COMES TO TOWN

LAURA CERWINSKE

MR. SLICK COMES TO TOWN
by Laura Cerwinske

“Mr. Slick comes to town... and all the girls are jazzed.”
So begins Laura Cewinske’s comic tale in words and pictures. Unamused by the consequent dither over Mr. Slick’s arrival, The Empress Fulfaggotra unleashes a force of superheroes, artists, and unsuspecting angels. A surreal frolic to restore Her Grace ensues, and Love, naturally, is the reward.

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With Mr. Slick Comes to Town
MR. SLICK COMES TO TOWN Copyright © 2011 by Laura Cerwinske Art work may not be duplicated without permission. Purchase of original Laura Cerwinske artwork does NOT transfer any rights of Copyright. Copyright remains with Laura Cerwinske. Published by Blue Hair Lady Publishing Miami, Florida All Rights Reserved ® by Laura Cerwinske

Laura Cerwinske announces the launch of

Laura would love to create books and art for you, too. Here’s a comic taste to whet your imagination. Turn the page to meet Mr. Slick and dream on…

Best viewing FULL SCREEN Best mode SLIDESHOW Painting of Mami Wata, 2010 by Judith Hoch Graphic Design by www.ellepricken.com

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Mr. Slick
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comes to town…

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and all the girls
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are jazzed.
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Even Lady Liberty

lifts a salute.
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The Empress
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Fulfaggotra,

however,

is not amused.
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Still, Barry Zaid and Celia Cruz

throw open their arms,
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while Popeye comes along, followed by
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Bugs and Wonder Woman.
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The Giant Green Baby then throws a steriodal rage which

extracts an appearance from Superman.

Ooooooo.

The Blue Hair Lady and The Man in the Tangerine Suit hold hands,
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while Polly spills the beans...
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Wouldn’t you know, Mr. Slick revises the script
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...and heads for Niagara Falls.
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Mistakenly, he lands in Salem where
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the artist Dina Knapp has sewn
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a picture of her dream.

The Monas watch...
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as did the neighbors.
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But then, aghast,
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the Patriarch,

took typical revenge.
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Still, the girls find it a hoot.
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Exploding heads...

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and...
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glowing
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heads
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and women

with sure strength,
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kneeling artists,
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and exultant

dames

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including the Inca angel
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and Little Red Writing Hood,
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and all the girlfriends...
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agree.

The Empress’s new clothes
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are about to appear.
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Cast your eyes upward.
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and hear the Graces...
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Love

is Fulfaggotra’s message.
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Halleleulah!

Take your frolic seriously.

The promise is this big. Mami Wata says so.
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Louis, the best of all drawing models, knew...

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and it showed.

Love and frolic are the reward. They’re everywhere, especially...
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ABOUT

THE MYTHOLOGY CHARACTERS

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companions of all ages and tongues, and they encouraged her in good deeds and prayer. They tutored her in the healing, creative, and martial arts. They trained her as a hunter, a warrior, an artist, and healer. They taught her nurture and benign rule. In time, Fulfaggotra grew to be the most powerful deity in all the Heavens. Universally adored, She took lovers on land and sea and populated every continent with her Earth-worshipping children. She cultivated civility among migratory creatures. She wove enchantment into the rituals of life. Eventually, Fulfaggotra’s power came to outweigh, overshadow, and outlast that of all other deities in OurStory. Mami Wata is a plural noun that connotes the myriad, ancient water deities of Africa, whose priesthoods are matriarchal. Mami Wata once inspired not only African cultures but also the ancient Anatolian, Middle Eastern, Greek, and Roman traditions. Mami Wata deities are often half mermaid, half reptile or fish, primordial deities who were the bringers of justice, and who established complex theological, moral, social, political, economic and cultural foundations. She says, “I hold the mysteries of your life. All will be well.” Judith’s series “Stop the Executions” (page 29) depicts images from the centuries early modern Europe’s population of wise women, midwives, and herbalists.

Mr. Slick lives for excitement. Once he gets the girls jazzed, he can get away with just about anything. He is expert at the fond gaze, the warm palm, the ready, grin. A master of distraction, Mr. Slick thrills to games, prizing his ease at arousing in others whatever desire – of heart or loins – best serves him. He reserves his feasts of vengeance for those who most wish to love him. He is insatiable. The Goddess Fulfaggotra represents the incarnation of Beauty, Creativity, Sensuality, the Extravagant, the Voluptuous, and the Ridiculous. Her mythology, created by Laura Cerwinske, is described as follows: In a heavenly collision of constellations, Creation’s two most powerful deities – Imagination and Passion – were sent rocking from their celestial cradles into the sparkling web of Divinity. Imagination grew to embody Beauty, Creativity and Sensuality; Passion ruled the Extravagant, the Voluptuous, and the Ridiculous. Out of their embrace was born a Daughter whom they called Fulfaggotra. The name, of Fauxmaic origin, derived from Fulfaggotore, meaning to Celebrate, to Decorate, to Animate. Imagination and Passion lavished upon Fulfaggotra a life of wisdom and exuberance. They guided her in accordance with the constellations; taught her the lore and law of the forests; and provided gardens for cultivation of her daydreams. They welcomed

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THE MYTHOLOGY CHARACTERS
CONTINUED
The Patriarchs represent the beliefs and actions of the rational, linear mind as it is invested in hierarchy, acquisition, domination, accumulation, measurement, consumption, complexity, compartmentalization, punishment, and vengeance. The domination of patriarchy over Fulfaggotry and its excessive application over the last eight millennium has robbed humanity of creative and sexual power, turning fundamental aspects of humanness that once were celebrated into cause for shame. Patriarchy run rampant has resulted in the cavalier desecration of the earth. In Albert Einstein’s words, “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”

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ABOUT THE

ARTISTS

*click on all bolded links for more information and to be directed to the artist webpages.

Laura Cerwinske makes art and books. Her continuous body of work, produced throughout the last forty years, includes painting, sculpture, drawing, collage, assemblage, altar-making, print and digital photography, photo styling, art directing, and book design. Like Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven, she also supported herself as an artist’s model. Many of the Laura’s images in this book, including Mr. Slick and The Empress Fulfaggotra, were taken as part of a photograph series of window displays (perpetually in progress). Mr. Slick, one of the quintessential “Mad Men”, if ever there was, was actually photographed on New York City’s Madison Avenue. The Girls (pages 8-9, 34), The Ladies Liberty (pp 10-11), Superman (p. 19) Bugs Bunny and Wonder Woman (p 17), Betty Boop, and the Glowing Heads (pp 44 – 45), were photographed in store windows on Fifth Avenue. The Empress Fulfaggotra (p. 13) continues to appear in a window on Miracle Mile in Coral Gables. Laura’s gallery of altars, icons, and artifacts comprising The Art of Fulfaggotry can be seen at www.fulfaggotry.com. Learn more about Laura at www.lauracerwinske.com/pages/art Judith Hoch (copyright page, pp. 28-29, 49, 63) is an artist and anthropologist who lives half each year on the South Island of New Zealand where she paints, practices and teaches yoga, and is reforesting forty acres of gardens and trees. The inspirations for her various series include the spontaneous, natural icons of the

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THE ARTISTS CONTINUED
early Neolithic in southeastern Europe, the woodblock prints made by artists attending witch executions in early modern Britain and Europe, the music of Verdi, the absolute soul presence of the Maori woman, Aroha Wainui, and images from her inner life of dream and contemplation. Learn more about Judith Hoch at www.judithhoch.com Barry Zaid (pp. 15, 27) is an illustrator and graphic designer who lives in Miami Beach. His illustrious career has included the design of the original Celestial Seasonings packaging, book covers and book designs for numerous publishers worldwide, posters, greeting cards, type designs, and all manner of other graphic products. Before he could read, he loved the shapes of the letters on the packages in his father’s grocery store. When in his teens, he produced signs...combining letters and images... for neighborhood stores. Posters produced during his student days led to his lifelong career. Learn more about Barry Zaid at www.barryzaid.com Richard Protovin (p. 47) was a painter and filmmaker. His obsessive love of drawing led him to a passion for animation, and he founded and headed the animation department at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University before the introduction of computers into the field. Each three-to five minute film required thousands of hand-drawn images. He was an associate professor at NYU and a professor of animation production and cinema studies at the University of Tampa. His films have been shown as part of the New Directors/New Films series at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and the Best Short Films series at the Seattle International Film Festival, as well as at festivals in Moscow, Cannes and Venice. Richard was also an acclaimed abstract painter. He died in 1991, beloved for his generosity and stupendous sense of the Ridiculous. Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven (p. 48) was an early 20th artist known as much for her personal costume and performance as for her collages and assemblages fashioned from found materials. Usually impoverished, she supported herself throughout much of her career as an artists’ model. She was a friend of Marcel Duchamp and many of the New York Dada crowd. A published poet, she was lauded as, “the first American dada… the only one living anywhere who dresses dada, loves dada, lives dada.” Dina Knapp (p. 31) is a textile artist and maker of wearable art. Her playful, colorful work draws on the high style and high jinks of the imagery of 1940s and fifties resort life. Her clothing and fine art collages and assemblages have been exhibited throughout the U.S. Learn more about Dina Knapp at www.dinaknapp.com Ciro Quintana (pp. 36-37, 62) was the founder of Havana’s radical Grupo Pure in the 1980s and,

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later, creator of a neo-pop aesthetic combining the appropriation of comic book heroes and neo-historical revisionism. His paintings, drawings, and work in other media have been exhibited throughout the world. Since 1992 he has Lived and worked in Miami, Barcelona, New York, and Milan. Learn more about Ciro Quintana at http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/ciro-quintana.html Ruben Torres Llorca (p. 46) was born and educated in Havana, where he was part of an internationally recognized group of artists who challenged the country’s artistic scenario. A lover of fiction, he credits the Afro-Cuban tradition for teaching hiim “the use of the emblem, the construction of the altar, the dramatic importance of space, the preference of three-dimensional representation and fragmentation. His preference for simple materials derives from Mexican craftsmanship, and he considers sociology and architecture as major influences. He has been exhibited in Europe and the U.S. and has lived in Miami since 1993. Learn more about Ruben Torres Llorca’s work at www.aaa.si.edu/collections/interviews/oral-historyinterview-ruben-torresllorca-13547 David Chieppo (pp. 22-23) is a cultural portraitist who was born in the U.S., but has resided in Switzerland since 1998. His luscious paintings could be called figurative abstractions of humanity seeped in pristine isolation.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR/PUBLISHER
As the author of more than 20 books on art, architecture, and design and as a practicing artist, Laura Cerwinske is devout in her love for Creativity. In fact, her passion is so nourishing, she wishes she could eat it. She considers Creativty to be a spiritual endeavor. Combining this understanding with her long experience as a writer, Laura developed Radical Writing, an online course that teaches the technique and rewards of uninhibited self-expression. Laura grew up not only during the heyday of the original movie and television cartoons, but as the daughter of one of the animators for the Fleischer Studios which produced, among other classic animations, Popeye and Betty Boop. Accordingly, Laura views life with a comic eye, and her Goddess creation – the Empress Fulfaggotra – reigns largely through a sense of the Ridiculous. Laura has created an assembly of altars, icons, and artifacts used in the worship of her goddess creation and known as The Art of Fulfagottry. Laura’s publishing company, Blue Hair Lady Publishing, is devoted to books and art that reveal the joyful intensity of Creative power. The publications are excursions through the secrets of transformation, weaving memoir and mythology, metaphysics and art, quantum thought and healing.

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Laura would love to: Develop books for you. Curate a program on Creativity for your organization. Create curricula for your art program. Coach you and/or your collective. Cultivate your visionary thinking. Contact her at: laura@lauracerwinske.com Enjoy Laura’s blog, Lauraputsout...words,pictures,ideas, where she writes about and illustrates topics ranging from dogs and neighbors to art and architecture to to love and duplicity to her “Affair with the Chair.” Laura’s monthly eblast includes her images and recommendations for films, videos, books, artists, and metaphysical miscellany. Sign up here www.radicalwriting.com/mailinglist.php

Follow Laura on

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CREDITS

& ATTRIBUTIONS

Cover photograph: from the series Madison Avenue Windows by Laura Cerwinske, 2010 Page 7 Pages 8-9 Pages 10-11 Page 13 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Pages 18-19 Pages 22-23 Page 24 Pages 26-27 Pages 28-29 Page 30 Page 31 Pages 32-33 Page 34 Page 35 Pages 36-37 Page 38 Mr. Slick, photograph by Laura Cerwinske The Girls are Jazzed, photographs by Laura Cerwinske Ladies Liberty, photographs by Laura Cerwinske The Empress Fulfaggotra from the series Miracle Mile Windows, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Barry at the Bass, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Popeye is Everywhere, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Bugs and the Lady, photograph by Laura Cerwinske The Big Boys, photographs by Laura Cerwinske detail of a painting by David Chieppo Mr. Slick’s Dog, photograph by Laura Cerwinske The Artist Barry Zaid and His Boys, photograph by Laura Cerwinske The artist Judith Hoch with Laura Cerwinske in front of the paintin, 1991 for which Laura Cerwinske modeled Portrait of the Artist Dina Knapp by Laura Cerwinske Dina Knapp at the Bass Museum, Miami, Florida 2006, painting and photograph by Laura Cerwinske The Monas, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Harold and Shirley, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Shirley, Now and Then, portrait by Laura Cerwinske details of El Patio de Mi Casa es Particular, a painting by Ciro Quintana, 2010 The Girls are Jazzed, photograph by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series

Pages 40-41 Jerome’s Window, photograph by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series Page 42 Andy on Houston, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Pages 43-45 Glowing Heads, photograph by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series Page 46 detail of Sin Noticias de la Habana by Ruben Torres Llorca, 2010 Page 47 Richard Protovin on his Knees Page 48 Baroness Elsa Page 49 Half of Everything is Ours by Judith Hoch, 1990 for which Laura Cerwinske modeled Page 50 Henriequita and Angel, Painting and photograph by Laura Cerwinske Page 51 Peg at Books and Books, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Pages 52-53 The Girlfriends at Age 90, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Pages 54- 55 The Girls and Mr. Slick, photographs by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series Page 57 Eyes Upward, photograph by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series Page 58-59 The Graces, photograph by Laura Cerwinske Pages 60 Watch and Frolic, photographs by Laura Cerwinske Page 61 Painting by Laura Cerwinske of a 19th century Capodimonte porcelain jar from Bonnin Ashley Antiques, Miami, Florida Page 62 detail of El Patio de Mi Casa es Particular, a painting by Ciro Quintana, 2010 Page 63 Mami Wata: I Love You This Much, 2010, by Judith Hoch Page 65 detail of a life size drawing by Laura Cerwinske, conte crayon and pastel on paper,1995 Page 67 Always in My Dreams, photograph by Laura Cerwinske, from the Window Displays series

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If you love Mr. Slick pass him on to your mailing list and join Laura’s mailing list for book, art, film, and other monthly recommendations and Blue Haired Lady updates.

www.radicalwriting.com/mailinglist.php