Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? An gladius?

Saint Paul Scholasticate Newsletter
No. 5 Christmas 2007

happy birthday, ipaul!
by Giovanni Scalese, CRSP One year has already elapsed since when, on Christmas 2006, we introduced ourselves: Here we are! More than a good idea, it was a challenge. How many good ideas do we conceive every day and then we are not able to carry them out or, after realizing them, we are incapable of carrying them on? It was with a certain trepidation that, a year ago, we set out on our adventure. We were wondering: Shall we be able to remain faithful to our good intentions? One year has elapsed, and we are still here with you for the fifth time. Maybe we have not always been on time with the schedule we had prearranged (iPaul was supposed to come out every thee months: Christmas, Easter, St. Paul, Michaelmas), we arrived with some delay—due to the school work of our scholastics—but, at last, we arrived. Have we attained the goals we set ourselves? The objective was to inform our confreres, relatives, benefactors,
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MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OUR READERS

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iPaul
Barangay San Jose

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friends and schoolmates about the life of Saint Paul Scholasticate. Have we managed? Of course, we cannot measure the degree of interest with which our newsletter is welcomed and read. It has to be said that, especially after the first issues, we received an exceptional feedback, token of the good welcome of our initiative. Anyway, with iPaul we give everybody the opportunity to know who we are and what we do. After introducing ourselves and our Scholasticate, we described our life and our activities; we are presenting the environment where we live (the City of Tagaytay, the Diocese of Imus, the Divine Word Seminary and, in this issue, the Barangay of San Jose); we are introducing to you our neighbours (the Merciful Sisters, the Hospitaler Sisters of Mercy, the Franciscan Missionaries of the Infant Jesus and now the Ursulines); we are delighting you with our reflections and poems; we inform you about the history and spirituality of our Congregation; we keep you updated about all the events concerning our community, especially ordinations and professions. Maybe sometimes the articles have left a little to be desired. Be patient! After all, iPaul is not a scientific review, it is just the newsletter of a seminary. It should not be forgotten that, besides the purpose declared on the first editorial and here recalled, there was a more hidden aim: this is a house of formation; everything we do has—must have—an educational intent. iPaul wants to be a kind of training ground for our scholastics: through their articles they practise searching, working out and composing. Sometimes the result is not the one expected, but we have to be content with it. The target—the training—has been achieved. Keep on accompanying us with the affection you have showed us until now. We will continue to remember you in our prayers. Besides our daily Mass and liturgy of the hours, every week we have the Eucharistic adoration and the Holy Rosary for those who entrust themselves to our prayers. Along with our warmest season greetings for you: Maligayang Pasko at Masaganang Bagong Taon, let us also wish our newsletter: Happy Birthday, iPaul!

a good place where to live
by Thomas Federick S. Tabada & Marlon B. Ramirez, CRSP

  The word “barangay” is derived from an an‐ cient Malayo‐Polynesian boat called a  balangay.  It is commonly believed that in pre‐colonial Phil‐ ippines, each original coastal “barangay” formed  as a result of settlers arriving by boat from other  places  in  Southeast  Asia.  Barangay,  also  known  by its former Spanish adopted name: the Barrio,  is  the  native  Filipino  term  for  a  “village,”  “district” or “ward.” Cities and municipalities are  composed of barangays. The name “barangay” it  is sometimes abbreviated as “Brgy.” or “Bgy.” or  “Bo.” (= Barrio)  Historically,  a  barangay  is  a  relatively  small  community  of  around  50  to  100  families.  Most  villages have only thirty to one hundred houses  and  the  population  varies  from  one  hundred  to  five  hundred  persons.  According  to  Juan  Lopez  de  Legazpi,  he  found  communities  with  twenty  to  thirty  people  only.  Many  coastal  villages  in  the  Visayan  region  consisted  of  no  more  than  eight to ten houses.  
San Jose Chapel, officiated by the Barnabites

What is a Barangay? 

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When the Americans arrived, the term barrio  went into prominence, as the barangays became  called by that name. The term was kept for much  of  the  twentieth  century  until  President  Ferdi‐ nand  Marcos  ordered  the  remaining  of  the  bar­ rios back to barangay. The name has stuck ever  since,  although  some  people  still  use  the  old  term. The municipal council was abolished upon  transfer of powers to the barangay system. Mar‐ cos  used  to  call  the  barangay  as  part  of  Philip‐ pine Participatory Democracy. Most of his writ‐ ings involved the New Society he envisioned for  the  role  of  the  Baranganic  Democracy  in  the  building  of  a  nation.  After  Edsa  Revolution,  and  the Drafting of 1987 constitution, the Municipal  Council  was  restored,  making  the  barangay  the  smallest local government in Philippine Politics.   The modern barangay is populated between  1000‐2000 people. It is constituted of a number  of  puroks,  and  is  headed  by  an  elected  official,  the  Barangay  Captain, who  is aided  by  counsel‐ ors,  also  elected.  Barangay  elections  are  hotly  contested.  The  barangay  is  governed  from  the  Barangay  Hall.  Barangay  Tanods,  male  volun‐ teers, paid a nominal honorarium, help maintain  peace and order of the community.   Moreover, a barangay is led and governed by  its barangay officials. The barangay officials are  considered  as  Local  Government  Unit  (LGU)  same  as  the  Provincial  and  the  Municipal  Gov‐ ernment.  It  is  composed  of  a  Punong  Barangay  or  Barangay  Captain,  seven  Barangay  Councils  or  Barangay  Kagawad  and  a  Sangguniang  Ka­ bataan  (SK)  Chairman  which  is  considered  as  a  member  of  the  Council.  Thus,  there  are  eight  members  of  the  Legislative  Council  in  a  baran‐ gay.  Each  has  its  own  respective  committee  where  they  are  Chairmen  of  these  committees.  The Committees are the following: (1) Peace and  Order Committee; (2) Infrastructure Committee;  (3) Education Committee; (4) Health Committee;  (5)  Agriculture  Committee;  (6)  Tourism  Com‐ mittee;  (7)  Finance  Committee;  (8)  Youth  and  Sports  Committee.  There  are  three  appointed  members of each committee. Thus, the quality of  the  organization  at  the  barangay  level  is  one  of  the strengths of the Philippines. 

  Barangay San Jose is located at the east of  Tagaytay with a population of the 2000 people  that  inhabited  in  eight  puroks.  These  puroks  are:  Olivarez,  Purok  156,  157,  158,  159,  161,  162,  and  163.  It  is  Purok  163  that  the  Saint  Paul  Scholasticate  belongs  to.  Barangay  San  Jose  is  surrounded  with  hotels,  restaurants,  motels,  and  food  chains.  Currently,  it  has  five  hotels,  six  restaurants,  ten  motels,  five  food  chains. These are the generating income of the  barangay.  The  income  the  barangay  got  is  used  to  support  the  women  empowerment  and  the  livelihood  program  of  the  barangay.  One  thing  that  San  Jose  is  remarkable  with  is  its enormous number of religious houses like a  small  Vatican!  At  present,  there  are  ten  reli‐ gious institutions: six female religious commu‐ nities (Franciscan Immaculatine Sisters, Fran‐ ciscan Missionaries of Mary,  Sisters of the An‐ gels,  Oblate  Sisters  of  the  Most  Holy  Re‐ deemer,  Merciful  Sisters  and  Hospitaler  Sis‐ ters  of  Mercy),  two  male  religious  communi‐ ties  (Divine  Word  Missionaries  and  Clerics  Regular of St. Paul) and two diocesan seminar‐ ies  (St.  Augustine  Major  Seminary  and  San  Pablo).  With  that  San  Jose  has  almost  zero  crime rate! 
San Jose Elementary School

Barangay San Jose, Tagaytay City 

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iPaul Interview with the Barangay Captain 

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Mrs. Cecilla Bayas is a Barangay Captain in  San Jose. She takes over in ruling the Barangay  after winning the election last October, and on  December  1,  2007  assumed  the  office.  She  continues and strengthens the livelihood pro‐ gram  of  the  former  administration  with  little  revision.  The  livelihood  programs  are:  raising  swine, making candies and soap, and rice field  planting. The administration is putting up the  capital  for  the  livelihood  program  to  help  the  whole population of the Barangay. It is a gen‐ erating  income  that  is  equally  and  properly  distributed to every member of the Barangay.  They are the beneficiaries. The administration  is  busy  in  taking  responsibility  for  the  pro‐ gram  instead  of  merging  or  plunging  them‐ selves into awful  vices  which  probably  would  create disorder to the Barangay.  How  do  the  programs  work?  It  is  distrib‐ uted to each purok. Purok means a small com‐ munity  in  the  Barangay  composed  of  50  to  300  families.  The  Barangay  is  divided  into  eight  puroks.  Each  purok  takes  charge  of  gen‐ erating  income  and  everybody  is  responsible.  The members spend nothing for it because the  money is coming from the Barangay Fund. It is  lent to them for such livelihood programs. The  members will pay it back without interest. 
The Barangay Captain with her interviewers

Another program is the Sangguniang Ka­ bataan (SK). This means a group of teenag‐ ers  with  their  chairman  supported  by  the  Barangay  Captain.  The  Captain  initiates  basketball  and  volleyball  games  among  purok  men  and  women  broken  into  junior  and senior categories. They play the games  with  the  goal  of  diverting  their  attention  away from evil vices.  The  Barangay  Captain  said  that  in  her  ad‐ ministration, as a mother of the Barangay who  is  elected  by  the  people  she  would  give  her  best  time,  effort,  and  intelligence  to  make  a  difference  as  best  she  can.  She  is  asking  the  loyal support from her councilors and staff to  bring  these  ideas  into  reality.  In  a  month  of  ruling you can already see the sincerity of her  administration, noticing the order in the office  both things and personnel. Moreover, she dis‐ tributed  the  committees  to  each  trustee  per‐ sonnel  to  function  according  to  their  poten‐ tials and capabilities.  In fact, the peace and order committee is a  remarkable one doing their duties and respon‐ sibilities  with  a  dedicated  heart.  The  crime  rate of San Jose is nearly zero percent. This is a  confirmation  that  the  peace  and  order  com‐ mittee  is  active  and  effective  in  their  desig‐ nated  task.  Mrs.  Bayas  still  wishes  to  address  domestic  and  neighborly  tensions  which  still  exist.  The health center office of the Barangay is  continuously serving the sick members of the  Barangay.  It  is  open  every  Thursday  and  Fri‐ day and has a professional doctor on duty.   This  is  how  the  administration  is  looking  forward  for  the  common  good  of  the  inhabi‐ tants of the entire Barangay. She said that rec‐ ognizing also the presence of religious houses  in this Barangay is a great help in maintaining  peace  and  tranquility.  There  are  also  the  learning  institutions,  one  private  college,  two  private  elementary  schools,  one  public  ele‐ mentary school, and one daycare center. 

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The Ursuline Sisters of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus

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the journey
by Ferdinand S. Dagcuta, CRSP
One  of  the  female  religious  Congregations  in  Tagaytay  are  the  “Grey  Ursulines,”  officially  known as the Congregation of the Ursuline Sis‐ ters  of  the  Agonizing  Heart  of  Jesus.  The  Con‐ gregation was founded after a long and arduous  work of self‐dedication in the name of love for  God  and  neighbor.  It  all  began  with  a  brilliant  woman whose simplicity and smile can worked  wonders  into  the  lives  of  those  she  met  and  whose  lives  she  touched.  Her  name  is  Ursula  (in  the  world  Julia  Maria)    Ledóchowska,  born  in  Loosdorf  in  lower  Austria  in  the  year  1865.  She came from aristocratic parents and grew in  an  environment  where  self‐discipline  and  an  intimate relationship with God was really lived  out.  It  is  no  wonder  she  grew  up  with  a  pro‐ found love of God and made it as a motivating  factor that defines her whole life.  It  was  in  the  year  1886  that  Ursula  entered  the  Ursuline  Order  founded  by  St.  Angela  Merici  in  1535.  This  Congregation  was  to  in‐ dulge  in  educating  girls  and  women  to  devote  their lives to God while living in their families,  which  in  a  way  helps  the  renewal  in  the  com‐ munity  and  the  Church  as  a  whole.  Ursula  de‐ voted  her  life  as  an  educator,  who  showed  the  love  of  Christ  by  her  words  and  actions.  She  was loved and respected by her students which  reflected her quality as an educator.  In  the  year  1907  Ursula  was  called  to  go  to  foreign land, Russia. This year marks a decisive  moment  in  Ursula’s  life  for  it  brought  her  to  a  new environment and new realities of apostolic  works.  In  Russia  she  was  invited  to  administer  at a boarding school for girls in Petersburg. She  and  her  two  companions  lived  in  secrecy  for  within the Russian Empire religious life was for‐ bidden. In the midst of this she continued to do  her work together with the local Roman Catho‐ lics.  Even  in  secrecy  the  community  that  she  and her two companions had started grew, and,  in  1908,  it  became  an  autonomous  Ursuline  house  with  Sister  Ursula  as  its  superior.  The  community  flourished.  They  did  various  apos‐ tolic  works  that  ranged  from  the  boarding  school  up  to  the  local  community  of  both  Catholic and Protestants alike. Ecumenism had  become part of the sisters’ life for they catered  also  to  the  needs  not  just  of  the  Catholic  but  that of other denominations.  However, the First World War broke out in  1914 and as an Austrian citizen she had to leave  Russia. This situation did not deter her to con‐ tinue her work. In exile she continued to com‐ municate with her community in Russia and at  the  same  time  she  worked  with  the  local  peo‐ ple. She stayed in Stockholm, Sweden teaching  foreign  languages.  Little  by  little  she  took  all  her sisters out of Russia and together they lived  in  Sweden.  In  1917  the  community  moved  to  Denmark  and  together  they  continued  their  works with the people. There they organized an  orphanage  for  Polish  immigrants  and  actively  participated  with  the  local  Catholic  commu‐ nity. She was actively involved in helping Polish  war victims, raising money for them and doing  everything  that  she  could  in  order  to  alleviate  their wallowing situation. 

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After spending her life in a foreign land, Sis‐ ter  Ursula  and  the  community  went  back  to  war devastated Poland after it gained independ‐ ence. Here she saw that the people were in dire  need.  To  respond  to  this  situation she  and  her  community accepted the challenge to work for  the people. In 1920, after asking the permission  of the Apostolic See, she transformed the com‐ munity into an Apostolic Congregation of Ursu‐ line  Sisters  which  at  present  are  known  as  Ursuline Sisters of the Agonizing Heart of Jesus  or  the  “Grey  Ursulines”  as  they  are  known  by  their  religious  habit.    On  November  21,  1930  their  Constitutions  had  been  definitely  ap‐ proved.  A  new  branch  of  the  Ursuline  Sisters  was  born  taking  the  essentials  of  the  religious  life  and  the  traditions  of  the  Ursuline  Order  founded by St. Angela Merici.   The  new  Congregation  caters  to  the  needs  of  the  contemporary  Church  according  to  the  charism of St. Angela. Thus, the new Congrega‐ tion still adheres to the old way but living it in  the new way in accordance to the present real‐ ity. They live in accord with the Ursuline Spiri‐ tuality  and  its  tradition  of  being  involved  in  education and going further they also find ways  in order to respond to the current needs of the  people, especially those of the poor. The words  of Mary in responding to the invitation of God  to  be  the  mother  of  His  Son  has  become  the  words  the  Ursuline  Sisters  responding  to  the  call of God to follow His Son, “Behold, I am the  handmaid of the Lord”. The Congregation’s life  project is to be attentive to Christ’s words upon  the  Cross,  “I  Thirst”.  This  serves  for  them  as  a  focal  point  of  their  response  in  serving  Christ  and His people. They followed the path of evan‐ gelical  radicalism  and  fraternal  service,  espe‐ cially to the most needy through the witness of  their  own  lives  and  the  sisterly  communion  in  the  community.  In  an  specific  way  they  were  involved  in  catechesis,  education,  teaching,  charitable, and missionary works.   The  Congregation  quickly  spread  in  Poland  and new houses were opened in other countries  such as Italy and France. Mother Ursula died on 

Saint Ursula Ledóchowska

the 29th of May 1939 and was canonized on the  18th  of  May  2003.  At  present  the  congregation  has  about  900  members  in  100  communities  that are scattered in 12 countries. In the Philip‐ pines  the  Ursuline  Sisters  made  their  founda‐ tion  in  2002  as  a  gift  for  the  canonization  of  their foundress.  They dedicated their house in  honor of St. Ursula Ledochowska, their mother  and  foundress.  The  Sisters  live  in  Maitim  II  East,  Tagaytay  City  and  do  their  apostolate  in  the  diocese  of  Imus  making  their  presence  felt  among  the  people,  especially  the  needy.  Their  presence  really  makes  a  difference  in  the  lives  of  the  people.  The  smile  they  readily  give  to  those people they meet is already an attestation  of  the  joy  they  feel  in  serving  Christ.  As  their  foundress would say, “Be Apostles by the smile  on  your  face,  by  kindness,  readiness  to  serve  others,  and  goodness  shown  to  everyone.”  These  are  the  characteristics  that  the  Sisters  have in serving God’s people. These are charac‐ teristics  that  show  their  strength  and  courage  in  order  to  continue  their  journey,  a  journey  with Christ and His people. 

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With Reference to the Motu Proprio “Summorum Pontificum”
by Giovanni Scalese, CRSP

IF ONLY…

On July 7, 2007 (07/07/07! any hidden meaning?) Pope Benedict XVI issued the motu proprio “Summorum Pontificum” on the use of the Roman liturgy prior to the reform of 1970. As early as in 1984 Pope John Paul II, by a special indult, had allowed the use of the Roman Missal published by Blessed John XXIII in 1962 (the last edition before the liturgical reform); but the indult was to be granted by the Diocesan Bishops, who though, with the most varied reasons, often refused. Then, in 1988, the same Pontiff, with the motu proprio “Ecclesia Dei,” had exhorted Bishops to make generous use of this power in favour of all the faithful who so desired. But even after this second pontifical intervention, the situation had changed little. Many a faithful had to go to churches and chapels of Lefebvrist priests, if they wanted to attend Mass according to the old rite. With this new motu proprio Pope Benedict XVI liberalizes the usage of the Tridentine liturgy for all those priests and faithful who like this rite. There is no further need of requesting permission from the local Bishop. From now on those responsible for granting permission are the parish priests, the rectors of churches and the major superiors for religious communities. In the motu proprio the Pope states that the old Missal has never been abrogated, and so it can be freely used as a forma extraordinaria (= extraordinary form) of the Roman liturgy—the forma ordinaria (= ordinary form) being the Missal promulgated by Paul VI in 1970. In a letter to the Bishops accompanying the motu proprio Benedict XVI explains the reason which motivated his decision to liberalize the celebration of the Tridentine Mass: “It is a matter of coming to an interior reconciliation in the heart of the Church. Looking back over the past, to the divisions which in the course of the centuries have rent the Body of Christ, one continually has the impression that, at critical moments when divisions were coming about, not enough was done by the

Church’s leaders to maintain or regain reconciliation and unity. One has the impression that omissions on the part of the Church have had their share of blame for the fact that these divisions were able to harden. This glance at the past imposes an obligation on us today: to make every effort to enable for all those who truly desire unity to remain in that unity or to attain it anew.” With these words the Holy Father reveals the true reason which prompted him to issue the motu proprio. We could call it an “ecumenical motive,” that is to say the unity of the Church. The reference of the Pope is evident. He wants to recover to full ecclesial communion those faithful who at present live on the fringes of the Church for liturgical—even though not only liturgical—reasons, namely priests and laypeople affiliated to the Society of St. Pius X, also known as “Lefebvrists” from the name of their initiator Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre, CSSp (1905-1991). Probably no pontifical document had ever been so harshly opposed. What surprises is that the strongest resistance to implement the papal decision comes from the Bishops themselves, of course most of the time not openly, but in a deceitful way, clinging to every kind of quibbles. Why? The reason usually given is that allowing to celebrate freely according to the old rite could lead to divisions within parish communities. It is curious that those who have always considered themselves supporters of liberty and pluralism in the Church, those who used to tell us that unity does not mean uniformity, those who have always tolerated reckless experiments, boundless creativity and scandalous abuses, now demand absolute uniformity, forgetting that in the Church there have always existed different rites, without this jeopardizing the unity of the Church. It is singular that the advocates of the ecumenism with everybody and at all costs, the same ones always ready to criticize the Church of old for being unable to avoid divisions,

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now not only do not care for the fate of their traditionalist brothers, but not even are able to see the legitimate—better, the due—concern of the Holy Father for his children wandering on the fringes of the Church. It is clear that the concern for the unity of parish communities is just a reason used as an excuse. Maybe the real reason of such strong reactions to the motu proprio is another one. Since the liturgical reform was in a way the “feather in the cap” of the Second Vatican Council, they fear that allowing a return to the pre-Vatican liturgy could lead to questioning the Council on the whole. The Pope has already made it clear that the liturgical reform is out of the question, all the more the Council. But there is something true in the concern of the “mutineers”. The papal decision at least brings into question a certain way of interpreting the Council. This is not the place to discuss about the Council; but, it is certain that, at more than forty years since the conclusion of the Vatican II, a dispassionate evaluation of the Council and of its subsequent interpretations becomes necessary. All the more so as Benedict XVI himself already started this “rethinking” of the Council with his authoritative speech to the Roman Curia on December 22, 2005—and only he, who had been one of the protagonists of the Council, could do it. Anyway, it is curious that those who have always appealed to the spirit of the Council now cling to the letter of it, in order to contest the Pope. That said, I would like to add some personal considerations about the motu proprio. I am one who was in time to know the old liturgy—when I became an altar boy the Mass was still in Latin. But in those very years the liturgical reform started and I was a convinced supporter of it. I love the new liturgy; I find it beautiful, when celebrated properly; it is rich and theologically deep. As a priest, I have never celebrated according to the old Missal, and after the Council I have just once or twice attended the Tridentine Mass: to be honest, I did not find it fascinating at all. I like Latin and enjoy celebrating Mass in Latin, especially if sung in Gregorian chant; but in the usus antiquior (= old usage), except Dominus vobiscum and Oremus, you hear nothing, everything is said in a low voice. Last month I bought a missalette, which reproduces the 1962

Missal, but I found it so poor in comparison with the Missal of Paul VI. What strikes more is the lack of abundance of the Word of God which we find in the new liturgy. So, I do not have any nostalgia of the old Mass—even though I acknowledge it as a gem of the tradition—and I do not think I will avail of the possibility granted by the motu proprio, except in the case I should be requested by some group of faithful to celebrate the Tridentine Mass—it is part of the Pauline spirit to be available toward everybody. I realize that the motu proprio, as it has been issued, cannot be the last word on the matter. In my opinion, a part from some points to be clarified (e.g. what means the “stable group of faithful” allowed to request from the parish priest the celebration according to the old rite), there are some problems which must, sooner or later, be addressed. Personally, I see three major problems: the uniformity of the calendar (it does not make sense to have two different calendars); the adoption of the new lectionary (which I consider one of the best fruits of the liturgical reform); the active participation of the faithful. But it seems to me that the Holy Father himself leaves the door open to possible future developments, when in his accompanying letter to the Bishops he says: “The two forms of the usage of the Roman Rite can be mutually enriching.” I would like to conclude with an experience I had last October. A couple of Filipinos living in the States, who usually attend Mass at a church of the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter—not to be confused with the Society of St. Pius X—in Phoenix, Arizona, asked me if I could celebrate a Tridentine Mass on occasion of their marriage anniversary. I answered them that I could not, first because I did not know how to celebrate, second because I did not have the Missal—I had not yet bought the aforementioned missalette. So, I offered to celebrate the Latin Mass according to the Missal of Paul VI, in Gregorian chant and with the readings in English. They were so satisfied that I thought: if all priests had always celebrated the novus ordo properly, maybe at this point nobody would have nostalgia for the old usage and there would not have been need of any motu proprio… We Italians would say: Meditate, gente, meditate!

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Fruits of the Spirit
by Michael F. Mancusi, CRSP

If one were to say that “the Holy Spirit is the soul of the Christian life” (Leon Joseph Cardinal Suenens, A New Pentecost, p. 86), then that person would be stating the truth. We believe that at Christian Baptism one is filled with the Holy Spirit. The same Spirit that filled Jesus and raised Jesus from the dead is within each of us. Therefore, we can logically say that the same qualities that were exhibited by Jesus have the capability of being exhibited by us. It depends upon how much we release the power of the Holy Spirit within our lives. The Holy Spirit is like a diamond of infinite carats. It has many facets to it. Every time we turn it, just so ever slightly, we see another facet of the Holy Spirit within us. These are the fruits of the Spirit. Jesus has said that “every good tree bears good fruit”. (Mt 7:20) We need to allow the Holy Spirit to take root in our lives so that it may flourish and produce good fruits abundantly. The fruits of the Holy Spirit are like the brush strokes which outline for us the portrait of a true Christian. We then need to see what the portrait looks like. Thus we can see what kind of person lives in sanctifying grace and submits oneself to the working of that grace in one’s life. “The possession of the fruits of the Holy Spirit is an indication that a person profits from the gifts of the Holy Spirit.” (Catechism of Catholic Doctrine, n. 92, p. 81) Another way of stating this is to say that “the fruits of the Holy Spirit are perfections which the Holy Spirit forms in us as the first fruits of eternal glory.” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, #1832) Traditionally there are twelve fruits of the Holy Spirit. They are: Charity, Joy, Peace, Patience, Benignity, Goodness, Long-Suffering, Faith, Mildness, Modesty, Continence, and Chastity. In the Catholic edition of the New Revised Standard Version Bible there are nine fruits listed.

[Some refer to this list as a ‘Contemporary Understanding.’] They incorporate the traditional ones as both come from St. Paul’s Letter to the Galatians 5:22-23. These nine are: Love or Charity, Joy, Peace, Patience (including Long-Suffering), Kindness or Benignity, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness (including Mildness), and Self-Control (including Modesty, Continence, and Chastity). (Rev. Peter Klein, The Catholic Source Book) The first of all the fruits is LOVE (charity). All things are rooted in love. Saint Thomas Aquinas tells us that love is both the source and goal of all virtues. Thus, all things originate from love and all things work for and toward love. Love is not a feeling, this cute warm cuddly thing. Love is an act of the will. Love then can be defined as “seeking another’s ultimate happiness and the good for the other”. Stopping at a red light then becomes an act of love. Correction of a child becomes an act of love. As long as what we do, say, and think is for

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the good of another, honestly, then we are loving. Here we can say that one sees Christ in others and thus is considerate and helpful no matter what the cost. FAITHFULNESS is having a sense of trust in God and in the community of the Church. This person does not force his faith upon others but does not apologize for his own faith. He does not conceal his religion in public and is willing to defend the truth of his faith. We need to rediscover our own faith. Some may say “how can I put my trust in people or the Church which is not perfect?” We have put our trust in our parents so many times and yet they were not perfect. We have to let go of our own securities. As an American citizen I look at the U.S. dollar bill. On it is printed the words “In God We Trust.” I really question that because I do not see it happening in any policy decisions—or in the politicians. There is a story I wish to tell you about trust. Pope John XXIII went to bed one night during the Second Vatican Council. That day there were many disagreements about some statements. Bishops were yelling at one another and calling each other heretics. He couldn’t get to sleep because of his worries over his Church. Soon the pope said to himself, “It’s not my Church but Your Church. It’s in your hands, Lord.” He got a good night’s sleep and Vatican II came out okay. SELF-CONTROL is another fruit of the Spirit and implies self-knowledge. We need to have the ability to reflect on our self. We need to reflect on what is to come by looking at what is going on now. Things become habitual for us and we do not reflect. We cannot settle for “that’s the way it has always been done”. We are meant to challenge the status quo. In doing that we are capable of growing as an individual and as the people of God. We need to take time for self-evaluation which involves discernment. We may be able to do this by ourselves or with the help of others. Here is a simple recipe for self-control: Reflect for one hour per day, one evening per week, one day per month, one week per year.

Self-control also includes Modesty, Continence, and Chastity. The modest person is one who displays a decency in speech, dress, and deportment. This is one who fortifies and not weakens others in their virtue. Those who show continence in their lives is the temperate person who contains self-control in all things. These people do not go to extremes but do all things in moderation. The chaste individual has a reverence for the procreative power of God in which one shares and thus never looks for selfgratification. The act of love itself is more directed toward the other rather than one’s own self. PATIENCE deals with time. And we all have to deal with time as we are in time. We have been sculpted into eternity as an artwork of God. All that we do then is an extension of God’s art and co -create with God. Thus, everything about us is also sculpted into eternity. We need to let time do its work. We just can’t throw Miracle Grow on ourselves and the next day we are done. We have become a very impatient people. Now that we can have our dinners prepared fast by microwaves, they are not fast enough. We stand by them and complain. The same is true for communications. Letters sometimes took just so long and now we have fax machines. But we stand by them complaining how long they take to set up and for the paper to come through. The same is true about people. We have to delegate to people and allow them to do at their pace. That is how they learn and grow. We have to give people the time to do it. We may be able to do it faster and better but we need to allow the Spirit of God to grow within them. Patience also includes the fruit of Long-suffering. This person is uncomplaining under pain and disappointment, even for a long time. Despite of the situation in which they may find themselves they do not have self-pity, nor will they be ones who will complain to God. It is a quality we can see portrayed in the book of Job and in the lives of the martyrs. (Yves Congar, I Believe in the Holy Spirit)

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GOODNESS is part of Patience. It is not doing for others but enabling others to do for themselves. Growing up in the sixties we thought we would be good and go to some homes of poor people and paint their house for them. What they really needed was to have someone show them how to paint the house. That would have been a good act. Parents need to stop doing everything for their children and allow them to do it on their own and rejoice in that. A friend of mine has a 3year-old child. She gets all excited now after she buttons something shouting “I did it!” The fruit of Goodness also is seen in one who stands for what is right. They do not judge, criticize, or condemn, nor will they compromise their principles. KINDNESS is basically love in small type. It is the little things that flow forth from the nature of something. Just a brief insight into something. Someone once told me that kindness is a wink from God given through others. GENTLENESS is living non-aggressively. We could be gentle in action but down deep we are cursing the person out. Our gentleness must exist in thought, word, attitude, and in action. Having gentleness in our life helps us in dealing with conflict, tension, and stress. Here we can say that it includes Mildness or Meekness in that a gentle person is not argumentative or domineering but will reason persuasively. PEACE is not a noun but a verb. It is the act of healing, nurturing, and reconciling. A person who is at peace is one who heals, nurtures, and reconciles others and oneself. We also must recall that if we do not have justice then we do not have peace. Instead rather we have peacelessness. (Leo J. Trese, The Faith Explained as well as www.bibleknowledge.com/f-o-t-H-S.html ) JOY is probably the most important witness to the Gospel. Many people don’t want to be Catholic Christians because they do not find them joyful. They are always frowning and suffering, and moaning. Are we a people without hope? People see hope in our hearts by our joy. We cannot

spread the Good News of Jesus Christ if we tell people by our lives that this is not a happy way of being. “Christian joy must mark the whole of life.” (Dies Domini, #57) No wonder our young people do not want to be part of the Catholic Church. There’s the story about a woman having a heart attack during Mass and dying. The paramedics were called. It took them 30 minutes before they found the dead woman. Everyone looked dead. Catholic Christians need a new commandment: “Smile at least two hours per day”. Christianity tells us not to fear for He has conquered the evil one. (Rev 17:14) Our lives need to joyfully reflect that. St. Thomas Aquinas describes the fruits of the Spirit as the ultimate and delightful products of the action of the Spirit in us. Fruits are what are gathered at the end of branches growing from a vigorous stock and they are delightful to the taste. They are what are reaped from a crop or harvest in a field that has been cultivated or sown. (Michael O’Carroll C.S.Sp., Veni Creator Spiritus) “We have received the Spirit of holiness within us as a pledge and first fruits. Now we must be faithful to this and, in all fidelity, cultivate the latent resources within us with all their potential.” (Leon Joseph Cardinal Suenens, A New Pentecost, p. 84)

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Pages of Barnabite History

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the immaculate conception and cardinal lambruschini
by Roan Cipriano J. Aborque, CRSP
The Catholic Church celebrates the Feast of the Immaculate Conception every December 8. Pope Pius IX, in his Encyclical “Ineffabilis Deus,” declared “The Most Holy Virgin Mary was in the first moment of conception, by the unique gift of grace and privilege of the Almighty God in view of the merits of Jesus Christ the redeemer of mankind, preserved free from all stain of original sin.” The Pope may have announced the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary but behind the proclamation were personalities who drafted, studied, and worked tirelessly on the truth about the Virgin Mary. One of them was Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini (1776-1854), a Barnabite, who gave a great contribution in the development of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception. Pope Gregory XVI created Lambruschini a cardinal with the Consistory of 1831 in recognition of his wisdom and service of the Church. The most valid contribution to the dogma of Cardinal Luigi Lambruschini was the publication, in 1843, of the Polemic Dissertation of the Immaculate Conception. The Dissertation represents the conclusion of the numerous instances and petitions that in the last years had multiplied in favor of the proclamation of the dogma. His publication received a favorable reception in and outside Italy and was justified by the historical circumstances; especially that he was the Secretary of State. It was on December 6, 1848 when Pope Gregory XVI appointed a Cardinal Commission, chaired by Cardinal Lambruschini, which undertook the role of a preparatory commission about the possibility of the definition of the Dogma of the Immaculate Conception. After Gregory died on June 1, 1846 the new Pope Pius IX was too concerned about the political situation to worry about the Dogma. His greatest fear was to upset nations like England, Germany and Ireland which had not presented any petition in favor of such. Yet on December 1848 he created a Congregation headed by Cardinal Lambruschini,

to study the possibility of the Dogma. Even Pope Pius IX will acknowledge to Cardinal Lambruschini the merit of “suggesting, advising and inculcating” the definition of the Immaculate Conception. The Commission, after a thorough study, prepared its conclusion, drafted by Lambruschini, in what would be known as the Encyclical “Ubi primum”, promulgated by Pius IX on February 2, 1849. A second Commission kept studying the possibility of the Dogma, and finally another Commission of 21 Cardinals took over to reach the conclusion. This time Cardinal Lambruschini, because of his age, had to withdraw his participation, and retired in Naples, He died there on May 12, 1854. The Dogma of the Immaculate Conception of Mary was proclaimed by Pope Pius IX on December 8, 1854 in his Encyclical “Ineffabilis Deus”.

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“Embrace the lily of chastity”
by Yohanes Besi Koten, CRSP
Chastity is the virtue by which we are trying to be morally and sexually pure. It means that we must “desire with joy the true integrity of body and soul” (The Writings, 157). Here, we must scrutinize chastity as the pure creation of God. It is God’s own will for the purpose of procreation. Because of this, any desires or sexual acts and powers outside of marriage are sinful. It is in the language of our founder, St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, by which we can say they are a kind of “spiritual adultery” (The Writings, 176), because we desire for worldly things and not the heavenly things. For this reason our founder urges us “… to embrace so much the Lily of Chastity that we would acknowledge committing spiritual adultery if we would find ourselves putting our love in anything whatsoever: being things, or relatives, or even self love…” (cf. The Writings, 176). Here, as the followers of St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, we should embrace the Lily of Chastity as he did. We are taught to exercise our chastity in the spiritual things, not the worldly things. We are asked to “make progress in the virtue of chastity (avoiding anything contrary to it), so that the body and mind would stop from being involved with filthy things” (cf. The Writings, 157). It means that we must avoid any immoral behavior which would lead our body and soul to destruction. Here, St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria advices us to strive for heavenly things in which we are called to live our holiness in perfect chastity. As religious under the umbrella of St. Anthony Mary Zaccaria, we are called to “embrace the Lily of Chastity.” We should exercise our chastity within spiritual values. We must avoid spiritual adultery! In turn, it is an ongoing process for us in searching for God and His kingdom alone. We are called to live our lives in perfect chastity. Moreover, our chastity is a mirror of heaven. In this case, we are blessed to be in this way of life. It is possible for us to live out our chastity because of the grace of God so that we may become an example to those people around us. Our lives become for them a spiritual radiance in which they can follow in living their chastity in whatever vocation of life that they have chosen for themselves. The calling to live in chastity acquires freedom. This freedom is only to love and serve God in our neighbor. It is a sign of our self-offering and self-giving with pure and undivided hearts for the Kingdom of God. This is how we strive for the benefit of others. In doing this—embracing the Lily of Chastity—I hope that we grow spiritually and be of spiritual radiance in order that we may “proclaim everywhere an energetic spirituality and zealous spirit” (The Writings, 32) to the people. God bless!

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Losing and finding...
by Jecker R. Luego, CRSP Recently I have lost a certain amount of money. If the woman of the Gospel turned her house to find her coin, I just looked for it at some possible place where I might have misplaced the amount. Unfortunately, I was not that lucky like the woman, I have not found mine. Up to now I am thinking what has happened and why I lost it. But for sure I will not find it anymore. What I just wish is that the money would be used in much better things. Honestly, I am a person who does not want to lose. It’s hard to accept to lose someone or something especially those who/that are dear to me. The loss of my grandmother is something that I have not let go with fully. I would say I am still suffering with such loss because she was so dear to me since I grew up with her. Besides, I felt the love that she had for me. She was that caring to me. I would honestly say that I was her most special one among her other grandchildren. This somehow explains why I am still that hurting because of her loss. I miss the love and care that she had for me. It is because I loved her so much. Reflecting upon this loss of someone in my life, I realized that same thing God feels for his creation, especially for those whom he made in his image and likeness. If I cannot allow such loss how much more God who loves all that He has created. He does not want to lose everything he created and he loves so much. Christmas season is the proof of such love and care of God for his creation. He does not want to lose them for nothing. He became man and one of us in order to find and redeem everything from destruction brought by sin. God so loved the world that he gave us His only Son. Because of His love He allowed another loss in order to find everything and to recover what he had lost. If I am hurting because I lost some money, God is much more hurting because he lost everything. But despite of this God let his Son to be born so as to save the world from damnation. It is very difficult to receive to lose someone or something. I may have lost some amount but I have found something in my life very special, the God who loves me so much. The amount I lost is nothing compare to the love that God is showing me every day. Maybe I lost the amount in order to realize the love that God has for me. I lost money so that I may realize I am already lost and that God is calling me back to his fold. Indeed, I am very much enlightened of what happened. It was like a red light for me where I have stopped to give time to myself to think about something better. It was a time for me to meditate once again upon the love of God for me. I am very much happy that with such event of my life, I have realized how lost I am within me and that God is looking for me. I have to go back home now. It is time now for each and every one of us to go back to God. God seeks us every time we go astray for he loves and cares for us so much. There is a time of losing but there is always a time to find. We have been lost but God has found us for we are His own, His people, His heritage….MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A BLESSED NEW YEAR 2008.

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looking with the eyes of jesus this Christmas
by Jonathan G. Ramoso, CRSP
One great mark that Christmas is already near is when people are busy buying and preparing gleaming Christmas decors, such as a Christmas tree, making a “belen”, multi-colored lights all over the street corners, the majestic stars of all varieties all over, and the unique images of Santa Claus in houses and malls. Even in September people are already thinking of what to prepare. The funny thing is that they are anxious about preparing for Christmas and New Year’s Eve, most likely if the food is enough and how much money to budget. This is the result of the over-commercialized trend of this season. Have we seen Jesus Christ, the center of this Yuletide season? No wonder that in the biblical accounts of Christ’s birth, the Judean people did not accept the couple—Joseph and Mary. In that, before Jesus was born He was already unnoticed, insignificant. He was born in the manger for there was no more room for them in the inn. The shepherds were the first witnesses of Jesus’ birth, His so called “fans”. See, how lowly and insignificant is our Savior, but there lies the wisdom and deep meaning of His coming and being born into this world. Have you seen the presence of Christ within the poor most especially this season of Christmas? Whenever I go out to photocopy something for our school papers I usually see an old woman, walking uncomfortably because she has defects in her body, shivering in a thin dress, and smelling awful. Every time I encounter this old woman, I become indignant and ask God if he can do something, to give her comfort and a decent living at least once in her life. In my last encounter I realized that, although I felt pity for her, I did nothing, even one step to offer something that I have. It made me realize that God is doing something in this mysterious world, He made me. And so, I gave her my 20 pesos. In many little ways, we can share something that benefits the poor, the marginalized. God made us for others. Jesus taught intently to His disciples through a discourse: “Then they will answer and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or in prison, and not minister to Your needs?’ He will answer them, ‘Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for Me’” (Mt 25:44-45). This is the main message of Christmas, of Christ’s coming, which is not mere complacency or selfish motives. Rather, Christ steps in human history and reality out of the spirit of selfless giving, a gift of the heart. Christmastime should make us realize and to be receptive to the real presence of the Divine Word—Jesus Christ—among our brethren, those who are forgotten by any given circumstances. It is Jesus Christ we ought to imitate. Our human fulfillment is a mere reflection of the goodness of an ever-loving and evergiving God. Hence, the spirit of giving and loving is not “seasonal,” exclusive for Christmastime only, but rather it is an everyday lifting up of its spirit because Christ is ever present in every life of people. We are adhered to be a selfgiver for all seasons. Have you seen the inner, moving presence of Christ in the Eucharistic celebration, especially this Christmas? The real meaning of the word “Christmas” is Christ and Holy Mass. Whenever we celebrate the Eucharist we commemorate His sacrifice on the cross once and for all. The meaningful celebration of Misa de Gallo (traditional Filipino dawn mass) entails for us perseverance and the attitude of vigilance in His coming of being human like us, except sin, and in His return in glory. The Eucharist as “the source and summit of Christian life” (cf. LG 11) renews in us the value we have to possess in our relation with God and our fellow individuals in this Yuletide season. In the Eucharist, we are valuing the right attitude of communion with God and others. Christ too lives with us and touches our hearts. In this Yuletide season, we may perceive in the Eucharist the value in which it challenges us. To look beyond what is the meaning of the Christmas celebration entails a tremendous challenge and a joyful moment of sharing as well. External preparations should not be the main reason for this celebration; rather, the heart of it is to concentrate on Jesus Christ who teaches us the value of giving and living one’s life to the full. Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year!

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give love on Christmas day
by Jay L. Patulin, CRSP

“Jesus was born in a humble stable, into a poor family. Simple shepherds were the first witnesses to this event.” (CCC 525) This account reveals that God is showing the immense importance of humbling oneself for the sake of the Kingdom. God wants us to be self-effacing in the eyes of others because this would be the ticket of assuming the action of Jesus Christ and by fulfilling the will of God. Being born poor does not mean we need to be materially poor but being poor is to be modest in our very self. This is the amazing virtue that God showed to us in the story of His son’s birth. However, aside from that particular virtue that God showed to us, He also offered to us the peak virtue which defines His coming, this is the virtue of love. The coming of Christ into this world intensifies the meaning of love. The love that makes Him humble enough to be born in the manger somehow gives meaning to His coming. He offered

that love for the sake of our redemption and to regain our identity of being as the children of God. Indeed, history tells us that we—the people of God—broke the bond of love by committing sin or through our disobedience to the will of God. We refused to follow God’s commandments because of our stubbornness. Nevertheless, God never ceased to claim us as His children. He does not want us to be far away from His bosom, that’s why He sent His only begotten Son for the greater purpose of liberation. This liberation brings the virtue of love. The celebration of the Yuletide season is the commemoration of God’s love and His identity as the self-effacing God. Christmas is the moment that we think of God as the God of love and meekness, and not as the God of superficiality. Christmas is the moment to share that love and meekness with others, especially to the outcasts in our society, to the hungry people, and to the faceless. It is the time to share our very love and attention to the needy in order to make one’s Christmas celebration more meaningful and fruitful. But sometimes we fail to do that significant purpose of Christmas because we think of the season of Christmas in its peripheral aspect and not in its central part. Instead of giving our attention to others, we’re preoccupied with the things that make our own Christmas wonderful. This leads to the idea of a selfish celebration of Christmas. Through this selfish perspective of Christmas, it nullifies the authentic essence of love that Jesus Christ shows to us in this fantastic season of Christmas. Thus, Christmas is the invitation to all of us to give more importance to the sharing of one’s love to others. It impels us to radiate the love of Jesus Christ to everybody and to manifest it through our very action by helping the poor and by visiting them in this season of Christmas and all through the year. It also reminds us that Christmas is to offer one’s life. Thus, Christmas is the season of love.

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S.p.s. choirs
by Isfridus Syukur, CRSP
Every weekend the Barnabite seminarians are assigned to different chapels in different parishes in Tagaytay, Amadeo and Alfonso. The seminarians usually go to the assigned chapels on Saturday afternoon or Sunday morning. They are there not only to serve during the Mass but to handle the choir as well. So they teach the children and youth how to sing and they themselves serve as musicians (guitarist or organist). My focus here however is not to inform the readers the details of their activities in their assigned areas since the next issue of this newsletter will say something about the matter. I am focusing on the choirs with which John Koten and I help to direct. Presently, John and I are assigned to our chapel every Sunday. We have Mass here in our Sagrado Corazon chapel every Sunday morning at 9 o’clock. We, as a community, are very thankful to our beloved bishop Luis Antonio G. Tagle, DD, Bishop of Imus, and to Fr. Serge P. Arenga, OFM Cap, the parish priest of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, Tagaytay for allowing us to celebrate the Mass in our chapel every Sunday. Since the day we celebrated the first Mass, there have been choirs of children, youth, and adults who commit themselves to serve the people by sharing their talents in song. At the moment, there are two groups of men and women who are willing and generously sharing their talents with us. The first group is the “Couples for Christ.” The members of the group come from different places around Tagaytay and Amadeo. Though they are from different places; however, they are united by one commitment: to serve God by serving his people. They sing in our chapel every fourth Sunday of the month. John and I serve as the conductor and organist respectively. With this group, we do not sing only in our chapel but we also have schedules in the two parishes of Tagaytay. We sing at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish every second Saturday of the month for an anticipated Sunday Mass at 5:30 pm, and on the third Saturday of the month we sing at Ina ng Saklolo (= “Our Lady of Perpetual Help”) Parish for an anticipated Sunday Mass at 6 o’clock in the evening. As a preparation for these

schedules we make ourselves available every Saturday afternoon for the choir to practice between 2-5 pm. The second group is from our neighborhood. They are committed men and women who generously render their talents in singing in our chapel from the first to the third Sunday of the month. They are really gifted men and women. They not only know how to sing but they also know how to play musical instruments, like the guitar, tambourine, and organ. This group is full time in our chapel serving as a choir with the preparation for Christmas. Moreover, in the Philippines there is a tradition called Simbang gabi or Missa de Gallo. It is nine-day night or dawn Masses in preparation for Christmas. Some churches and chapels celebrate the Missa de Gallo in the evening while others celebrate it in the morning or dawn. In our chapel we celebrate it in the morning at 5 am. John and I therefore are busy with the group preparing the songs for the Mass every morning. We have the choir practice every afternoon from 3-5 o’clock. Our Christmas Masses with their choirs were a great event filled with joy and enthusiasm. To conclude this article, allow me to express my deepest gratitude to the two groups and may God reward all their kindness and generosity. Thank you to all of you and wishing you peace of mind and heart, health of body and soul and endless joy everyday. Merry Christmas and a gracefilled New Year 2008!

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NEWS, EVENTS, AT IBA PA…
Catechetical Awareness Month
With the theme “Word of God, word of life”, the Our Lady of Lourdes Parish Catechetical Ministry held a culminating activity last November 11, at the Somascan Fathers Seminary. The said activity was fully participated by the students from the different elementary schools of the Parish. Four of us took part in the event, inasmuch as catechists in Maitim II Elementary School: Rev. Ferdinand Dagcuta, Rev. Roan Cipriano Aborque, Bro, Marlon Ramirez and Bro. Pat Golis. The gathering began with the registration at 8:30 am and it was followed by the Mass presided by our parish priest Rev. Fr. Sergio P. Arenga, OFMCap. In retrospect, Fr. Serge said in his homily that “catechism is very much important to our life as Christians.” We should be familiar of the basic truth of our faith and it is possible only through learning the basic catechism. He emphasized the importance of the basic Catechism to our life as God’s Children. Right after the Mass, snack was served. It was followed by a cheering competition by the different schools, which were divided into groups. All of them were able to share their talents in dancing, singing and even in using musical instrument that made the audience shout for joy. Then it was followed by a Basketball game which made the parents burst into laughter and enjoy upon seeing their children playing. Then the game was stopped at 12 noon for the lunch break and it was resumed in the afternoon. Then, after the game, the presentation from the different school followed. But before it was formally started, Miss Vilma M. De Luna, the head catechist, gave her opening remark. The audience, parents, catechists as well as the sisters who were present were filled with Joy and gladness as they witnessed the students performing their talents on the stage. Then at 3 o’clock there was another game which was held at the wide quadrangle of the Seminary. All of them participated and enjoyed including the catechist who was in charge of the game. It was indeed a great day for them for they were not only had showcased their talent but also were able to get to know one another well. The activity was successfully ended at 4 pm. (Pat M. Golis, CRSP)

Vocation Festival
There was a vocation festival which was launched last November 24–25, 2007. This vocation festival had been organized since 2006 last year by some diocesan priests, religious men and women and being supported by some lay persons (particularly from the Diocese of Imus). Its purpose was to invite the youth from the different schools and parishes and so that the priests and the religious men and women could share and to discover and proclaim that

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the Eucharist is a strength and guide of one’s vocation through praying, reflecting, singing and dancing. The venue of this activity was in the Rogationist College covered court. It was a one-day activity that began Saturday morning (9 am) and finished at 8 am on Sunday morning. There were many people involved in this activity since the participants were not only hundreds but thousands. Therefore, as part of the Diocese of Imus, the Saint Paul Scholasticate Seminarians did not refuse the invitation to become facilitators and to give some form of presentation in order to animate the youth. This was also the opportunity of the different congregations to make their vocation campaign to the youth through their respective vocation exhibits. To organize the program, this large number of youth who had joined the vocation festival was divided into groups. One group had 10 to 15 members and one facilitator, who was the one guiding the group. It was done in order not to confuse and give order to the program. This activity was animated by different presentations of singing and dancing presented by the students and youth from different schools and parishes. Before that some priests gave an explanation of what a vocation festival meant in order to widen the understanding of the youth about vocation. After the different presentations and exhibits, which began at morning and ended up until 10:30 in the evening the group sharing was followed that finished at 12:30 in the night. Then, the musical presentations resumed at 1:00 am and ended at 3:00 am. Since all were already tired and exhausted there was little rest because at 5:00 in the morning there was a dawn rosary. As a conclusion of this vocation festival and its activities there was the celebration of the Holy Mass officiated by our beloved Bishop Bishop Luis Antonio Tagle. (Clyd S. Autentico, CRSP)

SAMZ Seminary “Family Day”
As an expression of gratitude to benefactors, friends and parents, last November 30 the Saint Anthony Ma. Zaccaria Seminary in Marikina celebrated their “Family Day.” The said event aimed to give the chance to be with benefactors, friends and parents, to have enjoyment with them, and to deepen our bonds as a family. We, as “alumni” of the Seminary were invited. The gathering started with a Mass at 10 am celebrated by the Rector Fr. Joselito Ortega together with some other Barnabite priests. Fr. Joselito in his homily thanked all the benefactors who constantly and heartily subsidize the needs of the seminary. In addition, he mentioned to them the great effect of their help for the sustenance and the survival of the seminary. Then after the Eucharistic celebration, lunch followed at 12 o’clock. The lunch was beautifully served by a catering company. There were a lot of visitors came and join the celebration. After lunch, a program followed. The seminarians presented a kind of a comedy play and most of them were able to share their talents. They were able to entertain the visitors and as a result the audience enjoyed

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watching the presentation because of the unusual scene that they had witnessed. The play lasted for 2 hours. Then, after the presentation, a basketball game followed, the college seminarians vs. the theologian scholastics. The college varsity won the game under the initiative of Fr. Verano Ladra, the head coach of the team. The celebration was successfully ended at 4 o’clock in the afternoon. (Pat M. Golis, CRSP)

DWSTA Christmas Party
The cool breeze of December can warm the heart of every individual if one knows how to be sensitive to the wailing voices of the poor. One couldn’t ignore the reality that shopping malls and groceries are jammed by shoppers during the Christmas season. Gifts of any sort are wrapped, Christmas cards are sent, delicious foods are prepared for noche buena, but the question is: Are we ready to welcome the One who is to come? Are we ready to impart to others the true meaning of a joyful Christmas? This question somehow paved the way for the Divine Word School of Theology Students Association to make it as a theme for this year’s Christmas Party. The theme Pasko sa Mukha ng nga Dukha (= “Christmas in the face of the poor”) was a quite pondering one for a theology student. One cannot deny the fact that the theme itself bears a profound meaning for students who spend most of their time in front of layers of books and endless paper works. Last December 3, 2007, the Divine Word School of Theology Students Association held an outreach activity in different areas in Tagaytay City and in some parts of Cavite in order to fathom the richness of the theme for this year’s Christmas party. During the outreach program, every batch shared their time and goodies to our poor brothers and sisters who spend their Christmas season like the poor Savior who was born in a

manger two thousand years ago. After the outreach activity, theologians from different formation houses also shared together the essence of what it means to be the bearer of Jesus’ fraternal love. Brothers and fathers from different religious communities and dioceses wholeheartedly shared together an agape meal. After the meal, lively dance presentations and ice-melting voices were heard from each year level during the choral competition. T1 class, also known as the batch Ichthys (“fish” in Greek), garnered the highest points for the Christmas caroling competition as well as the 60 Seconds of Fame competition. Such merriment somehow helped the students to forget their paper works and layers of books that are still waiting on their study tables. After five hours of joy and breathtaking laughter, Fr. Michael Layugan, SVD, the Dean of Studies of the Divine Word Seminary, formally closed the 2007 Christmas Party by encouraging the theologians to bear witness and to radiate to others the real meaning of Christmas. (Rosauro A. Valmores, CRSP)

Novena to the Immaculate
Rev. Fr. Giovanni Ma. Scalese, CRSP, the superior of St. Paul Scholasticate, has been a recollection master of the Daughters of the Immaculate Concepcion of Charity (FICC) for six consecutive months, July to December. Fr. Robert Ma. Kosek, CRSP, his predecessor, was the first one who was in contact with the FICC. Fr. John continued this important Barnabite Ministry. In preparation of the Solemnity of the Immaculate Concepcion, the FICC held a novena before the evening Mass. Each day they assigned a congregation of priests and brothers to lead the novena and the Mass celebration. The Barnabites were assigned on the ninth day, the

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eve of the Solemnity of the Immaculate Concepcion. On that day Fr, Giovanni gave a recollection talk to the sisters. At six thirty in the evening he was joined by the Barnabite brothers in the chapel of FICC at Banay-Banay, Amadeo, Cavite. During the novena, Rev. Ferdinand Ma. Daguita, CRSP, delivered a Marian talk after the reading of the gospel. After the novena, the Eucharistic celebration begun. Fr. Giovanni was the main celebrant and Rev. Ferdinand was the assisting deacon. Some of the brothers were servers in the Mass while the rest sung in the choir. After the Eucharistic celebration we proceeded to the lobby for a kind of getting to know each other. All of the brothers were new to the place, and thus converse much with the sisters. We learned that about twenty children live in their convent. Those children live there temporarily. Some will soon be back with their own family but some are waiting for adoption. Some of the children belong to very poor families, others were abused, others are orphans. These sisters were able to help the children in collaboration with the Department of Social Welfare Development (DSWD). The children wanted to talk with the brothers as well. They did not hesitate to embrace the brothers as if they had known each other for some times. Dinner was served in the FICC’s refectory. Each table was set in such a way that a sister or two would be sitting in the table with the children. Some children asked the brothers to sit with them at the table. Of course the brothers willingly gave in to the children’s invitation. Everyone was so happy on that evening while sharing the meal despite the spirit of fasting as is their tradition on the eve of the Immaculate Concepcion’s solemnity. The meal that everyone had partaken was truly a festive one, for it was colored with songs and dances. After eve-

ryone ate, one of the sisters took a guitar and they sang in thanksgiving to the presence of the Tagaytay Barnabite Community. The children presented several numbers of dances too. After almost two hours, enjoying both the meal and being together we bade farewell to the children and the sisters with the hope of seeing each other again. (Joseph M. Bernales, CRSP)

Typically Filipino
Simbang Gabi, also known as Misa de Gallo or Aguinaldo Mass, is a nine-day dawn mass which is typically observed by the Filipino faithful. The term Misa de Gallo is the Spanish phrase for midnight mass, more literally translated as the “Rooster’s Mass.” It is told that the Missa de Gallo owes its name to the idea that a rooster would have been among the first to witness the birth of Jesus, and thus be the first one to announce it. In Spanish speaking countries, Misa de Gallo entails a typical midnight mass, starting at around 12 am on Christmas Eve. However, as practiced in the Philippines, this custom lasts for nine days, starting on December 16 up December 24, during which Filipino faithful attend dawn Masses, usually starting between 4-5 am. This practice started centuries ago during the Spanish colonial period

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when friars held early dawn masses for the farmers who wanted to attend Christmas Mass but could not leave their fields. These Masses were held before daybreak, hence the Filipino term Simbang Gabi (= “Midnight Mass”). Even today, Filipinos wake up very early in the morning to attend the Misa de Gallo as an expression of devotion to God. It is also an expression of the devotion of the Filipino to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Morning Star who will bear and give birth to Jesus. (http://en.wikipedea.org/ wiki/Misa_de_Gallo) In its observance to a century-old tradition, the Saint Paul Scholasticate of Tagaytay City held a nine-day Misa de Gallo in the chapels where they serve. Two chapels that belong to the jurisdiction of two different parishes are cared for by the Barnabite Fathers. They are: San Jose Chapel, which is under the jurisdiction of the Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, and the San Isidro Labrador Chapel of Buho, which is under the supervision of the Amadeo Parish. For nine untiring days of Misa de Gallo, Fr. Cirilo M. Coniendo, CRSP, Fr. Jecker M. Luego, CRSP, with the scholastics, who assist the choirs in each chapel, fervently served and shared with the faithful the message of what Christmas really means amidst hardships and trials in our day -to-day living. Lastly, amidst the cool breeze of December, Fr. John M. Scalese, CRSP, Fr. Michael M. Mancusi, CRSP, together with the Scholastics celebrated the Simbang Gabi at the Sacred Heart Chapel, which is inside the compound of the Saint Paul Scholasticate. The fathers and scholastics also shared with the faithful the joyful essence and significance of the nine-day preparation for Christmas. Communities of Sisters and families living near the compound perseveringly woke up early in the morning in order to share together the Holy Sacrifice of the dawn Mass at 5 am. This preparatory tradition majestically accompanied Mary toward the “Belen” in Bethlehem (Rosauro A. Valmores, CRSP).

The participants in the Tahanan Christmas Party

Tahanan Christmas Party
Christmas is one of the most festive celebrations in the Philippines and is the most awaited celebration, especially by the children and the poor. When the “-ber” months begin, one would be able to hear Christmas songs on radio stations and on television. The print media would start printing Christmas themes, grocery stores and malls have contests in showing their Christmas theme through colorful decorations. Then people would start thinking what to wrap for gifts to be distributed. It is also in this season that the spirit of giving is very much alive. The Tahanang Mapag-aruga ni Padre Semeria did its part in the celebration of the Christmas season. As early as the second week of November the Tahanan Staff met the parents of the Tahanan Scholars for the planning of the Christmas Party. It was agreed that the Christmas party would be held on the twenty second of December. Everyone, both the parents and the Scholastics in charge, worked together in preparing the necessary things. The Tahanan was blessed with generous visitors from the Colegio Alfonso de Madrid (CADM), a school owned by Mr. and Mrs. Voltaire and Myrna Mercado. The said school is

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located in Sitio Alangilan Pasong Camachille 2 Gen, Trias, Cavite. Among those with the group who came were Mrs. Inocencio, the principal, and Mrs. Del Purification and Mrs. Elvira Garcia, both teachers of CADM who initiated the idea of the outreach program to the Tahanan, Ms. Leny Columna their fellow teacher was one of those who planned for this program, however she was not able to come on the day itself for someone died in their family. Our condolences to you, teacher Leny! Mr. Edwin Bunag, a professor from La Salle and a brother of teacher Elvie was very instrumental for the Tahanan’s contact with the CADM. The Barnabites came to know Sir Edwin, through Fr. Jecker Ma. Luego, CRSP, the treasurer of the Barnabite community in Tagaytay. Fr. Jecker is a former co -teacher of Sir Edwin in La Salle Dasmariñas. Mrs. Raquel Bunag, the wife of Sir Edwin and a teacher from Don Bosco Makati supportively came with the group. Mrs. Josefine Gomez with her kids, was also present, a mother of one of the students. More than twenty students were in the group. The program started few minutes after the arrival of the CADM team. Fr. Giovanni led the opening prayer. It was followed by the National Anthem led by Heidi Baltar, the president of the parents of Tahanan. Then Fr. Giovanni delivered his welcome address to the visitors and to all present. In his speech he said that Christmas is the birthday of all the members of Tahanan, because Tahanan was conceived by Fr. Robert Ma. Kosek, CRSP during the Christmas Season. After visiting the poor and giving gifts, Fr. Robert came to know that there were many students who dropped out of school because of poverty. He then founded this institution with the assistance of Bro. Arvin Ma. Dagalea, CRSP. Presentations followed from both the Tahanan members and the students of CADM. After the presentations, the CADM students lined up to distribute the gifts they brought along with

them. We called the recipients family by family. There were forty families who were the recipients of the CADM gifts. However some of them were not present, but the gift will still be given to them. Barnabite workers also benefited from their generosity. Maraming Salamat po! (= “Thank you very much”) were the words that came out from their mouths, some were even teary eyed. After the gift-giving Mrs. Inocencio, delivered a message for the Tahanan Members. She said that they were willing to help these poor members even in the little way that they could. She was very much thankful also to the teachers, especially teacher Elvie, who really tried their best to make the outreach program happen. She said that even the little they had, they wanted to share to make someone happy. They did have another outreach program in their area in General Trias, but then they still tried their best to do it too for Tahanan. Br. Thomas Ma. Tabada, CRSP delivered words of thanks to them afterwards. After all of these we all shared together a simple meal prepared by the Tahanan members. Everyone was delighted and everyone enjoyed the meal. After lunch the CADM team made a little tour around the St. Paul Scholasticate and before they left they expressed their wish to go back in here.
Some students of Colegio Alfonso de Madrid

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At around one o’clock in the afternoon we resumed our activities. Although our visitors were not present anymore, we enjoyed the games we played very much. Parents played indigenous games with their children. Prizes were also distributed. The prizes were not that much, a pack of toothpaste, candies, bath soap, and some other useful items were distributed after each game. Although normally the winners receive the prize those who lost also received some consolation prizes. After the games each member exchanged gifts with each other and it was followed by a gift-giving from the Tahanan at this time. They were happy and some of them expressed their happiness in tears. With five kilos of rice, some canned goods, sugar and coffee; they said that it mattered a lot to them. Again, they said “Maraming salamat po!” For those who wanted to help the members of the Tahanang Mapag-aruga ni Padre Semeria you are most welcome to contact our Superior Rev. Fr. Giovanni Ma. Scalese, CRSP. Thank you and Merry Christmas. Mabuhay! (Joseph M. Bernales, CRSP)

Meetings at St. Paul Scholasticate
The visitors of the Scholasticate, this year, have not been limited only to the friends and benefactors of the Scholasticate, but also to the MBA students of the De La Salle University – Dasmarinas, where two of the fathers—Fr. Jecker Luego and Fr. Cirilo Coniendo—are presently studying for their masteral degree. Last December 8, 2007, the MBA students of this school, headed by Dr. Zeny Lontoc, professor of Production Management used the Sala Zaccaria of the Scholasticate for the activity of the class wherein they processed dishwashing liquid and fabric conditioner. This activity was part of the requirements of the subject “Production Man-

agement.” The students were amazed at the panoramic beauty of the place, and noticed the freshness of the air and the serenity of the place which is very good for recollection and retreat. Even Dr. Lontoc expressed her intention to bring her undergraduate students for a day of recollection or conference. The Scholasticate will open the doors to everybody especially to these young students who search for peace and serenity. Last December 11, 2007, the cluster 3 of the Tagaytay Religious Association (TRA) held their Advent recollection at the Saint Paul Scholasticate given by Fr. Guillermo Villegas, SVD with a Christological and soteriological reflection. This was the intention of the cluster to prepare Advent and Christmas together in order to deepen the relationship among the religious communities. The Tagaytay Religious Association (TRA) was grouped into clusters because it has more than 50 religious communities and it was very difficult to gather all together. The TRA was grouped into six different clusters. Saint Paul Scholasticate community belongs to cluster 3. The other members of cluster 3 are: San Pablo Formation House (Diocese of San Pablo, Laguna), Hospitaler Sisters of Mercy, Merciful Sisters, Franciscan Missionary of Mary (FMM), Immaculatine Sister, Sisters of the Angels, and the St. Mary’s Adoption Center. The recollection began with Midmorning Prayer. It was followed by the Advent reflection of Fr. Villegas. After this inspirational talk there was the adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and Mass, celebrated by our Superior Fr. John Scalese. The recollection ended with a short fraternal lunch whereby each community contributed the food. Last December 16, the faculty and staff of the Sacred Heart Villa School of the Sisters of the S. H. of Ragusa held their Advent recollection at the Saint Paul Scholasticate, given by Fr. Cirilo Coniendo, CRSP with the theme

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“Adbiyento: Paghihintay, pagbabalik-loob, kapayapaan” (= Advent: Preparation, conversion and peace). They were accompanied by Sister Maria Provvidenza Escobanez, the principal of the School. Sister Provvidenza also imparted her reflection about this theme (Cirilo B. Coniendo, CRSP)

Saint Paul Scholasticate Newsletter
THE CLERICS REGULAR OF SAINT PAUL — BARNABITES —

iPaul
Saint Paul Scholasticate

Incoming installation of ministers
The installation as lector and acolyte of a seminarian who is aspiring to become a priest is very necessary. It is one of the requirements of the Church to prepare and train him for his future ministry as a priest to carry out his function in serving God and to His people in the liturgy. In relation to this, the Saint Paul Scholasticate Seminary will install three lectors and seven acolytes by Fr. John Scalese, delegated by the General Superior of the CRSP. This will be done on December 31, 2007. These are the scholastics who will receive the ministry of lector: Bro. Rosauro A. Valmores, Bro. Joseph M. Bernales and Bro. Jay L. Patulin. The ministry of acolyte will be given to Bro. Marlon B. Ramirez, Bro. Yohanes Besi Koten, Bro. Clyd S. Autentico, Bro. Pat M. Golis, Bro. Jonathan G. Ramoso, Bro. Thomas Federick S. Tabada, and Bro. Isfridus Syukur. Before receiving these ministries they will have a recollection and seminar on December 28, 2007 at the Rogationist “Oasis of Prayer” with Fr. Cesare Bettoni, RCJ. (Clyd S. Autentico, CRSP)

Purok 163, San Jose Tagaytay City, Cavite, the Philippines Mailing Address: P. O. Box 32, 4120 Tagaytay City, Philippines Tel. & Fax: +63 46 413-2837 Email: stpaul@catholic.org Director: Fr. Giovanni Scalese, CRSP Editorial Staff: Fr. Cirilo B. Coniendo, Fr. Michael F. Mancusi, Fr. Jecker R. Luego, Rev. Ferdinand S. Dagcuta, Rev. Roan Cipriano J. Aborque, Marlon B. Ramirez, Yohanes Besi Koten, Clyd S. Autentico, Pat M. Golis, Jonathan G. Ramoso, Thomas Federick S. Tabada, Isfridus Syukur, Rosauro A. Valmores, Joseph M. Bernales, Jay L. Patulin Typeset in the Philippines by Saint Paul Scholasticate, December 2007

Maligayang Pasko at Masaganang Bagong Taon

Quis nos separabit a caritate Christi? An gladius?