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by Linda Xu, Miklos Sandorfi
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Wiley Publishing Australia Pty Ltd
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
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Hitachi Data Systems Edition
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About the Authors
Linda Xu is Director of Product Marketing, File, Content
and Cloud at Hitachi Data Systems. As director of the file,
content and cloud product marketing team, Linda is responsible
for developing go-to-market strategy for the portfolio, and
end-to-end execution of the marketing strategies. Her portfolio
includes the integrated Hitachi file and content solutions,
cloud initiative, Hitachi Unified Compute Platform and Hitachi
server. Linda holds an MBA in Marketing and Finance, and a
BA in Economics.
Miklos Sandorfi is Chief Strategist, File, Content and Cloud at
Hitachi Data Systems. As chief strategist of file, content and
cloud services, Miki is responsible for driving forward the
Hitachi file, content and cloud products, primarily focusing
on the interplay between the products and the resulting
customer-focused solutions. Miki has more than 18 years
of experience in the storage industry. Miki was founder and
chief technology officer of Sepaton, where he was responsible
for pioneering advances in enterprise data protection and
deduplication technologies. Miki currently holds 16 patents
with an additional 20 pending. Miki has a BSEE and attended
Babson College’s School of Executive Education.
Tanya Loughlin is Senior Product Marketing Manager, Cloud
at Hitachi Data Systems. As senior product marketing manager,
Tanya is responsible for the cloud portfolio. In this role she
directs the strategy and go-to-market planning and execution
for Hitachi’s cloud offerings throughout their lifecycle. Tanya
has more than 14 years of professional experience across
various marketing and business disciplines. Tanya has a BSBA in
Marketing Communications. She is a fellow of the UMASS Boston
Emerging Leaders Program 2009 Cohort and she is currently
pursuing her MBA.
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Publisher’s Acknowledgments
We’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online
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Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:
Acquisitions, Editorial and Media
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Graphics: Wiley Art Studio
Proofreader: Liz Goodman
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Table of Contents
Introduction ....................................................... 1
About This Book .........................................................................2
Conventions Used in This Book ...............................................2
How This Book Is Organized .....................................................2
Icons Used in This Book ............................................................3
Chapter 1: Cloud Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
What Is Cloud, Really? ...............................................................5
Another Paradigm Shift in IT? ...................................................6
Why Adopt Cloud? ......................................................................7
Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Why Use Cloud? ..........................................................................9
Win–win for subscribers and providers ......................10
The myth surrounding ‘as-a-service’ ...........................11
Private, Hybrid and Public Cloud Models .............................12
Private cloud ...................................................................12
Hybrid cloud ...................................................................14
Public cloud ....................................................................15
Chapter 3: Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Ensuring an Organization Is Well Equipped to
Deploy Cloud .........................................................................17
Spending efficiently ........................................................17
Understanding SLAs .......................................................18
Emerging standards .......................................................20
Translating Security and Legalities to Cloud ........................22
Addressing Changing Storage Needs .....................................24
Chapter 4: Best Practices and Use Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Adopting Cloud at Your Own Pace .........................................25
Moving from Peripheral to Core Data ....................................26
Simplifying for Greater Operational Efficiencies ..................27
Targeting Cost Centers for Adding Business Value .............28
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
vi
Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can
Help With Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Cloud Doesn’t Have to be Disruptive! ...................................29
Looking At Cloud-Enabling Platforms ....................................30
Building an Integrated Portfolio, Not Another Island..........32
Paving the Way to Private Cloud with Unified Compute
Platform ..................................................................................34
Hitachi Managed Services for Cloud ......................................38
Hitachi Storage-as-a-Service ....................................................39
Private File Tiering .........................................................39
Online Storage-as-a-Service ...........................................40
Partnering with Hitachi Data Systems ...................................41

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Introduction
W
hen faced with the moment-by-moment business and
IT pressures swirling around any large data center,
a boiling cauldron may come to mind. Today’s enterprise
organizations are keenly seeking ways to securely and cost
effectively address rampant multifaceted data growth with
flat or shrinking budgets. An unprecedented upsurge in
new unstructured data types, such as rich media, PACs and
eDiscovery documents, and their storage requirements are also
buckling the data center’s ability to maintain control. According
to many industry experts, keeping up with data growth is the top
challenge of IT managers.
So where do manageable costs and unparalleled data growth
become compatible? Answers may lie in cloud computing.
Representing a paradigm shift in the way organizations
can reduce capital and operational costs, cloud computing
transitions conventional storage methods to a utility-type
service model. Similar to an electric company that charges
customers based on consumption, cloud offers a way for IT
organizations to subscribe to on-demand capacity and usage
services, and can be metered either internally or through an
external provider. Savings are amplified as subscribers shift their
storage burdens to this pay-as-you-use model. In some instances,
the organization’s need for upfront capital investment goes
down; and in other cloud offerings, operational expenses such as
power, cooling and storage management tasks move to the cloud
provider. Regardless of the offering or deployment model, cloud
fosters a more agile IT environment. Therefore, cloud storage is
the foundation and focus of Cloud Storage For Dummies , which is
written on behalf of Hitachi Data Systems.
While the promise of cloud is heady, especially in a tumultuous
business climate, there is much confusion about the different
types of cloud, what they actually offer and which, if any, will
meet stringent business requirements. Knowing when and how
best to deploy cloud is critical to protecting the lifeblood of
the organization — the data itself. Enterprises are concerned
about security beyond the firewall and gaining the most value
from cloud without undergoing an overhaul of their existing
investments and processes.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
2
This book separates the hype of cloud from the crux of how to
deploy cloud safely and cost effectively.
About This Book
Cloud Storage For Dummies is your guide to the exciting world of
cloud storage. We guide you through what cloud storage is, the
types of cloud available and the best one for your organization,
as well as cloud’s many benefits.
Conventions Used in This Book
All web addresses appear in monofont, which looks like this.
When this book was printed, some web addresses may have
needed to break across two lines of text. If that happened, rest
assured that we haven’t put in any extra characters (such as
hyphens) to indicate the break. So, when using one of these
web addresses, just type in exactly what you see in this book,
pretending the line break doesn’t exist.
How This Book Is Organized
This book comprises five chapters.
Chapter 1 sets the framework of cloud computing, giving you
a summary of what it is, as well as an outline of how cloud
came about. This chapter also analyses how cloud will help you
manage data growth.
In Chapter 2 we talk about the reasons for using cloud and the
three main categories of cloud. Chapter 3 looks at translating
security and legalities to cloud, as well as understanding the
implications for storage requirements. Chapter 4 delves into
deciding what to move to cloud and how to phase it in while
adding business value and improving savings.
Last but not least, no For Dummies book would be complete
without a chapter of tens (although in this case it’s a chapter of
sevens). So Chapter 5 explains seven ways Hitachi can help you
accelerate cloud storage solutions that will help you adopt the
right kind of cloud storage for your organization with minimal
disruption.
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Introduction
3
Icons Used in This Book
Throughout this book we use a series of icons in the margins
that help flag special information. Here’s what to look for.
When we tell you something about cloud computing that bears
remembering, we mark it with the Remember icon. Descriptions
that appear beside this icon are worth storing away because
they help build your understanding.
This icon indicates a resource on the Internet you can go to for
further information.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
4
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Chapter 1
Cloud Overview
In This Chapter
ᮣDiscovering what cloud is
ᮣExploring new ways to deliver IT resources
ᮣManaging explosive data growth
A
long with the promise of reduced costs for managing
explosive data growth, cloud computing brings forward an
entire evolution for the IT industry. As organizations experience
demands for greater agility, availability, performance and rapid
deployment of new applications, the desire to do more with less
prevails.
In this chapter we explore what cloud is and reasons to adopt it.
What Is Cloud, Really?
Cloud is not a particular product, but a way of delivering IT
services that are consumable on demand, elastic to scale up and
down as needed, and follow a pay-for-usage model.
Cloud is an elastic delivery model that enables businesses to
become more adaptable and interconnected. Monolithic and
ageing infrastructures give way or progress toward a ‘rent versus
buy’ state of agility, where non-core competencies are shed for
not just on-demand technology, but also for on-demand business
innovation and savings.
Cloud can relate to many things (storage-as-a-service, compute-
as-a-service, application-as-a-service), but without the
fundamental storage pieces, none of the other applications are
possible. Cloud is built on the premise that you’re running in a
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
6
virtualized world and virtual computing is nothing more than big
data files.
While there are still varying definitions and much hype around
what cloud does and does not mean, the key attributes that
cloud computing must provide include
ߜ The ability to rapidly provision or deprovision a service
A consumption model where users pay for what they use ߜ
The agility to flexibly scale (‘flex up’ or ‘flex down’) the ߜ
service without extensive pre-planning
A secure, direct connection to cloud without having to ߜ
recode applications
Multi-tenancy capabilities that segregate and protect the ߜ
data
Many storage requirements are being driven by unstructured
data, such as files, emails, medical records, legal imaging and
videos. In addition to data growth, companies also need to deal
with other complexities that impact on IT, such as:
ߜ Changes in business models
Data security regulations ߜ
Maintenance of legacy environments ߜ
Mergers and acquisitions ߜ
No wonder today’s data centers need a better solution.
Another Paradigm Shift in IT?
Over the last decade, the IT industry experienced the evolution
from direct attached storage (DAS) to network attached storage
(NAS) and storage area networks (SAN). Networked storage
helped improve storage utilization and data center efficiency.
With cloud, the IT industry is experiencing another paradigm
shift (see Figure 1-1 ). Cloud is not a point product or a singular
technology, but a way to deliver IT resources in a manner that
provides self-service, on-demand and pay-per-use consumption.
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Chapter 1: Cloud Overview
7
Market adoption cycles
Today
Direct attached
storage
Network storage
(includes NAS and SAN)
Cloud
storage
Figure 1-1: Market adoption cycles in IT storage.
The concept of utility-based computing, which includes storage-
as-a-service, was first developed as early as 1961, but the idea
faded as technologies at that time were not ready to make the
utility model a reality.
This wave of adoption is now made possible by the recent
technological developments and adoption of new strategies
within today’s data center environments. Key catalysts for
cloud adoption are
ߜ Automation
Data center consolidation ߜ
Data mobility ߜ
Multi-tenancy ߜ
Server and storage virtualization ߜ
Why Adopt Cloud?
In many ways, cloud is changing the way vendors develop their
products and IT procure their resources. Organizations adopt
cloud for various reasons:
ߜ Cost reduction by leveraging the economies of scale
beyond the four walls of the data center
IT agility to respond faster to changing business needs ߜ
100 per cent resource utilization ߜ
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
8

Key technical terms in cloud
Here are some of the key technical
terms used when discussing cloud.
Multi-tenancy is a secure way to par-
tition the infrastructure (application,
storage pool and network) so multiple
customers share a single resource
pool. Multi-tenancy is one of the key
ways cloud can achieve massive
economy of scale.
Representational state transfer (REST)
is a type of software architecture for
client/server communications over
the web.
Chargeback is the ability to report on
capacity and utilization by application
or dataset and charge business users
or departments based on how much
they use.
As seen in Figure 1-2 , customers buy and provision for peak
demand in order to be able to service and respond to business
demand in a timely fashion. This leaves customers with a
significant amount of unused storage. If demand dips even
lower after the initial purchase, the amount of unused storage
sitting idle versus what is needed gets even larger. In contrast,
a cloud service delivery model allows customers access to
storage resources when they need it, but they pay only for what
they use.

S
t
o
r
a
g
e

(
T
B
)
Traditional supply
700
Waste
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
Traditional demand Cloud supply and demand
Figure 1-2: Storage supply and demand: Traditional versus cloud.
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Chapter 2
Discovering the Benefits
of Cloud
In This Chapter
ᮣUnderstanding the reasons to use cloud
ᮣDiscovering the three main categories of cloud models
S
implifying planning and using resources more cost
effectively is appealing to all organizations. Utilizing cloud
delivers time and cost savings.
This chapter explores the reasons for using cloud, as well as
considering the advantages of each type of cloud — private,
hybrid and public.
Why Use Cloud?
Cloud is designed to distribute IT resources in a cost-effective
and nimble way. Consumption-driven cloud commerce moves an
organization’s focus from CAPEX (capital expenditure), which
typically isn’t fully utilized, to smaller, incremental and variable
OPEX (operating expenditure)
Organizations may overprovision to manage storage bursts
or attempt to meet capacity planning, or even buy because
there is budget available. These organizational efforts result in
a lot of idle capacity and a longer time to realize a return on
assets (ROA).
Employing cloud instead can simplify long-range financial and
storage planning, as the redeployment of resources is performed
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
10
instantly, anytime and anywhere, to scale up or down, and to
support business objectives as needed.
In private clouds, the service delivery layer sits on top of an
organization’s IT infrastructure. In hybrid or public clouds, an
organization’s existing infrastructure can be repurposed more
efficiently for core data, freed up, or retired as needed. As a
result, less infrastructure equates to lower data center power,
cooling, facility and maintenance costs. (To find out more about
private, hybrid and public clouds, see the discussion later in
this chapter.)
Also noteworthy is the opportunity for an organization to engage
in new functionality and services through cloud deployments.
For example, in the case of mergers and acquisitions, where
infrastructure, platforms and protocols may not integrate, cloud
computing can come to the table with on-demand services. So,
rather than assimilating architecture, the expanded business can
leverage cloud-based deployment of services and instead focus
on generating revenue.
IT must respond quickly to internal requests for new
applications, infrastructure or capacity. Otherwise, the business
units might go out and ‘get their own’. As any IT manager
knows, ad hoc platforms can lead to unnecessary compliance
ramifications and financial or litigation risks — and IT will
eventually wind up supporting those different platforms anyway.
In cloud computing, IT departments can quickly meet requests
for services and time-to-market while mitigating risk and
maintaining influence.
Win–win for subscribers
and providers
Cloud involves the subscriber and the provider. The service
provider can be a company’s internal IT group, a trusted third-
party or a combination of both. The subscriber is anyone using
the services. Cloud storage economics benefit both subscribers
and providers. Providers gain economies of scale using multi-
tenant infrastructure and a predictable, recurring revenue
stream. Subscriber benefits include
ߜ Shifting storage costs to an operating expense: pay for use
Lowering operating expenses and the drain on IT resources ߜ
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Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud
11
ߜ Balancing the value of data with service level agreements
(SLAs) and costs
Gaining business flexibility with subscriber-controlled, ߜ
on-demand capacity and performance
Future-proofing, because storage media can change below ߜ
the cloud layer without disrupting services
To fully realize these benefits, cloud storage needs to be
ߜ Elastic, quickly adapting underlying infrastructure to
changing subscriber demands
SLA-driven, automated and integrated to provide swift ߜ
response times
Policy-based, with deep levels of automation to move data ߜ
as required
Secure and reliable ߜ
Able to control geographically dispersed data ߜ
The myth surrounding ‘as-a-service’
A frequently used term in any cloud-related book is as-a-service .
It really means that a resource or task has been packaged so
it can be delivered automatically to customers on demand in
a repeatable fashion. It is commonly used to describe cloud
delivery models. For example:
ߜ Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) delivers compute
hardware (servers, network or storage) as a service. The
characteristics commonly seen with IaaS are
Subscribers provision the resource without control of the •
underlying cloud infrastructure.
The service is paid for on a usage basis. •
Infrastructure can be automatically scaled up or down. •
An example of infrastructure-as-a-service is Amazon’s
Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), http://aws.amazon
.com/ec2
ߜ Storage-as-a-Service (STaaS) provides storage resources
as a pay-per-use utility to end users. It is one flavor or
type of infrastructure-as-a-service and therefore shares the
common characteristics described earlier.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
12
Hitachi’s Private File Tiering Cloud ( www.hds.com/
solutions/storage-strategies/cloud/index.html?WT.
ac=us_hp_flash_r1 ) is an example of storage-as-a-service.
ߜ Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) provides more than just the
infrastructure. It is a comprehensive stack for developers
to create cloud-ready business applications. The
characteristics commonly seen with PaaS are that it:
Is multi-tenant •
Supports web services standards •
Is dynamically scaling based on demand •
An example of platform-as-a-service is Microsoft Azure
www.microsoft.com/windowsazure .
ߜ Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) cloud providers host
and deliver business applications as a service. The
characteristics commonly seen with SaaS include:
Multi-tenancy •
Consumer uses applications running on a cloud •
infrastructure
Accessible from various client devices through web •
browser
CRM (customer relationship management) is one of the •
most commonly seen SaaS
Salesforce.com ( www.salesforce.com ) is an example of
software-as-a-service.
Private, Hybrid and Public
Cloud Models
The three main categories of cloud models are private, hybrid
and public. Each one may offer varying levels of security,
services, access, service level agreements (SLAs) and value to
end users.
Private cloud
In a private cloud, all components reside within the firewall of an
organization. The infrastructure is either managed internally by
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Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud
13
the IT department, or managed and delivered as a service by a
cloud provider.
Behind the security of the firewall, private cloud embraces high
levels of automation to virtualize the infrastructure — servers,
networks and storage — and deliver services to business units
or other branches.
How is private cloud used?
Private clouds can leverage existing infrastructure, deliver
massive scale and enable chargeback either by an organization’s
own IT staff, or as a vendor-managed service, but within the
privacy of an organization’s network. Additionally, private
clouds:
ߜ Can deliver IaaS or STaaS internally to employees or
business units through an intranet or the internet via a
virtual private network (VPN)
Can deliver software (applications) as a service to branch ߜ
offices
Include database on demand, email on demand or storage ߜ
on demand
Security in private cloud
With private cloud, security of the data and physical premises
are determined and monitored by the IT team, and its high-
quality SLAs remain intact. In a private cloud environment, the
network bandwidth is under IT’s control as well, which also
helps ensure SLAs.
An organization maintains its own strong security practices
of both the data and the physical location, such as key codes,
passwords and badging.
Access to data is determined internally and may resemble
existing role-based access controls; or separate administration
and data permissions, based on data types and security
practices, may be granted.
Why use private cloud?
Reasons for using private cloud include
ߜ To the end users: Quick and easy resource sharing,
rapid deployment, self-service and the ability to perform
chargeback to departments or user groups.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
14
ߜ To the service provider (in this case, an organization):
The ability to initiate chargeback accounting for usage
while maintaining control over data access and security.
Hybrid cloud
Hybrid cloud is a combination of private and public cloud
infrastructures. Selected data, infrastructure or applications
are allowed to ‘punch through’ the corporate firewall and be
provided by a trusted cloud provider.
In hybrid cloud, multi-tenant infrastructure outside the firewall
delivered by a trusted cloud provider is leveraged for further
cost reduction. The subscriber and the hybrid cloud provider
are bound together by standardized or proprietary technologies
that enable data and application portability.
The IT organization makes decisions regarding what types of
services and data can live outside the firewall to be managed by
a trusted third-party partner, such as telcos, system integrators
and internet service providers.
How is cost saving achieved?
Hybrid cloud usually provides an attractive alternative to an
organization when internal processes can no longer be optimized
because further cost reduction is provided by leveraging a
trusted service provider’s ability to deliver to more than a
single customer.
The service provider’s costs are lower because they amortize
infrastructure across many customers and this helps even out
supply ‘peaks and valleys’. The service provider passes along
those savings to the customer base.
An organization’s cost infrastructure may only be amortized
across business units or a small customer base. By moving
certain data and applications to a hybrid cloud, the organization
is able to take advantage of the multi-tenant capabilities and
economies of scale.
The overall outlay of service delivery shifts to the pay-for-usage
model for an organization, while the trusted provider appreciates
higher utilization rates through its shared infrastructure. The
result is reduced costs for any given service offered through the
hybrid cloud.
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Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud
15
Building bridges between an organization and its trusted
partners is critical to ensuring data is protected. Hybrid cloud
providers use stringent security practices and uphold high-
quality SLAs to help the organization mitigate risks and maintain
control over data managed services and application hosting
services delivered through multi-tenancy. An organization also
determines access limitations for the provider and whether the
services will be delivered via VPNs or dedicated networks.
Why use hybrid cloud?
Reasons for using hybrid cloud include:
ߜ To the organization: Cost reductions — well-managed
services that are seamlessly and securely accessed by its
end users.
ߜ To the trusted provider: The economies of scale —
supplying services to multiple customers while increasing
utilization rates of highly scalable cloud-enabled
infrastructure.
Public cloud
In public cloud, all major components are located in a multi-
tenant infrastructure outside an organization’s firewall.
Applications and storage are made available over the internet
and can be free or offered at a pay-per-usage fee.
The key characteristics of public cloud are
ߜ Elasticity
Low entry costs ߜ
Ease of use ߜ
Pay-per-use ߜ
Examples of public cloud services include picture and music
sharing, laptop backup and file sharing. Examples of providers
include Amazon and Google on-demand web applications, Yahoo
mail, Facebook and LinkedIn.
Why use public cloud?
In many public clouds, the focus is on the consumer and small-
to-medium businesses where pay-per-use pricing is available,
often equating to pennies per gigabyte.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
16
Reasons for the end user to employ public cloud include
inexpensive, quick and easy resource sharing, rapid deployment
and self-service.
A word of caution
Public clouds typically provide ‘consumer level’ or lower SLAs
and may not offer guarantees against data loss or corruption.
Public IaaS clouds do not necessarily provide for restrictions and
compliance with privacy laws, which remain the responsibility of
the subscriber or corporate end user.
Future prospects
The value of public cloud continues to grow, especially as
security and availability measures mature.

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Chapter 3
Getting Started
In This Chapter
ᮣTaking a pragmatic approach
ᮣTranslating security and legalities to cloud
ᮣUnderstanding the implications for storage requirements
M
oving to cloud is more than figuring out which type of
services may best suit the business at any given time.
To be successful at reducing costs and building fluidity, an
organization may want to take a pragmatic approach by adopting
cloud at a measured pace, which is what this chapter is about.
Ensuring an Organization Is Well
Equipped to Deploy Cloud
By evaluating the risks and benefits of any given cloud
deployment, and understanding how to ensure alignment with
business needs, an organization is better equipped to proceed.
Key areas of concern for organizations are discussed in the
following sections.
Spending efficiently
Increasing business demands and regulations, the explosion of
new data requirements, growing complexities and the burden
of legacy systems with suboptimal utilization rates are all part
of the daily balancing act between cost and delivery in an
organization’s data center.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
18
Managing it all has traditionally involved capital outlay and
upfront purchases of more equipment than is needed at the
time to handle fluctuations in storage requirements and internal
business processes.
Over time, a build-up of underutilized storage, multiple retention
copies, and varying tiers of storage and RAID (redundant array
of independent disks) protection requirements occurs. This
leads to an imbalance in the ratio between hardware costs
and the value of the information stored on that hardware. To
improve the total cost of ownership and to maximize utilization,
the need for mobility becomes apparent.
However, closer examination shows that hardware costs make
up only a portion of the overall costs of ownership. Enter the
lurking OPEX (operating expenditure) for device migration,
backup and recovery, scheduled downtime, change management
and environmental inefficiencies — and the human resources to
manage it all. Then, as equipment ages and flexibility wanes, the
IT organization is left to sweat the assets and manage against
flattened budgets.
In a cloud deployment, the opportunity to shrink both CAPEX
(capital expenditure) and OPEX arises, and the agility factor
swells. This is achieved through
ߜ Sharing resources flexibly across the business needs,
thereby reducing the expense
Needing fewer resources to manage more storage in cloud ߜ
Improving utilization rates because of the higher levels ߜ
of virtualization and automation in a multi-tenancy
environment
Understanding SLAs
Service level agreements (SLAs) set a common understanding
about services, responsibilities and guarantees. SLAs usually
contain specific metrics around uptime, performance or other
attributes.
Because storage systems and the data they contain play an
important role in helping organizations comply with regulatory
and legal obligations, understanding and protecting that data, no
matter where it resides, is essential.
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Chapter 3: Getting Started
19
Cloud storage standards can help define roles and
responsibilities for data ownership, archival, discovery,
retrieval and retirement. SLAs around data storage assessments,
assurance and auditing also benefit from being defined in a
consistent mode.
In cloud scenarios, understanding exactly how SLAs are
measured is critical to maintaining the organization’s day-to-day
business operations. Reporting and analysis are also integral to
ensuring that there are no surprises.
For IT professionals to trust and adopt cloud services outside
an organization, SLAs and expected quality of services need to
be part of the contractual relationship with the service provider
that owns the infrastructure.
When considering a cloud service, ensure you ask the questions
associated with SLAs, such as:
ߜ Are there guarantees on data resilience?
What metrics are used for availability? ߜ
What level of reliability is provided? ߜ
SLAs for data storage availability, reliability and resilience have
typically been measured on a time-based metric; for example,
how many minutes of downtime/outage are acceptable per year.
Not all SLAs are alike! Some cloud providers may offer
availability guarantees of just the service and not the underlying
infrastructure levels. Another provider may establish a metric
that computes the number of executed tries rather than the
standard availability measurement of three, four or five nines,
resulting in less-than-acceptable service levels.
Enterprise organizations should ask providers about each
level of infrastructure within the multi-tenant environment to
ensure that SLAs are thoroughly defined and can be guaranteed.
Consider the application, server, network and storage layers of
infrastructure.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
20
Emerging standards
Cloud computing is still evolving. While no standard protocols
for operating cloud have been widely adopted across the
industry at this time, standards are being developed and
implemented.
Standards are especially important in cloud because they help
simplify integration, reduce costs and enable users to make
informed decisions.
Standards are critical for cloud in the areas of:
ߜ Interoperability and access
Security and privacy ߜ
Integration ߜ
Portability ߜ
Many organizations have come together to develop and promote
standards related to cloud. Following are some examples.
Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA)
The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA,
www.snia.org ) is a not-for-profit global organization made up
of some 400 member companies spanning virtually the entire
storage industry. SNIA’s mission is to lead the storage industry
worldwide in developing and promoting standards, technologies
and educational services to empower organizations in the
management of information.
SNIA’s Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI) standard
provides an interface for storage vendors to implement the
required metering of storage and data service usage, as well as
the interface to feed the billing applications that IT organizations
will be putting into place.
SNIA’s new initiative, the Cloud Storage Initiative (CSI), promotes
the adoption of cloud storage as a new delivery model which
provides elastic, on-demand storage billed only for what is used.
More information can be found at www.snia.org/forums/csi .
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Chapter 3: Getting Started
21
Open Cloud Consortium (OCC)
The Open Cloud Consortium (OCC) is a member-driven
organization that:
ߜ Supports the development of standards for cloud
computing and frameworks for interoperating between
clouds
Develops benchmarks for cloud computing ߜ
Supports reference implementations for cloud computing ߜ
The OCC also manages test beds for cloud computing, such
as the Open Cloud Testbed, and operates cloud computing
infrastructure to support scientific research, such as the Open
Science Data Cloud.
For more information about Open Cloud Consortium, go to
www.opencloudconsortium.org .
Open Grid Forum (OGF)
Open Grid Forum (OGF) is an open community committed to
driving the evolution and adoption of distributed computing.
Distributed computing is critical to developing new
applications and infrastructures to increase the productivity
in the organization and within the science community. OGF
accomplishes its work through open forums that build the
community, explore trends, share best practices and consolidate
these best practices into standards.
The Open Cloud Computing Interface Group (OCCI) is a
working group within the OGF and focuses on the creation
of an application programming interface (API) for interfacing
infrastructure cloud facilities.
For more information about Open Grid Forum, go to
www.ogf.org .
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
22
Translating Security and Legalities
to Cloud
Cloud brings inherent advantages to businesses. However, the
risk of exposing potentially sensitive data or failing to meet
fiduciary and legal mandates keeps some organizations from
using cloud.
Protecting data is a legal requirement in most countries.
Organizations must also comply with industry standards,
internal security policies and customer requirements for data
handling.
Most organizations don’t yet have the depth of experience with
cloud to be confident that service providers are implementing
security and limiting access in the manner that meets an
organization’s corporate standards or compliance requirements.
Knowing the provider’s security procedures and understanding
any risks with approaching cloud can assist an organization in
continuing to meet SLAs and alleviate concern over security and
regulatory issues.
Some common areas of concern related to cloud security include
ߜ Lack of common standards to apply across the entire IT
infrastructure
Data leakage due to inadvertent exposure ߜ
Accountability ߜ
Access and control over sensitive data ߜ
Access and control over business processes ߜ
Compliance regulations, including data retention, chain of ߜ
custody and eDiscovery
High costs incurred to recover from data breach/loss/ ߜ
malicious activity
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Chapter 3: Getting Started
23
The following drivers for cloud security are consistent with the
drivers for storage security:
ߜ Compliance with external regulations, including data
retention, secure transactions, data preservation and
sanitization, and protection of personally identifiable
information
Compliance with internal and corporate mandates, ߜ
finance and human resources policies, and protection of
intellectual property
Protection of IT infrastructure ߜ
Defense of company brands and customer retention ߜ
These areas of risk in the storage ecosystem are the reasons
why organizations must remain stalwart in their data security
strategies. Data continues to be the most valuable asset of any
company and where the most exposure resides. When moving to
cloud, it is important to ensure that security extends to storage
management tools and the layers of the infrastructure upon
which the cloud sets.
IT managers may be reluctant to hand over data and services to
a third party because of the lack of visibility, and not knowing
whether there is proper segregation from other tenant data and
what security protocols are in place for the physicality of the
cloud — both infrastructure and housing facility.
Inquire if the cloud provider is capable of performing
functionality such as encryption, masking, immutability and
shredding if they are required to meet SLAs and security needs.
For legal services in cloud, such as eDiscovery and sustaining
chain of custody, an organization needs to ensure that the
cloud environment will not impact or change the policies
and processes put in place to ensure that compliance and
governance regulations can be met. Also, having audit logs
readily available and tamper-proof is essential, as is the ability
for employees of the security vendor or cloud provider to make
authorized changes.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
24
Addressing Changing Storage
Needs
Knowing what type of cloud to deploy and at what time can
lead to highly efficient storage management for an organization.
Cloud offers the advantages most desired in an agile data
delivery model, including
ߜ Ease of deployment
High levels of automation ߜ
Consolidation of storage and mobility of data between tiers ߜ
Provisioning of storage to fluidly scale up or down ߜ
Increased storage utilization ߜ
Integrated management of heterogeneous devices ߜ
Automated data migration ߜ
Take data migration, for example. Research has found that
when implementing energy-efficient systems, IT managers are
challenged by the costs, disruptions and complexities associated
with migrating data from legacy systems to the new ones.
In cloud deployments, IT managers want to ensure that
service providers are operating a highly efficient infrastructure
capable of seamlessly migrating data to new tiers of storage in
accordance with SLAs and security needs.
Effectively tiering data in cloud also helps organizations align the
business value of data with the cost of storage. Managing tiers
in cloud requires automated movement of data so that the entire
environment can be managed via policies and without human
intervention.
By employing highly scalable, virtualized block and file storage,
the service provider can shield subscribers from changes to
underlying infrastructure while providing exceptional efficiency
gains.
Cloud storage is also well suited for latency-tolerant applications
such as backup, archive, disaster recovery and cyclical peak
workloads; nearline file storage capacities; and leveraging
subscriber policies across geographic distances.
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Chapter 4
Best Practices and
Use Cases
In This Chapter
ᮣPhasing in the use of cloud
ᮣImproving savings and operational efficiencies
ᮣAssessing what to move to cloud
ᮣAdding business value
T
o date, adoption of cloud by enterprise organizations is
seen predominantly in the private cloud space. Over time,
the assumption is that enterprise organizations will garner
more confidence in the maturity of external cloud offerings and
security through trusted partners.
Enterprise organizations may best capitalize on the cost
advantages of cloud computing while protecting data, by moving
in phases from private to hybrid and eventually to public models
over time. This chapter talks about how these practices can
help organizations enter the cloud environment safely and cost-
effectively to quickly begin seizing operational cost reductions.
Adopting Cloud at Your Own Pace
A good general rule is to adopt cloud based on business needs.
By deploying private cloud, enterprise organizations can forgo
painful and expensive forklift changes and leverage existing
investments.
In this phased approach, organizations can realize incremental
improvements and cost reductions by first adopting private
cloud, and gaining a more thorough understanding of how to
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
26
deploy and utilize cloud services within the safety of the data
center. Then, the business is able to make better decisions about
what data and applications to deploy through a trusted partner
and eventually within a public cloud.
Moving from Peripheral to
Core Data
Start by identifying data that may have lower business value and
less stringent service level agreement (SLA) requisites, such as
‘Tier 3’ data types, including stale, unstructured content residing
in home directory or file shares, or static content such as
backup or archive data.
By starting with the peripheral data types (Tier 3 as shown
in Figure 4-1 ), organizations are able to free up both storage
resources and staff to focus on the business-critical, core
applications. This allows organizations to improve operational
efficiency and utilization, reduce costs and gain experience and
best practices, so they can move towards the core applications
at their own pace.
C
o
r
e
Tier 1
Business
critical
apps, data
Tier 2
Business
apps, data
Tier 3
File tiering
backup
archive
C
o
n
t
r
o
l

o
r

S
L
A
Business value of data
Figure 4-1: A practical approach to adopting cloud.
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Chapter 4: Best Practices and Use Cases
27
Here’s a deeper look at a typical example. Peripheral data is
often parked on primary network attached storage (NAS) storage
or other storage repositories. File tiering can be a very effective
way to offload this type of burden from primary data center
storage to cloud.
Often, the file environment grows out of control, leaving the IT
team to straddle protection copies, deduplication, virtual tape
libraries and tape backup to keep these copies online or at
higher performance levels than are necessary.
By moving this inactive file data to cloud as secondary
storage, an organization is able to reclaim and even centralize
primary file share space, reduce backup, and lower OPEX costs
associated with tending to legacy data that often requires a
lot of care and feeding to maintain, without impact on existing
business processes.
Organizations also can save on backup hardware and software
licensing, since the amount of data being backed up is
reduced. SLAs can still be driven to allow rapid, online access
to older inactive content; meanwhile, the organization gains
more efficient usage of storage, power consumption and
staff resources.
Upfront CAPEX may also be reduced, including capacity
planning, oversubscription of storage, unpredictable business
usage and storage refreshes.
Simplifying for Greater Operational
Efficiencies
Along the continuum of offloading data to cloud, considering
services that can quickly elevate savings by freeing up resources
and improving operational efficiencies is important.
Moving long-tail content, for example, out of the data center to
a managed pay-per-use service in cloud can alleviate the need
to maintain (or purchase new) onsite archive systems while
upholding compliance requirements.
For the private cloud physically located on the premises, the
day-to-day management is trimmed, as is money spent on
CAPEX. As the enterprise later shifts to its trusted partner
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
28
providers, so do the cost implications of the footprint, such as
power, cooling and floor space. In both cases, the enterprise
can avoid developing irrelevant expertise or applications and
continue consolidation efforts on a pay-per-use scale.
Targeting Cost Centers for Adding
Business Value
When assessing what to move into the cloud, consider areas of
the data center that are cost centers. Backup often surfaces to
the top of this elimination wish list for many IT groups. Backup
is expensive and recovery can be problematic — basically
becoming a cost center in itself.
The use case for backup-to-cloud as a storage service can reduce
total costs of ownership by minimizing or eliminating manual
processes centered on often less critical applications, plus the
storage costs of physical media, data reduction technologies,
shuttling or shipping services, and so on.
Finding a trusted repository, appropriate levels of availability,
and SLAs for corporate backups are paramount here.

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Chapter 5
Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways
Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
In This Chapter
ᮣAdopting cloud with minimum disruption
ᮣTaking a pragmatic approach to establishing a cloud enabling portfolio
ᮣLooking at cloud platforms, services and storage-as-a-service solutions
I
n this book we give you an introduction to cloud storage —
what it is, how it works and how it saves your organization
time and money. In this chapter we give you the rundown on
how Hitachi Data Systems provides your cloud solutions. (In
this chapter, when we refer to Hitachi Data Systems, most of the
time, we simply say Hitachi.)
Cloud Doesn’t Have to
be Disruptive!
For the enterprise organization considering private cloud and
for providers seeking cloud-enabled infrastructure, Hitachi Data
Systems facilitates highly scalable SLA-driven deployments that
are reliable, cost efficient and complementary to existing data
center infrastructure.
As the industry embraces the evolution to cloud, knowing that
cloud doesn’t have to be disruptive to the existing infrastructure
or practices within the data center is important. Using cloud
doesn’t have to be another island to manage.
Vendors like Hitachi focus on providing a path to enable
enterprises to adopt cloud at their own pace with no need to
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
30
rip and replace their existing infrastructure. Implementing
cloud can complement their current environment and improve
the return on their existing asset.
Looking At Cloud-Enabling
Platforms
Hitachi takes an integrated approach to its cloud strategy and
portfolio of offerings. Hitachi can offer cloud ready platforms
and services to customers looking to manage their own cloud
environment (see Figure 5-1 ). By leveraging the integrated set
of cloud enabled platforms and technologies along with Hitachi-
managed services and/or third party technologies, Hitachi has
developed storage-as-a-service solutions for customers that want
to procure storage resources on a consumption basis.
Hitachi also provides reliable and integrated infrastructure to
companies such as telecommunication companies, independent
software vendors (ISVs), service providers and system
integrators — a foundation on which to build their hybrid and
public cloud offerings.

Hitachi cloud strategy
Platform Solution Service
ª Hitachi managed
service
ª Integrated content
and file platforms
ª Enterprise and
modular storage
ª Unified compute
platform
ª Storage-as-a-service
ª Infrastructure-as-a-service
ª Partners: teIco, ISVs,
service providers,
systems integrators
Figure 5-1: Hitachi Data Systems’ integrated cloud strategy.
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
31
By leveraging the cloud-enabling capabilities of Hitachi
platforms, organizations can apply the appropriate delivery
mechanisms and deployment methodology on top to facilitate
and optimize their cloud deployments. This approach helps
customers strengthen their data center agility, reliability,
availability, storage efficiency and performance.
Hitachi recognizes that there is no assembly-line approach to
producing or deploying cloud, and believes that an integrated
portfolio of technologies is required to sustain successful cloud
operations.
To enable diverse uses within a cloud environment, Hitachi
capitalizes on proven virtualized and integrated block, file and
object technologies. Using a single, underlying infrastructure
that is reliable, scalable, multi-tenant and multi-tiered, Hitachi
technology provides integrated search, migration and archive
capabilities, and securely virtualizes IT assets into consolidated,
easy-to-manage pools of resources.
Subsequently, these resources can be provisioned as needed to
support a wide range of infrastructure and content services in
private, hybrid and public clouds. Advanced architectures such
as a single Hitachi Content Platform, for example, can support an
enterprise and cloud simultaneously.
Hitachi has an integrated portfolio and is a trusted infrastructure
vendor, with virtualized, scalable and high-performance
architecture built for the multi-petabyte environment.

Telstra: A success story
Telecommunications leader Telstra
signed a $50 million, five-year contract
to provide cloud computing services to
Visy, a global manufacturing company
based in Melbourne, Australia, with
more than 8,000 staff and operations
in 140 locations across Australia, New
Zealand, Asia and the United States.
Visy needed cost reduction solutions
to migrate its global SAP environ-
ment, and deemed infrastructure-as-
a-service cloud computing the way
to go.
The Telstra cloud layer is built upon
infrastructure from Hitachi which was
chosen for its multi-tenant storage
management abilities and tools.

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Cloud Storage For Dummies
32
Through its agile cloud-enabled technologies, Hitachi can help
organizations virtualize all existing storage resources into a
single and agile infrastructure to reduce storage costs, mitigate
risks and simplify management amid changing demands.
This approach eliminates the need to manage separate
silos of information and allows customers to apply common
management tasks across all types of data (as shown in
Figure 5-2 ).
Unified management
Virtualized infrastructure
Structured Unstructured Semi-structured Rich media
Figure 5-2: Common approach for managing all data types.
Beyond cloud-enabling architecture and services, Hitachi
provides a sound strategy and guidance for its enterprise
customers, and end-to-end cloud solutions that foster true value
and ease of deployment, and which triumph over the typically
stressed enterprise data center.
Building an Integrated Portfolio,
Not Another Island
Hitachi’s cloud technologies are built upon a core set of
principles to best support enterprise and provider organizations
with deployment solutions and services. Key features or
functionality within Hitachi’s products are built to be applicable
to the dynamic data center and cloud (see Figure 5-3 ).
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
33
Common platform and
management of all data
Scalable and flexible
Cost effective
Reliable
Mobilized data
Secure and private
Automated and integrated
Flexible, dynamic infrastructure
Figure 5-3: Hitachi’s design philosophy.
Key features of Hitachi’s cloud technologies include
ߜ Flexible and dynamic infrastructure: These core attributes
are designed to meet the notions of on-demand and just-
in-time services, and enable seamless continuity from
the data center into cloud with zero learning curve or
application disturbance.
ߜ Automation and integration: Built-in software tools that
ensure highly automated, reliable, repeatable and scalable
processes to help diminish operating costs associated with
manual steps and human interaction:
The integrated Hitachi file and content portfolio offers •
the ability to transparently move data across tiers, on
filers or storage systems, at both file and object levels,
from network attached storage (NAS) to archive devices,
triggered by policies on both file content and metadata.
Federated search across silos can be conducted with •
a single query. The search results can also trigger
migration among different tiers.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
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ߜ Security and privacy: End-to-end security practices and
authenticity can guarantee privacy and data protection for
the entire data asset life cycle, including
• Multi-tenancy: Logical partition to ensure segregation of
administration
• Encryption: Data at rest (while residing on internal
drives) and in flight (during transfer) is encrypted;
support of object-level encryption at the source;
credential interlock between core cloud and edge
customers
• Write Once Read Many : Immutability for compliant
retention is delivered with this technology
• Tenants and Namespaces: Logical segregation of
management and of data with customizable data
management personalities and access rights, and security
layers to prevent unauthorized access
ߜ Cloud Ready with representational state transfer (REST)
Interface: Industry-standard protocol embedded for direct
and reliable connection to cloud
ߜ Reliability: Bolster resiliency and data sentry with
inherent protection functionalities, such as object-based
replication and hardware-based redundant array of
independent disks (RAID)
ߜ Cost effectiveness: Use common management and
integrated technologies that orchestrate highly efficient
automation, processes, utilization, migration, tiering and
scalability to support rapid resource deployment for lower
CAPEX and OPEX opportunities
Paving the Way to Private Cloud
with Unified Compute Platform
Data centers have undergone tremendous transformation
over the last decade. The early wave of consolidation enabled
enterprises to achieve cost saving and efficiency improvement.
Today, most large organizations have leveraged virtualization
technology to modernize their data centers.
Virtualization has been implemented at the server, storage or
data network layers at many data centers. While virtualization
enables automation within the technology domain — for
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
35
example, server or storage — gaps remain at the ‘connection
point’ across these domains.
A foundational layer is the core cloud storage infrastructure. In a
fully virtualized world, the common thread is the storage layer:
‘Machines’ are nothing more than large data files; the user- or
application-generated content needs to be available flexibly
across virtual domains; disaster resilience and recovery need to
be managed universally. The core cloud storage platforms need
to provide this basic underpinning.
The next step in the data center evolution is to achieve an end-
to-end automation across the gaps of these domains. In other
words, the next step is to provide a holistic and horizontal view
from the perspectives of the business and the applications.
Converged infrastructure is a first step towards bridging the gap
from current emphasis on virtualization and consolidation to a
more automated and dynamic data center in order to create a
foundation for what comes next (see Figure 5-4 ).
The desire to achieve this holistic view has triggered a dynamic
wave of activities toward the converged infrastructure.
The converged infrastructure treats server, storage and network
infrastructure resources as pools, to be assigned as needed to
business services.
B
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IT as a service
private cloud
C
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Consolidate data center
Virtualize server and storage
Automate workflow
Time
Self-provisioning
Future: private cloud
Figure 5-4: Path of IT evolution.
c05.indd 35 8/19/10 3:49:01 PM
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
36
The goal is no longer to deploy each element (server, storage,
network) individually, but to build the optimal platform in
unified packages. Companies can then manage these packages
based on service level agreements (SLAs).
Converged infrastructure serves as the foundation for private
cloud. In essence, private cloud is defined by key attributes
enabled by the converged infrastructure:
ߜ Self-service provisioning
End-to-end automation across the entire workflow ߜ
Highly virtualized IT resources ߜ
Billing and chargeback enabled ߜ
Hitachi will deliver an open, unified platform designed to achieve
SLA-based workflow automation across the boundaries of server,
storage and data network components, as shown in Figure 5-5 .
The platform will centralize and orchestrate the management of
servers, storage, networking and applications with end-to-end
automation and SLA-based templates.
Figure 5-5: Hitachi’s unified compute platform.
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
37
The platform’s holistic and simplified management will
significantly reduce time to market and operational costs.
Improved agility and predictability will make possible dynamic
and cost-effective data centers that can quickly respond to
business needs.
The Hitachi Unified Compute Platform will differ from other
solutions in several ways:
ߜ The platform will be an open platform, not a vendor lock-in
vehicle:
Multi-Hypervisor support that permits multiple •
hypervisors, including Microsoft Hyper-V and
VMware ESX
Flexibility in supporting existing x86 server infrastructure •
Virtualized third-party storage behind Hitachi Universal •
Storage Platform V family
Open APIs to enable third-party or cloud providers to •
leverage and build upon the infrastructure
Key benefits will include investment protection; •
leveraging existing infrastructure; no rip and replacement
End-to-end orchestration software will coordinate the ߜ
management of the server, storage and data network:
Business-aligned automation through SLA templates as •
opposed to loosely coupled management tools
Designed from day one to solve business-level issues, as •
opposed to packaging existing solutions with disjointed
management tools
Key benefits are business alignment with an SLA-aware •
environment; lower management cost with automated
process; lower risk with repeatable process
Hitachi Unified Compute Platform will have tight integration ߜ
down to the hardware level:
Integration with storage hardware will enable Hitachi •
Unified Compute Platform to leverage the unique features
at the storage level — intelligent tiering, virtualization
and broad replication capabilities.
Key benefits will include the built-in intelligence native •
to Hitachi storage that will be leveraged to make
orchestration more efficient, and make the virtual
machine (VM) deployment and replication faster.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
38
Hitachi Managed Services
for Cloud
To support the evolving needs of enterprise organizations,
Hitachi Data Systems’ Professional Services has expanded
its suite of managed services pertinent to cloud deployment,
including Residency, Remote Management and utility-based
services.
Hitachi now provides Utility-based Services to the enterprise or
service provider deploying cloud, and helps derive greater value
and optimized performance from existing assets for new use
cases. Hitachi offers the following:
ߜ Residency Services: Developed to facilitate a higher
and quicker return on storage investments, Residency
Services help organizations to fill critical gaps in staff
skills or experience while improving asset utilization
and performance, and achieving service level objectives.
Hitachi Data Systems consultants are assigned to the
task — storage area networks (SAN), mainframe, open
systems, replication evaluation — and implement industry-
standard processes, tools, training and best practices.
ߜ Remote Management Services: Complementary to
Residency Services, Remote Management Services
comprise robust reporting, real-time monitoring, and
alerting and provisioning services, often the essential keys
to efficiently managing storage infrastructure. While most
organizations have flatlined their resource investments
and budgets, the demands for capacity and services
sharply rise and fall. The results: Do more and do it better,
faster and cheaper. Remote Management Services help
the enterprise manage and align the storage environment
with established service level requirements, and introduce
best practices that enable flexible service delivery to meet
changing business requirements.
ߜ Managed Storage Utility: Most cloud offerings provide
flex-up options to accommodate changes in capacity or
service needs. Hitachi is unique in its ability and offering
to also provide flex-down opportunities in which the
enterprise actually pays only for what is used. Utility-based
Services allow Hitachi to offer guidance as well as packaged
or custom services to both the enterprise and the provider
seeking revenue generation from cloud optimality.
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
39
Hitachi Storage-as-a-Service
Hitachi is helping customers deploy low-risk cloud at their own
pace with two new cloud offerings.
The first, Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering, is a
fully managed storage-as-a-service solution that will enable
customers to tier inactive file data into an onsite private cloud
environment and pay only for what they consume. The second,
a joint solution with Digi-Data, will deliver an end-to-end cloud
infrastructure, enabling telcos, service providers and systems
integrators to leverage Hitachi flexible storage infrastructure and
Digi-Data’s applications and services, to create a differentiated
cloud storage offering for their consumers and SMBs (small and
medium businesses).
Private File Tiering
Private File Tiering is a fully managed, utility-based cloud service
that moves legacy or lower-value unstructured data into a cloud
storage environment located within the customer’s data center.
The Private File Tiering cloud service enables customers to tier
inactive file data into a fully managed private cloud environment
and pay only for what they consume.
By leveraging the Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering,
enterprise customers can reduce costs, simplify management
and improve the efficiency and longevity of the primary NAS
environments.
Hitachi offers an integrated, fully managed, consumption-based
service located within an organization’s firewall, ensuring
existing security measures remain intact.
Data stays at the customer’s site and facilitates pay-for-usage
storage. The physical infrastructure at the customer’s site is
remotely managed by Hitachi. When new storage is required, the
request is automated and fulfilled based on customer-defined
policies, and remotely provisioned and managed by Hitachi.
Because this service is remotely managed by Hitachi, customers
can reduce management overheads while simultaneously
ensuring that their storage environment is being optimized.
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
40
The Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering will help
customers to:
ߜ Reduce the amount of storage residing on the primary NAS
by tiering to the cloud
Improve backup performance by cutting the amount of ߜ
storage that requires backup
Eliminate capital expense through a utility-based, cost per ߜ
gigabyte per month consumption model and by cutting out
oversubscription of storage
Reduce operating costs by moving inactive data to a ߜ
management-free environment and cutting down on the
amount of backup media, licensing and management
overhead required
Online Storage-as-a-Service
In partnership with Digi-Data, Hitachi offers a public online
cloud storage solution that provides a complete services menu
for telecommunications companies, service providers and
systems integrators looking to develop or expand their cloud
service offerings. This joint solution enables providers to deliver
differentiated cloud services to their consumers and SMBs.
Leveraging Hitachi flexible storage infrastructure and Digi-Data’s
applications and services, this solution gives providers access
to multiple connectivity options into the cloud, and a reliable
architecture for building and deploying an online cloud service.
With Digi-Data’s comprehensive set of application programming
interfaces (APIs), providers can integrate their own applications,
business and processing systems, and end-user interfaces into
the cloud infrastructure. Providers also get a comprehensive set
of technologies and services that help to:
ߜ Reduce costs by replacing costly legacy storage with a
consumption-based, pay–as-you grow model
Improve customer retention by becoming the center of ߜ
their customer’s digital universe, enabling them to store,
organize, protect and share their important digital assets
Increase return on investment and monthly revenues per ߜ
user and build stronger relationships with consumers by
delivering value-added services
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Chapter 5: Ten (Okay, Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud
41

Sify: A success story
Sify is one of India’s leading managed
services providers, delivering end-
to-end solutions for enterprises as
well as consumers. Sify designs and
develops a host of customized e-com-
merce and network connectivity solu-
tions to connect critical business
systems and offers a seamless data
network that encompasses customers,
suppliers, vendors and staff.
To leverage the growing opportuni-
ties in cloud storage, Sify wanted to
develop an on-demand and highly
scalable platform for storage to cater
to its enterprise customers. Sify chose
to build on Hitachi storage and soft-
ware because the basic architecture
of the solution enables scaling up
as and when required without huge
changes to the existing setup or
investments.
Sify’s on-demand storage service com-
bines award-winning Hitachi Adapt-
able Modular Storage 2500 and
Hitachi NAS Platform 3080, powered
by BlueArc. Together, they create
consolidated, easy-to-manage pools
of storage capacities that can be pro-
visioned as needed to support a wide
range of applications and data types.
According to P J Nath, executive presi-
dent, enterprise services, Sify ‘wanted
the on-demand storage platform to
be future ready for technologies like
storage virtualization and thin provi-
sioning, as these would become a key
game changer for the business as our
customers grow.’

The integrated portfolio of Hitachi cloud technologies, solutions
and services simplifies and accelerates the adoption of private,
hybrid and public cloud environments.
Partnering with Hitachi
Data Systems
The Hitachi team is passionate about bringing tangible results
and solutions to the rapidly maturing cloud universe, to channel
agility and alignment with business needs for the enterprise.
The Hitachi approach to cloud allows customers to choose the
best possible product mix and delivery methods for addressing
their particular cloud needs, through an offering of highly
integrated products for cloud. Hitachi is able to deliver elastic,
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Cloud Storage For Dummies
42
secure and end-to-end storage infrastructure that solves the
most pressing business challenges by:
ߜ Reducing cost with intelligent management of multi-tiered
infrastructure
Simplifying the IT environment and achieving operational ߜ
efficiency
Mitigating risks with a secure, highly available ߜ
infrastructure
Ensuring QOS and SLAs with enterprise class hardware and ߜ
software capabilities
To learn more about the architectures, platforms, services
and end-to-end Agile Cloud Solutions available, please contact
Hitachi or visit www.hds.com/cloud .

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Maximize your
IT resources with
cloud computing
Hitachi Data System
s Edition
A Reference
for the
Rest of Us!
®
Linda Xu
Miklos Sandorfi
Tanya Loughlin
C
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t
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g
e
S
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V
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Brought to you by
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Select the most suitable
cloud storage solution
for your organization
Assess the benefits
and savings of a cloud
storage model
Plan for the
implementation of
cloud storage
Protect your cloud
with a secure and
compliant environment
Find listings of all our books
Choose from many different
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Sign up for eTips at
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Explanations in plain
English
‘Get in, get out’ information
Icons and other
navigational aids
Top ten list
A dash of humour and fun
Hitachi Data Systems’ Cloud Storage For Dummies
provides all the answers. With this book, you discover
a clear explanation of cloud storage, and tips for how
to choose the right type of cloud storage for your
organization’s needs. You also find out how cloud
storage can free up valuable IT resources, saving time
and money.
Cloud Storage For Dummies presents useful information
on setting up a secure cloud storage environment. It
also details how you can ensure a smooth transition
of your IT system to cloud storage, with minimum
disruption.
Understand cloud computing
and save your
organization time
and money!
Cloud computing is taking IT by storm,
but what is it and what are the benefits
to your organization?
ISBN: 978-1-74246-862-4
Not for resale
Spine width 5 mm Trim size 215 x 140 mm
5_64_68624_CloudStorage-COV.indd 1 12/08/10 9:13 AM
By Wiffen, Liz - Brisbane at 11:58 am, Aug 20, 2010 By Thornton, Christine - Brisbane at 1:57 pm, Aug 20, 2010

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Hitachi Data Systems Edition

Cloud Storage
FOR

DUMmIES
by Linda Xu, Miklos Sandorfi and Tanya Loughlin

Wiley Publishing Australia Pty Ltd

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Cloud Storage For Dummies® Hitachi Data Systems Edition Published by Wiley Publishing Australia Pty Ltd 42 McDougall Street Milton Qld 4064 www.dummies.com Copyright © 2010 Wiley Publishing Australia Pty Ltd ISBN: 978 1 74246 862 4 The moral rights of the authors have been asserted. All rights reserved. No part of this book, including interior design, cover design and icons, may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the Publisher. Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Contracts & Licensing section of John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd, 42 McDougall Street, Milton, Qld 4064, or email auspermissions@wiley.com. Typeset by diacriTech, Chennai, India Printed in China by Printplus Limited 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: THE PUBLISHER AND THE AUTHORS MAKE NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS WORK AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION, WARRANTIES OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. NO WARRANTY MAY BE CREATED OR EXTENDED BY SALES OR PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS. THE ADVICE AND STRATEGIES CONTAINED HEREIN MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR EVERY SITUATION. THIS WORK IS SOLD WITH THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THE PUBLISHER IS NOT ENGAGED IN RENDERING LEGAL, ACCOUNTING, OR OTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. IF PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE IS REQUIRED, THE SERVICES OF A COMPETENT PROFESSIONAL PERSON SHOULD BE SOUGHT. NEITHER THE PUBLISHER NOR THE AUTHORS SHALL BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES ARISING HEREFROM. THE FACT THAT AN ORGANISATION OR WEB SITE IS REFERRED TO IN THIS WORK AS A CITATION AND/OR A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF FURTHER INFORMATION DOES NOT MEAN THAT THE AUTHORS OR THE PUBLISHER ENDORSE THE INFORMATION THE ORGANISATION OR WEB SITE MAY PROVIDE OR RECOMMENDATIONS IT MAY MAKE. FURTHER, READERS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT INTERNET WEB SITES LISTED IN THIS WORK MAY HAVE CHANGED OR DISAPPEARED BETWEEN WHEN THIS WORK WAS WRITTEN AND WHEN IT IS READ. Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, A Reference for the Rest of Us!, The Dummies Way, Making Everything Easier, dummies.com and related trade dress are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the United States and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Wiley Publishing Australia Pty Ltd is not associated with any product or vendor mentioned in this book.

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About the Authors
Linda Xu is Director of Product Marketing, File, Content and Cloud at Hitachi Data Systems. As director of the file, content and cloud product marketing team, Linda is responsible for developing go-to-market strategy for the portfolio, and end-to-end execution of the marketing strategies. Her portfolio includes the integrated Hitachi file and content solutions, cloud initiative, Hitachi Unified Compute Platform and Hitachi server. Linda holds an MBA in Marketing and Finance, and a BA in Economics. Miklos Sandorfi is Chief Strategist, File, Content and Cloud at Hitachi Data Systems. As chief strategist of file, content and cloud services, Miki is responsible for driving forward the Hitachi file, content and cloud products, primarily focusing on the interplay between the products and the resulting customer-focused solutions. Miki has more than 18 years of experience in the storage industry. Miki was founder and chief technology officer of Sepaton, where he was responsible for pioneering advances in enterprise data protection and deduplication technologies. Miki currently holds 16 patents with an additional 20 pending. Miki has a BSEE and attended Babson College’s School of Executive Education. Tanya Loughlin is Senior Product Marketing Manager, Cloud at Hitachi Data Systems. As senior product marketing manager, Tanya is responsible for the cloud portfolio. In this role she directs the strategy and go-to-market planning and execution for Hitachi’s cloud offerings throughout their lifecycle. Tanya has more than 14 years of professional experience across various marketing and business disciplines. Tanya has a BSBA in Marketing Communications. She is a fellow of the UMASS Boston Emerging Leaders Program 2009 Cohort and she is currently pursuing her MBA.

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Inc. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. please send us your comments through our online registration form located at http://dummies. Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following: Acquisitions.Publisher’s Acknowledgments We’re proud of this book. . Editorial and Media Development Project Editor: Catherine Spedding Acquisitions Editor: Rebecca Crisp Editorial Manager: Hannah Bennett Production Graphics: Wiley Art Studio Proofreader: Liz Goodman These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing.com. and any dissemination. distribution.custhelp.

.......... ............. ...... ............ Inc........................25 Moving from Peripheral to Core Data....................... ......20 Translating Security and Legalities to Cloud. ............ ......... .....6 Why Adopt Cloud?.......... .....2 How This Book Is Organized .... ..........15 Chapter 3: Getting Started .......................... and any dissemination. .......... .......... .......... ...............10 The myth surrounding ‘as-a-service’ ............ Really? .................... . 17 Ensuring an Organization Is Well Equipped to Deploy Cloud .... ............ or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited... ...22 Addressing Changing Storage Needs ...... ..26 Simplifying for Greater Operational Efficiencies .......17 Spending efficiently .. ........................... ............ ...........................3 Chapter 1: Cloud Overview ..... ..... ........11 Private............. ....2 Icons Used in This Book ... ................................................ .. .......................................... ................................ Hybrid and Public Cloud Models ....... ..... ... .......24 Chapter 4: Best Practices and Use Cases ..........................28 These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing........... .... ........... ....................... ... . ....... ...................... .............. ......... .18 Emerging standards ......... 5 What Is Cloud....................................... ..27 Targeting Cost Centers for Adding Business Value ................... ........... .............. . .... ...........17 Understanding SLAs ............ .. ..................................... . distribution...... .............. ........ ..............12 Private cloud ............ ................ ................... 25 Adopting Cloud at Your Own Pace....... .... .......................... 9 Why Use Cloud? ................ ............ .... ..... ..14 Public cloud . ..... .................. .... .... ... .................. .....................................5 Another Paradigm Shift in IT?....... .................... .....9 Win–win for subscribers and providers... . .... ...... 1 About This Book ............................ ..................... ... ...12 Hybrid cloud ................. .........Table of Contents Introduction ... .......... . ......2 Conventions Used in This Book ................. ............7 Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud . .......................................... . ...............

................. ............... ..... Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud ........vi Cloud Storage For Dummies Chapter 5: Ten (Okay.................... ........... .. .... ..... ..................... Inc........................... ............ distribution.. ........ ... ....... .....................34 Hitachi Managed Services for Cloud.... .... .. ....... or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited....... . ....................... ............39 Online Storage-as-a-Service ..32 Paving the Way to Private Cloud with Unified Compute Platform ...... ............. . ...................... ...... .... Not Another Island....40 Partnering with Hitachi Data Systems ..29 Looking At Cloud-Enabling Platforms ..... 29 Cloud Doesn’t Have to be Disruptive! .... ......30 Building an Integrated Portfolio........ and any dissemination........ ..... .. ..... ................38 Hitachi Storage-as-a-Service . .. ...... ..... ........ .............39 Private File Tiering ..... .....................41 These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. ..

such as rich media. and their storage requirements are also buckling the data center’s ability to maintain control. keeping up with data growth is the top challenge of IT managers. especially in a tumultuous business climate. distribution. cloud storage is the foundation and focus of Cloud Storage For Dummies. In some instances. While the promise of cloud is heady. and in other cloud offerings. will meet stringent business requirements. what they actually offer and which. An unprecedented upsurge in new unstructured data types. cloud offers a way for IT organizations to subscribe to on-demand capacity and usage services. cloud computing transitions conventional storage methods to a utility-type service model. operational expenses such as power. if any. and can be metered either internally or through an external provider. So where do manageable costs and unparalleled data growth become compatible? Answers may lie in cloud computing.Introduction hen faced with the moment-by-moment business and IT pressures swirling around any large data center. . Savings are amplified as subscribers shift their storage burdens to this pay-as-you-use model. and any dissemination. Today’s enterprise organizations are keenly seeking ways to securely and cost effectively address rampant multifaceted data growth with flat or shrinking budgets. Similar to an electric company that charges customers based on consumption. cloud fosters a more agile IT environment. W These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Enterprises are concerned about security beyond the firewall and gaining the most value from cloud without undergoing an overhaul of their existing investments and processes. Knowing when and how best to deploy cloud is critical to protecting the lifeblood of the organization — the data itself. which is written on behalf of Hitachi Data Systems. PACs and eDiscovery documents. Inc. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. cooling and storage management tasks move to the cloud provider. there is much confusion about the different types of cloud. Regardless of the offering or deployment model. the organization’s need for upfront capital investment goes down. Therefore. According to many industry experts. a boiling cauldron may come to mind. Representing a paradigm shift in the way organizations can reduce capital and operational costs.

distribution. So Chapter 5 explains seven ways Hitachi can help you accelerate cloud storage solutions that will help you adopt the right kind of cloud storage for your organization with minimal disruption. We guide you through what cloud storage is. the types of cloud available and the best one for your organization. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. which looks like this. when using one of these web addresses. and any dissemination. Chapter 4 delves into deciding what to move to cloud and how to phase it in while adding business value and improving savings. as well as an outline of how cloud came about. as well as understanding the implications for storage requirements. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. some web addresses may have needed to break across two lines of text. In Chapter 2 we talk about the reasons for using cloud and the three main categories of cloud. How This Book Is Organized This book comprises five chapters. just type in exactly what you see in this book.2 Cloud Storage For Dummies This book separates the hype of cloud from the crux of how to deploy cloud safely and cost effectively. About This Book Cloud Storage For Dummies is your guide to the exciting world of cloud storage. This chapter also analyses how cloud will help you manage data growth. Conventions Used in This Book All web addresses appear in monofont. rest assured that we haven’t put in any extra characters (such as hyphens) to indicate the break. as well as cloud’s many benefits. Chapter 3 looks at translating security and legalities to cloud. giving you a summary of what it is. Last but not least. pretending the line break doesn’t exist. When this book was printed. Chapter 1 sets the framework of cloud computing. If that happened. Inc. So. . no For Dummies book would be complete without a chapter of tens (although in this case it’s a chapter of sevens).

Introduction 3 Icons Used in This Book Throughout this book we use a series of icons in the margins that help flag special information. we mark it with the Remember icon. Descriptions that appear beside this icon are worth storing away because they help build your understanding. This icon indicates a resource on the Internet you can go to for further information. distribution. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Inc. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. . When we tell you something about cloud computing that bears remembering. Here’s what to look for.

or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.4 Cloud Storage For Dummies These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. distribution. Inc. .

cloud computing brings forward an entire evolution for the IT industry. but without the fundamental storage pieces. Cloud is an elastic delivery model that enables businesses to become more adaptable and interconnected. elastic to scale up and down as needed. and any dissemination. In this chapter we explore what cloud is and reasons to adopt it. What Is Cloud. application-as-a-service). performance and rapid deployment of new applications. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. where non-core competencies are shed for not just on-demand technology. Really? Cloud is not a particular product. Cloud is built on the premise that you’re running in a These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Inc. distribution. .Chapter 1 Cloud Overview In This Chapter Discovering what cloud is Exploring new ways to deliver IT resources Managing explosive data growth A long with the promise of reduced costs for managing explosive data growth. computeas-a-service. and follow a pay-for-usage model. Monolithic and ageing infrastructures give way or progress toward a ‘rent versus buy’ state of agility. none of the other applications are possible. but also for on-demand business innovation and savings. As organizations experience demands for greater agility. Cloud can relate to many things (storage-as-a-service. but a way of delivering IT services that are consumable on demand. the desire to do more with less prevails. availability.

such as files. but a way to deliver IT resources in a manner that provides self-service. Cloud is not a point product or a singular technology. Networked storage helped improve storage utilization and data center efficiency. Another Paradigm Shift in IT? Over the last decade. the key attributes that cloud computing must provide include The ability to rapidly provision or deprovision a service A consumption model where users pay for what they use The agility to flexibly scale (‘flex up’ or ‘flex down’) the service without extensive pre-planning A secure. In addition to data growth. companies also need to deal with other complexities that impact on IT. direct connection to cloud without having to recode applications Multi-tenancy capabilities that segregate and protect the data Many storage requirements are being driven by unstructured data.6 Cloud Storage For Dummies virtualized world and virtual computing is nothing more than big data files. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. the IT industry experienced the evolution from direct attached storage (DAS) to network attached storage (NAS) and storage area networks (SAN). Inc. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. legal imaging and videos. While there are still varying definitions and much hype around what cloud does and does not mean. distribution. medical records. and any dissemination. on-demand and pay-per-use consumption. such as: Changes in business models Data security regulations Maintenance of legacy environments Mergers and acquisitions No wonder today’s data centers need a better solution. the IT industry is experiencing another paradigm shift (see Figure 1-1). . emails. With cloud.

distribution. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. which includes storageas-a-service. Inc. Organizations adopt cloud for various reasons: Cost reduction by leveraging the economies of scale beyond the four walls of the data center IT agility to respond faster to changing business needs 100 per cent resource utilization These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. but the idea faded as technologies at that time were not ready to make the utility model a reality. This wave of adoption is now made possible by the recent technological developments and adoption of new strategies within today’s data center environments. The concept of utility-based computing. and any dissemination. . cloud is changing the way vendors develop their products and IT procure their resources. Key catalysts for cloud adoption are Automation Data center consolidation Data mobility Multi-tenancy Server and storage virtualization Why Adopt Cloud? In many ways. was first developed as early as 1961.Chapter 1: Cloud Overview 7 Market adoption cycles Today Direct attached storage Network storage (includes NAS and SAN) Cloud storage Figure 1-1: Market adoption cycles in IT storage.

or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. This leaves customers with a significant amount of unused storage. storage pool and network) so multiple customers share a single resource pool. distribution. . If demand dips even lower after the initial purchase. Chargeback is the ability to report on capacity and utilization by application or dataset and charge business users or departments based on how much they use. As seen in Figure 1-2. Traditional supply Traditional demand Cloud supply and demand 700 600 500 Storage (TB) 400 300 200 100 0 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Waste Figure 1-2: Storage supply and demand: Traditional versus cloud. Multi-tenancy is one of the key ways cloud can achieve massive economy of scale. Representational state transfer (REST) is a type of software architecture for client/server communications over the web. and any dissemination. but they pay only for what they use. the amount of unused storage sitting idle versus what is needed gets even larger. Multi-tenancy is a secure way to partition the infrastructure (application.8 Cloud Storage For Dummies Key technical terms in cloud Here are some of the key technical terms used when discussing cloud. In contrast. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. customers buy and provision for peak demand in order to be able to service and respond to business demand in a timely fashion. a cloud service delivery model allows customers access to storage resources when they need it. Inc.

Employing cloud instead can simplify long-range financial and storage planning. Why Use Cloud? Cloud is designed to distribute IT resources in a cost-effective and nimble way. Inc. These organizational efforts result in a lot of idle capacity and a longer time to realize a return on assets (ROA). as well as considering the advantages of each type of cloud — private. or even buy because there is budget available. hybrid and public. incremental and variable OPEX (operating expenditure) Organizations may overprovision to manage storage bursts or attempt to meet capacity planning. . and any dissemination. to smaller. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. distribution.Chapter 2 Discovering the Benefits of Cloud In This Chapter Understanding the reasons to use cloud Discovering the three main categories of cloud models S implifying planning and using resources more cost effectively is appealing to all organizations. which typically isn’t fully utilized. This chapter explores the reasons for using cloud. Consumption-driven cloud commerce moves an organization’s focus from CAPEX (capital expenditure). as the redeployment of resources is performed These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Utilizing cloud delivers time and cost savings.

in the case of mergers and acquisitions.) Also noteworthy is the opportunity for an organization to engage in new functionality and services through cloud deployments. rather than assimilating architecture. where infrastructure. In private clouds. In cloud computing. to scale up or down.10 Cloud Storage For Dummies instantly. a trusted thirdparty or a combination of both. Win–win for subscribers and providers Cloud involves the subscriber and the provider. So. Cloud storage economics benefit both subscribers and providers. In hybrid or public clouds. For example. IT must respond quickly to internal requests for new applications. the business units might go out and ‘get their own’. and to support business objectives as needed. Subscriber benefits include Shifting storage costs to an operating expense: pay for use Lowering operating expenses and the drain on IT resources These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. the service delivery layer sits on top of an organization’s IT infrastructure. anytime and anywhere. cooling. As a result. The service provider can be a company’s internal IT group. or retired as needed. and any dissemination. . infrastructure or capacity. platforms and protocols may not integrate. the expanded business can leverage cloud-based deployment of services and instead focus on generating revenue. ad hoc platforms can lead to unnecessary compliance ramifications and financial or litigation risks — and IT will eventually wind up supporting those different platforms anyway. recurring revenue stream. freed up. hybrid and public clouds. cloud computing can come to the table with on-demand services. Otherwise. see the discussion later in this chapter. distribution. As any IT manager knows. IT departments can quickly meet requests for services and time-to-market while mitigating risk and maintaining influence. Inc. (To find out more about private. an organization’s existing infrastructure can be repurposed more efficiently for core data. less infrastructure equates to lower data center power. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Providers gain economies of scale using multitenant infrastructure and a predictable. The subscriber is anyone using the services. facility and maintenance costs.

It is commonly used to describe cloud delivery models. It really means that a resource or task has been packaged so it can be delivered automatically to customers on demand in a repeatable fashion. Inc.Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud Balancing the value of data with service level agreements (SLAs) and costs Gaining business flexibility with subscriber-controlled. with deep levels of automation to move data as required Secure and reliable Able to control geographically dispersed data 11 The myth surrounding ‘as-a-service’ A frequently used term in any cloud-related book is as-a-service. An example of infrastructure-as-a-service is Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). It is one flavor or type of infrastructure-as-a-service and therefore shares the common characteristics described earlier. on-demand capacity and performance Future-proofing. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing.amazon . because storage media can change below the cloud layer without disrupting services To fully realize these benefits. network or storage) as a service. . and any dissemination. cloud storage needs to be Elastic. • The service is paid for on a usage basis. distribution.com/ec2 Storage-as-a-Service (STaaS) provides storage resources as a pay-per-use utility to end users. For example: Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) delivers compute hardware (servers. quickly adapting underlying infrastructure to changing subscriber demands SLA-driven. The characteristics commonly seen with IaaS are • Subscribers provision the resource without control of the underlying cloud infrastructure. automated and integrated to provide swift response times Policy-based. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. • Infrastructure can be automatically scaled up or down. http://aws.

com/windowsazure. all components reside within the firewall of an organization. Inc.html?WT.com (www.12 Cloud Storage For Dummies Hitachi’s Private File Tiering Cloud (www. Hybrid and Public Cloud Models The three main categories of cloud models are private. Each one may offer varying levels of security. service level agreements (SLAs) and value to end users. Private cloud In a private cloud. services. hybrid and public. It is a comprehensive stack for developers to create cloud-ready business applications. access. ac=us_hp_flash_r1) is an example of storage-as-a-service. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. distribution. The infrastructure is either managed internally by These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. Private. The characteristics commonly seen with SaaS include: • Multi-tenancy • Consumer uses applications running on a cloud infrastructure • Accessible from various client devices through web browser • CRM (customer relationship management) is one of the most commonly seen SaaS Salesforce.microsoft.hds. The characteristics commonly seen with PaaS are that it: • Is multi-tenant • Supports web services standards • Is dynamically scaling based on demand An example of platform-as-a-service is Microsoft Azure www. Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) cloud providers host and deliver business applications as a service.com) is an example of software-as-a-service.salesforce. .com/ solutions/storage-strategies/cloud/index. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) provides more than just the infrastructure.

self-service and the ability to perform chargeback to departments or user groups. security of the data and physical premises are determined and monitored by the IT team. may be granted. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. the network bandwidth is under IT’s control as well. or separate administration and data permissions. 13 How is private cloud used? Private clouds can leverage existing infrastructure. rapid deployment. which also helps ensure SLAs. but within the privacy of an organization’s network. such as key codes. Inc. passwords and badging. . private clouds: Can deliver IaaS or STaaS internally to employees or business units through an intranet or the internet via a virtual private network (VPN) Can deliver software (applications) as a service to branch offices Include database on demand. or managed and delivered as a service by a cloud provider. Behind the security of the firewall. and any dissemination. based on data types and security practices. In a private cloud environment.Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud the IT department. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. deliver massive scale and enable chargeback either by an organization’s own IT staff. Why use private cloud? Reasons for using private cloud include To the end users: Quick and easy resource sharing. private cloud embraces high levels of automation to virtualize the infrastructure — servers. Additionally. networks and storage — and deliver services to business units or other branches. email on demand or storage on demand Security in private cloud With private cloud. An organization maintains its own strong security practices of both the data and the physical location. and its highquality SLAs remain intact. Access to data is determined internally and may resemble existing role-based access controls. distribution. or as a vendor-managed service.

The service provider’s costs are lower because they amortize infrastructure across many customers and this helps even out supply ‘peaks and valleys’.14 Cloud Storage For Dummies To the service provider (in this case. How is cost saving achieved? Hybrid cloud usually provides an attractive alternative to an organization when internal processes can no longer be optimized because further cost reduction is provided by leveraging a trusted service provider’s ability to deliver to more than a single customer. multi-tenant infrastructure outside the firewall delivered by a trusted cloud provider is leveraged for further cost reduction. The result is reduced costs for any given service offered through the hybrid cloud. Hybrid cloud Hybrid cloud is a combination of private and public cloud infrastructures. Selected data. The subscriber and the hybrid cloud provider are bound together by standardized or proprietary technologies that enable data and application portability. system integrators and internet service providers. In hybrid cloud. By moving certain data and applications to a hybrid cloud. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. an organization): The ability to initiate chargeback accounting for usage while maintaining control over data access and security. The service provider passes along those savings to the customer base. distribution. infrastructure or applications are allowed to ‘punch through’ the corporate firewall and be provided by a trusted cloud provider. the organization is able to take advantage of the multi-tenant capabilities and economies of scale. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. The overall outlay of service delivery shifts to the pay-for-usage model for an organization. while the trusted provider appreciates higher utilization rates through its shared infrastructure. The IT organization makes decisions regarding what types of services and data can live outside the firewall to be managed by a trusted third-party partner. An organization’s cost infrastructure may only be amortized across business units or a small customer base. Inc. such as telcos. .

An organization also determines access limitations for the provider and whether the services will be delivered via VPNs or dedicated networks. To the trusted provider: The economies of scale — supplying services to multiple customers while increasing utilization rates of highly scalable cloud-enabled infrastructure. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Hybrid cloud providers use stringent security practices and uphold highquality SLAs to help the organization mitigate risks and maintain control over data managed services and application hosting services delivered through multi-tenancy. distribution. The key characteristics of public cloud are Elasticity Low entry costs Ease of use Pay-per-use Examples of public cloud services include picture and music sharing. and any dissemination. Yahoo mail. . laptop backup and file sharing. Examples of providers include Amazon and Google on-demand web applications. often equating to pennies per gigabyte. Facebook and LinkedIn. all major components are located in a multitenant infrastructure outside an organization’s firewall. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Public cloud In public cloud. the focus is on the consumer and smallto-medium businesses where pay-per-use pricing is available. Applications and storage are made available over the internet and can be free or offered at a pay-per-usage fee. Why use hybrid cloud? Reasons for using hybrid cloud include: To the organization: Cost reductions — well-managed services that are seamlessly and securely accessed by its end users. Inc. Why use public cloud? In many public clouds.Chapter 2: Discovering the Benefits of Cloud 15 Building bridges between an organization and its trusted partners is critical to ensuring data is protected.

or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. and any dissemination. quick and easy resource sharing. rapid deployment and self-service. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. . distribution. A word of caution Public clouds typically provide ‘consumer level’ or lower SLAs and may not offer guarantees against data loss or corruption. Inc. which remain the responsibility of the subscriber or corporate end user. Public IaaS clouds do not necessarily provide for restrictions and compliance with privacy laws. Future prospects The value of public cloud continues to grow. especially as security and availability measures mature.16 Cloud Storage For Dummies Reasons for the end user to employ public cloud include inexpensive.

. an organization is better equipped to proceed. which is what this chapter is about.Chapter 3 Getting Started In This Chapter Taking a pragmatic approach Translating security and legalities to cloud Understanding the implications for storage requirements oving to cloud is more than figuring out which type of services may best suit the business at any given time. and any dissemination. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. M Ensuring an Organization Is Well Equipped to Deploy Cloud By evaluating the risks and benefits of any given cloud deployment. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. To be successful at reducing costs and building fluidity. and understanding how to ensure alignment with business needs. an organization may want to take a pragmatic approach by adopting cloud at a measured pace. distribution. Key areas of concern for organizations are discussed in the following sections. Spending efficiently Increasing business demands and regulations. Inc. the explosion of new data requirements. growing complexities and the burden of legacy systems with suboptimal utilization rates are all part of the daily balancing act between cost and delivery in an organization’s data center.

and the agility factor swells. change management and environmental inefficiencies — and the human resources to manage it all. understanding and protecting that data. backup and recovery. scheduled downtime. Then. and any dissemination. performance or other attributes. In a cloud deployment. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. This leads to an imbalance in the ratio between hardware costs and the value of the information stored on that hardware. Over time. no matter where it resides. However. This is achieved through Sharing resources flexibly across the business needs. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. thereby reducing the expense Needing fewer resources to manage more storage in cloud Improving utilization rates because of the higher levels of virtualization and automation in a multi-tenancy environment Understanding SLAs Service level agreements (SLAs) set a common understanding about services. a build-up of underutilized storage. responsibilities and guarantees. closer examination shows that hardware costs make up only a portion of the overall costs of ownership. Inc. as equipment ages and flexibility wanes. To improve the total cost of ownership and to maximize utilization.18 Cloud Storage For Dummies Managing it all has traditionally involved capital outlay and upfront purchases of more equipment than is needed at the time to handle fluctuations in storage requirements and internal business processes. distribution. is essential. the IT organization is left to sweat the assets and manage against flattened budgets. Because storage systems and the data they contain play an important role in helping organizations comply with regulatory and legal obligations. the opportunity to shrink both CAPEX (capital expenditure) and OPEX arises. the need for mobility becomes apparent. . Enter the lurking OPEX (operating expenditure) for device migration. and varying tiers of storage and RAID (redundant array of independent disks) protection requirements occurs. SLAs usually contain specific metrics around uptime. multiple retention copies.

Another provider may establish a metric that computes the number of executed tries rather than the standard availability measurement of three. Consider the application. distribution. understanding exactly how SLAs are measured is critical to maintaining the organization’s day-to-day business operations.Chapter 3: Getting Started 19 Cloud storage standards can help define roles and responsibilities for data ownership. reliability and resilience have typically been measured on a time-based metric. ensure you ask the questions associated with SLAs. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. server. For IT professionals to trust and adopt cloud services outside an organization. SLAs and expected quality of services need to be part of the contractual relationship with the service provider that owns the infrastructure. four or five nines. Not all SLAs are alike! Some cloud providers may offer availability guarantees of just the service and not the underlying infrastructure levels. resulting in less-than-acceptable service levels. Enterprise organizations should ask providers about each level of infrastructure within the multi-tenant environment to ensure that SLAs are thoroughly defined and can be guaranteed. Inc. such as: Are there guarantees on data resilience? What metrics are used for availability? What level of reliability is provided? SLAs for data storage availability. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. network and storage layers of infrastructure. archival. retrieval and retirement. . discovery. In cloud scenarios. assurance and auditing also benefit from being defined in a consistent mode. how many minutes of downtime/outage are acceptable per year. When considering a cloud service. SLAs around data storage assessments. Reporting and analysis are also integral to ensuring that there are no surprises. for example.

. reduce costs and enable users to make informed decisions. as well as the interface to feed the billing applications that IT organizations will be putting into place. Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. and any dissemination.snia. technologies and educational services to empower organizations in the management of information.20 Cloud Storage For Dummies Emerging standards Cloud computing is still evolving. SNIA’s mission is to lead the storage industry worldwide in developing and promoting standards. on-demand storage billed only for what is used.snia. SNIA’s new initiative. standards are being developed and implemented. www. More information can be found at www. Following are some examples. While no standard protocols for operating cloud have been widely adopted across the industry at this time. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Standards are especially important in cloud because they help simplify integration.org/forums/csi. Inc.org) is a not-for-profit global organization made up of some 400 member companies spanning virtually the entire storage industry. the Cloud Storage Initiative (CSI). distribution. SNIA’s Cloud Data Management Interface (CDMI) standard provides an interface for storage vendors to implement the required metering of storage and data service usage. Standards are critical for cloud in the areas of: Interoperability and access Security and privacy Integration Portability Many organizations have come together to develop and promote standards related to cloud. promotes the adoption of cloud storage as a new delivery model which provides elastic.

and any dissemination. Inc. share best practices and consolidate these best practices into standards. OGF accomplishes its work through open forums that build the community. go to www. For more information about Open Cloud Consortium. The Open Cloud Computing Interface Group (OCCI) is a working group within the OGF and focuses on the creation of an application programming interface (API) for interfacing infrastructure cloud facilities. . explore trends. such as the Open Science Data Cloud. such as the Open Cloud Testbed.opencloudconsortium. Open Grid Forum (OGF) Open Grid Forum (OGF) is an open community committed to driving the evolution and adoption of distributed computing.Chapter 3: Getting Started 21 Open Cloud Consortium (OCC) The Open Cloud Consortium (OCC) is a member-driven organization that: Supports the development of standards for cloud computing and frameworks for interoperating between clouds Develops benchmarks for cloud computing Supports reference implementations for cloud computing The OCC also manages test beds for cloud computing. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. For more information about Open Grid Forum. and operates cloud computing infrastructure to support scientific research.ogf.org. go to www.org. Distributed computing is critical to developing new applications and infrastructures to increase the productivity in the organization and within the science community. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. distribution.

and any dissemination. internal security policies and customer requirements for data handling. Knowing the provider’s security procedures and understanding any risks with approaching cloud can assist an organization in continuing to meet SLAs and alleviate concern over security and regulatory issues. Inc. Most organizations don’t yet have the depth of experience with cloud to be confident that service providers are implementing security and limiting access in the manner that meets an organization’s corporate standards or compliance requirements. the risk of exposing potentially sensitive data or failing to meet fiduciary and legal mandates keeps some organizations from using cloud. chain of custody and eDiscovery High costs incurred to recover from data breach/loss/ malicious activity These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.22 Cloud Storage For Dummies Translating Security and Legalities to Cloud Cloud brings inherent advantages to businesses. Organizations must also comply with industry standards. Protecting data is a legal requirement in most countries. including data retention. However. distribution. . Some common areas of concern related to cloud security include Lack of common standards to apply across the entire IT infrastructure Data leakage due to inadvertent exposure Accountability Access and control over sensitive data Access and control over business processes Compliance regulations.

Inc. such as eDiscovery and sustaining chain of custody. Data continues to be the most valuable asset of any company and where the most exposure resides. . having audit logs readily available and tamper-proof is essential. secure transactions. and protection of personally identifiable information Compliance with internal and corporate mandates. Inquire if the cloud provider is capable of performing functionality such as encryption. and not knowing whether there is proper segregation from other tenant data and what security protocols are in place for the physicality of the cloud — both infrastructure and housing facility. distribution. Also. IT managers may be reluctant to hand over data and services to a third party because of the lack of visibility. and protection of intellectual property Protection of IT infrastructure Defense of company brands and customer retention 23 These areas of risk in the storage ecosystem are the reasons why organizations must remain stalwart in their data security strategies. an organization needs to ensure that the cloud environment will not impact or change the policies and processes put in place to ensure that compliance and governance regulations can be met. immutability and shredding if they are required to meet SLAs and security needs. as is the ability for employees of the security vendor or cloud provider to make authorized changes. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. When moving to cloud. data preservation and sanitization. and any dissemination.Chapter 3: Getting Started The following drivers for cloud security are consistent with the drivers for storage security: Compliance with external regulations. it is important to ensure that security extends to storage management tools and the layers of the infrastructure upon which the cloud sets. finance and human resources policies. including data retention. For legal services in cloud. masking. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

Cloud storage is also well suited for latency-tolerant applications such as backup. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. nearline file storage capacities. including Ease of deployment High levels of automation Consolidation of storage and mobility of data between tiers Provisioning of storage to fluidly scale up or down Increased storage utilization Integrated management of heterogeneous devices Automated data migration Take data migration. Inc. disruptions and complexities associated with migrating data from legacy systems to the new ones. Effectively tiering data in cloud also helps organizations align the business value of data with the cost of storage. disaster recovery and cyclical peak workloads. Cloud offers the advantages most desired in an agile data delivery model. archive. Managing tiers in cloud requires automated movement of data so that the entire environment can be managed via policies and without human intervention. distribution. virtualized block and file storage. Research has found that when implementing energy-efficient systems. and leveraging subscriber policies across geographic distances. By employing highly scalable.24 Cloud Storage For Dummies Addressing Changing Storage Needs Knowing what type of cloud to deploy and at what time can lead to highly efficient storage management for an organization. In cloud deployments. IT managers are challenged by the costs. the service provider can shield subscribers from changes to underlying infrastructure while providing exceptional efficiency gains. IT managers want to ensure that service providers are operating a highly efficient infrastructure capable of seamlessly migrating data to new tiers of storage in accordance with SLAs and security needs. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. for example. . and any dissemination.

Adopting Cloud at Your Own Pace A good general rule is to adopt cloud based on business needs. Enterprise organizations may best capitalize on the cost advantages of cloud computing while protecting data. By deploying private cloud.Chapter 4 Best Practices and Use Cases In This Chapter Phasing in the use of cloud Improving savings and operational efficiencies Assessing what to move to cloud Adding business value T o date. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Inc. and gaining a more thorough understanding of how to These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. organizations can realize incremental improvements and cost reductions by first adopting private cloud. the assumption is that enterprise organizations will garner more confidence in the maturity of external cloud offerings and security through trusted partners. by moving in phases from private to hybrid and eventually to public models over time. Over time. and any dissemination. enterprise organizations can forgo painful and expensive forklift changes and leverage existing investments. distribution. . adoption of cloud by enterprise organizations is seen predominantly in the private cloud space. This chapter talks about how these practices can help organizations enter the cloud environment safely and costeffectively to quickly begin seizing operational cost reductions. In this phased approach.

such as ‘Tier 3’ data types. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. . reduce costs and gain experience and best practices. so they can move towards the core applications at their own pace. organizations are able to free up both storage resources and staff to focus on the business-critical. This allows organizations to improve operational efficiency and utilization. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.26 Cloud Storage For Dummies deploy and utilize cloud services within the safety of the data center. By starting with the peripheral data types (Tier 3 as shown in Figure 4-1). Inc. unstructured content residing in home directory or file shares. C Control or SLA Tier 1 Business critical apps. or static content such as backup or archive data. Then. and any dissemination. data Tier 3 File tiering backup archive or e Business value of data Figure 4-1: A practical approach to adopting cloud. distribution. including stale. Moving from Peripheral to Core Data Start by identifying data that may have lower business value and less stringent service level agreement (SLA) requisites. data Tier 2 Business apps. core applications. the business is able to make better decisions about what data and applications to deploy through a trusted partner and eventually within a public cloud.

and any dissemination. the organization gains more efficient usage of storage. considering services that can quickly elevate savings by freeing up resources and improving operational efficiencies is important. meanwhile. File tiering can be a very effective way to offload this type of burden from primary data center storage to cloud. as is money spent on CAPEX. Often. By moving this inactive file data to cloud as secondary storage. leaving the IT team to straddle protection copies. distribution. for example. Moving long-tail content. online access to older inactive content. Simplifying for Greater Operational Efficiencies Along the continuum of offloading data to cloud. power consumption and staff resources. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. the file environment grows out of control.Chapter 4: Best Practices and Use Cases 27 Here’s a deeper look at a typical example. without impact on existing business processes. out of the data center to a managed pay-per-use service in cloud can alleviate the need to maintain (or purchase new) onsite archive systems while upholding compliance requirements. an organization is able to reclaim and even centralize primary file share space. the day-to-day management is trimmed. and lower OPEX costs associated with tending to legacy data that often requires a lot of care and feeding to maintain. Inc. As the enterprise later shifts to its trusted partner These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. deduplication. reduce backup. oversubscription of storage. since the amount of data being backed up is reduced. For the private cloud physically located on the premises. . Organizations also can save on backup hardware and software licensing. SLAs can still be driven to allow rapid. virtual tape libraries and tape backup to keep these copies online or at higher performance levels than are necessary. Upfront CAPEX may also be reduced. including capacity planning. Peripheral data is often parked on primary network attached storage (NAS) storage or other storage repositories. unpredictable business usage and storage refreshes.

so do the cost implications of the footprint. and SLAs for corporate backups are paramount here. Targeting Cost Centers for Adding Business Value When assessing what to move into the cloud. plus the storage costs of physical media. In both cases. . These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing.28 Cloud Storage For Dummies providers. Backup often surfaces to the top of this elimination wish list for many IT groups. the enterprise can avoid developing irrelevant expertise or applications and continue consolidation efforts on a pay-per-use scale. The use case for backup-to-cloud as a storage service can reduce total costs of ownership by minimizing or eliminating manual processes centered on often less critical applications. distribution. Inc. consider areas of the data center that are cost centers. and any dissemination. cooling and floor space. and so on. data reduction technologies. Finding a trusted repository. shuttling or shipping services. Backup is expensive and recovery can be problematic — basically becoming a cost center in itself. appropriate levels of availability. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. such as power.

distribution. we simply say Hitachi. Using cloud doesn’t have to be another island to manage.) I Cloud Doesn’t Have to be Disruptive! For the enterprise organization considering private cloud and for providers seeking cloud-enabled infrastructure. In this chapter we give you the rundown on how Hitachi Data Systems provides your cloud solutions. Hitachi Data Systems facilitates highly scalable SLA-driven deployments that are reliable. Vendors like Hitachi focus on providing a path to enable enterprises to adopt cloud at their own pace with no need to These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Inc. when we refer to Hitachi Data Systems. knowing that cloud doesn’t have to be disruptive to the existing infrastructure or practices within the data center is important. and any dissemination. (In this chapter. most of the time. . or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. services and storage-as-a-service solutions n this book we give you an introduction to cloud storage — what it is. cost efficient and complementary to existing data center infrastructure. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud In This Chapter Adopting cloud with minimum disruption Taking a pragmatic approach to establishing a cloud enabling portfolio Looking at cloud platforms.Chapter 5 Ten (Okay. As the industry embraces the evolution to cloud. how it works and how it saves your organization time and money.

Hitachi can offer cloud ready platforms and services to customers looking to manage their own cloud environment (see Figure 5-1). Implementing cloud can complement their current environment and improve the return on their existing asset. Hitachi cloud strategy Platform Solution Service and file platforms modular storage systems integrators platform service Figure 5-1: Hitachi Data Systems’ integrated cloud strategy. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Hitachi has developed storage-as-a-service solutions for customers that want to procure storage resources on a consumption basis. and any dissemination.30 Cloud Storage For Dummies rip and replace their existing infrastructure. By leveraging the integrated set of cloud enabled platforms and technologies along with Hitachimanaged services and/or third party technologies. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. . Hitachi also provides reliable and integrated infrastructure to companies such as telecommunication companies. distribution. independent software vendors (ISVs). service providers and system integrators — a foundation on which to build their hybrid and public cloud offerings. Inc. Looking At Cloud-Enabling Platforms Hitachi takes an integrated approach to its cloud strategy and portfolio of offerings.

with virtualized. distribution. The Telstra cloud layer is built upon infrastructure from Hitachi which was chosen for its multi-tenant storage management abilities and tools. and securely virtualizes IT assets into consolidated. hybrid and public clouds. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. can support an enterprise and cloud simultaneously. and any dissemination. with more than 8. multi-tenant and multi-tiered. Inc. organizations can apply the appropriate delivery mechanisms and deployment methodology on top to facilitate and optimize their cloud deployments. . Visy needed cost reduction solutions to migrate its global SAP environment. Hitachi technology provides integrated search.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. and deemed infrastructure-asa-service cloud computing the way to go. Advanced architectures such as a single Hitachi Content Platform. five-year contract to provide cloud computing services to Visy. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud By leveraging the cloud-enabling capabilities of Hitachi platforms. Asia and the United States. a global manufacturing company based in Melbourne. file and object technologies. easy-to-manage pools of resources. This approach helps customers strengthen their data center agility. for example. availability. migration and archive capabilities. Using a single. reliability. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Telstra: A success story Telecommunications leader Telstra signed a $50 million. storage efficiency and performance. Hitachi recognizes that there is no assembly-line approach to producing or deploying cloud. and believes that an integrated portfolio of technologies is required to sustain successful cloud operations. these resources can be provisioned as needed to support a wide range of infrastructure and content services in private. scalable and high-performance architecture built for the multi-petabyte environment. scalable. Subsequently. underlying infrastructure that is reliable. Hitachi capitalizes on proven virtualized and integrated block. Hitachi has an integrated portfolio and is a trusted infrastructure vendor.000 staff and operations in 140 locations across Australia. Australia. New Zealand. 31 To enable diverse uses within a cloud environment.

distribution. . or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. mitigate risks and simplify management amid changing demands.32 Cloud Storage For Dummies Through its agile cloud-enabled technologies. and any dissemination. Hitachi provides a sound strategy and guidance for its enterprise customers. Inc. Building an Integrated Portfolio. Key features or functionality within Hitachi’s products are built to be applicable to the dynamic data center and cloud (see Figure 5-3). Hitachi can help organizations virtualize all existing storage resources into a single and agile infrastructure to reduce storage costs. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Beyond cloud-enabling architecture and services. and which triumph over the typically stressed enterprise data center. and end-to-end cloud solutions that foster true value and ease of deployment. This approach eliminates the need to manage separate silos of information and allows customers to apply common management tasks across all types of data (as shown in Figure 5-2). Not Another Island Hitachi’s cloud technologies are built upon a core set of principles to best support enterprise and provider organizations with deployment solutions and services. Unified management Structured Unstructured Semi-structured Rich media Virtualized infrastructure Figure 5-2: Common approach for managing all data types.

or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Automation and integration: Built-in software tools that ensure highly automated. dynamic infrastructure Figure 5-3: Hitachi’s design philosophy. repeatable and scalable processes to help diminish operating costs associated with manual steps and human interaction: • The integrated Hitachi file and content portfolio offers the ability to transparently move data across tiers.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. and any dissemination. from network attached storage (NAS) to archive devices. The search results can also trigger migration among different tiers. Inc. triggered by policies on both file content and metadata. . These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Key features of Hitachi’s cloud technologies include Flexible and dynamic infrastructure: These core attributes are designed to meet the notions of on-demand and justin-time services. and enable seamless continuity from the data center into cloud with zero learning curve or application disturbance. at both file and object levels. • Federated search across silos can be conducted with a single query. on filers or storage systems. reliable. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud 33 Common platform and management of all data Scalable and flexible Cost effective Reliable Mobilized data Secure and private Automated and integrated Flexible. distribution.

or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. and security layers to prevent unauthorized access Cloud Ready with representational state transfer (REST) Interface: Industry-standard protocol embedded for direct and reliable connection to cloud Reliability: Bolster resiliency and data sentry with inherent protection functionalities. credential interlock between core cloud and edge customers • Write Once Read Many: Immutability for compliant retention is delivered with this technology • Tenants and Namespaces: Logical segregation of management and of data with customizable data management personalities and access rights. such as object-based replication and hardware-based redundant array of independent disks (RAID) Cost effectiveness: Use common management and integrated technologies that orchestrate highly efficient automation. The early wave of consolidation enabled enterprises to achieve cost saving and efficiency improvement. tiering and scalability to support rapid resource deployment for lower CAPEX and OPEX opportunities Paving the Way to Private Cloud with Unified Compute Platform Data centers have undergone tremendous transformation over the last decade. support of object-level encryption at the source. Today.34 Cloud Storage For Dummies Security and privacy: End-to-end security practices and authenticity can guarantee privacy and data protection for the entire data asset life cycle. distribution. . Virtualization has been implemented at the server. most large organizations have leveraged virtualization technology to modernize their data centers. including • Multi-tenancy: Logical partition to ensure segregation of administration • Encryption: Data at rest (while residing on internal drives) and in flight (during transfer) is encrypted. processes. utilization. While virtualization enables automation within the technology domain — for These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. migration. Inc. storage or data network layers at many data centers. and any dissemination.

. In other words. the common thread is the storage layer: ‘Machines’ are nothing more than large data files. The desire to achieve this holistic view has triggered a dynamic wave of activities toward the converged infrastructure.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. storage and network infrastructure resources as pools. disaster resilience and recovery need to be managed universally. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. IT as a service private cloud Bu i ld in g fou n da t i on Cost reduction Br id gi ng th is ga p Future: private cloud Self-provisioning Automate workflow Virtualize server and storage Consolidate data center Time Figure 5-4: Path of IT evolution. The next step in the data center evolution is to achieve an endto-end automation across the gaps of these domains. the next step is to provide a holistic and horizontal view from the perspectives of the business and the applications. In a fully virtualized world. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud example. 35 A foundational layer is the core cloud storage infrastructure. Inc. the user. Converged infrastructure is a first step towards bridging the gap from current emphasis on virtualization and consolidation to a more automated and dynamic data center in order to create a foundation for what comes next (see Figure 5-4). and any dissemination. to be assigned as needed to business services. server or storage — gaps remain at the ‘connection point’ across these domains.or application-generated content needs to be available flexibly across virtual domains. The converged infrastructure treats server. distribution. The core cloud storage platforms need to provide this basic underpinning.

storage. but to build the optimal platform in unified packages. unified platform designed to achieve SLA-based workflow automation across the boundaries of server. storage and data network components. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. The platform will centralize and orchestrate the management of servers. . network) individually. Inc. private cloud is defined by key attributes enabled by the converged infrastructure: Self-service provisioning End-to-end automation across the entire workflow Highly virtualized IT resources Billing and chargeback enabled Hitachi will deliver an open. In essence. distribution. Companies can then manage these packages based on service level agreements (SLAs). networking and applications with end-to-end automation and SLA-based templates. and any dissemination. Figure 5-5: Hitachi’s unified compute platform. storage. Converged infrastructure serves as the foundation for private cloud.36 Cloud Storage For Dummies The goal is no longer to deploy each element (server. as shown in Figure 5-5. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

including Microsoft Hyper-V and VMware ESX • Flexibility in supporting existing x86 server infrastructure • Virtualized third-party storage behind Hitachi Universal Storage Platform V family • Open APIs to enable third-party or cloud providers to leverage and build upon the infrastructure • Key benefits will include investment protection. The Hitachi Unified Compute Platform will differ from other solutions in several ways: 37 The platform will be an open platform. Inc.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. as opposed to packaging existing solutions with disjointed management tools • Key benefits are business alignment with an SLA-aware environment. and any dissemination. lower management cost with automated process. storage and data network: • Business-aligned automation through SLA templates as opposed to loosely coupled management tools • Designed from day one to solve business-level issues. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. not a vendor lock-in vehicle: • Multi-Hypervisor support that permits multiple hypervisors. • Key benefits will include the built-in intelligence native to Hitachi storage that will be leveraged to make orchestration more efficient. no rip and replacement End-to-end orchestration software will coordinate the management of the server. . or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. distribution. lower risk with repeatable process Hitachi Unified Compute Platform will have tight integration down to the hardware level: • Integration with storage hardware will enable Hitachi Unified Compute Platform to leverage the unique features at the storage level — intelligent tiering. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud The platform’s holistic and simplified management will significantly reduce time to market and operational costs. leveraging existing infrastructure. virtualization and broad replication capabilities. Improved agility and predictability will make possible dynamic and cost-effective data centers that can quickly respond to business needs. and make the virtual machine (VM) deployment and replication faster.

Utility-based Services allow Hitachi to offer guidance as well as packaged or custom services to both the enterprise and the provider seeking revenue generation from cloud optimality. Hitachi Data Systems consultants are assigned to the task — storage area networks (SAN). Remote Management Services comprise robust reporting. the demands for capacity and services sharply rise and fall. distribution. While most organizations have flatlined their resource investments and budgets. training and best practices. and helps derive greater value and optimized performance from existing assets for new use cases. Remote Management and utility-based services. Hitachi now provides Utility-based Services to the enterprise or service provider deploying cloud. faster and cheaper. and any dissemination. and alerting and provisioning services. often the essential keys to efficiently managing storage infrastructure. real-time monitoring. . Hitachi Data Systems’ Professional Services has expanded its suite of managed services pertinent to cloud deployment. mainframe. Remote Management Services help the enterprise manage and align the storage environment with established service level requirements. tools. Residency Services help organizations to fill critical gaps in staff skills or experience while improving asset utilization and performance. and achieving service level objectives. The results: Do more and do it better. Inc.38 Cloud Storage For Dummies Hitachi Managed Services for Cloud To support the evolving needs of enterprise organizations. Hitachi offers the following: Residency Services: Developed to facilitate a higher and quicker return on storage investments. Hitachi is unique in its ability and offering to also provide flex-down opportunities in which the enterprise actually pays only for what is used. Remote Management Services: Complementary to Residency Services. and introduce best practices that enable flexible service delivery to meet changing business requirements. replication evaluation — and implement industrystandard processes. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. including Residency. Managed Storage Utility: Most cloud offerings provide flex-up options to accommodate changes in capacity or service needs. open systems. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. and any dissemination. Hitachi offers an integrated. simplify management and improve the efficiency and longevity of the primary NAS environments. the request is automated and fulfilled based on customer-defined policies. The Private File Tiering cloud service enables customers to tier inactive file data into a fully managed private cloud environment and pay only for what they consume. distribution. consumption-based service located within an organization’s firewall. The physical infrastructure at the customer’s site is remotely managed by Hitachi. By leveraging the Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering. is a fully managed storage-as-a-service solution that will enable customers to tier inactive file data into an onsite private cloud environment and pay only for what they consume. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud 39 Hitachi Storage-as-a-Service Hitachi is helping customers deploy low-risk cloud at their own pace with two new cloud offerings. to create a differentiated cloud storage offering for their consumers and SMBs (small and medium businesses). enterprise customers can reduce costs. ensuring existing security measures remain intact. When new storage is required. Data stays at the customer’s site and facilitates pay-for-usage storage. . utility-based cloud service that moves legacy or lower-value unstructured data into a cloud storage environment located within the customer’s data center. service providers and systems integrators to leverage Hitachi flexible storage infrastructure and Digi-Data’s applications and services. a joint solution with Digi-Data. and remotely provisioned and managed by Hitachi. Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering. The first. fully managed.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. will deliver an end-to-end cloud infrastructure. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. Because this service is remotely managed by Hitachi. The second. Inc. enabling telcos. customers can reduce management overheads while simultaneously ensuring that their storage environment is being optimized. Private File Tiering Private File Tiering is a fully managed.

licensing and management overhead required Online Storage-as-a-Service In partnership with Digi-Data. Inc. service providers and systems integrators looking to develop or expand their cloud service offerings. Providers also get a comprehensive set of technologies and services that help to: Reduce costs by replacing costly legacy storage with a consumption-based.40 Cloud Storage For Dummies The Hitachi Cloud Service for Private File Tiering will help customers to: Reduce the amount of storage residing on the primary NAS by tiering to the cloud Improve backup performance by cutting the amount of storage that requires backup Eliminate capital expense through a utility-based. distribution. and end-user interfaces into the cloud infrastructure. pay–as-you grow model Improve customer retention by becoming the center of their customer’s digital universe. providers can integrate their own applications. protect and share their important digital assets Increase return on investment and monthly revenues per user and build stronger relationships with consumers by delivering value-added services These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. business and processing systems. and any dissemination. This joint solution enables providers to deliver differentiated cloud services to their consumers and SMBs. enabling them to store. cost per gigabyte per month consumption model and by cutting out oversubscription of storage Reduce operating costs by moving inactive data to a management-free environment and cutting down on the amount of backup media. organize. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. . Hitachi offers a public online cloud storage solution that provides a complete services menu for telecommunications companies. Leveraging Hitachi flexible storage infrastructure and Digi-Data’s applications and services. this solution gives providers access to multiple connectivity options into the cloud. and a reliable architecture for building and deploying an online cloud service. With Digi-Data’s comprehensive set of application programming interfaces (APIs).

Sify’s on-demand storage service combines award-winning Hitachi Adaptable Modular Storage 2500 and Hitachi NAS Platform 3080. Hitachi is able to deliver elastic. enterprise services. easy-to-manage pools of storage capacities that can be provisioned as needed to support a wide range of applications and data types. suppliers. To leverage the growing opportunities in cloud storage. powered by BlueArc. through an offering of highly integrated products for cloud. Partnering with Hitachi Data Systems The Hitachi team is passionate about bringing tangible results and solutions to the rapidly maturing cloud universe. Sify designs and develops a host of customized e-commerce and network connectivity solutions to connect critical business systems and offers a seamless data network that encompasses customers. they create consolidated. solutions and services simplifies and accelerates the adoption of private. as these would become a key game changer for the business as our customers grow. and any dissemination. Inc. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. The Hitachi approach to cloud allows customers to choose the best possible product mix and delivery methods for addressing their particular cloud needs. delivering endto-end solutions for enterprises as well as consumers. According to P J Nath.Chapter 5: Ten (Okay. hybrid and public cloud environments. Sify wanted to develop an on-demand and highly scalable platform for storage to cater to its enterprise customers. Seven) Ways Hitachi Can Help With Cloud 41 Sify: A success story Sify is one of India’s leading managed services providers. These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. Together. Sify ‘wanted the on-demand storage platform to be future ready for technologies like storage virtualization and thin provisioning. vendors and staff. Sify chose to build on Hitachi storage and software because the basic architecture of the solution enables scaling up as and when required without huge changes to the existing setup or investments. . to channel agility and alignment with business needs for the enterprise. distribution.’ The integrated portfolio of Hitachi cloud technologies. executive president.

services and end-to-end Agile Cloud Solutions available.hds.com/cloud. please contact Hitachi or visit www. and any dissemination. highly available infrastructure Ensuring QOS and SLAs with enterprise class hardware and software capabilities To learn more about the architectures. distribution. Inc.42 Cloud Storage For Dummies secure and end-to-end storage infrastructure that solves the most pressing business challenges by: Reducing cost with intelligent management of multi-tiered infrastructure Simplifying the IT environment and achieving operational efficiency Mitigating risks with a secure. . These materials are the copyright of Wiley Publishing. platforms. or unauthorized use is strictly prohibited.

Cloud Storage For Dummies presents useful information on setting up a secure cloud storage environment. with minimum disruption.dummies. you discover a clear explanation of cloud storage. You also find out how cloud storage can free up valuable IT resources. With this book.Understand cloud computing and save your organization time and money! Cloud computing is taking IT by storm. Select the most suitable cloud storage solution for your organization Assess the benefits and savings of a cloud storage model Plan for the implementation of cloud storage Protect your cloud with a secure and compliant environment ain Explanations in pl English formation ‘Get in. saving time and money.com ISBN: 978-1-74246-862-4 Not for resale . It also details how you can ensure a smooth transition of your IT system to cloud storage. and tips for how to choose the right type of cloud storage for your organization’s needs. but what is it and what are the benefits to your organization? Hitachi Data Systems’ Cloud Storage For Dummies provides all the answers. get out’ in Icons and other navigational aids Top ten list r and fun A dash of humou Find listings of all our books Choose from many different subject categories Sign up for eTips at etips.

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