1890s changed the nature of industrial development. The manufacture of a local product, Boontonware, made the town famous. The need for molded plastics in turn led to the development of a radio and electronic industry. Boonton was separated fray the Township of Boonton on March 18, 1867. Boonton had a 1980 population of 8,620, a decrease of 641 from the 1970 population. Future population growth within the town will be limited by the small amount of vacant land available for development, and the court-imposed ban on new sewer connections. Land use in Boonton consists primarily of single family residences; however, there are industrial areas located along Conrail and Myrtle Avenue and at the western end to Plane Street. Business areas are located on both sides of Main Street along a steep hillside. An estimated 527.6 acres (24.1 percent of the area) of the existing land in the town are residential, with single-family residences representing 83 percent of this acreage. Privately owned, vacant land takes up 290 acres (18.7 percent of the area). Approximately 25 percent of this vacant land is zoned for industrial use, while the remaining vacant land is zoned for single-family residences. Streets, highways and Conrail use 273 acres (approximately 17.6 percent of the area). Property owned by the City of Jersey City, including water-covered areas, take up 145 acres (9 percent of the area). Other significant land uses include churches and institutions (108.9 acres), public and private schools (94.5 acres). Business and industry take up 103 acres (approximately 7 percent of the area). Park and recreational facilities in Boonton include the following:

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All the land along both sides of the Rockaway River extending from Pond Bridge to the railroad, which is town property. Most of this area has been designed for park purposes. Land that extends north from Pond Bridge between North Main Street and the Rockaway River, which is a continuation of the canal bed area. A town beach was developed here and has since been enlarged and improved. This facility is the only public beach in Boonton. Sheep Hill Park consists of approximately 40 acres and overlaps the Town of Boonton and the Township of Boonton. This wooded hill is a passive recreation area used for hiking and picnicking. A multi-purpose recreation area of 3.1 acres, has been developed on Wootton Street and known as. Bentley Field includes baseball and football practice fields, and a children's playground. Boonton has several small playgrounds for children. These playgrounds are. located at the end of Kanouse Street, on Washington Street opposite the town hall, at the intersection of Lathrop Avenue and Old Boonton Road,' and at the public housing building on Plane Street. Most flood plain development in Boonton consists primarily of parkland. Very few residences are located in the western portion of the town. Commercial buildings occupy the flood plains. The Rockaway River originates in southeastern Sussex County in the Township of Sparta. The river flows south along the northern and eastern part of the Township of Jefferson in Morris County. The Rockaway River then flows east across the Borough of Wharton, the Town of Dover, the Township of Randolph, the Township of Rockaway, the Borough of Rockaway, the Township of Denville, and the Township of Boonton. The river enters the Town of Boonton from the west, then flows east across West Main Street. It cuts through the center of the town to form a rock-lined valley before crossing the embankments of Morris Avenue, Conrail, and Interstate Route 287. The river shifts to the south after passing Interstate Route 287 and U. S. Route 202, and spreads out onto the flood plain before flowing into the Boonton Reservoir (also known as the New Jersey City reservoir). Below the reservoir, the Rockaway River flows east into Montville and forms most of the southern corporate limits of Boonton with Parsippany Hills. Areas of very steep slopes occur along portions of the Rockaway River at scattered locations within the town. Most of the town slopes toward the Rockaway River and Boonton Reservoir. Boonton, along with all of Morris County, is located entirely within the Appalachian Province, one of the two primary geologic provinces along the Atlantic coast. Two of the four divisions of the Appalachian Province traverse Morris County, the Highlands and the Piedmont Plateau. The dividing line between the Highland and the Piedmont

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Plateau runs in a nearly straight geological fault line from the Hudson River at Stony Point through the Borough of Riverdale, the Township of Boonton, and the Town of Morristown, placing approximately 70 percent of Morris County in the Highland and 30 percent in the Piedmont Plateau. Generally, the Highlands consist of broad, rounded or flat-topped ridges with average elevations of 500 feet to 800 feet. The plateau is characterized by gentler hills and broader valleys with hills rising 200 feet to 400 feet above the surrounding land. Most of the land in Boonton is very hilly with elevations ranging from 200 feet near the Rockaway River at the bottom of Vreeland Avenue to 820 feet in Sheep Hill Park. The soils in the northwestern part of the town are stony, very cobbly or gravelly. In the extreme southeast, they are gravelly sand loam. In the southern portion of the community, the predominant soils are well drained and sandy or gravelly. Because of the extent of cut or fill in steeper areas along Main Street and the western side of Myrtle Avenue to William Street, a detailed soil classification is not possible. The soils along the Rockaway River are too variable to classify, according to the Soil Conservation Service in Morris County. Exceptions to this are the locations upstream of U. S. Route 202 to Interstate Route 287, and upstream from West Main Street to the corporate limits. At these locations, the soils are generally gravelly sandy loam. Vegetation consists of planted lawns, trees and shrubbery, typical of residential and commercial areas. Township of Boonton Boonton is located in northeast Norris County in north-central New Jersey. The township is bordered by the Borough of Kinnelon to the north, the Township of Montville to the east, the Town of Boonton and Borough of Mountain Lakes to the south, and the Townships of Denville and Rockaway to the west. The population of the township increased from 1,998 in 1960 to 3,070 in 1970, to approximately 3,210 in July 1973, and 3,273 in 1980 (a 54-percent increase between 1960 and 1970 and a 7-percent increase between 1970 and 1980). Land uses within the community are summarized in the following tabulation (References 36 and 37). 1970 % of Area 15 2 0 2 3 22 1973 % of Area 16 2 6 2 3 29

Developed Residential Commercial & Industrial Public & Semi-Public Streets & Highways Agriculture TOTAL DEVELOPED Undeveloped Swamp & Water

5

4

17

Vacant TOTAL UNDEVELOPED

73 78

67 71

The Township of Boonton is bordered to the southwest by the Rockaway River, a major tributary to the Passaic River. The township lies entirely within the Rockaway River basin, which has an area of 206 square miles. The natural drainage system of the township consists of Beaver Brook, a tributary to the Rockaway River, and two other streams which flow into Beaver Brook. The tributaries to Beaver Brook are Unnamed Creek, flowing from the northwest, and Stony Brook, flowing from the northeast. The Rockaway River basin is located almost entirely within Morris County, New Jersey. Although the basin is largely rural, mountainous and heavily wooded, other areas in the basin range from slightly developed to highly urbanized. Fourteen municipalities are located in the basin, including the Towns of Dover and Boonton. The area of the Township of Boonton is approximately 9 square miles. The topography of the area is characterized by gently rolling to mountainous terrain with average elevations of approximately 700 feet. The lowlands are generally swampy, with areas of dense, water-tolerant vegetation. Historically, the portion of Morris County that contains the Township of Boonton has remained undeveloped, except for the Town of Boonton. The Town of Boonton developed into a minor industrial, residential and commercial area during the early 1800s due to the presence of the iron ore industry. Later, the region served as a corridor between western New Jersey communities like Dover, and the more developed, eastern portions of New Jersey. The township was incorporated in 1868. Development within the Township of Boonton consists of small residential developments, scattered farms and estates. Residents of the township are employed in local industries or commute to businesses in the New York metropolitan area. The Tourne, a large county park, is located at the southern tip of the community. Boonton is largely undeveloped, and future development will probably not be intense due to the remote location of the community with respect to existing commercial, population and transportation centers which are located to the south. Development within the flood plain consists of approximately 20 percent industrial and 80 percent residential. Borough of Butler The Borough of Butler is located in north-central portion of Morris County in northeastern New Jersey. It is bordered by the Borough of Riverdale to the east, the Borough of Bloomingdale to the north, the Township of West Milford to the northwest, an the Borough of Kinnelon to the west and south. The population of Butler in July 1975 was estimated at 8,000. The population in 1950 and 1960 was

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4,050 and 5,415, respectively. The total land area contained within the corporate limits of Butler is 1.9 square miles. Butler is primarily a single-family residential community. As a result of the development trends of the 1960’s and early 1970s, the character of the borough is typically suburban. Older commercial areas are located in the Main Street-Boonton Avenue area of the town center, and some are scattered along State Route 23. The area in the vicinity of Kiel Avenue and State Route 23 has been developed as a regional shopping center. The few industrial areas in town are also situated near the Main Street-Boonton Avenue area. Limited new industrial development has occurred along State Route 23 and the Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike. Borough of Chatham The extent of the Borough of Chatham is 2.4 square miles, and the 1990 population was 8,001. The 2000 population was 8.460. (Reference 35) Township of Chatham The Township of Chatham is located in the southern part of Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is adjoined on the north by the Boroughs of Madison and Chatham, on the east by the Borough of New Providence and the City of Summit, on the south by the Borough of Berkeley Heights, and on the west by the Townships of Harding and Long Hill. The township has an area of 9.3 square miles, and a 1990 population of 9,361. The 2000 population of the Township of Chatham is 10,086. (Reference 35) The majority of the Township of Chatham north of Long Hill is gently rolling or flat country. The Great Swamp, a vestige of glacial Lake Passaic, has its eastern part in the Township of Chatham and extends westward into the Townships of Harding and Long Hill. The township lies entirely within the Passaic River basin. The Passaic River originates to the northwest of Chatham, near Mendham, at an elevation of nearly 900 feet. It flows south through the Great Swamp, and then northeast along the Watchung Mountains. Township of Chester The Township of Chester occupies 28.9 square miles of Morris County in northwestern New Jersey. It is located approximately 45 miles west of New York City, 11 miles west of Morristown, New Jersey, and 40 miles east of Allentown, Pennsylvania. The Township of Chester is bordered on the north by the Townships of Mount Olive and Roxbury, on the northeast by the Township of Randolph, on the east by the

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Township of Mendham, on the south by the Township of Bedminster and the Borough of Peapack and Gladstone, and on the west by the Township of Washington. The 1976 population was 4,560, yielding a population density of 159 people per square mile. This population shows an increase of 275 since 1970 census, or approximately a 6.4 percent increase. The 2000 population is 7,282. (Reference 35) The Township of Chester is primarily residential. There is also a significant area of land within Chester which is utilized for agricultural purposes. Minor commercial and industrial development is also present. The Township of Chester lies within the New Jersey Highlands, a portion of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. This area is characterized by a series of flat-topped ridges separated by narrow, deep valleys. Elevations range from 1,040 feet in the northeast portion of the township to 260 feet along the Lamington River. The area is underlain predominantly by crystalline, metamorphosed gneiss of the Precambrian Period which comprises the major parent material of the local soils overlying the bedrock. Pleasant Hill, located in the northern part of Chester, is composed of this resistant rock type. The remaining bedrock in the community is composed of Brunswick Shale, Martinsburg Shale, Kittitinny Limestone and Hardyston Quartzite. Glaciers advanced into New Jersey three times during the Pleistocene Epoch. The two earlier advanced deposited small discontinuous patches of till on the hillsides in Chester. During the most recent advance, minor amounts of outwash (sand and gravel sediment) were deposited by meltwater streams. Along the streams, recent alluvial silt covers the glacio-fluvial deposits to form the floodplains. The predominant soil group is composed mainly of stony, medium textured, poorly to moderately drained, silty-clay loam on the hillsides and moderately to excessively drained sily loam in the valleys. Vegetative cover consists of mainly wooded areas interspersed with cultivated areas of corn and soybean. In upland areas, broadleaf species of white, black and red oak, as well as white ash, tulip, sweet birch, yellow birch, red maple, beech and hickory are found along with several conifer species. The principal watercourse in Chester is the Lamington River which originates in the Township of Mine Hill and flows south through the Townships of Roxbury, Chester, Tewksbury, Readington and Bedminster, before it changes direction to flow easy to its confluence with the North Branch Raritan River. Burnett Brook originates in the Township of Randolph. It flows south to form corporate limits for the Townships of Chester and Mendham before it empties into the North Branch Raritan River in the Township of Mendham. Indian Brook is a diversion of Burnett Brook. It separates from the main channel approximately 500 feet downstream of Old Mill Road, in Chester. It then flows south, parallel to Burnett Brook, before rejoining the main channel approximate 1,500 feet upstream of Burnett

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Brook’s confluence with the North Branch Raritan River, in the Township of Mendham. Peapack Brook, which originates within Chester, flows south through Chester into the Borough of Peapack and Gladstone. It continues to flow south into the Township of Bedminster where it empties into the North Branch Raritan River. Gladstone Brook is a tributary of Peapack Brook and also has its headwaters in the Township of Chester. It flows south through Chester until it drains into the Peapack Brook, approximately 450 feet south of the corporate limits with the Borough of Peapack and Gladstone. Township of Denville The Township of Denville is located in central Morris County approximately 30 miles west of the City of New York. It is bordered on the north and northwest by the Township of Rockaway, on the northeast by the Township of Boonton, on the east by the Borough of Mountain Lakes, on the southeast by the Township of ParsippanyTroy Hills, on the west by the Borough of Rockaway, and on the southwest by the Township of Randolph. Denville was formed in 1913 when it separated from the larger Township of Rockaway. The area originally belonged to the Lenni Lanapi Indians, and became a center for iron mining during the 18th and 19th centuries. In recent years, however, with the virtual demise of the mining industry, the area turned to other industries and, with the opening of Interstate 80, has become part of the urban sprawl affecting Morris County. The township has an area of 12.6 square miles, and according to the 1980 census, the population was 14,280 persons. The 2000 census showed a population of 15,824. (Reference 35) Several major roads bisect the township in an east-west direction. These are US Route 46, State Route 10, and Interstate Route 80. Roads going north-south include Franklin Road, Diamond Spring Road, and State Route 53. The township is also served by bus transportation which provides express service to the City of New York, and by Conrail. Although the township is primarily residential, it does have large sections devoted to commerce and industry. Most of the original homes in Denville were constructed on the hillsides which the Rockaway River valley; however, recent development has extended into the valley floor, encroaching upon the floodplain. As this development has continued and more of the floodplain is encroached upon, the damage caused by season flooding has also increased. In addition to this development within the township, urban sprawl has engulfed most of the Rockaway River valley. Recent residential tract developments

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upstream of Denville have increased the demands upon the river as it flows through the township. The Rockaway River, which flows easy and north through the township, has a drainage area slightly greater than 100 square miles at the downstream corporate limits of Denville. Beaver Brook flows south and forms a portion of the western corporate limits, is a tributary to the Rockaway River, and has a drainage area of 22.6 miles. Den Brook is also a tributary to the Rockaway River. It flows north and has a drainage area of 8.61 square miles. The Tributary to the Rockaway River, which flows south in the township, has a drainage area of 1.84 square miles at its confluence with the Rockaway River. Denville lies within the New Jersey Highlands of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. The Highlands comprise rocks predominantly of the Precambrian era. The region is characterized by northeast trending ridges which are separated by long, broad valleys. The ridges are comprised of hard, crystalline, resistant Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, while the valleys are underlain by easily eroded shale and limestone. Except for the stream valleys, most of the bedrock in the Denville area is overlain with soils of the Rockaway-Hibernia-urban land association. There are deep, moderately steep sand loams which were formed from young glacial fill. The stream valleys in Denville are covered with soils of the Riverhead-Pompton association. These soils, which resulted from glacial outwash, are deep, moderately drained and sloped gravelly sandy loams which overlie sand and gravel. The central section of the township, along the Rockaway River, is highly developed; therefore, a considerable amount of land area is paved. Vegetative cover is characteristic of this type of land use and is composed of some lawned and naturally wooded areas consisting of native deciduous and coniferous trees (maple, oak and pine). Town of Dover The Town of Dover is located in central Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is approximately 20 miles west of Newark and 30 miles west of New York City and is considered to be part of the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area. The town is bordered by the Township of Rockaway to the north and east, the Township of Randolph and the Borough of Victory Gardens to the south, and the Township of Mine Hill and the Borough of Wharton to the west. The total land area of Dover is 2.3 square miles. The 1979 population was 15,485, and increase of 6.9 percent. The 2000 population was 18,188. (Reference 35) The town is a well-developed commercial and residential community. Numerous streets cross streams in the floodplains within the community; the floodplains abound with commercial, industrial, and residential developments.

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The topography of the town ranges from an elevation of approximately 970 feet at the southwestern part of the town to an elevation of 550 feet along the bank of the Rockaway River at the eastern corporate limits. Vegetation consists of lawns, trees and shrubbery, typical of residential and commercial areas. Township of East Hanover The township of East Hanover is located along the eastern boundary of Morris County in northern New Jersey. East Hanover is bordered by the Townships of Parsippany-Troy Hills and Montville to the north, the Township of Livingston and Roseland to the east, the Borough of Florham Park to the south, and the Township of Hanover to the west. East Hanover has an area of 8.2 square miles and population of 9,926 in 1990. The population in 2000 was 11,393 (Reference 35) The Passaic River flows in a northerly direction along the eastern boundary of the Township of East Hanover. It drains an area of 349 square miles just downstream of the confluence of the Rockaway River. The Rockaway River, which has a drainage area of 203.9 square miles, flows northeast at the northern border of the Township of East Hanover. The Rockaway River discharges into the Passaic River. The Whippany River flows northeast through the western part of the township and discharges into the Rockaway River. The Whippany River has a drainage area of 69.0 square miles. Black Brook, which has a drainage area of 10.4 square miles, flows northeast through East Hanover. It discharges into the Rockaway River. Pinch Brook has a drainage area of 2.2 square miles. It flows north through the township and discharges into Black Brook. Borough of Florham Park The Borough of Florham Park is located in Morris County, in northern New Jersey. The community is bordered by the Townships of Hanover and East Hanover to the north, the Township of Livingston to the east, the Boroughs of Chatham and Madison to the south, and the Township of Morris to the west. Florham Park is a residential community with housing subdivisions radiating from a centrally located shopping district. The borough has a large engineering research center, several light industries and two colleges. Commercial, industrial, residential and recreational land uses are located in the floodplains throughout the community. Industrial and commercial areas and some residences are located along the Passaic River.

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Park land and some residential structures located along the Spring Garden Brook, while industrial development is located in the Black Brook-Hassock swamp area. Land along Pinch Brook is zoned for both residential and industrial uses with a section presently used as a golf course. The community has a total area of 7.4 square miles, with a population of 8,857. (Reference 35) The borough is located in the Passaic River basin. The floodplains of the river are underlain by shallow much over silt with poor permeability and a high water table. The floodplains of Spring Garden Brook, Hassock Brook, Black Brook and Pinch Brook consist primarily of deep, poorly drained soil consisting of silt and clay. This soil is called Parsippany Silt Loam Sand and is low in permeability. Township of Hanover The Township of Hanover is located in eastern Morris County, New Jersey. It is bordered on the north by the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills, on the easy by the Township of East Hanover, on the south by the Borough of Florham Park and the Township of Morris, and on the west by the Borough of Morris Plains. It had a population of 13,326 in 1998 (Reference 35) The Township of Hanover is a residential-industrial community with most of its industrial facilities located in the vicinity of State Route 10, a major east-west road that traverses the township. The municipality has two population centers, Whippany and Cedar Knolls. Morris County’s largest airport facility, Morristown Airport, is situated in the southern part of the township adjacent to a large swamp area. The Township of Hanover covers approximately 11 square miles. Its topography is characterized by gently rolling terrain with average elevations of about 300 feet above mean sea level. However, the Township has low swampy land within its boundaries containing dense stands of water tolerant vegetation. Hydrologically, the majority of the area in the township lies within the Whippany River basin, a major tributary of the Passaic River. Many areas within the Whippany River basin are highly urbanized while others are lightly developed. Industrial zones characterize much of the areas contiguous to the Whippany River and its major tributaries. The floodplain of the Whippany River consists primarily of deep, well drained fine sandy loam, and fine loamy sand soils with have permeability properties. Flooding and ponding of surface water is not characteristic of these soils. Locally, some soils in the Whippany River floodplain are wet, silty alluvium and wet, loamy alluvium. These soils have moderate and low permeabilities, respectively, causing frequent

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flooding and ponding. The water table for these soils is located approximately at the ground surface. Township of Harding Harding is in southeastern Morris County, in north-central New Jersey. It is approximately 35 miles west of New York City. It encompasses approximately 21 square miles and is bordered by the Township of Morris on the north, the Township of Chatham on the east, the Township of Long Hill on the south, and the Townships of Bernards and Mendham and the Borough of Bernardsville on the west. The 1998 population of Harding, as estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau, was 3,857. The 2007 population was estimated at 3,319 (Reference 35). Residential development occupies over 60 percent of existing land in Harding. Approximately 39 percent of the land, or 5,100 acres, is devoted to park, conservation, and public land. Only 1 percent of the land is used for commercial purposes. The commercial section is located along U.S. Route 202. The Passaic River floodplain consists primarily of park and farmland. The floodplains of Great Brook, Tributary to Great Brook, and Primrose Brook are mostly residential and farmland. The floodplain of Silver Brook is occupied by farmland. Natural drainage in Harding is divided into two major systems, both of which ultimately enter the Passaic River through the Great Swamp. The area generally north of Glen Alpin Road and Village Road drains into the Great and Loantaka Brooks via several tributaries, while the area to the south is drained by Primrose Brook and Great Brook. The Passaic River, which forms the western boundary of Harding, drains all of Harding Township either directly or indirectly through its tributaries. It flows in a southeasterly direction. Great Brook and several of its tributaries form a major tributary of the Passaic River. Great Brook flows from the vicinity of James Street in the north through the Great Swamp to the Passaic River below Pleasant Plains Road in the south. Tributary of Great Brook, which originates in the New Vernon area near Village Road, flows easterly and crosses Blue Mill Road twice before turning and flowing in a northerly direction. Silver Brook originates north of Interstate Route 287 in the vicinity of Sand Spring Road and the northern corporate limits. It flows southerly for approximately 500 feet south of Interstate Route 287, then flows easterly.

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Primrose Brook, which originates in the Jockey Hollow Park area, drains the western part of Harding. The brook flows southerly before its confluence with Great Brook north of Pleasant Plains Road. The Great Swamp area fulfills an important role in the natural drainage of Harding. The natural features of the swamp, a series of wooded ridges interspersed with wide areas of wooded swamp and open marshland, allow the stormwater from Great Brook, Loantaka Brook, and Primrose Brook to spread out over the area. The Great Swamp tends to serve as a natural storage area for floodwaters and reduces peak stream flow discharges by approximately 25 percent. Morris County is made up of two predominant geographic features, the Appalachian Highlands in the western part of the county and the Piedmont Plateau in the eastern part of the county. Harding is divided by the two physical systems generally along the alignment of U.S. Route 202. On the northwestern side of U.S. Route 202, the Appalachian foothills dominate the topography. The gently sloping hillsides of the Piedmont Plateau compete with the foothills for predominance in the east. The Piedmont Plateau is characterized by rolling plains and swampy areas underlain by less resistant rock formations. Topography within Harding ranges from a high of approximately 700 feet on Sugar Loaf Hill in Morristown National Historical Park to a low of approximately 225 feet in the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge Area. The bulk of the land in Harding is rolling to moderately sloping, with intermittent steep slopes in the Mount Kemble Lake, Pleasantville Road, and Silver Lake areas. The central portion of the Township is comprised of gently rolling farms and woodland, ranging from 250 feet to 450 feet in elevation. Soil quality varies greatly throughout Harding from generally deep, well drained, course soils in the area north of U.S. Route 202, to the very poorly drained, fine textured silt and clay soils in the Great Swamp. Thus, the quality of soils in Harding is not amenable to major suburban subdivision development except in the area occupied by the Morristown National Historical Park. These upland soils are well drained and workable in the area bordering U.S. Route 202. East of this highway, soil quality is spotty and variable. Township of Jefferson The Township of Jefferson is located in the northwestern portion of Morris County in north-central New Jersey, approximately 45 miles west of New York City. Jefferson is bordered by the Township of Sparta to the west, the Borough of Hopatcong to the southwest, the Township of Hardyston to the northwest, the Township of Rockaway to the east, the Township of West Milford to the north, and the Borough of Mount Arlington and the Township of Roxbury to the south.

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As with most of northern Morris County, Jefferson traces its roots back to the Lenni Lenape Indians and to the iron industry. The township prospered when this industry flourished during the early 1800s. As the industry began to falter, the area also experienced a general decline. Recent times have brought a rejuvenation to the township as a residential community whose people work in New York City, northeast New Jersey, and Picatinny Arsenal. Jefferson is almost a parallelogram in shape, almost 12 miles long and having an average width of 4 miles. Within this parallelogram lies part of Lake Hopatcong and approximately 42 square miles of rugged land. The township has a sparse population of only 15,166 (1977 estimate) which yields a density of 360 persons per square mile. The estimated 2007 population was 27,137 (Reference 35). Development has been generally clustered in isolated areas including the Lake Hopatcong shoreline, Milton, New Russia, and Holland. Between 1960 and 1970, the population of Jefferson more than doubled. The 1970s showed a slower but continued growth. Most of the transportation avenues within the township follow the old mining roads. The main north-south routes are Berkshire Valley Road and State Route 15. Interstate 80 and the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad lie along the south end of the township, while State Route 23 is located along the northern border. Drainage is either to the Rockaway River basin, the Oak Ridge Reservoir and the Pequannock River basin, or the Lake Hopatcong-Musconetcong River basin. After collecting numerous tributaries in the northern portion of the township, the Rockaway River flows between two mountain ranges on the eastern edge of Jefferson. These mountains, which rise 600 feet above the river, form a valley which rarely exceeds a mile in width and contains most of the arable land in the township. There is some concentrated development surrounding the streams and lakes which form the northern tributaries of the river, however for the most part, the Rockaway River valley is lightly populated. Most of the concentrated recreational development is in the Lake Hopatcong and Weldon Brook areas. Waters entering the lake leave via the Musconetcong River and eventually flow to the Delaware River. Only a small area in the northern section of the township drains into Oak Ridge Reservoir and the Pequannock River basin. Jefferson lies within the New Jersey Highlands of the Reading prong of the New England Physiographic Province. The Highlands are comprised of rocks predominately of the Precambrian era. The region is characterized by northeasttrending ridges which are generally separated by long broad valleys. The ridges are composed of hard, crystalline, resistant, Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, while the valleys are underlain by easily eroded shale and limestone. With the exception of the Rockaway River valley, all of Jefferson is covered by soils of the Rockaway-Hibernia-Urban land association or the Rockaway-Rock outcrop association. The Rockaway-Hibernia-Urban land association, which covers the

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eastern portion of the region (except for the Green Pond Mountains), consists of deep, well drained to moderately drained, gently sloping, sandy loams. The RockawayRock outcrop association dominates the western section and the Green Pond Mountains and consists of deep, well drained, strongly sloped, and extremely, stony sandy loams. The Rockaway River valley is covered with soils of the RiverheadPompton association. These soils, which resulted from glacial outwash, are deep, moderately drained and sloped, gravelly, sandy loams that overlie sand and gravel. Borough of Lincoln Park The Borough of Lincoln Park is located in the extreme southeastern portion of Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is bordered by the Township of Pequannock to the north, the Township of Wayne to the east, the Borough of Fairfield to the south, the Township of Montville to the west, and the Borough of Kinnelon to the northwest. The population of Lincoln Park was approximately 9,685 in 1975, an increase of 647 from 1970. The 2000 population was 10,703 (Reference 35). The total land area contained within the corporate limits of Lincoln Park is 6.7 square miles, of which 22.9 percent is residential. Commercial and industrial development is relatively limited, totaling only 2.3 percent and excluding 3.6 percent of the Light Industrial Airport. The remaining 71 percent of the total area is vacant. Lincoln Park lies within the area known as the central basin of the Triassic Lowlands Province, which is characterized by relatively flat topography. The Passaic River forms the southern boundary of the borough and flows from west to east. The Pompton River forms the eastern boundary, flowing from north to south. Lincoln Park is bisected by Beaver Dam Brook, which flows west to east to its confluence with the Pompton River. East Ditch and West Ditch flow approximately parallel to each other and both discharge into Beaver Dam Brook. The present borough was formed from the Township of Pequannock by referendum on April 25, 1922. On February 26, 1925, it was reincorporated, and the boundary has remained the same since then (Reference 38). Township of Long Hill The Township of Long Hill is located in the southern tip of Morris County in central New Jersey, in the Passaic River Basin. The Township has an area of 12.1 square miles and a population of 7,826 in 1990. The estimated 2007 population was 8,652 (Reference 35). It is bordered on the north by the Township of Harding; on the east by the Townships of Chatham and Berkeley Heights; on the south by the Township of Warren; and on the west by the Township of Bernards. The Township of Long Hill is essentially a suburban community located in central New Jersey. The township was first settled in the early 1700s by Scottish Presbyterians and once was noted for its cigar factories, grist mills, and silk industry.

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The township was incorporated in 1866. The Great Swamp, part of which is located in the northern part of the township, has always been a natural barrier to the development of this area. The township is a residential community possessing a rural character with new subdivisions adjacent to 250-year-old homes. Two major east-west roads connect the township's five population centers of Stirling, Millington, Gillette, Meyersville, and Homestead Park. Part of the township is within the boundaries of the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Because the area has few industries, many residents commute to work in the New York metropolitan area via nearby stations of the Gladstone Branch of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad. Although the Township of Long Hill has experienced considerable development during the last decade, several factors have limited this past growth and will continue to influence growth in the future. These factors include poor drainage in areas adjacent to the Great Swamp, the tendency of the Passaic River to flood low-lying lands near its confluence with the Dead River, and the steep, rocky outcrops of Long Hill. The principal positive influences on development in the municipality continue to be the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad and industrial facilities along Valley Road. In addition, the completion of Interstate Route 78, a major east-west road that borders the township on the south, will increase access to the Township of Long Hill. Geographically, the Township of Long Hill is located in the Passaic River Basin and is about 5-1/2 miles long and 2-1/2 miles wide. The Passaic River forms the western and southern boundary of the township and low-lying land bordering the river is largely composed of swamps and meadows. A ridge divides the township into a northern and a southern section, the major portion of the northern sections forming a part of the Great Swamp. About 11 miles upstream of the Village of Millington, the Great Swamp acts as a collecting basin for the headwater tributaries of the Passaic River. At Millington, the river flows through a narrow gorge traversing a high trap rock ridge. From Millington downstream to the Township of Chatham, the river flows through a narrow corridor between two ridges that limits the width of the watershed in this section to an average of about 3 miles. In the southern part of the township, several minor tributaries join the Passaic River, and nearly 1,500 acres of the township in this section lie in the floodplain of the Passaic River. Borough of Madison The Borough of Madison is located in southeastern Morris County, New Jersey. The community is bordered by the Borough of Florham Park to the north and east, the Borough of Chatham and the Township of Chatham to the south, and the Township of Morris to the west.

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The population of the borough was 15,122 in 1960 and 16,710 in 1970 (11-percent increase between 1960 and 1970), while the 1973 population was estimated to be 16,930 and the 1980 population was projected to be 17,400. The township had a total area of 4.2 square miles, with a population of 15,850 in 1990. Currently the township has an area of 4.2 square miles, with a population of 16,046 (Reference 35). The Borough of Madison, known as Bottle Hill in the Colonial days after the Bottle Hill Tavern, was once the location of millionaire estates. The borough changed its name to Madison in 1834 and was incorporated in 1899. The community was nicknamed "Rose City" for it was once the center of an extensive greenhouse industry. The borough is located within the Black Brook and Spring Garden Brook drainage basins and both streams are tributaries of the Passaic River. The floodplains of both Black Brook and Spring Garden Brook consist of primarily fine, sandy loam glacial materials with low to moderate permeability. The water table depth fluctuates seasonally between two and six feet below the ground surface. Borough of Mendham The Borough of Mendham is a residential community of approximately 6 square miles situated in southern Morris County, New Jersey. It is located approximately 10 miles from the Town of Morristown, New Jersey and approximately 40 miles from New York City, New York. The Borough of Mendham is bordered by the Township of Mendham to the north, east, and west and by the Borough of Bernardsville to the south. According to the U. S. Bureau of the Census, the population of the borough was 4,889 in 1980, a 31.4 percent increase from 1970. In 1985, the New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry estimated the population to be 5,178. The estimated population in 2007 was 5,073. (Reference 35) The Borough of Mendham lies within the New Jersey Highlands, a portion of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. This area is characterized by a series of flat-topped ridges separated by narrow deep valleys. Elevations range from 960 feet in the north to 340 feet in the southeast part of the borough. Township of Mendham The Township of Mendham is a residential community of approximately 18 square miles situated in southern Morris County, New Jersey. It is located 8 miles from the City of Morristown, New Jersey, 40 miles from New York City and 70 miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The township is bordered by the Township of Randolph on the north, the Township of Chester on the west, the Boroughs of Peapack and

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Gladstone, Bernardsville and Mendham on the south and the Townships of Harding and Morris on the east. 1976 estimates showed Mendham had a population of 4,020, yielding a population density of 233 persons per square mile. This estimate represents a population increase of 8 percent since the 1970 census. The estimated 2007 population is 5,539 (Reference 35). Today the Township of Mendham is primarily a residential community with a few small dairies. Mendham lies within the New Jersey Highlands, an extension of the Reading Prong of the New England physiographic province. This area consists of a series of flattopped ridges separated by narrow deep valleys that were carved from the Schooley Peneplain during Tertiary time. Elevations range from 1,020 feet in the north to 300 feet in the southwest part of the township. The area is underlain predominantly by hard, crystalline, resistant and metamorphosed gneisses of the Precambrian Age and comprises the major parent material of the local soils overlaying the bedrock. The remaining bedrock is composed of Martinsburg shale and Triassic border conglomerate such as Mount Paul to the southeast. Glaciers advanced into New Jersey three times during the Pleistocene Epoch. Only the oldest entered the Township of Mendham, depositing small discontinuous patches of till on the hillsides. The youngest stage deposited minor amounts of outwash (sand and gravel sediment) by meltwater streams in the stream valleys as the ice stagnated approximately 7 miles north of the community, Along the streams, recent alluvial silt covers the glacio-fluviatile deposits to form the flood plains. The predominant soil group is comprised mainly of stony, medium textured, poorly to moderately drained silty clay loam on the hillsides and moderate to excessively drained silt loam in the valleys, Vegetative cover consists mainly of wooded areas interspersed with cultivated areas of corn and soybean. In upland areas, broadleaf species of white, black and red oak, as well as white ash, tulip, sweet birch, yellow birch, red maple, beech and hickory are found along with conifer species. The principal stream in Mendham is the North Branch Raritan River. It originates in the hills of the Borough of Mendham and flows south, joining the South Branch Raritan River near Raritan, New Jersey, to form the Raritan River. Burnett Brook, a tributary to the North Branch Raritan River, originates in the Township of Randolph and flows south to form a portion of the western corporate limits of the township. Indian Brook is a diversion of Burnett Brook. It separates from the main channel approximately 500 feet downstream of Old Mill Road in the Township of Chester. It then flows south and parallel to Burnett Brook before rejoining the main channel approximately 1,500 feet upstream of Burnett Brook's confluence with the North Branch Raritan River in the Township of Mendham. Dawsons Brook drains an area of

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the Township of Randolph and flows southwest to its junction with Burnett Brook near the Mendham-Randolph corporate limits. The Passaic River originates in the hills of the Township of Mendham, flows southeast through Mendham and then flows generally east until it empties into Newark Bay. The Whippany River rises in the hills of the Township of Mendham, and then flows east until it joins with the Passaic River near Pine Brook, New Jersey. Harmony Brook originates in Clyde Potts Reservoir which drains a northern portion of the Township of Mendham and a small area in the Township of Randolph. Harmony Brook flows in a generally southeast direction from the reservoir and then east to its confluence with the Whippany River. There is some residential development along the North Branch Raritan River. Along the Whippany River and Harmony Brook the flood plain is comprised of private residences and some municipal buildings near Brookside. Township of Mine Hill The Township of Mine Hill occupies approximately 3.0 square miles of Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is located approximately 40 miles west of New York City and approximately 70 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mine Hill is bordered by the Borough of Wharton to the north, the Townships of Dover to the east, Roxbury to the west, and Randolph to the south, The 1990 population was 3,333, yielding a population density of 1,111 persons per square mile. Data from the 1990 census indicates that for the period 1980-1990, the population increased by approximately 0.2 percent. The township is predominantly a residential community with several scattered commercial establishments. The Township of Mine Hill lies within the New Jersey Highlands, which are a portion of the Reading prong of the New England physiographic province. The Highlands consist of a series of flat-topped ridges separated by narrow, deep valleys. The hills are composed of hard, crystalline, resistant Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, and the valleys are underlain by easily eroded shale and limestone. Elevations in the community range from 620 feet near St. Mary's Cemetery in the eastern part of the township to 960 feet east of Randall Road in the northeastern part of the township. The Township of Mine Hill is well drained. In the southern and eastern portions the drainage pattern is characterized by fairly well defined valleys of rivers and brooks. The northern part of the township has an irregular drainage pattern. Vegetation consists mainly of wooded areas. These areas consist of broadleaf species of white and pin oak, as well as willow, river birch, boxelder, sugar maple, red maple, beech, and basswood, along with various conifer species. The floodplains of the Lamington River, branch of the Lamington River, Granny Brook, and portions of Jackson Brook are generally undeveloped. The westerly side

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of Jackson Brook, between Route 46 and the southerly municipal boundary are lightly developed, mostly residential structures. Township of Montville The Township of Montville is located in southern Morris County in northeastern New Jersey. The township is situated approximately 14 miles west of Newark and 22 miles west of New York City. The community is considered part of the New York-New Jersey metropolitan area. Montville is bordered by the Town of Boonton, the Township of Boonton and the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills to the west; the Township of East Hanover to the south; the Boroughs of Fairfield and Lincoln Park to the east; and the Borough of Kinnelon to the north. In 1980, the population of Montville was 14,290. In 2007, the population of Montville was 21,150 (Reference 35). The township has a total area of 19 square miles. Montville is a residential and commercial community. Existing development consists primarily of single-family residences in the flood plains of Hatfield Creek, Crooked Brook, Crooked Brook Tributary, and Beaver Brook. A small number of residential and commercial buildings are situated within the flood plains of the Passaic and Rockaway Rivers. A large portion of the community is undeveloped. Vegetation in the community consists of lawns, trees, and shrubbery typical of residential and commercial areas. The soil in the township is generally sandy to stony loam with a low clay content. Most of the soils in Montville are well drained, with the exception of the low-lying swampy area at the confluence of the Passaic and Rockaway Rivers. The northern and central portions of the township are steep, with slopes ranging from 2 percent to 10 percent. The southern portions of the community near the Passaic and Rockaway Rivers are flatter, with slopes ranging from 1 percent to 5 percent. The Passaic and Rockaway Rivers flow through Montville in broad, channels with varying banks. The tributaries within the study area are ephemeral and flow in narrow channels. Borough of Morris Plains Morris Plains is in east-central Morris County, in northeastern New Jersey. It is approximately 25 miles west of the City of New York. The borough encompasses an area of approximately 2.61 square miles, and is bordered by the Township of Morris on the south, the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills on the west and north, and the Township of Hanover on the east. In 1998, Morris Plains had a population of 5,298 The floodplains of Watnong Brook, Jaquis Brook, and Malapardis Brook are occupied by residential, industrial, and laboratory buildings; parkland; and undeveloped land.

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The topography of Morris Plains is characterized by hilly terrain in the northwestern portion while relatively level areas lie to the south of Grannis Avenue and east of Littleton Road. The highest elevations occur east and west of Grove Avenue, north of its intersection with Mountain Way. The elevations range from 830 feet to 330 feet in the northeastern area. Another substantial hill is situated east of CONRAIL and adjacent to State Highway 53 near the Easter Seal center. This latter ridge extends as far south as Grannis Avenue along the eastern side of State Highway 53. Recent soil removal operations, however, have cut this ridge back to a point just south of the Warner-Lambert property. A study prepared by Rutgers University has grouped the soils in Morris Plains into the following four categories: The higher areas of Morris Plains to the northwest are identified as gneissic bedrock. Soil cover varies greatly in this area where bedrock is 2 feet deep in some locations, and as much as 20 feet deep in the same vicinity. The soil itself is silty clay and silty sand, usually containing considerable rock fragments. Area surface-drainage characteristics are generally good because of the high elevations and sloping ground surfaces. Subsurface drainage, however, is impeded by the shallow rock formations. The southwestern portion of Morris Plains, from Grannis Avenue south, is identified as glacial outwash. It was deposited by glacial melt waters during the Wisconsin Glaciation. Soils are silty sand with some gravel and they have resultant good internal drainage. Surface drainage may present problems at some locations due to the flatness of the land. The remainder of the borough, generally to the east of CONRAIL, is classified as glacial terminal moraine. The moraine is composed of materials deposited at the outer edge of the ice sheet during the Wisconsin Glaciation. Soil and drainage characteristics are similar to those found in the glacial outwash with the addition of some appreciable amounts of clay. Finally, along Watnong Brook, which is a major drainage course, the soils are classified as recent alluvium deposits consisting of sand and gravel carried by the stream. Morris Plains is divided into three separate surface-drainage areas. The most prominent and best defined drainage course is Watnong Brook, a tributary of Whippany River, which drains the western portion of Morris Plains. The brook enters the borough at the northwestern corporate limits near U.S. Highway 10, and flows southerly to the vicinity of Grannis Avenue. From there, Watnong Brook flows generally southwesterly through Jaquis Pond to the southern corporate limits at Hanover Avenue. The drainage area at the southern corporate limits is 6.4 square miles.

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Jaquis Brook is a tributary of Watnong Brook and originates in Parsippany-Troy Hills. It flows generally southeasterly into Morris Plains, in the vicinity of Grannis Avenue. The brook then joins Watnong Brook at Jaquis Pond above Central Avenue. The drainage area of Jaquis Brook at this latter point is 2.1 square miles. The northeastern section of Morris Plains is served by a second, somewhat welldefined drainage course, that of Malapardis Brook. The brook has one branch originating west of Littleton Road and one branch, in the Community Park south of Malapardis Road; both extend northeast into Parsippany-Troy Hills, just north of Malapardis Road. The remainder of the borough to the southeast, from Old Wood Road south, does not have such a well-defined drainage system. Surface drainage flows generally southerly and westerly into Hanover. The vegetation is urban in nature, primarily comprised of grass and shrubs. Township of Morris The Township of Morris is located in southeastern Morris County, in northern New Jersey, approximately 50 miles north of the City of Trenton. The township covers an area of 15.7 square miles and had an estimated 1976 population of 20,210. The estimated 2007 population was 21,103 (Reference 35). Morris completely surrounds the Town of Morristown, which was once part of the township and now forms its inner boundary. Morris is bordered by the Town of Parsippany-Troy Hills, the Borough of Morris Plains, and the Township of Hanover to the north; the Boroughs of Florham Park and Madison to the east; the Township of Harding to the south; and the Townships of Mendham and Randolph to the west. The history of Morris parallels that of Morristown and dates hack to colonial times. Morris was one of the first three townships formed in Morris County in 1740, 2 years after its creation. The presence of iron ore in the area led to its early settlement and subsequent development. The strategic importance of iron ore was one of the reasons the Morristown area was selected by George Washington as his headquarters during the winters of 1777 to 1779. The township is closely tied to the greater New York metropolitan area and became an integral part of the region during the 19th century. Business managers employed in the City of New York settled in the Morris area because it was one of the most accessible areas. The Morris area has been the fastest growing part of the metropolitan region in the last 10 years. Population has almost doubled. The Township of Morris itself has experienced comparable growth. The township has managed to retain some of its rural characteristics over the years, but basically it is a residential area with some light industry and offices. The Township of Morris is located at the crossroads of U.S. Highway 202, State Highway 24, and Interstate Highways 80, 78, and 287. Major improvements and realignments have been proposed for State Highway 24. Conrail provides commuter

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rail service. Land use in Morris is directly related to its topography and soil conditions. Most of the eastern areas have been subject to urban development of relatively high intensity. The major exceptions are the areas around James Street and Interstate Highway 287, where adverse soil conditions have hindered such development. The western, hilly parts of the township contain low-intensity residential or institutional development. Most of the vacant land in Morris is located here. In 1971, almost 1 out of every 4 acres of land in Morris was vacant. However, more than one-half of this vacant land is constrained, or committed for development. The constraints are: Slopes, which are either too steep for development, or create economic hardship for certain uses Noise and pollution from Interstate Highway 287 and the new State Highway 24, which will restrict at least residential development within a parallel buffer area The proposed county reservoir in the Washington Valley, which will occupy a substantial part of the vacant land in the western portion of the township Areas sparsely developed, for which a change of use may have to be considered in the future, are the large private landholdings for schools and golf courses. Flood plain development in the Township of Morris is minimal. Morris is located within two major watersheds: the Whippany River watershed and the Upper Passaic River watershed. The approximate dividing line for the two watersheds east to west is Conrail, Madison Avenue and South Street in Morristown, and midway between Mt. Kemble Avenue and Western Avenue paralleling the two roads. Drainage within the Passaic River watershed in the township flows from Mt. Kemble Avenue easterly toward James Street and then southerly. It also flows from Madison Avenue southwesterly toward Loantaka Pond. Loantaka Brook and Great Brook are the major streams that drain this watershed as they flow into Great Swamp. Ultimately they empty into another major branch of Passaic River. Drainage within the Whippany River watershed flows generally toward Whippany River and northeasterly toward Speedwell Lake. Within the Township of Morris, there is one minor watershed whose boundary parallels Picatinny Road north to Mendham Road. It then continues north equidistant between Mendham Road and Knox Hill Road where it continues north, midway between Mendham Road and Sussex Avenue along the top of the ridge to the Township of Morris-Morristown corporate limits. All drainage within this subdrainage basin flows toward Morristown

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and the lake and Burnham Park. The western highlands, which are divided in two by Washington Valley, are drained by Whippany River. A reservoir is proposed for this area. Drainage in the section of Morris northeast of Morristown, which lies within the Whippany River watershed, flows generally toward Hanover Avenue and Park Avenue. This entire area is generally flat. Whippany River originates in Mendham and flows generally northwesterly into the township. The river drains the northern and western sections of the township. In the vicinity of Sussex Avenue, the flow changes to an easterly direction as the river begins its travel through the adjacent community of Morristown. Whippany River reenters the Township of Morris at the eastern corporate limits of Morristown near Interstate Highway 287. At this point, the flow changes direction to the north. Whippany River passes into the Township of Hanover at the corporate limits at Interstate Highway 287 and Hanover Avenue. The drainage area at the western corporate limits of Morristown is 24.2 square miles; at the eastern corporate limits it is 26.7 square miles, and at the eastern corporate limits of Morris, 28.2 square miles. Watnong Brook is in the northern part of the Township of Morris and enters from the adjacent community of Morris Plains. It flows southerly as it drains the northern part of the township. The brook is a tributary of Whippany River and joins it south of Lake Road. The drainage area at its confluence with Whippany River is 7.75 square miles. Great Brook originates in Morris near the Spring Brook Golf Course. It flows into Morristown, and then back into Morris, in the vicinity of Interstate Highway 287 in the southern part of the township. The brook flows southerly as it drains the southwestern part of the township and passes into the adjacent Township of Harding. The drainage area at the southern township corporate limits is 2.15 square miles. Loantaka Brook originates in the southern part of Morristown and Morris, and flows southerly. The brook has a drainage area of 3.7 square miles at the southern corporate limits. Soil conditions that provide physical and economic development constraints can generally he found in the lowlands surrounding James Street and in Washington Valley. Lush vegetation is characteristic of Morris, especially in the western sections. In the eastern area, where there is extensive urbanization, the vegetation consists of lawns, bushes, and shade trees typical of subdivided areas. Geologically, Morris is part of the fringe area between the Appalachian Highlands and the Piedmont Plateau. It is located at the eastern edge of the Watchung Mountains. Land elevations through most of the north-central, eastern, and southern

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portions of Morris lie between 300 and 400 feet. The eastern areas of Morris are relatively flat and without extensive slopes. Much of the valley of Whippany River and its tributary streams in the western sector of the township lie within these elevations. Mt. Kemble Avenue marks the boundary between the lower areas of 300- to 400-foot elevations and the beginning of western, higher plateaus. Elevations it the latter region rise from 400 feet to more than 700 feet. In the northwestern portion of the town-ship, the topography increases from 400 feet to more than 1,000 feet. The lowest elevation noted in Morris is the 230-foot elevation measured near Chimney Ridge Drive in the northeast. An analysis performed for the Township of Morris Planning Board indicates that 66 percent of township land contains slopes of less than 10 percent. Land with grades in excess of 20 percent occurs in approximately 17 percent of the township. Most of the steeply sloping lands, in excess of 20 percent, are located in the areas of higher elevations in southwestern and northwestern Morris. Areas of more moderately sloping lands are located in the southern and northeastern portions of the community. However, most of the moderately and steeply sloping lands are in the two western quadrants. The Morris County Soil Conservation Service has identified areas within Morris containing soils with low permeability, and other soils with severe limitations for septic effluent. In the northeastern section of the township, the primary location of these poorly draining soils is in the area from the College of St. Elizabeth north through the Morris County Golf Course and into the Cromwell Hills area. In the southern portion they are found in the Springbrook area, east of James Street, and north of Blackberry Lane and Spring Valley Road. In the southwestern quadrant, most of the low-permeability soils are located in the western one-half of the quadrant, and south of Sussex Avenue. In the northwestern sector, they are contained in the area west of the Morristown corporate limits and north of Sussex Avenue between Lake and Inamere Roads. The flood plain of Whippany River consists primarily of deep, well-drained sandy loam and loamy sand soils; however, some soils in the Whippany River flood plain are wet, silty alluvium and wet, loamy alluvium with low permeability contributing to frequent flooding and ponding. Town of Morristown The Town of Morristown is located in the northeastern portion of Morris County in north-central New Jersey, approximately 30 miles west of Manhattan Island, New York. It is completely surrounded by the Township of Morris. The total land area contained within the corporate limits of Morristown is approximately 2.86 square

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miles. The population of Morristown was estimated at 17,600 in 1975. The town is the county seat of Morris County. Morris County was formed in 1739 when a large tract of land was removed from Hunterdon County. The town, township, and county were named after the first colonial governor, Lewis Morris. The early settlers were attracted to the area by the rich bottom land, wild game, and forests. Forges and ironworks sprang up, owing to accessible deposits of iron and abundant water power. For these reasons, Morristown prospered as a trading center. At the time of the Revolutionary War, General George Washington chose Morristown to house his army during the winters of 1777 and 1779 because of its strategic location, the loyalty of its citizens, and its available resources. The town continued to play an important role in early America. In the Old Speedwell Iron Works, Samuel Morse and Alfred Vail developed the first electromagnetic telegraph. Also, the engines for the first trans-Atlantic steamship, the Savannah, were built here, as was the first cast-iron plow. In 1865, Morristown was separately incorporated as a town. Ease of transportation has been the key to growth in the Morristown area. A system of highways, including State Routes 10, 24, and 46, U. S. Route 202, and Interstate 287, provides easy access to areas of employment. Conrail furnishes commuter rail service to the Newark-New York region. Bus service is also available. In 1863, there were only 253 acres of vacant land remaining in Morristown. Most of it was located within firmly established boundaries of land use. Since there is still such a small amount of vacant land, most changes in land use will have to occur through redevelopment. This may be accomplished by the government through largescale urban renewal projects or by a private developer who rebuilds individual projects. It is possible, though not likely, that some of the large public holdings may be made available for future development. In any case, the only vacant land 20 years hence will undoubtedly be that land too difficult to develop economically. The improved transportation provided by the Morris Turnpike, the Morris Canal, and the Morris and Essex Railroad was an important factor in changing the character of the Morristown area. Easier access made this resort area a year-round community. Morristown is the major retail center for Morris County and should continue in this role as surrounding areas increase in population. Development in the town is mainly residential, consisting of low-density (one-family), medium-density (two-family), and high-density (apartments) districts. The business district is concentrated in the South Street area. The flood plain of the Whippany River is occupied by areas of industry, and there is increasing development along it. Flood plain development along Great Brook is minimal, but increasing.

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The Whippany River, one of the major tributaries of the Passaic River, originates in the Township of Mendham and flows northwest into the Township of Morris. It then flows east through the Washington Valley section of the western portion of Morris. It is joined by Watnong Brook, flowing from Morris Plains into the northern section of Morristown. It then flows through Speedwell Lake and continues south through Pocahontas Lake to the eastern corporate limits near Interstate 287. The river drains the northern and northeastern sections of the town. The remaining area is drained by Great Brook in lower Morristown. The drainage area of the Whippany River at the eastern corporate limits is approximately 26.7 square miles. Great Brook is in the southwestern portion of Morristown and drains that area as it flows southeast to the southern corporate limits near Interstate 287. The drainage area of Great Brook at the southern corporate limits is 1.2 square miles. There are two distinct physical features within Morristown and Morris County. These are the Appalachian Highlands and the Piedmont Plateau. A major fault line extending southwest from Stony Point, New York, through Morristown acts as a division between the two. The highlands are northwest of this fault. Morristown, which is at the foot of the Watchung Mountains, has a maximum elevation of 404 feet. From the "Green" southward, the land begins sloping into the plateau. The soils in the Whippany River flood plain consist primarily of deep, well-drained, sandy loams and loamy sands. In Morristown, some soils in the Whippany River flood plain are wet, silty alluvium and wet, loamy alluvium, with slow permeability that causes frequency flooding and ponding. The vegetation is largely urban, consisting of grass and ornamental shrubbery. Township of Mount Olive The Township of Mount Olive is a residential community with a land area of approximately 31.8 square miles, located in northern Morris County, New Jersey. Mount Olive is located approximately 45 miles north of Trenton, 40 miles west of New York and 60 miles northeast of Philadelphia. Mount Olive is bordered by the Township of Byram and the Borough of Stanhope to the north, the Borough of Netcong to the northeast, the Township of Roxbury to the east, the Township of Chester to the southeast, the Township of Washington to the south, the Township of Hacksettstown to the southwest and the Township of Allmuchy to the west. The 1980 population of the township was 18,748 an 84-percent increase over the previous 10year period (Reference 35). Mount Olive has a population density of 590 persons per square mile. The area where Mount Olive is located was first populated by the Lenni-Lenape Indians. The Dutch came to the area in the mid-seventeenth century. As the population grew in the mid-seventeenth century, farming became a major occupation,

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followed by tanneries, creameries, grist and saw mills and distilleries which used the available water power. Drought put the previously mentioned industries out of business. Around 1740, usable metals were discovered in the area and iron and force plants were soon opened. On March 22, 1871, the Township of Mount Olive separated from the Township of Roxbury. By the late nineteenth century, the area was dependant on tourism. By the end of World War II, tourism was no longer a profitable industry and Mount Olive became a suburban New Jersey community (References 39 and 40). The Musconetcong River, one of the principal waterways in Mount Olive, has a drainage area of 158 square miles. The river originates in Lake Hopatcong and loops to the northwest after flowing through Lake Musconetcong. The Musconetcong River flows southwest forming the border of Warren County and then into the Delaware River at Riegelsville, New Jersey. Wills Brook originates near the eastern corporate limits of Mount Olive and flows northwest and then north before its confluence with the Musconetcong River. The South Branch Raritan River, another major waterway in the Township of Mount Olive, has a drainage area of 276 square miles. The South Branch Raritan River originates in Budd Lake, flows southwest and then loops to the east and joins the North Branch Raritan River near Raritan, New Jersey to form the mainstream of the Raritan River. Budd Lake Tributary flows into Budd Lake. Drakes Brook flows southwest to its confluence with South Branch Raritan River. Conlon Pond Brook flows south to its confluence with Drakes Pond. The central region of the Delaware River Basin includes four geological provinces. The Musconetcong River and its tributaries are within the Reading Prong of the New England Upland Subprovince, which is called the Highlands in New Jersey. This is an area of moderate relief and is characterized by parallel, irregular ridges and intervening valleys running northeast. The ridges rise 500 to 1,000 feet above the valleys and are composed of gneiss and related hard crystalline rocks. The valleys are underlain by marine sediments, principally carbonate rocks and shale. Most of the New England Province has been glaciated. In the northeastern part of the Highlands, the ridges are covered by extensive deposits of glacial till, and the valleys contain thicker deposits composed mostly of outwash, which cover the bedrock in most places. Borough of Netcong The Borough of Netcong is a residential community of approximately 0.9 square miles. It is located in northwestern Morris County, New Jersey approximately 50 miles north of Trenton, New Jersey, 40 miles west of New York City and 70 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Netcong is bordered by the Borough of

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Stanhope to the north, the Township of Roxbury to the southeast and the Township of Mt. Olive to the south and west. The 1970 population was 2,858 yielding a population density of 3,176 people per square mile (Reference 35). According to the 1970 census of population, this represents a population increase of 68 percent over the previous ten year period. Netcong, formerly South Stanhope, was incorporated as a borough on October 22, 1894. Parts of the Townships of Mt. Olive and Roxbury were added to South Stanhope to form the borough. Netcong received its name from the Musconetcong River, which to the Delaware Indians meant "grass creek" or "swamp stream". The proximity of the old Morris and Sussex Turnpike, which passed through the region shortly after 1801, and the coming of the Morris Canal in 1831, made the site a favorable one for development (Reference 41). Netcong derived much of its business from the Delaware-Lackawanna and Western Railroad which had its last stop in Morris County in the heart of the borough. The principal waterway in Netcong is the Musconetcong River, with a drainage area of 158 square miles. Originating in Lake Hopatcong, the Musconetcong turns to the northwest after flowing through Lake Musconetcong and then flows southwest, forming the border of Warren County, until reaching its confluence with the Delaware River in Riegelsville. The central region of the Delaware River basin includes four geological provinces. The Musconetcong and its tributaries are within the Reading Prong of the New England Upland subprovince, which is called the Highlands in New Jersey. This is an area of moderate relief characterized by parallel, irregular ridges and intervening valleys trending northeast. The ridges, which rise 500 to 1,000 feet above the valleys, are composed of gneiss and related hard crystalline rocks. The valleys are underlaid by marine sediments - principally carbonate rocks and shale. Most of the New England province has been glaciated. In the northeastern part of the Highlands, the ridges are blanketed by extensive deposits of glacial till, and the valleys contain thicker deposits, largely outwash, which completely mask the bedrock in most places. Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills The Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills is located in eastern Morris County. The township is 12 miles northeast of Morristown and approximately 25 miles west of New York City. Parsippany-Troy Hills is bordered by the Town of Boonton and Borough of Mountain Lakes to the north; the Borough of Morris Plains, and the Townships of Morris, East Hanover, and Hanover to the south; the Township of Denville to the west; and the Township of Montville to the east. The Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills traces its origin back to the iron ore industry (Reference 42). The first iron ore forge opened in 1713 and enabled the community to flourish. After the Civil War, the township was used mainly as a summer retreat.

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During World War II, the housing shortage forced the summer cottages to become year-round residences. The post-war period has been one of continued growth. This is due partially to the easy access provided by U. S. Route 46 and Interstate Route 80 into the township (Reference 43). Access by several major roads into Parsippany-Troy Hills has increased the growth of the community. U. S. Route 46, Interstate Routes 80 and 280, and State Route 10 provide east-west transportation; while, Interstate Route 287, State Route 53, and U.S. Route 202 provide north-south transportation. In addition, there are numerous county roads, and the township is also serviced by Conrail. The total land area of Parsippany-Troy Hills is 16,192 acres (25.3 square miles). A 1974 survey indicated that one-half of the 4,000 acres still vacant was zoned residential. If this land were developed, there could be an increase in population of approximately 16,000 persons. There has already been tremendous growth in the township as seen in the population growth of 15,300 in 1950 to 50,101 in 1977. The 1980 population of the township was 49,868. In addition to rapid residential development, the community has experienced a substantial amount of commercial development. Major shopping centers have been built along U. S. Route 46, and industrial plants have been located along Interstate Route 287 and in the Fox Hill area. In Parsippany-Troy Hills, a large portion of the developed land is paved and has inadequate storm water drainage. The typical vegetative cover in the residential areas is that of lawns with patches of natural woods. The State and Wildlife Preserves, Inc., owns over 1,800 acres of Troy Meadows land. This entire area is classified as a flood hazard location and is a planned wildlife refuge and conservation center. There are several streams which cross the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills. The Rockaway River provides a natural border with the Township of Montville, and it has a drainage area of 203.9 square miles at its confluence with the Passaic River. The Whippany River has a drainage area of 69.04 square miles at its confluence with the Passaic River. Troy Brook, which drains a large portion of the township, has a drainage area of 15.03 square miles at its confluence with the Whippany River. West Brook is located at the western edge of Troy Meadows and has a drainage area of 1.53 square miles at its confluence with Troy Brook. Eastmans Brook, located in the south-central portion of the township, has a drainage area of 2.87 miles at its confluence with Troy Brook. Watnong Brook, located in the southwest portion of the township, flows south and has a drainage area of 2.93 square miles at the corporate limits with the Borough of Morris Plains. Parsippany-Troy Hills is located near the western edge of one of the four physiographic provinces which divide New Jersey. Each province has its own distinct geologic history and characteristics. Most of the township lies within the Piedmont

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Province. This area in New Jersey is underlain by rock formations deposited during the Triassic era; therefore, the region is known as the Triassic Lowlands. The characteristic rock formations of this region are sandstone and red shale. A small section of the township lies in the adjacent New Jersey Highlands of the New England Physiographic Province. This region is characterized by northeast trending ridges which are separated by long, broad valleys. These ridges are composed of hard, crystalline Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks. The valleys are underlain by easily eroded shale and limestone. Three soil associations cover the Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills. The soils from west to east are the Parker-Edneyville association, the Netcong-Rockaway association, and the Riverhead-urban land-Pompton association. The first two associations contain stony, sandy loams which overlie granitic gneiss on the upland. The Riverhead association contains poorly drained, gravelly sandy loams which overlie outwash sand and gravel. Township of Pequannock The Township of Pequannock is located in the northeastern portion of Morris County in northeastern New Jersey. It is bordered by the Borough of Lincoln Park to the south, the Borough of Kinnelon to the west, the Borough of Riverdale to the north, the Borough of Pompton Lakes to the northeast, and the Township of Wayne to the east. The total land area contained within the corporate limits of the Township of Pequannock is 6.9 square miles. The population of the township was estimated at approximately 15,000 in 1976, an increase of 650 from 1970. The population of the township was estimated at approximately 16,700 in 2007 (Reference 35). Most of the Township of Pequannock lies within the area known as the central basin of the Triassic Lowlands Province, which has a relatively flat topography. The Pequannock and Pompton Rivers flow north to south along the eastern boundary of the township. East Ditch also flows from north to south through the township of Pequannock. West Ditch flows southeast approximately 3,000 feet through the extreme southwestern corner of the township. Township of Randolph The Township of Randolph is located in northeastern Morris County, New Jersey. It is bordered by the Town of Dover and the Townships of Mine Hill and Rockaway to the north; the Townships of Denville and Morris to the east; the Township of Mendham to the south; and the Townships of Chester and Roxbury to the west. The 1980 population was 17,828, an increase of 34 percent over the 1970 population of 13,296. The Township of Randolph covers roughly 21 square miles. Its topography is characterized by hilly to slightly mountainous terrain with an average elevation of

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900 feet above. Lowlands are generally swampy and contain dense stands of watertolerant vegetation. The combination of a scenic rural environment with a proximity to educational, commercial, and transportation facilities, provides Randolph with a potential for future development. The township's only detraction from future development is the hilly topography and the significant amount of swamp land. Average annual precipitation in the region is approximately 43 inches with most of the heavy rains during the summer and fall months. Mean average temperatures range from a high of 76 degrees Fahrenheit (°F) in July to a low of 32°F in January. Borough of Riverdale The Borough of Riverdale is located in the extreme northeastern portion of Morris County in northeastern New Jersey. It is bordered by the Township of Pequannock to the south, the Borough of Pompton Lakes to the east, the Borough of Bloomingdale to the north, the Borough of Butler to the west, and the Borough of Kinnelon to the southwest. The population of Riverdale was estimated at 2,750 in 1976, an increase of only 21 from 1970 and 154 from 1960. The present borough was formed from the Township of Pequannock by referendum on April 17, 1923 (Reference 38). Riverdale has a total land area of 2.3 square miles, of which 14 percent is residential, mostly single-family dwellings. Vacant areas, situated primarily in the steep western portion of the borough, amount to over 56 percent of the total area. The Pequannock River flows along the northern and eastern boundaries of Riverdale. Borough of Rockaway The Borough of Rockaway is located in central Morris County in northern New Jersey, approximately 35 miles west of New York City. The borough is bordered by the Township of Rockaway to the north, west, and south; and the Township of Denville to the east. Rockaway has a land area of 2.1 square miles. The 1970 population of the community was 6,383, and the 1980 population was 6,852 (an increase of 7.3 percent). In 2007, the population was estimated at 6,313 (Reference 35). The average population density of the area is 3,263 persons per square mile. The Borough of Rockaway was incorporated in 1894, seceding from the Township of Rockaway. The name of the borough was derived from a Lenni Lenape Indian word meaning "the place of sands." The original Township of Rockaway was formed in 1844 and included what is now the Borough of Rockaway and the Townships of Denville and Rockaway. Denville seceded from the original Township of Rockaway in 1913. The development of the area was partially due to the presence of iron mines and furnaces throughout the region.

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Development within the community consists of residential areas, suburban communities and some commercial development clustered along the major routes of transportation. Major routes of transportation traversing Rockaway include U. S. Route 46, Interstate Route 80 and Main Street. The borough is drained by the Rockaway River, which flows through the center of the town. A considerable amount of the land area of Rockaway is paved. Vegetative cover consists of lawns and small wooded areas of oak and maple trees. Rockaway is located within the New Jersey Highlands of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. The Highlands comprise rocks predominantly of the Precambrian era. The region is characterized by ridges, extending from the northeast to southwest, separated by long broad valleys. The ridges are composed of hard, crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks, while the valleys are underlain by shale and limestone. Except for the Rockaway River valley, which accounts for approximately one-third of the area of the borough, the bedrock is covered with soils of the Rockaway-HiberniaUrban association. This soil group consists of deep, well drained to moderately drained, gently sloping sandy loams. The river valley is covered with soils of the Riverhead-Pompton association. These soils, which resulted from glacial outwash, are deep, moderately drained and sloped, gravelly sandy loams which overlay sand and gravel. Township of Rockaway The Township of Rockaway is located in the northern portion of Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is bordered by the Township of West Milford to the north, the Borough of Kinnelon and the Townships of Boonton and Denville to the east, the Town of Dover and the Boroughs of Rockaway and Wharton to the south, and the Township of Jefferson to the west. Incorporated in 1844, Rockaway is a sprawling, generally undeveloped area covering roughly 45 square miles. It is characterized by hilly to mountainous terrain. The major population centers of the township are the communities of Green Pond, Lake Telemark, White Meadow Lake, and Birchwood Village. The southern portion of Rockaway was the site of numerous iron ore mines which provided the area's initial catalyst for development. The community grew as services to the mining operations were required. Additional economic development occurred= during World War II with the expansion of Picatinny Arsenal, a major Army research and development center. Since World War II, an influx of industry and research laboratories has propelled a rise in population. The 1982 population of the township was approximately 19,647. The Rockaway River drainage basin has the potential for increased residential development. Although future development within Rockaway is expected to be small,

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patterns of accelerated growth in other parts of the basin are expected to continue. Flooding on the Rockaway River may be aggravated by these developmental factors. The Rockaway River flows east along the southern border of the township. It has a drainage area of 60.3 square miles at the downstream corporate limits. The Pequannock River flows south along the northeastern boundary of Rockaway. It has a drainage area of 58.34 square miles at the downstream corporate limits. Beaver Brook, which has a drainage area of 22.60 square miles, flows southwest through the southern portion of the township. It discharges into the Rockaway River. Green Pond Brook, also a tributary of the Rockaway River, flows southwest through the southern portion of Rockaway. It has a drainage area of 15.09 square miles. Hibernia Brook is a tributary of Green Pond Brook. It flows south through the township and has a drainage area of 7.98 square miles. White Meadow Brook, which has a drainage area of 3.66 square miles, flows southeast through the township and discharges into Beaver Brook. Tributary to Pequannock River has a drainage area of 3.66 square miles. It flows southeast through Rockaway to its confluence with the Pequannock River. Tanglewood Brook has a drainage area of 1.15 square miles at the downstream corporate limits. It flows south through the southern portion of the township to its confluence with the Rockaway River. Rockaway is situated within the New Jersey Highlands of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. The Highlands comprise rocks predominantly of the Precambrian era. The region is characterized by ridges extending from northeast to southwest and separated by long broad valleys. The ridges are composed of hard, crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks, while the valleys are underlain by shale and limestone. Township of Roxbury The Township of Roxbury occupies approximately 21.5 square miles of Morris County in northern New Jersey. It is located approximately 40 miles west of New York City and approximately 70 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Roxbury is bordered by the Borough of Stanhope, the Township of Byram, and the Boroughs of Hopatcong and Mount Arlington on the north, the Townships of Jefferson and Rockaway on the northeast, the Borough of Wharton and the Townships of Mine Hill and Randolph on the east, the Township of Chester on the south, and the Township of Mount Olive and the Borough of Netcong on the west. The 1980 population was 18,878, yielding a population density of 819 persons per square mile. Data from the 1980 census indicates that for the period 1970-1980, the

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population increased by approximately 19.8 percent. The township is predominantly a residential community with several scattered commercial establishments. The Township of Roxbury lies within the New Jersey Highlands, which are a portion of the Reading prong of the New England physiographic province. The Highlands consist of a series of flat-topped ridges separated by narrow, deep valleys. The hills are composed of hard, crystalline, resistant Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks, and the valleys are under-lain by easily eroded shale and limestone. Elevations in the community range from 680 feet near the Valley Airport in the southern part of the township to 1,220 feet at a point just south of Mountain Road in the northwestern part of the township. The Township of Roxbury is well drained. In the southern and eastern portions the drainage pattern is characterized by fairly well defined valleys of major rivers and brooks. The northern part of the township has an irregular drainage pattern. Vegetation consists mainly of wooded areas. These areas consist of broad-leaf species of white and pin oak, as well as willow, river birch, box-elder, sugar maple, red maple, beech, and basswood, along with various conifer species. The principal streams in Roxbury are the Lamington River, the Musconetcong River, the Rockaway River, Drakes Brook, and Succasunna Brook. The Lamington River originates in the eastern section of the Township of Roxbury and flows south for approximately 3.4 miles until it enters the Township of Chester. The Musconetcong River originates at Lake Hopatcong and flows southwest along the Roxbury/Byram/Hopatcong corporate limits, passing through Lake Musconetcong. The Rockaway River originates in the Town-ship of Jefferson and flows southwest until it enters the Township of Roxbury. It then turns south and flows for about 1,000 feet through Roxbury until it re-enters Jefferson. Lake Hopatcong is located in the northern portion of the Township of Roxbury. Approximately 3.0 miles of shore-front are within the corporate limits of Roxbury. The flood plains of the Lamington River, the Musconetcong River and the lower portions of Drakes Brook are generally undeveloped. The flood plains of the upper portions of Drakes Brook, Succasunna Brook, and the shorefront of Lake Hopatcong are heavily developed with mostly residential structures. Township of Washington The Township of Washington is a residential community with a land area of approximately 41.5 square miles, located in southwest Morris County, New Jersey. Washington is located approximately 40 miles north of Trenton, 40 miles west of New York and 60 miles northeast of Philadelphia. Washington is bordered by the Township of Mount Olive and the Town of Hackettstown to the north, the Township of Chester to the east, the Townships of Tewksbury and Lebanon to the south and the Township of Mansfield to the west. The 1980 population of the township was 11,402,

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a 64-percent increase over the previous 10-year period. The 2007 population was estimated at 18,469 (Reference 35). Washington has a population density of 253 persons per square mile. The Township of Washington and the surrounding area grew as a result of the opening of the Washington Turnpike in 1810 and the completion of railway service to the township in 1876. The economy of the area was based on agriculture, grain mills and iron and granite mines. Presently, Washington is a residential and farming community (Reference 44). One of the principal waterways in Washington is the Musconetcong River, with a drainage area of 158 square miles. Originating in Lake Hopatcong, the Musconetcong River loops to the northwest after flowing through Lake Musconetcong. The river flows southwest, forming the border of Warren County, and into the Delaware River in Riegelsville, New Jersey. Stephensburg Brook flows northwest to its confluence with the Musconetcong River. Tributary B flows northwest to its confluence with the Musconetcong River. The South Branch Raritan River is the other major waterway in Washington. The South Branch Raritan River originates in Budd Lake, flows southwest and then loops to the east to join the North Branch Raritan River near Raritan, New Jersey, forming the main stream of the Raritan River. Electric Brook flows southeast to its confluence with the South Branch Raritan River. Stony Brook flows southeast and then south to its confluence with the South Branch Raritan River. Drakes Brook flows southwest to its confluence with the South Branch Raritan River. Tanners Brook flows northeast to its confluence with the Lamington River. The central region of the Delaware River Basin includes four geological provinces. The Musconetcong River and the upstream portions of the South Branch Raritan River are within the Reading Prong of the New England Upland Subprovince, which is called the Highlands in New Jersey. This is an area of moderate relief and is characterized by parallel, irregular ridges and intervening valleys running northeast. The ridges rise 500 to 1,000 feet above the valleys and are composed of gneiss and related hard crystalline rocks. The valleys are underlain by marine sediments, principally carbonate rocks and shale. Most of the New England Province has been glaciated. In the northeastern part of the Highlands, the ridges are covered by extensive deposits of glacial till, and the valleys contain thicker deposits composed mostly of outwash, which cover the bedrock in most places. Borough of Wharton The Borough of Wharton is located in west-central Morris County, approximately 40 miles west of New York City. The borough is bordered by the Township of

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Rockaway to the north and east, the Township of Roxbury to the west, the Town of Dover to the east, and the Township of Mine Hill to the south. The borough occupies 2.2 square miles. According to the U. S. Bureau of the Census, the population of Wharton was 5,485 in 1980, with a density of 2,493 persons per square mile. The 2007 population was 6,127 (Reference 35). Most of eastern Wharton is developed; therefore, a considerable portion of this land is paved. Most of the vegetative cover of this area is composed of lawns. Other portions of the borough are naturally wooded with maple, oak, and pine trees. There has been no other major residential tract development in Wharton. Several major industries occupy Wharton, most of which are located close to the Rockaway River. There is only sparse residential development adjacent to the Rockaway River and its northern tributary, Green Pond Brook. Most of the adjacent land is railroad right-of-way and industrial property. Wharton lies within the New Jersey Highlands of the Reading Prong of the New England Physiographic Province. This region is characterized by northeast trending ridges, separated by long, broad valleys. Drainage within the borough is basically overland, flowing to the Rockaway River. There is also some drainage via Green Pond Brook. 2.3 Principal Flood Problems Town of Boonton Increased flooding along the Rockaway River may be attributed to increased urbanization, which produces larger runoff and results in greater flood damage. Greater flood damage is also due to the low permeability of certain soils, interacting with a high degree of development, and a lack of fully adequate storm sewers in the town. Some areas are subject to frequent flooding and ponding of surface water, especially during localized thunderstorms and hurricanes in the summer and fall. Such conditions exist between Oak and Green Streets in the northern portion of the community, and in the Sheep Hill section. In the southern portion of the town, where slopes are flat, periodic flooding is encountered between Boonton High School and at the rear of the Kanouse Street properties. Lands bordering on the Rockaway River from Greenback Road to the Montville corporate limits along Vreeland Avenue, are also vulnerable to flooding. Discharge records along the Rockaway River at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage (No. 01380500), above Boonton Reservoir, in the Town of Boonton indicate a maximum recorded discharge of 5,430 cubic feet per second (cfs) occurred on January 25, 1979. This flood had a recurrence interval of approximately 40 years. On

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June 2, 1952, there was a recorded discharge of 4,360 cfs. The most recent flooding event in Boonton occurred on May 12, 1981 with a discharge of 2,040 cfs. Township of Boonton Flooding in the Rockaway River basin may be aggravated by additional development. Increased development within the flood plain of Beaver Brook may also cause flooding problems in that area. Because soils in the community have high infiltration rates, development would have a significant impact on the infiltration rates and drainage characteristics of the area. This would result in increased flood peaks and costlier flood damage. An increase in flooding in the Beaver Creek watershed has been noticed by the residents. Flooding in the community has occurred as a result of heavy rainfall, usually associated with local thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall. Less intense rainfall, falling on snow covered or frozen soils, has produced less severe flooding. The most recent severe flood along the Rockaway River (as recorded at USGS gage No. 01380500 in the Town of Boonton along the Rockaway River) occurred on May 12, 1981 with a discharge of 2,040 cubic feet per second (cfs). The flood of record along the Rockaway River occurred on January 25, 1979, with a discharge of 5,430 cfs. The flood of January 1979 has a recurrence interval of approximately 40 years. Borough of Butler Low-lying areas of Butler are subject to periodic flooding caused by the overflow of the Pequannock River and Stonehouse Brook. The greatest flood of record occurred in 1903. The second largest flood occurred on March 2, 1902, resulting from snowmelt and heavy rain. Other severe floods occurred in the area in August 1955, October 1955, and May 1968. The storm of August 1955 caused some flooding along the Passaic River from Two Bridges to Paterson, but most of the flooding occurred on tributaries, including the Pequannock River (Reference 45). The storm of May 1968 caused widespread damage over the Passaic River basin, but flooding was most severe on the Pompton, Ramapo, Wanaque, and Pequannock Rivers. Severe damage also resulted from flooding caused by Stonehouse Brook in May 1968. The floods of 1971 and 1976 are the most recent floods to cause severe damage to the borough (Reference 46). The dam on Terrace Lake was damaged in June 1976. Borough of Chatham Flooding in the Passaic River Basin occurs as a consequence of locally heavy rains, generally associated with thunderstorms and hurricanes, which occur in the summer and autumn months.

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Township of Chatham Flooding occurs in the Green Village/Britten Road area from Loantaka Brook. The height of floodwater diminishes below Green Village Road as water spreads out into a section of the Great Swamp between Britten and Meyersville Roads. Natural streamflow is augmented by the effluence form the Woodland Road Treatment Plant in the Township of Morris. The Black Brook floods regularly in the vicinity of several houses as it crosses Green Village Road. The Great Swamp and the Millington Gorge affect the flow of the Passaic River. The Great Swamp acts as a storage area, while the Millington Gorge restricts the passage of flood levels. The highest flood ever recorded at the Millington Gorge gage occurred in 1905. The flow was measured at 2,000 cubic feet per second (cfs). Without the Great Swamp, the estimated discharge would have been 6,500 cfs. In more recent years, the two greatest discharges measured at the Chatham gage were 3,880 cfs in August 1973 and 2,540 cfs during Hurricane Doria in August 1971. Township of Chester Past history of flooding for the region indicates that flooding of various origins may be experienced in any season of the year since New Jersey lies within the major storm tracks of North America. Flooding during winter months is less frequent, but spring flooding compounded by ice and snow melt has occurred. The most extensive floods have occurred mostly in late summer and early fall, and are usually associated with tropical disturbances moving north along the Atlantic coast. The Township of Chester lies in two watershed systems. The western and northernmost parts of the township are part of the Lamington River watershed while the remaining part of Chester lies in the upper North Branch Raritan River watershed. Both watersheds are major contributors to the North Branch Raritan River Basin. There are no USGS gaging stations located within the limits of any of the detailed study streams. However, it is probable that major floods, which have been recorded at nearby gaging stations, influenced by similar climatic and physiographic factors would reflect flooding along the studied streams. USGS gaging station No. 013985000 is located on the North Branch Raritan River near Far Hills, New Jersey. Based on data collected from this gage since 1919, probable dates of ten major flooding events for the upper North Branch Raritan River Basin are: July 13, 1919, March 7, 1922, September 30, 1934, September 21, 1938, March 15, 1940, August 10, 1942, October 14, 1955, April 2, 1970, August 28, 1971 and May 31, 1972. For the Far Hills gage, the July 23, 1919 flood was the flood of record with a flow of 7,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) which has been assigned a 100-year recurrence interval (Reference 47).

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On August 27-28, 1971, New Jersey was hit by Hurricane Doria rendering the state a natural disaster area. An extensive high water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Doria; these data are on file with the Division of Water Resources. Township of Denville The history of flooding on the streams within the Township of Denville indicates that flooding usually occurs during the summer and fall months, and it is almost always associated with thunderstorms and hurricanes. Flooding along the Rockaway River occurs virtually throughout the entire length of the stream within the township. The greatest amount of damage occurs in the general area along Riverside Drive and the river-front properties in the vicinity of the Diamond Spring Road bridge. Damage from flooding along Beaver Brook is relatively light as a result of flood waters being limited to the largely undeveloped low-lying areas along the stream. Damages resulting from flooding associated with Den Brook occur along the shorelines of both Lake Esting and Indian Lake. Further downstream, additional damages are incurred in the Peck Meadow Brook and Woodland Avenue areas. The combined effect of flooding on Den Brook and the Rockaway River have inundated both U. S. Route 46 and Denville Center on a number of occasions. Flood damages on the Tributary to Rockaway River are relatively light, and no major problems are apparent. The flood of record in Denville occurred in 1903 when a discharge of 7,300 cubic feet per second (cfs) was recorded. Other major floods occurred in 1936, 1968, 1971, 1973, 1977, and 1979. In March 1936, 3.3 inches of rain fell steadily for 22 hours, flooding local residences of Denville Center. Many local roads and highways were also inundated. Problems in the basin were compounded by the failure of the Longwood Dam. At the time, this flood was labeled the worst since 1903. In May 1968, the Rockaway River flooded approximately 150 dwellings. Poor drainage caused sewers to back up and resulted in the evacuation of over 50 people. During the storm of August 1971, 6 to 9 inches of rain fell as a result of Hurricane Doria. Homes along Riverside Drive were severely damaged, and some residents were evacuated by boat. The business district was closed to traffic when flood waters inundated the area to a depth of 3 feet. Both U. S. Route 46 and State Route 53 were closed to traffic. Residents of Lenapi Island were evacuated when it appeared that the dam forming the lake might collapse. Also, 35 patients were evacuated from the New Jersey Home for the Blind. The maximum discharge recorded for that day at the U. S.

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Geological Survey (USGS) gage above Boonton Reservoir was 3,110 cfs. Based on the adopted hydrology, the discharge produced by this storm had a return period of less than 50 years. Although records indicate that flooding did result from the August 1973 storm, details are not readily available. The heavy rains of the March 1977 storm caused severe flooding in the township. Once again, sanitary sewers backed up and roadways were closed to traffic. The record-breaking rains of the January 1379 storm flooded commercial and residential areas, inundated roadways, and caused many people to leave their homes. Damages were estimated between $5 and $8 million, and 18 municipalities were declared "disaster areas". Town of Dover The Rockaway River flows through the heart of Dover in a broad channel with varying banks. Tributaries within the study area are intermittent and flow in narrow channels. Flooding is a result of heavy rainfall produced by hurricanes moving up the coast, large frontal storms from the west and south, and local thunderstorms. Large magnitude floods have not occurred in this portion of the Rockaway River basin. Township of East Hanover Flooding in the Passaic River and Whippany River basins occurs as a consequence of heavy rain in the summer and fall months and is usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes. Due to the low permeability of certain soils within the Township, some areas are subject to frequent flooding and ponding of surface water during these periods of heavy rain. Less intense rains, falling on snow covered or frozen ground in the winter months, produce lesser floods. Discharge records from the Passaic River gaging station at nearby Chatham, New Jersey, indicate a maximum recorded discharge of approximately 3,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) on January 9, 1905. Discharges of 2,540 cfs and 1,650 cfs were recorded for the floods of August 28, 1971 and September 18, 1971, respectively. Maximum discharges of 2,280 cfs, 2,000 cfs, and 1,130 cfs were recorded on the Whippany River at the gaging station in Morristown, New Jersey, for the floods of August 1971, August 1928, and September 1971, respectively. Borough of Florham Park Flooding in the Passaic River system occurs as a result of heavy rainfall, usually associated with local thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall. Due to the low permeability of the soils within the borough, the area is subject to frequent

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flooding and ponding of surface water during periods of heavy rain. Less intense rain, falling on snow or frozen ground in the winter has historically produced less severe flooding. Discharge records from the Passaic River gaging station at Chatham, New Jersey, immediately south of Florham Park, indicated a recorded discharge of approximately 3,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) on January 9, 1905. Discharges of 2,540 cfs and 1,650 cfs were recorded for the floods of August 28, 1971, and September 18, 1971, respectively. Township of Hanover Flooding in the Whippany River Basin has historically occurred as a consequence of heavy rain, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes, during the summer and fall months. Less intense rains, falling on snow or frozen ground in the winter months, have produced lesser floods. Due to the low permeability of certain soils within the Township, some areas are subject to frequent flooding and ponding of surface water during periods of heavy rain. Discharge records from the Whippany River gaging station at nearby Morristown, New Jersey, indicate a maximum recorded discharge of about 2,280 cubic feet per second (cfs) in August 1971. Discharges of 2,000 cfs and 1,130 cfs were recorded at the station during the floods of August 1928 and September 1971. Township of Harding Harding is basically a rural residential and farming area with little commercial and industrial development. The area east of U.S. Route 202 has very poor natural drainage and low permeability because of the shallow shale soils. These soils result in rapid runoff, which adds to the flooding problems. Local flooding has been experienced not only in the lowlands of Harding, which are along the Passaic River, but also along portions of Great Brook, Silver Brook, Tributary of Great Brook, Primrose Brook, and various locations in the Green Village area. These inundations are a consequence of heavy rains, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall months. Less intense rains, falling on frozen ground, have produced lesser floods during the winter months. The maximum flood for the Passaic River occurred on January 9, 1905. This event had an estimated recurrence interval of 65 years, and a discharge of 2000 cubic feet per second (cfs) recorded at the Millington gage. On August 29, 1971, Tropical Storm Doria created considerable overbank flooding along the streams in Harding and caused traffic interruptions and property damage.

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This event for the Passaic River had an estimated recurrence interval of 25 years, and a discharge of 200 cfs recorded at the Millington gage. Problem flooding locations identified at various times include the following: the areas along Great Brook crossing Pleasant Plains Road, Long Hill Road, Meyersville Road, Woodland Road, Village Road, and Van Beuren Road have been inundated frequently; Tributary of Great Brook with crossing at Featherbed Lane has flooded in this location during severe rainstorms. Parts of Blue Mill Road adjacent to this brook channel have also flooded; Silver Brook has overflowed its overbank areas for its entire length within the corporate limits; The Baileys Mill Road crossing of Primrose Brook at Youngs Road and Primrose Trail have been constant problems during severe storms. Some of these flooding problems can be traced to inadequate sizing of culverts and faster runoff caused by increasing development. According to the Morris County Daily Record, some residential properties adjacent to the Great Swamp have been flooded repeatedly by the high water stages within the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge area. Township of Jefferson Due in part to the low intensity of development in the river valleys, Jefferson has not historically experienced a significant amount of flood damage. The flooding of populated areas is usually confined to lakefront homes and is considered relatively minor. One notable exception occurs along the Rockaway River at Berkshire Valley Road just downstream of State Route 15. With scattered exceptions, all other flooding in the township is limited to the undeveloped low-lying areas adjacent to the streams. Borough of Lincoln Park Low-lying areas of Lincoln Park are subject to periodic flooding caused by the overflow of the Passaic River, the Pompton River, Beaver Dam Brook, East Ditch, and West Ditch. The greatest flood of record occurred in 1903. The second greatest flood of record occurred on March 2, 1902, as a result of snowmelt and heavy rain. Among the more recent floods, those of August 1955, October 1955, and May 1968 were the largest. The storm of August 1955 caused some flooding along the tributaries to the Passaic River, including the Pompton River. The storm of October 1955 caused the most severe flooding on the Pompton, Ramapo, and Wanaque Rivers. The other streams in the Passaic River basin were not as severely affected. The storm of May 1968 caused widespread damage over the basin. Floods also occurred in the area in 1970, 1971, and 1976. Township of Long Hill The Township of Long Hill has experienced severe flooding as a consequence of heavy rains, usually associated with localized thunderstorms or hurricanes, during the

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summer and autumn months. Less intense rains, falling on snow-covered or frozen ground in winter, have produced lesser floods. The low-lying swamps adjacent to the Passaic River, its tributaries, and a system of manmade and natural defiles connecting with the Passaic River increase flood potential in the Stirling area of the township. The most severe flood during 135 years of record occurred on October 10, 1903. Extensive losses were sustained as a result of this flood. Numerous storms of major proportion since then have caused considerable damage. Of the more recent floods, the flood of May 1968 and the flood caused by tropical storm Doria in August 1971 have caused the most damage to property. Borough of Madison Flooding along Spring Garden Brook and Black Brook has historically occurred as a result of heavy rainfall, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall. Less intense rain, falling on snow-covered or frozen ground in the winter has produced lesser floods. Water levels along Spring Garden Brook and Black Brook within the borough are not affected by the water levels of the Passaic River; therefore, flooding of the Passaic River due to stream water runoff from other parts of the river basin will not cause flooding in the borough. Few flooding problems in Madison originate outside the borough. Drainage problems within Madison can be attributed to inadequate culverts and storm sewers. Storm sewer inlets along steeply sloping streets are inefficient and storm water runoff has a tendency to flow over these outlets. Therefore, flooding may occur in the flatter areas of the borough due to the additional runoff. Areas subject to this kind of flooding are located near Kings Road and near the tributary to Black Brook in the Anthony DriveNorth Street area. Borough of Mendham Because New Jersey lies within the major North American storm tracks, flooding from various sources may be experienced in any season of the year. Flooding during the winter is infrequent. Spring flooding compounded by ice and snowmelt has occurred. The most extensive floods have occurred in late summer 'and early fall and usually are associated with tropical disturbances moving north along the Atlantic Coast. The recorded history of flooding at the North Branch Raritan River gaging station 01388500 near Far Hills, New Jersey, began in 1919. Large floods have occurred on July 23, 1919; September 30, 1934; September 21, 1938; March 15, 1940; August 10, 1942; October 14, 1955; April 2, 1970; August 28, 1971; January 24, 1979; and July 7, 1984. The July 23, 1919 flood had an estimated discharge of 7,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) and a recurrence interval of 100-years (Reference 48). On August 27-28, 1971, Hurricane Doria rendered the state a natural disaster area. High water marks

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were surveyed jointly by the State and the USGS following the flooding caused by Hurricane Doria. Township of Mendham Past history of flooding in Mendham indicates that flooding of various origins may be experienced in any season of the year since New Jersey lies within the major storm tracks of North America. Flooding during winter months is less frequent, but spring flooding compounded by ice and snow melt has occurred. The more extensive floods have occurred mostly in late summer and early fall and are usually associated with tropical disturbances moving north along the Atlantic coast. The recorded gage history of flooding in the North Branch Raritan River basin near Far Hills, New Jersey, began in 1919. Since then, several major floods have occurred and minor floods have been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges at USGS gaging station No. 01398500 near Far Hills, the dates of ten major flooding events within the basin are as follows: July 23, 1919, March 7, 1922, September 30, 1934, September 21, 1938, March 15, 1940, August 10, 1942, October 14, 1955, April 2, 1970, August 28, 1971 and May 31, 1972. The July 23, 1919 flood was the flood of record at the Far Hills gage with a flow of 7,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) and an assigned recurrence interval of 100-years. On August 27-28, 1971, New Jersey was hit by Hurricane Doria rendering the state a natural disaster area. During this storm the Far Hills gage recorded a discharge of 6,390 cfs and USGS gage No. 01381500 located on the Whippany River at Morristown, New Jersey, recorded a discharge of 2,280 cfs (Reference 49). These flows were assigned recurrence intervals of 55- and 50-years, respectively. An extensive high water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Doria; these data are on file with the Division of Water Resources. The Township of Mendham has reported flooding at three locations within the community. Flooding occurs on the North Branch Raritan River just upstream from the confluence of Burnett Brook. This area has a wide flood plain and the flooding along this section has been attributed to a topographic constriction near the Roxiticus Road crossing. Several homes along Roxiticus Road are affected by this situation. Flooding on the Whippany River occurs in the area of Tingley Road and has been attributed to the wide flat flood plain in this area. The flooding that occurs on the tributary to Harmony Brook in the area of West Main Street and Cherry Lane appears to be attributed to the structures at Cherry Lane. The municipal offices for the township and several other structures are affected by this situation.

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Township of Mine Hill The history of flooding in Mine Hill indicates that flooding of various origins may be experienced in any season of the year since New Jersey lies along the major storm tracks of North America. Flooding during the winter is less frequent, but spring flooding, compounded by snow melt, has occurred. The more extensive floods have occurred primarily in the late summer and early fall, and are usually associated with tropical disturbances moving north along the Atlantic coast. On August 27-28, 1971, New Jersey was hit by Hurricane Doria, rendering the state a natural disaster area. An extensive high water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) following Doria; these data are on file with the Division of Water Resources. The streams and rivers in Mine Hill contribute to the South Branch Raritan River basin, the Musconetcong River basin, or the Lamington River basin. There are no USGS recording or crest-stage gaging stations on Drakes Brook, which is part of the South Branch Raritan River system. However, it is probable that major floods which have occurred downstream of Drakes Brook also reflect flooding in the Drakes Brook basin. USGS gaging station No. 01396500 on the South Branch Raritan River near High Bridge, New Jersey, is approximately 16 miles downstream of the mouth of Drakes Brook in Mount Olive. According to this gage, which has continuous records from 1918 to the present, the dates of ten major flooding events are as follows: October 9, 1903; March 15, 1940; July 19, 1945; November 7, 1951; August 19, 1955; October 14, 1955; April 2, 1970; August 28, 1971; December 1, 1974; and January 26, 1979. The January 26, 1979, flood was the flood of record at the High Bridge gage, with a flow of 6,360 cubic feet per second (cfs), which has been assigned a 100-year recurrence interval using a log-Pearson Type III analysis of the gage data (Reference 50). USGS gaging station No. 01398500 is located on the North Branch Raritan River near Far Hills, New Jersey. Based on data collected from this gage, which began recording peak stages and discharges in 1919, probable dates of ten major floods are as follows: July 23, 1919; March 7, 1922; September 30, 1934; September 21, 1938; March 15, 1940; August 10, 1942; October 14, 1955; April 2, 1970; August 28, 1971; and May 31, 1972. For the Far Hills gage the July 23, 1919, flood was the flood of record with a flow of 7,000 cfs, which has been assigned a 100-year recurrence interval (Reference 47). The recorded gage history of flooding in the Musconetcong River basin near Mine Hill began in 1929. Since then, several major floods have occurred and minor floods have been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges at USGS gaging station No. 01455500 at the outlet of Lake Hopatcong near Mine Hill, the dates of five major flooding events are as follows: March 19, 1936; October 20, 1936; August 20, 1955; October 3, 1955; and August 5, 1969. The August 20, 1955, flood

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was the flood of record at the gage at the outlet of Lake Hopatcong, with a flow of 795 cfs, which has been assigned a 50-year recurrence interval using a log-Pearson Type III analysis adjusted to account for flow regulation of the gage data (Reference 51). There are no USGS recording or crest-stage gaging stations located on any of the remaining detailed studied streams, including the Lamington River. However, it is probable that major floods which have been recorded at nearby gaging stations influenced by similar climatic and physiographic factors would reflect flooding along the studied streams. Township of Montville Flooding in the community is a result of heavy rainfall produced by hurricanes moving up the Atlantic coast, large frontal storms from the west and south, and local thunderstorms. Large-magnitude floods along the Passaic River occurred 18 times during the past 200 years. The largest of these floods occurred in 1902, 1903, 1936, and 1945. The 1903 flood, with an estimated peak discharge of 31,700 cubic feet per second (cfs) at Little Falls on the Passaic River, inundated large areas, caused damage to buildings, and disrupted transportation and utility lines. Most of the flooding occurred along the Passaic and Rockaway Rivers. A storm similar to the one which caused the flood of 1903 would result in a significantly larger area of inundation and greater discharges today due to the increased percentage of impervious areas (Reference 53). Flooding occurred in 1968 and 1971, resulting in estimated damage in excess of one million dollars in the township. Both of these storms had estimated recurrence intervals of approximately 10 years (Reference 46). The USGS gage (No. 01380500) on the Rockaway River in the Town of Boonton shows the largest flood in the area occurring on January 25, 1979, with a peak discharge of 5,430 cfs. This flood has a recurrence interval of approximately 40 years. The most recent recorded flood occurred on May 12, 1981, with a peak discharge of 2,040 cfs (Reference 54). Borough of Morris Plains The flooding along Watnong Brook and Jaquis Brook is caused by heavy rain, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall months. Less intense rain, falling on frozen ground, has produced lesser floods during winter months. Area surface-drainage characteristics are generally good due to high elevations and sloping ground surfaces. There are some locations, however, with flat ground where flooding can be a problem.

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The major flood in August 1971 caused by a tropical storm named Doria, created considerable overbank flooding along streams, and caused traffic interruptions and property damage. Problem flooding locations identified at various times include the following: The area along Watnong Brook at the Warner-Lambert Plant, at the Lutheran Church near Mountain Way, and several houses at Jaquis Pond near Hanover Avenue, have all experienced flooding during severe rainstorms. The underpass at the junction of State Highways 202 and 53 has often been inundated and frequently closed to traffic in the 1970s. Johnson Road, between Malapardis Road and the old IBM building, was closed because of a mud slide from the construction site resulting from rains in March 1977. Township of Morris Morris is a developing residential community with several land tracts devoted to light industry. Factors which affect flooding in the community include increased runoff from development, steep land slopes, and low permeability of the soils. Flooding occurs along Whippany River, Watnong Brook, Great Brook, and Loantaka Brook. The discharge records of Whippany River at the U.S. Geological Survey Gaging Station No. 01381500, located approximately 700 feet downstream of the Township of Morris corporate limits, show a maximum recorded discharge of approximately 2280 cubic feet per second (cfs) in August 1971 during Tropical Storm Doria (Reference 54). This storm event has an estimated return period of 50 years. The next highest discharges occurred in August 1928 (2000 cfs, estimated return period of 25 years); and in November 1932 (1820 cfs, estimated return period of 20 years). The most recent flood occurred on March 22, 1977. This event had a discharge of approximately 1480 cfs and an estimated return period of 7 years. The major flood of 1971 created considerable overbank flooding along these streams and caused traffic interruption and property damage. Problem flooding areas identified at various times include the following: The area near Whippany River, at the Washington Valley Road crossing, has had repeated flooding, which caused frequent traffic closures in the 1970s. Whitehead Road, crossing Whippany River, was closed to traffic in 1970 due to flooding.

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Watnong Brook has overflowed its banks at Tracy Court and Bromleigh Way repeatedly during heavy storms due to backwater effects from Whippany River. The area along Loantaka Brook and its tributaries at Johnston Drive; Arborway; Woodland Avenue, including Township Hall; Fanok Road; Hillview Terrace; and Symor Drive have had flooding during severe rainstorms. Several homes on Whitney Avenue adjacent to Great Brook east of Interstate Highway 287 have frequently reported flood problems. Town of Morristown Morristown is a highly developed urban community with buildings and paved areas covering most of the land area; therefore, land available to absorb precipitation is effectively reduced, and the amount of runoff is increased. The hilly topography of the area further increases the rate of runoff and could result in flooding where drainage is inadequate. The major watercourse traversing Morristown is the Whippany River. According to the recollections of persons interviewed, the Whippany River has been responsible for major flooding since the late 1920s. All evidence indicates that the water levels reached during flood periods have not dramatically changed over the years. However, the frequency of these occurrences and the damage caused have both increased. Although the Whippany River is considered the major flooding source in Morristown, there are other areas which have become increasingly prone to flooding and resultant flood damage. In recent years, Great Brook has been subject to flooding owing to development within the flood plains and watershed areas. Throughout northeastern New Jersey in 1971, Tropical Storm Doria caused what is considered to be a new high-water level on the Whippany River. The level exceeded that caused by the historic storm of 1903, which was previously the most extreme ever recorded for the Passaic River and its tributaries. Discharge records for the Whippany River at the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage (No. 01381500) in Morristown, approximately 700 feet downstream of the western corporate limits, indicate a maximum recorded discharge of approximately 2,280 cubic feet per second (cfs). This figure was recorded in August 1971 during Tropical Storm Doria. The storm had an estimated recurrence interval of 50 years. The next highest discharges occurred in August 1928 (2,000 cfs, estimated recurrence interval of 25 years), and November 1932 (1,820 cfs, estimated recurrence interval of 20 years). As early as April 1924, Water Street (now known as Martin Luther King Avenue) was flooded as far west as Spring Street. From all available evidence, it appears that until the 1950s, floods would recur approximately once every 10 years. However,

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with the increase in development throughout the Whippany River valley following World War II, the frequency of flooding increased dramatically. During the 1960s, there were three occasions during which flooding along the Whippany River caused severe damage and loss to property owners. During the 1970s, floods occurred almost annually. Continued development of the upstream flood plains and watershed areas has created a condition which results in flooding or threats of flooding more frequently than has been the case in the past. Township of Mount Olive History of flooding in Mount Olive indicates that flooding may be experienced during any season of the year since New Jersey lies within the major storm tracks of North America. The most extensive flooding occurs in the late summer and fall and is usually associated with tropical storms moving north along the Atlantic coast. Flooding during the winter is infrequent, however, spring flooding associated with snowmelt and ice has occurred. Flooding in the Musconetcong River basin near Hackettstown has been recorded since 1922. Since then several major floods have occurred and minor flooding has been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges taken at USGS gaging station No. 01456000 near Hackettstown, major flooding events occurred on February 12, 1925, July 10, 1935, March 12, 1936, September 22, 1938, December 31, 1948, August 19, 1955, August 28, 1971, June 23, 1972, December 21, 1973, July 14, 1975 and January 26, 1979 (Reference 47). Recorded history of flooding for the South Branch Raritan River began in 1886 at USGS gage No. 1396500 near High Bridge. Based on peak stages and discharges at that gaging station, major flooding events occurred on February 6, 1896, February 1902, February 2, 1922, March 11, 1936, March 15, 1940, March 11, 1952, April 2, 1970, August 28, 1971, February 5, 1973, December 21, 1973 and January 25, 1979 (Reference 47). Hurricane Doria affected the study area from August 27 to August 28, 1971, causing the area to be declared a national disaster area. An extensive high-water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Hurricane Doria. Borough of Netcong The history of flooding in Netcong indicates that flooding of varied origin may be experienced in any season of the year, since New Jersey lies within the path of some of the major storm tracks of North America. Flooding during winter months is less frequent, but spring flooding compounded by ice and snow melt has occurred. The more extensive floods have occurred mostly in late summer and early fall, and are

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usually associated with tropical disturbances moving northward along the Atlantic coast. The recorded history of flooding in the Musconetcong River basin near the outlet to Lake Hopatcong began in 1929. Since then, several major floods have occurred and minor floods have been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges recorded at USGS gaging station No. 01455500 near the outlet to Lake Hopatcong, the dates of ten major flooding events are as follows: July 11, 1931, March 19, 1936, October 20, 1936, July 24, 1938, August 20, 1955, October 3, 1955 August 5, 1969, September 24, 1970, June 24, 1972, February 14, 1975 and January 25, 1979 (Reference 47). The January 25, 1979 storm had a discharge of 2,200 cubic feet per second (cfs) and a recurrence interval of 90 years at the Hackettstown, New Jersey gage. On August 27-28, 1971, New Jersey was hit by Hurricane Doria rendering the state a natural disaster area. An extensive high water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Doria. These data are on file with the NJDEP Division of Water Resources. Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills The Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills has had a history of severe flooding. In May 1968, over 200 homes and businesses were damaged by flooding along the Rockaway River. Damages were estimated at one and one-quarter million dollars. In September 1971 and January 1979, severe flooding was also experienced within the township. Damages from these floods were estimated at more than one million dollars. The most severe damages were sustained by the residential community of Lake Hiawatha. In May 1968, 30 homes along River Drive, Rockaway Avenue, and Lakeshore Drive were evacuated. Again in March 1970, 30 people had to be evacuated. During a flood in September 1971, a ten-block area was flooded and evacuations had to be made by boat. U. S. Route 202, from U. S. Route 46 to Littleton Road, was completely inundated; further, Jersey City's Boonton Reservoir was reported to have overflowed As a result of approximately 11 inches of rainfall. Water levels rose to 10 feet in some areas. In June 1972, February 1973, and twice in 1977, floods on the Rockaway River caused local residents to experience significant losses (Reference 55). The USGS gage (No. 01380500) on the Rockaway River in the Town of Boonton shows the largest flood in the area occurring on January 25, 1979, with a peak discharge of 5,430 cfs. This flood has a recurrence interval of approximately 40 years. Over 200 people were forced to leave their homes during this flood. The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported that this flood was the highest since their gage began operating in 1903. The most recent recorded flood occurred on May 12, 1981, with a peak discharge of 2,040 cfs (Reference 53). In addition to the flooding in Lake Hiawatha, sections of the township south of U. S. Route 46 have been subject to flooding from the numerous streams (Whippany River,

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Troy Brook, and Eastmans Brook) which flow east into Troy Meadows and eventually into the Rockaway River. Also, Watnong Brook has caused minor flooding in the Mount Tabor area of Parsippany-Troy Hills. Township of Pequannock Low-lying areas of the Township of Pequannock are subject to periodic flooding caused by the overflow of the Pompton River, the Pequannock River, the Ramapo River, East Ditch, West Ditch, and the tributaries to East Ditch. The greatest flood of record occurred in 1903. The second greatest flood of record occurred on March 2, 1902, as a result of snowmelt and heavy rain. Among the more recent floods, those of August 1955, October 1955, and May 1968 were the largest (Reference 45). The storm of August 1955 caused some flooding along the Passaic River from Two Bridges to Paterson but most of the flooding occurred on the tributaries, including the Pompton and Pequannock Rivers. The storm of October 1955 caused the most severe flooding on the Pompton, Ramapo, and Wanaque Rivers. The other streams in the Passaic River basin were not as severely affected. The storm of May 1968 caused widespread damage over the basin, but flooding was most severe on the Pompton, Pequannock, Ramapo, and Wanaque Rivers (Reference 56). Floods also occurred in the area in 1970, 1971, 1976, and 1984 (Reference 46). The preliminary high-water marks from the April 1984 flood substantiated the reasonableness of the generated profiles. Township of Randolph Major flooding in Randolph is a result of heavy rains, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer and fall months. Less intense rains, falling on snow-covered or frozen ground during the winter months, produce lesser floods. Borough of Riverdale Low-lying areas of Riverdale are subject to periodic flooding caused by the overflow of the Pequannock 'River. The greatest flood of record occurred in 1903. The second largest flood occurred on March 2, 1902, resulting from snowmelt and heavy rain. Other severe floods occurred in the area in August 1955 and May 1968. The storm of August 1955 caused some flooding along the Passaic River from Two Bridges to Paterson, but most of the flooding occurred on tributaries, including the Pequannock River (Reference 45). The storm of May 1968 caused widespread damage over the Passaic River basin, but flooding was most severe on the Pompton, Ramapo, Wanaque, and Pequannock Rivers. The floods of 1970, 1971, and 1976 are the most recent floods to cause damage to the borough (Reference 46).

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Borough of Rockaway The history of flooding along the streams within the Borough of Rockaway indicates that flooding usually takes place during the summer and fall and is almost always associated with thunderstorms and hurricanes. The majority of flooding in the borough occurs along the Rockaway River. Those areas affected include portions of Franklin Drive, between East Main Street and Rockaway Avenue, the eastern end to Nicholas Drive, and the industrial areas along the upstream corporate limits with the Township of Denville. Flooding also occurs along the entire lengths of Beaver and Fox Brooks within the borough; however, damage has been relatively light. The flood of record for the community occurred in 1903 when a discharge of 7,300 cubic feet per second (cfs) was recorded (Rockaway River, below reservoir, at Boonton, New Jersey). Records indicate that damage occurred in the borough as a result of the floods of 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1979. The maximum of these more recent storms was on January 25, 1971, when the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage (No. 01380500) above Boonton Reservoir in the Town of Boonton recorded a flow of 5,430 cfs. This storm had an estimated recurrence interval of less than 50 years. Township of Rockaway The major portion of Rockaway lies within the drainage basin of the Rockaway River, a major tributary of the Passaic River. The Rockaway River basin comprises approximately 206 square miles, much of which lies in Morris County. Although the basin is generally rural, mountainous, and heavily wooded, some areas are highly urbanized. Lowlands are generally swampy and contain dense stands of watertolerant vegetation. Flooding in the basin has historically occurred as a consequence of heavy rain, usually associated with localized thunderstorms and hurricanes during the summer months. Less intense rain, falling on snow covered or frozen ground in the winter months, has produced smaller floods. The flood of record for the community occurred in 1903 when a discharge of 7,300 cubic feet per second (cfs) was recorded on the Rockaway River below the reservoir at Boonton. Records indicate that damage occurred in the township as a result of the floods of 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1979. The largest of these more recent storms was on January 25, 1979, when the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage (No. 01380500) above Boonton Reservoir recorded a flow of 5,430 cfs. This storm had an estimated recurrence interval of less than 50 years. Damage within the Rockaway River basin was estimated between $5 and $8 million, and 18 municipalities were declared disaster areas.

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Township of Roxbury The history of flooding in Roxbury indicates that flooding of various origins may be experienced in any season of the year since New Jersey lies along the major storm tracks of North America. Flooding during winter months is less frequent, but spring flooding compounded by snow melt and ice has occurred. The more extensive floods have occurred primarily in late summer and early fall, and are usually associated with tropical disturbances moving north along the Atlantic coast. On August 27-28, 1971, New Jersey was hit by Hurricane Doria, rendering the state a natural disaster area. An extensive high water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Doria; these data are on file with the Division of Water Resources. The streams and rivers in Roxbury contribute to the South Branch Raritan River basin, the Musconetcong River basin, or the Lamington River basin. There are no USGS recording or crest-stage gaging stations on Drakes Brook, which is part of the South Branch Raritan River system. However, it is probable that major floods which have occurred downstream of Drakes Brook also reflect flooding in the Drakes Brook basin. USGS gaging station No. 01396500 on the South Branch Raritan River near High Bridge, New Jersey, is approximately 16 miles downstream of the mouth of Drakes Brook in Mount Olive. According to this gage, which has continuous records from 1918 to the present, the dates of ten major flooding events are as follows: October 9, 1903; March 15, 1940; July 19, 1945; November 7, 1951; August 19, 1955; October 14, 1955; April 2, 1970; August 28, 1971; December 1, 1974; and January 26, 1979. The January 26, 1979, flood was the flood of record at the High Bridge gage, with a flow of 6,360 cubic feet per second (cfs), which has been assigned a 100-year recurrence interval using a log-Pearson Type III analysis of the gage data (Reference 50). USGS gaging station No. 01398500 is located on the North Branch Raritan River near Far Hills, New Jersey. Based on data collected from this gage, which began recording peak stages and discharges in 1919, probable dates of ten major floods are as follows: July 23, 1919; March 7, 1922; September 30, 1934; September 21, 1938; March 15, 1940; August 10, 1942; October 14, 1955; April 2, 1970; August 28, 1971; and May 31, 1972. For the Far Hills gage the July 23, 1919, flood was the flood of record with a flow of 7,000 cfs, which has been assigned a 100-year recurrence interval (Reference 47). The recorded gage history of flooding in the Musconetcong River basin near Roxbury began in 1929. Since then, several major floods have occurred and minor floods have been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges at USGS gaging station No. 01455500 at the outlet of Lake Hopatcong near Roxbury, the dates of five major flooding events are as follows: March 19, 1936; October 20, 1936; August 20, 1955; October 3, 1955; and August 5, 1969. The August 20, 1955, flood was the flood of record at the gage at the outlet of Lake Hopatcong, with a flow of 795 cfs,

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which has been assigned a 50-year recurrence interval using a log-Pearson Type III analysis adjusted to account for flow regulation of the gage data (Reference 6). There are no USGS recording or crest-stage gaging stations located on any of the remaining detailed studied streams, including the Lamington River. However, it is probable that major floods which have been recorded at nearby gaging stations influenced by similar climatic and physiographic factors would reflect flooding along the studied streams. Township of Washington History of flooding in Washington indicates that, since New Jersey lies within the major storm tracks of North America, flooding may be experienced during any season of the year. The most extensive flooding occurs in the late summer and fall and is usually associated with tropical storms moving north along the Atlantic coast. Flooding during the winter is infrequent, however, spring flooding associated with snowmelt and ice has occurred. Flooding in the Musconetcong River basin near Washington has been recorded since 1922. Since then several major floods have occurred and minor flooding has been a common occurrence. Based on peak stages and discharges taken at the USGS gaging station No. 01456000 near Hackettstown, major flooding events occurred on February 12, 1925, July 10, 1935, March 12, 1936, September 22, 1938, December 31, 1948, August 19, 1955, August 28, 1971, June 23, 1972, December 21, 1973, July 14, 1975 and January 25, 1979 (Reference 47). Flooding along the South Branch Raritan River has been recorded since 1918 at USGS gaging station No. 1396500 near High Bridge, New Jersey. Based on peak stages and discharges at this gage, major flooding events occurred as follows: February 6, 1896, February 1902, February 2, 1922, March 11, 1936, March 15, 1940, March 11, 1952, April 2, 1970, August 28, 1971, February 5, 1973, December 21, 1973 and January 25, 1979 (Reference 47). Hurricane Doria affected the study area from August 27 to August 28, 1971, causing the area to be declared a national disaster area. An extensive high-water mark survey was conducted jointly by the State of New Jersey and the USGS following Hurricane Doria. Borough of Wharton The history of flooding along the streams within the borough indicates that flooding usually takes place during the summer and fall and is almost always associated with thunderstorms and hurricanes. The flood of record for the community occurred in 1903, when a discharge of 7,300 cubic feet per second (cfs) was recorded (Rockaway River, below reservoir, at

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Boonton, New Jersey). Records indicate that damage occurred in the borough as a result of the floods of 1868, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, and 1979. The maximum of these more recent storms was reported on January 25, 1971, when the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) gage (No. 01380500), above Boonton Reservoir in the Town of Boonton, recorded a flow of 5,430 cfs. This storm had an estimated recurrence interval of less than 50 years. Flood Problems For This Revision No special flood problems were taken into special consideration for this revision. 2.4 Flood Protection Measures Pre-countywide Flood Protection Measures In the Town of Dover, there is a dam on the Rockaway River located approximately 725 feet upstream of the New Jersey Central Railroad, and a spillway located approximately 370 feet upstream of Brook Lane. In the Township of Harding, existing impoundments such as Osborne Pond and Silver Lake help to control small flood events on the Passaic River and Silver Brook respectively. Minor impoundments on Primrose Brook, Silver Brook, and Tributary to Great Brook function similarly. These impoundments have no effect on rarer floods such as those in the 10- to 0.2 percent annual chance frequency range. There are no other major flood control works within the township limits. The Great Swamp acts as a huge natural retention basin which affects the storm discharges of the Passaic River. In the Borough of Wharton, there are two dams located on the Rockaway River. One is located approximately 900 feet downstream of the confluence with Green Pond Brook. The other is located approximately 100 feet upstream of North Main Street, at the downstream end of Washington Pond. Flood Protection Measures For This Revision No special flood protection measures were taken into special consideration for this revision.

3.0 ENGINEERING METHODS For the flooding sources studied by detailed methods in the county, standard hydrologic and hydraulic study methods were used to determine the flood hazard date required for this study. Flood events of a magnitude that are expected to be equaled or exceeded once on the average during any 10-, 50-, 100- and 500-year period (recurrence interval) have been selected as having special significance for the floodplain management and for flood

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insurance rates. These events, commonly termed the 10-, 50-, 100- and 500-year floods, have a 10-, 2-, 1- and 0.2-percent-annual-chance, respectively, of being equaled or exceeded during any year. Although the recurrence interval represents the long-term average period between floods of a specific magnitude, rare floods could occur at short intervals or even within the same year. The risk of experiencing a rare flood increases when periods greater than 1 year are considered. For example, the risk of having a flood that equals or exceeds the 100-year flood (1-percent chance of annual exceedence) in any 50-year period is approximately 40 percent (4 in 10); for any 90 year period, the risk increases to approximately 60 percent (6 in 10). The analyses reported herein reflect flooding potentials based on conditions existing in the county at the time of the completion of this study. Maps and flood elevations will be amended periodically to reflect future changes. 3.1 Hydrologic Analyses 3.1.1 Pre-countywide Analysis

Town of Boonton Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for the flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Discharge-frequency relationships for the Rockaway River were defined using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS stream gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage. These discharges, along with other hydrologic information, were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin (Reference 10). This model, which was developed by the USACE, provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 58). Township of Boonton Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the SEC-1 model of the basin. This model developed by the USACE provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 58).

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Peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals for Beaver Brook, Unnamed Creek and Stony Brook were calculated using regional regression equations from Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This report develops discharges from the following parameters: basin size; channel slope; surface storage within the basin; and an index of manmade impervious cover, which was determined from census data and population projections. Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance floods were determined by log-probability extrapolation of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. Township of Butler Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detailed affecting the community. Discharge-frequency data for the Pequannock River and Stonehouse Brook were developed using the regional equation contained in Special Report 38 and the standard log-Pearson Type III analysis as outlined by the Water Resources Council (References 57 and 59). Through a series of mathematical and graphical relationships, various parameters were used to estimate peak discharges for the selected flood frequencies. The parameters included stream drainage area, main channel slope, surface storage area, and an index of man-made impervious cover based on basin population and development conditions. Borough of Chatham For the pre-countywide FIS, the hydrology was determined using a proportional adjustment based on a log-Pearson Type III analysis using USGS gage data at Pine Brook. Township of Chatham Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the 1980 FIS, flood flow-frequency data for the Passaic River were based on statistical analysis of stage-discharge records at gaging stations operated by the USGS (Reference 53), covering a 45-year period at Chatham. This analysis followed the standard log-Pearson Type III method as outlined by the U.S. Water Resources Council (Reference 51). For the 2001 revision, the hydrology was determined using log-Pearson Type III analysis based on USGS gage data at Chatham.

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Township of Chester Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. No gage data were available for Burnett Brook, Peapack Brook, Gladstone Brook and Indian Brook. On the Lamington River a USGS gaging station (No. 01399500) is located near Pottersville, New Jersey. However, the large difference in drainage area size between the limits of the detailed study along the Lamington River and the Pottersville gage, made the use of the gage unfeasible. Therefore, all stream peak discharges for the selected frequencies were calculated using regional relationships developed by Stephen J. Stankowski of the USGS in cooperation with the NJDEP Division of Water Resources (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected over 100 gages across the state of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and ponds. Township of Denville Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin. This model developed by the USACE provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60). Peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals for Beaver Brook, Den Brook, and the Tributary to Rockaway River were calculated using regional regression equations from Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This report develops discharges from the following parameters: basin size; channel slope; surface storage within the basin; and an index of manmade impervious cover, which was determined from census data and population projections. Discharges for the 0.2percent annual chance floods were determined by log-probability extrapolation of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. Town of Dover Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community.

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A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin. This model developed by the USACE provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60). For McKeels Brook and Jackson Brook, peak discharges for floods of the 10-, 2-, and 1-percent annual chance recurrence intervals were developed using Special Report 38, Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in New Jersey with Effects of Urbanization, developed by the NJDEP in cooperation with the USGS (Reference 59). Special Report 38 presents mathematical relations to estimate peak flood discharges. Four parameters are required in these relations: relative basin size, channel slope, surface storage, and an index of man-made impervious cover. Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance floods for McKeels Brook and Jackson Brook were determined by straight-line extrapolation of a single-log graph of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. Township of East Hanover Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the January 17, 1986 FIS, discharge-frequency relationships for the Passaic, Rockaway and Whippany Rivers were defined using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS stream gages within the Passaic River basin were used to determine values of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 61). These discharges and other hydrologic information were used to calibrate the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) HEC-1 model of the Passaic River basin in which the Rockaway and Whippany basins are included. The hydrologic analyses for the Passaic River basin, in which East Hanover is located, is complex because three rivers, the Passaic, Rockaway, and Whippany, come together in a flat, swampy area. This produces conditions in which the flood conditions from the Passaic River control over the lower reaches of the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods; however, the flood elevations from the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers control over the 10-percent annual chance flood.

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For the Rockaway River, a combination of two runs, HEC-2 Run A and HEC-2 Run B, of the USACE HEC-2 model with different discharges were used to obtain the final water-surface profiles. The first run, HEC-2 Run A, used the 10-percent annual chance discharges on the Rockaway River which occurs when the Rockaway peaks at its confluence with the Passaic River. This point was identified on the Corps of Engineers HEC-1 model at Node 20. These discharges were used because the 10-percent annual chance water surface elevations generated from the HEC-2 Run A analysis are higher and thus have a controlling effect. Between the confluence of the Rockaway River with the Passaic River and a point 26,850 feet above the confluence with the Passaic River, the 2-, 1-, and 0.2percent annual chance discharges from the second run, HEC-2 Run B, were used. HEC-2 Run B used coincident discharges on the Rockaway River. These discharges occur when the Passaic River is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River in the Borough of Lincoln Park. This point was identified in the USACE HEC-1 model at Node 35. These discharges were used because the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance water surface elevations generated from the HEC-2 Run B analysis control between the confluence and a point approximately 26,850 feet above the confluence with the Passaic River. For the Whippany River, the same type of analysis was utilized. Two runs, HEC-2 Run C and HEC-2 Run D, of the USACE HEC-2 model with different discharges were used to obtain the final water-surface profiles. The 2- and 1-percent annual chance from HEC-2 Run D, which occur when the Passaic River peaks just downstream of the Pompton River, were used between the confluence of the Rockaway River and a point approximately 16,080 feet above the confluence. Upstream of that point, the 2-, and 1-percent annual chance discharges from the HEC-2 Run C analysis which occurred when the Rockaway River peaks were used. This point was identified in the USACE HEC-1 model at Node 20. The HEC-2 Run C model also gives peak Whippany River discharges, because the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers have coincident peaks. The 10-percent annual chance discharges for the Whippany River were also obtained from HEC-2 Run C the 0.2-percent annual chance discharges from HEC-2 Run D were used between the confluence with the Rockaway River and a point approximately 19, 860 feet above the confluence. Upstream of that point the 0.2-percent annual chance discharges from HEC-2 Run C were used. This model was developed by the USACE for the Passaic River Basin Study (Reference 58). Discharges for Black Brook, at its confluence with the Whippany River, were obtained from the Passaic River Basin Study (Reference 58). Discharges for the remainder of Black Brook and for Pinch Brook were developed by transferring the discharges developed by the Corps of Engineers upstream using the following drainage area-discharge relationship: Q1/Q2 = (A1/A2)T

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Where Q1 is the resulting peak discharge at the site, Q2 is the peak discharge at the computed site for a particular flood, Al and A2 are the drainage areas at the specific site and the computed site, and T is the transfer coefficient. By using transferred flows, the discharges for Black Brook and Pinch Brook are consistent with the methodologies used downstream. For this revision, the hydrology for the Passaic River was determined using a proportional adjustment based on log-Pearson Type III analysis using USGS gage data at Pine Brook. Borough of Florham Park Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the March 1, 1984, FIS, the Passaic River, peak discharges were determined on the basis of statistical analysis of 42 years of streamflow records for the USGS gaging station at Chatham (State of New Jersey, 1971). A log-Pearson Type III analysis, as outlined by the Water Resources Council, was used for the statistical analysis (Water Resources Council, 1967). Discharges further downstream were computed by adjusting the discharges at Chatham in proportion to the drainage area-discharge relationship obtained from historical records contained in Passaic River Report (USACE, April 1973). For Black Cat Ditch, Fish's Brook, and Pinch Brook, peak discharges were computed using National Weather Service rainfall data for the area and the synthetic unit hydrograph method of the Bureau of Reclamation (U.S. Department of Commerce, 1963; U.S. Department of the Interior, 1973). Information concerning soils and vegetation required for these analyses were obtained from soil maps of Morris County (Morris County Planning Board, 1972). Unit hydrographs were derived based on the measured drainage area, stream length and stream slope. Peak discharges for the floods of 10-, 2-, and 1-percent annual chance recurrence intervals were determined from unit hydrograph and rainfall data. Computations were made using the USACE HEC-1 computer program (USACE, January 1973). Peak discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance recurrence interval flood were obtained by extrapolation of 10-, 2-, and 1-percent annual chance flood discharges using a logarithmic probability relationship. Black Brook is the main drainage channel of a large swampy area covering nearly 10 square miles in the vicinity of Morristown Airport and includes other minor drainage-ways, including Hassock Brook. This swampy area functions as a service storage reservoir. Therefore, peak discharges in this area were found to be undefinable accurately by traditional methods. Backwater effects from the Whippany River were found to control flooding in the area.

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For the June 6, 2001, FIS, the hydrology for the Passaic River was determine using a proportional adjustment based on log-Pearson Type III analysis using USGS gage data at Pine Brook. For this revision, peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were determined using regression equations and procedures outlined in Special Report 38 (New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, 1974). Township of Hanover Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the 1977 FIS, peak discharges for the Whippany River were determined on the basis of statistical analysis of 50 years of streamflow records for the station at Morristown (Reference 53). The statistical technique used was the log-Pearson Type III distribution analysis (Reference 62). Discharges further downstream were computed by adjusting the gaging station discharges on a drainage area proportion basis. For Stony (Malpardis) Brook, and the Unnamed Tributary to the Whippany River, peak discharges were computed using the National Weather Service's rainfall records (Reference 63) for the area, and the synthetic unit hydrograph method of the U.S. Bureau of Land Reclamation (Reference 64). Information on soil groups and vegetation was obtained from Morris County Soil Maps (Reference 65). The unit hydrograph was developed based on the measured drainage area, stream length and stream slope. Peak discharges for floods of the correct recurrence intervals were determined from the derived unit hydrographs. Computations were performed using the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), HEC-1 computer program. The peak discharge value for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood was obtained by extrapolation of the 10-, 2-, and 1-percent annual chance flood discharges using a logarithmic probability relationship. Stony (Malpardis) Brook was studied from its confluence with the Whippany River to Jefferson Road. Areas upstream of Jefferson Road will most likely remain undeveloped and therefore were not considered. For this revision, hydrologic analyses for the Whippany River and Black Brook were taken from the effective FIS for the Township of East Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey (Reference 16). Township of Harding Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community.

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For the 1982 FIS, peak discharges for the Passaic River were determined on the basis of statistical analysis of stage-discharge records at gaging stations operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (U.S. Department of the Interior), covering an 8year period at Bernardsville (U.S. Geological Survey Gage No. 01378690, drainage area 8.83 square miles) and a 53-year period at Millington (U.S. Geological Survey Gage No. 0139000, drainage area 55.4 square miles). This analysis followed the standard log-Pearson Type III method as outlined by the U.S. Water Resources Council (U.S. Water Resources Council, 1967). The peak discharges for Great Brook, Tributary of Great Brook, Primrose Brook, and Silver Brook were determined by use of the frequency discharge relationship described in Special Report 38, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (U.S. Department of the Interior, 1974). Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood events for these streams were estimated by straight line extrapolation on log-probability paper based on flood discharges computed for flood frequencies up to 100 years. For this revision, the hydrology for the Passaic River was determined using a logPearson Type III analysis based on USGS gage data. Township of Jefferson Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency and peak elevation-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Peak discharges for the streams studied by detailed methods were calculated from the regional relationships developed in Special Report 38 (Reference 59). These relationships were developed using a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages across New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention in lakes and swamps. For the Rockaway River and Tributary No. 5 to Rockaway River, discharges decrease in the downstream direction of flow due to storage effects in the overbank areas along the course of each stream. For Lake Hopatcong, elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were determined by performing orifice and weir calculations. Borough of Lincoln Park Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community.

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Peak discharges for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods on the Passaic River were determined in previous studies by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and used in this study. The frequency-discharge relationship was based on discharge data recorded at Paterson and Little Falls (drainage area 762 square miles) by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). Continuous discharge records for this portion of the Passaic River date back to 1897. The USACE used the standard log-Pearson Type III method as outlined by the Water Resources Council in their hydrologic analysis of these records. Frequencies for the rare floods were based on an adjustment to account for the higher floods associated with hurricanes. For the other streams studied by detailed methods, hydrologic analyses were based on the method for estimating flood peak magnitudes as described in Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This method is based on a multiple regression analysis used to develop mathematical relationships between flood discharges at the various recurrence intervals (10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance) obtained from gaging station data and hydrologic characteristics. Flood information from 103 sites was used in making the analysis. Hydrologic parameters included stream drainage area, main channel slope, surface storage area, and an index of manmade impervious cover based on basin population and development conditions. The 500-year discharge value was extrapolated from the lower frequency floods. Township of Long Hill Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the October 14, 1977, FIS, flood discharges were determined from statistical analysis of gaging station records covering a 43-year period at the gaging stations at Millington and Chatham operated by the USGS. This analysis followed the logPearson Type III distribution technique outlined by the Water Resources Council (Reference 62). Peak discharges for 10-, 2-, and 1-perecnt annual chance floods at the above gaging stations were determined. Discharge for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood was determined by log-probability extrapolation of computed flood discharges for frequencies up to 100 years. For this revision, the hydrology was determined using a proportional adjustment based on log-Pearson Type III analysis using USGS gage data at Pine Brook. Borough of Madison Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the March 15, 1984, FIS, it was determined that the Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook has hydrological, geophysical, and soil conditions similar to Spring Garden Brook. Peak flood discharges were therefore estimated from computed peak discharges for Spring Garden Brook on the basis of the proportion

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of corresponding drainage areas. Information concerning soils and vegetation were obtained from soil maps for Morris County (Morris County Planning Board, 1972). A triangular unit hydrograph was derived based on the measured drainage area, stream length, and stream slope. Peak discharges for the 10-, 2- and 1percent annual chance floods were determined from the derived unit hydrograph and the rainfall excess data. Computations for the 1984 peak discharges for the Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook were made using the USACE HEC-1 computer program (USACE, January 1973). The peak discharges for the 0.2perecnt annual chance flood was obtained by extrapolation of 10-, 2-, and 1percent annual chance flood discharges using a logarithmic probability relationship. For this revision, discharge-frequency relationships for Spring Garden Brook were determined using regression equations and procedures outlined in Special Report 38 (New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, 1974). Additionally, due to an annexation in the corporate limits approximately 100 feet was added to the Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook from Florham Park (FEMA, June 6, 2001). Borough of Mendham Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for the flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. On the North Branch Raritan River, discharges were calculated using stream-gage records and regional regression equations. Values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2percent annual chance peak discharges were calculated at Far Hills gage, located just upstream of Ravine Lake Dam in Far Hills, New Jersey, using log-Pearson III frequency analysis of annual peak flow data. Flows calculated at the gage were transposed to specific locations according to the drainage area-discharge formula: Q1 = Q2 (Al/A2)T Where Q1 is the discharge at a specific location and A1 is the drainage area at that location, Q2 is the discharge at the gage and A2 is the drainage area at the gage "T" being the transfer exponent (Reference 66). For the North Branch Raritan River, a value of 0.070 was considered to be representative for the transfer exponent. Peak discharges for the selected frequencies for the North Branch Raritan River also were calculated using regional regression equations developed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resources in cooperation with the USGS, Special Report 38 (Reference 59). These relations were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at 103 gages across the State of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and swamps. A weighted average of log-Pearson Type III discharges and the discharge obtained using Special Report 38 was calculated for selected locations on the North Branch Raritan River. These values were used as the flood flows for the floods of the selected recurrence intervals.

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For the streams studied by approximate methods, calculations were made to estimate the 100-year flood depth to drainage area and the area of lakes and swamps in the basin (Reference 67). Township of Mendham Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. On the North Branch Raritan River, discharges were based on stream gage records and regional regression equations. Values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2percent annual chance peak discharges were calculated at the Far Hills gage, located just upstream of Ravine Lake Dam in Far Hills, using a log-Pearson Type III analysis of annual peak flow data. Flows calculated at the gage were transposed to specific locations according to the drainage area-discharge formula: Q1 = Q2 (A1/A2)T Where Q1 is the discharge at a specific location and Al is the drainage area at that location, Q2 is the discharge at the gage and A2 is the drainage area at the gage with T being the transfer exponent (Reference 66), For the North Branch Raritan River a value of 0.70 was considered to be representative for the transfer exponent. Peak discharges for the selected frequencies for the North Branch Raritan River were also calculated using regional relationships developed by Stephen J. Stankowski of the USGS, in cooperation with the NJDEP, Division of Water Resources (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages across the State of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and swamps. A weighted average of the drainage area adjusted log-Pearson Type III discharges and the discharges obtained using Stankowski's regional equation was calculated for selected locations on the North Branch Raritan River. These values were used as the flood flows for the floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Peak discharges for the Whippany River were calculated at the Morristown gage using a log-Pearson Type III analysis of annual peak flow data. Flows calculated for the gage were transposed to specific locations according to the drainage areadischarge formula mentioned above using a transfer coefficient of 0.5. For the remaining streams studied in detail in Mendham, all ungaged, peak discharges for the selected frequencies were calculated using Stankowski's regional equation. Township of Mine Hill Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for the flooding source studied in detail affecting the community.

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No gage data were available for the Lamington River. For this stream, peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were calculated from the regional relationships developed by Stephen J. Stankowski of the USGS, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages across the State of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention in lakes and swamps. The Stankowski regional equation was also used to determine flood flow for Jackson Brook (Reference 59). The drainage area, slope, storage and urbanization index were used to estimate the Mean Annual Flood. Township of Montville Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Discharge-frequency relationships for the Passaic River Basin, which includes the Rockaway River, were defined using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). Log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS stream gages within the Passaic River Basin were used to determine values of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the USACE HEC-1 model of the Passaic River Basin. For the Rockaway River, a log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS stream gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (References 53 and 57). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the USACE HEC-1 model of the Rockaway River Basin. The hydrologic analysis for the portion of the Passaic River Basin, in which Montville is located, is complex because three rivers, the Passaic River, the Rockaway River, and the Whippany River, come together in a flat, swampy area. This produces conditions in which the flood elevations from the Passaic River control the lower reaches of the Rockaway River for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods; however, the flood elevations from the Rockaway River control the 10-percent annual chance flood. For the Rockaway River, a combination of two runs, HEC-2-Run A and HEC-2Run B, of the USACE HEC-2 model with different discharges were used to obtain the final water-surface profiles. The first run, HEC-2-Run A, used the 10-percent annual chance discharge on the Rockaway River which occurs when the Rockaway River peaks at its confluence with the Passaic River. This point was identified on the USACE HEC-1 model at Node 20. This discharge was used because the 10-percent annual chance elevation generated from the HEC-2-Run A analysis is higher and, thus, has a controlling effect. Also, the 2-, 1-, and 0.2percent annual chance discharges from the HEC-2-Run A model of the Rockaway River were used upstream of a point approximately 26,850 feet above the
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confluence of the Rockaway River with the Passaic River for the above mentioned reason. For the Rockaway River, between its confluence with the Passaic River and a point 26,850 feet upstream, the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance discharges from the second run, HEC-2-Run B, were used. HEC-2-Run B used coincident discharges on the Rockaway River. These discharges occur when the Passaic River is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River in the Borough of Lincoln Park. This point was identified on the USACE HEC-1 model at Node 35. These discharges were used because the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance watersurface elevations generated from the HEC-2-Run B analysis control between the confluence and a point approximately 26,850 feet above the confluence with the Passaic River. This model, developed by the USACE for the Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report, which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision, provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway and Passaic Rivers (Reference 60). Special Report 38 presents flow equations which relate basin characteristics to peak flood discharges (Reference 59). These characteristics are basin size, channel slope, surface storage, and an index of manmade impervious cover. These parameters were determined using census data and USGS topographic maps (References 65 and 68). For the remaining streams studied by detailed methods, peak discharges for the floods having 10-, 2-, and 1-percent annual chance recurrence intervals were developed using Special Report 38 (Reference 59). The Rational Method was applied to streams with a drainage area less than one square mile. Discharges for the 0.2 percent annual chance floods were determined by log-probability extrapolation of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. Borough of Morris Plains Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For Watnong and Jaquis Brooks, where gage data were not available and the drainage area was larger than 1 square mile, the 10-, 2- and 1-percent annual chance discharges were calculated by using regional relationships contained in Special Report 38, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (Reference 59). This analysis takes into consideration drainage area, main channel slope, surface storage, and manmade impervious land cover. It was developed from a regression analysis of 103 stream-gaging stations throughout New Jersey. Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood events for these streams were estimated by straightline extrapolation on log-probability paper based on flood discharges computed for flood frequencies of up to 100 years.

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Township of Morris Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each stream studied in detail in the community. For Whippany River, flood flow frequency data were based on statistical analysis of stage-discharge records at gaging station No. 01381500. Operated by the U.S. Geological Survey (Reference 53), the station covers a 54-year period at Morristown (drainage area 29.4 square miles). This analysis followed the standard log-Pearson Type III method as outlined by the U.S. Water Resources Council (Reference 51). The peak discharges for Great and Watnong Brooks were determined by use of the frequency-discharge relationship described in Special Report 38, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (Reference 59). Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood events for these streams were estimated by straight line extrapolation on log-probability paper based on flood discharges computed for flood frequencies up to 100 years. Town of Morristown Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Flood-flow frequency data for the Whippany River were based on a statistical analysis of stage-discharge records at a gaging station (No. 0131500) operated by the USGS (Reference 53). The gage covers a 54-year period of record at Morristown and has a drainage area of 29.4 square miles. This analysis followed the standard log-Pearson Type III method as outlined by the Water Resources Council (Reference 51). Peak discharges for Great Brook were determined using the frequency-discharge relationship described in Special Report 38 (Reference 59). Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance flood were estimated by straight line extrapolation on log-probability paper based on discharges computed for flood frequencies up to 100 years. Township of Mount Olive Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. The discharges along the Musconetcong River from its mouth at the Delaware River upstream to Lake Musconetcong, a distance of 41.5 miles, have been determined by the Flood Plain Management Section of the Bureau of Flood Plain Management of the NJDEP, using a log-Pearson Type III distribution for gages at Bloomsbury, Hackettstown and at the outlet to Lake Hopatcong (Reference 51).

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For the South Branch Raritan River, discharges were determined on the basis of 58 years of stream flow records at the USGS gaging station at High Bridge. A log-Pearson Type III analysis was used with weighted regional skew (Reference 51 and 66). Since gage data were not available for Trout Brook and Mount Olive Brook, peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were calculated using the regional relationships developed by the USGS in cooperation with the NJDEP (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages in New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and swamps. The USGS method was also used to determine flood flows on the streams studied by approximate methods (Reference 59). The drainage area, slope, storage and urbanization index were used to estimate the mean annual flood. This discharge was then used to obtain the depth of flooding from the depth-discharge-frequency curve for New Jersey (Reference 67). Borough of Netcong Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for the flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. The discharges along the Musconetcong River from its mouth at the junction with the Delaware River upstream to Lake Musconetcong, a distance of 41.5 miles, have been determined by the Flood Plain Management section of the Bureau of Flood Plain Management, Division of Water Resources of the NJDEP, using a log-Pearson Type III distribution for gages at Bloomsbury, New Jersey, Hackettstown, New Jersey and at the outlet to Lake Hopatcong. Flood flows for the approximate studied stream were calculated using the regional relationships developed by Stephen J. Stankowski of the USGS in cooperation with the NJDEP Division of Water Resources (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages across the State of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and swamps. The drainage area, slope, storage and urbanization index were used to estimate the mean annual flood. This discharge was then used to obtain the depth of flooding from the depth discharge-frequency curve for non-coastal plain sites in New Jersey (Reference 69). Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Discharge-frequency relationships for the Rockaway River and the Whippany River were defined using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)
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stream gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the USACE HEC-1 model of the Passaic River Basin in which the Rockaway River Basin is included. Parsippany-Troy Hills is located along the Rockaway River approximately 1.5 miles upstream of the confluence of the Rockaway River with the Passaic River; however, Parsippany-Troy Hills is directly affected by the Passaic River. The hydrologic analysis for the portion of the Passaic River Basin, in which Parsippany-Troy Hills is located, is complex because three rivers, the Passaic River, the Rockaway River, and the Whippany River, come together in a flat, swampy area. This produces conditions in which the flood elevations from the Passaic River control over the lower reaches of the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods; however, the flood elevations from the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers control the 10-percent annual chance flood. For the Rockaway River, a combination of two runs, HEC-2-Run A and HEC-2Run B, of the USACE HEC-2 model with different discharges, were used to obtain the final water-surface profiles. The first run, HEC-2-Run A, used the 10percent annual chance discharges on the Rockaway River which occurs when the Rockaway River peaks at its confluence with the Passaic River. This point was identified on the USACE HEC-1 model as Node 20. These discharges were used because the 10-percent annual chance water-surface elevations generated from the HEC-2-Run A analysis are higher and, thus, have a controlling effect. Also, the 2, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance discharges from the HEC-2-Run A model were used upstream of a point approximately 26,850 feet above the confluence of the Rockaway River with the Passaic River for the above mentioned reason. Between the confluence of the Rockaway River with the Passaic River and a point 26,850 feet above the confluence with the Passaic River, the 2-, 1-, and 0.2percent annual chance discharges from the second run, HEC-2-Run B, were used. HEC-2-Run B used coincident discharges on the Rockaway River. These discharges occur when the Passaic River is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River in the Borough of Lincoln Park. This point was identified on the USACE HEC-1 model as Node 35. These discharges were used because the 2-, 1, and 0.2-percent annual chance water-surface elevations generated from the HEC-2-Run B analysis control between the confluence and a point approximately 26,850 feet above the confluence with the Passaic River. For the Whippany River, the same type of analysis was utilized. Two runs, HEC2-Run C and HEC-2-Run D, of the USACE HEC-2 model with different discharges, were used to obtain the final water-surface profiles. The 2-, and 1percent annual chance discharges from HEC-2-Run D, which occurred when the Passaic River peaks just downstream of the Pompton River, were used between the confluence with the Rockaway River and a point approximately 15,180 feet above the confluence. Upstream of that point, the 2- and 1-percent annual chance discharges from the HEC-2-Run C analysis were used, which occurred when the Rockaway River peaks. This point was identified on the USACE HEC-1 model at Node 20. The HEC-2-Run C model also gives peak Whippany River discharges,
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because the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers have coincident peaks. The 10percent annual chance discharges for the Whippany River were also obtained from HEC-2-Run C. The 0.2-percent annual chance discharges from HEC-2-Run D were used between the confluence with the Rockaway River and a point approximately 19,860 feet above the confluence. Upstream of this point the 0.2percent annual chance discharges from HEC-2-Run C were used. This model, developed by the USACE for the Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report, which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision, provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River and the Whippany River (Reference 60). Peak discharges for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance recurrence intervals for Troy Brook, West Brook, Eastmans Brook, and Watnong Brook were developed using Special Report 38, Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in New Jersey with Effects of Urbanization (Reference 59). Township of Pequannock Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Discharge-frequency data for the Pompton River were based on discharges calculated by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). The USGS determination followed the standard log-Pearson Type III analysis recommended by the Water Resources Council, which included weighting stations and regional skew (Reference 51). For the streams studied in this revision, the hydrology analyses were based on the soil conservation service Technical Release No. 55 tabular Hydrograph method (Reference 70). Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance storms were extrapolated from the calculated discharges for the 10-, 2- and 1-percent annual chance storms, assuming a log-Pearson Type III distribution. For the other streams studied by detailed methods, hydrologic analyses were based on the method for estimating flood peak magnitudes as described in Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This method is based on a multiple regression analysis used to develop mathematical relationships between flood discharges at the various recurrence intervals (2, 10, 50, and 100 years) obtained from gaging station data and hydrologic characteristics. Flood information from 103 sites was used in making the analysis. Hydrologic parameters included stream drainage area, main channel slope, surface storage area, and an index of man-made impervious cover that was based on basin population and development conditions. The 0.2-percent annual chance value was extrapolated from the lower frequency floods. Township of Randolph Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the USGS in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson
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Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500) upstream of Boonton Reservoir was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin. This model, developed by the USACE, provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60). For Mill and Den Brooks the peak discharges for the 10-, 2- and 1-percent annual chance recurrence intervals were computed using a regional flood frequency analysis (Reference 59). Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance floods were determined by log-probability extrapolation of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. The approximate analysis for the Black (Lamington) River used 53 years of records at the USGS gaging station near Pottersville, New Jersey. This analysis utilized the standard log-Pearson Type III distribution (Reference 62). For the approximate analysis of India Brook, peak discharges for floods of 10-, 2and 1-percent annual chance recurrence intervals were based on Weather Bureau rainfall data and unit hydrograph analyses incorporating the synthetic unit hydrograph method by the U. S. Bureau of Reclamation (References 63 and 64). Borough of Riverdale Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for the flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. Discharge-frequency data for the Pequannock River were developed using the regional equation contained in Special Report 38 (Reference 59). Through a series of mathematical and graphical relationships, various parameters were used to estimate the peak discharges for various frequencies. The parameters included stream drainage area, main channel slope, surface storage area, and an index of manmade impervious cover based on basin population and development conditions. Borough of Rockaway Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1- and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin. This model developed by the USACE provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60).

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Peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals for Beaver Brook and Fox Brook were calculated using regional regression equations from Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This report develops discharges from the following parameters: basin size; channel slope; surface storage within the basin; and an index of manmade impervious cover, which was determined from census data and population projections. Discharges for the 0.2-percent annual chance floods were determined by log-probability extrapolation of flood discharges computed for frequencies up to 100 years. Township of Rockaway Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined in Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage upstream of Boonton Reservoir was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrologic information were used to calibrate the USACE HEC-1 model of the basin. This model provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60). Discharges for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance storms for Green Pond Brook were also obtained from the HEC-1 model. Discharges for the Pequannock River were developed by transferring discharges from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of West Milford upstream to the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Jefferson (References 71 and 19). The following drainage area-discharge relationship was used: Q1/Q2 = (A1/A2)T where Q1 is the resulting peak discharge at the site, Q2 is the peak discharge at the computed site for a particular flood, Al and A2 are the drainage areas at the specific site and the computed site, and T is the transfer coefficient. By using transferred flows, the discharges calculated for the Pequannock River are consistent with the hydrologic methodologies used to develop discharges for the communities upstream and downstream of the township. Peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals of Beaver Brook, Hibernia Brook, White Meadow Brook, Tributary to Pequannock River, and Tanglewood Brook were calculated using regional regression equations from Special Report 38 (Reference 59). This report develops discharges from the following parameters: basin size; channel slope; surface storage within the basin; and an index of manmade impervious cover, which was determined from census data and population projections. For Fox Pond, stillwater elevations were obtained from the water-surface elevations for Fox Brook shown in the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Rockaway (Reference 10). Water-surface profiles are not provided for Fox Brook in this study because only backwater elevations resulting from the dam on Fox Brook in the Borough of Rockaway are included in the Township of Rockaway.
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Township of Roxbury Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency and peak elevation-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. For the Musconetcong River, 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges were calculated at USGS gage No. 01455500 using a log-Pearson Type III analysis of annual peak flow data, adjusted to account for flow regulation at the Lake Hopatcong Dam. Flows calculated at the gage were trans-posed downstream to specific locations using the drainage area-discharge formula: Q1 = Q2 (A1/A2)T where Q1 is the discharge at a specific location and Al is the drainage area at that location; Q2 is the discharge at the gage and A2 is the drainage area at the gage, with T being the transfer coefficient. For the Musconetcong River, a value of 0.75 was considered to be representative for the transfer coefficient. No gage data were available for the Lamington River, the Rockaway River, Drakes Brook and Succasunna Brook. For these streams, peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were calculated from the regional relationships developed by Stephen J. Stankowski of the USGS, in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages across the State of New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention in lakes and swamps. Township of Washington Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for floods of the selected recurrence intervals for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. The discharges along the Musconetcong River from its confluence with the Delaware River upstream to Lake Musconetcong, a distance of 41.5 miles, have been determined by the Flood Plain Management Section of the Bureau of Flood Plain Management of the NJDEP, using a log-Pearson Type III distribution for gages at Bloomsbury, Hackettstown and at the outlet to Lake Hopatcong (Reference 51). For the South Branch Raritan River, discharges were determined on the basis of 58 years of stream flow records at the USGS gaging station at High Bridge. A log-Pearson Type III analysis was used with weighted regional skew (References 51 and 66). Since gage data were not available for the remaining streams studied by detailed methods, peak discharges for the selected recurrence intervals were calculated using the regional relationships developed by the USGS in cooperation with the NJDEP (Reference 59). These relationships were developed through a statistical
89

regression analysis of data collected at over 100 gages in New Jersey. This analysis accounts for urban development as well as natural retention created by lakes and swamps. From the hydraulic analyses on Drakes Brook, it was determined that a portion of the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance discharges would overtop the left bank and flow east along Drakes Brook Overflow Channel. The discharges subtracted from Drakes Brook at the Conrail bridge were used for Drakes Brook Overflow Channel. Borough of Wharton Hydrologic analyses were carried out to establish the peak discharge-frequency relationships for each flooding source studied in detail affecting the community. A flood-frequency analysis was performed for the Rockaway River using procedures outlined by the USGS Bulletin 17B (Reference 57). A log-Pearson Type III distribution of annual peak discharges from the USGS gage (No. 01380500), upstream of Boonton Reservoir, was used to determine values for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance peak discharges at the gage (Reference 53). These discharges and other hydrological information were used to calibrate the HEC-1 model of the basin. This model developed by the USACE provided the discharge breakdown along the Rockaway River (Reference 60). Discharges for the 10-, 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance storms for Green Pond Brook were also obtained from the HEC-1 model. 3.1.2 This Countywide Study

For this countywide study, discharges for the 10-, 2-, 1- and 0.2-percent-annual chance recurrence intervals were calculated for stream reaches included in new detailed studies, and discharges for the 1-percent-annual chance recurrence interval were calculated for stream reaches studied by approximate method. The flood discharges for the gaged streams of the Passaic River and the Whippany River were determined based on the log-Pearson Type III distribution developed by the USGS. The gages used for this restudy are listed below in Table 6. TABLE 6 - STREAM GAGE INFORMATION Gaged Stream Passaic River Green Pond Brook Whippany River Gage No. 01378690 01379790 01381500 Location of Gage Years of Record 40 24 86

Bernardsville, New Jersey Wharton, New Jersey Morristown, New Jersey

For the studied gaged streams, ratios of weighted discharges to regression discharges were developed at each stream gaging station location. Discharges at other locations along these streams were then developed by multiplying the
90

regression discharges by these ratios. For the length of the Passaic River that was restudied, the ratios that were obtained for the Passaic River Gage No. 01378690 were used. For the length of the Whippany River that was restudied, the ratios that were obtained for the Whippany River Gage No. 01381500 were used. The hydrology for the ungaged streams that were studied, which include Fox Brook, Burnett Brook, Indian Brook, Harmony Brook, Hibernia Brook and West Ditch was computed using Special Report 38 (Reference 59). For the studied ungaged streams, ratios of weighted discharges to regression discharges were developed at each stream gaging station location. Discharges at other locations along these streams were then developed by multiplying the regression discharge by their ratios. For the length of Burnett Brook in the Townships of Mendham and Chester, the ratios obtained at the Passaic River gage were used. For the length of Indian Brook in the Township of Chester, the ratios obtained at the Passaic River gage were used. For the length of Harmony Brook from its confluence with the Whippany River to Clyde Potts Reservoir the ratios obtained at the Passaic River gage were used. For the length of Harmony Brook from the mouth to the upstream end of Lake Telemark, the ratios obtained at the Whippany River gage and the Green Pond Brook gage were used. For the length of Fox Brook from its confluence with Rockaway River to Interstate Route 80, the ratios obtained at the Whippany River gage and the Green Pond Brook gage were used. For the length of West Ditch the ratios obtained from the Green Pond Brook gage were used. For flooding sources studied by approximate methods, regional regression analysis was used to determine the discharges. The analysis was completed in accordance with the USGS report U.S. Geological Survey regional regression equations for estimating magnitude and frequency of floods for ungaged sites. For areas where urbanization was likely to affect discharges, impervious area was estimated based on population density. The percentage area covered by lakes and ponds was calculated using a lakes and ponds coverage obtained from Morris County. A summary of the drainage area-peak discharge relationships for all of the streams studied by detailed method is shown in Table 7, “Summary of Discharges”.

91

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT BEAVER BROOK A At the confluence with the Rockaway River Upstream of the confluence of White Meadow Brook BEAVER BROOK B Upstream of the confluence of Hibernia Brook At the confluence of Beaver Brook Tributary BEAVER DAM BROOK At its confluence with the Pompton River At the confluence of East Ditch At the confluence of West Ditch BLACK BROOK B At the confluence with the Whippany River Downstream of confluence with Pinch Brook Upstream of confluence with Pinch Brook Upstream of confluence of Hassock Brook BLACK CAT DITCH At mouth of Passaic River BURNETT BROOK At confluence with North Branch Raritan River At State Route 24 Downstream of tributary approx. 1,100 ft. upstream of downstream Old Mill Rd.

22.6 17.7

1,050 940

1,710 1,530

2,075 1,865

3,200 2,850

9.28 7.48

445 390

745 655

915 800

1,490 1,235

12.71 6.29 3.78

1,284 808 487

1,639 1,030 622

1,917 1,205 727

2,530 1,591 960

10.4 7.9 5.7 4.3

1,400 1,255 1,100 985

1,964 1,765 1,555 1,395

2,303 2,075 1,835 1,645

2,917 2,650 2,365 2,140

0.8

138

267

331

515

8.17 7.34

1,430 1,270

2,330 2,080

2,800 2,500

4,080 3,655

5.83

1,035

1,695

2,040

3,000

92

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT BURNETT BROOK (continued) Upstream of tributary approx. 1,100 ft. upstream of downstream Old Mill Rd. Downstream of tributary approx. 2,600 ft. downstream of upstream Old Mill Rd. Upstream of tributary approx. 2,600 ft. downstream of upstream Old Mill Rd. Downstream of confluence with Dawsons Brook 50 ft. upstream of South Road BUDD LAKE TRIBUTARY At confluence with Budd Lake CONLON POND BROOK At confluence with Drakes Brook CROOKED BROOK At confluence with Rockaway River At Millers Lane At Interstate Route 287

3.94

680

1,100

1,355

2,005

3.36

560

915

1,126

1,670

3.14 2.34 1.06

550 405 370

900 665 605

1,105 815 750

1,640 1,215 1,145

1.1

305

515

645

950

2.5

655

1,070

1,330

1,920

7.8 5.9 3.4

800 685 320

1,315 1,130 550

1,620 1,395 685

2,320 1,900 990

CROOKED BROOK TRIBUTARY At confluence with Crooked Brook 2.0 At Taylortown Road 0.5 DAWSONS BROOK At confluence with Burnett Brook At upstream Township of Mendham corp. limits

435 288

730 483

910 605

1,300 855

1.1 1.04

150 140

260 250

320 310

514 500

93

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT DEN BROOK Upstream of confluence with Rockaway River At the downstream limit of Lake Estling At the upstream limit of Lake Estling Upstream of State Route 10 At confluence with Shongum Lake DRAKES BROOK At confluence with South Branch Raritan River Downstream of Conrail Upstream of Conrail

8.61 6.36 5.51 4.85 3.04

610 515 525 415 320

995 845 865 690 530

1,215 1,035 1,060 845 640

1,900 1,580 1,640 1,340 850

16.0 16.0 5.88

1,135 500 350

1,850 800 600

2,260 1,000 740

3,465 1,650 1,155

DRAKES BROOK OVERFLOW CHANNEL At inlet from Drakes Brook * EAST DITCH At confluence with Beaver Dam Brook At confluence with Northern Tributary EASTMANS BROOK At the confluence with Troy Brook Upstream of confluence with Tributary No. 1 At Lake Parsippany Dam ELECTRIC BROOK At confluence with South Branch Raritan River FISH’S BROOK At mouth of Passaic River * data not computed

635

1,050

1,260

1,815

4.66 0.81

1,387 366

1,771 611

2,071 750

2,589 1,092

2.87 1.53 1.07

180 85 60

305 150 105

370 185 130

560 285 205

3.2

420

700

870

1,280

0.4

126

192

230

310

94

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT FOX BROOK At Rockaway River At Fox’s Pond At Interstate Route 80 GLADSTONE BROOK At confluence with Peapack Brook GREAT BROOK At Van Beuren Road At Blue Mill Road At Woodland Road At Township of Morris corporate limits At Loantaka Road At Interstate Highway 287

1.4 1.13 0.27

295 245 95

500 410 155

620 520 195

980 825 325

2.31

420

735

940

1,570

6.80 7.65 8.25 2.15 1.8 1.2

1,200 1,180 1,105 295 265 175

1,900 1,870 1,760 480 430 295

2,315 2,270 2,135 570 525 370

3,200 3,160 3,020 890 795 535

GREAT BROOK TRIBUTARY Upstream of confluence with Great Brook 1.25 GREEN POND BROOK At the confluence with Rockaway River HARMONY BROOK At confluence with Whippany River Downstream of confluence of tributary near Brookside Road Upstream of confluence of tributary near Brookside Road At Clyde Potts Reservoir HATFIELD CREEK At confluence with Rockaway River

265

440

550

795

15.09

664

1,133

1,350

2,032

3.82

690

1,135

1,405

2,120

3.54

650

1,065

1,315

2,030

2.62 2.10

460 340

760 565

940 700

1,430 1,075

1.7

150

260

315

450

95

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT HIBERNIA BROOK At confluence with Beaver Brook At Green Pond Road Upstream of Maple Terrace Tributary Upstream end of Lake Ames Upstream end of Lake Telemark INDIAN BROOK At confluence with Burnett Brook JACKSON BROOK At confluence with Rockaway River JAQUIS BROOK Upstream of confluence with Watnong Brook LAKE HOPATCONG TRIBUTARY NO. 1 At confluence with Lake Hopatcong LAKE HOPATCONG TRIBUTARY NO. 2 At the confluence with Lake Hopatcong

7.98 6.57 5.80 2.89 2.19

1,200 1,020 870 375 265

1,935 1,655 1,415 600 450

2,375 2,035 1,745 780 560

3,485 3,010 2,595 1,200 875

2.67

460*

650*

840*

1,100*

4.6

1,165

1,865

2,290

3,200

2.10

170

285

335

560

0.65

35

55

65

105

1.37

125

220

275

450

*the published FIS flood discharges for Indian Brook were obtained from the hydraulic analysis of the diversion at the upstream junction with Burnett Brook

96

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT LAMINGTON RIVER 1,350 feet downstream of Ironia Road Downstream of the confluence of Succasunna Brook Upstream of the confluence of Succasunna Brook MALAPARDIS BROOK At confluence of Whippany River MILL BROOK At confluence with Rockaway River MUSCONETCONG RIVER At downstream Township of Washington corporate limits Upstream of confluence of Stephensburg Brook Upstream of confluence of Hances Brook Upstream of confluence of Tributary B Upstream of confluence of Trout Brook At downstream Township of Mount Olive corporate limits Upstream of confluence of Lubers Run Upstream of confluence of Wills Brook At downstream corporate limits At the Lake Hopatcong gage

8.32

445

730

885

1,315

6.55

465

755

915

1,355

4.54

315

520

630

935

4.93

603

1,077

1,399

2,040

4.79

600

960

1,160

1,480

131.0 96.0 92.0 86.0 81.0

3,445 2,215 2,055 1,865 1,715

5,960 3,680 3,393 3,050 2,790

7,450 4,455 4,095 3,670 3,345

11,350 6,680 6,140 5,425 4,915

70.0 37.0 26.0 28.2 25.6

1,330 670 565 564 455

2,110 1,050 880 881 790

2,505 1,240 1,040 1,040 970

3,616 1,760 1,475 1,474 1,480

97

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT NORTH BRANCH RARITAN RIVER Upstream of confluence with McVickers Brook 17.31 Downstream of confluence with Burnett Brook 16.37 Upstream of confluence with Burnett Brook 8.20 At State Route 24 7.54 At upstream Township of Mendham corporate limits 6.68 Upstream from confluence of India Brook 2.11 Upstream from confluence of tributary 1.61 NORTHERN TRIBUTARY At confluence with East Ditch PASSAIC RIVER At confluence of Rockaway River At confluence of Pompton River At confluence of Rockaway River At Columbia Turnpike At Spring Garden Brook At Canoe Brook USGS Gage 01379500 At confluence of Dead River Upstream of Lord Stirling Road Upstream of Plainfield Road Upstream of Madisonville Road At downstream corporate limits Mendham/Morris

2,260 2,170 1,420 1,380

4,180 4,020 2,480 2,300

5,290 5,070 3,090 2,860

8,736 8,363 4,862 4,447

1,350 525 415

2,200 900 720

2,710 1,115 890

4,116 1,740 1,400

1.72

266

362

460

660

349.0 741.0 141.0 128.0 123.2 115.3 100.0 58 53 84 11 3.67

6,194 4,900 2,780 2,717 2,631 2,536 2,182 1,240 1,300 1,850 1,480 950

9,927 6,930 4,010 4,005 3,879 3,738 3,030 1,820 2,300 2,680 1,640 1,805

11,969 7,890 4,637 4,626 4,481 4,481 3,414 2,185 2,818 3,099 3,283 2,295

18,382 10,800 6,080 6,242 6,046 6,046 4,190 2,690 4,820 4,120 5,520 3,815

98

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT PASSAIC RIVER (continued) 500 ft. upstream of South Jockey Hollow RoadLeddell Road crossing 1,500 ft. downstream of North Tempe Wick Road crossing Upstream of trib. 1,500 ft. upstream of North Tempe Wick Road crossing PEAPACK BROOK At upstream Township of Chester corporate limit 50 feet upstream of Farm Road PEQUANNOCK RIVER At confluence with Pompton River Upstream of the confluence of the Wanaque River At the downstream Borough of Butler corp. limit Upstream of the confluence of Stonehouse Brook Upstream of confluence of Oakwood Lake Brook Upstream of confluence of Cold Spring Brook At downstream Township of Rockaway corporate limits At upstream Township of Rockaway corporate limits

2.97

800

1,525

1,940

3,225

1.69

510

970

1,235

2,055

1.08

360

680

865

1,435

4.30 3.56

970 930

1,600 1,520

2,020 1,900

3,400 2,955

204.9 94.0 90.0 82.5 81.7 79.0

7,355 3,854 3,618 3,250 3,155 2,950

11,227 6,036 5,686 5,143 5,008 4,714

13,374 7,264 6,850 6,214 6,058 5,721

18,364 10,165 9,609 8,762 8.562 8,130

58.34

2,180

3,515

4,265

6,285

46.70

1,740

2,825

3,440

5,200

99

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT PEQUANNOCK RIVER TRIBUTARY At confluence with Pequannock River 2.51 At Green Pond Road 0.95 PINCH BROOK At confluence of Black Brook At mouth of Black Brook POMPTON RIVER At confluence with Passaic River PRIMROSE BROOK At Lees Hill Road At Baileys Mill Road near Youngs Road At Baileys Mill Road At Highway 287 Northbound RAMAPO RIVER Upstream of Pompton Lakes Dam ROCKAWAY RIVER At confluence of Passaic River Upstream of Boonton Reservoir At Pocono Road At downstream Borough of Rockaway corporate limit At downstream Denville corporate limits Upstream of confluence of Whippany River At Knoll Road Downstream of Boonton Reservoir

695 195

1,135 335

1,405 415

2,150 655

2.2 2.0

755 265

1,075 440

1,275 567

1,695 830

378

12,300

24,100

31,000

53,200

4.65 4.00 3.10 2.25

765 690 595 450

1,225 1,140 990 790

1,555 1,410 1,235 975

2,410 2,185 1,940 1,600

160

7,122

13,356

16,945

28,356

203.9 116 96.40 86.70 99.51 134 129 119

4,073 3,601 3,400 3,306 3,210 2,774 2,680 2,409

7,229 6,224 5,764 5,545 5,567 5,302 5,378 4,951

8,851 7,509 6,859 6,577 6,710 6,479 7,230 6,873

14,234 11,623 10,396 9,948 10,273 10,361 12,530 11,888

100

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT ROCKAWAY RIVER (continued) Upstream of confluence of Beaver Brook At the downstream Township of Rockaway corporate limits Upstream of confluence of Mill Brook Downstream of confluence of Green Pond Brook At confluence of Jackson Brook At the downstream Jefferson corporate limits Above the confluence of Tributary No. 5 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 6 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 1 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 2 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 4 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 7 100 feet upstream of confluence of Green Pond Brook ROCKAWAY RIVER – TRIBUTARY NO. 5 Above the confluence of Tributary No. 5-1 At the confluence of Rockaway River

63.85

2,338

3,867

4,595

6,975

60.30 57.90 45.70 47.5 27.51 13.60 12.07 24.54 22.93 17.89 9.03

2,220 1,879 1,613 1,580 995 985 985 980 955 920 810

3,706 3,209 2,774 2,767 1,630 1,615 1,615 1,605 1,565 1,510 1,335

4,425 3,850 3,331 3,325 1,980 1,985 1,985 1,955 1,910 1,845 1,650

6,782 5,925 5,129 5,120 2,900 3,100 3,100 2,850 2,800 2,700 2,650

31.19

794

1,365

1,642

2,525

1.88 3.15

230 220

380 375

490 470

770 740

101

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT ROCKAWAY RIVER – TRIBUTARY NO. 6 At confluence of Rockaway River ROCKAWAY RIVER – TRIBUTARY NO. 7 At confluence of Rockaway River

0.96

120

215

270

460

2.30

175

305

380

610

ROCKAWAY RIVER TRIBUTARY Upstream of confluence of Rockaway River 1.84 Upstream of confluence of Cedar Lake Tributary 1.16 SILVER BROOK Upstream of confluence of Great Brook

105 90

185 155

230 195

390 320

2.92

695

1,130

1,390

1,920

SOUTH BRANCH RARITAN RIVER At downstream Township of Washington corporate limits 50.0 Upstream of Conrail 46.0 Upstream of confluence of unnamed tributary 45.0 Upstream of confluence of Electric Brook 40.0 Upstream of confluence of unnamed tributary upstream of confluence of Electric Brook 36.0 Upstream of confluence of Drakes Brook 51.0 Upstream of confluence of Turkey Brook 10.0 SOUTHERN TRIBUTARY At confluence with Northern Tributary

2,670 2,440 2,310 1,940

4,200 3,840 3,640 3,060

5,000 4,570 4,330 3,640

7,220 6,590 6,250 5,260

1,650 680 385

2,610 1,070 600

3,100 1,280 720

4,470 1,840 1,035

1.23

160

257

330

480

102

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT SPRING GARDEN BROOK At confluence of Passaic River Upstream of East Madison Avenue Upstream of Dean Street Upstream of Second Main Street crossing STEPHENSBURG BROOK At confluence of Musconetcong River STONEHOUSE BROOK At confluence of Pequannock River STONY BROOK A At confluence of South Branch Raritan River

2.92 2.26 1.09 0.40

385 375 320 120

625 610 340 200

760 740 520 245

1,130 1,100 960 370

1.3

240

400

510

770

7.5

579

953

1,166

1,690

3.7

490

800

1,000

1,500

STONY BROOK B At confluence of Taylortown Reservoir Brook 3.9 SUCCASUNNA BROOK 65 feet upstream of the Eylend Avenue bridge At confluence of Lamington River

230

365

490

720

2.0 0.8

160 140

260 240

325 300

500 460

TANGLEWOOD BROOK At the downstream Township of Rockaway corporate limits 1.15 At confluence of Tanglewood Brook Tributary 1.00

265 225

440 370

545 460

835 710

103

TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT TANNERS BROOK At downstream Township of Washington corporate limits Upstream of State Route 24 Upstream of dam near Valley Road TRIBUTARY B At confluence of Musconetcong River TROY BROOK Upstream of confluence of West Brook Upstream of confluence of Whippany River Upstream of confluence of Eastmans Brook WATNONG BROOK At Lake Road At Hanover Avenue Upstream of confluence of Jaquis Brook At the most downstream Conrail crossing At downstream Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills corporate limits Upstream of confluence of Tributary No. 1 WELDON BROOK At the confluence of Lake Hopatcong Above the confluence of Tributary No. 1 to Lake Hopatcong

2.6 2.4 2.0

330 265 210

580 465 370

750 600 480

1,120 895 715

1.5

350

530

630

870

10.95 15.03 6.77

790 710 625

1,260 1,140 1,010

1,520 1,317 1,220

2,205 1,985 1,790

7.85 6.35 4.10 3.80

1,135 965 680 670

1,780 1,525 1,090 1,075

2,145 1,850 1,330 1,305

3,120 2,720 1,970 1,920

2.93 2.33

625 495

1,005 800

1,225 980

1,860 1,500

9.65

605

1,010

1,240

1,930

8.02

520

870

1,070

1,670

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TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT WEST BROOK At confluence of Troy Brook WEST DITCH Confluence with Beaver Dam Brook At Jacksonville Road WESTERN TRIBUTARY At confluence with Southern Tributary WILLS BROOK At confluence of Musconetcong River WHIPPANY RIVER At confluence of Rockaway River At Conrail At State Route 10 At Whippany Road At Morristown and Erie Railway At Parsippany Road At Eden Lane At S. Jefferson Road At USGS Gage No. 01381500 At Morristown At Cedar Knolls Road At Hanover Avenue At Pocahontas Lake At downstream Township of Morris corporate limit Above confluence with Watnong Brook At Sussex Avenue At upstream Township of Mendham corporate limit *data not computed

1.53

95

165

205

240

2.42 1.50

530 510

860 835

1,060 1,040

1,580 1,580

*

110

195

270

400

4.1

540

875

1,080

1,560

69.0 50.2 38.4 36.9 36.5 31.1 30.9 30.6 29.4 30.1 28.2 25.4 24.4 16.08 13.98 7.75

2,985 2,446 1,663 1,620 1,611 1,547 1,542 1,534 1,520 1,481 1,470 1,415 1,385 1,125 1,050 1,000

4,114 3,479 2,500 2,435 2,422 2,326 2,318 2,307 2,410 2,228 2,210 2,240 2,195 1,780 1,660 1,450

4,683 4,073 2,896 2,821 2,806 2,694 2,686 2,671 2,870 2,579 2,560 2,670 2,615 2,125 1,980 1,650

5,571 5,390 3,847 3,800 3,726 3,578 3,567 3,547 4,150 3,425 3,400 3,860 3,780 3,070 2,860 2,160

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TABLE 7 - SUMMARY OF DISCHARGES – continued FLOODING SOURCE DRAINAGE AREA ______ PEAK DISCHARGES (cfs) ______ AND LOCATION __________ (sq. miles) 10-PERCENT 2-PERCENT 1-PERCENT 0.2-PERCENT WHIPPANY RIVER (continued) At downstream Township of Mendham corporate limit At confluence of Harmony Brook

7.75 5.85

780 678

1,237 1,075

1,474 1,280

2,131 1,851

WHIPPANY RIVER TRIBUTARY At confluence with Whippany River 0.76 WHITE MEADOW BROOK At confluence with Beaver Brook 3.2

133

249

317

500

3.66

245

405

490

745

Hydraulic Analyses Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Users should be aware that flood elevations shown on the FIRM represent rounded whole-foot elevations and may not exactly reflect the elevations shown on the Flood Profiles or in the Floodway Data Tables in Volume 2 of this FIS report. For construction and/or floodplain management purposes, users are encouraged to use the flood elevation data presented in this FIS in conjunction with the data shown on the FIRM. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Locations of selected cross sections used in the hydraulic analyses are shown on the Flood Profiles (Exhibit 2). For stream segments for which a floodway was computed (Section 4.2), selected cross-section locations are also shown on the FIRM (Exhibit 1). Roughness factors (Manning's "n") used in the hydraulic computations were chosen by engineering judgment and based on field observation of the stream and floodplain area. The hydraulic analyses for this and all pre-countywide FIS were based on unobstructed flow. The flood elevations shown on the profiles are thus considered valid only if hydraulic structures remain unobstructed, operate properly, and do not fail.
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3.2.1

Pre-countywide Analysis

Each community within Morris County has a previously printed FIS report. The hydraulic analyses described within those reports have been compiled below in this revision. Town of Boonton All data for the Rockaway River upstream of the Boonton Reservoir Dam were provided by the USACE in the report Stage 2 Report, Passaic River Basin Study (Reference 58). Cross sections for the backwater analysis of the Rockaway River were determined by combining field-surveyed channel and bridge data downstream of the. Boonton Reservoir Dam with overbank topographic data taken from aerial mapping (References 72, 73, and 74). The topographic mapping, showing planimetric, riverine, and topographic data was obtained for the entire width of the 0.2-percent annual chance flood plain of the Rockaway River. Fieldsurveyed cross sections were located at close intervals upstream and downstream of bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures. In addition, cross sections were taken between hydraulic control structures as warranted by topographic changes. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River below Boonton Reservoir were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for Montville (Reference 23). Water-surface elevations upstream of Boonton Reservoir were computed by the use of outlet rating curves assuming that the bascule gates are in the down position (Reference 58). Starting water-surface elevations developed for the Rockaway River above Boonton Reservoir were taken from the water-surface elevations developed for the Boonton Reservoir (Reference 58). The hydraulic analyses for the areas subject to shallow flooding, which were determined to have an average depth of less than 1 foot, were based on the depthdischarge relationship developed by the USGS (Reference 75). Township of Boonton Data for the reanalysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway were provided by the USACE from the Stage 2 Report, Passaic River Basin Study and from topographic maps (References 58 and 73). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals.
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Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River were taken from data for the Flood Insurance Study for the Town of Boonton which is being revised concurrently with this study (Reference 32). Starting water-surface elevations for Beaver Brook, Unnamed Creek and Stony Brook were determined from routing procedures used for the Rockaway River. Township of Butler Cross-section data for the backwater analyses of the streams studied in detail were obtained from aerial photographs (Reference 76); below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. Cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures in the highly urbanized areas. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Pequannock River were determined assuming coincident peak flows at its confluence with the Pompton River. Starting water-surface elevations for Stonehouse Brook were determined by the slope/area method. Along certain portions of Stonehouse Brook, a profile base line is shown on the maps to represent channel distances as indicated on the flood profiles and floodway data tables. Borough of Chatham Cross sections for the flooding sources studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 standard step-backwater computer software. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Township of Chatham Cross sections for the flooding source studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) HEC-2 stepbackwater computer program (Reference 2). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals.

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Township of Chester Overbank portions of cross sections for the backwater analyses of all streams were obtained from mapping prepared from aerial photographs (Reference 77). The below-water sections were obtained by field measurement by Geod, Inc. in conjunction with the aerial photographs. All bridges, dams and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped stream reaches, or reaches between structures, cross-sections were located at regular intervals and at changes in valley configuration. At structures, to determine their ability to pass flood flows, cross-sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream and were used in conjunction with the significant hydraulic features of the structure. Water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed through the use of the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the Lamington River and Gladstone Brook were calculated using the slope-area method. Peapack Brook starting water-surface elevations were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Peapack and Gladstone (Reference 78). Starting water-surface elevations for Burnett Brook and Indian Brook were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Mendham (Reference 21). A more rigorous analysis was needed to determine water-surface elevations in the area common to Indian Brook and Burnett Brook. For this analysis it was assumed that once the flood elevations rose above the ridge, the combined discharge would seek a common elevation. A HEC-2 backwater analysis was performed on the individual streams to develop rating curves at locations where interflow occurs. Water-surface elevations were determined from the rating curves that corresponded to the combined discharge of the two streams. Component stream discharges were determined from the individual rating curves that corresponded to the combined discharge elevations. The appropriate "flow splits" were then used to calculate the water-surface profiles for the two streams. This procedure was repeated for each of the selected recurrence interval floods where the water-surface elevations rose above the ridge. Township of Denville Data for the reanalysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway were provided by the USACE from the Passaic River Report (which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision) and from topographic maps (References 53 and 72). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures (References 72 and 77). Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River were based on the results of the revised hydraulic analysis for the Flood
109

Insurance Study for the Township of Boonton, New Jersey, which was done concurrently with this study (Reference 12). Starting water-surface elevations for Beaver Brook, Den Brook, and Tributary to Rockaway River were calculated using the slope/area method. For the areas studied by approximate methods, the boundary of the 100-year flood was based on curves presented in "Depth-Discharge-Frequency Relationships for Non-Coastal Plain Sites in New Jersey" for the mean annual flood (Reference 75). Information supplied by local officials, field investigations, and the original Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Denville were used as a supplement (Reference 15). Town of Dover Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied in detail were field surveyed. Cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures in highly urbanized areas. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. The Rockaway River starting water-surface elevations were based on the results of the revised hydraulic analysis for the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, which was done concurrently with this study (Reference 29). Starting elevations for McKeels and Jackson Brooks correspond to the elevation at their confluence with the Rockaway River. Township of East Hanover For the January 17, 1986, FIS, water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Data for the analysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway and Whippany Rivers were obtained from the USACE Passaic River Basin Study (Reference 58). Elevations for the different floods studied were checked through an analysis of the high-water marks of previous historical floods representing discharges in the desired range of recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the 10year flood and floodway analysis for the Rockaway River were developed from the peak flood of the Rockaway River at the confluence with the Passaic River by normal depth calculations taken from the Montville study (Reference 23). The starting water-surface elevations for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods of the Rockaway River were taken from the Passaic River profiles at the confluence with the Rockaway River taken from the Montville study (Reference 23). This was done since the Rockaway River is controlled by the Passaic River when it is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River (Reference 58). Starting water-surface elevations for the Whippany River were obtained from the corresponding flood elevations at its confluence on the Rockaway River. Starting water-surface elevations for Black Brook and Pinch Brook were determined using
110

normal depth calculations. Flood elevations in the area of Black Brook and Pinch Brook were determined to be controlled by backwater effects from the Whippany River at the confluence of Black Brook. For this revision, water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Borough of Florham Park Cross sections for the flooding sources studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys and supplemented by cross sections obtained from topographic mapping (New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, 1972). All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. For the March 1, 1984, FIS, water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using USACE HEC-2 standard stepbackwater program (USACE, October 1973). Field-surveyed cross sections for the backwater analyses for Black Cat Ditch, Fish's Brook, and Pinch Brook, were supplemented by cross sections obtained from topographic mapping (DeMarzo, Borough Engineers, 1962). Starting water-surface elevations for Black Cat Ditch and Spring Garden Brook were obtained from the elevations at their respective confluences with the Passaic River. Starting water-surface elevations for the Black Brook-Hassock Brook swamp area were taken from the flood levels at the mouth of Black Brook at the Whippany River. For Pinch Brook, starting water-surface elevations were obtained from the corresponding flood elevations at its confluence with Black Brook. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations to an accuracy of 0.5 foot for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. For the June 6, 2001, FIS, the Passaic River water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using HEC-2 standard stepbackwater computer program (USACE, 1991). For this revision, water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program (USACE, May 1991). Starting water-surface elevations for Spring Garden Brook were calculated using the effective FIS water-surface elevations on the Passaic River (FEMA, June 2001). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for flood of the selected recurrence intervals. Township of Hanover Cross sections for the flooding sources studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain
111

elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Cross sections for this backwater analysis were field surveyed and were supplemented by cross sections obtained from two-foot contour interval maps provided by the township (Reference 79). Township of Harding Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Users should be aware that flood elevations shown on the FIRM represent rounded whole-foot elevations and may not exactly reflect the elevations shown on the Flood Profiles or in the Floodway Data tables in the FIS report. For construction and/or floodplain management purposes, users are encouraged to use the flood elevation data presented in this FIS in conjunction with the data shown on the FIRM. Cross sections for the flooding sources studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. The base line used for horizontal control was also obtained by field survey. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program (USACE, 1982). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Township of Jefferson Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding sources studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each of these flooding sources. Cross sections for the backwater analyses were selected at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of those structures. Channel cross sections and partial overbank cross sections were obtained through field surveys. The overbanks were extended using topographic maps compiled from aerial photographs (Reference 77). All bridges and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. With the exception of Tributary No. 1 to Lake Hopatcong, whose profiles were determined by hand calculations, all water-surface profiles of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting watersurface elevations for the Rockaway River were taken from the flood profiles in the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Rockaway (Reference 29). Starting water-surface elevations for Tributary No. 5 to Rockaway River,
112

Tributary No. 5-1 to Rockaway River, Tributary No. 7 to Rockaway River, the Pequannock River, Weldon Brook, and Tributary No. 2 to Lake Hopatcong were determined using the slope/area method. Starting water-surface elevations for Tributary No. 6 to Rockaway River were determined using the 2-year watersurface elevation of Lake Swannanoa. Starting water-surface elevations for Tributary No. 1 to Lake Hopatcong were based on the water-surface elevation of Lake Hopatcong. Hydraulic analyses of the shoreline characteristics of Lake Hopatcong were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along the shoreline. The hydraulic analyses for the lake were computed by hand calculations. Borough of Lincoln Park Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Cross-section data for the backwater analyses were obtained from aerial photographs (Reference 80); below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. Cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures in the highly urbanized areas. All bridges and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Passaic River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Wayne (Reference 81). Starting water-surface elevations for the Pompton River were determined assuming coincident peak flows at its confluence with the Passaic River. Starting watersurface elevations for Beaver Dam Brook were determined by the slope/area method. Starting water-surface elevations for East Ditch and West Ditch were determined assuming coincident peak flows with Beaver Dam Brook. Township of Long Hill Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the Passaic River were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Users should be aware that flood elevations shown on the FIRM represent rounded whole-foot elevations and may not exactly reflect the elevations shown on the Flood Profiles or in the Floodway Data tables in the FIS report. For construction and/or floodplain management purposes, users are encouraged to use the flood elevation data presented in this FIS in conjunction with the data shown on the FIRM. Cross sections for the flooding source studied by detailed methods were obtained
113

from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Borough of Madison For the March 15, 1984, FIS, cross-section information for the streams studied by detailed methods was obtained by field survey. These cross sections were supplemented by cross sections obtained from topographic maps of the borough and by plans for the auxiliary channel for Spring Garden Brook (Grassman, Kreh, & Mixer, Inc.; 1975 & Borough of Madison, undated). For this revision, cross sections for the flooding source studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. For the March 15, 1984, FIS, water-surface elevations for the Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook of floods for the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 computer program (Grassman, Kreh & Mixer, Inc., 1972). The starting water-surface elevations for Unnamed Tributary to Spring Garden Brook were taken at its confluence with Spring Garden Brook. For this revision, water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program (USACE, 1991). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed watersurface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals (Exhibit 1). Starting water-surface elevations for Spring Garden Brook were obtained from the effective FIS water-surface elevations on the Passaic River. Borough of Mendham Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the source studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Overbank portions of cross sections for the backwater analysis for the stream studied by detailed methods were determined from topographic maps prepared from aerial photographs (Reference 82). Cross sections were located at close intervals upstream and downstream from bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of those structures. Appropriate valley cross sections were also located where reach lengths between structures were long. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field-checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USGS step-backwater computer program (Reference 83). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods
114

of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the North Branch Raritan River were taken directly from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Mendham (Reference 21). Township of Mendham Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding sources studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each of these flooding sources. Channel cross section data for the North Branch Raritan River from the downstream corporate limits to State Route 24 were obtained from the New York District of the USACE (Reference 86). Overbank portions of the cross sections for this stream segment were taken from the mapping used in the preparation of North Branch Raritan River Flood Hazard Report No. 13 (Reference 87). For the remaining detailed study portion of the North Branch Raritan River, and for the remaining streams studied by detailed methods, the valley portions of the cross section data were obtained from new aerial photogrammetric mapping (Reference 77). The below water cross section data were obtained by field measurements. All bridges, dams and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped stream segments, or long segments between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and at changes in valley configuration. At structures, to determine their ability to pass flood flows, cross sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream of the structure and were used in conjunction with the significant hydraulic features of the structure. Water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed through use of the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the North Branch Raritan River were initially determined using data from the previously conducted Flood Insurance Studies for the Borough of Peapack and Gladstone and the Borough of Bernardsville (References 78 and 88). The flood profiles for the Peapack and Gladstone study were determined by interpretative analysis of USACE rating curves. The HEC-2 step-backwater program was used for the hydraulic analysis on the North Branch Raritan River within the Township of Mendham. Correct water-surface elevations at the last cross section of the Peapack and Gladstone study were inserted into the HEC-2 computer program to presumably arrive at starting water-surface elevations at the Mendham-Peapack and Gladstone corporate limits. However, the program would not accept the elevations because they were below critical depth. Therefore, acceptable water-surface elevations were used, and then routed upstream to the corporate limits, continuing to the limit of detailed study. At the Mendham-Peapack and Gladstone corporate limits a large discrepancy existed between the two studies concerning the flood elevations of the selected recurrence intervals. This was satisfactorily resolved by accepting the elevations at the cross sections located immediately downstream and upstream of the corporate limits, and then connecting the profiles between the two studies using straight lines. This solution was proposed by Anderson-Nichols and Co., Inc., and agreed upon by the
115

NJDEP and the FEMA. Starting water-surface elevations for Burnett Brook, Dawsons Brook, the Passaic River, the Whippany River and Harmony Brook were calculated using the slope/area method. Starting water-surface elevations for Indian Brook were determined from the Burnett Brook profile since both brooks peak concurrently. A more rigorous analysis was needed to determine water-surface elevations in the area common to Indian and Burnett Brooks. For this analysis it was assumed that once the flood elevations rose above a ridge between the two streams, the combined discharge would seek a common elevation. A HEC-2 backwater analysis was performed on the individual streams to develop rating curves at locations where interflow occurs. Water-surface elevations were determined from the rating curves that corresponded to the combined discharge of the two streams. Component stream discharges were determined from the individual rating curves that corresponded to the combined discharge elevation. The appropriate "flow splits" were then used to calculate the water-surface profiles for the two streams. This procedure was repeated for each of the selected recurrence interval floods where the water-surface elevations rose above the ridge. For the streams studied by approximate methods, the depth of flooding was obtained from the Depth-Discharge-Frequency Curve for Non-Coastal Plain Sites in New Jersey (Reference 69). Township of Mine Hill Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the source studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. The overbank portions of the cross sections used for the hydraulic analysis for the Lamington River was obtained from mapping prepared by Geod Aerial Mapping, Inc. (Reference 77). The below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped stream segments, or long segments between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and changes in valley configuration. At structures, to determine their ability to pass flood flows, cross sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream of the structure and used in conjunction with the significant hydraulic features of the structure. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Lamington River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Chester (Reference 67).

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determined using the Depth-Discharge-Frequency Curve for Non-Coastal Plain Sites in New Jersey with utilization of the discharges determined in the hydrologic analyses (Reference 67). Township of Montville Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Data for the reanalysis of the hydraulic model on the Passaic and Rockaway Rivers were provided by the USACE from the Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report (which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision) and from topographic maps (References 60 and 72). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effect of these structures. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. For the Passaic River, starting water-surface elevations were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Lincoln Park, which was revised concurrently with this study (Reference 4). Starting water-surface elevations for the 10-percent annual chance and floodway analysis for the Rockaway River were developed from the peak flood of the Rockaway River at the confluence with the Passaic River by normal depth calculations. The starting water-surface elevations for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods of the Rockaway River were taken from the Passaic River profiles at the confluence with the Rockaway River. This was done since the Rockaway River is controlled by the Passaic River when it is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River. Starting water-surface elevations for Hatfield rook, Crooked Brook, and Crooked Brook Tributary were determined using normal depth elevations or coincidental elevations on the main stem, depending on the hydraulic conditions. Starting water-surface elevations for Beaver Brook were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for Lincoln Park (Reference 4). For Stony Brook, starting water-surface elevations were determined from a rating curve for Deer Park Dam. Two methods were used to determine elevations for the streams not studied in detail. In those areas where the stream channels contain one or more structures, the 100-year discharges were obtained from Township of Montville Storm-Water Master Plan (Reference 89). The discharges were modified by the appropriate factor for this region to obtain the mean annual flood. From the mean annual flood chart, the depth of flow was obtained (Reference 75). In cases where no structure crossed the stream, the rational formula was used to calculate the mean annual flood. The intensity (i) was interpolated for the mean annual flood. The depth of flow was obtained in the method referenced above.

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Borough of Morris Plains Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Users should be aware that flood elevations shown on the FIRM represent rounded whole-foot elevations and may not exactly reflect the elevations shown on the Flood Profiles or in the Floodway Data tables in the FIS report. For construction and/or floodplain management purposes, users are encouraged to use the flood elevation data presented in this FIS in conjunction with the data shown on the FIRM. Cross sections for the flooding sources studied by detailed methods were obtained from field surveys. All bridges, dams, and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) HEC-2 stepbackwater computer program. The computer models for Watnong Brook and Jaquis Brook were calibrated with the aid of flood mark information obtained during the flood of August 1971. Cross sections for the backwater analyses of Watnong Brook and Jaquis Brook were determined by combining field-surveyed channel and bridge data with overbank topographic data taken from aerial mapping (Reference 90). The field-surveyed sections were located at close intervals upstream and downstream of bridges and culverts in order to compute significant backwater effects of these structures. In addition, cross sections were taken between hydraulic controls wherever warranted by topographic changes. Starting water-surface elevations for Watnong Brook were obtained from flood profiles of Whippany River computed for the Township of Morris (Reference 24). Starting elevations for Jaquis Brook were obtained from flood profiles of Watnong Brook computed for this study. Due to the extreme meandering nature of streams in the study area, stream distances will not always agree between maps and profiles. The average depths used for the shallow flooding analysis were based on weir computations and field surveys. For streams studied by approximate methods, the depth-discharge relationship developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was utilized to determine approximate 1-percent annual chance flood elevations (Reference 75). Township of Morris Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of streams in the community were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each stream studied in the community. Water-surface elevations were computed using the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. The cross sections for the backwater analyses of Whippany River, Watnong Brook, and Great Brook were determined
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by combining newly field-surveyed channel and bridge data with overbank topographic data taken from aerial mapping at a scale of 1:12,00, with a 2-foot contour interval (Reference 90). The field-surveyed sections were located at close intervals upstream and downstream of bridges and culverts in order to compute significant backwater effects of these structures. In addition, cross sections were taken between hydraulic controls wherever warranted by topographic changes. Starting water-surface elevations for Whippany River were obtained from rating curves at the U.S. Geological Survey Morristown Gaging Station No. 01381500. Starting elevations for Watnong Brook were obtained from flood profiles of Whippany River computed for this study. Starting water-surface elevations for Great Brook were determined by the slope-area method. The computer models for Whippany River, Watnong Brook, and Great Brook were calibrated with the aid of floodmark information obtained during the floods of August 1971. Due to the extreme meandering nature of streams in the study area, stream distances will not always agree between maps and profiles. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations to an accuracy of 0.5 foot for floods of the selected recurrence intervals (Exhibit 1). For streams studied by approximate methods, the depth-discharge relationship developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (Reference 75), was utilized to determine approximate 100-year flood elevations. Town of Morristown Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the Whippany River and Great Brook were determined by combining newly field-surveyed channel and bridge data with overbank topographic data taken from aerial mapping (Reference 90). The fieldsurveyed sections were located at close intervals upstream and downstream of bridges and culverts in order to compute significant backwater effects of these structures. Cross sections were also taken between hydraulic controls wherever warranted by topographic changes. The base line used for horizontal control along Pocahontas and Speedwell Lakes was also obtained by field survey. In the revised study for Great Brook, additional cross sections were taken between the downstream corporate limits and James Street. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. The computer models for the Whippany River and Great Brook were calibrated with the aid of floodmark information obtained during the flood of August 1971.

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Starting water-surface elevations for the Whippany River were obtained from rating curves at the USGS gage in Morristown (Reference 53). Starting watersurface elevations for Great Brook were determined by the slope/area method. Due to the extreme meandering nature of streams in the study area, stream distances will not always agree between maps and profiles. Township of Mount Olive Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding sources studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each of these flooding sources. Estimates of the elevations of floods the selected recurrence intervals along the Musconetcong River were obtained using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were obtained from aerial photographs taken in December 1977 at a negative scale of 1:2,400, with the exception of the aerial photographs of the South Branch Raritan River which were flown in April 1968 and the Conlon Pond Brook aerial photographs which were flown in 1973 (References 72, 76 and 91). The below-water sections for the Musconetcong River were obtained from the USACE and the State of New Jersey Works Project Administration (References 92 and 93). The below-water sections for Wills Brook, the South Branch Raritan River, Budd Lake Tributary, Drakes Brook and Conlon Pond Brook were obtained from field measurements. All bridges, dams and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped areas or where long distances exist between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and at changes in topography. At structures, cross sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream and used in conjunction with significant hydraulic features of the structures. The acceptability of all assumed hydraulic factors, cross sections and hydraulic structure data was checked by computations that duplicated historic flood water profiles. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed through the use of the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the Musconetcong River and the South Branch Raritan River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Washington, Morris County (Reference 31). For Wills Brook, Budd Lake Tributary and Drakes Brook, starting water-surface elevations were calculated using the slope/area method. Water-surface elevations for Conlon Pond Brook were taken at its confluence with Drakes Brook. Borough of Netcong Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding source studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along this flooding source.
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Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the Musconetcong River were obtained from aerial photographs flown in December 1977 (Reference 72). The below water sections were obtained from the USACE and the State of New Jersey Works Project Administration (WPA) (References 92 and 93). All bridges, dams and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped stream segments, or long segments between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and at changes in valley configuration. At structures, to determine their ability to pass flood flows, cross sections were taken at close intervals up and downstream and used in conjunction with the significant hydraulic features of the structures. Flood profiles for the floods of the selected recurrence intervals were determined using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the Musconetcong River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Mt. Olive (Reference 25). Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Cross sections for the backwater analysis of the Rockaway River and Whippany River provided by the USACE were determined by combining field surveyed channel and bridge data with overbank topographic data taken from aerial mapping (Reference 72). Channel cross sections and partial overbank cross sections for Troy Brook, West Brook, Eastmans Brook, and Watnong Brook were obtained through field surveys and topographic data (Reference 91). All bridges and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Along certain portions of Troy Brook and Eastmans Brook, a profile base line is shown on the maps to represent channel distances as indicated on the flood profiles and floodway data tables. Along certain portions of the Rockaway River through Boonton Reservoir, a profile base line is shown coincident with the corporate limits to represent channel distances as indicated on the flood profiles and floodway data tables. Portions of the data for the hydraulic analyses on the Rockaway River were taken from the Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Study, which is a preliminary, unpublished, ongoing study, subject to revision (Reference 60). Starting watersurface elevations for the 10-percent annual chance flood and floodway analysis for the Rockaway River downstream of Boonton Reservoir were developed from the peak flood of the Rockaway River at the confluence with the Passaic River by normal depth calculations (Reference 23). The starting water-surface elevations for the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance floods of the Rockaway River were
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taken from the Passaic River profiles at the confluence with the Rockaway River (Reference 23). This was done since the Rockaway River is controlled by the Passaic River when it is peaking just downstream of the Pompton River (Reference 60). Water-surface elevations upstream of the Boonton Reservoir Dam were computed by the use of outlet rating curves assuming that the bascule gates are in the down position (Reference 60). Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River above Boonton Reservoir were taken from the water-surface elevations developed upstream of the Boonton Reservoir Dam (Reference 60). The starting water-surface elevations on the Whippany River were taken from the flood profiles for the Rockaway River, since the two streams are affected by similar hydrologic conditions. The starting water-surface elevations for Watnong Brook were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for Morris Plains (Reference 7). The starting elevations for all the other detailed streams in the township were determined using the slope/area method. Township of Pequannock Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Cross-section data for the backwater analyses were obtained from aerial photographs (Reference 76); below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. Cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures in the highly urbanized areas. All bridges and culverts were field surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) HEC-2 stepbackwater computer program (Reference 8). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Pompton River, East Ditch, and West Ditch were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Lincoln Park (Reference 4). Starting water-surface elevations for the Pequannock River, the Ramapo River, Northern, Southern, and Western Tributaries were determined assuming coincident peak flows. The 0.2-percent annual chance elevations for East Ditch, from the downstream corporate limits to Sunset Road, are controlled by the Pompton River. For the streams studied by approximate methods, the extent of the 100-year flood was determined using depth-discharge-frequency relationships for coastal and non-coastal floodplain sites in New Jersey (Reference 59). Township of Randolph Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals.
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Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed and were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures. The South Morris Street and Old Mill Road bridges over Mill Brook, and the Rickland Drive bridge over Den Brook were not modeled because their effects on the backwater analyses were not considered significant. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Rockaway, New Jersey, which was done concurrently with this study (Reference 29). Because of the mountainous topography of the area, most of the streams present rapid flow regimes (supercritical flow) in the upper parts of their watersheds. Such is the case for Mill Brook and Den Brook. Stream segments presenting supercritical flow approached critical flow for the range of discharges studied. Critical flow is defined as flow at a depth of minimum specific energy (Reference 16). This circumstance produces an inherent flow instability because the water moves with close to minimum energy and small disturbances can cause sudden increases or decreases in elevation. In this regime, due to the inherent flow instability, backwater programs such as HEC-2 are unreliable. Flood elevations for streams in this condition were approximated by a trial and error procedure involving computer runs for subcritical (tranquil flow regime) and supercritical flow conditions. Where flow regimes present supercritical flow, elevations no lower than critical were used. Borough of Riverdale Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the source studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Cross-section data for the backwater analyses were obtained from aerial photographs (Reference 76); below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. Cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures in the highly urbanized areas. All bridges and culverts were surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Pequannock River were determined assuming coincident peak flows at its confluence with the Pompton River.

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Borough of Rockaway Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Data for the reanalysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway River were provided by the USACE from the Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report (which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision) and from topographic maps (References 60 and 72). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures (References 72 and 77). Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Denville (Reference 15). Starting water-surface elevations for Beaver Brook and Fox Brook were calculated using the slope/area method. Township of Rockaway Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Data for the reanalysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway River were obtained from a USACE report, topographic maps, and the Flood Insurance Studies for the Borough of Wharton and the Township of Denville (References 60, 72, 80, 11, and 15). Hydraulic data for Beaver Brook downstream of Old Beach Glen Road were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Denville and topographic maps (References 17 and 15). Hydraulic data for Green Pond Brook upstream of Interstate Route 80 were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Wharton and topographic maps (References 19 and 77). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to compute the significant backwater effects of these structures. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program (Reference 20). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals.

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Along certain portions of White Meadow Brook, a profile base line is shown on the maps to represent channel distances as indicated on the flood profiles and floodway data tables. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River and Beaver Brook were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Denville (Reference 80). Starting water-surface elevations for the Pequannock River were obtained from a rating curve of the Charlotteburg Reservoir outlet structure, which controls the water-surface elevations on the river by automatic gages. Starting watersurface elevations for Green Pond Brook, White Meadow Brook, Tributary to Pequannock River, and Tanglewood Brook were determined by the slope/area method. Starting water-surface elevations for Hibernia Brook were determined assuming coincident peak flows at its confluence with Beaver Brook. All elevations are referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD). Elevation reference marks used in this study are shown on the maps. For areas studied by approximate methods, the extent of the 100-year flood was based on curves for the mean annual flood and the detailed hydraulic analysis performed in this study (Reference 75). Information supplied by local officials, field investigations, and the original Flood Insurance Study for Rockaway were used as a supplement (Reference 29). Township of Roxbury Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding sources studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each of these flooding sources. The overbank portions of the cross sections used for the hydraulic analyses for the Lamington River, the Musconetcong River upstream of the Conrail crossing, the Rockaway River, Drakes Brook upstream of Carey Road, and Succasunna Brook were obtained from mapping prepared by Geod Aerial Mapping, Inc. (Reference 77). The below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. The overbank portions of the cross sections for the Musconetcong River downstream of the Conrail crossing were obtained from mapping prepared by Aerial Data Reduction Associates, Inc. (Reference 72). The below-water sections were obtained by field measurement. The overbank portions of the cross sections for Drakes Brook downstream of Carey Road were obtained by mapping prepared by Quinn and Associates (Reference 76). The below-water sections were obtained by field measurement from the Drakes Brook Flood Hazard Report No. 10 technical backup (Reference 94). All bridges, dams, and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped stream segments, or long segments between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and changes in valley configuration. At structures, to determine their ability to pass flood flows, cross sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream of the structure
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and used in conjunction with the significant hydraulic features of the structure. Water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed through use of the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the Lamington River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Chester, New Jersey (Reference 14). Starting water-surface elevations for the Musconetcong River were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Borough of Stanhope, New Jersey (Reference 95). For the Rockaway River, starting water-surface elevations were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Jefferson, New Jersey (Reference 19). For Drakes Brook, the starting water-surface elevations were taken from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Mount Olive, New Jersey (Reference 25). Starting water-surface elevations for Succasunna Brook were determined using the slope/area method. For the streams studied by approximate methods, the depth of flooding was determined using the Depth-Discharge-Frequency Curve for Non-Coastal Plain Sites in New Jersey with utilization of the discharges determined in the hydrologic analyses (Reference 67). Hydraulic analyses of the shoreline characteristics of the lacustrine floding source studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along the shoreline. HEC-2 backwater calculations were computed up to Lake Hopatcong, and continued by hand for the lake itself. Township of Washington Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of the flooding sources studied in detail were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals along each of these flooding sources. Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods, excluding the South Branch Raritan River, were obtained from photogrammetric mapping at a scale of 1:2,400 with a contour interval of 5 feet, which were compiled from aerial photographs taken in December 1977 at a negative scale of 1:21,600 (Reference 72). The photogrammetric mapping used for the backwater analyses of the South Branch Raritan River were complied from aerial photographs taken in April 1968 (Reference 76). The below-water sections for the Musconetcong River were obtained from the USACE and the State of New Jersey Works Project Administration (References 92 and 93). The below-water sections for the remaining streams studied by detailed methods were obtained from recent field measurements. All bridges, dams and culverts were field checked to obtain elevation data and structural geometry. In undeveloped areas or where long distances exist between structures, cross sections were located at regular intervals and at changes in topography. At structures, cross sections were taken at close intervals upstream and downstream and used in conjunction with significant hydraulic features of the structures. A footbridge on Tanners Brook was not considered in the hydraulic analyses since it would not affect the watersurface elevations.

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The acceptability of all assumed hydraulic factors, cross sections and hydraulic structure data were checked by computations that duplicated historic flood water profiles. Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed through the use of the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program. Starting water-surface elevations for the Musconetcong River and the South Branch Raritan River were obtained from the Flood Insurance Study for the Township of Lebanon (Reference 96). For the remaining streams studied by detailed methods, starting water-surface elevations were calculated using the slope/area method. There are two outlets from Drakes Brook Overflow Channel to the South Branch Raritan River. The main outlet is at the confluence with the South Branch Raritan River; however, there is a secondary, lowflow, outlet at a Conrail bridge approximately 1,135 feet upstream of the confluence. A HEC-2 step-backwater analysis for Drakes Brook Overflow Channel was performed from the outlet at the Conrail bridge to Station 3470. Starting watersurface elevations for the HEC-2 analysis were taken from hydraulic calculations. From the HEC-2 analysis, it was determined that the 10-percent annual chance flood discharges would pass through the Conrail bridge; however, a portion of the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance flood discharges would continue to flow between Bartley Road and Conrail. Therefore, no 10-percent annual chance water-surface elevation is shown on the profile beyond the outlet at the Conrail bridge. For the 2-, 1-, and 0.2-percent annual chance profiles between the Conrail bridge and the South Branch Raritan River, the water-surface elevations were taken from the flood profiles for the South Branch Raritan River since it controls the flood elevations for this portion of Drakes Brook Overflow Channel. The water-surface profiles for Drakes Brook Overflow Channel upstream of Station 3470 were taken from the Drakes Brook profiles since Drakes Brook controls water-surface elevations between Station 3470 and Drakes Brook. For the streams studied by approximate methods, the 100-year flood boundary on the Flood Hazard Boundary Map for the Township of Washington was modified using normal depth calculations (Reference 31). Borough of Wharton Analyses of the hydraulic characteristics of flooding from the sources studied were carried out to provide estimates of the elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Data for the analysis of the hydraulic model on the Rockaway River were provided by the USACE from the Passaic River Report (which is a preliminary, ongoing study, subject to revision) and from topographic maps (References 60, 77 and 80). Cross sections for the backwater analyses of the streams studied by detailed methods were field surveyed. The cross sections were located at close intervals above and below bridges and culverts in order to Compute the significant backwater effects of these structures. All bridges and culverts were surveyed to obtain elevation data and structural geometry.
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Water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals were computed using the USACE HEC-2 step-backwater computer program (Reference 10). Flood profiles were drawn showing computed water-surface elevations for floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Starting water-surface elevations for the Rockaway River were based on the results of the revised hydraulic analysis for the Town of Dover, New Jersey, Flood Insurance Study, which was done concurrently with this study (Reference 33). Starting watersurface elevations for Green Pond Brook were taken from neither the Flood Insurance Study nor the Township of Rockaway (Reference 29). 3.2.2 This Countywide Study

The techniques and tools utilized to perform the hydraulic analyses in this FIS study meet FEMA’s adopted standards. No individual community criteria were incorporated within this study. Cross-sections for Burnett Brook, Fox Brook, Harmony Brook, Hibernia Brook, Indian Brook, Passaic River, Whippany River and West Ditch were determined from topographic maps with underwater portions obtained from field surveys. Information for bridges and dams were obtained from field survey data. Starting water-surface elevations for both gaged and ungaged study streams were determined by using the slope/area method. The USACE HEC-RAS computer program was used to compute water-surface elevations of floods of the selected recurrence intervals. Water surface profiles were produced for the 10-, 2-, 1- and 0.2-percent-annualchance storms for detailed study streams and for the 1-percent-annual chance storm for the approximate studies. Locations of selected cross sections used in hydraulic analysis of each stream are shown on the Flood Profiles (Exhibit 2). For stream segments for which a floodway was computed (Section 4.2), selected cross-section locations are also shown on the FIRM (Exhibit 1). At some locations along study streams, hydraulic conditions may create a situation of supercritical flow. Because if the inherent instability of such a condition, an assumption of critical flow has been adopted for backwater analyses. The hydraulic analyses for this FIS were based on unobstructed flow. The flood elevations shown on the profiles are thus considered valid only if the hydraulic structures remain unobstructed, operate properly, and do not fail. 3.2.3 Parameter Estimation for This Study

Channel roughness factors (Manning’s “n”) used in the hydraulic computations were chosen by engineering judgment and field inspection of the stream and floodplain areas. For Burnett Brook, Fox Brook, Harmony Brook, Hibernia Brook, Indian Brook, Passaic Brook, West Ditch and Whippany River, an “n” value of 0.015 was used for concrete structures, and a weighted average “n” value
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was used for bridges with steel decks, concrete abutments and earthen bottoms. Non-effective flow areas were disregarded by using extremely high “n” values. The acceptability of all assumed hydraulic factors, cross-sections, and hydraulic structure data were checked by calibrating computed flood profiles to known historic profiles. Table 8, “Manning’s “n” Values”, provides as listing of roughness coefficients used in the detailed models done for this countrywide study. TABLE 8 - MANNING’S “N” VALUES Stream Beaver Brook B Beaver Dam Brook Black Cat Ditch Black Brook B Budd Lake Tributary Burnett Brook Conlon Pond Brook Crooked Brook Dawsons Brook Den Brook Drakes Brook Drakes Brook Overflow Channel East Ditch Eastmans Brook Electric Brook Fish’s Brook Fox Brook Gladstone Brook Great Brook Green Pond Brook Harmony Brook Hatfield Creek Hibernia Brook Indian Brook Jackson Brook Lamington River Malapardis Brook McKeels Brook Mill Brook Musconetcong River North Branch Raritan River Northern Tributary Passaic River Peapack Brook Pequannock River Pinch Brook Pompton River Channel “n” 0.020-0.035 0.015-0.045 0.030-0.045 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.055 0.015-0.040 0.030-0.055 0.020-0.030 0.045 0.022-0.045 0.045-0.050 0.035 0.015-0.050 0.017-0.035 0.030-0.045 0.018-0.033 0.030-0.045 0.015-0.040 0.020-0.040 0.030-0.035 0.015-0.045 0.020-0.030 0.030-0.035 0.015-0.040 0.030 0.028-0.040 0.030-0.045 0.030 0.030-0.045 0.015-0.050 0.045-0.070 0.025-0.035 0.025-0.060 0.015-0.040 0.020-0.080 0.030-0.035 0.020-0.030
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Overbank “n” 0.050-0.110 0.050-0.090 0.080-0.120 0.080-0.100 0.040-0.085 0.040-0.090 0.030-0.090 0.060 0.060-0.075 0.080-0.125 0.080-0.120 0.060 0.030-0.100 0.040-0.125 0.040-0.075 0.080-0.110 0.080-0.120 0.040-0.090 0.080-0.110 0.080-0.125 0.055-0.080 0.060 0.100 0.040-0.090 0.060 0.060-0.080 0.080-0.120 0.060 0.060-0.080 0.050-0.120 0.055-0.110 0.100 0.030-0.200 0.040-0.090 0.060-0.200 0.080-0.120 0.050-0.130

TABLE 8 - MANNING’S “N” VALUES - continued Stream Primrose Brook Ramapo River Rockaway River Silver Brook South Branch Raritan River Southern Tributary Stephensburg Brook Stonehouse Brook Stony Brook A Stony Brook B Succasunna Brook Tanglewood Brook Tanners Brook Tributary to Great Brook Tributary to Pequannock River Tributary to Rockaway River Tributary 1 to Lake Hopatcong Tributary 2 to Lake Hopatcong Tributary 5 to Rockaway River Tributary 5-1 to Rockaway River Tributary 6 to Rockaway River Tributary 7 to Rockaway River Tributary B Troy Brook Unnamed Tributary to Whippany River Watnong Brook Weldon Brook West Brook West Ditch Western Tributary Whippany River White Meadow Brook Wills Brook 3.3 Vertical Datum All FIS reports and FIRMs are reference to a specific vertical datum. The vertical datum provides a starting point against which flood, ground and structure elevations can be referenced and compared. Until recently, the standard vertical datum used for newly created or revised FIS reports and FIRMs was the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD). With the completion of the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD), many FIS reports and FIRMs are now prepared using NAVD as the referenced vertical datum. Flood elevations shown in this report and on the FIRM are referenced to the NAVD. These flood elevations must be compared to structure and ground elevations referenced to the same vertical datum. Some of the data used in this
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Channel “n” 0.020-0.040 0.020-0.045 0.012-0.045 0.020-0.040 0.045-0.055 0.025-0.035 0.035-0.050 0.013-0.140 0.040-0.045 0.020-0.030 0.030-0.040 0.035 0.030-0.045 0.020-0.040 0.030-0.035 0.015-0.033 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.022-0.035 0.030-0.045 0.015-0.040 0.030-0.040 0.033-0.035 0.015-0.080 0.025-0.035 0.025-0.045 0.030-0.035 0.035-0.040

Overbank “n” 0.080-0.110 0.060-0.250 0.035-0.180 0.080-0.110 0.050-0.120 0.100 0.060-0.090 0.030-0.200 0.060-0.080 0.060 0.070 0.080 0.050-0.085 0.080-0.110 0.100 0.080-0.110 0.070-0.150 0.070-0.150 0.070-0.150 0.070-0.150 0.070-0.150 0.070-0.150 0.090 0.080-0.120 0.080-0.120 0.060-0.125 0.070-0.150 0.090-0.125 0.050-0.200 0.100 0.070-0.100 0.100 0.060-0.130

revision were taken from prior effective FIS reports and FIRMs and adjusted to NAVD88. That datum conversion factor from NGVD29 to NAVD in Morris County is 0.78 feet. For additional information regarding conversion between the NGVD and NAVD, visit the National Geodetic Survey website at www.ngs.noaa.gov, or contact the National Geodetic Survey at the following address: NGS Information Services NOAA, N/NGS 12 National Geodetic Survey SSMC-3, #9202 1315 East-West Highway Silver Spring, Maryland 20910-3282 (301) 713-3242 Qualifying benchmarks within a given jurisdiction that are cataloged by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and entered into the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS) as First or Second Order Vertical and have a vertical stability classification of A, B or C are shown and labeled on the FIRM with their 6character NSRS Permanent Identifier. Benchmarks cataloged by the NGS and entered into the NSRS vary widely in vertical stability classification. NSRS vertical stability classifications are as follows: • • • • Stability A: Monuments of the most reliable nature, expected to hold position/elevation well (e.g.; mounted in bedrock) Stability B: Monuments with generally hold their position/elevation well (e.g.; concrete bridge abutment) Stability C: Monuments which may be affected by surface ground movements (e.g.; concrete monument below frost line) Stability D: Mark of questionable or unknown vertical stability (e.g.; concrete monument above frost line, or steel witness post)

In addition to NSRS benchmarks, the FIRM may also show vertical control monuments established by a local jurisdiction; these monuments will be down on the FIRM with the appropriate designations. Local monuments will only be placed on the FIRM of the community has requested that they be included, and if the monuments meet the aforementioned NSRS inclusion criteria. To obtain current elevation, description, and/or location information for benchmarks shown on the FIRM for this jurisdiction, please contact the Information Services Branch of the NGS at (301) 713-3242 or visit their Web site at www.ngs.noaa.gov. It is important to note that temporary vertical monuments are often established
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during the preparation of a flood hazard analysis for the purpose of establishing local vertical control. 4.0 FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT APPLICATIONS The National Flood Insurance Program encourages State and local governments to adopt sound flood plain management programs. To assist in this endeavor, each FIS report provides 1-percent-annual-chance floodplain data, which may include a combination of the following: 10-, 2-, 1- and 0.2-percent-annual-chance flood elevations; delineations of 1- and 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplains; and 1-percent-annual-chance floodway. This information is presented on the FIRM and in many components of the FIS report, including Flood Profiles, Floodway Data Tables, and Summary of Stillwater Elevation tables. Users should reference the data presented in the FIS report as well as additional information that may be available at the local community map repository before making flood elevation and/or floodplain boundary determinations. 4.1 Floodplain Boundaries To provide a national standard without regional discrimination, the 1-percentannual-chance (100-year) flood has been adopted by FEMA as the base flood for flood plain management purposes. The 0.2-percent-annual-chance (500-year) flood is employed to indicate additional areas of flood risk in the community. For each stream studied in detail, the 1- and 0.2-percent annual chance plain boundaries have been delineated using the flood elevations determined at each cross section. Between cross sections, the boundaries were interpolated based on data provided by the Highlands Council and Earthdata. Terrain data was developed using LIDAR data collected by the Highlands Council (2 meter post spacing) and Earthdata (5,000 foot flying height and 2 meter post spacing). The data has a fundamental vertical accuracy of 1.2 feet or better at a 95% confidence level. The vertical RMSE is 0.6 feet (18.5 cm) when errors follow a normal distribution. The 1- and 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplain boundaries are shown on the FIRM (Exhibit 2). On this map, the 1-percent-annual-chance floodplain boundary corresponds to the boundary of the areas of special flood hazards (Zones A, AE) and 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplain boundary corresponds to the boundary of areas of moderate flood hazards (Zone X). In cases where the 1- and 0.2percent-annual-chance floodplain boundaries are close together, only the 1percent-annual-chance floodplain boundary has been shown. Small areas within the floodplain boundaries may lie above the flood elevations but cannot be shown due to limitations of map scale and/or lack of detailed topographic date. 4.2 Floodways Encroachment on floodplains, such as structures and fill, reduces flood-carrying capacity, increases flood heights and velocities, and increases flood hazards in areas beyond the encroachment itself. One aspect of flood plain management involves balancing the economic gain from flood plain development against the

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resulting increase in flood hazard. For purposes of the National Flood Insurance Program, a floodway is used as a tool to assist local communities in this aspect of flood plain management. Under this concept, the area of the 100-year flood plain is divided into a floodway and a floodway fringe. The floodway is the channel of a stream, plus any adjacent flood plain areas, that must be kept free of encroachment so that the 100-year flood can be carried without substantial increases in flood heights. Minimum federal standards limit such increases to 1.0 foot, provided that hazardous velocities are not produced. However, the State of New Jersey has established criteria limiting the increase in flood heights to 0.2 foot. Thus, floodways having no more than a 0.2-foot surcharge have been delineated for this study. The floodways in this study are presented to local agencies as minimum standards that can be adopted directly or that can be used as a basis for additional floodway studies. The floodways presented in this study were computed on the basis of equal conveyance reduction from each side of the flood plain. The results of these computations are tabulated at selected cross sections for each stream segment for which a floodway is computed (Volume 2, Table 9). Encroachment into areas subject to inundation by floodwaters having hazardous velocities aggravates the risk of flood damage, and heightens potential flood hazards by further increasing velocities. A listing of stream velocities at selected cross sections is provided in (Table 9). In order to reduce the risk of property damage in areas where the stream velocities are high, the community may wish to restrict development in areas outside the floodway. As shown on the Flood Boundary and Floodway Map, the floodway boundaries were computed at cross sections. Between cross sections, the boundaries were interpolated. In cases where the floodway and 100-year flood plain boundaries are either close together or collinear, only the floodway boundary has been shown. Near the mouths of streams studied in detail, floodway computations are made without regard to flood elevations on the receiving water body. Therefore, "Without Floodway" elevations presented in (Table 9) for certain downstream cross sections may be lower than the regulatory flood elevations in that area, which must take into account the 1-percent-annual-chance flood due to backwater from other sources. No floodways were computed for streams studied by enhanced approximate and approximate methods. Along streams where floodways have not been computed, the community must ensure that the cumulative effect of development in the floodplains will not cause more than a 1.0-foot increase in the base flood elevations at any point within the county.

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The area between the floodway and 100-year flood plain boundaries is termed the floodway fringe. The floodway fringe encompasses the portion of the flood plain that could be completely obstructed without increasing the water-surface elevation of the 100-year flood by more than 0.2 foot at any point. Typical relationships between the floodway and the floodway fringe and their significance to flood plain development are shown in Figure 1.

No floodways were calculated with the community limits of the Borough of Mendham.

5.0

INSURANCE APPLICATION For flood insurance rating purposes, flood insurance zone designations are assigned to a community based on the results of the engineering analyses. These zones are as follows: Zone A Zone A is the flood insurance rate zone that corresponds to the 1-percent-annual-chance floodplains that are determined in the FIS report by approximate methods. Because detailed hydraulic analyses are not performed for such areas, no base (1-percent-annualchance) flood elevations (BFEs) or depths are shown within these zones. Zone AE Zone AE is the flood insurance rate zone that corresponds to the 1-percent-annual-chance floodplains that are determined in the FIS report by detailed methods. Whole-foot BFEs

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derived from the detailed hydraulic analyses are shown at selected intervals within this zone. Zone X Zone X is the flood insurance rate zone that corresponds to areas outside the 0.2-percentannual-chance floodplain, areas within the 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplain, areas of 1-percent-annual-chance flooding where the contributing drainage area is less than 1 square mile, and areas protected from the base flood by levees. No BFEs or depths are shown within this zone. 6.0 FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP The FIRM is designed for flood insurance and floodplain management applications. For flood insurance applications, the map designates flood insurance rate zones as described in Section 5.0 and, in the 100-year floodplains that were studied by detailed methods, shows selected whole-foot base flood elevations or average depths. Insurance agents use the zones and base flood elevations in conjunction with information on structures and their contents to assign premium rates for flood insurance policies. For floodplain management applications, the map shows by tints, screens, and symbols, the 1- and 0.2-percent annual chance floodplains. On selected FIRM panels, floodways and the locations of selected cross sections used in the hydraulic analyses and floodway computations are shown. The current FIRM presents flooding information for the entire geographic area of Morris County. Previously, separate FIRMs were prepared for each identified floodprone incorporated community and for the unincorporated areas of the county. Historical data relating to the maps prepared for each community are presented in Table 10, “Community Map History”. 7.0 OTHER STUDIES Information pertaining to revised and unrevised flood hazards for each jurisdiction within Morris County has been compiled into the FIS. Therefore, this FIS supercedes all previously printed FIS reports, FIRMs, and/or FBFMs for all the incorporated areas and unincorporated jurisdictions within Morris County, and should be considered authoritative for the purposes of the NFIP. This is a multi-volume FIS. Each volume may be revised separately, in which case it supercedes the previously printed volume. Users should refer to the Table of Contents in Volume 1 for the current effective date of each volume; volume bearing these dates contain the most up-to-date flood hazard data.

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8.0

LOCATION OF DATA Information concerning the pertinent data used in the preparation of this study can be obtained by contacting Federal Insurance and Mitigation Division, FEMA Region II, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1351, New York, NY, 10278. Contact the FEMA Map Information eXchange or FMIX at 1-877-FEMA-MAP (1-877336-2627) for information on available products associated with this FIS. Available products may include previously issued Letters of Map Change, a Flood Insurance Study report, and/or digital versions of this map. The FEMA Map Information eXchange may also be reached by Fax at 1-800-358-9620 and its website http://www.msc.fema.gov.

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COMMUNITY
NAME

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP REVISION DATE(S)
June 4, 1976

FIRM EFFECTIVE DATE

FIRM
REVISION DATE(S)

Boonton, Town of

May 28, 1974

May 19, 1981

April 17, 1985

Boonton, Township of

May 31, 1974

--

September 1, 1978

April 17, 1985

Butler, Borough of

February 1, 1974

April 30, 1976

October 15, 1985

--

Chatham, Borough of

June 1, 1973

--

February 14, 1976

July 19, 2001

Chatham, Township of

July 27, 1973

July 23, 1976

March 15, 1980

July 19, 2001

Chester, Township of

December 6, 1974

December 15, 1978

April 1, 1982

--

Denville, Township of

June 26, 1971

--

June 26, 1971

April 17, 1985

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

TABLE 10

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ
(ALL JURISDICTIONS)

COMMUNITY MAP HISTORY

137

COMMUNITY
NAME

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP REVISION DATE(S)
July 9, 1976

FIRM EFFECTIVE DATE

FIRM
REVISION DATE(S)

Dover, Town of

March 16, 1973

September 5, 1979

July 4, 1989

East Hanover, Township of

August 31, 1973

--

April 16, 1979

June 6, 2001

Florham Park, Borough of

June 28, 1974

June 4, 1976

September 14, 1979

December 20, 2002

Hanover, Township of

December 21, 1973

January 3, 1975

December 1, 1977

June 6, 2001

Harding, Township of

April 12, 1974

February 20, 1976

March 15, 1982

December 6, 2001

Jefferson, Township of

October 25, 1974

June 18, 1976

July 5, 1983

--

Lincoln Park, Borough of

September 15, 1971

--

September 15, 1971

July 19, 1986

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

TABLE 10

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ
(ALL JURISDICTIONS)

COMMUNITY MAP HISTORY

138

COMMUNITY
NAME

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP REVISION DATE(S)
--

FIRM EFFECTIVE DATE

FIRM
REVISION DATE(S)

Long Hill, Township of

February 15, 1974

October 14, 1977

September 21, 2001

Madison, Borough of

July 16, 1979

--

July 16, 1979

April 15, 2002

Mendham, Borough of

January 31, 1975

--

November 4, 1992

--

Mendham, Township of

September 17, 1976

December 15, 1978

July 5, 1982

--

Mine Hill, Township of

January 7, 1977

--

September 10, 1982

May 3, 1993

Montville, Township of

December 28, 1973

August 13, 1976

February 15, 1980

August 19, 1985

Morris Plains, Borough of

June 28, 1974

July 2, 1976

June 1, 1981

June 5, 2000

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

TABLE 10

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ
(ALL JURISDICTIONS)

COMMUNITY MAP HISTORY

139

COMMUNITY
NAME

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP REVISION DATE(S)
August 20, 1976

FIRM EFFECTIVE DATE

FIRM
REVISION DATE(S)

Morris, Township of

May 31, 1974

June 1, 1981

--

Morristown, Town of

February 1, 1974

November 26, 1976

May 19, 1981

--

Mount Olive, Township of

January 16, 1974

March 19, 1976

May 15, 1985

--

Netcong, Borough of

May 3, 1974

March 19, 1976

August 2, 1982

--

Parsippany-Troy Hills, Township of

June 21, 1974

January 2, 1976

February 19, 1986

--

Pequannock, Township of

May 21, 1971

--

May 21, 1971

September 17, 1992

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

TABLE 10

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ
(ALL JURISDICTIONS)

COMMUNITY MAP HISTORY

140

COMMUNITY
NAME

INITIAL IDENTIFICATION

FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP REVISION DATE(S)
--

FIRM EFFECTIVE DATE

FIRM
REVISION DATE(S)

Randolph, Township of

February 15, 1974

December 18, 1979

--

Riverdale, Borough of

May 31, 1974

March 19, 1976

October 15, 1985

--

Rockaway, Borough of

September 3, 1971

--

September 3, 1971

June 19, 1985

Rockaway, Township of

September 3, 1971

--

September 3, 1971

June 19, 1985

Roxbury, Township of

March 29, 1974

August 6, 1976

December 15, 1982

--

Washington, Township of

January 9, 1974

June 4, 1976

June 5, 1985

--

Wharton, Borough of

March 3, 1974

April 16, 1976

February 19, 1987

FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

TABLE 10

MORRIS COUNTY, NJ
(ALL JURISDICTIONS)

COMMUNITY MAP HISTORY

141

9.0

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND REFERENCES 1. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Butler, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., October 15, 1985. 2. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Chatham, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 19, 2001. 3. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Florham Park, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 20, 2002. 4. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Lincoln Park, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., August 19, 1986. 5. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Madison, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., April 15, 2002. 6. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Mendham, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., November 4, 1992. 7. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Morris Plains, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 5, 2000. 8. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Netcong, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., February 2, 1982. 9. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Riverdale, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., October 15, 1985. 10. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 19, 1984. 11. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Wharton, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1987.

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12. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Boonton, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., April 17, 1985. 13. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Chatham, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 19, 2001. 14. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Chester, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., October 1, 1981. 15. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Denville, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., October 17, 1984. 16. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of East Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., June 6, 2001. 17. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Hanover, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., June 6, 2001. 18. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Harding, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 6, 2001. 19. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Jefferson, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., January 5, 1983. 20. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Long Hill, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., September 21, 2001. 21. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Mendham, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., January 5, 1982. 22. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Mine Hill, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., May 3, 1993.

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23. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Montville, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., August 19, 1985. 24. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Morris, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 1, 1980. 25. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Mount Olive, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., November 15, 1984. 26. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., February 19, 1986. 27. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Pequannock, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., September 17, 1992. 28. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Randolph, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., June 18, 1987. 29. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Rockaway, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., September 18, 1986. 30. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Roxbury, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., June 15, 1982. 31. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Washington, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 5, 1984. 32. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Town of Boonton, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., April 17, 1985. 33. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Town of Dover, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 4, 1989.

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34. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Town of Morristown, Morris County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 3, 1986. 35. US Census 2000, http://www.census.gov/main/www/cen2000.html accessed September 2007. 36. New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, New Jersey Municipal Profiles, Intensity of Urbanization, Trenton, New Jersey, January 1972. 37. Morris County Planning Board, New Jersey, Existing Land Analysis, Trenton, New Jersey, January 1973. 38. State of New Jersey, Bureau of Geology and Topography, The Story of New Jersey’s Civil Boundaries, 1606-1968, John P. Snyder, Trenton, New Jersey, 1969. 39. History of Morris County, New Jersey, New York, N.W. Munsell & Co., 1882. 40. Adalaide Beecher and Arthur Magnalio, Historical Journal, “Mount Olive Township, New Jersey”, Budd Lake, New Jersey, 1971. 41. The Musconetcong Foundrymen Historical Society, The Musconetcong Foundrymen Historical Society and Records of the late Louis M. Huyler (unpublished) 42. USR/MSR Engineers, “Passaic River Basin, Historical Search”, Montvale, New Jersey, 1980. 43. The League of Women Voters, “Know Your Town, Parsippany-Troy Hills”, New Jersey, 1973. 44. Washington Township Historical Society, This is Washington Township, Morris County, New Jersey, A Brief Historical Record, 1730-1976, Washington, New Jersey, July 4, 1976. 45. Richard P. Browne Associates, Drainage Study, Passaic County, New Jersey, Volumes I and II, 1975; Volume III, 1976. 46. State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resources, in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey, Special Report 37, Floods of August and September 1971 in New Jersey, Trenton, New Jersey, 1972. 47. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Gage Date, Expanded Rating Tables, Washington, D.C., August 1976; 1979.

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48. U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Data for New Jersey, Water Year 1989, Volume 1, U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Report NJ-89-1, by W.R. Bauersfeld, E.W. Moshinsky, E.A. Pustay, and W.D. Jones, Trenton, New Jersey, 1990. 49. U.S. Geological Survey, Water Data Report, NJ-79-1, Water Resources Data for New Jersey, Water Year 1979, Washington, D.C., 1980. 50. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Data for New Jersey, Water Data Report NJ-75-1, Trenton, New Jersey, 1976. 51. Water Resources Council, “Guidelines For Determining Flood Flow Frequency”, Bulletin 17, Washington, D.C., March 1976. 52. State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Water Control, Flood Hazard Delineation Based on Historical Date, Passaic River Basin, Trenton, New Jersey, 1973. 53. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Data for New Jersey, Part I, Surface Water Records, Trenton, New Jersey, published annually. 54. U.S. Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers, New York District, the Floods of August and September 1971 (Hurricane “Doria”), March 1975. 55. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Flood of November 8-10, 1977, in Northeastern and Central New Jersey, New Jersey, April 1979. 56. Township of Pequannock, Planning Department, with assistance of Water Control and Resources Commission, Health Department and Civil Defense, Flood Information Handbook, Pequannock, New Jersey, December 1973. 57. Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data, “Guidelines for Determining Flood Flow Frequency”, Bulletin 17B, U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia, March 1982. 58. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, Stage 2 Report, Passaic River Basin Study, Appendix A, Volumes 1 and 2, New York, June 1983. 59. State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resources, in cooperation with U.S. Geological Survey, Special Report 38, Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in New Jersey with Effects of Urbanization, by Stephen J. Stankowski, Trenton, New Jersey, 1974. 60. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, Hydrologic Study, Passaic River Report (unpublished – subject to revision).

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61. Richard P. Browne Associates (The RPB Group), Drainage Study, Morris County, New Jersey, Morristown, New Jersey, 1972. 62. Water Resources Council, “A Uniform Technique for Determining Flood Flow Frequencies”, Bulletin No. 15, December 1967. 63. National Weather Service, Rainfall Frequency Atlas of the United States, Technical Paper No. 40, May 1961. 64. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Design of Small Dams, 1973. 65. U.S. Soil Conservation Service, Soil Survey Interpretations, Morris County, New Jersey, November 1970. 66. D. Johnstone and W.P. Cross, Element of Applied Hydrology, New York, Ronald Press Co., 1949. 67. U.S. Geological Survey, Technique for Estimating Depth of 100-year Floods in New Jersey, Open-File Report 79-419, by A.J. Velnich and J.L. Laskowski, Trenton, New Jersey, April 1987. 68. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, 7.5-Minute Series Topographic Maps, Scale 1:24,000, Contour Interval 20 Feet: Pompton Plains, New Jersey, 1955, Photorevised 1970. 69. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Circular No. 13, Trenton, New Jersey, 1964. 70. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, Technical Release No. 55, Urban Hydrology for Small Watersheds, Washington, D.C., January 1975. 71. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of West Milford, Passaic County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., January 16, 1981. 72. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, subcontract to Aerial Data Reduction Associates, Inc., of Pennsauken, New Jersey, Topographic Map, Rockaway River Basin, Scale 1:24,000, Contour Interval 2 Feet: Town of Boonton, April 1978; Township of Denville, April 1978; Township of Montville, April 1978; Township of Mount Olive, 1977-1978; Borough of Netcong, 1977; Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills, April 1978; Borough of Rockaway, April 1978; Township of Rockaway, April 1978; Township of Roxbury, 1978; Township of Washington, 1977-1978.

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73. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Strip Topographic Map for Detailed Study, Scale 1:2,400, Contour Interval 5 Feet: Town of Boonton, New Jersey, April 1978. 74. Rockaway Valley Sewerage Authority, Topographic Map, Rockaway River (Downstream corporate limits of the Town of Boonton downstream to the Boonton Reservoir), Scale 1:1,200, Contour Interval 2 Feet, Boonton, New Jersey, April 1971. 75. U.S. Department of the Interior, Geological Survey, Water Resources Circular No. 14, Depth-Discharge Relations for Non-Coastal Plain Sites in New Jersey, Washington, D.C., 1964. 76. Quinn & Associates of Horsham, Pennsylvania, Aerial Photographs, Scale 1:1,000: Borough of Butler, March 1972; Township of Mount Olive, 1968, Township of Pequannock, March 1972; Borough of Riverdale, 1972; Township of Roxbury, 1978, Township of Washington, 1968. 77. Geod Aerial Mapping, Inc., Topographic Maps from Aerial Photographs, Scale 1:2,400, Contour Interval 5 Feet: Township of Chester, 1978; Township of Denville, 1978; Township of Jefferson, 1977; Township of Mendham, 1978; Township of Mine Hill, 1978, Borough of Rockaway, 1977; Township of Roxbury, 1978; Borough of Wharton, 1978. 78. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Peapack and Gladstone, Somerset County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., December 15, 1977. 79. Stefanick, G.E.; Township Engineering, Hanover Township, New Jersey, Topographic Maps, Contour Interval 2 Feet, Scale 1:100, 1958. 80. Robinson Service Corporation of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Aerial Photographs, Lincoln Park, 1970; Borough of Wharton, 1972. 81. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Wayne, Passaic County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C.; September 29, 1986. 82. Continental Aerial Surveys Incorporated, Topographic Maps, Scale 1:4,800, Contour Interval 10 Feet: Portion of Mendham Borough, New Jersey, Alcoe, Tennessee, 1987. 83. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, Bridge Waterways Analysis Model: Research Report by J.O. Sherman, W.H. Kirby, V.R. Schneider, and H.N. Flippo, July 1986.

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84. U.S. Geological Survey, Hydraulics of High Gradient Strains, ACSE Journal of Hydraulics, Vol. 110, No. 11, November 1984, by Robert D. Jarret. 85. U.S. Geological Survey, Guide for Selecting Manning’s Roughness Coefficients for Natural Channels and Flood Plains, Water Supply Paper 2339, by George J. Arcement, Jr., and Verne R. Schneider, 1989. 86. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York Division, Survey of North Branch Raritan River Topography, Scale 1:2,400, New York, New York, April 1965. 87. State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resources, Flood Hazard Report No. 13, Delineation of Flood Hazard Area, North Branch Raritan River, Trenton, New Jersey, 1973. 88. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Bernardsville, Somerset County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., September 1, 1977. 89. State of New Jersey, Township of Montville, Township of Montville, StormWater Master Plan, New Jersey 1974. 90. American Air Surveys, Inc.; Topographic Map, Borough of Morris Plains, Morris County, New Jersey, Scale 1:1,200, Contour Interval 2 Feet, 1961. 91. International Resources and Geotechnics, Inc. of Armonk, New York, Topographic Maps compiled from Aerial Photographs, Scale 1:2,400, Contour Interval 5 Feet: Township of Mount Olive, 1973, Township of Parsippany-Troy Hills, November 1972. 92. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Philadelphia District, Flood Plain Study of the Musconetcong River, Survey Data, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1975. 93. State of New Jersey, Works Project Administration, Riparian and Stream Survey, Musconetcong River, 1937-1939, New Jersey. 94. State of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Water Resources, Flood Hazard Report No. 10, Delineation of Flood Hazard Areas, Drakes Brook, Trenton, New Jersey, 1972. 95. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Borough of Stanhope, Sussex County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., May 17, 1982. 96. Federal Emergency Management Agency, Federal Insurance Administration, Flood Insurance Study, Township of Lebanon, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, Washington, D.C., July 5, 1983.

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