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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru
NEWSLETTER – April 2004

Welcome to this bumper edition of the Trust Newsletter, I am fortunate to have received an excellent article from Simon Hughes, and a report of an exciting new discovery in Mid Wales from Kelvin Davies. TRUST MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION AND INSURANCE 2004 Firstly I would like to thank all those who replied by letter, phone or email to the item in the last newsletter. Your feedback was much appreciated. A joint discussion was held with Welsh Mines Society members at the winter meeting in Ludlow on March 20th. During this meeting and the directors meeting that followed, the various options for insurance were discussed. The first option was to insure with the British Caving Association but this would have meant the Trust having to pay an excess of £2500 in the event of a claim, a sum that the Trust does not have available. If we had have chosen this option membership subscriptions would have risen to £9 for surface cover and £21 for underground cover. It was also felt that to raise the subscriptions to this level, would have resulted in many members leaving the Trust. (It is worth noting that underground cover is available through the Welsh Mines Society). Another problem the Trust is faced with on the insurance front, is the change in the Employer’s Liability Insurance law that now classes volunteer workers as employees, this means we are now required to have Employer’s Liability Insurance as well as Public Liability Insurance. The BCA policy does not provide Employer’s Liability cover, so we would be faced with purchasing it from another source, adding further to the cost of membership. The second option was to insure through the British Trust for Conservation Volunteer’s, for surface cover only, with membership rising to £7.50. This policy does not give Employer’s Liability cover either, purchasing it from another source would mean an addition to the cost of membership. The third option was to insure through the Council for British Archaeology, who provide both Public & Employer’s Liability cover. This will result in membership subscription rising to £8. Unfortunately this cover is for surface only. I also tried to obtain cover from other sources but they were not interested in a group as small as ours. I have spent a great deal of time trying to find the most cost effective means of insuring the Trust, its officers and members, and the cover provided by the Council for British Archaeology is the best available at the present time. Another point that was considered was whether to offer a full membership and a newsletter only subscription with no insurance. With the Council for British Archaeology Public Liability insurance scheme we are paying the lowest amount of cover, for up to 100 members, (at present we have 67 members) and with Employer’s Liability we are paying for up to 20 people working on a site at any one time, again this is the lowest level of cover. It was felt that if we had a newsletter only level of membership, the cost of membership for active members would have to be increased, to cover the price of the insurance. This would be fair enough with other Mining societies (eg Welsh Mines Society) where the insurance is

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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for people to take part in activities for their own enjoyment. Yes they should pay the full cost of their insurance. But by being a member of the Trust you are supporting the work of the Trust, and this includes working parties at mine sites (eg Catherine & Jane Consols). It would be totally unfair to expect volunteers working on behalf of the Trust to pay the full cost of insurance, it was felt that this should be shared by the membership as a whole. It was decided that the Trust would insure through the Council for British Archaeology. I hope members will agree with this decision, your views were taken into account and the decision was made in the best interests of the Trust. The cost of Trust Membership for 2004 (1 Jan 2004 to 31 Dec 2004) will be £8, a membership application form is enclosed with this newsletter. 2003 TRUST AGM & ACCOUNTS Enclosed with this newsletter you will find a copy of the minutes of the 2003 AGM, held in Newent on Sunday 5th October 2003 and a copy of the Trust accounts. The 2004 AGM will take place at David Bick’s home The Pound House, Newent, Glos on Sunday 3rd October 2004, members are welcome to attend. DONATION OF 1:2500 MAPS The Trust has been very fortunate, to have received a donation of approx 400 1:2500 maps of Wales, mainly covering North Wales but some of the south, from Welsh Mines Society Member Kelvin Davies. Trust Director Tony King has volunteered to take on the task of cataloguing and storing the maps. A list of these maps can be obtained from the Secretary (please enclose a SAE). They will be available for members to borrow for their research, details from Secretary. The Trust is most grateful to Kelvin for making this valuable donation. WELSH MINES PRESERVATION TRUST ARCHIVE The Trust is to set up an archive/library of items connected with Welsh Mining History. The maps referred to above being the first donation. Reports and photographs of previous Trust projects will also be added. I am at present scanning my collection of (3,000+) photographs of Welsh Mines on to CD’s, copies of these will be added to the archive in due course. JEREMY WILKINSON’S DATABASE OF MINES & QUARRIES OF NORTH WALES – NOW AVAILABLE ON THE INTERNET I am pleased to be able to tell you that Trust member Jeremy Wilkinson has placed his database on the internet, at the following address:- www.hendrecoed.org.uk/Wilkinson/ Dave Linton has added the database to his excellent website on Merioneth Manganese Mining, Dave’s own website can be found at:http://www.hendrecoed.org.uk/Merioneth-Manganese I am sure the many mining history researchers who will use the information Jeremy has collected over many years, will join me in thanking him for making it available.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

SIMON HUGHES – CWMYSTWYTH MINES CD The Trust has been very fortunate to have received £80, from Simon Hughes of Talybont, from the sale of these CD’s. The Trust is most grateful to Simon for this generous gesture. Copies of the CD are still available from Simon. WALLER’S “DESCRIPTION OF THE MINES IN CARDIGANSHIRE”, 1704 This book contains ten or a dozen, and sometimes more, plans of the mines, smelting mills etc, worked by the Mine Adventurers. It is now very rare, and I am hard at work on a facsimile edition to coincide with its tercentenary. Also will be added more scarcely known maps, and plans, and other documentary material of the period, with ideas on interpretation and correlating the records with evidence still on the ground. The book will run to some 60 pages in large format (8 ins x 10 ins) to do justice to the original drawings. With any luck, it will be published in the summer or autumn, and I shall be suggesting that the WMPT/WMS have a meeting at Esgaihir before long, where it all began over 300 years ago. David Bick

David Bick at the site of Waller’s Stamp Mill, Cwmystwyth Mine, Ceredigion. (photo William Bick November 2003)

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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ESTABLISHMENT OF LOCAL GROUPS WITHIN THE TRUST At the Directors meeting in Ludlow it was decided to establish Local Groups within the Trust, to undertake small projects on behalf of the Trust. The directors are keen to raise the profile of the Trust and for it to become more active. We are in the process of setting up a Local Group in North West Wales to carry on the work started last year at Catherine & Jane Consols, and another group in Mid Wales to undertake some projects at Goginan – undergrowth clearance and Cwmystwyth – survey of the site of Waller’s Stamp Mill (and possibly Bronfloyd – undergrowth clearance). It is hoped in the future to set up another group in South Wales. If you are interested in attending working weekends/days, with either of these groups please let me know on your membership form, and I will keep you advised of dates/locations etc. If you are interested in forming a local group elsewhere in Wales I will be pleased to hear from you. If you know of any mine site that would benefit from undergrowth clearance, minor building repairs, removal of rubbish/scrap etc. again please let me know. I am in the process of arranging another working weekend at Catherine & Jane Consols for early/mid May. I will advise all those members that attended last year when date is confirmed with Tilhill Forestry. If anyone else wishes to become involved, let me know and I will send you details. SOME RECENT WORK ON ANCIENT MINING IN MID WALES – Simon Hughes It is now nearly thirty years since I first offered the theory that Erglodd Mine had all the appearances of being pre-Medieval in origin. At this time, O.T. Jones and others, thought that the stone hammers at Cwmystwyth were “British “ and probably contemporary with the Roman occupation. Since Lewis Morris’s day, many authors have postulated that many of these mines were the groves of the Britons, of these Edward Hamer’s “ Parochial Account of Llanidloes “ is a particularly detailed and observant account. During the mid 1970s there were many opponents against the origins of mining being worked any earlier than Tudor times. The neighbouring Erglodd Fortlet was discovered during the dry summer of 1976 by Professor J. K. St Joseph, of Cambridge, using aerial photography ( JRS 1977 ). There is a report on the 1976 – ’77 excavation by J. Ll. Davies in BBCS 1980 p 719 – 729. Alongside Copper Hill at Cwmystwyth, the Erglodd Mine is the most copious source of stone hammers, or mauls, and the relationship between these hammers and ancient mines was subjected to a taxonomic analysis whilst I was undertaking my research at Manchester under the late Professor Barri Jones. One of my conclusions was that stone hammers were a feature that most of these ancient mines had in common. Some mines were rich in these hammer stones whilst others were remarkably poor. The earliest hammers appeared to have been used underground whilst they almost certainly persisted into later, times for crushing the minerals prior to washing the ore free of the gangue The subsequent research by Timberlake, et al, has shown that these underground hammers mark the earliest phase of exploitation. Around the village of Talybont these stone hammers are frequently accompanied by quern stones or mortars locally known as “bucking stones“ or “cerrig bwcio“. These anvils are quite obviously associated with washing and dressing rather than for mining in its true sense and it also raises the question of there being any differences between dressing and mining hammers, or maybe they had a universal function. There are several fine examples of these “bucking stones“ incorporated into an undated structure on Copper Hill whilst there is another cluster

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

located around the Allt y Crib Mine and the old smelting works at Leri Mills, Talybont.. The most common form of mortar is simply a flat rock of about 30 to 40 Cms in diameter the surface of which has been pounded into a shallow circular depression. With most examples, the stone would originally have had a shallow dished surface and with continued use the depression would get progressively larger and deeper. There are examples of this type preserved at the Llywernog Museum, from the Graigfawr opencast at Cwmystwyth, and another one from Darren is at the Ceredigion Museum in Aberystwyth. Far less common are the larger, rectangular slabs, with multiple depressions in the face. sometimes there are 2,3 or 4 indentations. I have found these at Talybont, Cwmystwyth and Nant y Cagal but I am fairly certain that further investigations will reveal other occurrences. Whilst I have not seen any at Darren Mine, that is not an indication that they are absent. There is a truly magnificent example in an old adit high on Graigfawr at Cwmystwyth and it is quite obvious that “ the old man “ was dressing his ore underground on these anvil like mortars. Several other specimens of this type were identified in the opencast below this level but their provenance can only be guessed at. In the dumps from Level Fawr at Cwmystwyth, I have found several double-sided circular mortar stone which had been used until one depression had broken through into the other. Something akin to a grit-stone doughnut. I have only seen these at Cwmystwyth and I am unable to offer any hypotheses regarding why they should be confined to such a small area. They lie alongside Nant Watcyn but are mixed in with 18th and 19th century development rock. As no stone hammers have been observed at this locality, my suspicion is that they are relatively recent and may be a relic of Bonsall’s dressing and washing works. Even the largest of the Cardiganshire varieties are a little less robust than the well known “Carreg Pumpsaint“ at Dolaucothi Mine. Since it was erected in this position, the date of which has not yet been determined, a myth has developed that the depressions were created by five Christian Saints, who’s brows were pressed against the stone during a moment of despair, whilst to anyone with a knowledge of ancient mining, it is quite obviously an ancient mortar stone and is likely to date from either the Roman or Bronze Age. Being a Talybont lad born & bred, I am quite familiar with Meyrick’s description of my parish and, from childhood, knew the story of the two stones which stood in Lletty Angharad Fach - when the third appears the end of the world will soon follow ! Having looked for these stones for nearly forty years I decided that they must have been carried away during 19th century agricultural improvements and was delighted when Medwyn Parry of Erglodd pointed out that one of the stones was now incorporated into the wall of his farmyard. As it was in situ in 1812, it would be reasonable to assume that it was uprooted around 1838 when the road from Talybont to Taliesin was cut along its present course. Whilst cutting this road near Erglodd, a narrow lead vein was met with, an adit was driven south upon it, and a considerable quantity of floaters, or shoad stones, were collected during the construction of this road. This discovery was reported upon by Absalom Francis in 1874 and this incident may well have enticed John Taylor into taking the lease of Erglodd in the late 1830s.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

Whilst not strictly correct, I have come to call this stone “ Carreg Angharad Fychan “ which I prefer to translate as “The stone of the small beloved one“ rather than as “Little Angharad’s Stone“. Properly the stone has no name, but it used to stand in Little Angharad’s Field. Angharad is now a rather old fashioned girl’s name meaning beloved one. It must be noted that the Church and Chapel were, at one time, very eager to remove these pagan “ Druidic “ structures and their flocks seemed equally as eager to redeem themselves by uprooting and systematically smashing these ancient monuments. Maybe by separating the stones, the end of the world was deferred. Meyrick was convinced that this mortar was a sacrificial stone and that the groove was to catch the blood of the sacrificial offerings – he thought that it must have been the work of the Druids and paid no attention to the ancient industrial setting in which it lay. Carreg Angharad Fychan may be described thus A smooth grit-stone monolith being 105 Cms long by 27 Cms wide. Its exact height is impossible to determine but lies between 25 and 30 Cms. The fabric of the grit is finer than some of the local varieties and its colour is buff rather than grey. It has been calculated as weighing in the region of 200 - 250 Kg, On its upper face there is a deep grove 20 Cms wide and 90 Cms long. This depression covers the greater proportion of the upper face and its capacity was calculated as being about five litres. The groove is a series of four 20 Cm diameter depressions which have encroached into each other, there are the relics of three ridges delineating the original depressions. The one end appears to have been formed into a spout to enable the contents to be poured or swept out, the other end, and the sides, are almost vertical.

Carreg Angharad Fychan Erglodd is a relatively recent name form of the name with no apparent meaning, however, until the 19th century it known as Aurglodd – the gold mine, and was surrounded by gruffy ground. It must be noted that samples of vein-stuff from Erglodd Mine display elevated levels of gold with appreciable Cobalt & Nickel. A Roman Fortlet dating from around 72 A.D. lies five hundred metres west of the mine at SN 653 903 and the road – Sarn Helen, must have thrown up lumps of ore during its construction, as did the 1838 road. During 2002, whilst cutting of a drainage ditch some three hundred metres north of the fort at SN 9495 9055, a substantial oak trough, 3.00 metres long and 85 Cms wide was found buried in three metres of peat in association with what appeared to be an ancient fines dump. It was

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

hoped that dendro-chronology would yield some dates but the sample was inadequate for this purpose and no conclusion could be drawn. A subsequent C14 analysis gave a date of 1200 BC. The neighbouring stream, Nant Ddyrnen, lies about 200 metres to the west and rises from a marsh near the Erglodd mine. Ddyrnen appears to be derived from Dyrnu – to beat or to thresh something. About a hundred metres north of this trough, aerial photography and subsequent excavation by Cambria Archaeology has revealed a wattled causeway at SN 6485 9070 heading across the bog towards Llancynfelin. No dates been obtained for these timbers as yet. It was also noteworthy that there was a remarkably high incidence of small flecks of quartz in the >2 / <3 mm range which had the appearance of having been milled. During the early 1970s, the remains of several kilns, or furnaces, were found buried in a deep cutting at SN 6570 9035, just below the Erglodd Mine, but these were carried away for roadstone before any investigations could take place. The course of Sarn Helen, the main Roman road in these parts, to the north of Talybont is somewhat ambiguous with two credible routed being offered. It has been proven to run from Carmarthen through Trawscoed and on to Penllwyn. It would have crossed the river Leri in Talybont, just above the old smelting works and probably in the same position as the present day bridge, and then from there its course has not yet been established beyond doubt. It can be identified on the north bank of the Dyfi at Pennal and, from there, runs northwards towards Caernarfon. The course of this road has been suggested as running either through Erglodd to Taliesin and Tre’rddol, “ the coastal route “ or through Pensarn to Gwarcwm and Furnace “Margery’s route“, which is so known, as it was postulated by I. D. Margery in “Roman Roads in Britain p356”. Margery’s route encounters a difficult crossing of the River Clettwr, which is virtually impossible without a bridge, whereas the costal route avoids this problem. Personally, I prefer Margery’s Route. An enormous dilemma, which will not be resolved without significant further excavation and research, is that if Sarn Helen runs past Pensarn then Erglodd Fortlet must have been built on a long spur road and must have been built in that position for a purpose greater than simply as a marching camp. Between 1979 and 1982, this area was regularly photographed by myself using infra-red film; This showed that apart from the disturbance caused by the construction of the fortlet, there was further disturbance to the south whilst that to the east showed just how vigilantly the veins had been pursued. Field walking in the southern area revealed nothing but I was always convinced that it was worthy of further attention with the potential of revealing a furnace or metalworking site within a vicus settlement attached to the short lived military encampment. Around the Pensarn-ddu farmstead, about 2 kilometres north-east of Erglodd, there are two other features of archaeological significance: (1) The Pensarn Mine at SN 667 912, which is very little recorded in recent times but is an old open rake of considerable antiquity on a north – south vein, it has produced both copper and lead ores and was reputedly both rich and shallow. Like Darren, it defied re-opening by many 19th century speculators who failed to realise the magnitude of the problem. Stone

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

hammers. and shards thereof, have been observed but are not common and many must have been buried by later development or agricultural improvements. (2) Bedd Taliesin at SN 672 911, a Bronze Age ring cairn and cist romantically said to be the burial place of the famed bard of Post Roman Wales but was in fact probably constructed over two thousand years before that. No firm date has ever been ascribed to this cairn but it would appear to have been erected during the Early Bronze Age. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Ring cairns of this period are not uncommon and a similar example can be found to the east of the Bwlchgwyn Mine, it was this stone circle which inspired the 19th century name change from East Llwynteifi Mine to the anglicised and much romanticised Temple Mine.

Bedd Taliesin (circa 1925) Having known Bedd Taliesin since the 1950’s, I was somewhat taken aback when I saw a “Valentine’s“ postcard, taken around 1925, in which a “bucking stone“ similar to Carreg Angharad Fychan is clearly visible as an integral part of the structure. It is curious that whilst Meyrick visited both sites, and noted Carreg Angharad Fychan, he did not recognise the same feature in Bedd Taliesin and then pass it off as being used for unmentionable Druidical rites. Until about 1850, the road to Esgair Hir Mine ran from Talybont past Bedd Taliesin and up the valley to Blaen Clettwr Fach before climbing up Moel y Llyn and then descending to Esgair Hir. Whilst using this road, one of the daughters of the Pryses of Gogerddan rode her mare into the mire and was never seen alive ever again ! A couple of miles beyond Bedd Taliesin the road east remains much as it would have been when William Waller rode to Esgair Hir. The whole valley carries reminders of man’s early presence whilst a few miles

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru

downstream, the Clettwr runs past the Llancynfelin Mine from which the Early Mines Research Group gathered a fragment of timber with a C14 date of around 1400 B.C. A recent examination of Bedd Taliesin revealed it to be in a rather sad and neglected condition with many of the stones having fallen over, the “bucking stone“ included. As children, in the 1950s, we were told that a skull had been found here and that it had been placed there to frighten people and thus protect the treasure buried beneath it. I have suspicions that someone has been looking for this treasure, without authority, since my youth.

Bedd Taliesin (1973) The Pensarn Mine has been used as a contractor’s yard and has been virtually obliterated though the extent of the substantial open cut can still be gauged but the splendid whim circle has been badly damaged. Like the “ Stone Doughnuts “ found near Level Fawr at Cwmystwyth, these stone troughs either perform a different function or date from a different period. With such an example built into the fabric of a ring cairn it would be somewhat romantic to consider that it was a “ tool of the trade “ of the incumbent in which case it must be more or less contemporary with the early working at Llancynfelin Mine. We must also presume that Erglodd Mine has similar ancient origins. SJS Hughes, Talybont, Ceredigion. mining.man@amserve.net 25th March 2004. (Photographs supplied by Simon Hughes)

LATE NEWS Just as I was completing this edition of the Newsletter, news of an exciting new discovery in Mid Wales was received from Kelvin Davies.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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EAGLEBROOK MINE On Saturday 27 March 2004 Kim, Dalton and I went to Eaglebrook workings above the road. We went to look for minerals. While I was looking for minerals in the area of the wheel pit, the kids played by the stream near the tailings. Thirty minutes or so passed when they shouted for me to come over to see what they had found. At first I ignored them thinking they were messing around, but then I went over to see. I looked down at what they were looking at, and there was clearly a large void. This void looked to be an Adit entrance (see fig 1).

Fig 1 Dalton (left) and Kim (right) at the entrance they had discovered (27-3-04k) I helped then to dig away the tailings so I could gain access to the entrance. When the entrance was large enough for me to gain access, I dropped down into it, about 3-4ft, and looked along it. The walls were perfect, and the roof was in good condition to. The walls were dry stoned, and the ceiling was covered in stone flags (see fig 2)

. Fig 2 Dry stoned walls with the ceiling covered with flag stones (27-3-04k)

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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I took some pics with my digital camera and decided to come back the next day, Sunday. My last picture I took I tried to include the wheel pit area to see if there was a chance that this adit might be for drainage from the wheel pit (see fig 3)

Fig 3. Kid’s by the entrance. The area that is fenced of to the right is where the wheel pit is. When I got home I emailed Simon Hughes, John Mason, and Graham Levins to let them know of what was discovered. On Sunday morning, 28th March, I returned to Eaglebrook with Dalton. When I got there John was waiting on the dumps for me. John went in and walked in as far as he could go. I went in and took some more pictures. The beginning of the passage was narrow, then after about 30 ft the construction of the adit changed. The adit became much wider and change direction, heading more towards the wheel pit. The ceiling was now in the form of a stone arch similar to that at Level Fawr Cwmystwyth. (See fig. 4)

Fig. 4. Stone side walls with stone arched roof. (28-3-04k)

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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The adit finishes in a collapse (see fig. 5). It appears that the arch as given way. On the left one can clearly see large upright timbers, which may suggest that the adit may split into more that one way. There is also water coming through the roof at this point, but not enough to suggest that the drivage is collapsed near the flooded wheel pit. More exploration is needed here.

Fig 5. Drivage finishing in a collapse. (Photographs by Kelvin Davies)

My thanks to David Bick for the item and photograph on Waller’s Stamp mill at Cwmystwyth. I am sure members will join with me in wishing you every success with the publication of your forthcoming book, which will not only commemorate the tercentenary of William Waller’s book, but also another important milestone” the thirtieth anniversary of the Welsh Mines Society”. Thank you Simon for the excellent article and photographs on Bedd Taliesin. My thanks also to Kelvin for the Eaglebrook report and photographs, seeing as we have a Catherine & Jane mine in northwest Wales and a George & Charlotte mine in Devon, until the official name for the adit at Eaglebrook is discovered, perhaps we should it the Kim & Dalton Level ? Graham Levins Secretary Welsh Mines Preservation Trust April 2004

All articles written by the Secretary unless stated.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru
Minutes of the 11th Annual General Meeting Held on the 5th October 2003 at the Pound House, Newent.

Present:T W Evans (TE) (Chairman), G C Levins (GL) (Secretary), D E Bick (DB), G W Hall (GH), A P King (AK), N A Chapman (NC) Directors. Meeting Opened at 1200 1. Chairman’s Opening Address The Chairman welcomed every one to the AGM and thanked David Bick for making his home available for the meeting. He said it had been a busy year for him, with his deep involvement in the successful AIA Conference held in South East Wales, the AIA Conference was opened by him, in his role as Chairman of the WMPT. He thanked David Bick for making his Waterwheel model available for display at the conference. Also on display were photographs of the work of the Trust. It was hoped that some new members to the Trust would have been recruited, but as yet no applications have been received. He was also pleased that the Trust working weekend at Catherine & Jane Consols has been a success. 2. Apologies for Absence Peter Claughton (In Japan), Simon Timberlake. 3. Minutes of Last AGM It was proposed by AK and Seconded by NC, that the Minutes of the 10th AGM of the Trust held in Pontypool on 6th October 2002, were a true and accurate record. Matters Arising from Minutes TE advised meeting that the roofs had been erected over the buildings at the Glyn Pits. 4. Secretary’s Financial Report and Presentation of Accounts The Secretary’s Financial (and Membership) Report was read and discussed. A copy of this report is attached to these minutes. It was noted that a donation was received during 2002 from a Mr I Jones for £75.00. The Secretary was unaware of the circumstances of this donation, it was with the paperwork received when he took over as Secretary. GH asked that the Secretary write to Christopher Williams and Rob Vernon to find out the details of this donation. It was noted that the Business Reserve A/c is with the Nat West Bank, GH proposed that the Trustees should consider if the money in this account could be invested elsewhere at a better rate of interest. It was agreed by all that suggestions should be sent to the Secretary and a decision would be made at the next AGM. 5. Re election of Directors due to Retire by Rotation It was proposed by DB, and seconded by AK that T Evans and G Levins be elected for a further 3 year period of office, it was agreed by all in attendance. Both T Evans and G Levins were happy to continue as Trust Chairman and Secretary.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru
A vote of thanks was proposed by TE and seconded by GH for the work put in by GL since taking over the role of secretary. 6. BCRA Insurance The secretary explained that changes are to happen in the way members are insured by the BCRA, which is shortly to change its name to the British Caving Association (BCA). The major change will be that the Trust will no longer purchase insurance for its members; members will have to purchase their own individual insurance from the BCRA/BCA, at present the estimated cost is £10. The more complicated problem is the question of insurance for the Trust, its officers and meet leaders, as yet the full details and cost are not known. The BCRA have not yet sorted the insurance situation out and as a result the insurance due to expire on 30/09/2003 has been extended to 31/10/2003. The directors will meet again to discuss insurance when details are known. 7. Membership Subscriptions 2004 Until the insurance situation is resolved the Trust is unable to decide the cost of membership for next year. The directors will meet again once cost of insurance is known. 8. Appointment of Auditor It was proposed by GH and seconded by NC that we appoint N Bennett as the Trust’s auditor for the forthcoming year. All in agreement. It was noted that the Secretary had written and thanked him, for the valuable service he is providing to he Trust. 9. Dates of Directors Meetings 2004 Sun 1st February 2004 1200 noon at 14 Dorset Road, Egbaston, Birmingham. Sun 14th March 2004, during Welsh Mines Society Winter meet at George Hall’s “Abilene”, Sheet Road, Ludlow. Annual General Meeting:- Sun 3rd October 2004 1200 noon at The Pound House, Newent. 10. Activities for next year Work will continue at the Glyn Pits, Engines will be removed for cleaning and remaking of missing parts. The Trust involvement at Catherine & Jane Consols will continue, minor work will be carried out during winter. Another working weekend will be arranged April/May next year. 11. Any Other Business The Chairman proposed a vote of thanks to David Bick for making his home available for this meeting, this was echoed by all present. AGM Closed at 1310.

Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com

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Welsh Mines Preservation Trust Yr Ymddiriedolaeth Cadwraeth Mwynfeydd Cymru
APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP OF THE WELSH MINES PRESERVATION TRUST 2004

Name:

__________________________________________

Address:

__________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________

Postcode:

____________________

Telephone:

____________________

Email:

__________________________________________

I wish to renew my membership/become a member, of the Welsh Mines Preservation Trust for 2004, cost including (surface only) insurance £8. Please note that the insurance is for surface activities only, and does not provide cover for any activities underground. I wish to be advised of dates/locations of Trust Group activities: North West Wales o Mid Wales o Please tick which area, tick both if you wish.

Signed:

_____________________________________

Please return form and cheque to: Graham Levins, Secretary, Welsh Mines Preservation Trust, 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP Secretary: Graham Levins 1 Stonecrop Close, Broadfield, Crawley, West Sussex, RH11 9EP. ( 01293-510567, Mobile: 07880-817370, email: graham.levins@btinternet.com