C M Y K

WILKES-BARRE, PA TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 50¢
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The Times Leader
Flooding tributaries causing
havoc risk in Midwest.
NATION & WORLD, 5A
Smaller streams
a big problem
Area businesses offering
more gluten free foods.
HEALTH, 1C
Making taste
more accessible
2
9
8
9
5
4
$
20
VOUCHER
FOR ONLY
$
10
JETER RETURNS
Yankees shortstop Derek
Jeter was back at shortstop
and again atop the batting
order for the first time since
June 13, when he went on the
disabled list with a calf injury.
New York’s captain went 0 for
4 and remained six
shy of becom-
ing the first
Yankees
player to
reach 3,000
hits. 1B
SPORTS
SCOREBOARD
IL BASEBALL
SWB YANKS 5
IRONPIGS 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
PHILLIES1
MARLINS 0
BRAVES 4
ROCKIES1
AMERICAN LEAGUE
INDIANS 6
YANKEES 3
BLUE JAYS 9
RED SOX 7
6 09815 10011
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 6A
Editorials 9A
B SPORTS: 1B
C HEALTH: 1C
Birthdays 4C
Television 6C
Movies 6C
Crossword/Horoscope 7C
Comics 8C
D CLASSIFIED: 1D
WEATHER
Isabella Scappaticci
Sunny. High 87, low 55.
Details, Page 8B
PLYMOUTH – The first
raindrops fell at 3 p.m. Sun-
day and fell for 30 minutes.
BoroughManager JoeMazur
went outside his Coal Street
home to wipe his picnic table
dry.
Ninety minutes later, that
table was sliding across his
deck, causing damage to sup-
port posts.
That was nothing com-
pared to the devastation the
storm caused less than 200
yards away.
The more than 3 inches of
rain caused the Coal Street
Creek to overflow its banks,
bringing a river of mud,
rocks and other debris down
the road, ripping up side-
walks and the pavement, da-
maging houses and cars and
leaving Plymouth in a state
of emergency.
“I have never seenrainthat
hard and that constant,” said
Mazur, a borough resident
for 69 years. He said the only
thing he could compare Sun-
day’s scene to was similar
flooding caused by heavy
rains in 1947.
Millions of dollars of dam-
age was done, he said.
“I don’t know how we’re
going to pay for what we’ve
got now,” Mazur said. “We’ll
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A Chevy Blazer was washed about 100 yards fromwhere
it was parked Sunday on Coal Street in Plymouth.
Assessing
the damage
Plymouth borough
manager says flood costs
could soar into millions.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See DAMAGE, Page 10A
WILKES-BARRE – Justin Davis was busy
making balloon animals for children patient-
ly waiting with eyes wide open.
Davis, known as “Justincredible,” is a 15-
year-old magician who brought his talents to
Kirby Park as thousands of people laid down
blankets and set up lawn chairs to prepare for
a day, evening and night of entertainment.
Rides, food stands and wide-open fields
provided fun for all ages as July 4th in Kirby
Park arrived for all to enjoy as Wilkes-Barre
celebrated the 235th birthday of the United
States with an old fashioned celebration on
Monday.
The 31st annual festival began at noon and
included food, crafts and amusements for
FOURTH OF JULY
A bang-up time
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
People at Riverfront Park in Wilkes-Barre watch the annual fireworks at Kirby Park on
Monday night.
Kirby Park scene for traditional fun
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See KIRBY, Page 2A
INSIDE: For more on the holiday celebrations,
Pages 3A, 4A
Five new Luzerne County
bridges have recently opened,
and another will be ready for
vehicle traffic any day now, of-
ficials say.
Four more bridges are in the
process of being rebuilt, and
two more are about to go to
construction.
The work is part of the coun-
ty’s ongoing efforts to replace
aging and flood-damaged
bridges.
The new structures are de-
signed to stay strong at least a
century, but it will take dec-
ades to address all the projects
on the back burner, said coun-
tyChief Engineer JoeGibbons.
The county owns 311
bridges, ranging from boxy
concrete culverts over streams
to roughly 80 spanning more
than 20 feet.
“There’s just not enough
time or funding. That’s how it
is throughout the United
States,” Gibbons said.
The five bridges that recent-
ly opened were damaged from
flooding in June or November
2006, he said.
These bridges, with their
price tags, are: Tunnel Road
County cashes in where
it can with new bridges
Five spans recently opened
mark progress for county
out to replace many.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See BRIDGES , Page 10A
WYOMING – One by one they
lined up as the Wyoming Valley
Band played patriotic melodies
nearby. Hand after hand was
extended, and with a smile and a
nod, Dr. Joseph Mattioli gladly,
but uncomfortably, accepted the
praise being heaped upon him
and his wife, Rose.
On Monday, Independence
Day, more than 300 people gath-
ered on the grounds of the his-
toric Wyoming Monument to
commemorate the Battle of
Wyoming, which took place 233
years ago.
Monumental restoration gift lauded
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Commemorative Association President Frank Conyng-
ham, left, and Marcella Starr, of the Wyoming Monument Associ-
ation, present a platter to Drs. Joseph and Rose Mattioli.
Donation noted
at rededication
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
See MONUMENT , Page 7A
PLYMOUTH – Tom
Serbin and his family walk-
ed down what is left of Coal
Street on Monday and
assessed the damage.
The Serbins live in the
last house on Coal Street in
Plymouth. The only street
they can use to get to work
and to access medical help
is gone. Ravaging waters
that rolled down the moun-
tain and into Coal Street
Creek on Sunday evening
left behind a trail of devas-
tation that will take months
and perhaps millions to fix.
“We really don’t know
how long we’re going to be
like this,” Serbin said. “Our
yard -- well, most of it -- is
gone and we don’t have any
power.”
Serbin’s wife, Sharla, is a
diabetic and needs insulin,
which must be refrigerated.
Devastation astounds
some Plymouth residents
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See PLYMOUTH, Page 10A
K
PAGE 2A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
DiGiacomo, Reno
Donovan,
Msgr. William
Dula, Gertrude
Sellani, John
Trachtenberg, Harvey
Venetz, Helen
OBITUARIES
Page 6A
MARK DIPIPPA’S affiliations
were incorrect in a story on
Page 3A in Monday’s editions.
DiPippa previously served as
director of the Wyoming Val-
ley Montessori School in King-
ston and the director of devel-
opment for MMI Preparatory
School in Freeland. He was
named the president of Rock
Solid Academy last year.
BUILDING
TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
to help us correct an inaccu-
racy or cover an issue more
thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – One player
matched all five winning
numbers drawn in Monday’s
“Pennsylvania Cash 5” and
will win a jackpot worth
$725,000.
Lottery officials said 159
players matched four num-
bers and won $221.50 each;
5,316 players matched three
numbers and won $11 each;
and 64,459 players matched
two numbers and won $1
each.
One player matched all six
winning numbers drawn in
Monday’s “Pennsylvania
Match 6 Lotto” and will win
a jackpot worth $950,000.
LOTTERY
MIDDAY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER – 8-1-8
BIG 4 – 2-5-8-1
QUINTO - 6-9-9-9-5
TREASURE HUNT
06-10-19-24-28
NIGHTLY DRAWING
DAILY NUMBER - 2-1-8
BIG 4 - 7-6-2-3
QUINTO - 3-9-4-0-1
CASH 5
04-12-29-30-38
MATCH 6 LOTTO
09-16-27-33-40-48
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painting, a basket raffle, a rum-
mage sale and music provided
by a DJ.
This year the rummage sale
was a new feature.
“We had 400 to 500 people
last year and most arrived at 8
o’clock. We added the rummage
sale from 6 to 8 to help us get
people here earlier,” Vander-
mark said.
Mark Davis, 17, of Forty Fort,
was one of the many West Side
CTC students who volunteered
during the event. He is a lawen-
forcement student at the
school. The law enforcement
students were there to organize
parking and to ensure crowd
control.
“It’s a good school. I’ve
learned a lot,” he said of the
school.
Katherine Dyanick and Wil-
liam Cassels, both of Pringle,
were there early and had great
seats staked out at the top of the
hill in front of the school.
Dyanick is a graduate of the
school and reminisced about
playing softball at the field in
PRINGLE -- The third annual
Olde Tyme Family Lawn Party
at West Side Career and Tech-
nology Center provided a stun-
ning viewMonday of the Fourth
of July fireworks all over the
Wyoming Valley.
Lorri Vandermark, director of
admissions at the West Side Ca-
reer and Technical Center, said
the fair was conceived because
of the view.
“Fromhere, you can see every
fireworks show in the valley,”
she said. “When we formed the
PTSA (Parent-Teacher-Student
Association), we thought we
would plan a family event.”
She said that although fun-
draising was a goal, the lawn
party was also intended to re-
ach out to the community.
“Some people around here
have never been to the school. If
the people who come ask about
classes, that’s a bonus,” Vander-
mark said.
The fair featured food and
merchandise vendors, face
the front of the school. When
asked why they had come so
early, she said, “We’re here to
see the fireworks but also to en-
joy the weather.”
In addition to usual fair food
such as pizza and ice cream, at-
tendees could try the unique
newcreation of vendor Phil Del-
zeit. The “Panana” is a peanut
butter and banana sandwich
deep fried in funnel cake batter
and served with a chocolate
raspberry sauce.
The PTSA could not provide
figures on the amount raised at
last year’s lawn party but hoped
to earn even more this year. The
funds raised at this year’s event
will be used to fund PTSAactiv-
ities, including school dances
and scholarships.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
People gather on the lawn at the third annual Olde Tyme Family Lawn Party at West Side Career and Technology Center in Pringle to
watch the fireworks fromKirby Park.
Eyeing funds and sky
Lawn party a chance to aid
W.S. Tech, see fireworks
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Hailey Rutcavate, 5, plays with a blowup crayon at the Old Tyme
Family Lawn Party on Monday.
children of all ages including the
U.S. Army rock climbing wall and
Pony Party Paradise pony rides
andpetting zoo. Childrenalso en-
joyed the “Puppen Meister” pup-
pet show and games.
Children also were provided
free bike helmets at the Houri-
gan, Kluger, and Quinn tent.
Eddie Warren of Wilkes-Barre
brought his sixchildrentothefes-
tival. He was pushing his son on a
swing while his daughter was
sliding down the sliding board.
“The others are around some-
where,” Warrensaidwitha laugh.
“This is great fun for the kids. I
just hope theyget tiredout for the
fireworks and are ready for bed
when we get home. We come ev-
ery year because there’s so much
for the kids to do.”
Harry Creasing of Kingston
and his two children were next to
Warren. They were smiling ear to
ear as they went fromride toride.
“It’s great family fun,” Creasing
said.
Elena Amanzio was attending
the Kirby Park event for the first
time since moving to Wilkes-
Barre 3 1/2 years ago. She
brought her mother, Ilumanaba,
and he nephew, Xavier, to see the
fireworks.
“We live in the Heights and we
usually watch the fireworks from
our porch,” Amanzio said. “We
decide to come over to get a clos-
er look this year.”
Bob and Esther Green of King-
stonandPhyllis Hesterfer of New
Jersey come every year.
“We enjoy the fireworks, of
course, and the people,” Bob
Green said.
Esther Green said she had one
complaint: The midway was so
crowded, she said, that people
with disabilities were having
trouble getting around.
“I hope the police take care of
that,” she said.
TheWatkins familyof West Ha-
zleton and the Chippi family of
Hazleton said the festival provid-
ed fun for the entire family.
“I love the funnel cake,” Judy
Watkins said. “This is just a great
day out.”
A group of about 15 people
were gathered in a circle awaiting
the start of music and fireworks.
The Landis family of Drums, the
Mandel family of New York and
the Tuckey family of Drums said
they come out every year.
“We’ve been to the July 4th cel-
ebrations in Boston and New
York, and Wilkes-Barre’s is as
good as any of those,” said Mr.
Mandel. “I told all of my friends
on Facebook to come to Wilkes-
Barre,” Mrs. Mandel said.
At 7:45 p.m., the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Philharmonic con-
cert began conducted by Joan
Landry and featuring singer Ka-
tie Williams. The philharmonic
was presented by the Martz
Group.
The day’s celebration was
capped-off by another spectacu-
lar fireworks show presented by
Pizza Paul Pyrotechnics at dusk.
KIRBY
Continued fromPage 1A
PHILADELPHIA — A career
criminal suspected of shooting
five people, two of them fatally,
inside a suburban home over an
alleged insurance-fraud scheme
was killed by SWAT team mem-
bers after a six-hour standoff
Monday, authorities said.
Since leaving prison last year,
Mark Richard Geisenheyner, 51,
had been vowing revenge on
Paul Shay, one of the victims of a
weekend shooting in rural Mont-
gomery County, authorities said.
Geisenheyner broke into
Shay’s vacation home late Satur-
day and said, “Guess you never
thought you’d see me again,” be-
fore shooting Shay in the head,
Montgomery County District At-
torney Risa Ferman said Mon-
day, citing a survivor’s account.
He then shot four others, kill-
ing Shay’s nephewand a toddler,
authorities said. Shay, his wife
and the toddler’s mother re-
mained in critical condition
Monday.
Geisenheyner told friends he
had taken the rap and been cut
out of the profits for aninsurance
scam he and Shay had concoct-
ed, Ferman said.
Geisenheyner was arrested for
possessing artwork that had
been reported stolen fromShay’s
home in 2006, and was sent back
to prison on a parole violation,
she said. Shay was not apparent-
ly charged, and Ferman did not
know if there was any truth to
Geisenheyner’s account. Shay
filed an insurance claim on the
painting, which went missing
about a month after a fire at his
home.
The shootings Saturday in
Douglass Township, about 30
miles northwest of Philadelphia,
killed Shay’s 43-year-old nephew
Joseph Shay, of Yarmouth,
Mass., and NewYork City, and 2-
year-old Gregory Erdmann, of
Fall River, Mass.
On Sunday, hours after the
rampage, Geisenheyner went to
the home of a prison buddy and
talked for several hours about
the slayings, offering details not
known to the public, officials
said.
When he fell asleep, the friend
and a companion sneaked out,
calling police just before 5 a.m.
Monday. Police and SWAT
teams surrounded the home in
Trainer, about 15 miles south-
west of Philadelphia, and con-
tacted the armed suspect by cell-
phone.
At about 11:30 a.m., police en-
tered the home, found Geisen-
heyner in the basement and shot
him. He had a gun with him, but
it was not clear if it had been
fired, Delaware County District
Attorney G. Michael Green said.
“He was determined not to
surrender, not to end up in a pris-
on again,” Green told The Asso-
ciated Press. “He obviously indi-
cated that he intended to seek re-
venge against the one victim.
There’s no explanation that I’m
aware of as to why he would have
shot at and killed multiple vic-
tims, including a 2-year-old
child.”
Cops kill
Philly
shooting
suspect
Career criminal was killed by
SWAT team members after
six-hour standoff.
By MARYCLAIRE DALE
Associated Press
CHICAGO—Most of the risk
of autism has been blamed by
experts oninheritedgenes. Now
one of the largest studies of
twins andautismshifts the focus
to the womb, suggesting that
the mother’s age and health may
play a larger role than thought.
The new research doesn’t
solve the mystery of what causes
autism. Most scientists think
faulty genes and outside factors
are both at work. And since au-
tismspectrumdisorders include
a wide range of conditions, from
mild to severe, it’s unlikely
there’s a single cause for all of
them.
Conditions during pregnancy
may trigger autism where
there’s a genetic vulnerability,
said Dr. Gary Goldstein of the
Kennedy Krieger Institute in
Baltimore, who was not in-
volved in the new research.
“We’ve identified lots of vul-
nerability genes, but not every-
body who has them gets au-
tism,” Goldstein said.
The newtwins study, publish-
ed Monday by Archives of Gen-
eral Psychiatry, used rigorous
methods to diagnose autism
spectrum disorders, including
direct observation of the chil-
dren.
Using California health re-
cords, it’s the largest study to do
that and the first to consider a
large sample of twins drawn
from a general population, said
lead author Dr. Joachim Hall-
mayer of Stanford University in
Palo Alto, Calif.
Children with autism can
have trouble communicating
and interacting socially. They
may have poor eye contact and
engage in repetitive behavior
such as rocking or hand-flap-
ping. One in 100 children have
autism disorders, according to
U.S. government estimates.
The new study included 192
sets of twins where at least one
of the twins was affected with
autism.
Some of the twins were identi-
cal and some were non-identi-
cal, or fraternal, twins.
The researchers used DNA
testing to determine which
twins were identical and which
were fraternal. That was impor-
tant because identical twins
come from one fertilized egg
andhave identical genetic make-
ups. Fraternal twins, from two
fertilized eggs, share no more
genetic material than any other
siblings.
The new study found, as ex-
pected, high rates of shared au-
tism disorders for identical
twins: 77 percent of male twin
pairs and 50 percent for female
pairs had autism in both twins.
Surprisingly, it also found fair-
ly high rates of fraternal twins
both having autism spectrum
disorders: 31 percent rate for
male fraternal twins and 36 per-
cent for female fraternal twins.
Other studies have found10to
20 percent of younger siblings of
children with autism are likely
to be diagnosed themselves
with the disorder.
Fraternal twins share the
same womb, even though they
don’t share identical genes. That
could be important, said Dr.
John Constantino of Washing-
ton University School of Medi-
cine in St. Louis, who wasn’t in-
volved in the new research.
“Finding so many fraternal
twin pairs in whom both twins
have autism spectrum disorders
is a key finding that puts a spot-
light on pregnancy as a time
when environmental factors
might exert their effects,” Con-
stantino said.
Those factors could include
stress, diet, infections, a moth-
er’s age and medications, ex-
perts said.
Study on autism shifts focus to the womb
The new twins report used
rigorous methods to diagnose
autism spectrum disorders.
By CARLA K. JOHNSON
AP Medical Writer
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
KINGSTON TWP.
Drowning victim identified
L
uzerne County Coroner John
Corcoran has identified the 54-
year-old man found Sunday in shal-
low water near the boat launch off
Carverton Road as Charles Hunter of
Shavertown.
Hunter was pronounced dead at
1:45 p.m., and his death does not
appear to be suspicious, Corcoran
said Monday. An autopsy is sched-
uled for this morning at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
“As far as we can see, it’s a drown-
ing,” Corcoran said. He said the
man’s name was not released Sunday
so family members could be notified.
HAZLE TWP.
Teen killed in crash
An 18-year-old woman from McA-
doo died Sunday night after she was
struck by a vehicle on I-81 south-
bound near exit 141.
State police at Hazleton said the
crash occurred at 11:30 and involved
a moving vehicle
driven by Onix
Gorbea-Lespier, 49,
of Mechanicsburg,
and a disabled
Dodge that had
pulled over on the
interstate’s shoul-
der.
The stopped
vehicle’s driver was Tyler Paisley, 18,
of Mountain Top, who suffered sig-
nificant injuries, and his passenger
was Kayla Bahrey, who was standing
outside of the vehicle when the acci-
dent occurred.
She was thrown 15 feet from the
initial point of impact, according to
state police, and was pronounced
dead at the scene by Luzerne County
Deputy Coroner Jeff Stock.
An autopsy is scheduled for this
morning at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital, according to Coroner John
Corcoran.
State police at Hazleton are contin-
uing to investigate the incident and
no charges have been filed. It was
unclear why Gorbea-Lespier’s Pon-
tiac left the roadway.
Bahrey graduated on June 7 from
Hazleton Area High School.
Hazleton Area High School Princi-
pal Rocco Petrone was saddened
when told of the news.
“It’s very difficult to lose any
young person,” Petrone said.
“My heart goes out to her family.”
He said no grief counselors were
planned to be at the school today but
that could change depending on the
calls the district may receive as word
spreads of her death.
-- Andrew M. Seder
SCRANTON
Hindu center planned
The Vallabh Youth Organization is
planning to build a Krishna Bhakti
Dham in Scranton.
Funds are being raised for the
proposed spiritual and cultural cen-
ter; which will focus on spiritual,
cultural and linguistic needs of the
community, according to a release
issued by the Universal Society of
Hinduism. Rangesh Shah is presi-
dent of Vallabh Youth Organization’s
Scranton chapter.
The youth centers are aimed at
passing on Hindu spirituality, con-
cepts and traditions to future gener-
ations, according to Rajan Zed, presi-
dent of the Universal Society of Hin-
duism.
Hinduism is the third-largest reli-
gion in the world, with about 1 bil-
lion adherents.
HUGHESTOWN
Clean-Up in the Park set
Hughestown residents will have
Clean-Up in the Park starting at 9
a.m. Saturday at the Robert Yaple
Memorial Park.
This is in effort to get ready for
Picnic in the Park, scheduled for
noon to 5 p.m. on July 16, according
to a release.
There will be some painting, and
maintenance in the area of the Rob-
ert Yaple Memorial Park.
Picnic in the Park will feature
entertainment, face painting, Moon
Walk, dunk tank, pony rides, lots of
games for the young and old.
Food and refreshments will be
available, free of charge. Anyone
wishing to donate baked goods or
salads may do so.
N E W S I N B R I E F
Bahrey
WASHINGTON– When Bob Casey of
Scranton crushed incumbent GOP Sen.
Rick Santorum in 2006 with 59 percent
of the vote, it was the first time in more
than four decades that a Keystone State
Democrat won a full term in the U.S.
Senate.
Now, as Caseybegins togear upfor his
re-electionbid, someindependent analy-
sts are wondering if 2012 will represent
another easy campaign for the freshman
senator with the famous Pennsylvania
political name.
Casey, the son of the former two-term
governor, starts off the campaign season
in better shape politi-
cally than several oth-
er Democrats also
elected in 2006 who
are now facing tough
re-election fights, such
as Sens. Jon Tester of
Montana and Claire
McCaskill of Missouri,
said Jennifer Duffy, the Senate analyst
for the nonpartisan Cook Political Re-
port.
Casey doesn’t have overwhelmingly
positive poll numbers, Duffy notes.
But he alsolacks a credible GOPoppo-
nent, and he already has raised a pile of
campaign cash – he raised $1.1 million
during the first quarter and had $2.1mil-
liononhandas of March30–withanoth-
er fundraising report due out by July 15
following the June 30 end of the second
quarter
“Casey’s numbers are good, but they
are not stellar,” Duffy said, cautioning
that it is too early to rule out a possible
stiff GOPchallenge toCasey. But Repub-
licans “certainly have struggled with
finding a candidate.”
A Quinnipiac University poll released
last month found that by a 47-26 percent
margin Pennsylvania voters approve of
the job Casey is doing, with 27 percent
undecided. They said by a similar mar-
gin, 47-31, that Casey deserves to be re-
elected.
Running against an unnamed GOP
challenger, Casey was ahead 47-32 per-
cent, including 44-26 percent among in-
dependent voters, Quinnipiac found.
Several big-name GOP candidates
have so far declined to get into the race,
including state Sen. Jake Corman, R-
Centre, the political web site Politics PA
has reported. Lesser-known candidates
whohavesaidtheyintendtorun, suchas
Tea Party leader Laureen Cummings
and attorney Marc Scaringi, didn’t even
rate being matched up against Casey in
the Quinnipiac poll, Politics PA noted.
2 01 2 S E N AT E R A C E Being son of a popular gov., lack of formidable GOP opponent boost re-election prospects, say analysts
Many factors could impact Casey’s chances
By JONATHAN RISKIND
Times Leader Washington Bureau
Casey
See CASEY , Page 7A
WILKES-BARRE – Wyoming
Valley Habitat for Humanity wants
to make it easier for prospective cli-
ents to be successful in the applica-
tion process.
KarenEvans Kaufer, executivedi-
rector, said the organization will
host an informational session 10:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. July 23, at Bos-
cov’s in Wilkes-Barre.
Kaufer said many families call
Habitat to re-
ceive an applica-
tion for a house
and 36 applica-
tions have been
sent in recent
months.
“We are find-
ingthat the proc-
essmaybealittle
daunting for the
applicants and
we want toreach
out to help with an informational
session,” Kaufer said. “We want to
make the process less difficult.”
She said the process requires ap-
plicants to provide copies of utility
bills, taxforms, income information
and a listing of expenses.
“Sometimes when you sit down
to do that it can be a little over-
whelming,” Kaufer said.
Applicants must demonstrate
needtobeeligible, shesaid, andsuc-
cessful applicants have to meet sev-
eral criteria. They are:
•ResideinLuzerneCountyforat
least a year.
•Demonstratetheabilitytopaya
monthlymortgage-- 20yearsat zero
interest. Kaufer said Habitat holds
the mortgages and clients must pay
on time every month.
• Meet the income guidelines.
Clients must fall within 30 percent
and 60 percent of the median in-
comeof LuzerneCounty. (Example:
A family of four must earn at least
$16,950 and not more than
$33,900.)
• A willingness to partner with
Habitat. Clients must commit to at
least 300 hours of volunteer effort –
Kaufer calls it “sweat equity” – to
help build their home.
“The sweat equity component is
like a down payment,” she said.
Kaufer said that through the
years, the local Habitat has built
about one home per year – until
2011.
“Thisyear, weareworkingonour
third home,” Kaufer said. “We have
built one in West Wyoming, Ed-
wardsville and nowWilkes-Barre.”
Habitat requires all partner fam-
ilies to be first-time home owners
andcomefromlivingsituationsthat
are substandard, meaning condi-
tions that are unsafe, unsanitary or
overcrowded.
Habitat
outreach
set for
applicants
Home-building program for
needy schedules informational
session for potential clients.
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
When: Sat-
urday, July 23
Where: Bos-
cov’s, Wilkes-
Barre
Time: 10:30
a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
I N F O
M E E T I N G
DALLAS – What do potato
pancakes, an outdoor flea mar-
ket and monkeys have in com-
mon?
More than you think.
They will all be part of the
65th annual Back Mountain
Memorial Library Auction, set
to begin Thursday at 4 p.m. at
the library grounds on Hunts-
ville Road, Dallas.
Thelibraryauctionis thebig-
gest fundraiser for the Back
Mountain Memorial Library
and nets a large percentage of
the library’s annual operating
budget.
This year the four-day event
will feature a host of familiar
and newvendors, merchandise
and activities that include, yes,
monkeys.
The tree-dwelling creatures
will be part of a series of Bid
Time Events, which are pro-
grams for children sponsored
by Misericordia University.
OnFriday night, kids will get
a chance to see exotic animals
such as monkeys, lemurs and
wallabies hostedbytheAppala-
chian Pet Farm of Bucks Coun-
Monkey business and more at library auction
Back Mountain fundraiser
will feature merchandise
and children’s activities.
By SARAH HITE
shite@timesleader.com
See AUCTION, Page 7A
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Carol Sweeney paints a 65 on the Library Auction yoke to
mark the latest edition of the event in Dallas.
65th Annual Back Mountain
Memorial Library Auction
Where: 96 Huntsville Road,
Dallas
When: 4 to 11 p.m. Thursday,
July 7, through Sunday, July 10
What: A four-day auction and
outdoor flea market featuring
food vendors, raffle chances,
children’s events and more to
benefit the library.
Contact: The Back Mountain
Memorial Library at 675-1182 or
visit www.backmountainlibra-
ry.org.
I F YO U G O
WRIGHT TWP. -- Wearing padded
headphones, 4-year-old Ryan Cimakossky
of Mountain Top jumped and twirled
excitedly as the fire trucks and ambulanc-
es in the parade screamed past him Mon-
day.
It was Ryan’s first time at the annual
Independence Day Parade, which marked
its 25th year, said his dad, Scott, 34.
“He threw candy at me,” Ryan said of
the waving “Smoky the Bear” who was
perched atop a Wright Township fire
truck.
A long line of fire trucks and ambulanc-
es from Wright Township and neigh-
boring municipalities roared past hun-
dreds of onlookers waving American
flags.
Cousins Olivia Aigeldinger, 6, Grace
Osiecki, 5, and Brady Womer, 6, all from
Mountain Top, guarded their plastic bags
that bulged with candy and toys as they
sat on the curb watching.
“We’ve taken themhere every year
since they were born,” said Brady’s mom,
Liz Womer, 38.
In addition to the many trucks and
vehicles representing Mountain Top
businesses, dozens of people rode on
decorated scooters and bikes. Doing his
best to balance atop a unicycle, Seth
Mullen, 27, a Mountain Top chiropractor,
pedaled through the route as he rushed
to join his about six other family mem-
bers, including his wife, Angela, 28, who
were also riding unicycles in the parade.
“I started riding a month ago,” said
Seth. “I’m fairly athletic, but this is one of
the hardest things I’ve ever done.”
The parade, which began at the Chalet
Restaurant and ran down state Route
309, ended with a flag-raising and
wreath-laying ceremony at the Wright
Township Municipal Building on South
Main Road.
Fire trucks, bikes and candy highlight 4th parade in Mountain Top
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Jayda waves her American Flag while watching the Wright Township Fourth of July Parade on Route 309 on Monday morn-
ing.
Sweet sights, sounds
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Times Leader Correspondent
INSIDE: To see more photos from this parade
and others in our area, turn to Page 4A.
C M Y K
PAGE 4A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
Fun, flags fill holiday
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Maxfield LaValle, 7, of Brooklyn, N.Y., rubs noses with an An-
gora llama while at Kirby Park visiting friends for the holiday.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
American Legion Post 781 members ride in the Wright Town-
ship Fourth of July Parade on Route 309 on Monday morning.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
The Crestwood marching band makes its way down the parade
route in Wright Township on Monday morning.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Mia, left, and Loralei Kratz enjoy themselves on the swing as part of the Fourth of July festivities in Kirby Park on Monday. Food, fun and
games during the day were followed by fireworks after dark.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Roland Smith of Wilkes-Barre works on his
twist cone with sprinkles at Kirby Park.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Cayden Caruthers, 1, of Kingston, goes fishing
with his aunt, Julie Caruthers, of Carbondale.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
The Clifford family, Alice, left, Scott, Leah, Jessica and dog Trudy take in
the Wright Township Fourth of July Parade.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Unicycle riders make their way down
the parade route in Wright Township.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Back Mountain Girl Scouts wave and throw candy out during the Wright
Township parade on the Fourth of July.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Victoria DeLucia of Long Island, N.Y., fires her bubble gun at
Kirby Park on Monday afternoon.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Mountain Post baseball players take in the crowd from the back of a truck during an
Independence Day parade.
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
Richard Kane hams it up for the cam-
era while riding a pony at Kirby Park.
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 5A
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
ORLANDO, FLA.
Anthony jury deliberating
J
urors in the Casey Anthony murder
trial have ended their first day of
deliberations without reaching a ver-
dict.
Judge Belvin Perry called the jurors
into the courtroom at 6 p.m. Monday
and dismissed them for the night. The
sequestered jury of seven women and
five men will head back to their hotel
and resume deliberating today at 8:30
a.m.
The 25-year-old mother is facing
first-degree murder and other charges
in the 2008 death of her 2-year-old
daughter Caylee.
Prosecutors in their rebuttal closing
argument earlier Monday said the
defense’s assertion that Caylee’s death
was an accident made no sense.
Anthony’s attorneys say the girl
drowned in the family’s pool.
CARACAS, VENEZUELA
Chavez returns home
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez
made a surprise return from Cuba early
Monday, stepping off a plane before
dawn amid rampant speculation about
his fitness to continue in office after
the removal of a cancerous tumor from
his pelvic region.
Looking thinner but standing
straight and appearing energetic, Cha-
vez strode across the tarmac of the
Havana airport before boarding a plane.
The president’s illness and three-
week stay in Cuba had political observ-
ers speculating that he could be gone
for months, and some questioned
whether he could realistically ever
return to office.
Chavez’s sudden unexpected arrival
Monday appeared to be his attempt to
put that speculation to rest.
WASHINGTON
Malia Obama becomes teen
A teenager now lives at the White
House.
Malia Obama, the eldest of President
Barack Obama’s two daughters, turned
13 on the Fourth of July.
As usual, she was sharing her par-
ents with hundreds of others on her
special day.
Obama and first lady Michelle Oba-
ma invited hundreds of troops and
their families from across the country
to attend a special barbecue and USO
concert on the South Lawn. There they
will have one of the best views of the
annual fireworks show on the National
Mall.
Malia’s birthday has been a source of
angst for the president, whose recent
public comments on that milestone
have ranged from fear of what lies
ahead to acceptance that daddy’s little
girl is, well, growing up.
BEIRUT
Syrian troops raid homes
Syrian troops raided homes and
made sweeping arrests in Hama on
Monday, wounding at least 20 people
before sealing off the city just days
after about 300,000 protesters there
held the largest demonstration since
the uprising against President Bashar
Assad erupted in mid-March, activists
said.
Rami Abdul-Rahman, the London-
based director of the Syrian Observ-
atory for Human Rights, said he was
told by Hama hospital officials that
most of the wounded suffered shots
from pump action rifles used by securi-
ty forces.
A major operation in Hama, a city
with a history of militancy against the
Assad regime, could lead to an outcry.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Looking to hitch a ride?
A seagull rests by a flock of swan
pedal boats Monday at the Shinobazu
Pond in Tokyo’s Ueno Park.
KABUL, Afghanistan—Theoutgoing
commander of U.S. and NATO forces in
Afghanistansaidthefocus of thewar will
shift in upcoming months from Taliban
strongholds in the south to the porous
eastern border with Pakistan, where al-
Qaida factions and others hold sway.
On his last Fourth of July in uniform
before becoming the new CIA director,
Gen. David Petraeus said more special
forces, intelligence, air power and possi-
blysomegroundtroopswill bemoved—
probably by fall — to battle insurgents
along the mostly rugged mountainous
border with Pakistan.
The U.S.-led coalition has focused
muchof its troopstrength, resources and
attention on Taliban strongholds in
southern Afghanistan, but the main ef-
fort of the war soon will turn eastward,
he said. The east is home to the Afghan
Taliban hotbeds and other groups such
as al-Qaida and Lashkar-e-Taiba.
“It’s a shift of intelligence assets. It’s a
shift of armed and lift helicopters and
perhaps theshift of somerelativelysmall
coalition forces on the ground and sub-
stantial Afghanforces ontheground,” he
said in interviews with The Associated
Press and three other news outlets after
attending two re-enlistment ceremo-
nies.
“The intent has always been that as
the southwest and south are solidified,
that theseassets wouldfocus ontheeast.
It’s not to say that we’re not doing it
now.”
Petraeus’ visit to Kandahar in south-
ern Afghanistan and Bagram Air Field,
north of Kabul, was one of the last of his
commandinAfghanistan. Petraeus, who
recently was confirmed as the next CIA
director, will be replaced by U.S. Marine
Lt. Gen. JohnAllenat a ceremonysched-
uled for July 18.
Petraeus leaves just as the United
States begins a 15-month drawdown of
about 33,000 troops by September 2012.
He and other military officials had rec-
ommended that President Barack Oba-
ma adopt a longer timeline — one that
would extend through next year’s fight-
ing season.
“I think it’s probably time to stop sec-
ond-guessing the decision that only the
president can make. Only he has the full
range of issues, considerations that he
has to deal with,” Petraeus said.
Afghan fight shifting to east
Petraeus: Focus moves from Taliban strongholds
By DEB RIECHMANN
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Gen. David H. Petraeus salutes before
re-enlistment ceremonies for 235
U.S. troops Monday in Afghanistan.
LINCOLN, Neb. —In a season of flooding by some
of the nation’s biggest rivers, it’s streams most Amer-
icans have never heard of that could cause some of
the worst problems in the Midwest.
Hundreds of tributaries that feed the congested
Missouri River face a greater-than-normal flood risk
this summer because of water levels that have kept
them from draining. The Missouri is expected to re-
main near historic highs for months, which means
the threat will remain through summer— a season
when the Midwest often is beset with thunderstorms
that can quickly dump heavy rain.
University of Iowa engineering professor Witold
Krajewski, director of the Iowa Flood Center, com-
pared the situation to a “traffic jam” of water. It start-
ed with the sustained release of massive amounts of
water from dams on the upper Missouri, caused by
spring rain and a heavy Rocky Mountain snowpack
that filled reservoirs.
“It’s like a football game and baseball game getting
out at the same time,” Krajewski said. “There are all
these cars trying to move. It doesn’t take long before
drivers can’t get out of the side streets.”
Backed-up tributaries in South Dakota and Mis-
souri have already submergedstreets andthreatened
homes near the point where they reach the surging
river. In Hamburg, Iowa, work crews are keeping
close watch on changing levels of the Nishnabotna
River to their east, as they try to hold off the Mis-
souri River from the west.
Some tributaries, such as the Nodaway and Big
Sioux, are so backed up with high water in the larger
river that local officials worry that a well-placed
downpour could suddenly pose a new flooding
threat.
Nebraska State Climatologist Al Dutcher said the
problem won’t end soon.
“We’re probably going to see the tributaries be
problematic all year,” Dutcher said. “If we get a mon-
ster stormthat drops 3 to4 inches of rainintoa basin,
all that water has to be evacuated. As it goes out to-
ward the Missouri River, it’s going to back up.”
Bob Anderson, a spokesman for the Army Corps of
Engineer in Vicksburg, Miss., said similar problems
could have happened during spring flooding along
the Mississippi River, but heavy rainstorms didn’t oc-
cur at key times and tributaries didn’t swell beyond
their normal size.
AP FILE PHOTO
Floodwaters from the nearby Missouri River cover a county highway in Hamburg, Iowa. Hundreds of tributaries that feed the congested Missouri River face a
greater-than-normal flood risk this summer because of water levels that have kept them from draining.
Smaller Midwest rivers a threat
Streams that feed into the Missouri are causing
some of the worst problems this summer.
By GRANT SCHULTE
Associated Press
PARIS — Dominique
Strauss-Kahn faced a poten-
tial newsexual assault investi-
gation Monday after a young
French writer said she would
formally accuse him of trying
torape her duringa 2002book
interview—a dizzyingturnof
events just as the former IMF
chief’s fortunes seemed to be
growing brighter.
With France debating his
possible return to presidential
politics, Strauss-Kahn swiftly
hit back at author Tristane Ba-
non’s plans to take him to
court over
the attempt-
ed rape ac-
cusations,
labeling her
account
“imaginary”
and counter-
ing with his
own plans to file a criminal
complaint of slander.
The sordid exchange may
have deep ramifications for
the 2012 presidential race in
France, where the surprise
weakening of the sexual as-
sault case against Strauss-
Kahn in New York last week
sparked a fierce debate about
whether he should return to
politics if the American case
against him collapses com-
pletely.
Before Banon’s announce-
ment, polls showed voters
were evenly split about
whether Strauss-Kahn, 62,
should try to revive a career
that until recently had himon
track to take on conservative
President Nicolas Sarkozy in
the race to be France’s next
leader.
“DSK Back?” the left-lean-
ing daily Liberation asked on
its front page Monday.
IMF chief faces new
sex assault charge
Strauss-Kahn hit back at
author Tristane Banon’s
plans to take him to court.
By MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN
and ANGELA CHARLTON
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Ex-IMF leader Dominique
Strauss- Kahn leaves New
York State Supreme court
with his wife Anne Sinclair.
Banon
WASHINGTON—The Secret
Service saidMonday it will inves-
tigate the hacking of Fox’s politi-
cal Twitter account over updates
claiming that President Barack
Obama hadbeenassassinated.
Secret Service spokesman Ge-
orge Ogilvie says the lawenforce-
mentagencywhosejobitistopro-
tect the president will conduct a
probe of the false postings and
that “we will conduct the appro-
priatefollow-up.”
Hackers broke into the Fox-
NewsPolitics account early Mon-
day, leaving a series of six tweets
reporting that Obama had been
shottodeathinIowaandtheshoo-
ter was unknown.
In a state-
mentpostedon
itswebsite, Fox
News called
thetweets“ma-
licious” and
“false.”
“We will be
requesting a
detailed inves-
tigation from
Twitter about
how this oc-
curred, and
measures to
prevent future
unauthorized
access into
FoxNews.comaccounts,”saidJeff
Misenti, vicepresident andgener-
al manager of FoxNews Digital.
Obama is spending the Inde-
pendence Day holiday at a barbe-
cue at the White House with mil-
itary families and administration
staffers.
Hackers post bogus news
on Fox’s Twitter account
Secret Service investigating
series of false tweets on
Obama’s assassination.
The Associated Press
“We will be
requesting
a detailed
investiga-
tion from
Twitter
about how
this oc-
curred.”
Jeff Misenti
Fox News Digital
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
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confirm. Obituaries must be
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through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
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address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
K
PAGE 6A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
In Memory of
Rosemarie K. Gillis
3-22-34 ~ 7-05-07
Missed by Husband,
Children, Grandchildren,
Family and Friends
In Loving Memory Of n Loving Memory O
Timothy Thomas
May 8, 1972 - July 5, 2003
Today And Everyday Your Memory Lives
On In Our Hearts.
Family & Friends
M
onsignor William L. Donovan,
95, Pastor Emeritus of Saint
Lawrence Church, Old Forge, and
former superintendent of the Scran-
ton Diocesan Schools, passed away
on Saturday, July 2, 2011, at Saint
Therese Residence, Wilkes-Barre.
Monsignor Donovan, son of the
late William Joseph and Honora
McCormick Donovan, was born in
Ashley and was a graduate of St.
Leo’s High School, Ashley.
He attended St. Charles College,
Catonsville, Md., andcompletedhis
studies for the priesthood at St. Ma-
ry’s Seminary, Baltimore, Md.
Monsignor Donovan was or-
dained to the priesthood on June 5,
1943, inSt. Peter’s Cathedral, Scran-
ton, by the Rev. William J. Hafey,
D.D., late Bishop of Scranton.
He served as an assistant pastor
at St. Catherine of Siena, Moscow,
and St. Mary’s, Avoca. Monsignor
Donovan became assistant superin-
tendent of Diocesan Schools in Sep-
tember 1951and resided at Holy Sa-
viour Rectory in Wilkes-Barre.
Monsignor Donovan was ap-
pointedsuperintendent of Diocesan
Schools on July 1, 1963.
In March of 1962, he became Vic-
ar Econome of the newly formed St.
Christopher’s Parish in Bear Creek
Township, a post he held until be-
coming pastor of St. Lawrence
Church, Old Forge, on April 3, 1963.
Monsignor Donovan was named
a Chaplain to His Holiness in June
1965.
On April 23, 1972, he was named
a Prelate of Honor of His Holiness.
Monsignor Donovan was appointed
to the Priests’ Education Commit-
tee onMarch28, 1972. AnHonorary
Doctorate Degree was presented to
Monsignor Donovan on May 29,
1977 during the University of Scran-
ton commencement exercises. He
was the first Diocesanpriest tobe so
honored.
Monsignor Donovan helped to
establish 11 new central Catholic
HighSchools inresponse toshifts in
population and organized a Depart-
ment for Religious Education in the
Diocese during his tenure.
He supervised 122 schools with
an enrollment of 35,642 students,
including 26 high schools and 96
elementary schools.
Monsignor Donovan was also a
member of the Priests’ Retirement
Board, the Diocesan Committee for
the Bicentennial Observance, the
Pennsylvania Catholic Conference
Education Department, and he
served as Dean of the Old Forge
Deanery.
In addition to his parents, Mon-
signor Donovan was preceded in
death by four sisters, Anne Claire,
Grace and Virginia Donovan, and
MaryDonovanPowers, andbrother,
John J. Donovan.
He is survived by a nephew, John
A. Powers.
AVigil Masswill becelebratedat
7 p.m. in St. Peter’s Cathedral. A
Pontifical Mass of Christian Burial
will be celebrated at 10 a.m. on
Wednesday in St. Peter’s Cathedral,
Scranton, with the Rev. Joseph C.
Bambera, D.D., J.C.L., Bishop of
Scranton, officiating. Viewing will
takeplacefrom4to6p.m. todayand
9 to10 a.m. on Wednesday at St. Pe-
ter’s Cathedral, 315 Wyoming Ave.,
Scranton. Interment will be in Saint
Mary’s Cemetery, Wilkes-Barre. Ar-
rangements are by the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 451 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
Monsignor William L. Donovan
July 2, 2011
R
eno A. DiGiacomo, 15, of Hun-
lock Creek, passed away Satur-
day July 2, 2011.
Born in Kingston, he was a son of
Richard and Andrea Chackan Di-
Giacomo, Hunlock Creek.
Reno attended Gate of Heaven
school and was currently a student
at Scranton Preparatory School, en-
tering his junior year.
From when Reno was a baby, he
was loved and the center of our
world. We agonized over the best
kindergarten, the best grade school,
the best high school, and we were
beginning our talks over the best
college.
He was excited about getting his
learner’s permit and would be driv-
ing for the first time this July. Dr.
Imbrogno even got him in early for
his physical so he could go for his
permit on his birthday, July 5th.
Everyone who knew Reno would
tell you how kind-hearted he was.
He was polite and always went out
of his way to help his friends and
family. There was never a bad day
knowing him.
Whether it was football with his
buds or skiing with the gang, Reno
was always the center of the fun.
Everyone that knew Reno, loved
Reno. Everyone will miss him.
He was preceded in death by his
paternal grandparents, Alfred and
Beatrice DiGiacomo; and maternal
great-grandmother, Mima Lewis.
Inadditionto his parents, Reno is
survived by maternal grandparents,
Joanne Gavlick, Rock Hill, S.C., and
Richard Gavlick, Wyoming.; aunts
and uncles, William and Maria Ri-
char, Rock Hill, S.C.; Stephen and
Georgene Carullo, Baltimore, Md.,
Andrew Chackan, Exeter; Mark
Chackan, Wilkes-Barre; Arnold (
Jocko) and Cheryl DiGiacomo,
Kingston; and Stephen and Carol
DiGiacomo, Colorado Springs, Co-
lo.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. Thursday at the
Gate of Heaven Church, 40 Machell
Ave., Dallas. Relatives and friends
maycall from4to7p.m. Wednesday
at the Gubbiotti Funeral Home,
1030 Wyoming Ave., Exeter.
Donations maybemadeinReno’s
memory to Scranton Preparatory
School or the donation of your
choice.
Reno A. DiGiacomo
July 2, 2011
J
ohn A. Sellani, of West Pittston,
belovedhusband, father, brother,
uncle, cousinanddevotedChristian
went home to be with his Lord and
Savior on Saturday, July 2, 2011, fol-
lowing a brief illness.
Born, September 1, 1927, in
Scranton, John was a son of the late
Pietro and Elivra Faraoni Sellani.
He graduated from Pittston High
School in 1945.
John married the love of his life,
Angeline Maira, in 1952. They cele-
brated55years of marriagetogether
prior to her passing in 2007.
He attended numerous automo-
tive schools across the nation. John
was a service manager for the Pitt-
ston Spring Service and AAA Weld-
ing.
John began his insurance and fi-
nancial servicecareer in1967at Pru-
dential Insurance. While there, he
was a member of the Million Dollar
Round Table for sales achievement
every year during his employment.
He held a LUTCF designation
and also studied insurance and fi-
nancial related course work. He re-
tired from Prudential in 1991.
In addition, John owned and op-
erated the Sellani Apartments in
West Pittston for more than 32
years.
He possessed a life-long dedica-
tion to his faith and church. He
served on the board of directors and
as treasurer for the Italian Christian
Pentecostal Church for 40 years.
He was also and Elder of the
church for 60 years.
John was a member of the Irem
Temple Shrine, a mason, and past
master of the Masonic Lodge 499 F
& A.M.
In addition to his parents and
wife, John was preceded in death by
brothers, Peter Sellani, in1940, and
Mario A. Sellani in 2010.
John and Angeline were blessed
withfour children, sons, Peter, West
Pittston; John and his wife, Cyndi,
Yardley; twindaughters, SusanHos-
ageandher husband, Stephen, Fran-
klin Township; Sandra, Newport
Beach, Calf.; three grandchildren,
John P. Sellani Jr., Philadelphia;
Courtney and Nadine Sellani, Yar-
dley; sister, Lena Sellani, West Pitt-
ston; and several nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral services will be held at
9:30 a.m. Thursday in the Italian
Christian Pentecostal Church, Oak
St., Pittston. The Rev. Charles Scri-
male and Assistant Pastor Peter
Sellani will officiate. Those attend-
ing the service are asked to go di-
rectly to the church. Friends may
call from 5 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday
at the Howell-Lussi Funeral Home
509 Wyoming Ave, West Pittston.
The family would like to extend
their most sincere appreciation for
the compassionate care that was
provided by the visiting nurses and
therapists of Complete Home Care
in Kingston and Wilkes-Barre Gen-
eral Hospital’s physicians, nurses
and staff.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
maybemadetotheItalianChristian
Church, 40 East Oak Street, Pitt-
ston, PA18640
John A. Sellani
July 2, 2011
H
elen Venetz, of Exeter, passed
away, Sunday, July 3, 2011, in
the Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Coxton, Helen was a
daughter of the late Michael and
Sophie Cherberkva Phillips.
She was a member of Corpus
Christi Parish/Immaculate Con-
ception Church, West Pittston.
Helen was formerly employed in
the garment industry.
In addition to her parents, she is
preceded in death by son John Li-
put; daughter, Nancy Liput; broth-
ers, Michael, George and Joseph,
sisters, Mary Binek and Ann Twar-
dowski.
Surviving is her husband of 40
years, Joseph; son Ronald Liput,
Duryea; step sons, JosephVenetz Jr.
andhis wife, Karen, Exeter; Michael
Venetz, Swoyersville; Richard Ve-
netz and his wife, Renee, South Car-
olina; step daughters, Betty Ann
Didgeon, Exeter, and Patricia Parry,
West Wyoming; 20 grandchildren;
18 great-grandchildren; four great-
great-grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
9 a.m. on Thursday at the Anthony
Recupero Funeral Home, 406 Sus-
quehanna Ave., West Pittston, with
a Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. in the Immaculate Conception
Church with Monsignor John Sem-
paas Celebrant. Interment will bein
Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carverton.
Friends may call from5 to 8 p.m. on
Wednesday at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests memorial contributions be
made to Corpus Christi Parish/Im-
maculate Conception Church, Lu-
zerne Ave., West Pittston, PA18643.
Helen Venetz
July 3, 2011
HARVEY G. TRACHTEN-
BERG, 84, Kingston, diedMonday,
July 4, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital. In addition to
his parents, Benjamin and Jennie
Smith Trachtenberg, he was pre-
cededindeathbywife, Marion; sis-
ters, Julia Kaul and Thelma Cha-
kofsky. He is survived by daugh-
ters, Lee Trachtneberg Walker,
Cortlandt Manor, N.Y.; Annie
Walker (David), Chester, N.Y.; son,
Jed Trachtenberg, Kingston; two
grandchildren, several nieces and
nephews.
Funeral service will be at 11
a.m. on Wednesday at the Rosen-
berg Funeral Chapel, 348 S. River
St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment will
be at Temple Israel Cemetery,
Swoyersville, withRabbi Larry Ka-
plan officiating. Shiva will be ob-
served from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednes-
day, 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.
Thursday, and 2 to 4 p.m. Friday at
29 Second Ave., Kingston. Condo-
lences can be sent by visiting
www.rosenbergfuneralchapel-
.com.
BACKO – John, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday at the Lehman-Grego-
ry Funeral Home Inc., 281 Chapel
St., Swoyersville. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in Holy Trinity
Church, Swoyersville. Friends may
call 6 to 9 p.m. today at the funer-
al home.
CUMBO – Leonard, funeral 9 a.m.
Wednesday at the Peter J. Adoni-
zio Funeral Home, 802 Susquehan-
na Ave., West Pittston. Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 am in
Corpus Christi Parish, Immaculate
Conception Church, West Pittston.
Friends may call 4 to 8 p.m. today
at the funeral home.
DEIBERT – Walter Jr., funeral 9 a.m.
today at the Nat & Gawlas Funeral
Home, 89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Mass of Christian Burial at 9:30
a.m. in St. Nicholas Church, Wilkes-
Barre.
DONOVAN – Monsignor William, Vigil
Mass 7 p.m. today in St. Peter’s
Cathedral, 315 Wyoming Ave.,
Scranton. A Pontifical Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 a.m. Wednes-
day in St. Peter’s Cathedral. View-
ing 4 to 6 p.m. today and 9 to 10
a.m. Wednesday at St. Peter’s
Cathedral.
GARINGER – Dorothy, funeral 11 a.m.
today at the Corcoran Funeral
Home Inc. 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township. Friends may call today
9:30 a.m. until the time of service.
GIMBI – Margaret, interment July 14
at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Eulogies start at 1:30
p.m. at the cemetery chapel.
HARRIS – Elizabeth, Divine Liturgy 11
a.m. Thursday in St. Nicholas
Byzantine Catholic Church, Tripp
Street, Swoyersville. Friends may
call from 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesday at
the funeral home.
HAYNES – Edward, funeral 10 a.m.
Wednesday, at the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in the Holy
Rosary Church, Duryea. Friends
may call 6 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
HUBBELL – Pauline, graveside
service 2 p.m. July 16 at Canaan
Corner’s Cemetery, Waymart.
KLOKIS – Rita, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday at the E. Blake Collins
Funeral Home, 159 George Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Benedict’s
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends may
call 6 to 9 p.m. today at the funer-
al home.
LOVE – Blanche, funeral 11 a.m. July
30, at in the Mehoopany Methodist
Church followed by a luncheon in
the church basement.
MANIK – Milan Anton, funeral 10 a.m.
until the time of service Wednes-
day in the John V. Morris Funeral
Home, 625 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre.
MCHUGH – Marie, funeral 10 a.m.
Wednesday at the Edward A.
Wade Funeral Home and Cre-
mation Services Inc., 4 Morris
Place at Terrace Street, Car-
bondale. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. Rose
of Lima Church, Carbondale.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
MCKEOWN – Robert, funeral 8:45
a.m. Wednesday at the Corco-
ran Funeral Home Inc., 20 S.
Main St., Plains Township. Mass
of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m.
in St. Mary of the Immaculate
Conception Church, Our Lady
of Fatima Parish, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
MCLAUGHLIN – Aloysius, funeral
10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the
Hugh B. Hughes and Son Inc.
Funeral Home, 1044 Wyoming
Ave., Forty Fort. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 11a.m. in Holy
Family Parish Church, Luzerne.
Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
NOVINSKI – Irene, funeral 10 a.m.
Wednesday at the Graziano
Funeral Home Inc., Pittston
Township. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. Wednesday
at St. Maria Goretti Roman
Catholic Church, Laflin. Rosary
at 10 a.m. at the church. Friends
may call 4 to 7:30 p.m. today at
the funeral home.
PERSCHAU – Mary, funeral 9:30
a.m. today at St. John’s Luth-
eran Church, 9 Wood St., Pitt-
ston. Friends may call 8:30 a.m.
until the time of service at the
church.
PHILLIPS – Reggie, friends may
call 10 a.m. to noon Thursday at
the Wroblewski Funeral Home
Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave., Forty
Fort. A brief service will follow
at noon.
PICCINI – Nicholas, funeral 10
a.m. Wednesday at the Louis M.
Margotta Funeral Home, 511
Church St., Jessup. Mass at 10
a.m. at St. Mary’s Assumption
Church, Jessup. Friends may
call 4 to 8 p.m. today at the
funeral home
SCHECHTER – Edward, family
will receive guests 5 to 8 p.m.
today at the family home, 589
Sutton Road, Shavertown.
SCHIMMEL - George, funeral 11
a.m. Wednesday at the Grace
Lutheran Church. Friends may
call today, 6 to 8 p.m., at Koch
Funeral Home, 2401 S. Atherton
St., State College.
SCHOCH – Melvin, Celebration of
Life at 1 p.m. July 9 at 5319 N.
Lehigh Gorge Rd., White Haven,
Pa.
SEARFOSS – Margaret Ann, funeral
10 a.m. Friday at the Jendrzejew-
ski Funeral Home, 21 N. Meade St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 6
to 8 p.m. Thursday at the funeral
home.
SEPELA – John, funeral 9 a.m.
today at the John V. Morris
Funeral Home, 625 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
the St. Stanislaus Kotstka wor-
ship site of St. Andre Bessette
Parish, 666 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre.
TERASAVAGE – William, funeral
10:30 a.m. today at the Nat &
Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 11 a.m. in St. Leo’s
Holy Rosary Church, Ashley.
TROCHYMCZUK – Lillian, services
10:30 a.m. July 16 at Sacred Heart
of Jesus Church, 215 Lackawanna
Ave., Dupont.
VALE – Elaine, Shiva 2 to 4 p.m. and
7 to 9 p.m. today at 510 Highland
Ave., South Abington Township.
FUNERALS
G
ertrude S. Dula of Nanticoke,
formerly of West Wyoming,
passed away early Sunday, July 3,
2011, at Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital.
She was born in Plymouth, De-
cember 21, 1925, and was a daugh-
ter of the late Charles and Sophie
Parcinski Steczkowski Piscotty,
and step father, John Piscotty.
Gertrude was a graduate of Ply-
mouth High School and a member
of St. Faustina Parish, Nanticoke.
In addition to her parents and
step father, she was preceded in
death by her husband, Peter, April
4, 1990; brothers, Edward and Leo-
nard; sisters Martha Romanski, Jo-
sephine Wisniewski and Rosetta
Borsch.
Gertrude is survived by daugh-
ter, Christine Novak, Nanticoke;
son, Bernard, Nanticoke; grand-
children, Christa, Joseph, Ryan
and Kevin; great-grandchildren,
Alec, Jacob, Sam, Noah and Kin-
sley; sister BernadineKosicki , Ma-
ryland; and several nieces, neph-
ews and cousins.
Funeral serviceswill be heldat
10:30 a.m. Wednesday, from the
Grontkowski Funeral Home P.C.,
51 W. Green St., Nanticoke, with
Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m.
in St. Faustina Parish, 520 South
Hanover St, Nanticoke, with the
Rev. James Nashandco-celebrated
by the Rev. Gerald Gurka. Inter-
ment will be in St. Mary’s Ceme-
tery, Plymouth Twp. Friends and
relatives are invited from 9:30 to
10:30 a.m. Wednesday at the funer-
al home.
Memorial contributions may be
made to St. Faustina Parish or
American Red Cross of Wilkes-
Barre.
Gertrude S. Dula
July 3, 2011
BERLIN—Otto von Habsburg
saw the crumbling of the empire
his family had ruled for centuries
and emerged from its ashes as a
champion of a united and demo-
cratic Europe.
The oldest son of Austria-Hun-
gary’s last emperor fought Nazi-
sm and Soviet
communism
during his long
decades of exile
from his home-
land, and was li-
onized by lead-
ers across the
continent as “a
great Europe-
an.”
Habsburg died Monday at age
98 in his villa in Poecking in
southern Germany, where he had
livedsince the1950s, withhis sev-
en children nearby, his spokeswo-
man Eva Demmerle told The As-
sociated Press.
Habsburg used his influence in
a vain struggle to keep the Nazis
from annexing Austria before
World War II, then campaigned
for the opening of the Iron Cur-
tain in the decades after the war.
With the fall of the Berlin Wall,
he used his seat in European Par-
liament to lobby for expanding
the European Union to include
former Eastern bloc nations.
“My father was a towering per-
sonality,” Habsburg’s oldest son
Karl Habsburg-Lothringen told
the Austria Press Agency. “With
himweloseagreat Europeanwho
has influenced everything we do
today beyond measure.”
Born in 1912 in Austria, Habs-
burg witnessed the family’s de-
clineafter theempirewas disman-
tled and Austria became a repub-
lic after World War I. He became
head of the family at his father’s
death in 1922 and continued to
claim the throne until the 1960s.
He was a member of the Eu-
ropean Parliament for the conser-
vative Bavarian Christian Social
Union in southern Germany and
also served as president of the
Pan-European League from 1979
to 1999.
In that role, he was instrumen-
tal in helping organize the Pan-
European Picnic peace demon-
stration in 1989 on the border of
Austria and Hungary. The border
was briefly opened in a symbolic
gesture, which created the oppor-
tunity for 600 East Germans to
flee communism months before
the fall of the Berlin Wall.
It was the first time an Eastern
European nation had opened its
borders, and is widely seen as the
start of the fall of communism.
European Commission Presi-
dent Jose Manuel Barroso
mourned the passing of “a great
European ... who gave an impor-
tant impetus to the Europeanpro-
ject throughout his rich life.”
Anti-Nazi
activist
dies at
age 98
Otto von Habsburg, son of
Austria-Hungary’s last
emperor, battled communism.
By DAVID RISING
Associated Press
von Habsburg
LONDON—AnnaMassey, the
member of an acting dynasty
whose roles ranged from lonely
spinsters to Margaret Thatcher,
has died. She was 73.
Massey died Saturday after a
battle with cancer, with her hus-
band and son at her side, her
agent Pippa Markham said Mon-
day.
The actress was born in 1937
into a performing family — her
father was Canadian actor Ray-
mond Massey and her mother
British actress Adrianne Allen.
Her brother Daniel Massey also
became an actor, and her godfa-
ther was director John Ford.
Massey made her West End
stage debut at 17 in “The Reluc-
tant Debutante” and her film de-
but in Ford’s 1958 police proce-
dural “Gideon’s Day.”
Shehadroles infilms including
Michael Powell’s classic chiller
“Peeping Tom,” Otto Premin-
ger’s “Bunny Lake is Missing,”
Alfred Hitchcock’s “Frenzy” and
the 2002 adaptation of “The Im-
portance of Being Earnest.”
Born into a performing family, Britain’s Anna Massey, 73, dies
By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 7A
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ty.
On Saturday, kids will enjoy a
birds of preyexhibit fromtheCar-
bon County Environmental Edu-
cation Center, and Sunday, the
youngsters can watch a karate
demonstration by local attorney
Gary Michak and then cool down
with a yoga session led by his
wife, Courtney Burgess-Michak.
“I might need to go to the yoga
session to relax,” said Nadine
Young, this year’s auction chair-
woman.
Young and her team of 34 auc-
tion committee members have
worked throughout the year to
ensure the auction’s success.
“Community libraries need
support,” said Young, a 20-year
volunteer of the auction. “In
some states the government pro-
vides all the funding for commu-
nity libraries, but inPennsylvania
that’s not the case.”
The event netted about $75,000
for the library last year, and every
year’s goal is to raise even more
funds.
But Young, of Dallas, said even
though all the proceeds are gener-
ated for the library, attendees can
still find quality merchandise for
bargain prices.
“It’s like a giant yard sale,” said
Wayne Williams, of Trucksville,
chairperson of the Odds and Ends
tent. “People love the thrill of the
hunt.”
Williams said anything and ev-
erythingcanbefoundat thebooth,
whichhe’s beenmanningfor about
five years. Patrons donate items
throughout the year and volun-
teers sort through every piece, no
matter its size or condition.
“Last year we had a student
count all thecoffeemugs that were
donated,” he said. “We counted
about 725 mugs. What do you do
withall them? We sold10mugs for
a $1.”
Other booths include Nearly
Olde, a selection of items not suit-
able for the auction block; Attic
Treasures, a collection of antique
items and collectables; Cottage
Keepers, a boothwithsmall pieces
of affordable furniture; anda jewel-
ry tent, which will sell costume
and estate jewelry.
Foodisalwaysabigcrowd-pleas-
er at the auction, and a few new
vendorsinadditiontothestandard
potato pancakes and hamburgers
will jointhelibrarygroundsinclud-
ing a gyro and taco stand.
But the main attraction is what
happens ontheblock. Professional
and amateur auctioneers will be
taking bids on antiques and new
items each night to raise the most
money possible for library.
Guest auctioneers include Jon
Meyer and Renie Workman from
WNEP-TV on Friday and Rocky
and Sue of KRZ Radio on Satur-
day. A children’s auction led by
Boy Scout Troop 281on Saturday
morning will give youngsters a
chance to bid on items such as
bikes and Barbie dolls at kid-
friendly prices.
Leslie Horoshko, antiques
committee chairwoman, said she
has been an auction volunteer for
decades, but it’s still a different
experience every year.
“Every year I choose some-
thing and say, ‘This will get the
most money,’ ” she said. “I’ve nev-
er been right. I guess that’s the
unpredictability of auctions.”
AUCTION
Continued from Page 3A
governor. Casey starts the 2012
campaign in very good shape,
and even if Obama — whose ap-
proval ratings are middling in
Pennsylvania — doesn’t perform
well at the top of the ticket (that
might change), Casey should be
all right.”
However, Duffy and Quinni-
piac’s Malloy note Republicans
can take some hope fromthe fact
that Casey’s approval rating and
generic “re-elect” number re-
main below the 50 percent mark.
“Pennsylvania voters like their
senior senator, but more than
one-in-four are undecided,” Mal-
loy said. “And in three measures,
jobapproval, deserves re-election
It appears the state GOPmight
be pinning its hopes on a wealthy
candidate who can spend his or
her own millions on a race
against Casey.
Still, “you can’t beat somebody
with nobody, and right now no-
body is emerging as a possible
Republican challenger to Sen.
Bob Casey Jr.,” said Tim Malloy,
assistant director of the Quinni-
piac University Polling Institute,
when the poll was released June
15.
That’s a big reason why the
University of Virginia’s Center for
Politics has rated Casey as likely,
right now, to win re-election in
the latest Crystal Ball predictions
by center director Larry Sabato.
“The Keystone State is another
place where Republican hopes
are fading against a first-term
Democratic incumbent, Bob
Casey,” Sabato wrote. “As in Mi-
chigan and Ohio, members of the
Republican U.S. House delega-
tion apparently have taken a
pass.”
But even more important, Sa-
bato said, is that “Casey has a
golden political name thanks to
his father’s two popular terms as
and Casey v. nobody, Casey is
short of that magic 50 percent
mark that allows incumbents to
sleepmorecomfortablyat night.”
Casey’s campaign structure
thus far is focusedonfundraising.
The candidate himself is focused
on his work on Capitol Hill on is-
sues such as trade and manufac-
turing – Casey is leery of free
trade deals and says more needs
to be done to spur the U.S. econo-
myandespeciallyits manufactur-
ing sector – than on the upcom-
ing campaign, says Larry Smar,
Casey’s deputy chief of staff.
Whenit does come time for full
campaign mode, “Sen. Casey is
prepared to run a strong cam-
ronment for Republicans,” Ni-
castre said.
Still, Cook Political Report’s
Duffy said that 16 months before
Election Day is too early to pro-
claim the Pennsylvania Senate
race to be over. Her “cautionary
tale,” Duffy said, is what hap-
pened in Wisconsin in 2010.
There, seeminglysafe incumbent
Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold
was defeated by Republican Ron
Johnson, and Johnson wasn’t
even a candidate at this point in
that race.
Casey “starts off in a good
place, but you have to see who
eventually gets in” on the Repub-
lican side, Duffy said.
paign just as he did in 2006,”
Smar said.
ThePennsylvania GOPandthe
National Republican Senatorial
Committee did not return calls
last week.
Mark Nicastre, spokesman for
the Pennsylvania Democratic
Party, saidDemocratic turnout in
2012 should be even larger than
in 2006 because it will be a presi-
dential election year with the in-
cumbent Barack Obama, who
won Pennsylvania in 2008, on the
ballot. Plus, Nicastre contended,
Democrats like Casey will be able
to successfully attack GOP Medi-
care and budget plans.
“It is a tough recruiting envi-
CASEY
Continued from Page 3A
Many come every year; some
came this year just tosee the Mat-
tiolis and the 66-foot, 6-inch-tall
monument that their generous
donation of $100,000 helped to
restore during the past year.
Gloria Blandina, of Wyoming,
has been to the annual event 35
times. Before leavingonMonday,
she went up to the stage at the
front of the large tent giving shel-
ter to those gathered from the
sweltering sun and extended her
hand and personal thanks to the
Mattiolis.
“It’s very, very gracious of him
to do this for the community,”
Blandina said after her few sec-
onds with the owners of Pocono
International Raceway in Long
Pond. “What a great, great gift he
gave to all of us.”
On Aug. 3, 2008, lightning
struck the monument. The strike
movedthe toptworows of stones
at least two inches, damaged the
joints onthe monument’s capand
blew out a small chunk of con-
crete. A plaque listing the names
of survivors of the Battle of
Wyoming sustained a crack from
top to bottom along the right
side, running through the last
names of 14 of the men, from En-
sign Daniel Downing down to
Pvt. Cherrick Westbrook.
Immediately after the strike,
the community rallied around
the monument andheldfundrais-
ers tobeginraisingthe more than
$125,000 needed to repair the
town’s cherished treasure.
But more than a year after the
damage was done, only one-fifth
of the needed funds was raised.
ThenJosephMattioli reada story
inTheTimes Leader about theef-
forts to restore the monument
and made a call to the story’s au-
thor, Bill O’Boyle.
The reporter helped arrange a
meeting among monument asso-
ciation officials; the borough’s
mayor, Bob Boyer; and the Mat-
tiolis at the couple’s Long Pond
home on July 12, 2010. Mattioli
wrote a check for $100,000 and
handedit to the group. The resto-
ration could begin.
Throughout Monday’s more
than two-hour program, speakers
praised the Mattiolis and their
generosity. The couple, he seated
in a wheelchair, she in a folding
chair by his side, wiped away
tears as they heard how much
their donation was appreciated.
“It was nice,” Joseph Mattioli
said after the program. “They re-
ally outdid themselves with a
beautiful program.”
Though he had never been to
the annual commemoration be-
fore Monday, he said growing up
in Old Forge, he would drive
down Route 11and past the mon-
ument onhis travels. He saidthat
when he read about what had
happenedandhowthe communi-
ty was trying to raise funds, he
felt he could help.
“I was lucky to make a lot of
money. These are the types of
things I like to support,” Mattioli
said.
While the money given by the
Mattioli family was key ingetting
the project the funds necessaryto
begin, the work by Masonry Pres-
ervation Services of Berwick en-
sured the monument was re-
stored and in a state that it would
remain for generations more to
appreciate.
Jeff Erdly, the CEOof Masonry
Preservation Services, was on
handto witness the rededication,
and like Mattioli, took in his first
July 4th in the shadow of the
monument.
“It’s very special,” he said.
The Mattiolis’ actions touched
many of those gathered Monday
and elicited praise from Bob Pa-
volonis, 65, of Wyoming.
“They’ve got kind hearts.
They’re wonderful people. That’s
what you call voluntarily sharing
your wealth,” said Pavolonis,
who said the large turnout was
probably due to a combination of
the restoration of the monument
itself andpeoplewantingtomake
sure the Mattiolis knew how
much their donation meant.
“Usually there’s empty seats,
but not this time,” Pavolonis said.
Among those who said he
came for the first time Monday
was Bill Sullivan, 38, of West
Wyoming.
“After hearing about it and
reading about it the past two
years, I knew this was a big deal
andI felt likeI neededtobehere,”
Sullivan said.
Even those who have been to
the ceremonies dozens of times
noted the difference in this year’s
event.
Frank E.P. Conyngham, presi-
dent of the Wyoming Commemo-
rative Association, said Sunday
night was like Christmas Eve for
him. He said he was filled with
anticipation and excitement for
the event to begin.
MONUMENT
Continued from Page 1A
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Curtis Montz, 99, looks at a plaque presented to him by Wyoming
Commemorative Association President Frank Conyngham during
the 133rd annual commemoration of the Battle of Wyoming.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Shawn Zanicky of Wilkes-Barre, right, touches the original marble plaque listing the survivors of the
Wyoming Massacre. Also pictured is her daughter, Victoria.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
The 24th Connecticut Militia fires a volley tribute during the
133rd annual commemoration of the Battle of Wyoming.
The Wyoming Monument honors
the more than 170 Connecticut
settlers who were killed by Tories
and Iroquois Indians on July 3,
1778, in the Battle of Wyoming. The
remains of those killed were found
in a mass grave in May 1832 and
reburied where the monument
stands. The monument’s construc-
tion began in July 1833 and was
suspended due to a lack of funds
when the monument reached 20
feet. Construction resumed in 1841
when the Ladies Luzerne Monu-
mental Association, which became
the Wyoming Monument Associ-
ation in 1860, raised money to
complete the monument at a cost
of $8,000. On the 100th anni-
versary of the battle on July 3,
1878, a commemoration service
drew more than 50,000 people to
hear the main speaker for the
event, U. S. President Rutherford
B. Hayes. The service has been
held on the battle anniversary
every year since.
D E S E R V E D H O N O R S
C M Y K
PAGE 8A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
2
9
8
2
4
8
These statements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration. These
products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Results not typical.
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HAZLE TWP. – State police
at Hazleton have charged a
Tamaqua man with the robbery
of a Turkey Hill and an attempt-
ed robbery of a Ramada Inn, on
Sunday.
Police said that Charles Ste-
phen Hausman, 29, robbed a
Turkey Hill on state Route 924
at 3:51 a.m. Sunday. They also
accuse him of demanding a
clerk at the Ramada Inn in Ha-
zle Township give him money in
a holdup at 10:28 p.m. Sunday.
The clerk did not comply and
Hausman fled.
State police were notified and
his description was provided to
other area businesses. At 11:30
Sunday night, Hausman was
seen at the Turkey Hill on state
Route 93, near Airport Road,
also in Hazle Township. He was
apprehended and charged with
robbery, theft, and retail theft
from the Turkey Hill on state
Route 924 and attempted theft
and attempted robbery at the
Ramada, state police said.
He was taken to the Luzerne
County Correctional Facility,
where he was still lodged Mon-
day night awaiting arraignment.
State police at Hazleton also
reported:
• Brittany J. Hinkle, 16, no
place of residence given, report-
ed that someone placed a burn-
ing cigarette and leaves on the
front seat of her 1994 Chevrolet
Corsica that was parked in the
Kmart parking lot in Hazle
Township on Friday night. She
said her windows were left
down and the cigarette left a
burn hole in the driver’s seat.
• Someone stole $2 from a tip
jar at the Dunkin Donuts, 1190
N. Church St., Hazle Township,
Saturday night. Employees
report the man has done this
before.
• A two-vehicle crash left two
people with minor injuries Sun-
day night in Sugarloaf Town-
ship.
State police said a Ford F-150
pickup with a trailer turned out
of P & R Trucking on Tomh-
icken Road at 3:15 p.m. and was
accelerating when a Honda
Civic driven by Joshua Lom-
bard, 22, of Lakeland, Ga., was
traveling too fast on the same
road and rear-ended the trailer.
Two passengers of the Ford, a
16-year-old female and 43-year-
old Melissa Peters, of Shickshin-
ny, received minor injuries and
were taken by Sugarloaf EMS to
Hazleton General Hospital.
The driver of the pickup,
Brian Brutosky, 40, of Shickshin-
ny, was not injured. Neither
were his passengers, Justin
Lovett, 22, and Jonathan Lovett,
20, both of Sugarloaf Township.
BUTLER TWP. -- Township
police are investigating the
robbery of the Econo Lodge
Motel on North Hunter High-
way that occurred late Friday
night.
According to police, a clerk
reported that a man wearing
camouflage over his face en-
tered the motel and demanded
money.
The man concealed his hand
inside his clothing as if he had a
gun. The clerk was not injured
in the robbery, and the suspect
fled into a wooded area near the
motel.
Anyone with information is
asked to contact township po-
lice at 788-3230.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the following:
• Sarah Lynn Santine, of First
Street, Old Forge, was charged
with retail theft after store secu-
rity allegedly found her remov-
ing tags from merchandise and
placing the items into her bag
without paying at the Burling-
ton Coat Factory on Spring
Street on Saturday. Security said
she had $80.94 worth of items.
• Police responded to Bow-
man Street on Sunday for a
report of someone damaging
four windows on a vehicle own-
ed by Bridgette Baron, 310 Bow-
man St. No arrests have been
made. The investigation contin-
ues.
• Randy Rosado, of Mill
Street, was charged with harass-
ment after his girlfriend called
police to report that he argued
with her, then choked her and
threw her to the floor during an
argument Friday night.
POLICE BLOTTER
“We will get through this.”
Dr. Lois Margaret Nora
The interim president and dean of The
Commonwealth Medical College took over six weeks
ago. Among her challenges: funding uncertainties
caused by the economy, the governor’s plan to end
$5 million in state funding, the need to lay off 12
staff and eight faculty members and a national accrediting group’s
decision to place the fledgling Scranton-based school on probation.
Reader blasts planned cut
of West Side Tech sports
A
t the West Side Career and Technology
Center’s Joint Operating Committee
meeting held June 27, the committee
voted on a final budget that included the
elimination of sports.
There was an 8-6 vote in favor of the
elimination. Some coaches offered to coach
for free. There was no talk of pay-to-play,
fundraising, etc. They just cut it without
giving anyone a chance to do some of these
things to keep it.
Dallas, which is getting a new school
built, and Wyoming Valley West, which I
think still has a bad taste in its mouth over
other issues at West Side CTC, did not give
a single “no” vote. This is something I,
along with a lot of others, will remember
during election time.
This issue is now in the hands of the five
sending school districts’ board members. I
hope they think this through before they
make the mistake of dropping sports at
West Side CTC. I would just like them to
think about what athletics has done for
them, their kids or grandkids. Some of you
got your educations and have the jobs you
now enjoy because of sports.
We need to petition our sending districts,
whether it be Dallas, Wyoming Valley West,
Wyoming Area, Lake-Lehman or Northwest.
Taking sports away at West Side CTC
would not only hurt the school, I think the
number of kids attending the school will
be reduced and – with the elimination of
the school’s recruiter, Lorri Vandermark,
who has gotten the school to its highest
attendance – might crush the school.
Mike Jeschke
Dallas Township
Reader questions Casey’s
commitment to pro-life
L
arry Smar, deputy chief of staff for U.S.
Sen. Robert Casey Jr., recently sought
to defend the senator’s pro-life stance
as one focused on reducing the number of
unintended pregnancies and abortions,
while valuing life at every stage.
Unfortunately, the senator’s record does
not qualify for that lofty evaluation. It
shows he voted for a health care bill that
lacked tough abortion language. He voted
against the Mexico City Policy, which
sought to eliminate foreign aid funding for
abortion. The Bishop of Scranton scolded
him for that vote, saying it would “mean
the deaths of thousands of unborn chil-
dren.”
Since assuming office in 2007, Sen.
Casey has received $327,914 from groups
advocating abortion rights. These include
Planned Parenthood, EMILY’s List, NOW
(the National Organization for Women),
and NARAL (National Abortion and Re-
productive Rights Action League). These
facts were reported by the Catholic News
Agency.
If you follow his actions and “the mon-
ey,” and not his words, it’s hard to cate-
gorize him as pro-life. It’s a classic example
of trying to have it both ways.
Sen. Casey has opportunities in the
future to back what he says he supports, to
show his true colors.
He could vote for the “Life at Concep-
tion Act,” thus supporting his purported
view that life does indeed begin at concep-
tion, as science confirms. Passage of this
law will be the end of Roe v. Wade.
Until that comes to pass, he could vote
to de-fund Roe v. Wade by votes big and
small, such as any future votes on the
Mexico City Policy, health care and fund-
ing for pro-abortion organizations.
James U. Sinclair
Wright Township
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 9A
AND THEN there were
none.
On Thursday, Nancy
Tkatch finished her final
day as Northwest Area
School District superin-
tendent, leaving a job she
held for eight years. She was the last of what
had been a small local vanguard of the once-
unthinkable: female superintendents.
In 2003, Luzerne County’s 11 public
school districts came within a month of
having three female superintendents: Ger-
aldine Shepperson in Hazleton Area, Alberta
Griffiths in Hanover Area and Tkatch.
Shepperson was forced to leave that Au-
gust by a board that had marginalized her
for months, while Tkatch was appointed just
weeks after Shepperson’s departure.
Griffiths died two years later.
Tkatch’s departure might seem amicable,
but it is not voluntary. Her contract was up
for renewal and a new school board wanted
a new direction. Meanwhile, Betsy Ellis was
retiring as Career Center administrative
director, and for Tkatch, the timing was
perfect and the job an almost ironic fit.
She freely admits that as a teenager she
had no intention of attending college. She
studied culinary arts at Wilkes-Barre Vo-
Tech and planned to enter the field as soon
as she got the diploma. A string of unexpect-
ed opportunities emerged, and she took
them.
Now she has multiple degrees and certifi-
cations, is leaving the top position in the
school district to head a “vo-tech,” though
these days they are called “career centers.”
It’s not surprising that she has become an
eloquent proponent of comprehensive
change to our schools. She argues for a
focus – from kindergarten to high school
diploma – on making sure every student has
the skills needed to pursue a career, whether
right away or through more education.
It also is not surprising that she sees the
dearth of local female superintendents as a
regional failure. I agree.
“People make assumptions on what gen-
der brings to a job,” Tkatch said.
This is no indictment of the current crop
of (now all-male) superintendents in our
county. Tkatch gives her colleagues praise.
It might be that there still aren’t enough
qualified women applying for the job. But as
I noted after Griffith died, local districts
often groom someone from within. They
could groom a woman as easily as a man.
But it is more likely because, without
exception, women are never more than a
small minority on any board in the county.
There are some strong-willed, very active
women in those seats, but they are still few
and far between.
One reason often given for putting qual-
ified women into positions such as district
superintendent is the need for role models.
When kids see someone like themselves in a
job, it’s easier for them to aspire to that job.
(This is also why we should work to get
more men teaching elementary grades).
But there’s a more compelling reason.
Getting qualified women – and for that
matter, qualified minorities – into high-level
positions such as school district superin-
tendent is not a matter of “political correct-
ness” or “gender equality.” It is a matter of
common sense. We need to develop and use
everyone’s talents to their fullest.
Our inability to produce or find qualified
female superintendents makes us look like
we’re stuck in the 1950s.
Mark Guydish can be reached at 829-7161 or by
email at mguydish@timesleader.com.
Districts deserve ‘F’ for failing to hire female leaders
MARK GUYDISH
C O M M E N T A R Y
Our inability to produce or find qualified
female superintendents makes us look like
we’re stuck in the 1950s.
T
HE SYRIAN disside-
nts who were allowed
by the Baathist re-
gime to meet June 27
in a Damascus hotel are not
leaders of the current protests
in the street – but the younger
activists should form lines of
communication with them,
rather than carp at them as
dupes of the state.
The Damascus Declaration
Coalitionandother groups fear
the government will exploit
the Semiramis Hotel meeting
to pretend that freedom has
come to Syria.
But there is little danger of
that, after the killing of at least
1,300 people at demonstra-
tions, the arrest of about12,000
and the flight of 11,000 refu-
gees over the border.
The organizers of the meet-
ing are not puppets. No such
event has happened in dec-
ades. Its principal instigator,
Luay Hussain, called the re-
gimea“systemof tyranny,” and
their concluding communiqué
advocated a popular uprising.
On the other hand, the leaders
of the uprisingwere wise not to
attend; the government’s secu-
rity forces were watching.
Their meeting was not the
beginning of a Syrian era of
glasnost, but it does open a
door, if ever so slightly. And
that is a change for the better.
The Globe and Mail, Toronto
Dissidents aren’t puppets
T
HE International
Criminal Court war-
rant against Libyan
leader Moammar
Gadhafi doesn’t really come as
a surprise to anyone.
Given the international out-
rage over the regime’s contin-
uing atrocities against its own
people and the West’s strug-
gling military campaign, this
was to be expected. Notwith-
standing the hypocrisy often
demonstrated in such cases, it
has to be said that the ICC
charges brought against the Li-
byan trio – Gadhafi, his son
Seif Al-Islam and intelligence
chief Al-Senussi – are far from
unreasonable and unjustified.
Thousands have been killed
inthe crackdownby the Libyan
regime since the popular upris-
ing began nearly four months
ago. All attempts to talk sense
into the maverick Libyandicta-
tor, who has ruled the country
with an iron hand for more
than four decades, have failed.
On the oth-
er hand, the
opposition
fighters have
failed to
make any
substantial
progress de-
spite the
moral support they have re-
ceived. The unprecedented
NATO-U.S. military campaign
has sofar failedtobreakthe ob-
stinacy of Gadhafi.
The ICCwarrant against the
regime for its crimes against
humanity will therefore come
as a much-needed shot in the
armfor the opposition. It could
very well prove the proverbial
last straw on the camel’s back
for Gadhafi, although there are
fears that the ICC move also
could make the colonel desper-
ately dangerous. Let us hope
for the best.
Arab News
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
WORLD OPINION
Warrant against Gadhafi
can only help opposition
Gadhafi
QUOTE OF THE DAY
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/Impressions Media
EDITORIAL BOARD
MALLARD FILLMORE DOONESBURY
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
P
REMIER WEN Jiabao
has been delivering
China’s decisive mess-
age that it will contin-
ue to bolster its partnership
withEuropeancountries strug-
gling with debt crises and eco-
nomic recession.
In Hungary, this message
was embodiedinhis announce-
ment that China would buy a
“certain amount” of treasury
bonds. The Hungarian govern-
ment described it as “a deci-
sion of historic significance.”
After previous announce-
ments of bond purchases from
Greece, Spain and Portugal,
China’s latest support commit-
ments came in tandem with
the European Union leaders’
difficult approval of a second
bailout for Greece.
In fact, China is continuing
its commitment to developing
all-round relations both at Si-
no-EU and China-EU member
country levels.
This trade and investment
has savedmany factories inEu-
rope from going bankrupt and
has made it possible for many
Europeanworkers tokeeptheir
jobs.
But some people worry that
China’s growing investment
might reduce the EU and its
member countries into de-
pendents of China. However,
all EU countries are eager not
to miss the China boat.
China Today, Beijing
China’s EU aid helpful
C M Y K
PAGE 10A TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
Bridge, Dennison Township,
$320,000; Marchakitus Road
Bridge, Lehman Township,
$375,000; Moss Road Bridge,
Fairmount Township, $400,000;
Reese Road Bridge, Union Town-
ship, $290,000; and Old State
Road Bridge, Ross Township,
$275,000.
Replacement of these bridges
was delayed because the county
had to negotiate federal funding
for the projects with the Federal
Emergency Management Agen-
cy, Gibbons said.
The county must build the
bridges to comply with current
lane widths and other safety fea-
tures, but the federal government
only wanted to fund the cost of
structures the dimensions of the
ones destroyed, Gibbons said.
After rounds of back-and-forth,
the federal government agreed to
reimburse the county anywhere
from70 to 95 percent of the cost,
Gibbons said. The county’s share
comes out of capital bond fund-
ing borrowed in the past, he said.
The bridge that’s ready to open
is on Main Street in Sugarloaf
Township, crossing Nescopeck
Creek.
The original steel structure
was built in 1895 and was closed
by the county several years ago
because of safety concerns, Gib-
bons said.
The county initiated a federal
funding request to replace the 85-
foot-longbridgein2004. Thenew
bridge cost $1.018 million, with
80 percent of the tab pickedupby
the federal government. The
state is covering the rest.
The new bridge is finished
with stained, concrete forms to
make it look like natural stone,
Gibbons said.
“We try to mimic the kind of
stone that’s in the creek so it kind
of blends it in,” he said.
The same type of finish will be
used for bridges on Chase and
Hillside roads that cross Hunts-
ville Creek because both spans
are near The Lands at Hillside
Farms, Gibbons said. Both
bridges will also have a decora-
tive stone marking the construc-
tion date, he said. Construction
should start soon, he said.
“We’re trying to preserve the
historical attributes of the area,”
he said. “These bridges are de-
signed to last 100 years, so you
want to pay attention to aesthet-
ics, especially in historic dis-
tricts.”
Three of the four bridges cur-
rently under construction – Ma-
honey Road in Ross Township
and the East Sorber Mountain
Road and North Mountain Road
bridges in Lake Township – were
destroyed by June 2006 flooding.
The fourth – Breaker Road
Bridge over Solomon Creek in
Hanover Township – was closed
about two years ago because of
safety concerns, Gibbons said.
The replacement bridge will cost
about $1.5 million.
The county ended up owning
and maintaining most of its
bridges during the Great Depres-
sion, when the court ordered a
takeover because townships and
municipalities didn’t have the fi-
nancial means to take care of the
structures, Gibbons said.
“That’s howwe got most of our
roads as well,” he said. The coun-
ty owns and maintains 127 miles
of roadway scattered throughout
the county.
BRIDGES
Continued from Page 1A
worry about that later.”
Even the famed Agnes flood,
which caused millions of dollars
in damage throughout North-
east Pennsylvania in1972, didn’t
leave this section of Plymouth in
such dire straits.
“Agnes was nowhere near
this,” Mazur said.
Brian Wrightson, director of
emergency services for the Red
Cross of Northeastern and Cen-
tral Pennsylvania, saidthat inhis
15 years of responding to disas-
ters “this is the worst flash flood-
ing I’ve seen in this area in a long
time.”
He said more than 125 people
have been affected and a service
center has been set up at the
Goodwill Hose Co. on West
Main Street in the borough. It
will reopen today at 1 p.m. and
remain open until 7 p.m. People
can get information on help for
the damage done to their proper-
ties as well as cleanup kits and
mops.
An emergency shelter would
have opened in the Plymouth
Township municipal building if
the need arose, Wrightson said,
but nobody requested overnight
shelter. He said many people
who sought help at the service
center Monday said they were
staying with friends or family or
would remain in their home,
even though the structures were
damaged by Sunday’s flooding.
The borough is urging people
whose property was damaged to
call the borough building at 779-
1011. The more people who re-
port damage, the more funds
may be freed up by emergency
management agencies.
Mazur spent Sunday night,
the wee hours of Monday morn-
ing and well into Monday eve-
ning surveying damage, walking
the streets talking to people,
snapping pictures and docu-
menting whatever damage he
could find. He did not sleep and
said he wasn’t alone.
Boroughpolice, volunteer fire-
fighters, street department
workers and other volunteers
worked nonstop clearing debris,
assisting residents, pumping out
basements and surveying dam-
age.
By Monday night, Mazur said
he and others had done all they
could do in a 24-hour span. Main
Street and Shawnee Avenue
were washed down and cleared.
Other streets were a lot better
looking than they were just a day
earlier.
“We’re not in too bad of
shape,” Mazur said after enjoy-
ing two hot dogs as part of his In-
dependence Day dinner.
He thanked the contractors
who heeded the holiday call to
do some emergency work and all
the volunteers who did what
they could with little to no sleep.
He said nobody is to blame for
what happened. No dams were
breached, no drainage issues
were responsible.
“It was an act of God,” Mazur
said.
Looking out of his window
Sunday at about 5 p.m., Mazur
said he saw the wind begin to
pick up, saw the skies darken,
then the hail began falling and
then the heavens opened.
His 18-foot round pool, which
he leaves filled 8 inches to the
top, hadwater to the rimafter 45
minutes.
Other than his damaged deck
and picnic table, his home was
spared. But homes across the
street were deluged with water
and sustained damage.
He said the slope of the road
kept water on the opposite side
of Coal Street.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A stop sign is bent over Monday from the tree limbs, roots and other debris that washed down Coal Street in Plymouth on Sunday.
DAMAGE
Continued from Page 1A
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Major damage was done to a stone bridge on Coal Street just above Mill Street in Plymouth during
flash flooding Sunday.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Alan Valunas hoses down a fence Monday on Ransom Street in
Plymouth after Sunday’s flooding.
They can’t drive down Coal
Street because the street is gone.
The rushing water caused it to
buckle and collapse. From Mill
Street up, the roadis impassable.
Several residents don’t have a
way to get out.
A Chevrolet Blazer that was
parked on the street was lifted
and carried about 100 yards,
coming to rest on its roof in the
middle of the ripped-up street.
Mud, debris and rocks are every-
where; yards have been washed
away, exposing huge water lines
and storm sewer lines.
Power lines fell andcrews were
working Monday to restore elec-
tricity to some of the homes hit
bythe storm. Autilitypole witha
streetlight attached fell across
the street.
Joe Mazur, Plymouth’s bor-
ough manager, lives at 108-114
Coal St. He watchedthe flooding
fromhis front porch. He couldn’t
believe his eyes.
“The rain came down so hard
andsofast,” he saidMonday. “All
that runoff from the mountain
just went into the creek and
washedeverythingawaywithit.”
Mazur said he and other bor-
ough officials will meet with rep-
resentatives of Pennsylvania
Emergency Management Agen-
cy today to assess the damage
and to ask for help.
“I’ve talked to state Sen. John
Yudichak and state Rep. Gerald
Mullery, and they said they will
do what they can to get us help,”
Mazur said. “This happened
once before, in 1947. We need a
lot of helptofixthis. There has to
be millions and millions of dol-
lars of damage.”
Joe Judzikowski has lived at
125Coal St. for sixyears. The wa-
ter washedawaymost of his yard,
leaving his foundation exposed.
He said he hopes the state and
federal governments come to the
people’s aid.
“We need answers,” he said.
Many wondered where all the
water came fromwithsuchforce.
Some speculated one of the four
reservoirs on Plymouth Moun-
tain had been compromised. But
Mazur quickly dispelled the ru-
mors.
“Thosefour reservoirs werere-
moved years ago,” he said. “This
water just came down the moun-
tain and into the creek.”
Gary Neupauer’s home on
Coal Street was spared any dam-
age. He said he watched the wa-
ter and couldn’t believe what it
caused.
“There was just too much wa-
ter for the creek to handle,” Neu-
pauer said.
Joseph Mentyka Sr. is 92 and
he has lived at 126 Coal St. for 54
years. His basement filled with
water from the storm, rising to
just one foot from entering his
first floor. His son, Joe, Jr., said
they had been pumping water all
day on Monday.
People on Poplar Street, sever-
al blocks away, were shoveling
mudfrominfront of their homes.
They said a creek runs under
their homes andswelledsomuch
that sidewalks and the street
were uprooted as the water
gushed.
“WewerehomeandI smelleda
strong scent of methane gas,”
Bob Warman of 133 Poplar St
said. He pointed to a large con-
crete slab that was lying on the
street.
“That’s my sidewalk,” he said.
“It was right here.” He pointedto
an uncovered area where water
could be seen flowing near the
foundation of his house.
Warman said officials have
toldhimthereis a“natural creek”
running under his house and un-
der the street.
“Look in there,” he said.
“There are two concrete walls on
either side. It looks like some-
body built a creek wall there.”
Warman and his wife, Janice,
have questions. They said bor-
ough officials were around, but
were non-committal on whether
help is on the way.
“Somebody needs to fix this
situation,” said Tammy Wolfe,
who lives at 126 Poplar St. Her
mother, Eleanor Ferkel, lives at
128 Poplar.
“Obviously the drainage sys-
tem needs to be fixed,” Wolfe
said. “This can’t happen again.”
Coal and Poplar streets are in
need of major repairs. Most of
each street needs to be replaced.
Neighbors on Poplar Street such
as Helen Kibildis have base-
ments filled with mud, debris
and water.
“If it rains hardagain, we could
have more major problems,” Ki-
bildis said. She’s lived in the
house at 137 Poplar St. for more
than60years. “I’mworriedabout
my foundation.”
Other sections of Plymouth,
Flat Road, Ransom Street and
many streets in Plymouth Town-
ship also received heavy damage
from mud, debris and water.
“We intendtofight for our peo-
ple,” Mazur said. “We’ll have
more information after (today’s)
meeting.”
PLYMOUTH
Continued from Page 1A
Bill O’Boyle, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 829-7218.
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. —
The four astronauts who will
close out NASA’s 30-year space
shuttle program arrived Monday
for their history-making launch
week, saluting the nation’s birth-
day and all those who contribut-
ed to Atlantis’ final flight.
The launch countdown begins
today. Liftoff is set for Friday at
11:26 a.m. before an estimated
crowd of up to 1 million people.
Commander Christopher Fer-
guson and his crew received
small American flags as launch
director Mike Leinbach greeted
themout onthe runway. The four
needed just two training jets for
the flight fromtheir training base
in Houston.
“This is a day that’s decidedly
American, a daywhere we kindof
reflect on our independence and
all the wonderful things that we
really have as a part of beingUnit-
edStates of America,” saidFergu-
son, a retired Navy captain.
“It’s wonderful that you’ve all
came out to join us,” he told the
approximately 65 photographers
and other journalists who
swarmed the runway. He urged
themto go andenjoy some barbe-
cue, fireworks and apple pie.
Altogether, about 2,500 mem-
bers of the news media have re-
quested credentials to cover the
launch. As of Monday, the esti-
mated total crowd count also had
risen: NASA spokesman Allard
Beutel said between 750,000 and
1 million people now are expect-
ed to jam the area to witness the
end to shuttle history.
That’s considerably more than
the crowds that showed up for
Discovery’s last liftoff in Febru-
ary and Endeavour’s in May.
Atlantis will make a supply run
to the International Space Sta-
tion, before joining Discovery
and Endeavour in retirement.
Last 4 shuttle astronauts
arrive in Fla. for countdown
By MARCIA DUNN
AP Aerospace Writer
REDON, France — Two months ago, Tyler Far-
rar was demoralized, sleeping 20 hours a day. He
had even stopped riding, overcome by sorrowafter
his best friend died in a crash at the Giro d’Italia.
On Monday, Farrar became the first American to
win a stage of the Tour de France on the Fourth of
July. It was the first time he had won a stage
in cycling’s showcase race, and he dedicat-
ed the victory to the late Wouter Wey-
landt of Belgium.
“It’s a little bit unbelievable to me at
the moment that it actually happened,”
said Farrar, who pulled out of the Giro
after the accident.
After crossing the finish line, Farrar
held up his hands to form a “W” with
his fingers and thumbs in tribute to
Weylandt.
See TOUR, Page 5B
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N B
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011

timesleader.com
MOOSIC – Shaeffer Hall’s parents
departed from their home in Kansas
City en route to Richmond, Va., to
watch their son pitch.
However, late Sunday night he in-
formedthemif theywantedtoseehim,
they wouldhave to drive a little farther
north.
The extra eight hours in the car paid
off as Hall went out and helped the
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees to a
5-3 victory over Lehigh Valley in front
of 10,321 fans at PNC Field Monday
night.
“They were in West Virginia and
were headed to Richmond,” Hall said.
“I called them at about 11:30 and said,
‘Guys I’m going up to Triple-A, do you
mind detouring and going up north?’ ”
The IronPigs struck first in the
game, taking a 1-0 lead on a solo blast
off the scoreboard in left-center by
John Mayberry Jr. in the first inning.
It was Mayberry’s fourth homer of
the season.
The Yankee offense teed off during a
four-runthirdinning. DougBernier hit
a line drive double to the left-center-
I N T E R N AT I O N A L L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Hall helps SWB defeat Lehigh Valley
5
YANKEES
3
IRONPIGS
Yankees pitcher allows two runs in
6 1/3 innings in his Triple-A debut
against Phillies farm team.
By JOSH HORTON
For the Times Leader
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Umpire Adam Hamari signals safe at home as Yankees third
baseman Terry Tiffee celebrates on Monday night. See YANKEES, Page 7B
CLEVELAND — In 10 years,
Austin Kearns has just two career
hits against A.J. Burnett.
He’s made them both count.
Kearns hit his first homer in105
at-bats this season, a stunning
three-run shot in the seventh in-
ning off Burnett, sending the Cle-
veland Indians to a 6-3 win and
spoiling All-Star shortstop Derek
Jeter’s return to
the Yankees’ li-
neup Monday
night.
With two on and
the Indians trail-
ing 2-1, Kearns,
who has been in a
slump all season,
hit a 1-0 pitch
from Burnett
(8-7) the oppo-
site way to right
for his first homer
since Aug. 22,
when he wore
Yankee pin-
stripes.
Kearns came up
batting only .192
with two RBIs in a part-time
role.
He was only1of 11against
Burnett —a grand slamas a
rookie in 2002 for Cincinnati.
“It’s a funny game,” Kearns
said.
Jeter was back in his familiar
spot at shortstop and again atop
the batting order for the first time
since June 13, when he went on
the disabled list with a calf injury.
New York’s captain went 0 for 4
andremainedsixshy of becoming
the first Yankees player to reach
3,000 hits.
“I felt fine, no problems, no is-
sues,” Jeter said. “I was nervous at
the beginning, almost like it was
opening day again. It was just
nerves. Three weeks is definitely
a long time to be out. I felt better
M L B
AP PHOTO
The Yankees’ Derek Jeter runs
out a ground ball in the first
inning against the Indians on
Monday in Cleveland.
Jeter back
in lineup;
Yanks lose
Shortstop goes hitless in first
game back from injury.
By TOMWITHERS
AP Sports Writer
6
INDIANS
3
YANKEES
See JETER, Page 7B
AP P HOTO
Tyler
Farrar
cele-
brates
winning the
third stage of
the Tour de
France in
Redon, Britta-
ny, western
France, on
Monday.
T O U R D E F R A N C E
“This has been a
horrible last two
months with
everything that hap-
pened in the Giro.
I’ve had a lot of ups
and downs. But in
the end, I wanted to
be able to come
back, and do some-
thing special to pay
tribute.”
Tyler Farrar
After winning Monday’s stage
of the Tour de France
By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press
WILKES-BARRE – Chris Wa-
das and Regan Rome ran to easy
victories in the YMCA3 Mile Run
on Independence Day.
But despite the easy wins, both
runners weren’t satisfied with
their finishing times.
The humidity surely played ha-
voc with their performances.
Wadas, 29, of Plains Township,
broke the tape in 15 minutes and
nine seconds. The Misericordia
University track and cross coun-
try coach outran sec-
ond-place finisher
Chris Ehret,
17, of Dallas,
by 1:04. James “Bear” Maloney,
22, of Scranton, finished third,
five seconds behind Ehret. And
last year’s winner, former Lock
Haven University standout Jeff
Skwierz, 28, of Pringle, finished
fourth, just a split-second behind
Maloney.
“I didn’t do too well,” said a
slightly disappointedWadas, who
runs for the Keystone Track Club,
based in Harrisburg. “I finished
the first mile in 4:53. But after
that first mile, I didn’t feel too
comfortable.
“I ran through the last two
miles in10:16,” Wadas continued,
while shaking his head. “That’s
not good. That’s a workout pace
for me. I just didn’t have it. It
wasn’t my day.”
Once Wadas realizedhe was go-
YMCA 3 MI L E RUN
Mixed results
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Runners take off from the start of the annual YMCA 3 Mile Run in Wilkes-Barre Monday morning. The run is also known as
‘Bernie’s Run.’
Finishing times leave winners wanting a little more
By ROBERT MINER
For The Times Leader
See RUN, Page 5B
American Farrar remembers fallen friend
with emotional Independence Day victory
Wadas
Rome
H
e was decorated in a special
Independence Day uniform that
resembled an American flag,
just like the rest of his Trenton Thun-
der teammates.
Only this was Derek Jeter, the cap-
tain of the New York Yankees.
“Looked like Captain America,”
Yankees general manager Brian Cash-
man said with a laugh.
Jeter smiled.
The Yankees got a good hoot too,
when Cashman sent them pictures he
clicked during Jeter’s dress rehearsal
Sunday night.
“Here’s the captain,” Cashman said
he teasingly warned the team. “Try to
do everything you can do not to get
injured so you don’t end up looking
like this.”
Nobody’s joking around now.
Jeter returned to the Yankees on
Monday after a weekend rehabilitation
stint at Double-A Trenton, where he
successfully proved his aching calf that
forced him to miss 19 games is healthy
enough for him to play for New York
again.
Is he still skilled enough to stay
there?
Now in his 17th season with the
Yankees, at the age of 37, Jeter doesn’t
make people jump from their seats as
he once did.
His .260 batting average through the
first half of this year, coming off a .270
season in his contract year, suggest
Jeter is in decline from the player who
owns a .312 lifetime batting average.
He went into Monday’s game at Cleve-
land needing just six hits to reach the
prestigious 3,000 mark for his career,
but those hits are coming fewer and
further between for him.
It is why Yankee fans, and maybe
the Yankees themselves, are becoming
so enamored with the shortstop across
town who plays for the Mets. But as
electrifying as Jose Reyes can be, he’s
had problems staying in the lineup
himself.
Jeter rarely comes out, having
played in at least 148 games during 14
of the past 15 seasons.
“I don’t like sitting out,” Jeter said.
Fans continue to love the way he
plays the game, which is why a record
crowd of 9,212 people turned out to
watch Jeter at Waterfront Park.
It didn’t take long for Jeter to fill the
park with energy.
It was nothing more than a final
tuneup in Trenton for him Sunday, but
Jeter played it the way he always does
– like the World Series was on the
line.
He barely broke stride going from
first to third when the left fielder bun-
gled a base hit. His lunge couldn’t
snare a sinking liner in the field, but
his quick-witted flip to second record-
ed an out on the play. He didn’t need
help completing a double play against
Altoona a couple innings later.
And for every little flub – Jeter com-
mitted an error and struck out to the
delight of some Altoona Curve fans
who gleefully implored him to retire –
Jeter flashed baseball brilliance.
The defining moment of what he is
about, what he has always been about,
came when he dropped down a bunt
for a base hit with two men on base
during his final at-bat in the fifth in-
ning.
“He was back,” Jeter said of the
Altoona third baseman, “we needed
runners on base, we were losing at the
time. It’s something I would do during
the course of the season. Why not do
it here?
“Still had to play the game.”
It’s never mattered to Jeter whether
that game was going on in Double-A
Trenton or amid the thrills of the
postseason at Yankee Stadium.
“He’s ready to go,” Cashman pro-
claimed.
Always.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Capt. America
is still leaving
his calling card
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
“I ran through the last
two miles in 10:16. That’s
not good. That’s a
workout pace for me. I
just didn’t have it. It
wasn’t my day.”
Chris Wadas
Overall race winner
K
PAGE 2B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
MEETINGS
Luzerne County Federation of
Sportsmen will meet at 7:30 p.m.
on July 11 at the American Legion
Post 609 on corner of Lee Park
Avenue and St. Mary’s Road. Club
delegates are urged to attend and
interested sportsmen are invited.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
ENTERTAINMENT REPORT
Who will replace Regis
Mark Consuelos 3/2
Andy Cohen 2/1
Ryan Seacrest 8/1
Kathy Griffin 12/1
Tim Gunn 15/1
Mario Lopez 15/1
Neil Patrick Harris 20/1
Alec Baldwin 25/1
Anderson Cooper 50/1
Anthony Weiner 100/1
Any other 3/1
POLITICAL REPORT
Odds to win the Republican nomination in 2012
Mitt Romney 5/2
Sarah Palin 9/2
Jon Huntsman 6/1
Rick Perry 7/1
Michele Bachmann 8/1
Tim Pawlenty 12/1
John Boehner 15/1
Jon Thune 15/1
Rudy Giuliani 20/1
Michael Bloomberg 20/1
Bobby Jindal 25/1
Ron Paul 25/1
Jeb Bush 25/1
Chris Christie 25/1
Newt Gingrich 30/1
Paul Ryan 40/1
Rick Santorum 50/1
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
Yankees -$150 INDIANS
RED SOX -$220 Blue Jays
RANGERS -$200 Orioles
WHITE SOX -$155 Royals
Rays -$115 TWINS
Tigers -$125 ANGELS
A’S -$105 Mariners
National League
PIRATES -$120 Astros
NATIONALS -$135 Cubs
CARDS -$150 Reds
BRAVES -$125 Rockies
Phillies -$160 MARLINS
BREWERS -$175 D’backs
DODGERS -$125 Mets
GIANTS -$158 Padres
CFL
Favorite Points Underdog
Friday
WINNIPEG 2 Toronto
BR COLUMBIA 1 Calgary
Saturday
Montreal 1.5 SASKATCHEWAN
EDMONTON 2 Hamilton
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
The stakes seasonreally kicks into highgear today withthe start of
GrandCircuit Week. Eachandeveryliveracingcardfor thenext week
wewill get aglimpseof thestars of tomorrowinexcitingstakes racing
action. Here’s a quick look at the schedule for the Reynolds Memorial
Stakes, which conclude next Tuesday, July 12.
Today – 2 year old colt &gelding trotters and 3 year old filly pacers
Wednesday – 2 year old filly trotters
Friday – 2 year old filly pacers
Saturday – 3 year old colt & gelding pacers and trotters
Tuesday, July12- 2year oldcolt &geldingpacers and3year oldfilly
trotters
This is typically one of the most exciting times of the season for
harness racing fans. How can you not like great drivers, fast horses
and hot weather? That’s what horse racing is all about.
BEST BET: UNCLE PETER (13TH)
VALUE PLAY: PRINCE OF A FELLA (14TH)
POST TIME 6:30 p.m.
All Races One Mile
First-$19,891 Reynolds Stakes
1 Astarsborn Hanover R.Schnittker 1-1-1 Looks great in the AM 3-1
3 Pekoe Fashion D.Palone 1-3-1 Solid, if stays on gait 7-2
7 Nothing But Class J.Takter 2-2-x Well-bred youngster 5-2
4 Whata Buz T.Smedshammer 2-4-x Trond having some year 9-2
2 Frost Bites K C.Norris 2-1-x Norris solid with 2yr olds 8-1
6 Ballagio Hanover To.Schadel 2-8-x Marks his debut 6-1
5 Tangram G.Wright 5-3-4 Wright in for rare visit 12-1
Second-$9,700 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,600 last 5
9 Royal Cam-Hall G.Napolitano 3-7-4 Finds a winning spot 9-2
7 Artmendous B.Simpson 4-5-1 Sent off by team Simpson 15-1
1 Keystone Swinger T.Tetrick 5-2-6 New to Castellani barn 7-2
4 Artist Point A.McCarthy 5-7-3 Note the driver change 6-1
6 Clear Character M.Simons 8-6-4 Mare tries the boys 3-1
2 Sir Beach Dragon D.Ingraham 6-4-4 Not won in a long time 4-1
3 Kevin’s Apples A.Santeramo 6-4-4 Andy yet to pick up #1 8-1
5 Powered By Zeus M.Romano 4-6-5 Overwhelmed 10-1
8 Rader Detector P.Berry 7-7-8 Too slow 20-1
Third-$19,891 Reynolds Stakes
2 Stormin Normand T.Tetrick 1-1-1 Won’t be stopped 5-2
4 Lad Pine D.Miller 2-7-2 The breeding is there 3-1
5 Chapter Eleven D.Palone 1-4-3 Cantab Hall colt 7-2
6 Keystone Silencer To.Schadel 2-1-4 Todd loves to be first off gate 8-1
1 Pine Tab R.Schnittker 1-5-x Won his last qualifier 9-2
7 Marionmetropolitan T.Smedshammer 5-3-x Say that name fast 6-1
3 Flashbacks D.Chellis 3-x-x Keep dreaming 12-1
Fourth-$20,291 Reynolds Stakes
1 Lightning Storm Y.Gingras 1-1-x Reason Yannick is here 7-2
4 Possess The Will T.Tetrick 1-4-2 Fast in prep 3-1
8 Meadowbranch Jack To.Schadel 1-5-4 Sj’s Caviar gelding 8-1
7 Donatello R.Schnittker 3-6-x Ray owns-trains-drives 4-1
6 Not Afraid J.Takter 6-2-x Takter great with trotters 5-1
3 Super Macdeen C.Norris 2-1-x Can be any type 10-1
5 Marion Manhattan M.Kakaley 4-2-2 Riding solo 12-1
2 Broadway Zinger T.Smedshammer 5-4-x Out of bullets 9-2
Fifth-$21,967 Reynolds Stakes
6 Fresh Idea D.Palone 1-1-2 Lynch champ is back 5-2
1 Foxy Lady M.Kakaley 2-1-2 Still seems green 3-1
2 Mikayla Rose T.Tetrick 3-1-1 Can’t be overlooked 9-2
4 Nelly Hanover J.Pavia 2-1-8 Pavia picks up stakes drive 6-1
5 Lightning Maddy G.Napolitano 2-4-3 Rare Pena youngster 7-2
7 Latin Lyric D.Miller 5-4-1 Notch below these 8-1
3 Brookie B Quick J.Taggart 9-6-8 Easy toss 12-1
Sixth-$9,800 Clm.Hndcp Pace;clm.price $7-10,000
9 Dance In The Wind L.Stalbaum 4-1-1 Back with Asher stable 3-1
8 PW Ivory Grin G.Napolitano 1-8-9 A danger if finds early spot 9-2
7 Grngrasanhitimes A.McCarthy 5-5-2 Gets a little relief 4-1
1 Five Star Gazer M.Kakaley 5-1-4 Moves up in price 7-2
4 Cardine Hanover T.Tetrick 2-2-3 In live hands 6-1
6 Star Of India A.Napolitano 8-3-7 Dull 8-1
2 Mysteriosa Hanover J.Pavia 7-6-4 Little since the purchase 10-1
3 Naughty Indeed B.Simpson 5-1-5 Walloped in most recent 20-1
5 Lady O’Grady T.Buter 1-3-8 No it’s not Lady Gaga 15-1
Seventh-$15,000 Clm.Hndcp Trot;clm.price $12-15,000
5 Tilly Bomb G.Napolitano 1-3-5 Has got it going 7-2
1 Credit Score T.Buter 1-2-4 Live trot from the pole 6-1
2 Apeachtoremember S.Allard 1-1-1 Allard’s been active on scene 3-1
3 Speculation D.Miller 2-9-3 Couldn’t hold off the Laser 4-1
7 McKelvie M.Simons 3-4-4 2nd start off the claim 8-1
4 Round About L.Stalbaum 3-3-5 Tough company 9-2
8 Chiselled H.Parker 2-5-2 Needs a lot to happen 10-1
9 Money Machine J.Pavia 5-8-3 Stuck at the ATM 20-1
6 Smedshammer M.Kakaley 6-5-7 His spree is over 15-1
Eighth-$24,000 Clm.Pace;clm.price $30,000
6 Three New Dawns G.Napolitano 1-2-1 On fire 5-2
4 Dragon Laws L.Stalbaum 3-3-1 A hot commodity 4-1
2 Four Starz Elder M.Romano 1-3-2 They all chase the chalk 7-2
1 Vintage Fenom T.Tetrick 4-8-8 Big driver change 6-1
8 Bongo A.McCarthy 2-4-6 Can’t sustain the bid 15-1
3 Lap Hanover J.Pavia 5-2-1 2nd start for Pavia outfit 5-1
5 Success Rocks D.Miller 2-6-7 Good to see Miller here 8-1
9 Mambo Italiano S.Allard 1-8-1 Not from out here 12-1
7 Triple Major M.Simons 7-5-2 Flagged early 20-1
Ninth-$9,700 Cond.Pace;n/w $4,600 last 5
6 Four Starz Sue G.Napolitano 2-8-5 It’s his race to lose 3-1
7 R C Cruiser W.Mann 2-3-7 Just missed in solid effort 7-2
9 Final Flash T.Tetrick 7-4-6 Chester invader 8-1
1 Marks Pacific A.McCarthy 5-9-3 The wood can’t hurt 4-1
2 A Fool For Mark Du.Ingraham 2-1-7 Aren’t they all 9-2
8 The Real Dan A.Santeramo 3-5-6 An also ran 10-1
5 Thee Town Hero L.Stalbaum 7-7-9 Vote against 6-1
4 Murphy Delivers J.Pavia 4-1-6 Off a scr-lame 15-1
3 Kingofthecastle M.Kakaley 6-x-x Not raced since Dec. 20-1
Tenth-$21,967 Reynolds Stakes
5 Cold Mist G.Napolitano 3-2-4 Nap steers her home 3-1
3 In Deep Thought D.Palone 4-2-3 Better last season 5-2
2 Nutmegs Cider T.Tetrick 1-3-4 Retain Tetrick 7-2
6 Aspiration A.Napolitano 4-1-2 Anap gets stakes shot 9-2
1 Musette Mindale P.Berry 1-9-1 It would be an upset 6-1
7 Fashion Gal D.Miller 1-2-2 Big move up ladder 8-1
4 Real Lady Katie A.McCarthy 7-6-1 Tags along 12-1
Eleventh-$20,291 Reynolds Stakes
6 Weingartner J.Takter 2-4-2 Takter has to win one 3-1
3 Hall Harbour M.Kakaley 1-6-6 Burke pupil 7-2
5 On The Podium R.Schnittker 2-3-x Marks his debut 4-1
7 Beer Summit A.McCarthy 1-4-x From barn of Noel Daley 5-1
8 Dohini Surfer D.Miller 4-3-4 Miller good with trotters 9-2
1 Caspian Boko K.Rickert 1-1-2 Has the experience 8-1
2 Can Do R.Paver 3-2-3 Can not 10-1
4 Order By Me D.Ingraham 3-7-6 Left in the dust 12-1
Twelfth-$21,967 Reynolds Stakes
2 Hasty Pulse M.Kakaley 1-2-4 Getting better and better 3-1
1 Show And Tell D.Palone 4-1-2 A fan favorite 7-2
5 Myluvmylife M.Lachance 3-8-4 Iron Mike in for mount 9-2
7 Kayla’s Dream G.Napolitano 3-2-5 Been getting checks 8-1
3 Live Inspired M.Teague 10-3-6 Teague still riding a high 5-2
4 Tu Sei Bella D.Miller 1-4-1 Has to show more speed 12-1
6 Caviart Sarah A.McCarthy 4-5-5 Winless on season 6-1
Thirteenth-$20,291 Reynolds Stakes
4 Uncle Peter J.Takter 1-1-x Romps 3-1
5 Melt In Your Mouth T.Tetrick 2-x-x Chase is on for place 5-1
8 Solvato T.Smedshammer 1-2-x Late fury for third 4-1
3 Chasin Mason R.Schnittker 2-7-2 Ray has a lot in all week 7-2
7 Map Of Hawaii D.Palone 1-7-4 Wrong part of town 9-2
1 Muscle Source C.Norris 1-2-x Muscles Yankee colt 8-1
2 Radical Ridge D.Ingraham 6-4-x A turn for the worse 10-1
6 Abbi’s Gabbi A.McCarthy 4-2-x One more race to go 12-1
Fourteenth-$4,800 Clm.Pace;clm.price $5,000
6 Prince Of A Fella G.Napolitano 7-6-1 Darkhorse of the night 9-2
4 Hand Me No Lines M.Romano 2-7-4 Just missed vs. similar 7-2
2 Sammy Savannah A.McCarthy 1-8-3 Live in here 3-1
7 Crazy Character L.Stalbaum 3-5-6 From potent Asher stable 4-1
8 Heavenly Helen J.Pavia 4-4-3 Use in super’s 6-1
1 Seafood Prince A.Santeramo 9-3-6 Winless in previous 45 10-1
3 Cajun Moon M.Simons 6-2-6 Dusted 8-1
5 Juliard T.Buter 8-4-10 ….next 15-1
9 Listen To Your Art D.Ingraham 8-7-3 See you tomorrow 20-1
On the Mark
By MARK DUDEK
Times Leader Correspondent
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Today
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Back Mountain at Wilkes-Barre
Old Forge at Nanticoke
Greater Pittston at Mountain Top
Northwest at Swoyersville
Hazleton at Tunkhannock
LITTLE LEAGUE
District 16 Junior Baseball
(5:45 p.m.)
Avoca/Pittston-1 at South W-B/Mayflower
Avoca/Pittston-2 at Jenkins Twp.
Plains at Duryea/Pittston Twp.
Hanover/Ashley at North W-B/Bear Buck
District 31 Junior Baseball
(5:45 p.m.)
Kingston/Forty Fort at Northwest
Swoyersville at Greater Wyoming Area
District 16 Major Baseball
(6 p.m.)
Jenkins Twp. at Avoca/Dupont
Pittston Twp. at North Wilkes-Barre
District 31 Major Baseball
(6 p.m.)
Kingston/Forty Fort at Exeter
West Side at Wyoming/West Wyoming
Back Mountain American at Swoyersville
District 16 10-11 Baseball
(6 p.m.)
Duryea at South Wilkes-Barre
Nanticoke at Mountain Top
District 3110-11 Baseball
(6 p.m.)
West Side at Back Mountain American
Wyoming/West Wyoming at West Pittston, 6 p.m.
District 16 Minor Baseball
Hanover at Jenkins Twp., 6 p.m.
District 31 Minor Baseball
Northwest at West Pittston, 6 p.m.
Section 5 Major Softball
(at Nanticoke Little League)
Kingston/Forty Fort vs. North Pocono, 5:30 p.m.
Nanticoke vs. Carbino Club, 7:30 p.m.
District 16 Minor Softball
Mountain Top at Duryea/Pittston Twp., 6 p.m.
District 31 Minor Softball
Bob Horlacher at Harveys Lake, 6 p.m.
Wednesday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Plains at Wilkes-Barre
Mountain Top at Hazleton
Greater Pittston at Northwest
Tunkhannock at Swoyersville
Nanticoke at Back Mountain
LITTLE LEAGUE
(6 p.m. unless noted)
District 16 Senior Baseball
(5:45 p.m.)
North Wilkes-Barre at Pittston
Nanticoke at Duryea/Pittston Twp.
Avoca/Jenkins at Hanover/Ashley
Newport at Plains
District 31 Senior Baseball
Greater Wyoming Area at West Side, 5:45 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS — Tour de France, stage 4, Lorient to
Mur-de-Bretagne, France
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
7 p.m.
ESPN — Cincinnati at St. Louis
ROOT – Houston at Pittsburgh
COMCAST – Philadelphia at Florida
YES – N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland
10 p.m.
MLB—Regional coverage, San Diego at San Fran-
cisco or Detroit at L.A. Angels
SNY – N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers
SOCCER
Noon
ESPN—FIFA, Women’s World Cup, Group B, En-
gland vs. Japan, at Augsburg, Germany
ESPN2 — FIFA, Women’s World Cup, Group B,
New Zealand vs. Mexico, at Sinsheim, Germany
2:30 p.m.
ESPN — FIFA, Women’s World Cup, Group A,
France vs. Germany, at Moenchengladbach, Ger-
many
ESPN2 — FIFA, Women’s World Cup, Group A,
Canada vs. Nigeria, at Dresden, Germany
WNBA BASKETBALL
9 p.m.
ESPN2 — Los Angeles at Phoenix
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
NEWYORKYANKEES—Activated SSDerek Jeter
from the 15-day DL.
TEXAS RANGERS—Activated C Mike Napoli from
the 15-day DL. Optioned C Taylor Teagarden to
Round Rock (PCL).
TORONTOBLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with SS
Dawel Lugo and RHP Osman Gutierrez.
National League
CHICAGOCUBS—Recalled RHPCasey Coleman
fromIowa (PCL). Optioned RHPChris Carpenter to
Iowa.
COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled OF Cole Gar-
ner from Colorado Springs (PCL). Optioned RHP
Clayton Mortensen to Colorado Springs.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Promoted OF
BryceHarper fromHagerstown(SAL) toHarrisburg
(EL).
American Association
EL PASO DIABLOS—Signed INF Javier Brito.
LINCOLNSALTDOGS—ReleasedINFKevinRios.
Signed RHP James Garcia.
SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Signed RHP Luis
Carreras.
WICHITA WINGNUTS—Signed RHP Marcos Ta-
bata. Released RHP Steve Macfarland.
WINNIPEG GOLDEYES—Released RHP William
Jackel.
Can-Am League
BROCKTON ROX—Released RHP Travis
Hughes.
NEW JERSEY JACKALS—Released LHP AJ
Wideman. Signed LHP John Kibler.
NEWARK BEARS—Released LHP Victor Gonza-
lez. Signed INF Kyle Davis.
PITTSFIELD COLONIALS—Released LHP Eric
Katzman.
QUEBEC CAPITALS—Signed INF Kevin Young.
ROCKLAND BOULDERS—Signed C Scott Clem-
ent, OF Joe Hage, INF Cole Kraft and OF Ryde Ro-
driguez.
WORCESTER TORNADOES—Released RHP
Ryan Walfield.
Frontier League
RIVERCITYRASCALS—Released CJosh Banda.
TRAVERSE CITY BEACH BUMS—Signed LHP
Richard Raraigh. Released RHP Wayde Kitchens
and LHP Ben Rodewald.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Signed RB Mike
McLendon to the practice roster.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES—Re-signed D Mike Weber to
a multiyear contract.
CALGARYFLAMES—Re-signedDAntonBabchuk
to a two-year contract.
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed LW Alex-
andre Giroux to a one-year contract.
EDMONTON OILERS—Agreed to terms with D
Theo Peckham on a one-year contract.
MONTREAL CANADIENS—Signed F Brock Trot-
ter to a one-year contract.
PHOENIX COYOTES—Signed G Curtis McElhin-
ney and D Tyler Eckford to a one-year contract.
ST. LOUIS BLUES—Signed F Brett Sterling to a
one-year contract.
WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Signed D Danny
Richmond to a one-year contract.
WINNIPEG JETS—Agreed to terms with D Randy
Jones, D Derek Meech, C Aaron Gagnon, D Mark
Flood, LW Tanner Glass and F Rick Rypien.
E A S T E R N
L E A G U E
At A Glance
All Times EDT
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 47 33 .588 —
Trenton (Yankees) ................. 48 34 .585 —
New Britain (Twins) ............... 43 37 .538 4
Reading (Phillies)................... 42 41 .506 6
1
⁄2
Portland (Red Sox) ................ 30 50 .375 17
Binghamton (Mets) ................ 29 52 .358 18
1
⁄2
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) ........... 47 34 .580 —
Richmond (Giants) ................. 41 39 .513 5
1
⁄2
Erie (Tigers) ............................ 42 40 .512 5
1
⁄2
Bowie (Orioles)....................... 41 40 .506 6
Akron (Indians) ....................... 42 42 .500 6
1
⁄2
Altoona (Pirates)..................... 36 46 .439 11
1
⁄2
Sunday's Games
New Britain 9, Harrisburg 3
Portland 5, New Hampshire 2
Bowie 4, Binghamton 3
Erie 6, Akron 2
Reading 4, Richmond 3
Altoona 8, Trenton 1
Monday's Games
Bowie 17, Reading 12
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Trenton 1, Richmond 0, 2 innings, susp.
Akron 7, Altoona 1
Erie at Harrisburg, (n)
New Britain at New Hampshire, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Portland at Binghamton, 5:35 p.m., 1st game
Akron at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
New Britain at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
Reading at Bowie, 7:05 p.m.
Portland at Binghamton, 8:05 p.m., 2nd game
Wednesday's Games
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
Akron at Altoona, 7 p.m.
Erie at Harrisburg, 7 p.m.
New Britain at New Hampshire, 7:05 p.m.
Reading at Bowie, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at Richmond, 7:05 p.m.
I N T E R N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
At A Glance
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 49 35 .583 —
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(Yankees) ................................ 45 38 .542 3
1
⁄2
Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 44 39 .530 4
1
⁄2
Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 37 45 .451 11
Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 36 50 .419 14
Rochester (Twins).................. 31 50 .383 16
1
⁄2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) ....................... 45 38 .542 —
Gwinnett (Braves) .................. 45 38 .542 —
Charlotte (White Sox)............ 41 43 .488 4
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles)..................... 34 50 .405 11
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians)................ 57 27 .679 —
Louisville (Reds) .................... 45 40 .529 12
1
⁄2
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 43 43 .500 15
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 35 51 .407 23
Sunday's Games
Columbus 4, Louisville 2
Toledo 7, Indianapolis 1
Pawtucket 9, Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 3
Syracuse 10, Buffalo 4
Norfolk 11, Charlotte 7
Lehigh Valley 3, Rochester 1
Durham 7, Gwinnett 4
Monday's Games
Toledo 2, Indianapolis 1
Syracuse 4, Buffalo 2
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 5, Lehigh Valley 3
Pawtucket at Rochester, (n)
Durham at Gwinnett, (n)
Columbus at Louisville, (n)
Norfolk at Charlotte, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Pawtucket at Rochester, 5:05 p.m., 1st game
Buffalo at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Durham at Gwinnett, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Columbus at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
Pawtucket at Rochester, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Wednesday's Games
Pawtucket at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Norfolk at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 7:05 p.m.
Columbus at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Charlotte, 7:15 p.m.
C Y C L I N G
Tour de France Results
Monday
At Redon, France
Third Stage
A123-mile flat stage from Olonne-sur-Mer to
Redon
1. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo, 4
hours, 40 minutes, 21 seconds.
2. Romain Feillu, France, Vacansoleil-DCM, same
time.
3. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Movistar, same time.
4. Sebastien Hinault, France, AG2R La Mondiale,
same time.
5. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-Highroad, same
time.
6. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-Cervelo, same
time.
7. Julian Dean, New Zealand, Garmin-Cervelo,
same time.
8. Borut Bozic, Slovenia, Vacansoleil-DCM, same
time.
9. Andre Greipel, Germany, Omega Pharma-Lotto,
same time.
10. Jimmy Engoulvent, France, Saur-Sojasun,
same time.
11. Denis Galimzyanov, Russia, Katusha, same
time.
12. SebastienTurgot, France, Europcar, sametime.
13. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procy-
cling, same time.
14. Gianni Meersman, Belgium, Francaise des
Jeux, same time.
15. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Procycling, same
time.
16. Linus Gerdemann, Germany, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
17. William Bonnet, France, Francaise des Jeux,
same time.
18. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack,
same time.
19. Rob Riujgh, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-DCM,
same time.
20. Philippe Gilbert, Belgium, Omega Pharma-Lot-
to, same time.
Also
23. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioSh-
ack, same time.
34. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxop Bank Sungard,
same time.
43. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, same
time.
54. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack,
same time.
82. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
84. Tom Danielson, United States, Garmin-Cerve-
lo, same time.
119. Tejay VanGarderen, UnitedStates, HTC-High-
road, same time.
125. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad,
same time.
172. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC, same
time.
190. DavidZabriskie, UnitedStates, Garmin-Cerve-
lo, 3:22 behind.
Overall Standings
(After three stages)
1. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Garmin-Cervelo, 9
hours, 46 minutes, 46 seconds.
2. DavidMillar, Britain, Garmin-Cervelo, sametime.
3. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, :01 behind.
4. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Procycling, :04.
5. Linus Gerdemann, Germany, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
6. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procy-
cling, same time.
7. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
8. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
9. Jakob Fuglsang, Denmark, Leopard-Trek, same
time.
10. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, same
time.
11. Manuel Quinziato, Italy, BMC, same time.
12. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
13. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, same
time.
14. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-Highroad, :05.
15. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad, same
time.
16. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, HTC-High-
road, same time.
17. Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-Highroad, same
time.
18. Matthew Harley Goss, Australia, HTC-High-
road, same time.
19. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack, :10.
20. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioSh-
ack, same time.
Also
22. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack,
same time.
69. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank Sungard,
1:42.
71. TomDanielson, UnitedStates, Garmin-Cervelo,
1:49.
72. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, same time.
92. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC, 2:31.
109. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad,
2:54.
168. DavidZabriskie, UnitedStates, Garmin-Cerve-
lo, 6:22.
169. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo,
6:26.
N E W Y O R K -
P E N N L E A G U E
At A Glance
All Times EDT
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Staten Island (Yankees) ........ 14 2 .875 —
Brooklyn (Mets) ...................... 10 7 .588 4
1
⁄2
Hudson Valley (Rays)............ 7 9 .438 7
Aberdeen (Orioles) ................ 2 15 .118 12
1
⁄2
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Mahoning Valley (Indians)...... 11 6 .647 —
Jamestown (Marlins)............... 11 7 .611
1
⁄2
Auburn (Nationals)................... 9 8 .529 2
Williamsport (Phillies) ............. 9 9 .500 2
1
⁄2
Batavia (Cardinals) .................. 7 10 .412 4
State College (Pirates) ............ 5 12 .294 6
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Vermont (Athletics) ................. 10 5 .667 —
Lowell (Red Sox) ..................... 8 8 .500 2
1
⁄2
Connecticut (Tigers) ............... 7 8 .467 3
Tri-City (Astros) ....................... 6 10 .375 4
1
⁄2
Monday's Games
Williamsport 10, Jamestown 2
Vermont at Tri-City, 6 p.m.
Brooklyn at Staten Island, 7 p.m.
Connecticut at Lowell, ppd., rain
State College at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
Hudson Valley at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Mahoning Valley at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Vermont at Tri-City, 7 p.m.
Brooklyn at Staten Island, 7 p.m.
Mahoning Valley at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Auburn, 7:05 p.m.
Hudson Valley at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Connecticut at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Williamsport, 7:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Vermont at Brooklyn, 7 p.m.
Connecticut at Staten Island, 7 p.m.
Lowell at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
State College at Batavia, 7:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Auburn at Jamestown, 7:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Mahoning Valley, 7:05 p.m.
S O C C E R
Women's World Cup Glance
All Times EDT
FIRST ROUND
(Top two nations in each group advance)
GROUP A
GP W D L GF GA Pts
x-France................ 2 2 0 0 5 0 6
x-Germany............ 2 2 0 0 3 1 6
Nigeria................... 2 0 0 2 0 2 0
Canada.................. 2 0 0 2 1 6 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Sunday, June 26
At Sinsheim, Germany
France 1, Nigeria 0
At Berlin
Germany 2, Canada 1
Thursday, June 30
At Bochum, Germany
France 4, Canada 0
At Frankfurt
Germany 1, Nigeria 0
Tuesday, July 5
At Moenchengladbach, Germany
France vs. Germany, 2:45 p.m.
At Dresden, Germany
Canada vs. Nigeria, 2:45 p.m.
GROUP B
GP W D L GF GA Pts
x-Japan ................. 2 2 0 0 6 1 6
England................. 2 1 1 0 3 2 4
Mexico................... 2 0 1 1 1 5 1
New Zealand ........ 2 0 0 2 2 4 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Monday, June 27
At Bochum, Germany
Japan 2, New Zealand 1
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Mexico 1, England 1
Friday, July 1
At Leverkusen, Germany
Japan 4, Mexico 0
At Dresden, Germany
England 2, New Zealand 1
Tuesday, July 5
At Augsburg, Germany
England vs. Japan, 12:15 p.m.
At Sinsheim, Germany
New Zealand vs. Mexico, 12:15 p.m.
GROUP C
GP W D L GF GA Pts
x-United States..... 2 2 0 0 5 0 6
x-Sweden.............. 2 2 0 0 2 0 6
Colombia............... 1 0 0 2 0 4 0
North Korea.......... 2 0 0 2 0 3 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Tuesday, June 28
At Leverkusen, Germany
Sweden 1, Colombia 0
At Dresden, Germany
United States 2, North Korea 0
Saturday, July 2
At Augsburg, Germany
Sweden 1, North Korea 0
At Sinsheim, Germany
United States 3, Colombia 0
Wednesday, July 6
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Sweden vs. United States, 2:45 p.m.
At Bochum, Germany
North Korea vs. Colombia, 2:45 p.m.
GROUP D
GP W D L GF GA Pts
x-Brazil .................. 2 2 0 0 4 0 6
Australia................ 2 1 0 1 3 3 3
Norway.................. 2 1 0 1 1 3 3
Eq. Guinea............ 2 0 0 2 2 4 0
x-advanced to quarterfinals
Wednesday, June 29
At Augsburg, Germany
Norway 1, Equatorial Guinea 0
At Moenchengladbach, Germany
Brazil 1, Australia 0
Sunday, July 3
At Bochum, Germany
Australia 3, Equatorial Guinea 2
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Brazil 3, Norway 0
Wednesday, July 6
At Frankfurt
Equatorial Guinea vs. Brazil, Noon
At Leverkusen, Germany
Australia vs. Norway, Noon
QUARTERFINALS
Saturday, July 9
At Leverkusen, Germany
Group B winner vs. Group A second place, Noon
At Wolfsburg, Germany
Group A winner vs. Group B second place, 2:45
p.m.
Sunday, July 10
At Augsburg, Germany
Group C winner vs. Group D second place, 7 a.m.
At Dresden, Germany
Group D winner vs. Group C second place, 11:30
a.m.
SEMIFINALS
Wednesday, July 13
At Moenchengladbach, Germany
Leverkusen quarterfinal winner vs. Dresden quar-
terfinal winner, Noon
At Frankfurt
Wolfsburg quarterfinal winner vs. Augsburg quar-
terfinal winner, 2:45 p.m.
THIRD PLACE
Saturday, July 16
At Sinsheim, Germany
Semifinal losers, 11:30 a.m.
CHAMPIONSHIP
Sunday, July 17
At Frankfurt
Semifinal winners, 2:45 p.m.
H A R N E S S
R A C I N G
Pocono Downs Results
Monday July 04
First - $7,000 Trot 1:57.2
2-Tameka Seelster (Ma Kakaley) ....5.40 2.60 2.20
4-Traveling Tune (Ji Taggart Jr) ...............5.60 4.40
1-Grace N Charlie (Ma Romano) .......................4.40
EXACTA (2-4) $34.80
TRIFECTA (2-4-1) $110.20
SUPERFECTA (2-4-1-ALL) $74.20
Second - $9,700 Pace 1:55.1
2-Princess Bliss (Ty Buter) ...........34.00 10.60 7.80
1-Miss Matthews (An Napolitano) .............6.80 7.00
8-Dicey Miss (Jo Pavia Jr)..................................6.00
EXACTA (2-1) $187.40
TRIFECTA (2-1-8) $792.60
SUPERFECTA (2-1-ALL-ALL) $389.60
DAILY DOUBLE (2-2) $92.00
Third - $9,700 Trot 1:56.0
7-Foggy Lane K (Da Ingraham)....36.60 19.00 8.60
5-Calchips Muscle (La Stalbaum).............7.40 3.80
2-Lost In The Fog (An Santeramo)....................6.00
EXACTA (7-5) $450.20
TRIFECTA (7-5-2) $2,123.00
SUPERFECTA (7-5-2-6) $1,769.80
Fourth - $11,000 Trot 1:56.1
8-Eagle Say (La Stalbaum)................4.20 3.00 2.10
1-Gunga Win (De Dunn).............................3.40 2.20
3-Victory Nut (To Schadel) .................................2.20
EXACTA (8-1) $21.20
TRIFECTA (8-1-3) $50.20
SUPERFECTA (8-1-3-4) $1,083.00
Fifth - $9,700 Trot 1:58.1
4-Detech (To Schadel) ......................7.80 3.80 3.20
5-Zero Boundaries (Ma Romano).............3.60 2.60
8-Alarming Quick (Mi Simons) ...........................4.00
EXACTA (4-5) $25.00
TRIFECTA (4-5-8) $151.40
SUPERFECTA (4-5-8-6) $238.20
PICK 3 (7-8-4) $302.00
Scratched: Enjoy Your Tour
Sixth - $10,000 Pace 1:55.4
8-Every Girls Desire (An Napolitano) 11.80 8.00
6.80
5-Purple Mcrain (To Schadel) ...............25.20 10.00
9-Love To Rock (Mi Simons) .............................3.40
EXACTA (8-5) $250.00
TRIFECTA (8-5-9) $685.20
SUPERFECTA (8-5-ALL-ALL) $1,284.00
Seventh - $7,000 Trot 1:57.1
3-Gidget (Ma Kakaley) ......................3.60 2.40 2.60
6-Crushproof (Mi Simons) .........................3.60 3.60
5-Techalong (To Schadel)................................14.60
EXACTA (3-6) $16.40
TRIFECTA (3-6-5) $221.00
SUPERFECTA (3-6-5-ALL) $494.60
Eighth - $4,800 Pace 1:53.1
4-Universal Dream N (Ma Kakaley).3.40 2.60 2.60
1-The Rising N (Ty Buter) ..........................3.20 2.20
5-Imposter A (Ma Romano)................................4.80
EXACTA (4-1) $17.40
TRIFECTA (4-1-5) $83.40
SUPERFECTA (4-1-5-3) $359.80
Ninth - $4,800 Pace 1:54.0
4-Doc’s Whisky (La Stalbaum) .........5.40 3.40 2.20
5-Annika S (An McCarthy).........................4.00 2.40
1-Bridezilla (Ma Kakaley)....................................2.20
EXACTA (4-5) $15.00
TRIFECTA (4-5-1) $28.00
SUPERFECTA (4-5-1-3) $1,656.40
PICK 4 (8-3-4-4 (4 Out of 4)) $139.00
Tenth - $12,000 Trot 1:56.4
3-Celebrity Legacy (Da Ingraham) .11.20 3.20 3.00
8-Badboy Paparazzi A (Mi Simons)........10.00 2.80
2-Zorgwijk Kingpin (Ma Kakaley) ......................3.60
EXACTA (3-8) $94.80
TRIFECTA (3-8-2) $493.00
SUPERFECTA (3-8-2-1) $1,033.00
Scratched: Beach Nut Brand
Eleventh - $11,000 Trot 1:56.2
3-Commandment (Ty Buter) .............3.80 3.00 2.10
5-Cashahallic (An Napolitano) ..................5.60 3.00
6-Peaceful Path (Ma Kakaley) ...........................3.00
EXACTA (3-5) $10.60
TRIFECTA (3-5-6) $25.60
SUPERFECTA (3-5-6-4) $48.40
Scratched: Meadowbranch Red
Twelfth - $11,000 Pace 1:53.3
2-Bonfire Bliss (Da Ingraham) ..........5.80 5.00 2.60
7-May I Say (Ty Buter) ............................ 20.00 5.80
4-The Pan Flamingo (Ma Kakaley) ....................2.10
EXACTA (2-7) $148.20
TRIFECTA (2-7-4) $278.00
SUPERFECTA (2-7-4-5) $1,921.20
PICK 3 (3-3-2) $28.60
Scratched: A Knuckle Sandwich
Thirteenth - $7,000 Trot 1:57.2
5-Here Comes Monte (Ma Romano)9.20 4.00 3.60
1-Bar None (Mi Simons) .............................8.80 5.60
4-Revington (An Napolitano)............................12.80
EXACTA (5-1) $70.80
TRIFECTA (5-1-4) $692.00
SUPERFECTA (5-1-4-ALL) $1,594.60
Fourteenth - $7,000 Trot 1:57.3
4-Ashcroft (Mi Simons)......................5.40 2.60 2.20
1-Vijay Star (Ty Buter) ................................2.80 2.60
8-Funny Briefs (Si Allard) ...................................5.20
EXACTA (4-1) $13.00
TRIFECTA (4-1-8) $121.20
SUPERFECTA (4-1-8-2) $347.40
LATE DOUBLE (5-4) $30.00
Scratched: Black Watch
Total Handle-$226,886
G O L F
PGA Tour FedExCup Leaders
Through July 3
Rank Player .......................Points YTDMoney
1. Nick Watney.................. 1,798$4,189,233
2. K.J. Choi ........................ 1,536$3,665,704
3. Luke Donald.................. 1,455$3,550,248
4. Bubba Watson .............. 1,448$3,017,350
5. Mark Wilson.................. 1,321$2,690,688
6. Matt Kuchar ................... 1,306$2,878,861
7. David Toms................... 1,280$2,920,730
8. Phil Mickelson .............. 1,261$2,496,784
9. Gary Woodland ............ 1,237$2,381,229
10. Webb Simpson........... 1,230$2,466,692
11. Brandt Snedeker ........ 1,191$2,392,395
12. Steve Stricker ............. 1,173$2,561,139
13. Martin Laird................. 1,165$2,348,956
14. Jonathan Byrd............. 1,154$2,358,204
15. Jason Day ................... 1,141$2,720,362
16. Rory Sabbatini ............ 1,137$2,200,867
17. Aaron Baddeley.......... 1,112$2,329,848
18. Fredrik Jacobson....... 1,112$2,026,682
19. Hunter Mahan............. 1,072$2,181,312
20. Charl Schwartzel........ 980$2,080,921
21. Bill Haas...................... 946$1,730,170
22. Steve Marino .............. 930$1,812,196
23. Dustin Johnson .......... 900$1,947,228
24. Jhonattan Vegas ........ 894$1,577,378
25. Keegan Bradley.......... 891$1,822,168
26. Spencer Levin ............ 879$1,712,268
27. D.A. Points.................. 875$1,700,583
28. Ryan Palmer ............... 815$1,614,010
29. Jason Dufner .............. 813$1,678,060
30. Charles Howell III....... 808$1,535,895
31. Vijay Singh.................. 799$1,532,130
32. Brendan Steele .......... 756$1,460,104
33. Ryan Moore ................ 740$1,463,150
34. Justin Rose................. 734$1,441,382
35. Bo Van Pelt ................. 733$1,486,545
36. Y.E. Yang.................... 728$1,587,837
37. Charley Hoffman........ 716$1,123,658
38. Brandt Jobe ................ 707$1,252,470
39. Tommy Gainey........... 701$1,341,751
40. Lucas Glover .............. 699$1,377,188
41. Robert Garrigus ......... 678$1,387,787
42. Kevin Na...................... 660$1,247,029
43. J.B. Holmes ................ 640$1,398,583
44. Zach Johnson............. 638$1,131,621
45. Adam Scott ................. 637$1,478,553
46. Harrison Frazar .......... 624$1,192,489
47. Robert Karlsson......... 609$1,184,755
48. John Senden .............. 607 $966,820
49. Rickie Fowler.............. 607 $999,545
50. Chris Kirk .................... 607$1,042,909
51. Brian Gay..................... 600 $999,066
52. Robert Allenby ........... 596$1,109,862
53. J.J. Henry.................... 585 $826,927
54. Jeff Overton................ 560$1,039,570
55. Kevin Streelman......... 557$1,030,075
56. Charlie Wi ................... 545 $982,840
57. John Rollins................ 541 $960,036
58. Brian Davis.................. 541 $784,555
59. Carl Pettersson .......... 538 $892,408
60. Ryuji Imada................. 517 $913,162
61. Jimmy Walker............. 506 $883,895
62. Pat Perez..................... 497 $875,808
63. Ricky Barnes............... 496 $848,892
64. Brendon de Jonge ..... 494 $657,498
65. Stewart Cink ............... 493 $809,028
66. Troy Matteson............. 488 $833,746
67. Johnson Wagner........ 486 $966,064
68. Marc Leishman........... 485 $772,767
69. Graeme McDowell ..... 479 $987,558
70. Kevin Chappell ........... 477$1,021,298
71. Jerry Kelly ................... 471 $767,876
72. Sergio Garcia ............. 471 $903,091
73. Paul Goydos ............... 460$1,099,260
74. Chris Couch................ 459 $738,856
75. Jim Furyk .................... 456 $769,757
76. Ben Crane................... 451 $771,151
77. Michael Bradley ......... 443 $818,895
78. Blake Adams .............. 425 $525,966
79. Geoff Ogilvy................ 418 $814,227
80. Tim Herron.................. 411 $675,318
81. Bryce Molder .............. 409 $743,855
82. Hunter Haas ............... 408 $708,566
83. Scott Verplank............ 406 $758,178
84. Tom Gillis.................... 400 $782,667
85. Chad Campbell .......... 399 $545,513
86. Matt Bettencourt ......... 392 $612,354
87. Greg Chalmers........... 388 $626,193
88. Cameron Tringale...... 386 $707,975
89. Chris DiMarco ............ 371 $532,677
PGA Tour Statistics
Through July 3
Scoring Average
1, Nick Watney, 69.40. 2, Luke Donald, 69.42. 3,
Matt Kuchar, 69.51. 4, Steve Stricker, 69.65. 5,
Webb Simpson, 69.71. 6, Sergio Garcia, 69.76. 7,
John Merrick, 69.82. 8 (tie), Fredrik Jacobson and
Brandt Snedeker, 69.86. 10, Spencer Levin, 69.89.
Driving Distance
1, J.B. Holmes, 317.6. 2, Bubba Watson, 311.6. 3,
Robert Garrigus, 309.8. 4, Dustin Johnson, 307.8.
5, Gary Woodland, 306.6. 6, Steven Bowditch,
305.7. 7, Angel Cabrera, 302.6. 8, Kyle Stanley,
301.6. 9, Jhonattan Vegas, 300.4. 10, Martin Laird,
299.9.
Driving Accuracy Percentage
1, David Toms, 74.41%. 2, Brian Gay, 73.83%. 3,
Ben Curtis, 72.80%. 4, Heath Slocum, 72.29%. 5,
Joe Durant, 72.23%. 6, Jerry Kelly, 71.73%. 7, Zach
Johnson, 70.57%. 8, Justin Hicks, 69.05%. 9, Roc-
co Mediate, 68.97%. 10, Brian Davis, 68.73%.
Greens in Regulation Pct.
1, Bubba Watson, 72.43%. 2, David Toms, 71.86%.
3, Justin Rose, 71.56%. 4, Hunter Mahan, 71.11%.
5, Bill Haas, 71.00%. 6, Heath Slocum, 70.44%. 7,
Boo Weekley, 70.20%. 8, Chad Campbell, 70.09%.
9, Ernie Els, 70.03%. 10, Bill Lunde, 69.49%.
Total Driving
1, Adam Scott, 67. 2, Bo Van Pelt, 69. 3, Brandt
Jobe, 71. 4, John Rollins, 72. 5, Nick Watney, 81. 6,
Chris Couch, 90. 7, Boo Weekley, 94. 8, John Mer-
rick, 96. 9, John Senden, 103. 10, 2 tied with 104.
Putting Average
1, Steve Stricker, 1.690. 2, Luke Donald, 1.694. 3,
Rickie Fowler, 1.706. 4, Brandt Snedeker, 1.707. 5,
Lucas Glover, 1.712. 6, Kevin Na, 1.719. 7, Nick
Watney, 1.727. 8 (tie), Greg Chalmers and Webb
Simpson, 1.728. 10, 3 tied with 1.730.
Birdie Average
1, Steve Stricker, 4.53. 2, Rickie Fowler, 4.44. 3,
DustinJohnson, 4.43. 4, LukeDonald, 4.38. 5, Hun-
ter Mahan, 4.37. 6, Webb Simpson, 4.34. 7, Nick
Watney , 4.33. 8, Aaron Baddeley, 4.31. 9, Bubba
Watson, 4.30. 10, Phil Mickelson, 4.29.
Eagles (Holes per)
1, Sunghoon Kang, 74.3. 2, Sergio Garcia, 76.5. 3,
Bubba Watson, 86.7. 4, Derek Lamely, 90.0. 5,
Scott Piercy, 93.0. 6, Scott McCarron, 95.1. 7, Bob-
by Gates, 97.2. 8, Bo Van Pelt, 106.2. 9, Nate Smith,
108.0. 10, 2 tied with 110.0.
Sand Save Percentage
1 (tie), Brian Gay and Jason Day, 66.67%. 3, D.J.
Brigman, 65.22%. 4, K.J. Choi , 64.29%. 5, Ian
Poulter, 63.93%. 6, RodPampling, 63.79%. 7, Greg
Chalmers, 62.61%. 8, Paul Stankowski, 62.50%. 9,
Scott Verplank, 61.70%. 10, Mike Weir, 61.54%.
All-Around Ranking
1, Webb Simpson, 234. 2, Matt Kuchar, 271. 3, Hun-
ter Mahan, 280. 4, Nick Watney , 281. 5, David
Toms, 293. 6, Steve Stricker, 331. 7, Bo Van Pelt,
340. 8, Jason Day, 375. 9, Justin Rose, 385. 10,
Chris Couch, 394.
PGA TOUR Official Money Leaders
1, Nick Watney (14), $4,189,233. 2, K.J. Choi (15),
$3,665,704. 3, Luke Donald (10), $3,550,248. 4,
Bubba Watson (15), $3,017,350. 5, David Toms
(14), $2,920,730. 6, Matt Kuchar (15), $2,878,861.
7, Jason Day (13), $2,720,362. 8, Mark Wilson (17),
$2,690,688. 9, Steve Stricker (11), $2,561,139. 10,
Phil Mickelson (13), $2,496,784.
90. John Merrick............... 370 $598,277
91. Vaughn Taylor ............ 365 $350,352
92. Scott Stallings ............ 360 $653,546
93. Kevin Stadler .............. 360 $666,213
94. Kyle Stanley................ 358 $426,828
95. Davis Love III.............. 357 $669,797
96. Ian Poulter................... 356 $569,626
97. Stuart Appleby............ 350 $592,186
98. Nick O’Hern ................ 348 $470,889
99. Retief Goosen ............ 343 $623,670
100. Joe Ogilvie................ 342 $669,009
101. D.J. Trahan............... 335 $443,573
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
MIAMI —Vance Worley
pitchedsevenshutout innings
andthe Philadelphia Phillies
scoredthe only runona close
play inthe seventhinning to
beat the Florida Marlins1-0
Monday night.
Michael Martinez, playing for
aninjuredShane Victorino,
earnedhis fifthRBI of the year
witha single to center. Asliding
Domonic Brownbarely beat the
throwhome, althougha TV
replay appearedto showhe was
taggedout before touching the
plate.
The Marlins arguedonly
briefly, but twice hada player
ejectedfor disputing other calls.
Worley (4-1) allowedtwo hits
—bothsingles —while low-
ering his ERAto 2.21in10
games. Antonio Bastardo
pitcheda hitless ninthfor his
fifthsave to complete a two-
hitter for Philadelphia, which
leads with13 shutouts.
Pirates 5, Astros 3
PITTSBURGH—Rookie
Alex Presley hadthree of Pitts-
burgh’s14 hits andthe Pirates
movedthree games over .500
this late inthe seasonfor the
first time in12 years witha win
over the HoustonAstros.
Aday after matching a season
highfor hits with16, the Pirates’
offense had13 off Houston’s
Brett Myers (3-8) —the most
he’s allowedin234 career start-
ers.
Nationals 5, Cubs 4
WASHINGTON—Jayson
Werthturnedboos to cheers by
scoring the winning runona
wildpitchinthe bottomof the
10thinning, andthe Nationals
snaggedanother one-runvicto-
ry.
Cardinals1, Reds 0
ST. LOUIS—Chris Carpen-
ter outdueledCincinnati Reds
nemesis Johnny Cueto with
eight scoreless innings, then
watchedfromthe dugout as
pinch-hitter Mark Hamilton
drove inthe lone runwithan
infieldhit for the St. Louis Car-
dinals ina victory.
Padres 5, Giants 3
SANFRANCISCO—Will
Venable hit his secondhome
runof the seasonandthe San
Diego Padres pouncedonTim
Lincecumina victory over the
SanFrancisco Giants.
Diamondbacks 8, Brewers 6
MILWAUKEE—Chris
Young drove inthe go-ahead
runwitha two-out single inthe
ninthandthe Arizona Dia-
mondbacks overcame a grand
slamby pitcher ShaunMarcum
andralliedfroma five-rundef-
icit to beat the slumping Mil-
waukee Brewers.
Arizona scoredinevery in-
ning fromthe fourththrough
ninthafter falling into a 6-1hole
to the best home teaminthe
majors.
Braves 4, Rockies1
ATLANTA—Freddie Free-
manhomeredtwice to drive in
three runs, Tommy Hanson
combinedwithtwo relievers on
a four-hitter andthe Atlanta
Braves beat the Colorado Rock-
ies.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
Florida Marlins catcher John Buck is unable to tag out the
Philadelphia Phillies’ Domonic Brown (9) as he slides into home
to score on a single hit by Michael Martinez during the seventh
inning of a baseball game Monday in Miami.
Worley, Phillies
defeat Marlins
The Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS —Brian
Duensing overcame a shaky
start to throwa six-hitter and
Danny Valencia homered
among his three hits and had
three RBIs to help the Minneso-
ta Twins beat the Tampa Bay
Rays 7-0 on Monday.
Duensing (6-7) struck out
seven and walked four for his
second career shutout, giving
struggling closer Matt Capps
the day off.
David Price (8-7) gave up
four runs on five hits with six
strikeouts in six innings for the
Rays.
Michael Cuddyer added a
solo homer and Tsuyoshi Nish-
ioka had a two-run double for
the Twins.
Blue Jays 9, Red Sox 7
BOSTON—Travis Snider
had three doubles and drove in
a pair of runs and Aaron Hill
homered as Toronto became
the latest teamto rough up
John Lackey.
Hill also had an RBI single
and Rajai Davis added two
doubles for the Blue Jays, who
had lost nine of 14.
The Blue Jays scored a run in
the first, two in the second and
chased Lackey (5-8) with four
in the third. In seven Fenway
starts, heLackey is 3-4 with a
9.17 ERA.
Mariners 2, Athletics1
OAKLAND, Calif. —Michael
Pineda and three relievers
combined on a three-hitter and
Josh Bard hit his first home run
of the season for Seattle.
Justin Smoak added a tie-
breaking RBI double in the
seventh inning for the Mari-
ners, who opened a key seven-
game road trip against division
rivals with their third win in
four games.
White Sox 5, Royals 4
CHICAGO—A.J. Pierzynski
scored the winning run on a
balk called on Aaron Crowin
the ninth inning and the Chica-
go White Sox beat Kansas City
after the Royals had tied it on a
homer first ruled a triple in the
top of the inning.
Rangers13, Orioles 4
ARLINGTON, Texas —Endy
Chavez had his first four-RBI
game in more than eight years
with a long home run and a
double in the Texas Rangers’
victory over the Baltimore
Orioles and former manager
Buck Showalter.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Duensing, Minnesota
shut out Tampa Bay
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York ....................................... 50 33 .602 — — 7-3 L-2 28-18 22-15
Boston............................................ 49 35 .583 1
1
⁄2 — 5-5 L-1 22-17 27-18
Tampa Bay..................................... 47 38 .553 4 2
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 21-21 26-17
Toronto........................................... 42 44 .488 9
1
⁄2 8 5-5 W-2 19-22 23-22
Baltimore........................................ 36 45 .444 13 11
1
⁄2 3-7 W-1 22-22 14-23
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cleveland....................................... 45 38 .542 — — 5-5 W-1 25-14 20-24
Detroit............................................. 45 40 .529 1 4
1
⁄2 5-5 W-1 27-19 18-21
Chicago.......................................... 43 43 .500 3
1
⁄2 7 6-4 W-1 20-20 23-23
Minnesota...................................... 37 46 .446 8 11
1
⁄2 5-5 W-2 19-18 18-28
Kansas City ................................... 34 51 .400 12 15
1
⁄2 3-7 L-1 23-24 11-27
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles .................................. 44 41 .518 — 5
1
⁄2 8-2 W-2 20-21 24-20
Texas ............................................. 44 41 .518 — 5
1
⁄2 4-6 L-2 24-18 20-23
Seattle ............................................ 42 43 .494 2 7
1
⁄2 5-5 W-2 23-22 19-21
Oakland.......................................... 38 48 .442 6
1
⁄2 12 4-6 L-1 22-20 16-28
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................. 54 32 .628 — — 7-3 W-1 32-14 22-18
Atlanta........................................... 50 36 .581 4 — 7-3 W-1 25-18 25-18
Washington.................................. 43 43 .500 11 7 4-6 W-1 25-15 18-28
New York...................................... 42 42 .500 11 7 6-4 W-1 19-22 23-20
Florida........................................... 38 47 .447 15
1
⁄2 11
1
⁄2 5-5 L-1 17-27 21-20
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis......................................... 46 40 .535 — — 5-5 W-1 22-18 24-22
Milwaukee...................................... 45 41 .523 1 5 4-6 L-2 29-12 16-29
Pittsburgh ...................................... 44 41 .518 1
1
⁄2 5
1
⁄2 6-4 W-2 20-20 24-21
Cincinnati ....................................... 43 43 .500 3 7 4-6 L-1 23-21 20-22
Chicago.......................................... 35 51 .407 11 15 4-6 L-1 20-26 15-25
Houston ......................................... 29 57 .337 17 21 1-9 L-4 14-33 15-24
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
San Francisco.............................. 48 38 .558 — — 6-4 L-2 24-14 24-24
Arizona ......................................... 46 40 .535 2 4 4-6 W-1 23-19 23-21
Colorado....................................... 41 44 .482 6
1
⁄2 8
1
⁄2 3-7 L-2 22-22 19-22
San Diego..................................... 39 47 .453 9 11 7-3 W-1 19-27 20-20
Los Angeles................................. 37 48 .435 10
1
⁄2 12
1
⁄2 3-7 L-2 19-24 18-24
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Detroit 6, San Francisco 3
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 4
Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 5
N.Y. Mets 3, N.Y. Yankees 2, 10 innings
Baltimore 5, Atlanta 4
Tampa Bay 8, St. Louis 3
Boston 2, Houston 1
Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 7
Chicago Cubs 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Kansas City 16, Colorado 8
Oakland 7, Arizona 2
Seattle 3, San Diego 1
Florida 6, Texas 4
L.A. Angels 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Monday's Games
Toronto 9, Boston 7
Minnesota 7, Tampa Bay 0
Seattle 2, Oakland 1
Cleveland 6, N.Y. Yankees 3
Chicago White Sox 5, Kansas City 4
Baltimore at Texas, (n)
Detroit at L.A. Angels, (n)
Tuesday's Games
N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 11-4) at Cleveland (C.Car-
rasco 8-4), 7:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 1-3) at Boston (Lester 10-4), 7:10
p.m.
Baltimore (Undecided) at Texas (M.Harrison 6-7),
8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (F.Paulino 0-2) at Chicago White Sox
(Peavy 4-1), 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5) at Minnesota (S.Baker
6-5), 8:10 p.m.
Detroit (Verlander 11-3) at L.A. Angels (Haren 8-5),
10:05 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-7) at Oakland (Cahill 8-6),
10:05 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Tampa Bay at Minnesota, 1:10 p.m.
Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 2:10 p.m.
Detroit at L.A. Angels, 3:35 p.m.
Seattle at Oakland, 3:35 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Sunday's Games
Detroit 6, San Francisco 3
Toronto 7, Philadelphia 4
Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 5
N.Y. Mets 3, N.Y. Yankees 2, 10 innings
Baltimore 5, Atlanta 4
Pittsburgh 10, Washington 2
Tampa Bay 8, St. Louis 3
Boston 2, Houston 1
Minnesota 9, Milwaukee 7
Chicago Cubs 3, Chicago White Sox 1
Kansas City 16, Colorado 8
Oakland 7, Arizona 2
Seattle 3, San Diego 1
Florida 6, Texas 4
L.A. Angels 3, L.A. Dodgers 1
Monday's Games
Washington 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 5, Houston 3
Arizona 8, Milwaukee 6
San Diego 5, San Francisco 3
Philadelphia 1, Florida 0
St. Louis 1, Cincinnati 0
Atlanta 4, Colorado 1
N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, (n)
Tuesday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Ortiz 0-0) at Washington (Detwiler
0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 6-4) at Pittsburgh (Karstens
6-4), 7:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (Volquez 5-3) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 7-3),
7:09 p.m.
Colorado (Chacin 8-5) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 4-6), 7:10
p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 9-4) at Florida (Volstad 4-7),
7:10 p.m.
Arizona (Duke 1-3) at Milwaukee (Wolf 6-5), 8:10
p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 4-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 5-8),
10:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 4-5) at San Francisco (Cain
7-4), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Arizona at Milwaukee, 2:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Washington, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m.
Colorado at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
N L B O X E S
Phillies 1, Marlins 0
Philadelphia Florida
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Rollins ss 4 0 1 0 Bonifac 3b 3 0 1 0
Polanc 3b 3 0 0 0 Dobbs 3b 1 0 0 0
Utley 2b 4 0 1 0 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0
Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 GSnchz 1b 2 0 0 0
Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0 HRmrz ss 4 0 1 0
DBrwn rf 3 1 2 0 Morrsn lf 4 0 0 0
Schndr c 2 0 1 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0
Ruiz c 0 0 0 0 Petersn cf 3 0 0 0
Mrtnz cf 4 0 1 1 J.Buck c 2 0 0 0
Worley p 3 0 0 0 Hayes c 0 0 0 0
Stutes p 0 0 0 0 Nolasco p 1 0 0 0
BFrncs ph 0 0 0 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Gload ph 1 0 0 0 Wise ph 1 0 0 0
Bastrd p 0 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0
Mujica p 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 28 0 2 0
Philadelphia....................... 000 000 100 — 1
Florida ................................ 000 000 000 — 0
E—Do.Brown (3). LOB—Philadelphia 8, Florida 5.
SB—Rollins (18), Bonifacio (11), Stanton (3). S—
Ruiz, Nolasco.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
Worley W,4-1 .......... 7 2 0 0 2 6
Stutes H,6................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Bastardo S,5-5 ........ 1 0 0 0 1 1
Florida
Nolasco L,5-5.......... 7 6 1 1 2 4
Choate...................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
M.Dunn.....................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Mujica.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires—Home, Kerwin Danley;First, Vic Cara-
pazza;Second, Doug Eddings;Third, Dana De-
Muth.
T—2:50. A—27,103 (38,560).
Diamondbacks 8, Brewers 6
Arizona Milwaukee
ab r h bi ab r h bi
KJhnsn 2b 4 1 2 0 RWeks 2b 5 0 1 0
S.Drew ss 5 0 1 1
Morgan
cf-lf-cf 5 0 2 0
J.Upton rf 5 1 1 0 C.Hart rf 5 1 1 1
CYoung cf 4 1 1 1 Fielder 1b 4 1 2 0
Monter c 5 1 3 2 YBtncr ss 4 0 0 0
Brrghs 3b 5 2 3 1 Kotsay lf 4 0 1 0
Mirand 1b 4 0 2 2 Axford p 0 0 0 0
GParra lf 5 0 2 0 Gamel lf 0 0 0 0
DHdsn p 1 0 0 0 McGeh 3b 4 2 2 0
W.Pena ph 1 1 1 1 Lucroy c 3 1 1 0
ACastll p 0 0 0 0 Marcm p 2 1 1 4
Owings p 0 0 0 0 Counsll ph 0 0 0 0
RRorts ph 1 1 1 0 Hwkns p 0 0 0 0
Patersn p 0 0 0 0 Loe p 0 0 0 0
Nady ph 1 0 0 0 CGomz cf 1 0 0 0
Demel p 0 0 0 0 Estrad p 0 0 0 0
DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 41 817 8 Totals 37 611 5
Arizona............................... 000 112 112 — 8
Milwaukee.......................... 001 500 000 — 6
E—K.Johnson (5), Miranda (4), Fielder (8),
R.Weeks (10), Lucroy (4). DP—Arizona 3, Milwau-
kee 1. LOB—Arizona 9, Milwaukee 6.
2B—K.Johnson (16), Miranda 2 (8), McGehee (15).
HR—Montero (10), W.Pena (5), C.Hart (9), Mar-
cum (1). SB—C.Young (11).
IP H R ER BB SO
Arizona
D.Hudson................. 4 8 6 5 1 3
A.Castillo.................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Owings ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Paterson................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Demel W,2-2 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Da.Hernandez
S,4-6......................... 1 0 0 0 0 3
Milwaukee
Marcum.................... 6 7 4 4 2 5
Hawkins H,9............. 1 2 1 1 0 1
Loe BS,6-7...............
2
⁄3 4 1 1 0 0
Axford L,2-2............. 1 4 2 2 0 1
Estrada.....................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
HBP—by Owings (Counsell). WP—Axford, Estra-
da.
Umpires—Home, Brian Gorman;First, Tony Ran-
dazzo;Second, Larry Vanover;Third, Manny Gon-
zalez.
T—3:17. A—41,622 (41,900).
Nationals 5,
Cubs 4
Chicago Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fukdm rf 4 0 0 0 Berndn cf-lf 5 1 0 0
K.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Cora 3b 3 0 0 0
JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Zmrmn ph 0 0 0 0
DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 Bixler pr-3b 1 0 0 0
Mateo p 0 0 0 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0 L.Nix lf-1b 4 1 2 2
Barney 2b 5 0 0 0 Werth rf 3 1 1 2
SCastro ss 5 0 0 0 Stairs 1b 2 0 0 0
ArRmr 3b 4 2 2 0 Matths p 0 0 0 0
C.Pena 1b 4 1 3 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
Byrd cf 3 1 2 1 Marqus ph 1 0 0 0
ASorin lf 3 0 1 2 Storen p 0 0 0 0
Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Marshll p 0 0 0 0 LHrndz ph 0 0 0 0
Campn lf 1 0 0 0 IRdrgz c 3 0 0 0
Soto c 4 0 2 1 Dsmnd ss 4 1 1 0
CColmn p 2 0 0 0 Zmrmn p 2 0 1 0
RJhnsn lf-rf 2 0 0 0 Ankiel cf 1 0 1 0
Totals 38 410 4 Totals 33 5 7 4
Chicago ........................ 010 201 000 0 — 4
Washington.................. 200 001 100 1 — 5
One out when winning run scored.
E—C.Pena (3). DP—Chicago 1, Washington 1.
LOB—Chicago 5, Washington 9. 2B—Ar.Ramirez
(21), Espinosa (15). 3B—C.Pena (1), L.Nix (1).
SB—Bixler (4), Werth (11). CS—Werth (3). S—
L.Hernandez, Ankiel.
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
C.Coleman............... 5
1
⁄3 5 3 2 1 5
Samardzija H,3........
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Marshall H,15..........
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
K.Wood BS,4-4....... 1 0 0 0 3 3
J.Russell .................. 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Mateo L,1-2..............
1
⁄3 0 1 1 1 0
Marmol ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Washington
Zimmermann ........... 6 8 4 4 1 5
Mattheus................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Clippard.................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Storen....................... 1 2 0 0 0 0
H.Rodriguez W,3-1. 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP—by K.Wood (Espinosa). WP—K.Wood, Mar-
mol.
Umpires—Home, Mike Winters;First, Mike Everitt-
;Second, Chris Guccione;Third, Mike Muchlinski.
T—3:31. A—32,937 (41,506).
Padres 5, Giants 3
San Diego San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Venale rf 5 2 2 1 Rownd cf-lf 5 0 0 0
Bartlett ss 5 2 2 0 Burriss 2b 3 1 0 0
Headly 3b 4 0 1 1 PSndvl 3b 4 1 3 2
H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 Mota p 0 0 0 0
Ludwck lf 5 0 1 1 Huff 1b 4 0 0 0
OHudsn 2b 4 0 1 1 C.Ross lf 1 0 1 0
Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 Vglsng pr 0 0 0 0
Rizzo 1b 2 0 1 0 RRmrz p 0 0 0 0
Hundly c 4 0 1 1 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
Richrd p 2 0 1 0 Romo p 0 0 0 0
KPhlps ph 1 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 1 1 1 0
Frieri p 0 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 4 0 0 0
Spence p 0 0 0 0 CStwrt c 2 0 0 0
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Burrell ph 0 0 0 0
Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0 Cain pr 0 0 0 0
MAdms p 0 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 1
AlGnzlz 3b 0 0 0 0 Linccm p 0 0 0 0
Hall ph 1 0 0 0
SCasill p 0 0 0 0
Torres cf 2 0 0 0
Totals 37 511 5 Totals 30 3 6 3
San Diego.......................... 200 010 011 — 5
San Francisco.................... 000 002 001 — 3
E—Burriss (5). DP—San Diego 2, San Francisco1.
LOB—San Diego 8, San Francisco 7. 2B—Bartlett
(9), Maybin (10), Rizzo (7), Richard (1), P.Sandoval
(11), M.Tejada (15). HR—Venable (2), P.Sandoval
(8). SB—Venable (14), Bartlett (16), Maybin (12),
Rizzo (2). S—Lincecum. SF—Headley.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Richard W,5-9......... 5 2 0 0 3 2
Frieri H,3 ..................
1
⁄3 1 2 2 0 0
Spence H,2..............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Qualls H,6................ 1 0 0 0 0 0
M.Adams H,17 ........ 1 1 0 0 0 0
H.Bell S,25-26......... 1 2 1 1 1 0
San Francisco
Lincecum L,6-7 ....... 5 7 3 3 1 4
S.Casilla................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
R.Ramirez................ 1
1
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
Ja.Lopez .................. 0 0 0 0 0 0
Romo........................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Mota.......................... 1 1 1 1 0 1
Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Frieri (Burriss), by Ja.Lopez (Rizzo).
WP—H.Bell. PB—C.Stewart.
Umpires—Home, TimTimmons;First, Eric Cooper-
;Second, Jeff Kellogg;Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T—3:00. A—42,300 (41,915).
Cardinals 1,
Reds 0
Cincinnati St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
FLewis lf 4 0 0 0 Theriot ss 4 0 1 0
BPhllps 2b 4 0 0 0 Jay rf 2 0 1 0
Votto 1b 4 0 3 0 Hollidy lf 2 0 0 0
Rolen 3b 4 0 1 0 Brkmn 1b 2 0 0 0
Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 Freese 3b 3 0 0 0
RHrndz c 3 0 1 0 Rasms cf 3 1 2 0
Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 YMolin c 2 0 1 0
Renteri ss 3 0 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 0 0 0
Cueto p 3 0 0 0 Crpntr p 1 0 0 0
MHmlt ph 1 0 1 1
Salas p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 0 6 0 Totals 23 1 6 1
Cincinnati ........................... 000 000 000 — 0
St. Louis............................. 000 000 01x — 1
DP—Cincinnati 3. LOB—Cincinnati 7, St. Louis 3.
CS—Jay (3). S—Y.Molina, C.Carpenter.
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Cueto L,5-3.............. 8 6 1 1 3 0
St. Louis
C.Carpenter W,4-7. 8 6 0 0 1 3
Salas S,15-17.......... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Umpires—Home, Jerry Meals;First, Dale Scott-
;Second, CB Bucknor;Third, Dan Iassogna.
T—2:25. A—40,551 (43,975).
Braves 4, Rockies 1
Colorado Atlanta
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Blckmn lf 4 0 0 0 Schafer cf 4 0 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 3 1 0 0 AlGnzlz ss 4 0 0 0
Helton 1b 4 0 1 1 McCnn c 4 2 2 0
Tlwtzk ss 2 0 0 0 Fremn 1b 3 2 2 3
JHerrr ss 2 0 1 0 Heywrd rf 4 0 1 0
S.Smith rf 3 0 1 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0
Wggntn 3b 3 0 0 0 Conrad 3b 3 0 1 0
Splrghs cf 3 0 0 0 Lugo 3b 1 0 0 0
Iannett c 2 0 0 0 McLoth lf 2 0 1 0
Jimenz p 2 0 1 0 Hanson p 2 0 0 0
Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Kimrel p 0 0 0 0
Garner ph 1 0 0 0
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0
Totals 29 1 4 1 Totals 30 4 7 3
Colorado ............................ 000 100 000 — 1
Atlanta ................................ 200 001 01x — 4
E—J.Herrera (3). DP—Atlanta 2. LOB—Colorado
3, Atlanta6. 2B—S.Smith(23), Heyward(10). HR—
Freeman 2 (11). SB—M.Ellis (1). S—Hanson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Jimenez L,3-8.......... 5
1
⁄3 6 3 3 1 9
Brothers ...................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 2 2
R.Betancourt ........... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Mat.Reynolds........... 1 1 1 1 0 1
Atlanta
Hanson W,10-4....... 7 4 1 1 1 6
Venters H,17 ........... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Kimbrel S,25-30...... 1 0 0 0 0 0
PB—Iannetta.
T—2:54. A—36,137 (49,586).
A L B O X E S
Indians 6, Yankees 3
New York Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 4 0 0 0 Brantly lf 4 0 0 0
Grndrs cf 3 1 1 1 ACarer ss 4 0 2 0
Teixeir 1b 4 1 1 0 Hafner dh 3 1 1 0
AlRdrg 3b 4 0 0 0
CSantn
c-1b 4 1 1 2
Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 GSizmr cf 2 1 0 0
Swisher rf 4 0 1 2 OCarer 2b 4 0 0 0
Posada dh 3 0 0 0 Chsnhll 3b 2 1 0 0
Martin c 3 0 0 0 Marson c 0 0 0 0
Gardnr lf 3 0 0 0 Duncan 1b 3 1 1 1
Hannhn
1b-3b 0 0 0 0
Kearns rf 3 1 1 3
Totals 32 3 4 3 Totals 29 6 6 6
New York ........................... 000 000 210 — 3
Cleveland........................... 000 000 42x — 6
E—Chisenhall (2). LOB—NewYork 3, Cleveland 3.
2B—Swisher (16), A.Cabrera (22). HR—Grander-
son (23), C.Santana (13), Kearns (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
A.J.Burnett L,8-7..... 7 4 4 4 4 6
Wade........................ 1 2 2 2 0 1
Cleveland
Tomlin W,10-4......... 7 3 2 2 1 5
Sipp H,17.................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Pestano H,12...........
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
C.Perez S,20-21..... 1 0 0 0 0 0
WP—A.J.Burnett.
Umpires—Home, Mike Estabrook;First, Jeff Nel-
son;Second, Marty Foster;Third, Bill Welke.
T—2:36. A—40,676 (43,441).
Blue Jays 9, Red Sox 7
Toronto Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
RDavis cf 5 1 2 1 Ellsury cf 5 1 4 2
EThms lf 4 1 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 0
Bautist 3b 5 1 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 5 0 1 1
Lind 1b 3 2 1 1 Youkils 3b 1 0 0 0
Encrnc dh 5 0 0 0
YNavrr
pr-3b 3 1 1 0
A.Hill 2b 5 2 3 2 D.Ortiz dh 3 1 1 0
Snider rf 5 1 3 2 Reddck lf 2 0 0 0
JMolin c 3 0 0 0
DMcDn
ph-lf 2 0 0 0
JMcDnl ss 4 1 2 1 Sltlmch c 4 1 1 2
J.Drew rf 3 1 1 1
Scutaro ss 3 1 1 0
Totals 39 913 7 Totals 35 711 6
Toronto............................... 124 000 110 — 9
Boston................................ 000 040 030 — 7
E—Youkilis (6), Y.Navarro (1). DP—Toronto 2.
LOB—Toronto 7, Boston 6. 2B—R.Davis 2 (15),
Snider 3 (7), Ad.Gonzalez (28), D.Ortiz (21).
3B—Ellsbury (1), Saltalamacchia (2). HR—A.Hill
(4). SB—R.Davis (22), Ellsbury (27). CS—Pedroia
(3). S—J.Molina. SF—J.Drew.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
Morrow W,5-4.......... 5 5 4 4 3 5
L.Perez H,2.............. 2 2 0 0 0 2
Frasor ....................... 1 3 3 3 0 2
F.Francisco
S,10-14..................... 1 1 0 0 0 3
Boston
Lackey L,5-8............ 2
1
⁄3 9 7 7 0 2
Wheeler.................... 2
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Aceves ..................... 2
2
⁄3 3 2 1 1 1
F.Morales.................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
Albers....................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
Morrow pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
HBP—by Morrow (Youkilis). WP—Morrow. PB—
J.Molina.
Umpires—Home, Jerry Layne;First, Brian Knight-
;Second, Tim McClelland;Third, Bob Davidson.
T—3:37. A—38,072 (37,065).
Mariners 2, Athletics 1
Seattle Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 4 0 2 0 JWeeks 2b 4 0 0 0
Ryan ss 4 1 1 0 SSizmr 3b 3 0 0 0
AKndy 3b 3 0 0 0 Crisp cf 3 0 0 0
Smoak 1b 3 0 2 1 Matsui dh 4 1 1 0
Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 Carter 1b 3 0 0 0
Cust dh 3 0 0 0 DeJess rf 3 0 0 0
Halmn cf-lf 4 0 0 0 CJcksn lf 3 0 0 0
Peguer lf 2 0 0 0 KSuzuk c 3 0 2 1
FGtrrz ph-cf 1 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 3 0 0 0
J.Bard c 3 1 1 1
Totals 31 2 6 2 Totals 29 1 3 1
Seattle ................................ 000 001 100 — 2
Oakland.............................. 010 000 000 — 1
DP—Seattle 1, Oakland 2. LOB—Seattle 5, Oak-
land 4. 2B—Smoak (20). HR—J.Bard (1). SB—
Crisp (25).
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Pineda W,8-5 .......... 6 2 1 1 2 7
Laffey H,4 ................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pauley H,7 ............... 1 1 0 0 0 0
League S,23-26 ...... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Oakland
McCarthy L,1-5 ....... 6
2
⁄3 4 2 2 2 5
Ziegler ......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Breslow.................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Fuentes ....................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 1 1
De Los Santos.........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Umpires—Home, David Rackley;First, Andy
Fletcher;Second, Tim Welke;Third, Jim Reynolds.
T—2:29. A—15,566 (35,067).
Twins 7, Rays 0
Tampa Bay Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Damon dh 4 0 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 0 1
SRdrgz 2b 4 0 2 0 ACasill 2b 4 0 0 0
Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 Mauer c 3 1 0 0
BUpton cf 3 0 1 0 Cuddyr rf 3 2 1 1
Ruggin lf 4 0 0 0 Valenci dh 4 2 3 3
Ktchm 1b 4 0 2 0 LHughs 1b 4 0 0 0
Shppch c 3 0 0 0 Repko lf 4 1 2 0
Joyce rf 2 0 0 0 Tolbert 3b 3 1 0 0
EJhnsn ss 2 0 0 0 Nishiok ss 3 0 1 2
Totals 30 0 6 0 Totals 32 7 7 7
Tampa Bay......................... 000 000 000 — 0
Minnesota.......................... 031 000 03x — 7
E—E.Johnson (1). DP—Minnesota 2. LOB—Tam-
pa Bay 7, Minnesota 4. 2B—Valencia (16), Nishioka
(4). HR—Cuddyer (12), Valencia (10). CS—B.Up-
ton (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Price L,8-7 ............... 6 5 4 4 1 6
C.Ramos.................. 1
1
⁄3 0 1 1 0 0
A.Russell ..................
2
⁄3 2 2 2 1 0
Minnesota
Duensing W,6-7...... 9 6 0 0 4 7
HBP—by C.Ramos (Mauer).
Umpires—Home, Paul Emmel;First, Rob Drake-
;Second, Gary Darling;Third, Bruce Dreckman.
T—2:24. A—39,528 (39,500).
Pirates 5, Astros 3
Houston Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 5 0 0 0 Presley lf 4 0 3 1
Kppngr 2b 5 2 2 0 dArnad ss 5 2 2 0
Pence rf 3 1 2 0 GJones rf 4 0 2 0
Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 1 2 Veras p 0 0 0 0
Michals lf 3 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
MDwns 3b 4 0 1 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 1
Barmes ss 2 0 0 0 Walker 2b 4 0 2 1
Corprn c 3 0 0 0 Overay 1b 4 1 2 1
Myers p 3 0 0 0 JHrrsn 3b 2 0 1 0
SEscln p 0 0 0 0 BrWod 3b 1 1 0 0
DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 0 1 1
Wallac ph 1 0 0 0 Mahlm p 2 0 0 0
DMcCt p 0 0 0 0
Paul rf 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 6 2 Totals 34 514 5
Houston.............................. 102 000 000 — 3
Pittsburgh .......................... 012 011 00x — 5
E—M.Downs (4), Overbay (8), J.Harrison 2 (4).
DP—Houston 1, Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Houston 8,
Pittsburgh 9. 2B—Pence (24), d’Arnaud (3),
G.Jones (14), A.McCutchen (22). 3B—Presley (2).
SB—Presley (2), Walker (5). S—Corporan,
McKenry, Maholm. SF—Ca.Lee.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Myers L,3-8.............. 6 13 5 4 0 1
S.Escalona .............. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Del Rosario.............. 1 0 0 0 2 0
Pittsburgh
Maholm W,5-9......... 6 5 3 1 3 3
D.McCutchen H,5... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Veras H,17............... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hanrahan S,25-25 .. 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBP—by Maholm (Pence).
MIAMI — Progress in Ryan
Madson’s bruised right hand is
difficult to judge because the
Phillies closer has declined on
multiple occasions to speak
about his injury. Andas the calen-
dar creeps toward the all-star
break, a return in the first half be-
came less and less likely.
With only six games (in seven
days) left inthe season’s first half,
Madson was officially ruled out
from retuning before the break.
Rich Dubee said Monday it was
impossible because Madson has
yet to even throw off a mound
during his recovery process.
“I don’t know when he’ll be on
the mound,” Dubee said, before
later adding he hopes it happens
sometime in the next week.
Eventhen, Madsonwill require
a stint of minor-league games to
return to pitching shape. With
the time off for the break, Mad-
son could go a month between
appearances in the majors.
His last game was June 18, al-
most a month after the injury ac-
tually occurred in a May 20 game
against Texas. In the13 games af-
ter being struck by a David Mur-
phy liner, Madson had a 4.15
ERA. Dubee said his grip was af-
fected.
“His fastball and cutter were
very tough (to throw),” Dubee
said. “He just didn’t have
strength in his fingers to throw
the ball.”
There has been progress, Du-
bee said. That has come in the
form of long tossing Saturday
and Sunday. Madson played
catch again Monday.
Victorino sits
Twenty-four hours of online
voting put Shane Victorino in the
lead of the “Final Vote” for the
34th spot on the National League
All-Star roster. During that same
span, the Phillies centerfielder
foundhimself out of Charlie Man-
uel’s lineup with a swollen right
thumb.
That was a result of Victorino’s
belly flop in the sixth inning of
Sunday’s loss to Toronto. What
happened on that play?
“Other than utter embarrass-
ment?” Victorino said, laughing.
“Other than me having turf in my
mouth when I got up?”
Victorino’s left cleat was
caught in the Rogers Centre turf
and tumbled to the ground, jam-
ming his right finger in the proc-
ess. Manuel said Victorino was
completely unavailable for Mon-
day because gripping a bat was
too tough. Victorino does not ex-
pect to miss much time.
“It’s a little sore,” he said, “but
it’s all right.”
Polanco sees stars
Placido Polanco is the first to
admit a pinched nerve in his back
is hurting him and has affected
his swing. So why not rest it dur-
ing the all-star break?
“I don’t know when I’d be able
to play in another All-Star
Game,” Polanco said.
The 35-year-old third baseman
was electedbyfans tostart for the
National League. Polanco figures
a few innings and one or two at-
bats won’t have any effect on his
status.
“Tome, if hecanplaythegame,
I’d let him,” Manuel said. “That’s
kind of how I look at it.”
Extra bases
Brad Lidge (torn rotator cuff)
began his official rehab assign-
ment with a scoreless inning for
single-A Lakewood. Lidge al-
lowed two singles and threw 15
pitches. ... Joe Blanton (right el-
bow inflammation) threw a bull-
pen session Monday in Clearwa-
ter, Fla. It was the first time since
May 19 that Blanton threw off a
mound. “He was fine,” Dubee
said. ... A name to watch: Juan
Rivera. He was designated for as-
signment by Toronto after Sun-
day’s game and could provide a
righthanded outfield option for
the Phillies. Rivera, 33, was hit-
ting .327 with a .909 OPS in 65
plate appearances against lefties
this season but the Blue Jays
were fed up with his inability to
be an everyday player and his
$5.25 million salary.
Madson
won’t pitch
before break
By MATT GELB
The Philadelphia Inquirer
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
1904 —The Philadelphia Phillies snapped the New
York Giants’ 18-game winning streak with a 6-5
10-inning victory.
1935 — Tony Cuccinello of the Dodgers and his
brother Al —for the Giants —each hit home runs in
thesamegametomark thefirst timeinmajor league
history that brothers on opposing teams connected
for homers. Brooklyn beat New York 14-4.
1937 —Hal Trosky hit three home runs to pace the
Cleveland Indians to a 14-4 victory over the St.
Louis Browns in the opener of a doubleheader.
1937 — Frank DeMaree of Chicago went 6-for-7 in
the first game of a doubleheader, in which the Cubs
beat the St. Louis Cardinals13-12 in14 innings. De-
Maree had three doubles and three singles. The
Cubs won the second game 9-7 and DeMaree had
two more singles.
1947 —Larry Doby became the first black to play in
the American League. He struck out as a pinch-hit-
ter as Cleveland lost 6-5 to the White Sox.
C M Y K
PAGE 4B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 5B
➛ S P O R T S
WASHINGTON — Roger
Clemens’ tenacious pursuit of vic-
tory on the pitcher’s mound is re-
emerging as he enters federal
court this weektofight charges he
lied about using drugs and to try
to ruthlessly discredit the former
friend who says he did.
Clemens is charged with perju-
ry, false statements and obstruc-
tion of Congress for telling a
House committee under oaththat
he never used performance-en-
hancing drugs during his 23-sea-
son career. The record-setting
pitcher who once seemed a sure
bet for baseball’sHall of Famenow
could face pris-
on if 12 jurors
agree that he
lied and unani-
mously agree to
convict him.
The trial of
the United
States vs. Wil-
liamR. Clemens, scheduled to be-
ginWednesdayandlast 4-6weeks,
will bringaparadeof celebrityath-
letes and plenty of sordid details
to the staid Washington federal
courthouse. It will feature testi-
mony about illicit drugs, bloody
evidence of injections, an abscess
on Clemens’ backside allegedly
caused by steroid use and allega-
tionsthat hisaccuser isaserial liar
and a rapist.
Clemens isn’t the only all-star
baseball player to be criminally
charged for lying about drug use,
and prosecutors have a mixed re-
cord. Infielder Miguel Tejada
pleaded guilty in 2009 to a misde-
meanor for withholding informa-
tionabout anex-teammate’suseof
drugs whenquestionedin2005by
congressional investigators. But
in their first jury test, prosecutors
were able to convict home run
kingBarryBondsof just onecount
of obstruction of justice in April
for giving an evasive answer to a
grandjurywhenaskedabout drug
use. The jury deadlocked on the
three remaining counts that
Bonds made a false statement by
saying he never knowingly re-
ceived steroids and human
growth hormone fromhis trainer.
But unlike the Bonds trial,
where the trainer who allegedly
provided injections refused to tes-
tify against his former boss and
friend, Clemens’ strength trainer,
Brian McNamee, is the prosecu-
tion’s leading witness.
For a decade, McNamee
worked out intensely with Clem-
ens and helped shape “The Rock-
et” into one of the most powerful
pitchersinthemajorleagues, even
into middle age. McNamee also
says he injectedClemens withste-
roids and human growth hor-
mone, andevenkept theusednee-
dles that will be key scientific evi-
dence at trial.
But McNamee, a former New
York City police officer, is not an
ideal witness for the prosecution.
He actedas a drugdealer tosever-
al major league players and ac-
knowledges he hasn’t always told
the truthwhenaskedabout Clem-
ens’ drug use and other matters.
McNamee initially denied giving
Clemens drugs, he says out of loy-
alty to his best and longtime cli-
ent, but eventually admitted to
federal agents he injected the sev-
en-time Cy Young Award winner.
Clemens’ main defense has
been to discredit McNamee,
whom Clemens’ attorneys de-
scribed in a recent court filing as
“the only person in the entire
worldwhohaseverallegedthat he
witnessed Mr. Clemens use per-
formance enhancing drugs at any
time in his storied career.”
Clemens’ lawyers accuse
McNamee of being a “congenital
liar” who made up the allegations
against their client tosave himself
fromdrugcharges. Theyalsowant
to introduce evidence that in 2001
McNamee drugged and raped a
woman, thenliedtopolicewhoin-
vestigated the allegation but nev-
er charged McNamee with a
crime. “If Mr. McNamee’s mouth
is moving, he’s making an incon-
sistent statement,” Clemens at-
torney Rusty Hardinsaidduring a
recent hearing.
Prosecutors arefightingtokeep
out evidence of the sexual assault
investigation and plan to call sev-
eral witnesses to back up McNa-
mee’s allegations against Clem-
ens. Among them are Clemens’
former Yankee teammates Andy
Pettitte, Chuck Knoblauch and
Mike Stanton, who all admit get-
ting performance enhancing
drugs from McNamee. Pettitte is
particularly important because
he’s the only witness besides
McNameewhosayshespokewith
Clemens about his drug use.
The six felony counts against
Clemens stem from the House
Government Reform Commit-
tee’s 2008 investigation into the
use of performance-enhancing
drugs inbaseball. Former Sen. Ge-
orge Mitchell had recently pub-
lished a 400-page report that
named Clemens and 85 other for-
mer and current major league
players as users.
B A S E B A L L
Clemens ready to fight as perjury trial opens
Clemens
Ex-pitcher’s trial on charges
that he lied to congress set
to begin Wednesday.
By NEDRA PICKLER
Associated Press
ingtowin, hejust ranthebest he
could to the finish line.
Rome, the promising 15-year-
old fromDallas, won the female
division in 17:47. She outdis-
tanced second-place finisher,
Deedra Porfirio, 34, of West Pitt-
ston, by32seconds. Marina Orr-
son, 20, of Shavertown, who
runs for Wadas’ team at Miser-
icordia, finished third, six sec-
onds behind Porfirio.
“I went out a little too fast,”
said Rome, who will be a sopho-
more at Dallas High School in
the fall. “I’m not happy with my
time. I’mstill excited about win-
ning. I’m happy about that.”
Rome had hoped to run in the
low17s.
“But my time here today is
around the same as my time in
this race last year,” she said.
“And I’m not at all happy with
that.”
Rome actually ran last year’s
race three seconds faster, finish-
ing in third place behind two of
the area’s best runners (Heidi
Peoples, who was a 12-time All
American at Moravian College,
then running under her maiden
name, Wolfsberger; and Kelly
Ciravolo, the area’s premiere
triathlete).
But on this Fourth of July the
humidity was just too tough.
Christine Snarski, 29, of King-
stonwonthe 3 Mile Racewalkin
30:55. And James Langan, 12, of
Wilkes-Barre, leda fieldof about
50 runners in the Kid’s Fun Run.
Wilkes-Barre YMCA 3 Mile Run ™Bernie's
Run∫
Top 15
Chris Wadas, 29, Plains Twp., 15:09
Chris Ehret, 17, Dallas, 16:13
James Maloney, 22, Scranton, 16:18
Jeff Skwierz, 28, Pringle, 16:18
Jason Kennedy, 30, Honesdale, 16:33
Paul Leonard, 49, Scranton, 16:36
Alec Richardson, 20, Mountain Top, 16:41
Mike Kurinovsky, 33, Dallas, 16:41
Frank Ferlenda, 18, Dallas, 16:44
Jess Adams, 17, Dallas, 16:51
Justin Mazer, 21, Shavertown, 17:01
Zachary Bottone, 19, Wilkes-Barre, 17:05
Pat Leonard, 31, Pittston, 17:15
Joe Hickey, 19, Drums, 17:18
Dom DeLuca, 15, W. Pittston, 17:28
Male award winners: Overall: 1. Wadas; 2.
Ehret; 3. Maloney. Age group winners: 11-15: 1.
Dom DeLuca, W. Pittston, 17:28; 2. Brenden Eh-
ret, Dallas, 18:08. 16-20: 1. Alec Richardson,
Mountain Top, 16:41; 2. Frank Ferlenda, Dallas,
16:44. 21-25: 1. Justin Hazer, Shavertown, 17:01;
2. James Drogalis, Old Forge, 17:37. 26-30: 1. Jeff
Skwierz, Pringle, 16:18; 2. Jason Kennedy, Ho-
nesdale, 16:33. 31-35: 1. MikeKurinovsky, Dallas,
16:41; 2. Pat Leonard, Pittston, 17:15. 36-40: 1.
Kebber, na, 21:00; 2. Jim Prokopovich, Freeland,
21:20. 41-45: 1. CraigRome, Dallas, 20:22; 2. Don
Sheoner, W. Pittston, 20:33. 46-50: 1. Paul Leo-
nard, Scranton, 16:36; 2. George Dunbar, Old
Forge, 16:52. 51-55: 1. Dan Thomas, Dallas,
17:50; 2. Mike McAndrew, Avoca, 18:36. 56-60: 1.
Robert Miller, Forty Fort, 20:00; 2. Dave Jiunta, W.
Wyoming, 20:10. 61&over: 1. EdZindell, Jermyn,
20:37; 2. Stewart Harry, Forty Fort, 21:53.
Top 5 female finishers
Regan Rome, 15, Dallas, 17:47
Deedra Porfirio, 34, W. Pittston, 18:19
Marina Orrson, 20, Shavertown, 18:25
Kathleen Druther, 20, Clarks Summit, 18:41
Amy Rome, 44, Dallas, 19:17
Female awardwinners: Overall: 1. R. Rome;
2. Porfirio; 3. Orrson. Age group winners: 11-15:
1. Ally Rome, Dallas, 20:18; 2. Allison Grose, Dal-
las, 21:42. 16-20: 1. Kathleen Druther, Clarks
Summit, 18:41; 2. Alexandria Plant, Swoyersville,
20:06. 21-25: 1. Christa Filipkowski, na, 21:01; 2.
Elizabeth Hunter, Dunmore, 22:46. 26-30: 1. Erin
Moreck, Forty Fort, 20:35; 2. Robin Scarmastro,
Pringle, 21:08. 31-35: 1. Cassandra Zegarski, Co-
vington, 19:31; 2. Mariann Jurista, Mountain Top,
21:14. 36-40: 1. Jen Heck, W. Wyoming, 20:31; 2.
Cathy Oragwa, Mayfield, 21:06. 41-45: 1. Amy
Rome, Dallas, 19:17; 2. Julie Platt, Dallas, 20:48.
46-50: 1. Lynn Dolan, W. Wyoming, 20:21; 2. Jill
Hildebrand, Wapwallopen, 21:55. 51-55: 1. Joan
Angeli, Hudson, 25:17; 2. Maryann Gagliardi, Ha-
nover Twp., 25:21. 56-60: 1. Joyce Foster, Dallas,
23:27; 2. Sharon Davies, Mountain Top, 25:03. 61
& over: 1. Dee Cordora, Swoyersville, 26:06; 2.
Audrey Zionabelle, Cranford, N.J., 32:35.
Kid's Fun Run
James Langan, 12, Wilkes-Barre
Cassidy, 9, W. Wyoming
Nick Pikul, 9, Wilkes-Barre
Cameron Marcinkowski, 9, Hunlock Creek
Akira Kopec, 7, Kingston
3 Mile Racewalk
1. Christine Snarski, 29, Kingston, 30:55
2. Desiree Holena, 16, Swoyersville, 33:08
3. Mark Krokas, 34, Plains Twp., 33:34
Field: 620 (run-438, walk-132, fun run-50).
Pace car: Dr. George Moses. Official starters:
Joe Coyne (former Wilkes-Barre Chief of Police
and Phil Latinski. Timing: Insta Results (run-Jeff
Gaval, walk-Marv Keck). Results: Insta Results.
Race director: Joe Barkett. YMCAExecutive Di-
rector: Jim Thomas.
Schedule
Saturday, July 23: Wyoming Valley Striders’
Summer 10Km Run (final leg of Striders Triple
Crown) at 9 a.m. at Kirby Park. Info: Vince Wojnar,
474-5363.
Thursday, Aug. 4: Jack Daniels Mile at 7 p.m.
at TiogaStreet andFranklinAvenue(next totheTri-
ton Hose Company Fairgrounds, Tunkhannock.
Info: Dick Daniels, 240-1932.
RUN
Continued from Page 1B
“This has been a horrible last
two months with everything that
happened in the Giro,” Farrar
said. “I’ve had a lot of ups and
downs. But in the end, I wanted
to be able to come back, and do
something special to pay tribute,
and this is certainly the biggest
stage in the world to do that.”
Farrar, a sprint specialist from
Wenatchee, Wash., who rides for
Garmin-Cervelo, sped ahead in
the last few hundred yards of the
123-mile course fromOlonne-sur-
Mer to Redon to win the third
stage. He has now won a stage in
each of cycling’s three-week ma-
jor tours — France, Italy and
Spain.
The previous American to win
a Tour de France stage was Levi
Leipheimer, whoin2007was first
in the individual time trial in An-
gouleme.
“I certainly would have taken it
on any day,” Farrar said. “But as
an American, winning on the
Fourthof July, it’s the icingonthe
cake. ... Lucky me.”
Norway’s Thor Hushovd kept
the Tour de France’s yellow jer-
sey.
Hushovd, however, is a sprint
specialist and is not expected to
hold his lead through the moun-
tains in the second and third
weeks.
The top of the standings didn’t
change muchafter the mostly flat
trip into western Brittany that in-
cluded a ride on a wind-swept
suspension bridge over the
famed Loire River.
It was during the third stage of
another race — the Giro in Italy
on May 9 — when Weylandt
clipped a wall on a steep descent.
He fell off his bike and slammed
his head on the ground, dying al-
most instantly.
It was the first death of a rider
at one of the major tours in 16
years.
Jonathan Vaughters, the Gar-
min-Cervelo team manager, said
that from the time Farrar was 15
years old Weylandt was his best
friend.
“He was almost two weeks
without riding his bike at all, and
sleeping 20 hours every day, and
just totally, totally, totally demor-
alized,” he said. “But then he
started training.”
Farrar rode in the weeklong
Dauphine Libere in France and
the lesser-known Ster ZLM Tour
inJune. Vaughters saidthat was a
“bit of a risk.”
“It was probably the heaviest
racing program of any sprinter,”
he said. “But we had to do it as an
emergency to get him going be-
cause he had taken so much time
off, which was understandable.
But it got him in shape.”
Vaughters said he wasn’t going
to push Farrar to ride again, add-
ing that he would have under-
stood if the 27-year-old American
decided to wait until next year to
race again.
“I simply said: ‘Tyler when you
are ready, we are ready tosupport
you.”’ he said. “That simple, real-
ly.”
Farrar gave Garmin-Cervelo a
second straight victory following
a win in Sunday’s time trial that
left Hushovd with the yellow
shirt.
Overall, Hushovd leads team-
mate David Millar of Britain, in
second, by a split second. Cadel
Evans of Australia of BMC is
third, a second back. Three-time
Tour champion Alberto Conta-
dor, who lost time Saturday after
becoming entangled in a crash, is
69th — 1:42 behind the Norwe-
gian.
Others looking to contend for
the title on the Champs-Elysees
on July 24 include 2010 runner-
up Andy Schleck of Luxembourg
and Bradley Wiggins of Britain.
Schleckis eighthoverall andWig-
gins is10th, each four seconds off
the lead.
In Monday’s final dash, the
HTC-Highroad team of British
sprint star Mark Cavendish lined
up near the 2.4-mile mark to es-
cort himto the finish line. But by
the last fewhundredyards, Hush-
ovd and Farrar had zoomed
ahead.
“To have the world champion
and yellowjersey work for you to
launch the sprint, it’s crazy,” Far-
rar said.
The American nosed ahead of
France’s Romain Feillu, who was
second, and Spain’s Jose Joaquin
Rojas, who was third. Farrar and
a pack all had the same time: 4
hours, 40 minutes, 21 seconds.
Five breakaway riders jumped
out early in the stage from the
coastal town of Olonne-sur-Mer,
building a lead of as much as 8
minutes, 5 seconds by the 46-
mile mark. The fast-moving pack
reeled them all in with 5.5 miles
to go.
Hushovd could be pressured
for the lead as soon as today
when the pack travels 107 miles
fromLorient to Mur de Bretagne
witha super-steep, 1.2-mileuphill
finish.
For now, Garmin is reveling in
two straight days of success on
the Tour.
“Just keep drinking cham-
pagne, as long as my liver can
handle it,” Vaughters said.
And about the Independence
Day win?
“Yeah, an American winning
on Fourth of July, that’s pretty
good—I just thought of that,” he
said. “We’re going to have to read
the Constitution in the bus or
something.”
TOUR
Continued from Page 1B
REDON, France — Jonathan
Vaughters received another
email from his good friend Sen.
John Kerry, who was congrat-
ulating the manager of the Gar-
min-Cervelo team for a stage
win at the Tour de France.
“Kerry’s a massive cycling
fan,” Vaughters told The Associ-
ated Press on Monday. “He’s got
a (Garmin-Cervelo) jersey and
shorts, he always rides in it.”
Vaughters showed the AP an
email he had received from the
Massachusetts senator after
Sunday’s victory in the team
time trial, adding that he got
“another congratulatory note”
on Monday after American
sprinter Tyler Farrar had won
the third stage.
Vaughters said he received
the following note from Kerry
on Sunday after stage 2:
“Congratulations on a terrific
showing today. It was really fun
to watch you guys set pace,
focused and disciplined and to
listen to your exhortations.
Hope to get over, maybe to-
wards the end (of the Tour). All
the best, John Kerry.”
EVANS FEARS THIN
ROADS: Cadel Evans is worried
that the roads at the Tour de
France are getting a bit too thin
and dangerous.
The two-time Tour runner-up
was in third place overall after
Monday’s third stage, but he
was concerned about the lacy
bends near the end of the route
from Olonne-sur-Mer to Redon.
“It was a nervous, dangerous
stage with a fair bit of wind in
the final,” Evans said. “It seems
they use more and more narrow
roads in the Tour. It’s great for
excitement but puts the risk
rating up a bit high.”
The Australian, who was the
Tour runner-up in 2007 and ’08,
thanked veteran teammate
George Hincapie for keeping
him safe on the roads.
“Fortunately, George and
Marcus (Burghardt) kept me in
front most of the time.”
The 34-year-old Evans will get
a chance to test his climbing
legs in Tuesday’s fourth stage,
which he should relish as it
features a final climb with an
average gradient of 6.9 percent
and some sections at 15 percent.
AMERICAN RIDERS: Ten
American riders celebrated
Independence Day on the roads
of the Tour de France. It is the
most American riders in the
race in 25 years.
Veterans like BMC’s George
Hincapie and RadioShack’s
Chris Horner were among the
U.S. riders taking stock of the
bumper crop from America this
year — and looking to some
promising young compatriot
competitors.
“Ten Americans at the Tour
de France just shows you how
much the sport has grown in the
U.S.,” said Hincapie, riding in
his 16th Tour. “You know people
are really starting to realize
what a grueling sport this is,
and starting to respect it.”
Tyler Farrar, among the
world’s best sprinters, became
the first American rider to win a
Tour stage on July 4 when he
won Monday’s third stage.
GOING GREEN: Mark Caven-
dish was disqualified from an
intermediate sprint during Mon-
day’s third stage of the Tour,
dealing a blow to his hopes of
winning the green jersey as the
best sprinter in the race.
The HTC-Highroad cyclist
from the Isle of Man crossed the
intermediate sprint line in sixth
place during a stage tailor-made
for sprinters, but race officials
ruled he shouldn’t have used his
head to push Thor Hushovd,
who had deviated from his line.
Hushovd, who currently leads
the race, was also disqualified
from the sprint.
“Just discovered Thor & I
have been disqualified from the
intermediate sprint today. Seri-
ously no idea why?” Cavendish
said on Twitter.
AP PHOTO
The pack crosses Saint Nazaire bridge crossing Loire river during
the third stage of the Tour de France over 123 miles, starting in
Olonne sur Mer, Vendee region, and finishing in Redon, Brittany,
western France, Monday.
T O U R D E F R A N C E N O T E B O O K
U.S. team has fan
in Senator Kerry
By JEROME PUGMIRE
AP Sports Writer
MINNEAPOLIS — The Min-
nesota Wild have been search-
ing for the kind of dynamic goal
scorer who can put the puck in
the net in the blink of an eye, a
player who won’t hesitate to let
a shot rip from anywhere in the
opposing goaltender’s zip code,
ever since Marian Gaborik left
in 2009.
Here comes Dany Heatley,
who never met a shot on goal he
didn’t like, determined to show
the rest of the league he can still
light the lamp with the best of
them.
The Wild landed Heatley
from San Jose on Sunday night,
sending forward Marty Havlat
to the Sharks in a straight-up
swap of two 30-year-old win-
gers. Heatley said Monday he
was excited to be coming to
Minnesota and couldn’t wait to
prove that last year’s sub-par
season was a fluke.
“As a goal scorer and a player,
you want to be that guy,” Heat-
ley said.
Heatley had back-to-back 50-
goal seasons in 2005-06 and
2006-07 for the Ottawa Sen-
ators, but finished with only 26
goals last season for the Sharks.
Heatley played a month and a
half witha bro-
ken hand and
said he had
several other
nagging inju-
ries that held
him back.
“Last year
wasn’t the
greatest year for me personally,
but I’m looking forward to get-
ting back there,” Heatley said.
After the Sharks flamedout in
the playoffs yet again, San Jose
GMDougWilsonwas lookingto
switch things up. He found a
willing partner in Wild GM
ChuckFletcher, whose teamhas
missedtheplayoffs inbothof his
seasons as the team’s top exec-
utive.
Fletcher fired coach Todd Ri-
chards, replacing him with the
Houston Aeros’ Mike Yeo, and
then sent All-Star defenseman
Brent Burns to the Sharks for a
package that included 24-year-
old goal scorer Devin Setoguchi
on draft night.
Fletcher said the biggest pri-
ority heading into the offseason
was injecting some juice into a
team that finished 30th in the
league in shots on goal and had
too many players who were bet-
ter suited to passing and setting
up others than finishing the
plays themselves.
N H L
Wild’s Heatley confident
he still has scoring touch
By JON KRAWCZYNSKI
AP Sports Writer
Heatley
C M Y K
PAGE 6B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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WIMBLEDON, England —
Novak Djokovic is on the path
to greatness, and one way to
fully grasp that is to focus not
on his many successes but
instead on a setback.
Indeed, for all of his accom-
plishments already in 2011 —
rising to the No. 1 ranking
Monday; two Grand Slam titles,
including a victory over Rafael
Nadal in the Wimbledon final
Sunday; $7.5 million in prize
money; a 48-1 record — what
Djokovic himself relishes the
most is how he set aside his
lone loss.
He was unbeaten in 43
matches, dating to the Davis
Cup final in December, until
that run ended against 16-time
Grand Slam champion Roger
Federer in four sets in last
month’s French Open semi-
finals.
Djokovic could have been
devastated. He could have gone
into a tailspin. But after taking
a brief break, he returned to the
tour at Wimbledon and started
a new winning streak.
“I’m proud of many things, to
be honest, in this moment, but
something that comes up to my
mind is after having an incred-
ible run, an incredible year up
to Roland Garros, and then
losing that really epic semifinal
against Federer — a great
match — I managed to recover
and to come back in a great
style and to win Wimbledon for
the first time in my life,” Djo-
kovic said Monday morning at
the All England Club during a
10-minute interview with two
reporters.
“I think that’s something that
I maybe wasn’t managing to do
in the past,” he added, “and
right now, I am able to mentally
switch off and just recover
quickly and look to the next
challenge.”
The key, Djokovic explained,
was that he didn’t allow himself
to get too low after losing to
Federer.
That was a problem for Djo-
kovic in the past, such as when
he went through what he called
“a crisis” during the first half of
2010. He lost in the quarterfi-
nals at the Australian Open and
French Open — both times
frittering away substantial leads
— and in one stretch played in
five consecutive tournaments
without ever winning more
than three matches in a row.
He dwelled on those defeats.
“But now I just didn’t allow
myself to get to that position
anymore, because it’s just not
worth it. It’s sport. You win;
you lose,” Djokovic said Mon-
day. “And I have played good
(against Federer). I didn’t have
anything to regret, because the
(other) player was better that
day. So I just needed to sleep,
get some rest and come here
and perform my best. And I
have done that.”
Among the things on the
24-year-old Serb’s career “To
Do” list now are adding cham-
pionships at the two major
tournaments he hasn’t won —
the French Open and the U.S.
Open, where he was the runner-
up to Federer in 2007, and to
Nadal last year — and a pro-
longed stay at No. 1.
“This is what I’m made for: I
want to win. I’m a professional.
I want to win more majors,
more titles,” he said. “Obvi-
ously, the U.S. Open is the next
big thing.”
As well as he’s playing cur-
rently, Djokovic still sees room
to work on his game, particular-
ly his serve and getting to the
net more frequently. He pointed
to Nadal — the man he re-
placed atop the ATP rankings
— as someone who’s set an
example by constantly figuring
out ways to get better.
As it is, the stroke that Djo-
kovic has improved the most
this season is his serve. In Sun-
day’s 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3 victory
over Nadal, for example, Djo-
kovic didn’t face a single break
point in either of the first two
sets.
But the area in which Djokov-
ic has made the most strides
over the past year is his self-
belief, something he and those
around him say received a big
boost when he helped Serbia
beat France for the 2010 Davis
Cup title.
“He realized lots of things,”
Djokovic’s mother, Dijana, said
Sunday about those matches in
Belgrade. “You know, he ma-
tured, and then he start to play
as he play now.”
France led the best-of-five
series 2-1 when Djokovic faced
top-10 player Gael Monfils on
the final day. If Monfils had
won that match, France would
have clinched the trophy. But
Djokovic won in straight sets,
and Serbia went on to win its
first Davis Cup.
“I proved to myself that I can
really play like this, you know,
on the big stage, under big
pressure, in big events, the
same way,” Djokovic said.
And that’s exactly what he’s
managed to do, over and over
and over.
“I do experience that very
high confidence level that I
have. And I do experience that
I’m mentally stronger than
ever,” Djokovic said. “So prob-
ably that gives me a slight ad-
vantage over my opponents.”
Even the best opponents.
After entering 2011 with a
39-50 record against top-10
players, Djokovic is 14-1 against
them this year.
That includes a 5-0 mark
against 10-time major champion
Nadal, all in tournament finals,
and on three different surfaces.
It also includes a 3-1 mark
against Federer.
And, perhaps most impres-
sively, a perfect turnaround
after the only blemish on an
otherwise perfect season.
Only 19 hours after crouching
down on Centre Court to pluck
and eat a few blades of grass,
Djokovic said he hadn’t had
time to digest everything he’s
done.
“I’m still euphoric. I’m still on
an adrenaline rush. I’m still
under great joy of winning
Wimbledon and of having a
magnificent season so far. I
have Davis Cup coming up this
weekend, and then after that, I
have two weeks of rest. And
then, I guess, when I go down
to the beach, leave my racket in
the room and then just close
my eyes in the sun,” Djokovic
said with a chuckle, “I’ll prob-
ably reflect on everything that
happened.”
P R O T E N N I S
AP PHOTO
Novak Djokovic reacts as he lifts up the Wimbledon trophy in
Belgrade, Serbia, Monday. Djokovic received a rapturous wel-
come in Serbia following his triumph at Wimbledon and on his
first day as the world’s top-ranked tennis player.
Djokovic’s proudest
moment? Putting
lone loss in the past
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
C O M M E N T A R Y
Djokovic new No. 1;
Serena Williams
drops to 175th
WIMBLEDON, England —
Wimbledon champion Novak
Djokovic rose to No. 1 in the
ATP rankings for the first time
Monday, while Serena Williams
dropped to 175th on the WTA
list, her lowest spot since 1997.
Djokovic officially moved up
from No. 2 one day after
beating previously top-ranked
Rafael Nadal 6-4, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3
for his first title at the All
England Club. It’s the first time
in nearly 7
1
⁄2 years that a man
other than Nadal or Roger
Federer is ranked No. 1.
“Times are changing,” the
24-year-old Djokovic said
Monday. “It’s good for the
sport, I think, to have some
new faces.”
Federer first took the top
place on Feb. 2, 2004, and he
or Nadal had been No. 1 every
week since then. Federer spent
a total of 285 weeks there, one
week short of Pete Sampras’
record. Nadal’s latest stay
began June 7, 2010, the day
after he won last year’s French
Open.
“They have made me
improve,” Djokovic said. “They
have made me a better player.”
Djokovic had been No. 2
since March. But he surged
past Nadal by going 48-1 with
eight titles so far in 2011,
including Grand Slam trophies
at the Australian Open and
Wimbledon.
When Djokovic arrived at
the All England Club on
Monday morning for a series
of interviews, the ATP
presented him with a cake
shaped like a “1” in the red,
blue and white colors of
Serbia’s flag. He is the first
man from that country to be
No. 1 since the ATP introduced
computer rankings in 1973.
Djokovic is the 25th player
to reach No. 1.
AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — The ailing
oaks at Toomer’s Corner are a mot-
tled mix of yellow and brown these
days, but experts say there’s still a
chance the trees will be in good
enough shape for Auburn football
fans to roll them with toilet paper
after wins this fall.
It’s been about five months since
school officials confirmed that the fa-
mous trees had been poisoned, and
fan of archrival Alabama is now await-
ing trial in the attack. Emergency pro-
cedures that included removing poi-
soned dirt around the trees’ roots
have helped them survive this long.
Auburn University horticulturist
Gary Keever said no one is sure yet
whether the trees will live or die.
Fans have celebrated wins under the
trees since at least the early 1970s.
“I don’t want to give a sense of false
hope, but we’re not ready to say
they’re definitely not going to make
it,” said Keever, part of a team of ex-
perts monitoring the health of the
trees and trying to save them.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
Auburn oaks still hanging on, but fate is uncertain
BEIRUT(AP) —ASyrian boxer who won a
medal at the 2004 Olympics was injured along
with at least 20 others Monday as President
Bashar Assad’s regime swept through several
cities and towns to crush a pro-democracy up-
rising, activists said.
Nasser al-Shami, a heavyweight who shared
the bronze medal in Athens, was in stable con-
dition after being hit by shotgun pellets in the
city of Hama, said Rami Abdul-Rahman, the
London-based director of the Syrian Observ-
atory for Human Rights. Abdul-Rahman said
hespoketothedoctor whotreatedtheathlete.
Syrian troops and tanks sealed off Hama
and blocked the roads leading in, an apparent
attempt tocrushgrowingdissent there andre-
take the city one month after security forces
withdrew. About 300,000protesters heldhuge
protests against the regime in Hama last
week, a sign the city was spiraling out of gov-
ernment control.
B O X I N G
Activist group: Ex-Olympic
boxer wounded in Syria
CHARLOTTE, N.C. —Carl Ed-
wards is no longer NASCAR’s
points leader, his 10-week streak
at the top snapped by an early ac-
cident at Daytona International
Speedway.
The 37th-place finish Saturday
night wasn’t his fault, and Ed-
wards andhis RoushFenwayRac-
ing team earned a ton of respect
by gutting it out through several
rounds of repairs and a stretch in
whichit grewsohot inthecar, Ed-
wards was begging his crew to
douse his cockpit withwater.
“We don’t ever give up and
that’s the thing. I told my guys to
keeptheir heads up,” hesaidafter
the race. “We’ll take this bad day
and keep our pride. In the big pic-
ture, it doesn’t mean much, but
there is a lot of pride in leading
those points, so we’ll try to get
that points leadback.”
Then Edwards talked of strate-
gy, lessons learned and motiva-
tion. What he didn’t discuss was
his future.
Edwards is the biggest free
agent in this year’s class, and he’s
been determined to not let his
contract negotiations play out in
public. If he could, he said two
weeks ago, he’dwait until the end
of theseasontofigureout his2012
plans becausedealingwithit now
doesn’t appear to be high on his
list of priorities.
But waiting isn’t possible, not
when Edwards represents the
largest pieceof thefreeagent puz-
zle.
Far too much depends on his
decision, particularly at RFR, the
team that gave the substitute
teacher fromMissouri a full-time
Trucks Series ride back in 2003.
Hewas23yearsold, tryingtoclaw
his way into a decent NASCAR
job, when Jack Roush gave Ed-
wards the life-changing chance.
He was in the Cup series 23
races into the next season as a re-
placement for Jeff Burton, a long-
time Roushmanwho left midsea-
sonforafreshstart elsewhere. Ed-
wards pumped some life into a
team stuck in a nearly three-year
winless streak with three top-10s
inhisfirst fourstarts, andhewasa
bonafide star by his 17th career
Cupstart, whenhelandedhisfirst
celebratorybackflipfollowinghis
breakthroughwinat Atlanta.
Here we are now, seven years
and 19 wins later, waiting for Ed-
wards’ second major contract ne-
gotiation. He took all the calls
from team owners the last time
around, but landed right back
withRoush, withanexpensiveex-
tension that made him one of
NASCAR’s highest paiddrivers.
Now Edwards is apparently
again listening to outside offers,
and that appar-
ently includes a
pretty lucrative
one from Joe
Gibbs Racing.
The team has
room to add a
fourth car, or
could use Ed-
wards toreplaceJoeyLoganoand
help longtime sponsor Home De-
pot feel likeit cancompetewithri-
val Lowe’s string of five consecu-
tive championships with Jimmie
Johnson.
Denny Hamlin, who nearly
knocked off Johnson last season,
thinks Edwards would be a very
nice fit at JGR. But unlike previ-
ous years, when Hamlin said he
was used in a failed recruiting ef-
fort of Dale Earnhardt Jr., he’s not
been asked to reach out to Ed-
wards.
“I hear what everybody is say-
ing, but nobodyhas saidanything
to me that I’d consider to be a
strong indication,” Hamlin said.
“In the past, they’d asked me to
talk to Junior, or another driver
they wanted to sign, but there’s
been nothing at all on Edwards.
Nobody has said a word to me or
askedme to do anything.”
That doesn’t mean that JGR
doesn’t want Edwards, but team
president J.D. Gibbs learned ev-
erything fromhis dad, the former
Washington Redskins coach, and
both men tend to guard their
words as if the Dallas Cowboys
themselves might use everything
against them.
N A S C A R
Edwards keeping mum
on contract situation
By JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
Edwards
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 7B
➛ S P O R T S
WOLFSBURG, Germany —
Rest is nice, winning is better.
The United States plays Swe-
den in the group stage finale at
the Women’s World Cup on
Wednesday, a game that would
seem to have little importance
with both teams already through
to the quarterfinals. But there is
plenty still at stake for the Amer-
icans, starting with the bragging
rights — and everything that
comes with them — for winning
the group.
“We go for a win,” U.S. coach
Pia Sundhage said Monday. “Ab-
solutely.”
The two-time World Cup
champions need only a tie
against Sweden to win Group C
and likely avoid a quarterfinal
matchup with Brazil. The Group
C winner plays the second-place
team in Group D, likely Australia
or Norway, while the Group C
runner-up gets the Group D win-
ner.
Brazil, runner-up in 2007 and
at the last two Olympics, needs
only a draw against World Cup
newcomer Equatorial Guinea to
win Group D.
“I cansafely say that there’s not
going to be one player or person
or staff member from the United
States that’s going to say, ‘We
want a tie,”’ Abby Wambach said.
“We want to win this game be-
cause we want to keep the mo-
mentumgoing forward. Obvious-
ly, you have to be smart. We want
to get some of those 90-minute
players some rest if we can do
that. But first and foremost, we
want to make sure and secure the
first place out of this group.”
The United States is 18-4-7
against Sweden, including a 3-0
record in the World Cup. But
Sweden beat the U.S. 2-1 in Janu-
ary, one of three losses in a five-
month span after the Americans
had gone more than two years
without a loss.
Since arriving in Germany,
however, theU.S. has hadlittlere-
semblance tothe teamthat strug-
gled just to get there. Only Japan
(six) has scored more than the
five goals the Americans had in
their first two games. France also
has five goals.
Though Wambach and fellow
forward Amy Rodriguez have yet
to score, the U.S. is getting pro-
duction from an abundance of
players and places. Five different
players have scored, including
defender Rachel Buehler.
“We knowthat we’re entertain-
ing people,” goalkeeper Hope So-
lo said. “We’re not just winning
games. You can see that swagger
back in the U.S. teamwhether it’s
the way we celebrate goals,
whether it’s the way you can see
we’re enjoying the game again.
It’s not just that hard-fought,
’blood and guts glorified’ game.
It’s the game we love.”
Sweden, meanwhile, had
tougher than expected games
against bothColombia andNorth
Korea, and will be without cap-
tain Caroline Seger. The midfiel-
der is suspended after picking up
her second yellow card Saturday
against North Korea.
Sundhage will have to keep a
close eye on Wambach, who is
carrying a yellowcard and would
miss the quarterfinals if she gets
another. But Sundhage will be
watching her entire lineup close-
ly.
While winning the game is the
priority, Sundhage has been
preaching a “21 players” mantra.
As in, it will take all 21 on the
squad to win the World Cup. She
put Lori Lindsey into the starting
lineup against Colombia and
gaveShannonBoxxabreak. She’s
alreadygottenWorldCuprookies
Alex Morgan and Tobin Heath
ontothe fieldas subs, andfounda
way to get high-energy Megan
Rapinoe significant playing time.
Knowing the Americans are al-
ready into the quarterfinals
would allow Sundhage to work a
fewmore players into the mix. Or
give a breather to those players
who get the bulk of the minutes
or are already nursing some ach-
es and pains. Wambach
(Achilles) and Heather O’Reilly
(groin) both sat out practice
Monday as a precaution.
“We don’t have to force any-
thing which is good,” Sundhage
said. “It wouldbe totally different
if this was a game that wouldtake
us tothe quarterfinals but it’s not.
We have a chance to play proba-
bly some different players.”
As long as it doesn’t get in the
way of the main objective, that is.
“We want to get a good result
against Sweden, we want to play
well,” Wambach said. “That’s the
thing. We want to keep playing
well, performing to our potential
because we’re going to continue
to get better as the tournament
goes on and, hopefully, we’ll
come into the championship
game playing our best.”
W O M E N ’ S W O R L D C U P
Plenty at stake for U.S. against Sweden
By NANCY ARMOUR
AP National Writer
AP PHOTO
American goalkeeper Hope Solo tries to stop a shot from team-
mate Alex Krieger during a training session in preparation for a
match against Sweden on Wednesday during a Women’s Soccer
World Cup practice in Wolfsburg, Germany, on Monday.
UP NEXT
U.S. vs. Sweden
2:45 p.m., Wednesday
TV: ESPN
DAYTON, Ohio —Don Camp-
bell has attended 600 Dayton
Dragons games, cheering on the
Class A team from a front-row
seat next to the home dugout. He
knows what to expect.
Friendly ushers and ballpark
staff. Amusing fan contests dur-
ing the 90 seconds between in-
nings. A chance to see some of
the Cincinnati Reds’ up-and-com-
ing players learn their craft.
Then, after the last out, he’ll
encounter the team’s executives
waiting at the gate.
“When you leave the game,
they’re out there greeting people
and thanking you for coming,”
said Campbell, a 62-year-old reti-
ree.
They keep coming back to
Fifth Third Field — in record
numbers.
The Dragons will sell out their
815th consecutive home game on
Saturday, setting a record for a
professional teaminNorthAmer-
ica, according to the team’s re-
search. With their 7,230 seats fil-
led and hundreds more fans re-
clining on a grassy hill beyond
the outfield wall, they’ll pass the
PortlandTrail Blazers’ markfrom
1977-95.
“I know it will be a source of
pride,” team President Robert
Murphy said. “It’s no secret that
things in and around the Dayton
region have been difficult the last
couple of years. It’s also a city of
perseverance. People love this
community. This is something
they’re proud of.”
It wasn’t always that way. The
southwest Ohio city had mixed
feelings about building a ballpark
in a run-down area downtown.
Only 57miles fromthe Reds’ ball-
park, there were questions about
how a team would fare.
It’s turned into an unpreceden-
ted success, built on an old-fash-
ioned business model that works
very well for the Dragons: Being
passionate about people.
Since sharing a cab ride to
scout out the downtown site in
1998, Murphy andExecutive Vice
President Eric Deutsch have
banked on fan friendliness, em-
ployee loyalty and marketing cre-
ativity. The formula works —
Dayton led not only all Class A
leagues in attendance last sea-
son, but all of Double-A as well.
They do it by making fans feel
they’re the stars.
The club puts a lot of money
and effort into keeping fans hap-
py — what businesses refer to as
customer service. Season tickets
arrivedinteamcollectibles. Tick-
et holders get red-carpet treat-
ment. The ballpark staff makes
sure fans feel appreciated.
B A S E B A L L
Class A team
packs ’em in
at record rate
Reds minor league club will
sell out its 815th straight
game Saturday.
By JOE KAY
AP Baseball Writer
EXETER – It took over a
week to decide, but a champion
was finally crowned in the John
A. AllanTournament at FoxHill
Country Club on Monday.
The teamof Don Crossin and
Bill Briggs completed their
round on Monday with a 7-un-
der 65 to winthe annual tourna-
ment over the team of John
Mulhern and Len Coleman,
who finished with a 68.
The two teams were back out
on the course Monday to com-
plete the last 13 holes of a spe-
cial playoff that was interrupted
by rain on Sunday.
The playoff was necessary af-
ter the two teams finished three
days of play tied over a week
ago.
On June 26, both teams fin-
ished at 14-under par in the bet-
ter-ball stroke play format. Af-
ter three playoff holes, neither
team converted on its potential
match-winning putts and the
match was called due to dark-
ness.
The teams returned to the
course Sunday, but had to quit
after five holes due to rain.
L O C A L G O L F
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Don Crossin watches the ball of teammate Bill Briggs on the second hole during Sunday’s play
in the John A. Allan Tournament at Fox Hill Country Club. Crossin and Briggs returned to the
course Monday and won the tournament with a 65.
Crossin, Briggs win Allan … finally
The Times Leader staff
Jordan Bone smacked a solo
home run and a two-run double
during a nine-run first inning,
then worked four innings on the
mound to pick up the victory as
Plains defeated Tunkhannock
10-3 in an American Legion base-
ball game Monday.
Bone also scored two runs, and
surrendered just one while allow-
ing three hits over four innings.
Josh Savakinus added a double
and provided the final run for
Plains with a homer in the fourth
inning. Anthony Grillini added
two doubles and drove home
three runs.
Tunkhannock Plains
ab r hBi ab r h bi
Thompson cf 4 1 2 0 Bone p 4 2 3 3
Sherry lf 2 0 0 1 Sorokas cf 3 2 0 0
Cline 2b 3 0 1 2 Grillini 3b 4 0 2 3
Ash c 4 0 0 0 Gulius c 3 1 1 0
Bednarz 3b 3 0 1 0
J. Parsnik
ss 1 1 0 0
Zaner ss 4 1 1 0
Savakinus
ss 2 1 2 1
Spencer 1b 4 0 1 0 Champi 1b 0 0 0 0
Clark p 0 0 0 0 Ell 1b 2 0 0 0
Holton p 3 1 0 0 Martinez dh 1 1 0 1
Montross rf 0 0 0 0 Graziosi lf 1 1 0 1
D. Parsnik lf 2 0 0 0
Concini 2b 2 1 2 1
Emmett 2b 2 0 0 0
Okun rf 2 0 0 0
Castellino rf 1 0 1 0
Totals 27 3 6 3 Totals 30101110
Tunkhannock......................... 100 011 0 —3
Plains...................................... 900 100 x —10
2B – Grillini 2, Bednarz, Bone, Savakinus. HR –
Bone, Savakinus.
A M E R I C A N L E G I O N B A S E B A L L
Plains tops Tunkhannock
The Times Leader staff
The Rock Solid girls basketball
team defeated the Oklahoma
Stars, 62-40, in the AAU Eighth
Grade National Championships
at the ESPN Wide World of
Sports complex in Orlando, Fla.,
on Monday.
Gabrielle Volpetti ledRockSol-
id with 15 points. Alexis Lewis
had 11 and Lydia Lawson and Al-
lie Barber each had eight points.
In opening-round play on Sun-
day, RockSolidlost tothedefend-
ing champions from Fairfax, Va.,
55-18.
G I R L S B A S K E T B A L L
Rock Solid posts win in Fla.
The Times Leader staff
as the game went on.”
Josh Tomlin (10-4), who car-
ried a no-hitter into the seventh
inning, allowed two runs and
three hits and improved to 7-1 at
home this season. The Indians’
right-hander also became the
first pitcher since 1919 to go at
least five innings in each of his
first 29 career appearances.
“He was able to holddownthat
amazing lineup,” Indians manag-
er Manny Acta said. “He doesn’t
back down from anybody.”
Carlos Santana hit a two-run
homer in the eighth for Cleve-
land, finally back home after a
nine-game interleague trip.
Chris Perez pitched a 1-2-3
ninth for his 20th save in 21 tries
as the Indians improved to 25-14
at Progressive Field, which was
sold out for the third time in
2011.
Curtis Granderson hit his 23rd
homer for the Yankees, who have
lost two straight after a seven-
game winning streak.
Following the game, manager
Joe Girardi revealed that closer
Mariano Rivera was not available
because of a sore triceps muscle.
Both Girardi and Rivera down-
played the discomfort.
“I’m not concerned at all,” the
41-year-old Rivera said. “It was
sore today. I got a lot of treat-
ment. Hopefully, I’ll be able to
pitch tomorrow.”
Trying to become the first
pitcher in 53 years to no-hit the
Yankees by himself, Tomlin re-
tired18 straight entering the sev-
enth and was poised to deliver a
Fourth of July spectacular to a
rare sellout crowd that included
roughly 15,000 very vocal Yan-
kees fans.
However, Mark Teixeira broke
up Tomlin’s no-hit bid with a
leadoff single to center. Tomlin
buckled down and struck out
Alex Rodriguez before Robinson
Cano reached on a lucky infield
single that caromed off the plate
and stayed fair as it dribbled
down the third-base line. Cano
laughed as he crossed first base.
Nick Swisher followed by
jumping on the first pitch and
splitting the outfielders with a
double that rolled to the wall,
scoring Teixeira and Cano to
make it 2-0.
Burnett couldn’t hold the lead.
JETER
Continued from Page 1B
Rivera has sore
triceps muscle
CLEVELAND — New York
Yankees closer Mariano Rivera
was not available for Monday
night’s 6-3 loss to the
Cleveland Indians because of a
sore right triceps muscle.
Yankees manager Joe
Girardi revealed Rivera’s
condition following the game.
He said Rivera told him before
the game that he was sore
after blowing a save on Sunday
against the Mets.
Girardi said there are no
current plans for Rivera to
undergo medical tests.
Rivera said he’s not
“concerned at all” and hopes to
be able to pitch Tuesday.
Girardi said he would have used
right-hander David Robertson
had there been a save situation
in the series opener against
the Indians.
The 41-year-old Rivera is 1-1
with 21 saves in 25 chances and
a 1.91 ERA in 35 appearances.
field gap and was then sacri-
ficed to third by Greg Golson.
Bernier then scored on an RBI
double to left off the bat of Mike
Lamb.
“We had a lot of fans tonight,
andit was goodtobehomeafter
that long road trip,” Golson
said. “Were chasing those guys
(Lehigh Valley) so we wanted
to put our best foot forward.”
Jordan Parraz then reached
on an infield single as the ball
deflectedoff thegloveof Lehigh
Valleystartingpitcher TimRed-
ding.
Terry Tiffee then drove in
Lamb from third, giving the
Yankees a 2-1 lead.
Next, Jorge Vazquez roped a
line drive single to left field.
Brandon Moss came charging
in trying to make the catch, but
the ball bounce past him and
went all the way to the left-field
wall, allowing both Parraz and
Tiffee to score and putting the
Yankees up 4-1.
“Vazquez has been a big part
of our season period,” Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre manager
Dave Miley said. “I told him
multiple times it was nice to
have himbackandhe feels good
so he will be back in there to-
morrow.”
The Yankees extended their
lead to 5-2 in the bottom half of
the fourth inning. Luis Nunez,
Bernier and Golson hit consec-
utive singles.
Nunez scored on Golson’s
single.
The IronPigs got one back in
the top half of the fifth inning.
Tagg Bozied lined a leadoff tri-
ple just under the glove of a div-
ing Jordan Parraz in right field.
Cody Overbeck then hit a sacri-
fice fly to the warning track in
center field.
The IronPigs cut the Yankee
lead to just 5-3 in the top half of
the ninth. Rich Thompson led
off the inning with a bunt single
down the third base line. He
then scored on a double off the
bat off the bat of Josh Barfield.
Barfield then advanced to
third on a sacrifice fly to center
off the bat of Mayberry Jr. How-
ever, Yankee reliever Logan
Kensing struck out Brandon
Moss and then got Tagg Bozied
to ground out to short to end
the game.
Hall was terrific for Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre in his Tri-
ple-A debut. The southpaw
went 61/3innings allowingjust
two runs on five hits, while
striking out three IronPigs and
walking none.
“I talked to Montero and he
told me he hits his spots good
and can throw every pitch for a
strike,” Gustavo Molina said.
“He hit the corners and got the
ball down for the most part. He
pitched very well tonight.”
Former Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre pitcher Tim Redding suf-
fered the loss for the IronPigs.
He went five innings, allowing
four earned runs on 10 hits. He
struckout three andwalkedjust
one.
The Yankees improved to 45-
38 and are now just 3 ½ games
behindthe IronPigs inthe Inter-
national League North stand-
ings.
“It’s awesome just knowing
we can go into the second half
and have a lead on these guys
and possibly even win the divi-
sion,” Golson said.
The Yankees andtheIronPigs
will play the final game of the
short twogameseries at 7:05to-
night at PNC Field.
Yankee Notes
The New York Yankees have
optioned outfielder Chris Dick-
erson to Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre. In 31 games for New
York, Dickerson hit for an aver-
age of .300 with 3 RBI in 21 at
bats.
YANKEES
Continued from Page 1B
C M Y K
PAGE 8B TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
2
8
9
3
8
9
Play at these courses:
Applewood Golf Course
454 Mt. Zion Road, Harding, PA (570) 388-2500
Arnold’s Golf Course
490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653
Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs
4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776
Emanon Country Club
Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112
Fernwood Hotel Resort
Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966
Hollenback Golf Course
1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169
Lakeland Golf Club
Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983
Maple Hill Public Golf Course
S. Ridge Rd., Springville, PA (570) 965-2324
Mill Race Golf Course
4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040
Morgan Hills Golf Course
219 Hunlock Harveyville Rd., Hunlock, PA (570) 256-3444
Mountain Laurel Golf Course
HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424
Mountain Valley Golf Course
1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242
Sand Springs Country Club
1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845
Shadowbrook Inn and Resort
Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295
Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort
1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633
Stone Hedge Country Club
49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108
Sugarloaf Golf Course
18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097
Towanda Country Club
Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939
Traditions at the Glen
4301 Watson Blvd., Johnson City, NY (607) 797-2381
Twin Oaks Golf Course
RR3 Box 283, Dallas, PA (570) 333-4360
Villas Crossing Golf Course
521 Golf Road, Tamaqua, PA (570) 386-4515
White Birch Golf Course
660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525
White Deer Golf Club
352 Allenwood Camp Ln., Montgomery, PA (570) 547-2186
Woodloch Springs
Woodloch Drive, Hawley, PA (570) 685-8102
Driving Ranges & Instruction
Academy of Golf Center
1333 N. River St., Plains, PA (570) 824-5813
International Golf School
Multiple course locations. Call (570) 752-7281 for information.
Join The Most Exclusive Club In Northeastern
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2011
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NUMBER
ONE
AUDITED
NEWSPAPER
IN LUZERNE COUNTY
– AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS (ABC)
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OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
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NEWS
IN LUZERN
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 83/61
Average 82/60
Record High 99 in 1911
Record Low 46 in 1986
Yesterday 7
Month to date 21
Year to date 229
Last year to date 285
Normal year to date 180
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00”
Month to date 1.57”
Normal month to date 0.52”
Year to date 28.18”
Normal year to date 18.69”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 3.51 -0.45 22.0
Towanda 1.67 -0.24 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 7.53 3.19 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 82-87. Lows: 59-60. Mostly sunny.
The Poconos
Highs: 83-87. Lows: 67-71. Mostly sunny to
the north, partly cloudy to the south.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 76-87. Lows: 53-64. Mostly sunny.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 85-88. Lows: 59-70. Partly to most-
ly sunny.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 83-90. Lows: 69-75. Partly cloudy,
chance of scattered showers and
thunderstorms.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 61/53/.00 64/50/sh 63/50/sh
Atlanta 91/73/.00 93/72/t 92/72/t
Baltimore 88/70/.00 90/69/pc 91/75/t
Boston 90/70/.00 85/70/s 88/69/pc
Buffalo 80/62/.00 76/64/s 81/65/t
Charlotte 92/70/.00 92/71/t 90/71/t
Chicago 87/65/.00 87/72/s 81/65/t
Cleveland 84/68/.00 80/67/s 82/68/t
Dallas 100/78/.00 99/76/pc 101/77/pc
Denver 99/59/.00 87/62/t 82/59/t
Detroit 85/68/.00 86/69/s 84/68/t
Honolulu 86/73/.00 87/74/s 88/75/pc
Houston 96/78/.00 97/77/pc 96/77/pc
Indianapolis 84/71/.01 87/67/s 85/67/pc
Las Vegas 91/80/.00 103/88/t 105/88/t
Los Angeles 74/63/.00 75/67/pc 73/66/pc
Miami 90/76/.62 89/78/t 89/77/t
Milwaukee 84/61/.00 82/64/pc 76/61/pc
Minneapolis 89/68/.00 84/65/t 83/63/pc
Myrtle Beach 88/75/.00 89/74/t 88/75/pc
Nashville 89/71/.00 92/71/t 92/71/t
New Orleans 94/77/.00 92/78/t 92/78/t
Norfolk 94/73/.07 85/73/t 89/74/t
Oklahoma City 102/73/.00 102/74/pc 100/76/s
Omaha 85/67/.00 89/69/t 86/67/t
Orlando 94/74/.00 93/75/t 92/75/t
Phoenix 103/83/.00 108/88/pc 109/88/pc
Pittsburgh 84/65/.00 85/61/s 87/66/t
Portland, Ore. 79/53/.00 84/62/s 82/56/s
St. Louis 84/71/.06 90/71/pc 90/72/t
Salt Lake City 86/77/.00 90/69/t 93/71/t
San Antonio 95/76/.00 96/74/pc 96/72/pc
San Diego 76/66/.00 74/65/pc 73/66/pc
San Francisco 68/55/.00 77/55/s 76/54/pc
Seattle 75/51/.00 76/55/s 74/55/s
Tampa 90/77/.00 93/76/t 93/76/t
Tucson 99/76/.00 99/79/t 100/79/t
Washington, DC 90/73/.00 88/72/t 90/73/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 70/48/.00 75/58/pc 69/53/sh
Baghdad 108/84/.00 109/84/s 111/84/s
Beijing 97/70/.00 91/74/pc 93/70/pc
Berlin 64/59/.00 74/56/pc 78/59/pc
Buenos Aires 54/30/.00 54/36/s 56/39/s
Dublin 70/50/.00 63/54/sh 63/51/sh
Frankfurt 77/50/.00 78/61/t 77/58/sh
Hong Kong 91/82/.00 91/82/pc 90/80/s
Jerusalem 90/61/.00 85/62/s 87/64/s
London 77/57/.00 75/58/sh 64/54/sh
Mexico City 70/55/.00 74/55/t 74/57/t
Montreal 84/68/.00 85/64/pc 79/63/sh
Moscow 88/61/.00 74/62/t 74/59/t
Paris 81/52/.00 82/55/pc 73/54/sh
Rio de Janeiro 64/63/.00 72/62/pc 73/62/pc
Riyadh 108/81/.00 112/86/s 111/84/s
Rome 82/63/.00 83/71/t 85/71/pc
San Juan 89/76/.00 86/77/t 88/78/t
Tokyo 91/79/.00 87/75/t 85/74/t
Warsaw 61/52/.00 69/54/sh 70/56/sh
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
90/70
Reading
89/64
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
87/59
87/60
Harrisburg
88/63
Atlantic City
86/68
New York City
88/71
Syracuse
86/62
Pottsville
86/61
Albany
87/62
Binghamton
Towanda
86/59
87/56
State College
85/57
Poughkeepsie
88/62
99/76
87/72
87/62
98/74
84/65
75/67
73/55
92/70
89/59
76/55
88/71
86/69
93/72
89/78
97/77
87/74
61/48
64/50
88/72
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:36a 8:40p
Tomorrow 5:37a 8:39p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 10:28a 11:09p
Tomorrow 11:39a 11:38p
First Full Last New
July 8 July 15 July 23 July 30
The Independ-
ence Day holiday
weekend may be
over, but sum-
mer-like weather
is here to stay.
Temperatures
will climb into
the mid to upper
80s today under
near-full sun-
shine. Clouds
and showers will
plague areas
south of the
Mason-Dixon
line, but around
here conditions
will remain dry
right through
late tomorrow.
Humidity levels
will remain com-
forable today,
but that changes
tomorrow as
more soupy air
returns. Night-
time lows will
continue to fall
into the 50s as
skies remain
clear. Our
extended out-
look shows
afternoon highs
sticking in the
80s to even near
90 at times over
the next week.
-Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: A stationary frontal boundary extending from the central Plains to the East
Coast will continue to generate scattered storms from the lower Mississippi Valley to the Southeast
and Gulf Coast. Meanwhile, another frontal boundary will create a band of showers and thunder-
storms from the Southwest, across the central Plains and Upper Midwest to the Great Lakes.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Sunny
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny
87°
58°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny
85°
59°
SATURDAY
Mostly
sunny
85°
60°
SUNDAY
Partly
sunny
88°
62°
MONDAY
Partly
sunny, T-
storms
87°
65°
THURSDAY
Partly
sunny, T-
storms
85°
64°
87
°
55
°
K
HEALTH S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011
timesleader.com
Getting you back to your life.
Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing
ManorCare - Kingston
570.288.9315
Hampton House
570.825.8725
www.hcr-manorcare.com
Fair season beckons, which can mean
only one thing: fatty foods. On a stick!
Take our quiz on the nutrition content
(or lack thereof) of the most popular
carnival food attractions culled from
the book “The Calorie King 2009
Calorie, Fat & Carbohydrate Counter.”
1. Which iconic fair treat weighs in with
the most calories at 760 calories?
a) Cotton candy (5.5-ounce bag)
b) Funnel cake (plain)
c) Cheesecake on a stick (6 ounces)
2. Which has more calories?
a) Jumbo corn dog (6 ounces)
b) Foot-long hot dog, with bun
c) Candied apple (7 ounces)
3. Which has a higher fat content?
a) Fried Twinkie
b) Fried Snickers bar
c) Cotton candy
4. True or false: A smoked turkey leg,
with skin, contains nearly twice as
many calories as cheesecake on a
stick.
5. No one eats a funnel cake plain.
Which of the following funnel toppings
is the most caloric?
a) Strawberries and cream (2 ounces)
b) Apple cinnamon (2 ounces)
c) Cinnamon and sugar (2 teaspoons)
ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: b (hot dog, 470; corn
dog, 375; apple, 330); 3: b (Snickers,
445 grams; Twinkie, 420; cotton candy,
0); 4: true (turkey, 1,135 calories;
cheesecake, 655); 5: b (apple cinna-
mon, 85; strawberries, 70; cinnamon
and sugar, 30)
From Times Leader wire service
N U T R I T I O N Q U I Z : Fair Food
Q: I’ve noticed that
ears seem to get big-
ger with age. Is that
true, and if so, why
might that be so?
— G.F., Huntsville,
Ala.
A: It’s not your
imagination. Ears do get bigger with
age. Not only does the cartilage in the
ear continue to grow lengthwise (but
not with increasing width) throughout
our lifetime, but the earlobe elongates
and sags due to years of gravity. A
British study published in the Dec. 23,
1995, issue of the British Medical
Journal studied 206 patients over time
and found that our ears elongate by
0.22 mm per year. Another study de-
termined that the average ear length is
2.04 inches at birth, and 3.07 inches in
length in men at age 70 and 2.83 inch-
es in length in women at age 70. No-
body really knows the exact reason
why ear cartilage continues to grow
throughout our lifetime.
Another odd fact is that your nose
also gets longer with advancing age
due to the effects of gravity.
Q: Two days ago when I went to a
clinic for severe foot pain, my blood
pressure was 176/104. My doctor as-
sures me that blood pressure spiking
under stress or pain is normal and
doesn’t need to be treated. What is the
up-to-date thinking on this subject?
— K.M., Downingtown, Pa.
A: If your blood pressure is elevated
for sustained periods on a daily basis,
it should be treated. A sudden rise in
blood pressure because of acute pain,
anxiety or strenuous physical exertion
isn’t hypertension, as long as it rapidly
returns to normal. In the doctor’s
office, we see these rises in blood
pressure in folks who are nervous or
rushed. It’s called “white coat syn-
drome,” in reference to the doctor’s
white coat. I find that giving patients a
“friendly” magazine to read for a few
minutes can distract and relax them
enough to bring the pressure down to
its baseline. Keep in mind that folks
with white coat syndrome may still
have underlying high blood pressure.
What should your blood pressure
be? According to the American Heart
Association, the upper “systolic” num-
ber should ideally be less than 120
(120-139 is borderline high; 140 or
higher is high); the lower “diastolic”
number should be less than 80 (80-89
is borderline high; 90 or higher is
high).
I’d recommend that you monitor
your blood pressure outside the doc-
tor’s office: At home and at work,
when you’re stressed and when you’re
relaxed. Keep a diary of the time, your
state of mind and your activity. That’ll
help you and your doctor determine if
you’ve got hypertension.
ASK DR. H
M I T C H E L L H E C H T
Yes, it’s true:
Our ears grow
as we get older
Dr. Mitchell Hecht is a physician specializing
in internal medicine. Send questions to him
at: “Ask Dr. H,” P.O. Box 767787, Atlanta, GA
30076. Personal replies are not possible.
andcramping. Other moreserious effects
can be full body rashes, violent vomiting
and sharp stomach pains.
Gluten is a broad termgiven to certain
proteins contained in grains such as
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Lindo Sabatini, owner of Sabatini’s Pizza
in Exeter, cuts a gluten-free pizza. Saba-
tini’s recently started serving gluten-free
pizza and beer.
By JOE DOLINSKY Times Leader Correspondent
See GLUTEN, Page 3C
M
ost people would admit there is nothing like biting into a
warm cut of pizza and a cold mug of beer on a Friday night.
And if you have lived in the area long enough, you’d be hard pressed
to avoid a pizzeria in your travels. However, as increasing numbers
of diagnoses grow, those suffering from celiac disease find them-
selves unable to enjoy this simple fare.
Celiac disease is a genetic disorder
which affects children and adults. When
an individual with CD digests gluten it
causes the villi, tiny hairs that line the
small intestine, to become damaged. Re-
actions can vary. Some sufferers can ex-
perience digestive discomfort, fatigue
Area businesses offer alternatives for celiac sufferers
Marion Welliver, owner of The Gluten Free Basket, Dallas Township. The store sells only gluten-free products.
Summer flights are on their way, along
with the germs that ride along. Followthese
tips to “put the odds overwhelmingly inyour
favor of not catching a cold or the flu,” says
Dr. Mark Gendreau, an air-travel expert and
vice chair of emergency medicine at the La-
hey Clinic in Burlington, Mass.:
•Drinklots of water. Nasal membranes —
an important barrier against germs — don’t
work as well if they dry out. Keep in mind
that the air onplanes is very lowinhumidity.
• Use saline nasal spray. Sprays can in-
crease howrapidly the tiny hairs that line na-
sal passages beat back and forth to expel
germs. They also help keep membranes in
the eyes, nose and mouth moist.
• Carry hand sanitizer. Buy products that
contain at least 60 percent alcohol and clean
your hands frequently, especially before
touching your face. Since germs can linger in
public restrooms, it’s a good idea to use san-
itizer evenafter washingwithsoapandwater.
•Wipe down trays and seat handles. Both
can be contaminated with dangerous germs
such as drug-resistant bacteria. Clean with
alcohol-based hand sanitizer or an antibacte-
rial wipe.
•Increase the ventilation at your seat. Sa-
liva droplets from sneezing, coughing and
even conversation can fly up to six feet in the
air and rain down on nearby passengers.
Turn the vent above your seat to medium
flowandpositionit sothe current moves just
slightly in front of your face.
• Consult your doctor. People who are
pregnant, battling a serious respiratory in-
fection, undergoing chemotherapy or taking
an immunosuppressant are at higher risk for
complications from an infection and may
need to take extra precautions.
Don’t let air travel ground you
By ALISON JOHNSON
Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)
C M Y K
PAGE 2C TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Ready for your dog’s days of summer?
Everybody seems to have a list of tips.
Most are no-brainers. Don’t leave dogs in hot cars or
let them walk on hot asphalt, play too hard or get too
muchsun. Applyflea andtickrepellents, andif you’rein
a mosquito-prone area, talk to your vet about heart-
wormprevention pills. Take dogs on walks early or late
toavoidmiddayheat andprovideampledrinkingwater.
But there are other risks that
come with heat, vacations and
outdoor play. Here are some
ways to keep dogs healthy and
comfortable this summer, with
tips from veterinarian Louise
Murray, vice president of the
American Society for the Pre-
vention of Cruelty to Animals’
Bergh Memorial Animal Hospi-
tal in New York City.
Grooming: A dog’s coat is like
insulation, warding off cold in
the winter and heat in the sum-
mer. Trim, but don’t give your
dog a crew cut or such a close
shave that it takes away that pro-
tection.
Dogs get sunburn and skin
cancer, so never cut fur shorter
than an inch. (In some breeds,
even an inch is too short.)
Dogs shedmore insummer, so
brushtoget ridof extra fur along
with fur that’s matted from wa-
ter play.
Heat Relief: Most pets find
cool, shady spots to lie down,
but some, especially animals
that are overweight or can’t tol-
erate heat, might benefit from
cooling beds, mats or vests.
The mats get filledwithwater,
whichmixes witha high-techgel
to create a cool, waterbed-like
cushion. Consumer reviews are
generally positive but caution
that some beds spring leaks (or
are chewed by dogs).
Food: No food will keep your
dog cooler, but food helps keep
body temperature up, so dogs
may not need to eat as much in
the summer.
If your dog stays at a dog-
friendly hotel with you or at a
kennel, consider bringing food
fromhome. A change in diet can
cause diarrhea.
Barbecues and picnics are a
veterinarian’s nightmare. Keep
pets in the house or on a leash to
prevent them from being fed or
lappingupthings that arebadfor
them, whether it’s spilled alco-
hol or onion dip. Onions, garlic,
grapes, raisins and chocolate are
the most toxic foods for dogs.
Vacations: Dogs can get car-
sick if they’re not used to driv-
ing, so go for small trips before a
road trip.
On boats, consider a doggie
life vest. Protect the dog from
gasoline and other toxic prod-
ucts. At the beach, provide
drinking water so the dog does
not drink salt water.
On planes, if your pet is small
enough, keep it in the cabin with
you. Call ahead because some
airlines limit animals per flight.
Be prepared to pay a fee and
check on necessary paperwork.
If your dog must fly as cargo,
note that the U.S. Department of
Transportation says short-faced
breeds like pugs and bulldogs
die during air transport at much
higher rates than other breeds.
If you’re boardingyour dog, re-
member that many kennels re-
quire proof of vaccines such as
rabies and kennel cough.
Lawns: Some lawn products
are toxic to dogs and cats. Weed
killers and herbicides are the
worst — some cause cancer.
Some fertilizers are also toxic.
All a dog or cat has to do is walk
on the lawn and lick its paws to
be exposed.
In 2010, the ASPCA Animal
Poison Control Center received
more than 4,000 calls related to
garden toxins. These include
herbicides, plants (hydrangea,
tulips, azaleas, lilies), insecti-
cides, mushrooms, fertilizers
and cocoa mulch.
Overheating: Recognize over-
heating if you see it —excessive
panting, difficulty breathing, in-
creased heart and respiratory
rate, drooling, mild weakness,
seizures, and elevated body tem-
peratures over 104 degrees.
“A lot of dogs will just keep
running until they drop because
they have so much heart and so
muchenergy,” saidMurray. “You
have to be proactive.”
Animals with flat faces, like
pugs and Persian cats, are more
susceptible to heat stroke since
they cannot pant as effectively.
Sponge the animal with luke-
warm water and seek veterinary
care if you suspect overheating.
Windows: Murray’s clinic sees
two or three pets a week that
have fallen or jumped from
apartment windows, roofs, bal-
conies or fire escapes. Multiple
limb fractures or potentially
deadly internal or brain injuries
often result. Use window
screens, open windows fromthe
top instead of the bottom, con-
sider child-safety window
guards.
Pamper your pet through the dog days of summer
AP PHOTO
Animal groomer Ana Sondall gives her client Bodie a summer cut at Petco in the Van Nuys sec-
tion of Los Angeles. A dog’s coat is like insulation, warding off cold in the winter and heat in the
summer. Trim, but don’t give your dog a crew cut or such a close shave that it takes away that
protection. Dogs can get sunburn and skin cancer, so never cut fur shorter than an inch.
By SUE MANNING Associated Press
Veterinarian Jeff Kahler’s column
does not publish this week.
Skin screenings offered
The Greater Hazleton Health
Alliance, in conjunction with
Dr. Kathleen Veglia, will host a
free skin screening from 2 to 4
p.m. on July 12 at the 15th
Street Cancer Treatment Cen-
ter. Registration is required.
Call 501-6204 to register.
MS series continues
Dr. Douglas Nathanson, a
multiple sclerosis specialist at
Geisinger Health System, will
continue his five-part MS educa-
tion series at 6 p.m. on July 13
at the East Mountain Inn,
Plains Township.
The program is free. To make
a reservation, contact Christie
Edwards at 808-7330 or cled-
wards@geisinger.edu.
Medics slate open house
Geisinger’s Life Flight 3
based in Avoca will hold an
open house from1 to 4 p.m. on
July 17 at the Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center West
entrance parking lot, 1000 E.
Mountain Drive, Plains Town-
ship.
The event is free and will be
held rain or shine. For more
information, call Lisa Weston at
271-6217.
Health and safety seminar
The Susquehanna Valley
Association of Pennsylvania
Occupational Health Nurses,
Inc., in alliance with the Occu-
pational Safety & Health Ad-
ministration, will conduct a
seminar from 2 to 6 p.m. on
Aug. 17 at the John Heinz In-
stitute, 150 Mundy St., Wilkes-
Barre Township.
Occupational health nurses,
human resource personnel, risk
managers and safety profession-
als can contact Daurice Holly at
dlholly@pplweb.com for more
information.
IN BRIEF
wheat, rye, and barley and can be
found in everything from cereal
to pasta. Gluten is also found in
most types of beer.
According to the Celiac Dis-
ease Foundation, one out of every
133 people in the United States is
diagnosed with celiac disease.
Each faces challenges finding
and enjoying favorite foods. But
two local businesses are doing
their part tomake sure these indi-
viduals have options.
Sabatini’s Pizza is one business
making a focusedeffort to adhere
to the needs of celiac sufferers.
Owner Lindo Sabatini, due in no
small part to the demand from
customers, pursued the creation
of gluten-free pies at his Exeter
pizzeria. After a few misses, Sa-
batini and his manager John Ral-
lofoundtheir formula: a carefully
prepared pie that gives their fa-
mous original a real run for its
money.
“We didn’t want to put out
somethinginferior. We wantedto
make something we could like,
too,” said Rallo.
They also didn’t want to take
the preparation method lightly.
Cross-contamination is often a
problem in preparing gluten-free
foods, and in a bustling restau-
rant environment wheat can of-
ten find its way into what should
be gluten-free foods. Sabatini and
the staff at the pizzeria take extra
care in preparing each pie.
They use separate peels, cut-
ters, screens and even separate
cheese. Additionally, the pies get
made in a line completely sepa-
rate from the normal pizza line.
This ensures the wheat fromoth-
er pies doesn’t find its way into
the gluten-free pies. Once the piz-
za comes out of the oven, the
cooks wash the peel again -- all to
GLUTEN
Continued from Page 1C
• Sabatini’s Pizza, 1925 Wyom-
ing Ave., Exeter, 693-2270. Open
1 1 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Monday
through Thursday, 1 1 a.m.-mid-
night Friday and Saturday, and
noon-10:30 p.m. Sunday. Full
menu available online, including
downloadable version and
catering menu – www.sabati-
nis.com.
• The Gluten Free Basket,
routes 1 18 and 415 in Dallas,
next to Subway, 594-1046 or
www.glutenfreebasketnepa-
.com. Store hours are 9:30
a.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday through
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat-
urday, and 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sunday.
• The Greater Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Celiac Support
Group meets the third Sunday
of every month at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Hospital, 1000
E. Mountain Drive, Plains Town-
ship. Contact Rosemary Butera
for details at 655-0728. The
group will hold a picnic the last
Sunday in August at Nay Aug
Park in Scranton.
• www.glutenfreely.com, a
website created by the Uni-
versity of Maryland’s Center for
Celiac Research features glu-
ten-free recipes, medical arti-
cles, blogs and 400 items in its
online store.
• The Celiac Disease Founda-
tion, celiac.org, 818-990-2354,
provides services and support.
RESOURCES
Celiac disease is a digestive
disorder that damages the
small intestine and interferes
with absorption of nutrients
from food. People who have
celiac disease cannot tolerate
gluten, a protein in wheat, rye,
and barley. Gluten is found
mainly in foods but may also be
found in everyday products
such as medicines, vitamins,
and lip balms.
• One in 133 Americans has
celiac disease.
• An estimated 3 million Amer-
icans across all races, ages and
genders suffer from celiac.
• Celiac disease can lead to a
number of other disorders
including infertility, reduced
bone density, neurological
disorders, some cancers, and
other autoimmune diseases.
• There are no pharmaceutical
cures for celiac disease.
• A100 percent gluten-free diet
is the only existing treatment
• Gluten-free sales reached
more than $2.6 billion by the
end of 2010 and are now ex-
pected to exceed more than $5
billion by 2015.
Source: National Institute of
Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidneys Diseases
ACTS ABOUT CELIAC DISEASE
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Lindo Sabatini, owner of Sabatini’s Pizza, Exeter, says his gluten-free pizza is as good as his famous
original pie. His preparation method also prevents cross-contamination.
“I got a phone call from a woman nearly crying, saying she
hadn’t had a piece of pizza since 1996. She was finally able to
have a pizza and a beer, and better yet it was a Sab’s pie.”
Lindo Sabatini
Owner of Sabatini’s Pizza on the addition of gluten-free pizza and beer on its menu
ensure the safety and satisfaction
of their customers.
Sabatini’s also offers gluten-
free beer in addition to its pizza
and pasta offerings.
Since they finalized the recipe
two months ago, Sabatini and
Rallo have received numerous
phone calls and visits, not to
mention countless face-to-face
thank-yous from customers.
“I got a phone call froma wom-
an nearly crying, saying she
hadn’t had a piece of pizza since
1996. She was finally able to have
a pizza and a beer, and better yet
it was a Sab’s pie,” Sabatini re-
called.
If you crave something other
than pizza or beer, The Gluten
Free Basket in Dallas is the only
location in the area devoted sole-
ly to the sale of gluten-free prod-
ucts. Since its grand opening in
April, the store has continued to
offer vast varieties of foods which
those with the CDcan enjoy wor-
ry free.
“You could leave your glasses
at home because you don’t have
to read a label here,” said owner
Marion Welliver.
Welliver was diagnosed with
celiac disease in 2010 and knows
how frustrating it can be reading
label after label trying to find
something not only safe but ed-
ible and enjoyable. Her store of-
fers “everything gluten free from
A to Z” including pasta, cookies,
chips, cereals, desserts, frozen
chicken nuggets and even frozen
mozzarella sticks.
“Sticking to the diet is impor-
tant,” saidRosemaryButera. But-
era heads the Greater Wilkes-
Barre Scranton Celiac Support
Group and stressed the impor-
tance of a smart diet when deal-
ing with CD.
“You have to be careful of any-
thing put in your mouth,” Butera
said. In addition to foods, “tooth-
pastes, mouthwashes, lipstick,
over-the-counter prescriptions
and medicines” may also contain
gluten.
Reading labels is an extremely
important facet of a gluten-free
diet, and the Celiac Disease
Foundation stresses “When in
doubt, leave it out.” That means
if you are unsure a food or prod-
uct absolutely does not contain
gluten, then avoid it in your diet.
But such diets aren’t just for
those diagnosed with celiac dis-
ease.
Gluten-free diets can also be
beneficial for those seeking a
healthier lifestyle. In addition to
containing zero preservatives,
gluten-free diets also are void of
additives, artificial colors, artifi-
cial flavors, MSG, sulfites and
contain little to no cholesterol.
As more businesses begintoof-
fer these alternatives, one thing
is clear: customers are taking no-
tice and they aren’t shy about
showing their thanks.
Onesuchcustomer was Janelle
Giebus, who traveled from Flor-
ida to visit relatives and enjoy
some of Sabatini’s gluten-free
pies. Giebus made sure to stop
Sabatini and thank himpersonal-
ly for making sucha concertedef-
fort.
“It tastes just like Sabatini’s
pizza,” she said. “I could just hug
him.”
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 3C
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Ivan and Cheri Davidowitz, Certified Pedorthists
Finding the right cheese —
that’s what gave Shannon Nowak
the most trouble.
“I know, it’s just grilled
cheese,” said the Rochester,
Mich., mother whose family has
moved toward a gluten-free, ca-
sein-free diet. “But we went
through six or seven months
without grilled cheese sandwich-
es or cheese in the house. You
don’t realize how much you’ll
miss it until you can’t have it.”
Still, like many families with
diets restricted by food allergies,
sensitivities or personal prefer-
ence, the Nowaks found that it’s
getting easier to go grocery shop-
ping these days.
Food labeling is becoming
more understandable, partly be-
cause federal law now mandates
that the most common allergens
be clearly listed.
It’s good business, too.
Approximately 3 million chil-
dren in the U.S., or about 4 per-
cent, were reported to have a
food allergy in 2007 — a jump of
18 percent over the preceding
decade, according to a 2009 re-
port bytheAmericanAcademyof
Pediatrics.
For those with food allergies, a
bite of the wrong thing — even a
touch of it on their skin — can
trigger a violent, life-threatening
immune response known as ana-
phylaxis that swells the lips, face,
tongue and throat and cuts off
breathing.
Such allergies cause 300,000
trips to emergency departments
and physician offices, 2,000 hos-
pitalizations and150 deaths each
year, according to the National
Institute of Allergy and Infec-
tious Disease, or NIAID.
Even a bowl of vanilla ice
creamcan be scary if you’re aller-
gic to nuts.
“So they make rocky road ice
cream, and they hose it (the
equipment) down. The next run
is vanilla, but it could have trace
amounts (of nuts) in the first few
cartons,” said Carol Finkelstein
of Orchard Lake, Mich. Her son
Ben, 9, is allergic tomilk, sesame,
tree nuts and latex.
“It’s a game of Russian rou-
lette,” she said. “How lucky do
you feel today?”
The issue sparked headlines in
Florida in March when an ele-
mentary school — trying to pro-
tect one child with a peanut aller-
gy — began mandating hand-
washing each time students en-
tered the classroom. It also or-
dered mouth-rinsing as soon as
students arrived at school and af-
ter lunch. Snacks in the class-
room were banned. A peanut-
sniffing dog was brought on-site.
According to Finkelstein, the
school went too far. In fact, after
parents protested, it eased some
of the rules.
But all of this underscores that
the country is still trying to bal-
ance several things: educating
those with allergies about howto
protect themselves, training
schools in proper emergency in-
tervention during an attack and
asking for understanding from
others, she said.
Beyond allergies, there is a
growing understanding of food
sensitivities. This intolerance
may not cause the violent im-
mune response of a food allergy,
but it can lead to other serious
problems, especially with diges-
tion.
High fructose corn syrup, a
ubiquitous ingredient in proc-
essed food, sends pains into Lib-
by Lee’s abdomen that has the12-
year-old doubled over and vomit-
ing violently.
That means certain pizzas or
ice cream at a sleepover used to
land her in the emergency room:
“My stomach kind of feels like
there’s a knife in it,” said the Ho-
well, Mich., seventh-grader.
Allergies affect about 12 mil-
lion Americans. The body’s im-
mune response is triggered as if
otherwise harmless substances,
including food, are a threat.
Some people produce a specific
type of antibody called immuno-
globulin E (IgE), which binds to
food and triggers the release of
chemicals such as histamine. In
severe cases, that leads to life-
threatening anaphylaxis.
Eight foods account for 90 per-
cent of all food-allergic reactions:
milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts,
fish, shellfish, wheat and soy.
For more, visit www.foodaller-
gy.org or www.niaid.nih.gov/
topics/foodallergy.
For many allergy sufferers, increase in food labeling provides relief
By ROBIN ERB
Detroit Free Press
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C M Y K
PAGE 4C TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your child’s
name, age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grandparents’
names and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a daytime
contact phone number. Without one,
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We cannot return photos submitted
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photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious or
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Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
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WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
Alyssa Nicole Swanberry, daugh-
ter of Michael and Sariya Swan-
berry, Cairo, Egypt, is celebrating
her fourth birthday today, July
5. Alyssa is a granddaughter of
Janice Swanberry and Francis
Swanberry, both of Wilkes-Barre,
and Mona St. Leger, Alexandria,
Va. She is a great-granddaughter
of Helen Swoboda, Wilkes-Barre.
Alyssa has a brother, Ryan Geof-
frey, 6.
Alyssa N. Swanberry
Scott A. Meeker Jr., son of Scott
Meeker and Theresa Meeker,
Hanover Township, is celebrating
his sixth birthday today, July 5.
Scott is a grandson of Anna
Meeker and the late William
Meeker, Ashley; Carol Eckrote,
Drums; and the late Joseph
Oeller III. He is a great-grandson
of Shirley Meeker, Laurel Run;
Helen Parry, Freeland; the late
Margaret Oeller; and the late
Betty Stankevich.
Scott A. Meeker Jr.
Hunter Shillingburg, son of Linda
and Sam Shillingburg, Hunlock
Creek, is celebrating his 1 1th
birthday today, July 5. Hunter is
a grandson of David and Patricia
Schwenk, Swoyersville, and
Gerald and Antoinette Shil-
lingburg, Keyser, W.Va. He has a
brother, Colby, 12.
Hunter Shillingburg
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
EDWARDSVILLE: The Ed-
wardsville Senior Center, 57
Russell St., will host a program
on nutrition by the Penn State
Extension program at 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
Wyoming Valley Drug &
Alcohol will discuss “Gambling
awareness” at 11:30 a.m. on
Friday.
The Kingston Police Depart-
ment will conduct a demonstra-
tion with its drug-sniffing dog at
11:30 a.m. on Monday. The
public is invited. For more in-
formation, call Jim at 287-3381.
KINGSTON: Dirty bingo will
be played at 12:45 p.m. on
Wednesday at the Kingston
Senior Center, 680 Wyoming
Ave. Players are asked to bring a
new wrapped gift worth $2.
On Friday, Joke Day begins at
11:30.
The shuffleboard team will
travel to Falls on Monday. For
more information, call 287-1102.
MOUNTAIN TOP: The Moun-
tain Top Social Club will meet
on July 12 in Father Nolan Hall
Day Room at St. Jude’s Church.
Doors will open at noon. Any-
one age 50 years of age or older
can join.
Upcoming trips are July 14,
Mount Haven Resort, Milford;
Aug. 17, Rainbow Theatre, Lan-
caster; Sept. 24, Ehrhardt’s
Lake, Wallenpaupack; Nov. 4,
Hunterdon Hills Playhouse,
New Jersey. The bus will pickup
Wilkes-Barre area residents at
St. Aloysius Church, Barney
Street. For reservations or more
information call Otto at 474-
0641.
PLAINS TWP.: Plains Senior
Citizens, Project Head, will
meet at on Wednesday in the
cafeteria at SS. Peter and Paul
School, Hudson Road. A light
lunch will be held at noon fol-
lowed by the business session.
Hosts are Carolyn Byrne,
Betty Campanella, Stella Cap-
pellini, Nanci Conlon, and
Louise and Jerry Cookus. New
members are invited to join.
The group offers guest speakers
and other activities.
PLYMOUTH: The Senior
Citizen’s Friendship Club of St.
Mary’s welcomed new members
Charles Verespy and Jane Tho-
mas at a recent meeting. June
birthdays were celebrated and
congratulations were extended
to Felix and Regina Pietrzykow-
ski on their 65th wedding anni-
versary. The 50/50 winners
were Geraldine Wabik, Matilda
Raklewicz and Jackie McCabe.
The annual picnic is Aug. 4 at
the Checkerboard Inn, Carv-
erton. Guests are invited. Trips
planned are to Cape Cod in
August and Lancaster in No-
vember. Call Ann at 779-3203
for details.
Meetings are planned for
Monday and July 18. The serv-
ing committees are Ann and
John Brunick, Lucille Burns,
Rita Buzinski and Valeria Cack-
owski; and Bernadine Clark, Pat
Cole, Barbara Elgonitis, Frank
and Mary Jane Forlin.
TUNKHANNOCK: The
Wyoming County Senior Center,
101 Dymond Terrace, will offer
blood pressure screenings from
10 a.m. to noon today.
The shuffleboard team will
play at Dallas on Monday.
Free knitting classes with
Sandi are offered from 2:30 to
3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. Pat-
terns, yarn and instructions are
available. For more information,
call 836-2324.
WILKES-BARRE: The Char-
les T. Adams Senior Center, 5 E.
Market St., will accept applica-
tions from 9 to 11 a.m. today for
the Commission on Economic
Opportunity’s Commodity Food
Program. An ice cream social
fundraiser will take place from 8
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Rhonda Tillman will present a
peer program at 11:30 a.m. on
Thursday.
On Friday, there will be a
support group meeting with
Heartland Home Health at 2
p.m. For more information, call
825-3484.
WILKES-BARRE: Rainbow
Seniors of Wilkes-Barre will
meet at 1 p.m. on July 19 at
Albright United Methodist
Church, Dana and Grove streets.
Servers are Bernice Krasnahill,
Ted and Joan Krasnahill, Betty
Krasnahill. New members are
invited.
Birthday celebrants are Joan
Krasnahill and Jean Langley.
Celebrating a wedding anni-
versary are Angelo and Berna-
dine Ricci.
WILKES-BARRE: The Fir-
wood Senior Citizens will meet
at 1 p.m. Thursday in the hand-
icap accessible lower level of
Firwood Methodist Church. Joe
Kelly will preside. Refreshments
will be served. New members
are invited. James Ruck will
lead a sing-along.
Upcoming trips include July 9
Dutch Apple Dinner Theater;
Aug. 19-26, Northern National
Parks; Sept. 14 Inn at Hunt’s
Landing in Matamoras; Oct. 13,
Mohonk Mountain House; Nov.
11, Sight and Sound; Nov. 17,
nine-night Eastern Caribbean
cruise. Contact Maureen, 824-
6538, for more information.
WYOMING: The Wyoming-
West Wyoming Seniors will
meet at 1:30 p.m. today at the
St. Monica Parish meeting cen-
ter with Frank Perfinski presid-
ing. Servers are Theresa Alexan-
der, Marian Pocceschi and He-
len Ostroski.
Fifty-fifty winners were Paul
Delaney, Howard Kelley, Char-
maine Potenza and Marion
Poceschi. The bingo jackpot
winner was Theresa Alexander.
Eva Casseri was welcomed into
membership. The guest was
Catherine Michelson. New
members are being accepted.
Call Frank Perfinski at 693-3202
for more information.
The annual picnic will be held
July 19 at the Daley Park Pavil-
ion on Shoemaker Ave., West
Wyoming. Dinner will be served
at noon by Ann Voitek catering.
Bingo and games will be played.
Parking is available and for the
handicapped.
NEWS FOR SENIORS
Editor’s Note: Information for this
space may be mailed to Senior
News, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1. To en-
sure accuracy, information must be
typed or computer-generated.
Announcements can also be sent
by e-mail to people@timeslead-
er.com. The deadline is Thursday at
noon for all copy. For more in-
formation, contact Michele Harris
at 829-7245.
PETS OF THE WEEK
Names:
Bows, Babes,
Pandora, and
Amber
Sex: females
Age: 9
weeks old
Breed/
types: Hem-
mingway mix
How to adopt: Call or visit the Hazleton Animal Shelter, 101 North Pop-
lar St. (corner of Hemlock) in Hazleton. Phone 454-0640. Hours for
adoptions are Monday through Saturday from1 to 4 p.m.; Sunday 1 1 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Business hours are Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
and Sunday 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wish List: donations of cat food, cleaning supplies, paper products, and
blankets are in need.
Members of the Falls Senior Center enjoyed an ‘Oldies But Good-
ies’ singing event with Eugene Smith on piano. Participants, seated,
are Art Haefner, Eugene Smith and Margaret O’Fier. Standing: Jea-
nette Martin, and Pat Smith.
Falls center members sing along to the oldies
The Northeastern Pennsylvania Nonprofit & Community Assistance Center held its 201 1 Community
Awards Program at the Woodlands Inn & Resort, Plains Township. The event highlights nonprofit orga-
nization’s impact within NCAC’s seven county region, which includes Luzerne and Lackawanna coun-
ties. Award winners are: Arts and Culture, first place, First Friday Scranton; runner-up, Crayons, Car-
bondale’s Main Street Gallery Art Walk; Theodore ‘Ted’ G. Daniels Community Development & Improve-
ment, first place, Greater Carbondale YMCA, 21st Century Capital Campaign; first place, Luzerne Coun-
ty Flood Protection Authority and RiverCommon.org, River Common Park; Children and Youth, first
place, Schuylkill United Way, Stuff the Bus Annual School Supply Drive; runner-up, Children’s Service
Center, Juvenile Fire Setters Program; Education, first place, Voluntary Action Center of NEPA, RSVP
Literacy Project; runner-up, the Scranton School for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children; Environment
and Animal Welfare, first place, Newport Township Community Organization, Newport Township Beau-
tification Program; runner-up, Pennsylvania Environmental Council, Evening for NEPA’s Environment;
Health and Human Services, first place, Schuylkill Alliance for Health Care Access, Health Care for the
Uninsured - For a Healthy Community; and runner-up, Neighborhood Housing Services of Lackawanna
County, Carbondale NeighborWorks Week. All winners received a plaque; first place winners received
$250 for their organization; first place winners of the Ted Daniels Community Development Award
received $500 for their organization and runner-ups received a one-year NCAC membership. Seated,
from left, are Kate Totino, NCAC; Kurt Bauman, executive director, NCAC; Michele McGowan and Anna
Cervenak, NCAC Board treasurer. Standing Jeffrey Box, president and CEO, NEPA Alliance; Eileen Kup-
eravage, executive director, Schuylkill Area Community Foundation; Jack McNulty, NCAC Board; Leo
McGowan, trustee, The William G. McGowan Charitable Fund; and Charles Barber, NCAC Board chair-
man.
Nonprofit & Community Assistance Center presents awards
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 5C
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TODAY
■ BETTER BREATHERS CLUB:
for individuals with lung disease
and their families, 6:30-7:30
p.m., John Heinz Institute, 150
Mundy St., Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship. Call 346-1784.
■ CANCER SUPPORT: for cancer
patients and loved ones, 6:30-8
p.m., Mercy Hospital, Scranton.
Call 348-7940.
■ GASTRIC BYPASS SUPPORT:
5-8 p.m. Dorranceton United
Methodist Church, 549 Wyoming
Ave., Kingston. Call 864-3289.
■ GENTLE YOGA CLASS FOR
CANCER PATIENTS & OTH-
ERS: 5:30-6:45 p.m., Candy’s
Place, 190 Welles St., Forty Fort.
Free to cancer patients (doctor’s
note required for all patients); $5
per class or $30 per month for
all others. Call 714-8800.
■ HIV/AIDS: We Care, HIV/AIDS
Support Network Inc., support
for people infected and affected
by HIV. Call for meeting location
and time, 24-hour hotline, 824-
1007, or visit www.wecarewb.org.
■ PARENTS OF MURDERED
CHILDREN: 7:30-9:30 p.m. at
the former Nesbitt Hospital,
Wyoming Avenue, Kingston.
Refreshments served. Call 825-
3297.
WEDNESDAY
■ CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 4
p.m., Wilkes-Barre General Hos-
pital, radiation-oncology depart-
ment, 575 N. River St., Wilkes-
Barre. Call 552-1300 to register.
■ EXERCISE CLASS: 10:15-1 1:30
a.m., standing strong chair class,
Candy’s Place, 190 Welles St.,
Forty Fort. Free to cancer pa-
tients (doctor’s note required for
all patients); $5 per class or $30
per month for all others. Call
714-8800.
■ FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT: for
fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue
syndrome or similar chronic
illness, 6 p.m., Faith United
Church of Christ, off the Airport
Beltway behind the Toyota dea-
lership, Hazleton. For informa-
tion or directions, call Carol
Vilcko, 788-7363, Debbie Mainie-
ro, 454-2821, Alice Powell, 788-
3847, Stacy Morris, 403-6063,
facebook.com, or www.orgs-
ites.com/pa/hfsg.
THURSDAY
■ ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT
GROUP: 10:30 a.m.-noon, Mead-
ows Nursing Center, 55 W. Cen-
ter Hill Road, Dallas. Call 822-
9915 or 675-8600, ext. 195.
■ HIV CLINIC: for Wilkes-Barre
residents only, 2-4 p.m., Kirby
Health Center, 71 N. Franklin St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Call 208-4268 for
information.
■ RECOVERY INC.: support group
for people with anxiety, panic
attacks and depression, 7-9 p.m.,
Dorranceton United Methodist
Church, 549 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston. Call Peggy at 288-
0266.
■ SUICIDE SURVIVORS: for
family and friends of suicide
victims, 7 p.m., Catholic Social
Services, 33 E. Northampton St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Call 822-71 18, ext.
307.
FRIDAY
■ DIABETES CLASS: 1:30 p.m., St.
Stephen’s Episcopal Church,
conference room, 35 S. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre. Call Shirley
Smith at 675-5970.
■ DIABETES SUPPORT: 10 a.m.,
Community Medical Center
School of Nursing, 1800 Mulber-
ry St., Scranton. Call 969-7272.
SUNDAY
■ BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT
GROUP: 2-3 p.m., Hospice for
the Sacred Heart, Center for
Education, 340 Montage Moun-
tain Road, Moosic. Call 706-2400
or 1-800-657-6405 for additional
information and registration.
■ PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUP-
PORT: 2 p.m., Summit Health
Care Limited, 453 S. Main Road,
Wright Township.
■ REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYS-
TROPHY SUPPORT: 1 p.m.,
Resource Center for Autoim-
mune Diseases, Lupus Founda-
tion, 615 Jefferson Ave., Scran-
ton. Call Suzanne at 383-0578.
MONDAY
■ ADOPTIVE OR FOSTER PAR-
ENT SUPPORT: support group
for foster parents, adoptive
parents or grandparents raising
grandchildren, 6-7:30 p.m., Ca-
tholic Social Services, 33 East
Northampton St., Wilkes-Barre.
To attend, contact Joan Gower
at 822-71 18, ext. 470. Childcare is
available.
■ CANCER SUPPORT: peer-to-
peer groups for patients newly
diagnosed six months or less,
5:30-6:30 p.m., Candy’s Place,
190 Welles St., Forty Fort. Call
714-8800.
■ DOWN SYNDROME SUPPORT:
for parents of children with
Down Syndrome, 7 p.m. For
meeting location, call 714-6320,
days, or 825-9995, evenings.
■ LYME DISEASE SUPPORT
GROUP: 7 p.m., Thomas P. Sax-
ton Medical Pavilion, 468 North-
ampton St., Edwardsville. Call
287-8990.
■ LUPUS SUPPORT: 5:30 p.m.,
Lupus Foundation of PA, 615
Jefferson Ave., Scranton. Call
558-2008.
■ NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT: a
support group for families and
friends of those afflicted with
mental illness, 7 p.m., Suite 6
(second floor), Thomas C. Tho-
mas building, 100 East Union
Street, Wilkes-Barre.
■ OSTOMY SUPPORT: Mercy
Hospital, large meeting room,
Scranton. Call 348-7738 for
meeting time.
■ RECOVERY INC.: support group
for people with anxiety, panic
attacks and depression, 7-9 p.m.,
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church,
Church Street and Wyoming
Avenue, Kingston. Call Peggy at
288-0266.
HEALTH CALENDAR
The health calendar is limited to
nonprofit entities and support
groups. To have your health-oriented
event listed here, send information to
Health, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA1871 1-0250; by fax:
829-5537; or e-mail health@time-
sleader.com. New and updated
information must be received at least
two weeks in advance. To see the
complete calendar, visit www.times-
leader.com and click Health under the
Features tab.
BACK MOUNTAIN FREE MEDICAL
CLINIC: 6:30 p.m. Fridays, 65
Davis St., Shavertown. Volunteers,
services and supplies needed. For
more information, call 696-1 144.
BMWFREE COMMUNITY HEALTH
CLINIC: 6-8 p.m., second Thurs-
day, New Covenant Christian Fel-
lowship Church, rear entrance, 780
S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre. Free basic
care for people without health
insurance and the underserved.
Call 822-9605.
CARE AND CONCERN FREE
HEALTH CLINIC: Registration
5-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, former
Seton Catholic High School, 37
William St., Pittston. Basic health
care and information provided. Call
954-0645.
CARE AND CONCERN FREE PEDI-
ATRIC HEALTH CLINIC for in-
fants through age 1 1, former Seton
Catholic High School, 37 William
St., Pittston. Registrations accept-
ed from 4:30-5:30 p.m. the first
and third Wednesday of each
month. For more information, call
654-9923.
THE HOPE CENTER: Free basic
medical care and preventative
health care information for the
uninsured or underinsured, legal
advice and pastoral counseling, 6
p.m.-8 p.m. Mondays; free Chi-
ropractic evaluations and vision
care, including free replacement
glasses, for the uninsured or un-
derinsured, 6-8 p.m. Thursdays;
Back Mountain Harvest Assembly,
340 Carverton Road, Trucksville.
Call 696-5523.
VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday,
190 N. Pennsylvania Ave., Wilkes-
Barre. Primary and preventive
health care for the working unin-
sured and underinsured in Luzerne
County with incomes less than two
times below federal poverty guide-
lines. For appointments, call 970-
2864.
WILKES-BARRE FREE CLINIC:
4:30-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 5:30
p.m.-7:30 p.m. on the first and third
Wednesday, St. Stephen’s Episcopal
Church, 35 S. Franklin St., Wilkes-
Barre. Appointments are neces-
sary. Call 793-4361. Physicians,
nurse practitioners, pharmacists,
RNs, LPNs and social workers are
needed as well as receptionists and
interpreters. To volunteer assist-
ance leave a message for Pat at
793-4361.
FREE MEDICAL
CLINICS
LUZERNE COUNTY: The
Wyoming Valley Chapter of
the American Red Cross
hosts community blood
drives throughout the
month. Donors who are 16
years of age or older, weigh
at least 1 10 pounds and are in
relatively good health may
give blood every 56 days. To
learn how to donate or to
schedule a blood donation,
call (800) GIVE-LIFE.
In addition to those listed be-
low, blood drives are con-
ducted at the Red Cross
regional blood center, 29
New Commerce Blvd., Hanov-
er Industrial Park, Mondays
noon-6 p.m.; Tuesdays 9:30
a.m.-6 p.m.; and Fridays,
Saturdays and Sundays from
7:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Collec-
tions also take place every
Monday from 9 a.m.-noon at
the Hazleton Chapter House,
165 Susquehanna Blvd.,
Hazleton.
For a complete donation sched-
ule, visit nepagivelife.org or
call (800) GIVE-LIFE, ext.
2150. Area blood donation
sites include:
Today, 12:30-6 p.m., St. There-
se’s Church, 64 Davis St.,
Shavertown.
Wednesday, 1 1:30 a.m.-6:30
p.m., Waterfront Banquet
Facility, 670 N. River St.,
Plains Township.
Thursday, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Lu-
zerne County Community
College, Prospect and Middle
Road, Nanticoke. Donors will
receive a free VIP voucher
for the Vans Warped Tour
201 1. July 12, 12:30-5:30
p.m., Holy Trinity Lutheran
Church, 813 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston.
July 13, noon-6 p.m., Mohegan
Sun at Pocono Downs, 1280
Highway 315, Plains Town-
ship.
July 16, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Kingston
Township Municipal Building,
180 E. Center St., Shaver-
town.
July 19, noon-6 p.m., Thomas P.
Saxton Medical Pavilion, 468
Northampton St., Edwards-
ville; 12:30-6 p.m., Veterans
of Foreign Wars Post 4909,
403 Main St., Dupont.
July 21, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Depart-
ment of Veterans Affairs
Medical Center, 1 1 1 1 East End
Blvd., Plains Township.
July 24, 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Our
Lady of Victory Church,
Second Street and Route 415,
Harveys Lake.
July 25, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley, 1000
E. Mountain Drive, Plains
Township; 12:30-6:30 p.m.,
Irem Temple Country Club,
397 Country Club Road,
Dallas Township.
July 26, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m.,
Jewish Community Center,
760 S. River St., Wilkes-
Barre; noon-6 p.m., American
Legion Post 644, 259 Shoe-
maker St., Swoyersville; 1-6
p.m., Wright Township Fire
Hall, 477 South Main Road,
Mountain Top.
July 27, 12:30-6 p.m., Black
Diamond American Legion,
386 Wyoming Ave., Kingston.
July 30, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., St.
Anthony/St. George Catholic
Church, 315 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre.
July 31, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m., St.
Jude’s Church, 420 S. Main
Road, Mountain Top.
BLOOD DRIVES
Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal was recognized by Blue
Cross of Northeastern Penn-
sylvania as a Blue Distinction
Center for Cardiac Care for
providing a full range of high
quality cardiac care services,
including inpatient cardiac
care, cardiac rehabilitation,
cardiac catheterization and
cardiac surgery. The Blue
Distinction designation is a
national designation award-
ed by Blue Cross and Blue
Shield companies to hospi-
tals and medical facilities
that have demonstrated
expertise in delivering qual-
ity health care in the areas
of bariatric surgery, cardiac
care, complex and rare
cancers, knee and hip re-
placement, spine surgery
and transplants.
HEALTH PEOPLE
C M Y K
PAGE 6C TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
V&G 570-574-1275
Free Removal. Call Anytime.
Highest Price Paid In Cash!
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
NO PASSES
TRANSFORMERS:
DARK OF THE MOON
TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (XD
3
-3D) (PG-13)
11:30AM, 3:15PM, 7:00PM, 10:35PM
LARRY CROWNE (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
10:55AM, 1:20PM, 4:15PM, 7:25PM,
10:30PM
MONTE CARLO (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:20AM, 1:55PM, 4:30PM, 7:15PM,
9:50PM
TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON
(3-D) (PG-13)
12:15PM, 1:00PM, 4:00PM. 4:45PM,
7:45PM, 8:30PM
TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON
(DIGITAL) (PG-13)
10:45AM, 1:45PM, 2:30PM, 5:30PM,
6:15PM, 9:15PM, 10:00PM
BAD TEACHER (DIGITAL) (R)
11:25AM, 12:40PM, 1:50PM, 3:00PM,
4:10PM, 5:15PM, 6:30PM, 7:40PM,
8:50PM, 10:10PM
BRIDESMAIDS (DIGITAL) (R) 12:30PM,
6:55PM
CARS 2 (3D) (G)
11:20AM, 12:00PM, 2:00PM, 2:40PM,
4:40PM, 5:20PM, 7:20PM, 8:00PM,
9:55PM
CARS 2 (DIGITAL) (G)
10:40AM, 12:35PM, 1:20PM, 3:20PM,
3:55PM, 6:05PM, 6:40PM, 8:45PM,
9:20PM
GREEN LANTERN (3D) (PG-13)
12:50PM, 4:05PM, 6:50PM, 9:30PM,
THE HANGOVER 2 (DIGITAL) (R)
12:05PM, 2:45PM, 5:10PM, 7:50PM,
10:25PM
MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:00AM, 1:15PM, 3:30PM, 5:45PM,
8:05PM, 10:20PM
MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (DIGITAL)
(PG) 11:50AM, 1:05PM, 2:20PM,
3:35PM, 4:45PM, 7:10PM, 9:50PM
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON
STRANGER TIDES (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
3:50PM, 9:45PM
SUPER 8 (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:35AM, 2:15PM, 4:55PM, 7:35PM,
10:15PM
X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
7:05PM, 10:05PM
2
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Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
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• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
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***$2.50 Additional Charge for 3D Attractions.***
No passes, rain checks, discount tickets accepted to these features
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
• FIRST MATINEE SHOW ALL SEATS $5.25
EXPERIENCE D/BOX MOTION ENHANCED
SEATING ON SELECT FEATURES
*Larry Crowne - PG13 - 110 Min.
(1:15), (3:45), 7:15, 9:50
*Monte Carlo - PG - 120 Min.
(1:40), (4:40), 7:20, 9:50
***Transformers 3D - PG13 - 170 Min.
(12:45), (4:05), 7:25, 10:45
*Transformers - PG13 - 170 Min.
(12:30), (1:00), (3:50), (4:30), 7:10, 8:10,
10:30
***Cars 2 3D - G - 125 Min.
(1:15), (3:50), 7:15, 9:50
Cars 2 - G - 125 Min.
(1:00), (1:30), (3:40), (4:10), 7:00, 8:00, 9:40
**Bad Teacher - R - 100 min.
(1:10), (3:20), 7:10, 9:20
Mr. Popper Penguins - PG - 105 Min.
(1:10), (4:10), 7:00, 9:15
Midnight In Paris - PG13
(1:35), (4:25), 7:25, 10:15
Green Lantern - PG13
(1:25), (3:55), 7:10, 9:40
Super 8 in DBox Motion Seating -
PG13 - 120 Min. (1:45), (4:30), 7:35, 10:10
Super 8 - PG13 - 120 Min.
(1:45), (4:30), 7:35, 10:10
Bridesmaids - R - 135 Min.
(1:45), (4:30), 7:15, 10:00
FREE SUMMER KIDDIE MOVIE SERIES
Tuesday July 5th & Wednesday July 6th
HORTON HEARS A WHO - PG - 86 Min.
Doors open at 9am and the Movie starts at 10am
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TIMES LEADER
6 a.m. 22 The Daily Buzz(TVG)
6 a.m. CNN American Morning(N)
6 a.m. FNC FOX and Friends(N)
7 a.m. 3, 22 The Early Show(N)
7 a.m. 56 Morning News with Web-
ster and Nancy
7 a.m. 16 Good Morning America(N)
7 a.m. 28 Today When people em-
barrass their kids; flip flops; Domin-
ique Dawes; Rob Shuter; yoga. (N)
9 a.m. 16 Live With Regis and Kelly
Kevin James; Rose Byrne; Corinne
McCormack. (N) (TVPG)
TV TALK
Daily grid contains updated information (PA) Parental advisory (N) New programming MOVIES
6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30
0
News World
News
Newswatc
h 16
Inside Edi-
tion
Wipeout “America’s
Finest” (TVPG)
101 Ways to Leave a
Game Show (N)
Combat Hospital (N)
(CC) (TV14)
News (:35)
Nightline

Three’s a
Crowd
Three’s a
Crowd
WNEP’s
H&G
Good
Times
Married...
With
Married...
With
All in the
Family
All in the
Family
Newswatc
h 16
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
WNEP’s
H&G
Mad Abt.
You
6
Judge
Judy
Evening
News
The Insid-
er (N)
Entertain-
ment
NCIS “Pyramid” (CC)
(TV14)
NCIS: Los Angeles
“Lockup” (TV14)
The Good Wife (CC)
(TV14)
Access
Hollyw’d
Letterman
<
News Nightly
News
Wheel of
Fortune
Jeopardy!
(N)
America’s Got Talent
(N) (CC) (TVPG)
America’s Got Talent Competing for a spot in
the top 48. (N) (CC) (TVPG)
News at 11 Jay Leno
F
Extra (N)
(TVPG)
Family
Guy (CC)
That ’70s
Show
Family
Guy (CC)
One Tree Hill (CC)
(TVPG)
Hellcats (CC) (TVPG) Entourage Curb En-
thusiasm
TMZ (N)
(TVPG)
Old Chris-
tine
L
PBS NewsHour (N)
(CC)
Call the Doctor History Detectives (N)
(CC) (TVPG)
Frontline “Wikise-
crets” (CC) (TVPG)
POV Montana’s Absaroka-
Beartooth Wilderness. (TVPG)
Charlie
Rose (N)
U
Judge Mathis (CC)
(TVPG)
The People’s Court
(CC) (TVPG)
Are You
Smarter?
Are You
Smarter?
Don’t For-
get
Don’t For-
get
Hawaii Five-0 (CC)
(TVPG)
Honey-
mooners
Name Is
Earl
X
The Office
(CC)
Two and
Half Men
The Office
(CC)
Two and
Half Men
Kitchen Nightmares
“Zeke’s” (TV14)
MasterChef (N) (CC)
(TV14)
News First
Ten
News
10:30
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond

Without a Trace (CC)
(TVPG)
Without a Trace (CC)
(TV14)
Without a Trace (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
Criminal Minds (CC)
(TV14)
#
News Evening
News
Entertain-
ment
The Insid-
er (N)
NCIS “Pyramid” (CC)
(TV14)
NCIS: Los Angeles
“Lockup” (TV14)
The Good Wife (CC)
(TV14)
News Letterman
)
Love-Ray-
mond
King of
Queens
How I Met How I Met Are You
Smarter?
Are You
Smarter?
Don’t For-
get
Don’t For-
get
The 10
News
Love-Ray-
mond
King of
Queens
House of
Payne
+
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
Two and
Half Men
Two and
Half Men
One Tree Hill (CC)
(TVPG)
Hellcats (CC) (TVPG) PIX News at Ten Jodi
Applegate. (N)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
1
My Wife
and Kids
Two and
Half Men
Two and
Half Men
Family
Guy (CC)
Are You
Smarter?
Are You
Smarter?
Don’t For-
get
Don’t For-
get
Phl17
News
Friends
(TV14)
Family
Guy (CC)
Entourage
AMC
Rocky IV (PG, ‘85) ›› Sylvester Stallone,
Talia Shire, Burt Young. (CC)
The Matrix (R, ‘99) ››› Keanu Reeves. A computer hacker learns
his world is a computer simulation. (CC)
The Matrix (R, ‘99)
››› (CC)
AMER
Beach-
combers
Beach-
combers
Chicago Hope “The
Virus” (CC) (TVPG)
Gator (PG, ‘76) ››› Burt Reynolds. Agents force an ex-
con to help nab a corrupt politician.
The Ray Lucia Show (TVG)
AP
Untamed and Uncut
(CC) (TV14)
Untamed and Uncut
(CC) (TV14)
Yellowstone: Battle For Life Animals living in
Yellowstone. (CC) (TVG)
Wild Amazon (CC)
(TVPG)
Yellowstone: Battle
For Life (CC) (TVG)
ARTS
Gene Simmons Family
Jewels (CC)
Gene Simmons Family
Jewels (CC)
Family
Jewels
Family
Jewels
Gene Simmons Family
Jewels (CC)
Family
Jewels
Family
Jewels
Gene Simmons Family
Jewels (CC)
CNBC
Mad Money (N) The Kudlow Report
(N)
Cigarette Wars 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Mad Money
CNN
Situation Room John King, USA (N) In the Arena (N) Piers Morgan Tonight
(N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) (CC)
COM
Scrubs
(TV14)
Scrubs
(TV14)
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
Kevin Hart: I’m a
Grown Little Man
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Tosh.0
(TV14)
Worka-
holics
Daily
Show
Colbert
Report
CS
Sport-
sNite
Phillies
Pregame
MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Florida Marlins. From Sun Life
Stadium in Miami. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live)
SportsNite (N) (Live)
(CC)
Sports
Stories
’net IM-
PACT
CTV
Choices
We Face
EWTN
Gallery
Daily Mass The Holy
Rosary
CTV Special Presen-
tation
Focus (TVG) Threshold of Hope
(TVG)
Fulton
Sheen
Women of
Grace
DSC
Cash Cab
(CC)
Cash Cab
(N)
Deadliest Catch (CC)
(TV14)
Deadliest Catch (CC)
(TV14)
Deadliest Catch (N)
(CC) (TV14)
After the Catch (N)
(CC) (TV14)
Deadliest Catch (CC)
(TV14)
DSY
Phineas
and Ferb
(TVG)
Good Luck
Charlie
Babysit-
ter’s a
Vampire
Suite Life
on Deck
Good Luck
Charlie
Shake It
Up! (CC)
(TVG)
Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy
Rescue (G, ‘10) ›› Voices of Mae
Whitman. (CC)
Good Luck
Charlie
Suite Life
on Deck
Suite Life
on Deck
E!
E! Special (TVPG) E! News (TVPG) Sex and
the City
Sex and
the City
E! Special (TV14) Chelsea
Lately
E! News
(TVPG)
ESPN
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
MLB Baseball Cincinnati Reds at St. Louis Cardinals. From Busch
Stadium in St. Louis. (N Subject to Blackout) (CC)
Baseball Tonight (N)
(Live) (CC)
SportsCenter (N)
(Live) (CC)
ESPN2
NASCAR
Now (N)
Interrup-
tion
Football
Live
NFL Live
(N) (CC)
SportsNation (CC) WNBA Basketball Los Angeles Sparks at
Phoenix Mercury. (N) (Live) (CC)
NFL Year-
b’k
NFL Year-
b’k
FAM
The Nine Lives of
Chloe King (TV14)
Pretty Little Liars
(CC) (TV14)
Pretty Little Liars (N)
(CC) (TV14)
The Nine Lives of
Chloe King (TVPG)
Pretty Little Liars
(CC) (TV14)
The 700 Club (N) (CC)
(TVG)
FOOD
Iron Chef America
“Flay vs. Bull”
Restaurant: Impossi-
ble “Villari’s”
Cupcake Wars (N) Chopped “Crunch
Time”
Chopped “Nopales,
No Problem” (N)
24 Hour Restaurant
Battle
FNC
Special Report With
Bret Baier (N)
FOX Report With
Shepard Smith
The O’Reilly Factor
(N) (CC)
Hannity (N) On Record, Greta Van
Susteren
The O’Reilly Factor
(CC)
HALL
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVG)
Little House on the
Prairie (CC) (TVPG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVG)
Frasier
(TVPG)
Frasier
(TVG)
HIST
Clash of the Gods
“Minotaur” (TVPG)
Modern Marvels (CC)
(TVG)
How the States Got
Their Shapes (CC)
How the States Got
Their Shapes (CC)
How the States Got
Their Shapes (N)
Modern Marvels (CC)
(TVPG)
H&G
Property
Virgins
Property
Virgins
Hunters
Int’l
House
Hunters
My First
Place (N)
My First
Place
Property
Virgins
Property
Virgins
House
Hunters
Hunters
Int’l
For Rent
(TVG)
Property
Virgins
LIF
Unsolved Mysteries
(CC) (TV14)
Pawn
Stars
Pawn
Stars
American Pickers
“Mole Man” (TVPG)
American Pickers
(CC) (TVPG)
How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met
MTV
Teen Mom Teen Mom “Lashing
Out” (TVPG)
Teen Mom (CC)
(TVPG)
Teen Mom “See You Later” Maci
and Ryan battle. (TVPG)
Teen Mom (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Teen Mom (CC)
(TVPG)
NICK
Bucket,
Skinner
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
Bob
Sponge-
Bob
My Wife
and Kids
My Wife
and Kids
George
Lopez
George
Lopez
That ’70s
Show
That ’70s
Show
The Nan-
ny
The Nan-
ny
OVAT
Fame (CC) (TVPG) Fame (CC) (TVPG) Tupac: Resurrection (R, ‘03) ››› The life and music of
rapper Tupac Shakur.
Tupac: Resurrection (R, ‘03)
›››
SPD
Pass Time Pass Time NASCAR Race Hub
(N)
Am.
Trucker
Pass Time Barrett-Jackson Spe-
cial Edition (N)
Speedmakers
“Jaguar” (TVG)
Am.
Trucker
Pass Time
SPIKE
Ways to
Die
Ways to
Die
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
Auction
Hunters
SYFY
Enterprise Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (PG, ‘82) ››› William
Shatner, Leonard Nimoy.
Star Trek Generations (PG, ‘94) ›› Patrick Stewart,
William Shatner, Malcolm McDowell.
Star Trek
III
TBS
King of
Queens
King of
Queens
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
Seinfeld
(TVPG)
The Office
(CC)
The Office
(CC)
The Office
(CC)
The Office
(CC)
The Office
(CC)
The Office
(CC)
Conan
TCM
Doctor Zhivago (4:30) (PG-13, ‘65) ›››
Omar Sharif. (CC)
The Sea Hawk (‘24) ››› Milton Sills, Enid Bennett.
Silent. English nobleman becomes pirate.
The Thief of Bagdad (‘24) ›››
Douglas Fairbanks.
TLC
Toddlers & Tiaras
(CC) (TVPG)
Fabulous Cakes (CC)
(TVG)
I Kid -
Brad G.
I Kid -
Brad G.
19 Kids-
Count
19 Kids-
Count
Little Cou-
ple
Little Cou-
ple
I Kid -
Brad G.
I Kid -
Brad G.
TNT
Law & Order “Disci-
ple” (TV14)
Law & Order “Merg-
er” (TV14)
Law & Order (CC)
(TV14)
Memphis Beat (N)
(CC) (TV14)
HawthoRNe (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Memphis Beat (CC)
(TV14)
TOON
World of
Gumball
Johnny
Test
Johnny
Test
Scooby-
Doo
Looney
Tunes
World of
Gumball
King of
the Hill
King of
the Hill
American
Dad
American
Dad
Family
Guy (CC)
Family
Guy (CC)
TRVL
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
Bizarre Foods With
Andrew Zimmern
TVLD
Sanford &
Son
Sanford &
Son
Sanford &
Son
All in the
Family
All in the
Family
All in the
Family
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Love-Ray-
mond
Cleveland Happily
Divorced
USA
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit
Law & Order: Special
Victims Unit
White Collar (N) (CC)
(TVPG)
Covert Affairs (N)
(CC) (TVPG)
Necessary Roughness
(CC) (TVPG)
VH-1
Basketball Wives
(TV14)
Basketball Wives
(TV14)
Single Ladies (TVPG) Celebrity Rehab With
Dr. Drew
Celebrity Rehab With
Dr. Drew
40 Most Shocking
Breakups (TV14)
WE
Charmed (Part 1 of 2)
(CC) (TVPG)
Charmed (Part 2 of 2)
(CC) (TVPG)
Staten Island Cakes
(CC) (TVPG)
Staten Island Cakes
(N) (TVPG)
Cupcake
Girls
Cupcake
Girls
Staten Island Cakes
(CC) (TVPG)
WGN-A
Dharma &
Greg
Dharma &
Greg
America’s Funniest
Home Videos (CC)
Old Chris-
tine
Old Chris-
tine
How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine
(N) (CC)
Scrubs
(TV14)
Scrubs
(TV14)
WYLN
Chef Lou I.N.N.
News
Beaten
Path
Tarone
Show
Rehabili-
tation
Sweets Press Box Let’s Talk Local News (N) Classified Topic A
PREMIUM CHANNELS
HBO
Inception
(4:00)
›››
Flipped (PG, ‘10) ›› Madeline
Carroll, Callan McAuliffe. Pre-
miere. (CC)
Despicable Me (PG, ‘10) ›››
Voices of Steve Carell, Jason
Segel. (CC)
Charlie St. Cloud (9:45) (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Zac
Efron. A tragedy shatters the dreams of a
college-bound youth. (CC)
True
Blood
(TVMA)
HBO2
Darkman III: Die
Darkman Die (5:30)
(R, ‘96) ›› (CC)
REAL Sports With
Bryant Gumbel (CC)
(TVPG)
The Informant! (R, ‘09) ››› Matt Damon.
An ADM executive informs on price fixing by
agribusinesses. (CC)
Real Time With Bill
Maher Journalist
David Carr. (TVMA)
Boxing
MAX
Robin
Hood
(4:00)
The Betrayed (6:20) (‘08) Melis-
sa George, Oded Fehr, Christian
Campbell. (CC)
The Relic (R, ‘97) ›› Penelope Ann Miller. A
ravenous monster stalks guests at a Chicago
museum gala. (CC)
The Nutty Professor (PG-13, ‘96)
››› Eddie Murphy, Jada Pinkett.
Premiere. (CC)
(:35)
Femme
Fatales
MMAX
Drag Me to Hell
(5:30) (PG-13, ‘09)
››› (CC)
Ninja Assassin (7:15) (R, ‘09) ›› Rain,
Naomie Harris. A rogue assassin saves the
life of a Europol agent. (CC)
A Nightmare on Elm Street (R,
‘10) ›› Jackie Earle Haley,
Rooney Mara. (CC)
(:35) The Best Sex Ever A young
couple spices up their vacation.
(CC) (TVMA)
SHO
Holy Rollers (R, ‘10) ›› Jesse
Eisenberg. A Jewish youth be-
comes a drug mule.
Adventures of Power (PG-13,
‘08) ›› Ari Gold, Michael McK-
ean. iTV Premiere.
Weeds
(CC)
(TVMA)
The Big C
(CC)
(TVMA)
Weeds
(CC)
(TVMA)
The Big C
(CC)
(TVMA)
Episodes
(CC)
(TVMA)
The Real L
Word
(TVMA)
STARZ
G-Force (5:50) (PG, ‘09) ›› Bill
Nighy. (CC)
The Ugly Truth (7:20) (R, ‘09) ›
Katherine Heigl. (CC)
Burlesque (PG-13, ‘10) ›› Cher, Christina
Aguilera, Eric Dane. (CC)
Eat Pray Love (PG-13,
‘10) ›› (CC)
TMC
Nine
(4:25) ››
(CC)
Far Cry (6:25) (R, ‘08) Til
Schweiger, Emmanuelle Vaugier,
Natalia Avelon. (CC)
Scream 3 (R, ‘00) ››› David Arquette,
Neve Campbell. A copycat killer stalks actors
on the set of “Stab 3.”
Wake of Death (R, ‘04) ›› Jean-
Claude Van Damme, Simon Yam.
Premiere. (CC)
Harvard
Man (R,
‘01) ››
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 7C
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
MINUTE MAZE
W I T H O M A R S H A R I F & T A N N A H H I R S C H
CRYPTOQUOTE
GOREN BRIDGE
B Y M I C H E A L A R G I R I O N & J E F F K N U R E K
JUMBLE
B Y H O L I D A Y M A T H I S
HOROSCOPE
CROSSWORD
PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Ange-
les, CA 90069
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
Dear Abby: The let-
ter from “Turned Off
in Texas” (May 18)
caught my attention.
While I agree that
putting a toilet brush
in the dishwasher
with the dishes was
unexpected and off-putting — we
don’t ever want to link the toilet
with our food — I think your answer
showed a little overreaction. Running
the dishes in another cycle should
take care of any concerns as long as
the water is hot.
Studies have shown that the inside
of the average public toilet bowl
is not as bacteria-laden as a public
drinking fountain. Our disgust is
emotional, not likely fact-based. As I
told a colleague during his wife’s baby
shower, you have to believe in the
power of soap and water or you won’t
survive parenthood.
While it’s worthwhile for “Turned
Off” to tell his stepdaughter that this
practice is unacceptable to him, it is
no reason not to eat at her house.
— Facts Over Emotion in Miami
Dear Facts: Thank you for your
letter. Frankly, I was as grossed out
by what “Turned Off” saw his step-
daughter do as he was. So it surprised
me to find that many of my readers
weren’t as affected by the “ew” factor.
Read on:
Dear Abby: It’s possible that what
“Turned Off” perceived to be a toilet
brush was never used for cleaning
a toilet. I bought a brand-new toilet
scrubber to keep under the kitchen
sink. I use it only for cleaning the
garbage disposal. Afterward, I wash it
in the sink, not the dishwasher. Let’s
give the stepdaughter the benefit
of the doubt. Things are not always
what they appear to be.
— Not Disgusted in Arcadia, Calif.
Dear Abby: I can top the letter
from the gentleman who said his
stepdaughter, after cleaning his
house when his wife fell ill, put the
toilet brush in the dishwasher. My
daughter has a close friend who
told her she and her husband put
the cat’s litterbox in the dishwasher
when they want to clean it. I was
mortified, as was my daughter. You’d
never guess it — she’s an otherwise
clean-appearing person. Well, need-
less to say, we no longer eat at this
woman’s home.
— Anonymous in Connecticut
Dear Abby: I am a retired doctor. I
have been in the Army, slept in the
woods and eaten three-day-old food
— so I know a little bit about germs.
The hot water and soap will take
care of any bacteria on the brush.
(It’s unaesthetic, but not unsanitary.)
The brush will be as clean as your
hands are when you wash them after
using the toilet. I would be happy to
eat off the plates that came out
of that dishwasher.
— Dr. M. in Naples, Fla.
Dear Abby: We bought a new toilet
seat a few years back, and on the in-
structions it stated that it was “dish-
washer safe.” That made me think at
the time, “Who in their right mind
would remove a toilet seat in order
to run it through the dishwasher, and
why would they want to?”
— LOL in Anderson, S.C.
DEAR ABBY
A D V I C E
Readers run hot and cold on putting dirty toilet brush in dishwasher
To receive a collection of Abby’s most
memorable — and most frequently re-
quested — poems and essays, send a busi-
ness-sized, self-addressed envelope, plus
check or money order for $3.95 ($4.50 in
Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keepers,” P.O. Box
447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Postage
is included.)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You feel
the pressure as much as anyone
around you, but instead of feel-
ing squeezed out, you interpret
the sensation as a push in the
right direction.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20). While
the sun is up, you’ll convey the
appropriate sense of seriousness
in all you do. People will look to
you for behavioral cues. When
the sun goes down, it takes your
seriousness with it. Evening will
be light and lively.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You are
emotionally fluid now, moving
through different states without
getting hung up for too long on
any one feeling.
CANCER (June 22-July 22). You’ve
heard the old adage that you
should dress for the job you
want, not the job you have. You
won’t go wrong following this
advice now.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Some peo-
ple are takers. Their mentality
may be hard for you to under-
stand, but it is just as necessary
to the world balance as your giv-
ing mentality. Stay aware.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Feedback is a gift, although,
unfortunately, not the kind
that can be exchanged for
something you like better.
Whether or not you asked for
a critique, you’ll get one and
find the value in it.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You
should in no way feel guilty for
spending money to look your
best. When you feel good about
your image, you’ll make a lasting
impression.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You
give the impression of being
much younger than you are,
which can be a good thing.
However, there is an opportunity
today to earn the respect of your
peers, and a serious approach
will be best.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You may notice something amiss
in your social interaction with
others, but it’s best not to apolo-
gize, complain or explain. The
classiest move is to wait until
you can fix it in private.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). A
friend who comes into your liv-
ing space will have interesting
things to say about it. This will
allow you to look at your envi-
ronment with fresh eyes and
make decisions about what, if
anything, to change.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You
will be feeling generous in every
way and will contribute much
more than you had planned
to. You’ll walk away from the
exchange feeling richer, and
that’s how you’ll know it was the
right move for you.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You’ll
get a chance to ask questions
and will be careful not to probe
too deep. You are also sensitive
about not mentioning the past
mistakes of others. You under-
stand human frailty.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (July 5).
You’ll take excellent care of
yourself, realizing that success
is easier when you look and
feel your best. Your connection
to nature, especially to animals,
will guide your August activities.
November is the most romantic
month. Leo and Scorpio people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 4, 14, 49, 24 and 11.
F U N N I E S TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
SALLY FORTH
CLASSIC PEANUTS
STONE SOUP
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THATABABY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
GET FUZZY
CLOSE TO HOME
ARGYLE SWEATER
B.C.
PICKLES
PARDON MY PLANET
MARMADUKE HERMAN
DRABBLE
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
MOTHER GOOSE & GRIMM
TUNDRA
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 1D
CALL TO PLACE 24/7
570.829.7130
800.273.7130
SEARCH: TIMESLEADER.COM/CLASSIFIED
EMAIL: CLASSIFIEDS@TIMESLEADER.COM
MARKETPLACE
150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices
412 Autos for Sale
150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices 150 Special Notices
Celebrations
Area Businesses To Help Make
Your Event a Huge Success!
To Advertise Call Tara 570-970-7374
BEVERAGES
WYO. VALLEY BEVERAGE
Rt. 11 Edwardsville
BUD LIGHT - 36 PACK
$19.76
Dolphin Plaza
1159 Rt. 315
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
(570) 208-2908
gymboreeclasses.com
PARTIES FOR
CHILDREN 5 & UNDER
PARTIES
BEST CRAFT BEER SELECTION AROUND!
G&B Tent Rentals
LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED
570-378-2566
FROM 40 X 160 WEDDING
TENTS TO 20 X 20 BACKYARD
BARBEQUE TENTS.
TENT RENTAL MUSIC
Harpist
Music for Banquets,
Weddings, Christmas
Parties & More!
Sherri L. Trometter
570-988-1972
harpingalong@wildblue.net
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
The Snack Shack
750 Wilkes-Barre Twp Blvd
Wilkes-Barre
(570)-270-2929
Birthday Parties
We Deliver Complete
Party Packages
including Ice Cream,
Food, Face Painting,
Party Host and
Lifeguards.
DUNDEE
BEVERAGE
Keyco Plaza
San Souci Parkway
WITHOUT A DOUBT
AREA’S COLDEST BEER
OPEN EVERY DAY
EXCEPT CHRISTMAS
BEVERAGES
BIRTHDAY, BACHELOR &
BACHELORETTE PARTIES
Birthday Parties
Bachelor & Bachelorette Parties
SWEET 16 PARTIES
570.825.0000
Wilkes-Barre
Invite all your friends!
Private Party - small to large
Rental includes Sound System,
Lights, DJ, soda - You Decorate!
Food & Cake Available
PARTIES
Club 79
Banquet room available for Parties!
Birthdays, Sweet 16s,
Baby Showers & More!
Bring your own food.
Bartender Available.
825-8381 * 793-9390
$200 for 4 hours
“Free Pool Wed. & Fri. 8pm-10pm”
DJ
The Lesser
Evil DJ
• Weddings
• Parties
• Dances
• Karaoke
www.TheLesserEvilDJ.com
Check us out on Facebook!
(570) 954-1620 Nick
(570) 852-1251 Allen
CATERING
We specialize in
Italian/American Cuisine
Banquet facility at
West Wyoming Hose Co. #1
or we’ll bring it to you!
570-407-2703
Rates start at $10.95pp
WVON¡MO VALLEV
WHEN YOU FINANCE A VEHICLE
UP TO 36 MONTHS OF FREE GAS
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
See sales
representative
for details
FREE
GAS
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
2
9
5
7
2
8
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
NEW LOW PRICES!
$
4,990
*
2002 Hyundai
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$
4,990
*
4DR, Sunroof, Air, All Power
2003 Kia
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$
5,990
*
Air, 4-Cyl, Auto, 4DR
1993 Toyota
Four Runner SR5
$
3,490
*
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags.
2000 Dodge
Stratus SE
$
3,490
*
1999 Buick
Century
2002 Ford
Focus SE
$
4,990
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5 Speed 4x4, V6, 4DR Wagon
4 Door, 4-Cyl, Air, 82K Miles 6-Cyl, Air, All Power, 59K
Air, Auto, 4-Cyl, 4DR, 72K
SEE M O R E P IC S A T
P ETILLO M O TO R S.C O M
FINA NC ING A VA ILA B LE
W EEK LY
SPECIALS
05JE E P GR AND
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SuperClean OneOw ner, Good M iles,
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7 Passenger, Tinted Glass, Ov er100K,
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$
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Accent
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JO -D A N M O TO RS JO -D A N M O TO RS
1339 N .R iver R d .,P lain s,PA • 829-2043
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JO -D A N M O TO RS JO -D A N M O TO RS
SPECIAL OF
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N ADA Book Price $ 14 ,17 5 N ADA Book Price $ 14 ,17 5
4 D oor,A utom atic,CD,O nly 20 K ,Factory
W arranty,A /C,Very Clean
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠFREE REMOVAL
ŠCA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
120 Found
FOUND: Sunday
6/26 near Luzerne
Lumber company,
camera in case.
570-287-8410
135 Legals/
Public Notices
Notice
Public Notice is
hereby given that
the Harveys Lake
Borough Council will
hold a public Hear-
ing on Tuesday, July
19th at 7:00 pm to
consider Preliminary
Plan Approval of the
Villas at Waterwood.
This meeting will be
held in the Confer-
ence Meeting Room
at the Harveys Lake
Borough Municipal
Building, 4875
Memorial Highway,
Suite 101, Harveys
Lake, PA 18618.
Please call 570-
639-3300 for more
information.
Notice is further
given that approval
by the Borough
Council may be
given at that time.
Susan R. Sutton,
Borough Secretary
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
PUBLIC NOTICE
MEETING POST-
PONED: The Rice
Township Zoning
Hearing Board will
hold a meeting on
Wednesday, Sep-
tember 14, 2011 at
7:00 p.m., POST-
PONED FROM
JULY 6, 2011, con-
cerning Polonia
Estates Phase 3 for
the dimensional
front yard variances
of 13 homes. The
meeting will be held
at the Rice Town-
ship Municipal Build-
ing, 3000 Church
Road, Mountaintop,
PA 18707.
Donald A Armstrong
Secretary/Treasurer
135 Legals/
Public Notices
NOTICE
The Court of Com-
mon Pleas of
Luzerne County will
hold a hearing on
the motion to
decrease the num-
ber of council mem-
bers of Luzerne
Borough pursuant
to Section 818 of the
Borough Code.
Said hearing to be
held in Courtroom
B., Penn Place, 20
North Pennsylvania
Avenue, Wilkes-
Barre, PA at 3:00
a.m. on Monday,
August 15, 2011.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
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you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
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Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
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with classified!
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A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Find Something?
Lose Something?
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belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 2D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
ONLINE AUCTION!
Wednesday, July 6, 2011 8 am
The World's Largest Retailer has contracted
with Orbitbid.com to utilize “The Online
Auction Advantage Selling from your
Location” to sell a
GARDEN CENTER TENT & TABLES.
The Auction will be held on Wednesday, July
6, 2011, starting at 8:00 a.m. EST and will
start closing at 6:00 p.m. EST the same
day. The Garden Center Tent and tables are
located at 809 SR S
Tunkhannock, PENNSYLVANIA 18657.
Preview at store location on July 5,
2011 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
We Buy Scrap Metal
$$$$ ALL KINDS $$$$
PIPE - ROD - SHEET - BAR - TUBING - TURNINGS - BEAMS -
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MACHINERY - FARM EQUIPMENT - METAL ROOFING -
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Small quantities to 1,000’s of tons accepted
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AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD JULY 31
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-pm
Happy Trails!
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
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$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
Selling your
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find a new owner.
570-829-7130
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
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Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
To Place Your Ad, Call 829-7130
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
310 Attorney
Services
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Line up a place to live
in classified!
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment
Plans
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
135 Legals/
Public Notices
BID NOTICE
Sealed bids and/or
request for propos-
als (RFP’s) will be
received by Mr.
Anthony Ryba, Sec-
retary, Hazleton
Area School District,
1515 West 23rd
Street, Hazleton,
Pennsylvania
18202-1647, until
11:00 A.M., Tues-
day, July 19, 2011,
for the following:
• Printing/Copying
Services (RFP)
• Purchase of
All-In-One Touch
screen
Computers (Bid)
• Student
Accident
Insurance (RFP)
Public Bid / RFP
Opening:
Date: Tuesday,
July 19, 2011
Time: 11:05 A.M.
Location:
HASD Administra-
tion Building
First Floor
Conference Room
1515 West 23rd
Street,Hazleton, PA
18202-1647
A copy of the speci-
fications for these
bids/contracts/RFP’
s may be obtained
at the office of the
undersigned or call
(570) 459-3111 ext.
3106. In addition,
bids / RFP’s may be
obtained off of the
school district web-
site (http://www.
hasdk12.org/web
bids). Questions
regarding the bid
specifications
should be directed
via email to Robert
J. Krizansky
(krizanskyr@hasd
k12.org).
All proposals must
be submitted in a
sealed envelope,
which shall be plain-
ly identified as a bid
and/or RFP. Where
indicated, bids /
RFP’s shall be
accompanied by a
certified check or
bid bond in an
amount specified
within the specifica-
tions of the proposal
to be drawn in favor
of the Hazleton Area
School District.
Emailed or faxed
bids will not be
accepted.
The Hazleton Area
School District
reserves the right to
accept or reject any
or all bids / RFP’s
received and the
right to waive any
informalities.
/s/ Anthony Ryba
Secretary /
Business Manager
150 Special Notices
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
Adoption Adoption is a
choice you’ve
made out of
love. We dream
of giving your
newborn a safe,
secure lifetime
of love. Please
call Theresa &
Steve @ 1-877-
801-7256 or visit
The r e s a AndSt e v e
. s hut t e r f l y. c om
White wedding
dresses are
uncommon in
the Eastern
culture because
white is their
color of
mourning.
bridezella.net
DO YOU ENJOY
PREGNANCY ?
Would you like
the emotional
reward of helping
an infertile
couple reach
their dream of
becoming
parents?
Consider being a
surrogate. All
fees allowable by
law will be paid.
Call Central
Pennsylvania
Attorney,
Denise Bierly, at
814-237-6278
ext. 226
Good looking mar-
riage minded out-
doorsman looking to
meet female 25-50
for a lasting rela-
tionship. Call
570-594-6377
150 Special Notices
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
in my Kingston
home. Licensed.
Accepting
Lackawanna &
Luzerne CCC.
570-283-0336
MISS B’S CHILD CARE
Placements now
available! Call for
more information
570-779-1211
350 Elderly Care
Assisting the Elderly &
Disabled in their homes.
Flexible hours -
bachelors degree in
social work.
Contact Nancy at
570-824-3417
leave message if
not available.
HOME HEALTH AIDE
& HOUSEKEEPING
Driving, house-
keeping & com-
panionship. Rea Rea- -
sonable rates sonable rates
& excellent & excellent
references. references.
Current Criminal
Background Check
(570) 639-2704
380 Travel
NY SIGHTSEEING
& Brooklyn, 7/16
Narrarated Tour &
Free Time
1-800-432-8069
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HONDA`09 RECON
TRX 250CC/Electric
shift. Like New.
$3,800.
(570) 814-2554
SUZUKI`09
KING QUAD 750AXI
Hunter green. 214
miles. Excellent
condition. 50”
Moose plow with
manual lift included.
Asking $5,900
(570) 287-4055
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 125 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk mid
size 125cc 4 wheel-
er. Only $995 takes
it away!. Call
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
YAMAHA`02 GRIZZLY
660, Limited edi-
tion, 22 inch ITP,
Chrome wheels.
$3,500
Or best offer.
(570)333-4236
YAMAHA`04 RHINO
Excellent condition,
200 hours. Priced
to sell. $6,500 or
best offer. Call
Keith 570-971-4520
409 Autos under
$5000
BUICK `98 CENTURY
Black, 4 door, tinted
windows, 158,000
miles. $2,350 or
best offer.
(570) 262-7550
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
DODGE `95 NEON
Nicely Equipped!
Automatic, white
2 door.
Only $999
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
FORD ‘00
ESCORT ZX2
2 door. 1 owner.
59,000 original
miles. $4,995
GMC ‘96 JIMMY SLE
4WD, Hunter
Green, 4 door, CD,
168,000 miles.
$2,650 obo.
(570) 262-7550
412 Autos for Sale
ACURA `08 TL
Type-S. All Options.
White. 33,000
miles. $22,000
(570) 876-3832
AUDI `02 A4
1.8 Turbo, AWD,
Automatic, white
with beige leather
interior. 84,000
Miles. Very Good
Condition. $8,900
(570) 696-9809
(570) 690-4262
AUDI `02 A4
3.0, V6, AWD
automatic, tiptronic
transmission. Fully
loaded, leather
interior. 92,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. Asking $9,500.
Call (570) 417-3395
09Escape xlt $12,995
09 IMPALA LS $11,995
08Taurus SEL $12,995
08RAM 1500 $12,995
09 JEEP PATRIOT$12,995
04MazdaB3000$4,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
BMW `00 323I
Black w/ tan leather
interior. All power. 6
cylinder. Sun roof.
Recently inspected.
New tires. 140K
miles. $6,800
(570) 868-6986
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $12,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
412 Autos for Sale
BMW `03 530 I
Beige with tan
leather interior.
Heated seats, sun-
roof, 30 MPG high-
way. Garage kept.
Excellent condition
86,000 miles.
Asking $11,500.
(570) 788-4007
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $20,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
BMW ‘02 M3
Convertible. SMG
equipped. Brand
new wheels & tires.
All service records.
Navigation, Harmon
Kardon, 6 disc
changer, back up
sensors, xenons,
heated seats,
Only 77,000 miles,
Fully Loaded
$19,999
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
BUICK `05 LESABRE
3.8 V6, 20 city/29
highway. 42,000
miles. Last year
full size model.
Excellent condition
in & out. Roadster
cloth roof. Gold with
tan interior. $7,900.
(570) 822-8001
BUICK `98 LESABRE
4 door. All leather.
114,000 miles. Great
shape. $2,600. Call
570-819-3140 or
570-709-5677
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,000
570-881-2775
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 QUATTRO
Convertible.
Sprint blue, 2 tone
black/brown leather
int. 19” alloys,
330HP turbo (AWD)
08 FORD FUSION SE
grey, auto, V6
08 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Dove grey, alloys,
V6
08 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, Silver/grey
leather, sunroof
06 DODGE STRATUS XXT
RED.
05 JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
04 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
3.5 white, black
leather, sun roof
03 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 4 door, 4cyl.
66,000 miles
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
green, tan leather
nav., AWD
00 CADILLAC CATERA
silver/blk leather,
sunroof, 56K
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
99 CHRYSLER
CONCORDE gold
98 MERCURY GRAND
MARQUIS black
98 SUBARU LEGACY
SW white, auto,
4 cyl. (AWD)
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
passenger mini van
07 DODGE NITRO SXT,
garnet red, V6, 4x4
06 BUICK RENDVEOUS
Ultra blue, tan
leather, 3rd seat
AWD
06 PONTIAC
TORRANT
Black (AWD)
06 GMC ENVOY SLE
WHITE, 4X4
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
06 JEEP COMMANDER
Slvr, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT, Quad cab, slvr,
5.7 hemi, auto, 4x4
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4
SPORT white, V6,
05 FORD ESCAPE XLT
Silver 4 x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
05 MAZDA TRIBUTE S,
green, auto, V6,
4x4
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE DURANGO
SLT hemi, blue/
grey, 3rd seat, 4x4
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 LINCOLN AVIATOR
pearl white, grey
leather, 3rd seat,
AWD
04 FORD F-150
Heritage, X-cab,
blk, auto, 4x4
04 NISSAN XTERRA SE
blue, auto, 4x4
03 FORD WINDSTAR
LX blue, 4 door
mini van
3 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
01 FORD WINDSTAR SE
green, 4 door,
7 pass. mini van
01 VOLVO V70
AWD, station
wagon, blue grey
leather, 84k miles.
99 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO,
grey, auto, 4x4
98 EXPLORER XLT
Blue grey leather,
sunroof, 4x4
95 CHEVY 1500 XCAB
TRUCK, green 4 x 4
95 GMC JIMMY
2 door, purple 4x4
CENTRAL CITY
MOTORS
319 W. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
HIGHEST QUALITY
VEHICLES
All Guaranteed
Bumper to
Bumper For
30 Days
570-779-3890
570-829-5596
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
CHEVY ‘01 CAVALIER
2 door, 4 cylinder,
automatic. 71K. AC
Looks & runs great.
$3,695. DEALER
570-868-3914
412 Autos for Sale
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$5,500
(570) 760-0511
CHEVROLET `95
GEO TRACKER
Convertible, 4
wheel drive, 4 cylin-
der, auto, new tires,
brakes, inspection.
$1650.
570-299-0772
CHEVROLET `98
CAMARO
Excellent condition.
3.8L, V8 automatic
with overdrive.
T-top convertible.
Bright purple
metallic with dark
grey cloth interior.
Only 38,200 miles.
New battery. Tinted
windows. Monsoon
premium audio
system with DVD
player. $6,500
(570) 436-7289
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
412 Autos for Sale
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
CHEVY `03 BLAZER
LS 4WD 2 door
$6,280
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
CHEVY `04 CAVALIER
Sedan. 4 cylinder
auto. Green. 128k
miles. A/C, cruise,
power locks, ABS.
$4,499 or best
offer. Call
570-704-8685
CHEVY `05 EQUINOX
LT (premium pack-
age), 3.4L, 47,000
miles. All wheel
drive, power moon-
roof, windows, locks
& seats. Leather
interior, 6 cd chang-
er, rear folding
seats, keyless entry,
onstar, roof rack,
running boards,
garage kept.
$13,750.
570-362-1910
CHEVY`96 CAMARO
Silver. 42k miles. 6
cylinder auto. Fully
loaded, all power,
cruise, t-tops, new
tires, garage kept.
Female owned. Non
smoker. $6,400 or
best offer. Call
570-333-4958 or
570-313-9525
CHRYSLER `05
SEBRING LX
Low mileage, blue,
2 door, automatic.
Excellent condition
$7,500
(570) 740-7446
CHRYSLER `92
LEBARON
CONVERTIBLE
Needs engine seals
56K Original Miles.
Radiant Red. Mint
condition, new
paint, automatic,
new battery, tune
up, brakes, top.
Runs well, needs
some work.
$1,999 OBO
(347) 452-3650
(In Mountain Top)
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,300
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
412 Autos for Sale
‘10 DODGE
CARAVAN SXT
32K, Power sliding
doors, Factory
warranty!
$18,599
‘09 DODGE
CALIBER SXT 2.0
Automatic, 24k
Factory Warranty!
$14,099
‘08 HONDA
RIDGELINE RTL
32K, Factory
Warranty, Leather
Sunroof
$24,599
‘08 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
34K, Red
$16,599
‘08 CHEVY
IMAPALA LS
4 door, only 37K! 5
Year / 100K
Factory Warranty!
$13,799
‘07 CHEVY IMPALA
LS
4 door, only 45k / 5
Year 100K Factory
Warranty!
$11,699
01 LINCOLN
TOWN CAR,
Executive, 74K
$7,099
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W W E E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
FORD `05 FREESTAR
LIMITED EDITION
Low mileage, fully
loaded, $10,999.
negotiable.
570-283-1691
FORD `05 RANGER
X-Cab V6 Auto
2WD; $5,980
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `87 F150
116k, rebuilt trans-
mission, new radia-
tor. Runs great.
$1,250. Call
570-864-2339
FORD `90 MUSTANG GT
Must See. Sharp!
Black, new direc-
tional tires, excel-
lent inside / outside,
factory stock, very
clean, must see to
appreciate. $8,000
or best offer. Must
sell. 570-269-0042
Leave Message
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
FORD ‘05 EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT
4WD, automatic,
V6
$15,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘08 MUSTANG
V6 convertible.
Auto. Power win-
dows & locks.
44K. Very Clean.
$15,980
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
HARLEY DAVIDSON
`08 NIGHTSTER
Orange / Black,
low miles
$7,800
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA `02 CIVIC
EX. Auto. 42k miles.
A/C. Sunroof. AM
/FM CD. Excellent
gas mileage. Cruise.
Anti-theft. Power
steering, windows &
locks. Dark blue.
Asking $7,500. call
570-824-1812
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
HONDA `08 CIVIC
Every option avail-
able. Sunroof,
leather, navigation
system, premium
sound system.
Must sell. $16,000
or best offer
(570) 301-7221
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘03
ELANTRA
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Economy Car!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
KIA ‘08 RIO LX
Sedan, automatic,
low miles
$11,650
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MAZDA `08 MIATA
MX-5 CONVERTIBLE
Red. Power steer-
ing, auto, AC, CD.
ONLY 5,300 MILES.
$18,500
(570) 883-0143
412 Autos for Sale
PONTIAC ‘99 SUNFIRE
4 door, 4 cylinder,
automatic.
$2,150
FORD ‘96 RANGER
Pickup, 4 cylinder,
automatic, $1,850
MAZDA ‘96 626
4 door, 4 cylinder,
automatic, sun roof
85K.
$2,050
BUICK ‘94 LESABRE
4 door, 6 cylinder,
automatic
$1250
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
570-825-8253
LEXUS `08 IS 250
AWD Sedan. 17,200
miles. No accidents.
Perfect condition.
Black with leather.
V6 Automatic.
Moonroof. 27 MPG.
Never seen snow.
$26,800
(570) 814-1436
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
LINCOLN`06
TOWN CAR LIMITED
Fully loaded.
46,000 miles,
Triple coated
Pearlized White.
Showroom
condition.
$18,900.
(570) 814-4926 or
(570) 654-2596
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES-BENZ `06
C-CLASS
Silver with leather
interior. Good condi-
tion. 34,000 miles.
$15,000 Negotiable
(570) 885-5956
MERCEDES-BENZ `95
SL 500
Convertible, with
removable hard
top, dark Blue,
camel interior,
Summer Driving
Only, Garage Kept.
Very Good
Condition, No
Accidents. Classy
Car. Price
Reduced!
$13,995
or trade for
SUV or other.
570-388-6669
MERCURY `02 SABLE
LS Premium. Fully
loaded, 80k. Very
clean, well main-
tained, recent tune-
up. B-title. Moon
roof, 6 CD, premium
sound, all power
options & leather.
KBB retail - $7,150.
Asking $5,250 or
best offer. Call
570-510-4849
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 3D
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EX IT 170 B O FF I-8 1TO EX IT 1. B EAR R IG HT O N B USIN ESS R O UTE 3 0 9 TO SIX TH LIG HT. JUST B ELOW W YO M IN G V ALLEY M ALL.
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821- 2772 •1- 800- 444- 7172
601 KIDDER STREET, W ILKES-BA RRE, PA
M O N .-THUR S. 8 :3 0 -8 :0 0 pm ; FR I. 8 :3 0 -7:0 0 pm ; SAT. 8 :3 0 -5 :0 0 pm
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2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 2W D RE G UL AR C AB
Stk. #11570,4.3L V 6 4 Sp eed A utom atic,A ir
C ond itioning,L ocking R ear D ifferential,
17” SteelW heels,Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol
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N EW
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IN S TO C K !!
2011 C HE V Y IM P AL A
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$25,490
Stk. #11173,3.5L V 6 A utom atic,D ual Z one A ir
C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,Six-W ay Pow er D river Seat,
PW ,PD L ,T ilt,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io
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D eep T inted G lass,A ir C ond itioning,F old ing R ear
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$22,7 3 5
Stk. #11725,2.4L D O H C M F I A utom atic,
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M P3,PW ,PD L ,O nStar,X M Satellite
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Tu rn-B y-Tu rn Tu rn-B y-Tu rn Tu rn-B y-Tu rn
N a viga tio n N a viga tio n N a viga tio n
4 5 4 5 4 5
AV A ILA B LE AV A ILA B LE AV A ILA B LE
IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K & IN -STO C K &
IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D IN -B O U N D
O
R
O
R
M S R P
$1 7 ,1 7 5
2011 C HE V Y S IL V E RAD O
1500 4W D C RE W C AB
Stk. #11099,4.8L V 8 A uto.,A ir C ond itioning,Stabilitrak,
PW ,PD L ,K eyless E ntry,O nStar,X M Satellite R ad io,
C hrom e W heels,Pow er H eated M irrors,A M /F M /C D
M S R P
$3 4,505
2011 C HE V Y TRAV E RS E
FW D & AW D
Stk. #11738 M S R P
$3 0,280
L S • LT • LT Z
M S R P
$42,7 95
2011 C HE V Y TAHO E
L S 4W D
Stk. #11370,5.3L V 8 A utom atic,C lim ate C ontrol,
Stabilitrak w / T raction C ontrol,PW ,PD L ,
B luetooth,A uto L ocking D ifferential,8 Passenger
Seating,T hird R ow Seat,O nStar,X M Satellite
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
2011 C HE V Y C AM ARO
C O UP E
1LT • 2LT • 1SS • 2SS
C O N V E R T IB L E
Stk. #10577,6.0L Vortec V 8 6-Sp eed A utom atic,
A ir C ond itioning,A M /F M Stereo,L ocking R ear
D ifferential,16” W heel,F ull F loor C overing,
C ustom C loth Seats
2010 C HE V Y E X P RE S S
3500 C ARG O V AN
M S R P
$3 1 ,595
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
0
%
0
%
0
%
AP R AP R AP R
2011 C HE V Y E Q UIN O X
AW D a n d FW D
L S • LT • LT Z • 4 C yl. • 6 C yl.
ST K #11721
O
R
8’ Bo x
Stk. #11540
Stk. #11734
0%
AP R
u p to
60 m os .
O N S E L E CT
V E HICL E S
the
W E W A N T
YOUR
TRA DE !
$TOP DOL L A R$
*Tax & Tags additional. LowAPR to qualified customers. See dealer for details. Select vehicles may not be GM Certified. Photos may not represent actual vehicle. Prior use daily rental on select vehicles. Not responsible for typographical errors.
07 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L S
#11786A ,43K M iles.....................................
$
17,999
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#Z2417,4W D,O nly 39K M iles..........................
$
21,590
*
10 BUICK E N CL A V E CXL A W D
#Z2316,17K M iles.......................................
$
34,900
*
06 GM C S IE RRA DUM P TRUCK
#Z2373,29K M iles........................................
$
23,999
*
07 HUM M E R H3
#11079C ,6 To C hoose From ...............S ta rtin g A t
$
19,999
*
07 DODGE CA L IBE R R/T
#11544A ,O nly 27K M iles................................
$
15,999
*
07-08 CA DIL L A C S RX A W D
#Z2213,Low M iles..........................S ta rtin g A t
$
25,999
*
1997 S A TURN S L 2
#11733A ,O nly 7,000 M iles.................................
$
7,999
*
03 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 RE G CA B
#11348A ,Low M iles......................................
$
14,999
*
08 CA DIL L A C DTS A W D
#Z2425,11K M iles........................................
$
28,500
*
05 CA DIL L A C DE V IL L E 4DR
#Z2424A ,O nly 46K M iles................................
$
13,999
*
08 CHE V Y A V E O H/B
#Z2063,22K M iles............................................
$
9,999
*
08 CHE V Y E QUIN OX L TZ A W D
#11634A ,34K M iles......................................
$
20,999
*
08 CHE V Y S IL V E RA DO 1500 E XT CA B
#Z2410,4W D,O nly 33K M iles..........................
$
22,999
*
07 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#Z2402,37K M iles........................................
$
13,987
*
F la g Down
A G rea t Dea l!
42
M P G
h wy
(ECO)
3 3
M P G
h wy
29
M P G
h wy
3 2
M P G
h wy
O
R
F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s F o r60 M o s
1 .9
%
1 .9
%
1 .9
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
S AV E
OV ER
$7 000
1
.9%
A s L ow A s
A P R
A v a ila ble
06 CHE V Y M ON TE CA RL O L T
#Z2342,36K M iles........................................
$
14,999
*
08 S A TURN V UE A W D
#Z2444,24K M iles.......................................
$
19,875
*
06 P ON TIA C G6 GT CON V E RTIBL E
#Z2380.....................................................
$
21,495
*
07 CHE V Y COL ORA DO W /T
#Z2320,O nly 32K M iles..................................
$
16,999
*
06 CHE V Y CORV E TTE CP E
#11692A ,O nly 21K M iles................................
$
33,998
*
05 GM C S A V A N A CA RGO V A N
#Z2415,38K M iles........................................
$
16,999
*
06 P ON TIA C TORRE N T
#Z2323,Low M iles.......................................
$
16,999
*
07 S A TURN OUTL OOK XE
#Z2328,A W D,31K........................................
$
25,999
*
03 CHE V Y IM P A L A L S
#11737A ,43K,1 O w ner...................................
$
10,499
*
H
U
R
R
Y
!
S
A
L
E
E
N
D
S
J
U
L
Y
5
T
H
*Tax & tags additional. Price includes all rebates. LowAPR in lieu of rebates. **Price includes $750 Bonus Cash on ‘11 Silverado, Tahoe, Suburban, Avalanche & Traverse. Is not compatible with supported lease programs. Offer Ends 7/5/11.
CRUZE - “S” Tier - (800+) lease for 39 mos. at $169 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2354.21 due at signing to qualified buyers; MALIBU - “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $179 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2879
due at signing to qualified buyers; EQUINOX- “S” Tier (800+) - lease for 39 mos. at $269 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year $2180.05 due at signing to qualified buyers; TRAVERSE LS FWD - “S” & “A” Tier Lease for 39 months at
$299 per month plus tax, 12K miles per year, $3650 due at signing to qualified buyers. Prior sales excluded. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Must take delivery by July 5, 2011. Not responsible for typographical errors.
JU ST
ANNOU NCED !
$
750
BONU S CASH **
On SelectM o d els
F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s F o r7 2 M o s
0.9
%
0.9
%
0.9
%
AP R AP R AP R
$
1
6
,9
9
5
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
1
6
9
S TAR TIN G AT
$
1
7
,2
4
9
**
$
1
9
,9
9
9
* S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
1
7
9
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
2
,9
9
9
*
$
2
6
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
2
,9
9
9
*
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
3
,7
9
9
** S TAR TIN G AT
P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
6
9
$
2
4
,2
9
9
**
S TAR TIN G AT
S TAR TIN G AT
$
2
6
,2
4
9
** P er
M o . L EAS E
F OR
$
2
9
9
$
2
7
,2
9
9
**
S TAR TIN G AT
$
3
7
,9
9
9
**
S TAR TIN G AT
Offer E n d s Ju ly 5th
2007 CHE V Y TRA IL BL A ZE R
#11679A
S ta rtin g A t
L OW
M IL E S
12
Tra ilbla z er’s
To Ch oose
F rom
$
14,999
* $
14,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
2007 CHE V Y COL ORA DO
L T CRE W CA B 4W D
#Z2465
$
19,999
* $
19,999
*
SA L E
P R ICE
L ow
M iles
2010 CHE V Y M A L IBU
L T •L TZ
$
17,999
* $
17,999
*
L OW A P R
A V A IL A BL E
S ta rtin g A t
L ow
M iles
SA L E
P R ICE
#Z2448
2007-2010 CHE V Y COBA L TS
L S •L T •CP E •S DN
SA L E
P R ICE
$
11,967
* $
11,967
*
S ta rtin g A t
L OW
M IL E S
12
Coba lt’s
To Ch oose
F rom
#Z23 59
2006 P ON TIA C S OL S TICE
CON V E RTIBL E
#Z2379
$
16,888
* $
16,888
*
P ow er
P a c ka ge
45K M iles
SA L E
P R ICE
$
16,750
* $
16,750
*
L OW
M IL E S
2008 GM C S IE RRA
2W D RE G CA B
SA L E
P R ICE
#11563A
2010 CHE V Y HHR
P A N E L L S
#Z2438
$
13,950
* $
13,950
*
L OW
M IL E S
5
A V A IL A B L E
32 M P G
(HW Y)
S ta rtin g A t
SA L E
P R ICE
2008 S A TURN A URA XE
$
14,877
* $
14,877
*
#Z2429
S ta rtin g A t
8
A u ra ’s
To Ch oose
F rom
L OW
M IL E S
SA L E
P R ICE
2006 GM C CA N YON S L
2W D RE G CA B
#11678A
$
11,799
* $
11,799
*
SA L E
P R ICE
ON L Y
42K
M IL E S
V IS IT US 24/7 W W W .V A L L E YCHE V ROL E T.COM
3 0
M P G
h wy
FOURTH FOURTH
OF JULY OF JULY
GEAR-UP GEAR-UP
PAGE 4D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months
payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate.
Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. “BUY FOR” prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000 financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of
vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends JULY 5, 2011.
WWW.COCCIACARS.COM
M
O
S.
ON EVERY VEHICLE LISTEDBELOW
OVER
NEW2011 FORD
F-150 4X4
FOOT
BOX
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
All Wheel Drive, Auto., Pwr. Locks, 16” Steel
Wheels, Pwr. Windows, Keyless Entry w/
Remote, Safety Canopy, Air, Side Air Bags
72
Mos.
Auto., AM/FM/CD, Tilt Wheel, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, Anti-Theft Sys., 1st &
2nd Air Curtains, Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,
Message Center, SYNC
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/5/11.
NEW2011 FORD
FUSION SE
24
Mos.
3.7L V6, AM/FM/CD,
Cloth Seat, ABS, Cruise
Control, XL Plus Pkg., 40/20/40 Split
Seat, XL Decor Group, Air, Automatic
NEW2011 FORD
ESCAPE XLS 4X4
72
Mos.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 5D
412 Autos for Sale
MERCURY `03 SABLE
GS Sedan 59k V6
$5,990
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
MERCURY `95
GRAND MARQUIS
4 door, V8, fully
loaded, moon roof,
new tires & brakes.
Interior & exterior in
excellent shape. 2
owners. Call
(570) 822-6334 or
(570) 970-9351
MINI COOPER S `06
GARAGED
Pure silver metallic.
Roof & mirror caps
in black. Tartan red
cloth / panther black
leather interior.
Black bonnet
stripes. Automatic.
Steptronic paddles.
Dual moon roofs,
Cockpit chrono
package, conven-
ience, cold weather
(heated seats) &
premium packages.
Dynamic stability
control. Xenon
headlights, front
and rear fog lights.
Parking distance
control. Harmon-
Kardon sound sys-
tem. Chrome line
interior. Mint condi-
tion. 17,000 miles.
Must Drive!
$21,500
570-341-7822
MINI COOPER`08
CLUBMAN S
Sparkling silver
metallic. Roof and
mirror caps in black.
Black leather interi-
or. Automatic step-
tronic paddles. Dual
moon roof. Cold
weather package.
Dynamic stability
control. Excellent
Condition. 33,600
miles. Just Ser-
viced. 30 MPG City.
$20,995
(570) 472-9909
(570) 237-1062
NISSAN `02 SENTRA
SE-R SPEC V
Red. 87,000 miles,
manual, sun roof,
tinted windows,
$5,600.
570-954-0115
NISSAN `93 MAXIMA
V6, automatic, dual
overhead cam,
109,000 original
miles, needs some
work. Asking $850
negotiable.
570-674-3876
NISSAN ‘02 ALTIMA
2.5 S, automatic,
air condition.
power window &
lock, cruise con-
trol, CD on dash.
Excellent condi-
tion. 112,000 miles
$5,850
Trade Welcome
570-829-3929
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
PONTIAC ‘03 VIBE GT
4 cylinder,
6-speed, cd,
sunroof, 1 owner.
Sharp Sharp Car!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
PONTIAC `05
GRAND PRIX
Sedan. White. Great
condition. Sunroof,
tan leather interior.
Recently main-
tained. 70k miles.
$5,000. Call
570-954-7459
PONTIAC ‘07 VIBE
Automatic, moon-
roof, AWD
$11,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PONTIAC ‘69 FIREBIRD 400
CONVERTIBLE
Blue/white top &
white interior.
Recent document-
ed frame-off
restoration. Over
$31,000 invested.
will sell $21,500.
570-335-3127
PORSCHE `02 BOXSTER
S
Great convertible,
black top, 6 speed
manual transmis-
sion, carbon fiber
dash, leather interi-
or, front & rear
trunk, fast & agile.
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-262-2478
SUBARU `05 LEGACY
SPORT AWD
Air, new tires &
brakes, 31,000
miles, great
condition. $11,995.
570-836-1673
412 Autos for Sale
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN ‘05 ION
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Extra Clean!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
SUBARU `96 OUTBACK
Legacy. Red. Auto,
AWD, air, everything
in working condition.
Factory roof-rack.
New tires & brakes.
Non smoker. 174k
miles. Asking $2,900
570-687-3613
SUBARU ‘05 LEGACY
2.5i Limited AWD,
Excellent Condition,
Dark Blue, Loaded
with features such
as sun roof and
heated seats.
Manual 5-speed
transmission.
116,000 accident-
free highway miles.
Asking $7,500. Call
570-575-0656
SUZUKI ‘10 SX4
5 door hatchback,
AWD Only 8,600
miles!
$15,892
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
TOYOTA `03 SOLARA
Coupe. Auto. Silver.
Power windows &
locks. A/C. Satellite
radio, CD. $6,200.
Call 570-899-5076
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
TOYOTA `93 MR2
T-top, 5 speed.
AM/FM/CD, AC,
power antenna.
New tires. No rust.
Great condition.
$5,000
(570) 708-0269
after 6:00PM
TOYOTA ‘07 CAMRY LE
4 cylinder sedan,
automatic
$16,855
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
VOLKSWAGEN `01 GTI
Great running
condition. Red with
cloth interior, power
door locks, power
windows, power
moon roof,
5 speed, just
serviced, 117k.
Asking $5,300
570-885-2162
VOLKSWAGEN `04
BEETLE
CONVERTIBLE
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Reduced
$14,000
570-822-1976
Leave Message
VOLVO `01 XC70
All wheel drive,
46,000 miles, bur-
gundy with tan
leather, complete
dealer service histo-
ry, 1 owner, detailed,
garage kept, estate.
$9,100.
570-840-3981
VOLVO `01 XC70
All wheel drive,
46,000 miles, bur-
gundy with tan
leather, complete
dealer service histo-
ry, 1 owner, detailed,
garage kept, estate.
$9,100.
570-840-3981
VOLVO ‘04 XC70
Cross Country,
All Wheel Drive
$11,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CADILLAC `80
COUPE DEVILLE
Excellent condition,
$3,000 located in
Hazleton.
570-454-1945 or
561-573-4114
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `63
IMPALA
2 door hardtop.
Partial restoration.
All original parts.
Asking $4,000 or
best offer. Call
(570) 885-1119
CHEVROLET `69 NOVA
SS clone. 350
engine, 290 Horse-
power. 10 bolt posi-
rear. PowerGlide
transmission. Power
disc brake kit. Over
$20,000 invested,
sacrifice at
$7,500 Firm.
Call 732-397-8030
(Wilkes-Barre)
CHEVROLET `72
CHEVELLE
Two door hard top.
307 Motor. Needs
work. Comes with
additional 400 small
block & many parts.
$3,500. Serious
inquires only.
(570) 836-2574
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
Very Good
Condition!
Low miles!
$7500. FIRM
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
CHEVROLET `79
CORVETTE L-48
All Corvette options,
all original, new
Good Year tires,
new mufflers, just
tuned. 46,000 miles.
PRICE REDUCED
$5,900
570-262-2845 or
570-239-6969
CHEVROLET `81
CORVETTE
Very good condi-
tion. 350 engine,
classic silver with
black bottom trim,
all original, regis-
tered as an antique
vehicle, removable
mirror tops. 66,000
miles, chrome
wheels & tires in
very good shape,
leather interior,
garage kept. Must
see to appreciate.
Asking $9,000 or
willing to trade for a
newer Pontoon
boat.
Call 570-545-6057
CHEVY `68
CAMARO SS
396 automatic,
400 transmission,
clean interior, runs
good, 71K, garage
kept, custom
paint, Fire Hawk
tires, Krager
wheels, well
maintained.
$23,900
Negotiable
570-693-2742
CHEVY`75 CAMARO
350 V8. Original
owner. Automatic
transmission. Rare -
tuxedo silver / black
vinyl top with black
naugahyde interior.
Never damaged.
$6,000. Call
570-489-6937
1949 DESOTO CUTOM
4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In it’s
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
she’s beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
FORD `66
Mustang Coupe.
Pearl white, pony
interior. Pristine
condition. 26K
miles. $17,000 or
best offer.
(570) 817-6768
LINCOLN `66
CONTINENTAL
4 door,
Convertible, 460
cu. engine, 67,000
miles, 1 owner
since `69. Teal
green / white
leather, restorable,
$2,500 570-287-
5775 / 332-1048
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
LINCOLN `88
TOWN CAR
61,000 original
miles, garage kept,
triple black, leather
interior, carriage
roof, factory wire
wheels, loaded,
excellent condition.
$5,500. Call
Mike 570-237-7660
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES BENZ
`74 450 SE
SOLID CAR!
Interior perfect,
exterior very good.
Runs great! New
tires, 68K original
miles.
$5,500 FIRM.
570-905-7389
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $31,000. Call
825-6272
MERCEDES-BENZ `88
420 SEL
Silver with red
leather interior.
Every option.
Garage kept, show-
room condition.
$7,000.
(570) 417-9200
OLDSMOBILE `68
DELMONT
DRASTICALLY
REDUCED!!
This model only
produced in 1967
& 1968. All
original 45,000
miles, Color
Burgundy, cloth
& vinyl interior,
350 rocket
engine, 2nd
owner. Fender
skirts, always
garaged. Trophy
winner at shows.
Serious inquiries
only, $7,500.
570-690-0727
PONTIAC `68
CATALINA
400 engine. 2
barrel carburetor.
Yellow with black
roof and white wall
tires. Black interior.
$4,995. Call
(570) 696-3513
PONTIAC 1937
Fully restored near
original. New paint,
new interior, new
wiring, custom tint-
ed glass, new motor
& transmission.
Spare motor &
trans. 16” wide
white walls car in
excellent condition
in storage for 2
years. $14,000 or
best offer. Serious
inquiries ONLY.
Call 570-574-1923
VW CLASSIC `72
KARMANN GHIA
Restoration
Vehicle. Family
owned, garage
kept, good shape.
Needs some
interior work, new
seats, needs
carburetor work.
Only 58,000 miles.
Asking $5,000.
Serious inquiries
only! Call
570-343-2296
WANTED: PONTIAC
`78 FIREBIRD
Formula 400
Berkshire Green,
Originally purchased
at Bradley-Lawless
in Scranton. Car
was last seen in
Abington-Scranton
area. Finder’s fee
paid if car is found
and purchased. Call
John with any info
(570) 760-3440
421 Boats &
Marinas
ALUM V-TRAILER 14”
15 Evinrude/55 lb.
min. anchor, oars,
seats, etc. Ready to
go, just add poles &
bait. $2,995.
570-751-8689
CUSTOM
CREST 15’
Fiberglass
boat with
trailer. Out-
board propul-
sion. Includes:
2 motors
Erinmade,
“Lark II series”
PRICE
REDUCED!
$2,400
NEGOTI ABLE
570-417-3940
BOAT SPACE NEEDED
Looking for a place
near Harveys Lake
to park boat for
summer.
570-784-8697
421 Boats &
Marinas
STARCRAFT ‘80
16’ DEEP V
‘90 Evinrude out-
board 70hp with tilt
& trim— ‘92 EZ
loader trailer. With
‘00 Tracker Series
60lbs foot pedal, 2
downriggers, stor-
ages, gallon tanks,
2 fish finders and
more. MUST SEE.
Make Best Offer.
Call 866-320-6368
after 5pm.
424 Boat Parts/
Supplies
RIGGERS: 2 can-
non uni troll down
riggers - swivel
bases & weights
avail. - $250.
FISH FINDER -
hummingbird wide
100. $40 firm.
GAS TANK:
3 gallon quicksilver
plastic gas tank with
fuel line $20.
570-262.0716
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
DUMP TRAILER ‘05
10 yards, 4 ton limit,
very good condi-
tion. Asking $3,900
Also, E-350. Cheap
For more info, call
973-906-8404
FORD ‘99 E350
BUCKET VAN
Triton V8. 2 speed
boom; 92,000miles;
$9999 or best price.
Great condition. Call
570-675-3384 or
570574-7002
GMC `01 3500 CUBE
VAN
15 ft.L X 8 ft.W X
6 ft.H, auto, A/C,
5.7 V8, 10,000
GVW, dual rear tires
& pull out loading
ramp. Asking
$3,000
(570) 864-0858
439 Motorcycles
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY ‘01
DAVIDSON
Electra Glide, Ultra
Classic, many
chrome acces-
sories, 13k miles,
Metallic Emerald
Green. Garage
kept, like new
condition. Includes
Harley cover.
$12,900
570-718-6769
570-709-4937
HARLEY DAVIDSON `01
Road King 19,000
miles, new tires, lots
of extra chrome.
Like New. $12,900.
Call 570-639-1989
or 570-760-1023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON `07
Road King Classic
FLHRC. Burgundy /
Cream. Driver &
Passenger back
rest, grips, battery
tender, cover. Willie
G accessories. 19k
miles. $14,400 or
best offer. Call
262-993-4228
HARLEY DAVIDSON
01’ SPORTSTER
883 cubic inch
motor, Paco rigid
frame, extended &
raked. Low miles.
$5,000 or best
offer.(973) 271-1030
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$10,000.
570-639-2539
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05
SCREAMING EAGLE
V-ROD
Orange & Black.
Used as a show
bike. Never abused.
480 miles. Excellent
condition. Asking
$18,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘05
V-ROD VRSCA
Blue pearl,
excellent condition,
3,100 miles, factory
alarm with extras.
$10,500.
or best offer.
Tony 570-237-1631
439 Motorcycles
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘08 SPORTSTER
XL 1200 Low Rider.
6,700 miles. Lots of
chrome & extras.
Perfect condition.
$8,000 or best offer
(570) 709-8773
HARLEY DAVIDSON
2006 NIGHTTRAIN
SPECIAL EDITION
#35 of 50 Made
$10,000 in acces-
sories including a
custom made seat.
Exotic paint set,
Alien Spider Candy
Blue. Excellent con-
dition. All Documen-
tation. 1,400 Asking
$20,000 or best
offer. Call
570-876-4034
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$8,500
570-905-9348
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘92 DAYTONA DYNA
SPECIAL EDITION
Bike #770 of 1,770
made. Many extras.
Must sell. 13,300
miles. Get on this
classic for only
$6,995
570-477-1109
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘92 ULTRA CLASSIC
Many extras,
Garage kept,
2 tone blue.
17,600 miles.
REDUCED PRICE
$8,400
Lehman area.
(570) 760-5937
HONDA 2005 SHADOW
VLX600, White,
10,000 miles
& new back tire.
$3,000
(570) 262-3697 or
(570) 542-7213
KAWASAKI
`08 NINJA
250 cc, blue, like
new, under 1,000
miles. Great starter
bike. $2,800 Seri-
ous inquiries only.
Call 570-331-4777
KAWASAKI ‘05
NINJA 500R. 3300
miles. Orange.
Garage kept. His &
hers helmets. Must
sell. $2400
570-760-3599
570-825-3711
Kawasaki` 93
ZX11D NINJA
LIKE NEW
8900 Original
miles. Original
owner. V@H
Exhaust and Com-
puter. New tires.
$4,100.
570-574-3584
POLARIS ‘00
VICTORY CRUISER
14,000 miles,
92 V-twin, 1507 cc,
extras $6000.
570-883-9047
Q-LINK LEGACY `09
250 automatic. Gun
metal gray. MP3
player. $3,000.
Great first motorcy-
cle. 570-696-1156
SUZUKI `07 C50T
CRUISER
EXCELLENT
CONDITION
Windshield, Bags,
Floorboards,V&H
Pipes, White
walls,Garage Kept.
6K Miles $5,200
(570) 430-0357
SUZUKI ‘77
GS 750
Needs work.
$1,500
or best offer
570-822-2508
UNITED MOTORS
‘08 MATRIX 2 SCOOTER
150cc. Purple &
grey in color. 900
miles. Bought brand
new. Paid $2,000.
Asking $1,600 or
best offer.
(570) 814-3328 or
(570) 825-5133
YAMAHA `04 V-STAR
1100 Custom. 5800
miles, light bar,
cobra exhaust,
windshield, many
extras, must sell.
$4,900. Call
570-301-3433
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA ‘1975 80
Antique. Very good
condition. Must see.
Low milage. Road
title. Asking $1,260
Call (570) 825-5810
Leave Message
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
‘96 SUNLINE TRAILER
23’. Excellent con-
dition. Sleeps 3 or 4
people. $6,000
negotiable.
570-453-3358
DUTCHMAN 96’
5TH WHEEL
with slideout & sun
room built on. Set
up on permanent
site in Wapwallopen.
Comes with many
extras. $7,000.
(570) 829-1419 or
(570) 991-2135
EQUIPMENT/BOBCAT
TRAILER
Brand new 2010
tandem axle, 4
wheel electric
brakes, 20’ long
total, 7 x 16 wood
deck, fold up ramps
with knees, remov-
able fenders for
oversized loads,
powder coat paint
for rust protection,
2 5/16 hitch
coupler, tongue
jack, side pockets,
brake away switch,
battery, 7 pole
RV plugs, title &
more!! Priced for
quick sale. $2,995
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels,
water purifier,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
raised panel fridge
& many acces-
sories & options.
Excellent condition,
$22,500.
570-868-6986
NEWMAR 36’
MOUNTAIN AIRE
5th wheel, 2 large
slides, new
condition, loaded
with accessories.
Ford Dually diesel
truck with hitch
also available.
570-455-6796
90’ SUNLINE CAMPER
JUST REDUCED!
35 ft. Well kept. On
campground on the
Susquehanna River
near great fishing.
Attached 12X22”
carpeted room.
Brick heater,
covered by metal
roof with large
breezeway. Shed &
many extras includ-
ed. Call for more
information.
(570) 237-7076
SUNLINE `06 SOLARIS
Travel Trailer. 29’,
mint condition, 1
slide out a/c-heat.
Stove, microwave,
fridge, shower
inside & out. Many
more extras, includ-
ing hitch equipment
and sway bars.
Reduced. $12,500.
Call 570-842-6735
SUNLITE CAMPER
22 ft. 3 rear bunks,
center bathroom,
kitchen, sofa bed.
Air, Fully self con-
tained. Sleeps 6.
New tires, fridge
awning. $4500.
215-322-9845
TRAVEL TRAILER 33 ft
Rear queen master
bedroom, Walk
thru bathroom.
Center kitchen +
dinette bed. Front
extra large living
room + sofa bed.
Big View windows.
Air, awning, sleeps
6, very clean, will
deliver. Located in
Benton, Pa. $4,900.
215-694-7497
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS CX
HARD TO FIND!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
20,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New tires. Like
new, inside &
out. $14,900. Call
(570) 540-0975
CHEVR0LET`02
EXPRESS
CONVERSION
VAN
Loaded. Low
miles. Excellent
condition.
$18,900
570-674-3901
CHEVY `10 SILVERADO
4 Door Crew Cab
LTZ. 4 wheel drive.
Excellent condition,
low mileage.
$35,500. Call
570-655-2689
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `05
SILVERADO LT Z71
Extended cab,
automatic. Black
with grey leather
interior. Heated
seats. 59,000
miles. New Michelin
tires. $16,500
(570) 477-3297
CHEVROLET `05
TRAILBLAZER LT
Black/Grey. 18,000
miles. Well
equipped. Includes
On-Star, tow pack-
age, roof rack,
running boards,
remote starter,
extended warranty.
$16,000
(570) 825-7251
CHEVROLET `09
EQUINOX LS
Low mileage,
16,000 miles, auto-
matic, all-wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
Sirius radio, On-Star,
cassette player, CD
player, keyless
entry, rear de-
froster, rear wind-
shield wiper, tinted
windows.
REDUCED PRICE
$16,500.
(570) 954-9333
Call after 9:00 a.m.
CHEVROLET `10
SILVERADO 1500
Extended Cab V71
Package 4x4. Bed-
liner. V-8. Red.
Remote start.
6,300 miles
$26,000
(570) 639-2539
CHEVROLET `97
SILVERADO
with Western plow.
4WD, Automatic.
Loaded with
options. Bedliner.
55,000 miles.
$9,200. Call
(570) 868-6503
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘00 ASTRO
CARGO VAN
Automatic, V6
1 owner
Clean Work Van!
$3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘05 BLAZER
2 Door. Auto. V-6.
CD. Extra Sharp.
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVY `04 EXPRESS
2500
Series. 6.0 Litre V8.
Heavy Duty version.
Excellent cargo van.
85K miles. Excellent
condition. $8,700
570-829-4548 or
570-417-5991
CHEVY ‘03
TRAILBLAZER LTZ
4WD, V6, leather,
auto, moonroof
$13,620
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY 06 EQUI NOX LT
$13,895
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘07
TRAILBLAZER LT
On-Star, Leather.
Satellite Radio.
$14,990
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHRYSLER `07 PACIFICA
Silver. Only 83K
miles. All wheel
drive, 4.0L V6. All
Power. A/C. Loaded.
Must Sell.
PRICE REDUCED
$10,500 or best
offer. Call
570-417-7937
DODGE `00 RAM
1500 QUAD CAB
4X4, V8 automatic.
New tires & brakes.
Fully loaded. Lea-
ther interior. Many
extras. Must see.
Excellent condition.
(570) 970-9351
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVY ‘99
TAHOE
4 door, 4x4
LT Package,
Cold A/C
KBB $7,800
Our Price
ONLY $3,795
CHEVY`05 TRAILBLAZER
NEW PRICE
$9,500 OR
BEST OFFER
JUST REDUCED!
SAVE MONEY! GET
READY FOR THE
WINTER! Don’t pay
dealer prices! White
with grey interior.
Looks and runs like
it just came off the
lot. Four Door, 4
wheel drive, 84,900
miles, new tires,
tow package, anti
lock brakes, driver
and passenger
airbags, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
locks, rear window
defroster and
wiper, privacy tint,
air conditioner,
cruise control. CD,
keyless entry and
much more.
Call
570-332-4999
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA
QUAD CAB SLT 4X4
Automatic, CD
Tool Box
Like New!
$8,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `05 DAKOTA
SLT Club Cab. V8
auto. Blue. 49k
miles. Many extras.
Garage kept. Excel-
lent condition.
$14,000 negotiable
570-430-1396
DODGE `99 CARAVAN
SE. 2 sliding doors.
Very clean. Runs
great. 107k miles.
$2,500. Call
570-709-5677 or
570-819-3140
DODGE `99
DAKOTA SPORT
4 X 4, extended
cab, 117,000
miles, new
inspection, just
serviced, oil, trans
flushed, new fluid
transfer case &
axels, cooling sys-
tem flushed.
$6,599.00
Call 693-1262
after 5:00 PM
DODGE `99
DURANGO SLT
5.9 V8, Kodiak
Green, Just serv-
iced. New brakes.
Tow package. AC.
Very good condi-
tion. Runs & drives
100%. 68,000 miles.
Asking $6,850 or
best offer
(570) 239-8165
DODGE `99 RAM
1500 CLUB CAB
Good condition.
Runs great. High
miles. Asking
$2,700
(570) 239-3950
DODGE ‘02
CARAVAN
Silver
Ice Cold Air
$4,295
DODGE ‘02
GRAND CARAVAN
2nd row Captain
Chairs, Power
Sliding Door &
Hatch. Too many
new parts to list!
$5,995
TRUCKS FOR SALE
Ford, GMC,
International-Prices
starting at $2,295.
Box Truck, Cab &
Chassis available.
Call U-haul
570-822-5536
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
DODGE ‘07 NITRO
Low Mileage!
$17,448
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘97 F-150 4X4
Automatic,
4.2L V6, AC
Economical
Work Truck!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `03
EXPLORER
Low mileage,
63,500 miles,
automatic, all-wheel
drive, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes,
air conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, all
power, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, CD changer,
keyless entry,
leather interior, sun/
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows.
$12,500.
(570) 362-0938
FORD `04
EXPLORER
SUV, V6, 4x4,
automatic,
85,000 miles
Black Beauty.
Garage kept.
Must sell.
$8,700
(570) 883-2754
FORD `04 FREESTAR
Limited. Leather. 7
passenger.Remote
doors. DVD player,
premium sound.
Rear A/C. 57,800
miles. $8,995. Call
570-947-0771
FORD `04 FREESTAR
Automatic, front
wheel drive, 4 door,
anti-lock brakes, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, CD player,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
tinted windows,
new starter, just
inspected, $3,900.
570-594-4992.
Call after 4:30 p.m.
FORD `05 WHEEL
CHAIR LIFT VAN
Seating capacity for
7 plus 2 wheel
chairs. 140,000
miles. Great condi-
tion. Asking $7,000.
For more details,
Call 570-589-9181
FORD `06
EXPLORER
78,400 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air
conditioning, air
bags, power locks,
power windows,
power mirrors,
power seats,
cruise control, AM/
FM radio, CD
changer, DVD play-
er, keyless entry,
leather interior,
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper.
$16,000
(570) 954-5462
Call after 9 a.m.
FORD `97 DIESEL
Cummins engine,
8-L. 49,049
miles. 33,000
gross wt. 6,649
light wt. $19,500
Must see!
(570) 829-5886
FORD `99 E250
Wheelchair Van
78,250 miles. Fully
serviced, new bat-
tery, tires & rods.
Seats 6 or 3 wheel-
chairs. Braun Millen-
nium lift with
remote. Walk up
door. Front & rear
A/C. Power locks &
windows. Excellent
condition. $7,500.
570-237-6375
FORD ‘99 TARUS
Blue. 4 door.
89,000 miles.
New Inspection
$2,895
GMC `99 TRUCK
SLE PACKAGE
2 wheel drive
84,000
original
miles
$5,900.
or best offer
570-
824-3096
PAGE 6D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
A Benson Family Dealership
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
All Prices Plus Tax & Tags, Customer Must Qualify for All Rebates. See Salesperson for Details. See dealer for details. Some restrictions apply. Dealer may discontinue program at any time.
BAD CREDIT
NO CREDIT
Divorce, Foreclosure,
Tax Liens, Bankruptcy
WE DON’T CARE HOW
BAD- WE WILL WORK
OUR HARDEST TO GET
YOU A CAR.
CALL NOW
Ask For
GOOD NEWS
RICH HUGHES
397-1209
Hurry!
JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.
713 North State Street • Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-6676 • fax: 570-586-9466
www.chermaksaab.com
Intelligence
goes a long way.
Intuitive technology. Brilliant design. A legendary Saab Turbo engine
with an EPA-est. 33 mpg hwy. Add road-gripping XWD and it’s a
no-brainer. The all-new 9-5 Sport Sedan. It’s a thinking man’s machine.
20XX Saab Model
$
000/ mo. for XX mos. For qualified lessees
1
20XX Saab Model 0
%
APR for XX mos.
for qualified buyers
2 $0,000 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit. Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
JOSEPH CHERMAK INC.
713 North State Street, Clarks Summit, PA 18411
570-586-6676 fax: 570-586-9466
www.chermaksaab.com
Intuitive technology. Brilliant design. A legendary SaabTurbo engine
with an EPA-est. 33 mpg hw. Add road-gripping AWD and it’s a
no-brainer.The all-new 9-5 Sports Sedan. It’s a thinking man’s machine.
1Low-mileage lease of a specially equipped 2011 SaabTurbo. Example based on survey. Each dealer sets its own price.Your payments may vary. Payments are for a specailly equipped 2011 SaabTurbo with an MSRP of $40,700. 39 monthly payments total $15,556.
Option to purchase at lease end for an amount to be determined at lease signing. Must approve lease. Must take delivery from dealer stock by 05/31/11. Mileage charge of $.25/mile over 32,500 miles. Lessee pays for maintenance, repair and excess wear. Payments
may be higher in some states. Not available with other offers. Residency restrictions apply. Vehicle subject to availability.
2011 SaabTurbo
$
399/mo. for 39 mos. For qualified lessee
1
$3,558 due at signing (after all offers). Includes security deposit.Tax, title, license, dealer fees and optional equipment extra.
Pre-Owned Saabs
2008 Saab 9-3 Sedan
SNOW SILVER, GRAY HEATED LEATHER SEATS 4CYL H.O.
TURBO,AUTOTRANS, PW, PL, AC, 16”ALLOY WHEELS,
MOONROOF, FRESHLY SERVICED & DETAILED, 18K MILES
$21,995
2008 Saab 9-3 Sedan
SNOW SILVER, GRAY HEATED LEATHER SEATS, 4CYL
H.O.TURBO, AUTOTRANS, PW, PL, AC, 16”ALLOY WHEELS,
MOONROOF,REAR PARK ASSIST, FRESHLY SERVICED
& DETAILED, 30K MILES
$20,995
2010 Saab 9-3X AWD
WHITE, PARCHMENT LEATHER, ALL WHEEL DRIVE, 4 CYL, H.0.
TURBO, AUTOTRANS, PW, PL, AC, ALLOY WHEELS, LOCAL NEW
CAR TRADE, FRESHLY SERVICED & DETAILED, 7K MILES
$33,995
2008 Saab 9-3 Sedan
BLACK, PARCHMENT LEATHER HEATED SEATS 4CYL H.O.
TURBO,AUTOTRANS, PW,PL,AC, 16”ALLOY WHEELS,MOONROOF,
VERY CLEAN FRESHLY SERVICED & DETAILED, 34K MILES
$20,995
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `99
SUBURBAN
Champagne
exterior,
leather interior,
power windows
& locks, 4 wheel
drive. $3,685.
Call
570-362-4080
HONDA `10
ODYSSEY
Special Edition.
Maroon, Fully
loaded. Leather
seats. TV/DVD,
navigation, sun roof
plus many other
extras. 3rd seat .
Only 1,900 Miles.
Brand New.
Asking $37,000
(570) 328-0850
HYUNDAI `05
TUCSON
61,000 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, cruise
control, AM/FM
radio, cassette play-
er, CD player, key-
less entry, sun/
moon roof, rear
defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new towing pack-
age, auto start.
$10,000
(570) 762-4543
INTERNATIONAL ‘95
DUMP TRUCK
Refurbished, rebuilt
engine, transmis-
sion replaced.
Rear-end removed
and relubed. Brand
new 10’ dump. PA
state inspected.
$12,900/best offer.
570-594-1496
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
JEEP ‘99
GRAND CHEROKEE
6 cylinder,
automatic,
sunroof, CD
Excellent runner!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP `00 WRANGLER
78,500 miles, 6
cylinder automat-
ic, hard & soft
tops. Well main-
tained. Many
new parts. Adult
driven only. Kelly
Blue Book
$10,400, Asking
$8,800.
570-704-8730
JEEP `02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
Triple black, eco-
nomical 6 cylinder.
4x4 select drive.
CD, remote door
opener, power win-
dows & locks,
cruise, tilt wheel.
108k highway miles.
Garage kept. Super
clean inside and out.
No rust. Sale price
$6,895. Scranton.
570-466-2771
JEEP `02 LIBERTY
Blue/grey, new
rebuilt engine with
warranty, new
tires & brakes,
4,000 miles.
$5,900 or
best offer.
570-814-2125
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
JEEP `06
COMMANDER 4X4
Lockers, V-8. Heat-
ed leather. All
power. Navigation,
Satellite, Blue tooth,
3rd row, More.
69,000
highway miles.
$14,900. Call
(570) 855-3657
JEEP `07
WRANGLER X
4x4, stick shift, soft
top. Red exterior,
well maintained,
garage kept. 11,500
miles, one owner.
AC, CD player,
cruise control.
Tow package with
cargo carrier.
Excellent condition.
$18,700
Call 570-822-9680
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
LEXUS `02 RX 300
49,000 miles,
Excellent condition.
With Warranty.
Leather, all options
including satellite
radio. Non smoking
vehicle. Asking.
$12,900
(570) 696-9809
LEXUS `06 GX 470
Cypress Pearl with
ivory leather interi-
or. Well maintained,
garage kept. All
service records.
Brand new tires.
All options including
premium audio
package, rear
climate control,
adjustable suspen-
sion, towing pack-
age, rear spoiler,
Lexus bug guard.
42,750 miles.
$28,950
(570) 237-1082
LEXUS `96 LX 450
Full time 4WD, Pearl
white with like new
leather ivory interi-
or. Silver trim.
Garage kept. Excel-
lent condition.
84,000 miles, Ask-
ing $10,750
570-654-3076 or
570-498-0005
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA ‘04
TRIBUTE LX
Automatic, V6
Sunroof, CD
1 owner
Extra Clean!
$5,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MAZDA ‘08 TRIBUTE
Utility, 4WD
$18,655
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MERCEDES BENZ ‘06
R350 CLASS WAGON
4Matic, 3rd row,
power tailgate
$21,960
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MERCEDES-BENZ
`99 ML 320
Sunroof, new tires,
115,930 miles
MUST SELL
$7,200 OBO
(570)760-0511
MERCURY ‘09 MILAN
4 cylinder,
automatic,
Only 9,800 miles
$18,875,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MINI ‘08
COOPER
2 door, automatic,
leather, sky roof,
boost cd, fogs
$19,945
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
MITSUBISHI `08
RAIDER
VERY GOOD CONDITION!
29,500 miles. 2-
4X4 drive option, 4
door crew cab,
sharp silver color
with chrome step
runners, premium
rims, good tires,
bedliner, V-6, 3.7
liter. Purchased at
$26,900. Dealer
would sell for
$18,875.
Asking $16,900
(570) 545-6057
MITSUBISHI `95
MONTERO SR 4WD
177,102 miles, auto-
matic, four wheel
drive, 4 door, anti-
lock brakes, air con-
ditioning, air bags,
power locks, power
windows, power
mirrors, power
seats, cruise con-
trol, AM/FM radio,
cassette player, CD
changer, leather
interior, sun roof,
rear defroster, rear
windshield wiper,
new Passed inspec-
tion, new battery.
$2,500
(570) 868-1100
Call after 2:00 p.m.
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
MITSUBISHI `97
15’ CUBE VAN
Cab over, 4 cylinder
diesel engine.
Rebuilt automatic
transmission. Very
good rubber. All
around good
condition inside
& out. Well
maintained.
Ready to work.
PRICE REDUCED!
$6,195 or
best offer
Call 570-650-3500
Ask for Carmen
NISSAN ‘06 ALTIMA S
Automatic, CD,
Local Trade
$11,880
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
NISSAN 08 ALTIMA SE
Sporty 2 Door
$21,500
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
NISSAN ‘10 VERSA
ONLY 6,000 miles!
$15,490
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
PLYMOUTH 1995
VOYAGER
Great work van or
reliable 7 passen-
ger transportation.
120K miles.
All maintenance &
inspection current.
New brakes & tires.
Runs & looks great.
JUST REDUCED!
$1,600 or best
reasonable offer.
(570) 820-0677
SATURN ‘09 VUE XE
4WD, automatic
Moon Roof
$17,875
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
TRACTOR
TRAILERS
FREIGHTLINER
’97 MIDROOF
475 CAT & 10
speed transmission.
$12,000
FREIGHTLINER
’99 CONDO
430 Detroit, Super
10 transmission.
Asking $15,000.
‘ 88 FRUEHAUF 45’
with sides. All
aluminum, spread
axle. $6,500.
2 storage trailers.
570-814-4790
VOLVO `08 XC90
Fully loaded, moon
roof, leather, heat-
ed seats, electric
locks, excellent
condition. New
tires, new brakes
and rotors. 52,000
miles highway
$26,500/ best offer.
570-779-4325
570-417-2010 till 5
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid In Cash!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
503 Accounting/
Finance
ACCOUNTS
RECEIVABLE/
DATA ENTRY CLERK
Local fast paced
office has a full-time
position available in
the Sweet Valley/
Back Mountain area.
Accounting experi-
ence necessary.
Apply at www.back
mountaingas.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
ARCHITECTURAL SHEET
METAL WORKER
Fabricates compo-
nents by using
equipment to cut,
form, and fasten
pieces. Develops
sheet metal proj-
ects by analyzing
work orders, prints,
and completed
assembly. 10+ years
experience. Fore-
man experience.
FULL TIME (DAY).
R.N. DeMeck
ROOFING &
SIDING Inc.
CONTACT US AT:
570-842-4474
ELECTRICAL ESTIMATOR
/ SERVICE MANAGER
Local Construction
firm is seeking an
experienced esti-
mator. Knowledge
of Industrial & Com-
mercial projects,
customer relations
skills, and computer
experience a must.
Experience with
Maxwell Estimation
System a plus.
Send cover letter,
resume, references
& salary history to:
George J Hayden,
Inc., Attn: HR Dept,
235 E Maple St,
Hazleton, PA 18201
HEAVY EQUIPMENT
OPERATORS/ TRUCK
DRIVERS/ QUARRYMEN
Experienced per-
sons needed for
busy Quarry in
Northeast PA. Expe-
rience with Quarry
operations & plant
maintenance pre-
ferred. Truck drivers
must have valid CDL
and medical card.
Competitive salary
and health benefits.
Please fax resume
to: 570-643-0903
PAINTER/ LOCAL WORK
10-15 years experi-
ence. No handymen
need apply. Pay
commensurate with
experience.
Call 570-675-5873
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
CLIENT SERVICES/
TELEPHONE
RECEPTIONIST
Our busy animal
hospital is looking
for a motivated,
dependable person
to work in our client
services and tele-
phone receptionist
departments. Cus-
tomer service and
experience answer-
ing multi-line tele-
phones is preferred.
Ability to work well
with the public and
attention to detail a
must! Hours will
include weekdays,
some Saturdays
and evenings.
Please reply to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 2615
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250
521 Editorial/
Writing
FREELANCE SPORTS /
NEWS
CORRESPONDENTS
Abington Journal
Clarks Summit
The Abington
Journal has
immediate open-
ings for freelance
writers/news and
sports correspon-
dents to attend
and report on
local meetings
and sports events
in the newspaper
coverage area.
Gain clips and
valuable experi-
ence for your
future in journal-
ism or writing.
Report and write
byline stories con-
cerning sports,
local government,
school board and
other public
meetings. Pay
commensur at e
with experience.
Writing experi-
ence preferred.
Please send
resume and
writing samples
to:
The Abington
Journal
Attention:
Kristie Grier
Ceruti, Editor
211 South State St
Clarks Summit
PA 18411
Email: kgrier@
theabington
journal. com
Fax:
570-586-3980
No phone calls
please.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
REPOR REPORTER TER
P PAR ART T TIME TIME
Abington Journal
Clarks Summit
The Abington
Journal has an
immediate open-
ing for a part-time
reporter.
Gain valuable
experience for
your future in print
and online journal-
ism. Report and
write byline stories
concerning local
government,
school board and
other public meet-
ings. Assist in the
weekly production
of a community
newspaper on a
deadline. Photo-
graph events and
design creative
page layouts.
Responsibilities
include writing,
editing, photogra-
phy, daily web site
updates, page
design, general
office tasks and
other projects as
assigned by the
Editor. A reporting
position at The
Abington Journal
includes relation-
ship development
with the general
public, including
schools, commu-
nity groups, busi-
nesses and read-
ers.
Bachelor’s degree
in related field
required. Writing
experience a
must. Photogra-
phy and editing
ability helpful. Use-
ful skills include
organization,
responsibility, cre-
ativity. Pay com-
mensurate with
experience.
Please send
resume and writ-
ing samples to:
The Abington
Journal
Attention:
Kristie Grier
Ceruti, Editor
211 South State
Street, Clarks
Summit PA 18411
Email: kgrier@
theabington
journal.com
Fax:
570-586-3980
No phone calls
please. Only
candidates
considered will be
contacted.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
Hampton Inn &
Suites
Wilkes-Barre
HOUSEKEEPER
Do you believe there
is a place for every-
thing and everything
in its place? Are
you at your best
when there’s a
mess to clean up?
If you answered YES
then you may be the
person we’re look-
ing for to join the
housekeeping team.
If you are motivated,
and dependable
stop by and apply to
day:
876 Schechter Dr.
Wilkes-Barre
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL LL NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LLE LE LE LE E LLE LE EE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 7D
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
Dedicated Account Drivers
$62K Annually, $2K Sign-On Bonus
Affordable Medical Plan options with
Eligibility First Day of Employment.
Co-Driver Positions -
Home Weekly and Every Weekend
Automotive Industry Gouldsboro PA
(Scranton Metro)
TeamOne a National Logistics Organization is
currently recruiting for dedicated account Team
Drivers for their new facility that will begin oper-
ation in mid June 2011. These fully benefited posi-
tions are well compensated. The route drivers will
be delivering auto parts to dealerships throughout
the Eastern portion of the US. Qualified candi-
dates should be 23 years of age and possess a
valid CDL A drivers licenses with a minimum of
two years OTR verifiable experience. Candidates
must possess an acceptable BI and MVR. Drivers
must possess doubles and Haz Mat endorsements.
TeamOne offer a competitive salary and afford-
able benefits inclosing choice of medical plans,
dental, vision, 401K, etc. Interested candidates
can call 866-851-9902 to set up an interview.
TeamOne is an equal opportunity Employer
M/F/H/V
Excellent Beneft Package, for full time employees which includes
medical, dental, vision, tuition reimbursement defned contribution
plan. Part Time employee’s benefts are pro-rated.
Candidates interested in joining our team can forward
their resume in confdence to: jobs@ghha.org
Employment Applications are available for download
from our web site at www.ghha.org
700 E. Broad Street, Hazleton, PA 18201
Our Heart Is In Healthcare
The Greater Hazleton Health Alliance is currently
seeking the following candidates:
Information Systems Analyst
(BS required) Full Time
Cooks
(experience necessary) Full Time & Casual
Dietary Aides
Casual
RN’s - OB
Part Time
RN’s – Med./Surg.
Part Time
RN’S:
Full-Time 3p-11:30p
Part-Time Supervisor 7a-3:30p
every other weekend
Part-Time 11p-7:30a
LPN’s:
Part-Time 11p-7:30a
CNA’S:
Full-Time 11p-7a
Part-Time 11p-7a;
Part time weekends all shifts
RN’s/LPN’s/CNA’s:
Pool positions-All shifts
Apply in person to: Kingston Commons
615 Wyoming Ave., Kingston, PA 18704
570-288-5496
Or e-mail resume to: Tmines@ageofpa.com
E.O.E. Drug free workplace
Cornell Iron Works, a leading and growing manufacturer of Secu-
rity Closure Products, is seeking qualified metal workers and
assembly workers at our manufacturing facility in Mountaintop. If
you’ve had previous experience in metal fabrication or assembly
you might be the ideal candidate! Other requirements include HS
Diploma or GED, good mechanical and technical aptitude, ability
to use a tape measure, basic math and reading skills, a demon-
strated commitment to good attendance, a solid work history and
the ability to frequently lift 50 lbs. All applicants should be self-
motivated, work well in a team atmosphere & be safety-focused.
We are currently accepting applications for all shifts, with imme-
diate openings on 2nd and 3rd shift.
Cornell Iron Works offers a great work environment with a com-
petitive benefit program including health insurance, dental,
vision, 401(k), life insurance, tuition reimbursement, paid vaca-
tion and most of all, opportunity for advancement and great work
environment.
Applications will be available immediately from 8:30 am until
4:00pm. Interested applicants must apply in person during the
specified hours at:
Cornell Iron Works
Crestwood Industrial Park
24 Elmwood Road, Mountaintop, PA 18707
www.cornelliron.com
No phone calls, please Equal Opportunity Employer
METAL WORKERS
NEEDED!
Earn Extra Cash
For Just A Few
Hours A Day.
Deliver
To find a route near you and start
earning extra cash, call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Mountain Top/ Wapwallopen
$900 Monthly Profit + Tips
159 daily papers / 192 Sunday papers
Saint Mary’s Road, Blue Ridge Trail,
Pond Hill Mountain Road, Lily Lake Road,
Yocum Road
Available routes:
( No Col l ect i ons) ( N ( No CCol l l l ect i t i on ) s)
Ken Pollock
Career Minded
Lot Attendant
• Good Starting Pay
• Benefits Pkg. Available
• Excellent Working Conditions
• Dependable & Hardworking
CONTACT:
BRIAN MARCINKOWSKI
in person at the dealership
339 Highway 315
Pittston, PA
Come prepared to complete an application and participate in an
immediate interview.
Step By Step, Inc.
Cross Valley Commons
744 Kidder Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
Phone (570) 829-3477 Ext. 605
skauffman@stepbystepusa.com
EOE
Come join us
Thursday July 7, 2011 at
Our Lady of Snow’s Parish Hall.
301 S. State St., Clarks Summit,
PA. At one of our 2 sessions
beginning at 9AM or 11AM
Come see what makes
Step By Step
The Human Service
Employer of Choice!
We have Full and Part time 2nd shift and
overnight positions available working with
adults with developmental disabilities in
community home settings. Positions
available in Luzerne, Lackawanna and
Susquehanna counties. Generous benefit
package for full time employees.
Applicants must be 18 years or age or
older, have a high school diploma, and a
valid driver’s license with a good record.
JOB JOB
F FAIR! AIR!
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
FENCE INSTALLATION
TECHNICIAN
We help keep dogs
safe using “Invisible
Fence” technology.
Training provided
installing our under-
ground wire and
components. Travel
required & outdoor
labor experience a
must. Full time.
Must be courteous,
have good math
skills, clean driving
record & pass phys-
ical & drug test. Call
Harvis Interview
Service for applica-
tion: 542-5330 or
apply in person at:
Invisible Fence of
Northeast PA, 132
N. Mountain Blvd.
Mountaintop
Questions? Email
Brian at Ifnepa.jobs@
gmail.com
MECHANIC
Responsible for
daily maintenance
of equipment.
Knowledge in
hydraulic and
electrical systems.
Welding a plus.
Competitive salary
and benefits.
Solomon Container
Service
495 Stanton St.
Wilkes-Barre
570-829-2206
542 Logistics/
Transportation
OWNER OPERATORS
WANTED
Northeast Regional
Home Most Nights-
Weekends Available
Minimum 5 years
experience.
Apply Within:
Dupont Motor Line
105 North Keyser
Avenue., Old Forge,
PA 18518
ROLL OFF
TRUCK DRIVER
Class A or Class B
CDL. Minimum 2
years experience.
Full time positions.
Benefits include
company paid
health insurance,
holidays, vacation
and 401k.
Apply In person
Louis Cohen & Son
9 Fellows Avenue
Hanover Twp.
548 Medical/Health
AIDES NEEDED
Bayada Nurses
needs aides for the
Lackwanna County
area. Please call
Theresa @
570-883-5600
CRNAS
Local surgery cen-
ter looking for
CRNAs full time and
per diem coverage.
Surgery center
hours. Must have
experience.
Confidential CV to
P. O. BOX 70
MOUNTAIN TOP, PA
18707, or fax to:
570-501-6869
RN/LPN
Full Time. Private
solo practice.
Excellent benefits.
Send resumes to:
c/o Times Leader
Box 2610
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250.
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTS
needed! FCCY is
looking for people
to help meet the
growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested in
becoming foster
parents call 1-800-
747-3807. EOE.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NOW HIRING
ALL POSITIONS
No experience
needed, will train.
Part time.
Flexible hours.
Weekends a must.
Apply in person at
America’s Best
Value Inn
400 Hwy Route 315
Pittston Twp, PA
PRINTING
Kappa Graphics,
a busy publication
printer 45 years
strong, has open-
ings on all shifts/
all departments.
If you have
experience:
*On digital, sheetfed,
or web printing
presses as an oper-
ator or helper.
*In pre-press using
imposition software
*As a production
equipment mainte-
nance technician.
*In supervision, cus-
tomer service, or
scheduling.
If you have no
experience:
*But looking for
steady factory work
with room for
advancement.
Then today is your
lucky day!
Apply in person
Monday - Friday
8:30a.m.-5:00p.m.
OR send resume to:
Kappa Graphics
50 Rock Street,
Pittston, PA 18640.
551 Other
SUNDA SUNDAY Y
INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT
CONTRACT CONTRACT
HAULERS HAULERS
To deliver the
Times-Leader to
single copy loca-
tions, this
includes stores
and coin racks.
Delivery hours are
3 am to 7 am.
Must have reliable
vehicle with capa-
bility to haul a
minimum of 2000
lbs.
Call Rosemary at
570-829-7107
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
557 Project/
Program
Management
ASSISTANT
MANAGER TRAINEE
3 people needed to
assist manager.
Duties will include
recruiting, training &
marketing. Will train.
Call Mr. Scott
(570)288-4532
E.O.E
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
Slick Systems, LLC
is seeking an
experienced
Account Executive/
Sales position
in the IT industry
focused in NE PA.
Talented self-
starters please
apply online at
www.slicksystems.
com/contact-us/
employment.
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
A
Better
Career
Starts
Here!
Your chance to build
your own business with
a JAN-PRO Cleaning
Systems franchise.
‰ Extensive Training
‰ Guaranteed
Customers
‰ Guaranteed
Financing
‰ No Selling Needed
Just $950 starts your
career, so call
570-824-5774 today!
BEER DISTRIBUTOR
License available
with option to lease
building or sold
separately.
570-954-1284
BREAD ROUTE
NJ’s fastest grow-
ing bread company.
Anthony & Son’s
Bakery. Two routes
available. One in
Wilkes-Barre Area
and one in the
Leigh Area. Both
excellent routes.
Earning net
$1,600/week.
Trucks included at
$99K each. Pick up
in the Mt Pocono
Area. Call Phil at
973-625-2323
x236
BUSINESS FOR SALE!
Location:
NEPA
Gross:
$194,667.00
Net:
$90,000.00
Selling Price:
$250,000.00
17 year old opera-
tion with existing
client base. We
provide specially
made products to
order. Serious
inquires only. Send
letter of interest
to: PO Box 1271,
Kingston PA 18704
Landscaping
Business For Sale
Must have 5 years
experience in land-
scape design,
retaining walls and
all aspects of paver
work. Includes
dump truck, mini
excavator, 2 skid-
sters, trailer & 2
snow plows with a
great current snow
contract. Serious
inquiries only.
570-233-6880
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
12000 BTU, profes-
sionally cleaned
inside, coolant
topped off, start
capacitor replaced,
runs like new! $75.
570-824-0654
AIR CONDITIONER
Fedders 5000 btu
good working con-
dition $50.655-3197
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUE victorian
rocking baby cradle,
circa 1920, all origi-
nal. $250.
570-823-6829
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, old gun
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DOLL HOUSE
1960’S Tin Doll
House Superior Toy
Co Very good condi-
tion. Has some fur-
niture & the original
assembly instruc-
tions. $150. or best
offer. 570-239-6622
F KELLOGG 1883
buckboard/carriage
jack Excelsior #1
$100 or best offer.
570-262-9989
MILK CAN with lid,
painted black has
decal $30.
570-288-8689
WALKING LIBERTY
HALVES 1917-S-18-S
1920-S-36-S $70.
570-287-4135
YEARBOOKS, Kings
College - 1970,
1990, 1994, 1995,
1996. Wilkes Univer-
sity - 1988, 1989.
$10 each.
570-706-1548
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
YEARBOOKS:
Coughlin H.S. 1926,
1928, 1932, 1934,
1943, 1944, 1946,
1949, 1951, 1952,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1961, 1963; GAR
H.S.: 1934, 1935,
1936, 1937, 1945,
1946, 1955, 1956,
1961, 1972, 1973,
1975, 1976, 1984,
1980, 2005, 2006;
Meyers H.S.: 1935,
1936, 1937, 1938,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1946, 1950,
1957, 1960, 1974,
1975, 1976, 1977;
Old Forge H.S.:
1966, 1972, 1974;
Kingston H.S.: 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1944,
1945, 1948, 1949,
1962, 1964; Ply-
mouth H.S.: 1930,
1931, 1932, 1933,
1938, 1960; Han-
over H.S.: 1951,
1952, 1954; Berwick
H.S.: 1952, 1953,
1956, 1957, 1958,
1960, 1967, 1968,
1969; Lehman H.S.:
1973, 1974, 1976,
1978, 1980; Dallas
H.S.: 1966, 1967,
1968; Westmore-
land H.S.: 1952,
1953, 1954; Nanti-
coke Area H.S.:
1976, 2008; Luzerne
H.S.: 1951, 1952,
1956, 1957; West
Pittston H.S. Annual:
1925, 1926, 1927,
1928, 1931, 1932,
1959, 1960, 1954;
Bishop Hoban H.S.:
1972, 1973, 1974,
1975; West Side
Central Catholic
H.S. 1965, 1975,
1980, 1981, 1984;
Pittston H.S.: 1963;
Hazleton H.S.: 1938,
1939, 1940, 1941,
1942, 1943, 1945,
1948, 1949, 1950,
1953, 1954, 1955,
1956, 1957, 1959,
1960, 1961, 1962,
1964; Hazle Twp.
Senior H.S.: 1951,
1952. 570-825-4721
710 Appliances
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
DRYER Amana elec-
tric, white super
capacity $50.
570-287-3056
GENE’S
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
GRILL electric
ceramic 12”x12”
nonstick. Smoke
free. New in box.
$15. 570-655-2154
REFRIGERATOR
office sized, black
$45. MICRO WAVE
OVEN Amana $30.
FOOD DEHYDRA-
TOR, Ronco, 10 tray,
like new $40. JUICE
EXTRACTOR, Black
& Decker like new
$10. 570-824-7807/
570-545-7006
STOVE. Kenmore
electric. Ceramic
flat top surface,
black front, cream
color. Very good.
$150 570-457-7854
WASHER GE king
size capacity, top
load, stainless steel
tub, 19 was cycles,
3 speeds, like new
only 5 years old.
Asking $250. call
Dave 570-714-5247
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and inex-
pensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money, Let
us take a look at it
first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
712 Baby Items
FISHER PRICE
JUMPEROO with
lights & music $40.
Vibrating infant seat
$15. Pfaltzgraff
Dishes $40.
570-639-1803
FISHER PRICE sit
and spin zebra $15.
Fisher Price lights &
sound roaring
dinosaur with balls
$10. Fisher Price sit
& play piano$10.
Little Tykes ride on
giraffe $10.
570-954-1273
HIGH CHAIR blue
with animals on it .
asking $15.
570-655-6465
STROLLER: double
baby stroller $45. J.
Mason single
stroller. $10.00 Tele-
tubbies twin size fit-
ted sheet & pillow-
case $3. Call 283-
2920 after 2pm.
SWING, Newborn
$40. CLOTHING,
Newborn-12 mos,
girl, new. $5 or less.
570-825-0569
TODDLER CLOTHES
4t winter girl’s bag
full $10. Toddler 3t
winter bag full $10.
570-954-1273
WALKER, with seat,
burgundy, heavy
duty, $15 823-4941
714 Bridal Items
WEDDING GOWN
package, new, tags
on, ivory strapless,
size 10, beautiful
bead work, veil
beaded to match &
slip. Paid $600 ask-
ing $100.
570-287-3505
716 Building
Materials
BATHROOM SINK
SET: Gerber white
porcelain bathroom
sink with mirror and
medicine cabinet.
Matching set. $80.
570-331-8183
CERAMIC TILE 4
3/8”x 4 3/8”, 140
pieces. asking $25
for all. 301-7067
CLOSET DOORS (2)
Birch sliding 30” x
77” ready to hang
$40. 288-8689
716 Building
Materials
KITCHEN CABINETS
& GRANITE
COUNTERTOPS
10 ft.x10 ft., 1 year
old, Maple kitchen.
Premium Quality
cabinets, under-
mount sink. Granite
tops. Total cost
over $12,000.
Asking $3,890
570-239-9840
SINK TOP 37”X22”,
Opal, NEW $25.
570-675-3328
720 Cemetery
Plots/Lots
CEMETERY
PLOTS FOR SALE
(4) Four plots, all
together. Crestlawn
Section of Memorial
Shrine Cemetery in
Kingston Twp. $600
each. Willing to
split. For info, call
(570) 388-2773
CEMETERY PLOTS
Plymouth National
Cemetery in
Wyoming. 6 Plots.
$450 each. Call
570-825-3666
CEMETERY PLOTS
(3) together.
Maple Lawn
Section of
Dennison
Cemetery.
Section ML.
$550 each.
610-939-0194
MEMORIAL SHRINE
CEMETERY
6 Plots Available
May be Separated
Rose Lawn Section
$450 each
570-654-1596
OAKLAWN CEMETERY
4 grave sites,
fabulous location.
Purchased 20
years ago.
2 lots - $1,200
4 lots - $2,200
610-838-7727
ST. NICHOLAS’
CEMETERY,
SHAVERTOWN
6 Plots. Can be
divided. Near
Entrance. $550
each. Call
570-675-9991
724 Cellular Phones
CELL PHONE LG,
PRIME, AT&T &
charger, new. $75.
Uniden model EXA
17980, 900 mhz,
extended range,
cordless phone,
built in digital
answering machine
$99. or best offers.
570-287-2901
726 Clothing
WEDDING GOWN
accessories, good
condition $100.
570-457-3541
732 Exercise
Equipment
Exercise Bicycle
$25.
570-822-4251
EXERCISE EQUIP-
MENT: Power t ec
Shoulder press,
$175; Bench Press
$175; Lat with low &
Mid Pulley $175;
Body Solid Workout
Equ i pmen t : L eg
Extension / Leg Curl
$175; TDS Workout
Equipment: Spyder
row machine $175;
Shrug Bar $100. Call
570-239-8040
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
FURNACE: Hot air
Furnace / Beckett
Oil Gun / Duct Work
/ Tank. Firm $500.
Call 570-540-6794
KEROSENE HEATER
Corona $30. 570-
824-7807 or 570-
545-7006
STOVE Whirlpool
propane gas stove
can be converted to
natural gas, 2 years
old, great shape,
white & black $250.
Hearth Rite 3 brick
propane heater with
blower, very good
condition $150.
570-693-1921
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BATHROOM VANITY,
Mahogany with
granite top. Beauti-
ful. Must see.
Paid $1,200. Sell for
$600.
570-822-1724
Bedroom set,
Danish Modern.
Includes, full bed,
chest, triple
dresser and mir-
ror, desk, chair,
cedar chest $50.
Comforter/drapes
set for full bed.
Dark green and
coral flowered
print. Lined
drapes. $20 Com-
forter/drapes set
for twin bed.
Burgundy and blue
flowered print.
Lined drapes. $15
570-283-1406
BOOKCASE moving
out of state, must
sell 29 3/4 across,
71” tall with 4
shelves. $25.
570-313-5213
CHAIR rocks &
swivels, love seat,
pink color, good
condition. both $50.
570-655-2154
CHEST OF DRAW-
ERS, solid wood.
Very Nice! $125.
675-3328
DESK: child’s, three
side drawers 1 top
wooden $20. Coffee
table and end table
both $20.
570-208-3888
744 Furniture &
Accessories
DESKS drop down
top 3 drawers,
pecan finish, $85.
Computer with pull-
out for keyboard,
shelf for tower $15.
570-287-2517
DRESSER maple
with mirror & 3
drawers, maple
chest with 4 draw-
ers, maple night
table one drawer
$150. 654-2505
DRESSER: triple mir-
ror & dresser, night
stand, mirror folds
straight or can fold
inward, $150. Floral
lined drapery 52”w
x 72” l each panel,
matching valance
106”l x 14” d & floral
quilted full matching
bedspread $40.
Bates George
Washington off
white full bedspread
$15. Beige floral full
bedspread re-
versible both sides
different pattern
$15. Purple twin but-
terfly quilt with
matching sham
$15. Call after 3:30
pm 570-288-4809
ENTERTAINMENT
UNIT, good condi-
tion $55.
570-287-0837
HEADBOARD, Twin
Oak. $50. Night
stand, Oak. $50.
570-825-0569
KITCHEN SET dark
pine, solid wood
with 4 matching
chairs. Very good.
$50. 570-823-6829.
744 Furniture &
Accessories
Kitchen Set
Wood Table with
4 chairs, white legs
and white hutch.
$300.00 Full size
bedroom set -
dresser with mirror
and nightstand
$150.00 JVC
Surround Sound
System $80.00
(570) 256-4450
KITCHEN SET, 60” x
30” tile top table & 4
high quality chairs,
white wash. Origi-
nally $800. Sell for
$135. 878-2849
LAMP: Floor Lamp,
brand new, gold
with white shade,
$10. 570-823-4941
LAMPS (2) grey
metal & black. $25
each. 570-740-1246
LIVING ROOM FUR-
NITURE consists of
couch, chair with
ottoman, end tables
& lamps, 27” RCA
console TV all in
good condition
$200. Sears Roe-
buck sewing
machine table
model 5669673
$30. WATERFALL
BEDROOM FURNI-
TURE consists of
wardrobe, dresser,
vanity with seat and
small wooden bed-
room chair $400.
570-239-6622
744 Furniture &
Accessories
LOVE SEAT
Floral pattern $25.
570-287-3056
LOVE SEAT SOFA
cream with flowers
$20. RECLINER
blue, excellent con-
dition $75. MAPLE
KITCHEN TABLE
with chairs, good
condition $50. Small
DRESSER brown,
good condition $30.
570-868-6635
AFFORDABLE
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $149
Full sets: $169
Queen sets: $189
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
SECTIONAL NEW 2
piece, taupe, never
used, MUST SEE.
paid $1200 sell for
$800.570-287-7390
SECTIONAL with re-
cliner & sleep sofa,
LAZYBOY, ultra-
shield fabric protec-
tion. Excellent con-
dition. $990/
570-388-1106
SOFA BED and love
seat $50 like new
570-417-2074
WALL CURIO, with
shelves. Dark wood.
$25. 570-262-1136
WARDROBE CABI-
NET 1940’S vintage
light wood color,
good used condition
$100. 570-655-3197
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PAGE 8D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
NEED TOP SOIL?
Screened & Blended.
Delivery Available.
Call Back Mountain Quarry
570-256-3036
39 Prospect St • Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
10am
to 6pm
744 Furniture &
Accessories
Sofa and love seat
by Wesley Hall
flower print $295
Coffe table and
two end tables by
Thomasville $50.
3 brass Stiffel
lamps, 2 table,
one floor. $65
Antique server/
cabinet $20
stereo cabinet and
CD/DVD cabinet
$10.
570-283-1406
TABLE: 48” long
sofa table, medium
color wood $35.
2 seater child high
back bench $12. 2
country wood
shelves $8. for both.
Chrome clothes
tree $3. Large red
velvet Christmas
bows $3. for all.
Pine trees for deco-
rating, small .25.
medium .50 & large
$1. each. 301-8515
WICKER 8 PIECE
SET in good condi-
tion. Cushions
included which are
in excellent condi-
tion $200.
570-655-8475
LUZERNE CTY.
FAIR GROUNDS
July 2, 9, 16, 23
9AM TO 2PM
10 FT. FOR
ONLY $10.
VENDOR SET
UP
8AM
NO PRE-
REGISTRATION
REQUIRED!
RAIN OR SHINE
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
CHIPPER,
SHREDDER
VACUUM Troy Bilt
4-in-one chipper,
shredder, vacuum
w/ hose, 5.5HP
(used 5 times) $250
MOWER John
Deere 6.5HP, self-
propelled lawn
mower (model JS
63C) $75.
570.262.0716
LAWN MOWER
Murry 4.5 hp 20”
cut, excellent condi-
tion, great buy $55.
570-457-7854
LAWN MOWER,
Briggs & Stratton.
Engine 3.5 HP, runs
great, easy start.
$60. 570-825-3371
LAWN ROLLER: 934
Water Fill lawn roller
$100. 262-9989.
Patrick & Deb’s
Lawn Care
See our ad under
Call An Expert
1162 Landscape &
Garden
TRIMMER: Crafts-
man electric string
trimmer, works. 3
years old $10.
570-693-1072
WEED EATER, gas
powered. $20.
570-690-8009
754 Machinery &
Equipment
HAULMARK ‘07
TRAILER 6’X14’
Like new with
electric brakes,
new tires and
reinforced tongue.
$2700.
570-239-5457
MOTOR: 6HP Single
Phase 220 electric
motor $300.
570-239-6622
756 Medical
Equipment
HOSPITAL BED with
side rails, trapeze,
complete. Good
condition, $500.
Folding Wheelchair
with removable leg
rest. $100. Must
pick up items.
570-235-1106
POWER CHAIR - full
size with cover and
rack for walker.
$400.
570-288-3059
758 Miscellaneous
AIR MATTRESS
queen size with
electric pump $30,
ROTISSERIE Broil
King, fits gas grill
$15. 570-696-2008
ANTIFREEZE 5 gal-
lons $8. each or all
for $35. 570-l 283-
2920 after 2pm.
BARREL,
wooden.
53 gallon.
Excellent
condition $195.
570-876-3830
BEDLINER: 89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
cab $30. Four bar-
rel carb running
from Chevy motor
$50. 3 suitcases in
excellent shape
$40. 90 feet flexible
fencing, new $50.
Five storm windows
$50. 570-740-1246
758 Miscellaneous
BICYCLES Girls 20”
$40.
570-822-4251
BOOKS: An invita-
tion to the White
House. At home
with Hilary Clinton”
published 2000.
Jack & Jackie
Kennedy portrait of
an American Mar-
riage” published
1996. Memoirs of
Barbara Bush pub-
lished 1994. Mem-
oirs of Nancy Rea-
gan published 1989
Sarah Palin Going
Rogue” published
2004 Secret Live Of
Marilyn Monroe”
published 1985. All
for $45.
Call Jim 655-9474
BOXES: plastic
boxes 2 1/4 “w x 2
1/4”l x 3”h without
lids total of 94 all for
$8. 570-735-6638
CANES & WALKING
STICKS. New batch
Different sizes and
shapes. Made from
the roots of Slippery
Maple Trees. Over
20 available at $4. &
& $5. 735-2081.
CEDAR CHEST 80
years old, CASWELL
RUNYAN CO.
41”x21” carved legs.
$160. 570-675-5723
COMPRESSOR,
Campbell Hausfeld,
20 gal tank. Made in
USA. Next to new.
$120. 570-825-3371
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVER
ITEMS
Dresser - 6 drawers
with mirror $25. 4
drawer dresser
chest, matches
dresser $25. Girl’s
20” 2 wheel bike
$10. 570-954-4715
GARAGE SALE
LEFT OVER
ITEMS
Wagon, Radio Flyer,
$40, Piano, Pearl
River, $1200, 2
wheelchairs. $100
each, floor steamer,
$20, drop in fridge/
freezer, $40, Base-
ball pitching target,
$20, Barbie collec-
tion (15) - $400 for
set, Pinewood
Derby Timer and
test track, $40.
570-474-0191
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
DOLL COLLECTION
and ACCESSORIES
$1-$12. Lead Miners
and Firemen $4.-
$10. Tools, Nails.
New comforter &
shams - double
queen, $10. Pasta
Machine.
Call 570-288-0296
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
Solid wood table
$25. 4 dining chairs
$40. TV Teddy + 6
videos $18. 20”
girl’s bike $10.
Graco portable
playpen $10. Type-
writer $5. Cat litter
vox $8. Doll house
$3. Ceramic canis-
ter set, duck design
& spice rack $5.
570-696-3368
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVER
ITEMS
TIRES 2 Michelin
Symmetry all sea-
son tires, less than
5,000 miles, P225/
60R 16-975 $120.
SKI BOOTS DAL-
BELLO NX6.5 com-
fort fit twin overlap
ski boots, worn
once, size 9, ladies
$40. 570-824-1241
GLASS DOOR. 4
way glass door for
bath tub. $25
570-331-8183
MANUALS: Chilton &
Motor Manuals for
auto/truck repair,
ranging from 1960 -
1980. $12. each.
Truck Door for 1973-
1980 Passenger
side Dodge Pickup.
New, never used.
$100. Pinto Trailer
hook for dump truck
$40. Radiator for
1950/54 model
Chevy Truck $75. or
best offer. Tail
Lights, new, for
Ford dump or box
truck brackets
included 2 for $25.
Auto repair manuals
1950-1985 $12.
each. Electric chain
saw sharpener,
made in USA $30.
570-823-6829
POLICE SCANNER,
200 channel hand
held. Excellent Con-
dition. $75. Firm.
570-371-3367
SAFE: Mosler fire
resistant safe $50.
570-287-0837
SNOW TIRES: 2
unmounted P195
65R15. Like new,
deep tread. $99.
570-823-0415
Sump Pump - Rigid,
1/2hp, pedestal
sump pump. Excel-
lent condition. $100.
570-655-2192
TIRES: 4 WINTER-
MARK Magna/Grip
P225/60R16 mud
and snow tires for
sale. Original price
over $100 each.
Only used one sea-
son. $100 for all 4.
call 570-829-1903.
758 Miscellaneous
Upholstery Shop
Liquidation Sale
Stripping Tanks,
Industrial Sewing
Machines, Material
& much more.
A LARGE VARIETY OF ITEMS!!
Call for Appointment
570-909-7334
760 Monuments &
Lots
GRAVE LOT
Near baby land at
Memorial Shine in
Carverton.
$400. Call
570-287-6327
762 Musical
Instruments
AMP - Marshall JMD
102 combo amp.
100 watts with 2x12”
Celestion speakers.
$625. 283-2552
DRUM SET WJM
percussion 5 piece
set complete with
cymbals, throne,
metallic blue, slight-
ly used. 4229. Radio
Shack MD-1121 syn-
thesizer with stand
like new $125.
570-574-4781
GUITAR, Jackson
Kelly, excellent con-
dition; works great.
Has Straplock sys-
tem & Floyd Rose 2
trem. The only
blemish is a tiny
spot on the top of
the fin where the
paint is off. Paid
$400. selling for
$100. Call 570-331-
2176, ask for Scott.
GUITAR: Fender
accoustic guitar,
new with case &d
instructional materi-
al $175.l 655-9472
766 Office
Equipment
FILE CABINET desk-
top, 15”x18”, holds
hanging folders,$15.
570-655-2154
PRINTERS HP Office
Jet model 6310, all
in one, color printer,
fax, scanner, copier,
new in box $99. HP
Deskjet model
3520V portable ink
jet color printer with
new HP#27 car-
tridge $75. or best
offers. 287-2901
768 Personal
Electronics
Kindle 3rd genera-
tion, 3G/WIFI, Like
New in box,
includes USB/
charger, case, pur-
chased new Oct.
2010, balance of
manufacturer &
extended warranty
till Oct 2012, 1 White
1 Graphite, $175.
each, must sell.
570-592-3072
770 Photo
Equipment
MOVIE CAMERA old
Bell & Howell 8mm
double run Sport-
ster spring loaded
$60. 570-675-5723
772 Pools & Spas
POOL FILTER. DE
filter with 1HP pump
& chlorinator. Hay-
ward model EC-40.
Older Model. $20.
570-693-1072
SWIMMING POOL
STEP2 BIG SPLASH
CENTER with slide
approXimately
45”wx66”lx11”deep
$35. 570-287-3056
774 Restaurant
Equipment
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Bev Air 2 door
refrigerator/ sand-
wich prep table,
Model SP48-12,
$1300. For details
Call 570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
SOMERSET TURN
OVER MACHINE -
Model # SPM45,
$500; ALSO, Bunn
Pour Over Coffee
Machine, Model #
STF15, $225
For more info, call
570-498-3616
RESTAURANT
EQUIPMENT
Somerset Dough
Sheeter, Model
CAR-100. Only
1 available. $1,500
Call for more info
570-498-3616
776 Sporting Goods
BASKETBALL
HOOP; Great condi-
tion, asking $90.
Call 570-331-8183
BICYCLE, girl’s Ral-
lyee Charm 12” with
training wheels,
perfect 3 to 5 years
old just learning to
ride, easy rolling
pneumatic tires,
double chain guard
protection, $15.
570-709-3146
BIKE girl’s 16” Tork-
er, wild cherries,
light blue with bas-
ket & training
wheels. $20.
570-287-3056
BOOTS: Burton
snow board boots,
size 9. Excellent
Condition $60. Call
Mark at 570-301-
3484 or Allison 570-
631-6635.
BOW: Hoyt Havotec
compound with all
accessories &
arrows $100. Golf
clubs: Calloway
Diablo 5 iron $35.
Nike IC putter with
oversize grip $35.
Srixon 56 deg.
wedge $35.
Call 655-9472
776 Sporting Goods
FISHING POLE new,
pink, turn handle,
lights up, Roddy
Hunter $20. firm.
570-235-6056
GLOVE: right hand-
ed peewee baseball
glove $8. 570-283-
2920 after 2pm.
GOLF CLUBS:
youth, complete -
5,6,7,8,9, SW, driv-
er, 3 wood hybrid,
putter, stand up
bag. $75.
570.262.0716
GOLF Wedges, Tay-
lor Plade 52
degrees $35. Titleist
Vokey 58 degrees
$35/ Hybrids Taylor
Plade R7 draw 25
degrees 425. Taylor
made R7 draw 28
degrees $25.
570-735-4824
KITCHEN/”KING”
UNIT, ideal for cabin,
cottage or camper.
Two-burner electric
stove, stainless
steel sink & under-
counter refrigerator
with freezer (Dou-
glas Crestlyn Int’l).
Unit is 4’W, 23”D,
41”H. Covered with
formica lid. $150.
570-735-2694
SKIS: USA Super S
Volart 72IN Skis with
Salomon 900S alum
bindings $99.
570-287-2901
778 Stereos/
Accessories
STEREO SYSTEM
with two tall speak-
ers. Holds 6 CDs.
$75. 570-262-1136
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TELEVISION. RCA
XL-100 13”. Like
new, remote, $45.
570-698-5448
TELEVISION: 32”
Color Zenith. Works
great. $50.
570-262-1136
TELEVISION: GE.
28” works good,
needs remote $90.
570-740-1246
784 Tools
COMPOUND MITER
SAW, 10” blade,
Chicago Electric
Power Co., 15 AMP,
5300 rpm, includes
dust bag, extension
wings, 60 tooth car-
bide blade, 9 posi-
tion stops, spring
loaded guard, table
tilts 45 degrees left
& right, brand new,
box shows some
wear $60. TABLE
SAW, Delta 10”,
120V, 13 AMP, Model
36-540 Type 2,
good condition. $75.
570-735-2694
FLASHLIGHT/DRILL
Ryobi 18 volt cord-
less drill/ flashlight
combo with charg-
er. Excellent condi-
tion. $50. 655-9472
HEDGE TRIMMER:
Garden Groomer
Pro with bag, 3
years old, like new,
$200. 654-0956
WELDER, Lincoln,
Electric. $75
570-675-3328
786 Toys & Games
DAWN FASHION
SHOW STAGE in
original box, from
Topper toys. $75.
570-823-6829.
LITTLE TIKES
climber/slide $25.
Little Tikes slide $5.
Today’s Kids picnic
table $10. Girl’s
Schwinn bike, 26”
$65. 570-654-2657
PLAY YARD Pres-
sure treated play
yard with six level
tower connected
with swinging
bridge to a two level
tower, swings, slid-
ing board and bas-
ketball backboard.
footprint 18 ft. by 10
ft. FREE to chil-
dren’s organization
or family.
570-885-1122
PLAYHOUSE Little
Tikes $30. WAGON,
green, seats 2 $25.
570-592-8915
TRAIN SET: Lionel
Dodge Motorsport
Set LIO11933 O27
Gauge. Brand New,
$125. 570-574-4781
788 Stereo/TV/
Electronics
SONY 5 piece
speaker & base unit
$25. 570-824-7807
/ 570-545-7006
790 Swimming
Pools/Hot Tubs
POOL SKIMMER
with telescoping
pole handle, vacu-
um attachment
included. $20.
HAYWARD PUMP
for above ground
swimming pool, 2
years old, hair & lint
pot included. Rated
at 1 horse power &
60 gallons/minute.
Excellent condition.
$125. SAND FILTER
in great condition, 2
years old, sand &
mounting base
included $125.
POOL LADDER for
4ft. above ground
swimming pool,
great condition.
$20. 570-690-8009
POOL. Family. New
in box. Strong
durable vinyl
103”x69”x18”. $6.
570-235-6056
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
NINTENDO DSI
black, like new
$75. 570-407-2775
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
The Vi deo
Game St or e
28 S. Main W.B.
Open Mon- Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929 /
570-941-9908
$$ CASH PAID $$
VI DE O GAME S &
S YS TE MS
Highest $$ Paid
Guaranteed
Buying all video
games &
systems. PS1 & 2,
Xbox, Nintendo,
Atari, Coleco,
Sega, Mattel,
Gameboy,
Vectrex etc.
DVD’s, VHS & CDs
& Pre 90’s toys,
The Video
Game Store
1150 S. Main
Scranton
Mon - Sat,
12pm – 6pm
570-822-9929
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
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WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 991- 7448
( 570) 48GOLD8
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orwol d
Mon- Sat
10am - 8pm
Cl osed Sundays
Highest Cash Pay
Outs Guaranteed
We Pay At Least
78% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
Shots, neutered,
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only.
FRIENDLY
HOUSECATS
(2) 4 year old males,
neutered & de-
clawed, extremely
friendly. FREE to lov-
ing home, free cat
carrier for each cat,
good with dogs.
570-362-8182
FREE KITTENS
Orange and gray
tabbies. Blue eyes.
Approx 5 weeks
old. Shickshinny.
542-2126 or
441-3481
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
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Place your pet ad
and provide us your
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This will create a
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online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
CHIHUAHUA FOX TERRIER
10 weeks old. Very
friendly. 1 female
$225. Call
(570) 371-3441
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES. 3 months,
vet checked, guar-
anteed, family
raised. 2 females &
1 male.
$450 each.
(570) 736-6518
(845) 913-8766
GERMAN SHEPHERD/
LAB PUPPIES
3 males, $350 each.
1 female, $400.
All Black.
CHIHUAHUA PUPS
1 female $375, 1
male $325. Black &
tan. Great lap dogs.
All puppies ready
now. Vet certified.
No papers.
570-648-8613
GOLDEN RETRIEVERS
Registered puppies,
from excellent
bloodlines. Family
raised. First shots &
wormed. $395. Call
570-374-2190 or
570-716-1050
Grand Opening!
Chihuahuas, Poms,
Dachshunds,
Beagles, Shih Tzus,
Bostons, Maltese,
Rotties, Yorkies,
Westies, Labs,
Huskies & more!
570-453-6900 or
570-389-7877
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
Registered and
ready to go! Parents
on premises. Blue.
Vet Checked
570-617-4880
LAB BEAGLE MIX
PUPPIES
Family Raised, vet
checked, 1st shots.
Ready now. $100.
Call for further infor-
mation at:
570-204-5981
LAB PUPS
AKC. Chocolate &
Black. English,
stocky, big blocky
heads, hips/eyes
clear. Ready Now.
570-549-6800
www.emlabradors.com
POMERANIAN PUPPY
Male. 9 weeks old.
Sable. 1st shots,
wormed & health
check. Paper & out-
door trained. $350.
Call 570-829-1735
SAINT BERNARD
1 year old.
Neutered. Shots &
house broken. Very
loveable. Can’t
keep. $500.
(570) 379-3898
(570) 606-9312
SHIH TZU
female sixteen
weeks old. All shots
and dewormed.
$500. 570-313-7148
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SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Parents on premises
Shots Current.
$500 -Shih-Tzus
$400 -Shih-Tzu mix’s
570-401-1838
YORKIE AKC TEACUP
Female. Black and
gold, 10 weeks, 1st
shots and wormed.
Excellent disposi-
tion and a teddy
bear face! Pictures
available. $900
570-436-5083
845 Pet Supplies
BIRD CAGES:
Small $10.
Large $20.
570-288-4852
DOG CAGE, medium
size. $50.
570-675-3328
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
ASHLEY
82 Manhattan St
Great house in a
great neighbor-
hood, just waiting
for a new owner!!
3 bedrooms, hard-
wood floors, built-
ins, 4 season sun-
room, 1 &1/2 bath,
covered deck,
stone bar-b-que
& a fenced yard.
Family of 5 lived
comfortably in this
home. Contractor
owned and nicely
cared for. A lot
of house for
the money.
MLS 11-225
$68,000
Ask for Holly
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL
ESTATE
570-821-7022
AVOCA
REDUCED!
314 Packer St.
Newly remodeled 3
bedroom home with
1st floor master, 1.5
baths, detached
garage, all new sid-
ing , windows, shin-
gles, water heater,
kitchen and bath-
rooms. A must
see house! For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$109,900
MLS 11-73
Call Tom
570-262-7716
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new apartment?
Classified lets
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BACK MOUNTAIN
912 Lewis Road
Remodeled kitchen,
hardwood floors,
master bedroom
with French doors
out to deck, lower
level finished w/tiled
bath. Private 1 acre
lot. MLS# 11-2057
$165,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
BEAR CREEK
241 Laurie Lane
Privacy within
walking distance of
swim/rec area in
historic Bear Creek
Village. This 3,954
s.f., 5 bedroom,
3 1/2 bath home
offers living room
with fireplace,
hardwood floors,
family room with
stone fireplace &
vaulted ceiling;
dining; granite
kitchen with break-
fast room; studio
with cathedral ceil-
ing, 2nd kitchen
& greenhouse.
Paneled rec room
in lower level.
All this plus a
lake view.
$390,000
MLS# 11-1646
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
2992 Laurel Run Rd
Stunning jewel
snuggled on 1 acre
lot bordering state
game lands. Rec
room can be
re-converted to
garage. Stylish 4
bedroom, 3 bath
modern home can
be heated for only
$700/year. Entertain
or relax in our 600
S/F + family room
featuring a coal
stove, built in
aquarium, and full
wet bar. State of
the art alarm sys-
tem. Enjoy serenity
on the patio or the
10x17 deck and only
minutes from town.
Sold “AS-IS”
MLS 11-555
$164,900
Call Sandy
Rovinski
570-288-0770
Ext. 25
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
475 East Ave.
Top to bottom re-do
for this beautiful 3
bedroom, 1.75 bath,
2 story home locat-
ed in the Meadow
Run Lake communi-
ty of Bear Creek.
Tranquil setting,
modern interior all
re-done, granite
countertops in the
kitchen, exterior
with new landscap-
ing and stone patio
with lake frontage
to name a few!
MLS 11-1643
$329,900
Call Jay A.
Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
BEAR CREEK
A A RARE FIND RARE FIND
This contemporary
2 story is rare find
for the price. Enter
in through French
doors into a dramat-
ic entrance foyer
with wood floors
and staircase. Off
the foyer is
an office,
G r e a t
r o o m
w i t h
s t o n e
fireplace &
wet bar lead-
ing onto rear deck.
Just off the great
room is a custom
kitchen with maple
cabinets, granite
tops, island and
desk area. The 1st
floor master bed-
room offers a full tile
bath with Jacuzzi
and walk in tile
shower, plus spa-
cious walk in closet.
Three additional
bedrooms and 2 full
baths Plus an over-
sized 3 car garage
all nestled on 2+
acres just off Route
115. $389,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654
P
E
N
D
IN
G
BERWICK
1419 First Ave
2 story 4 bedroom,
2 bath. 2,244 sq ft.
$55,900.
MLS 11-521
570-696-2468
BLAKESLEE
NEW PRICE
37 Chestnut Road
(Old Farm Estates)
Custom built solid
brick 4 bedroom,
3.5 baths Colonial
style home with an
open floor plan on
1+ acre lot in the
Poconos. A few of
the amenities
include central A/C.
2 Master bedrooms
each with bath
room and fireplace,
ultramodern
kitchen, hardwood
floors throughout,
cathedral ceiling
and 2 car garage.
MLS #11-653
$435,000
Call Kim
570-466-3338
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
(Franklin Twp.)
Orange Road
Lush setting on
almost 5 acres with
magnificent stone
walls, fish pond,
house, garage,
barn and separate
offices with storage
area. 4,400 SF with
9 rooms, 4 bed-
rooms and 3 full
baths, 2 half baths
on 3 floors.
Reduced to
$379,000
MLS# 11-1628
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
DALLAS
119 Jackson St
4 year old custom
built 2 story, foyer,
dining room w/cus-
tom moldings, fami-
ly room w/stone
fireplace, oak
kitchen cabinets
w/granite tops,
French doors out to
patio - Interior
recently painted
throughout.
MLS# 11-1693.
$299,900
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-288-9371
DALLAS
119 Midland Drive
Custom Built Ranch
Home -The ranch
home is IN
DEMAND! This one
offers everything
you are looking for!
Plenty of space for
in-law quarters, 4
bedrooms, cherry
kitchen, sunroom,
recreation room
with 12 seat oak
bar. This home
includes an
attached 2 car
garage plus a
detached custom
garage that can fit
up to 12 cars or
boat storage, only 5
miles to beautiful
Harveys Lake - 1 yr
Home Warranty.
All this on 4 ACRES
of serenity in the
heart of Dallas
$419,000
MLS #11-155
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
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DALLAS
20 Fox Hollow Drive
Well maintained
two story with
fully finished lower
level awaits its
new family. 4 bed-
room, 3.5 bath,
2 fireplaces. One
year home warranty
included. Wonderful
neighborhood.
Double lot.
$310,000
MLS #11-1806
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
20 OAK DRIVE
WOW! This home
offers replacement
windows, newer hot
water heater, gas
fireplace, hardwood
floors, sun porch,
large fenced rear
yard, flagstone
patio, heated in-
ground pool, fin-
ished lower level,
located in the
Lehman School Dis-
trict. Just minutes
from Harveys Lake,
why not join the
Beach Club this
summer! It is a
MUST SEE HOME!
MLS#11-1258
$159,500
Bob Cook 696-6555
Jill Jones 696-6550
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DALLAS
211 Hillside One
Enjoy the comforts
& amenities of living
in a beautifully
maintained town-
house, 3/4 Bed-
rooms, family room
with fireplace out to
deck. Bright & airy
kitchen, finished
lower level, Tennis,
Golf & Swimming
are yours to enjoy
& relax. Mainte-
nance free living.
$224,900
MLS# 10-1221
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DALLAS
3 Crestview Dr.
NEW LISTING!
Well-constructed
and maintained
sprawling multi-
level with 5,428
square feet of living
space. Living room
& dining room with
hardwood floors
& gas fireplace;
eat-in kitchen with
island; florida room.
5 bedrooms, 4
baths; 2 half-baths.
Lower level rec
room with wet bar
& fireplace. leads
to heated in-ground
pool. Beautifully
landscaped 2
acre lot.
$575,000
MLS# 11-1798
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
400 Shrine View
Elegant & classic
stone & wood
frame traditional in
superb location
overlooking adja-
cent Irem Temple
Country Club golf
course. Living room
with beamed ceiling
& fireplace; large
formal dining room;
cherry paneled sun-
room; 4 bedrooms
with 3 full baths &
2 powder rooms.
Oversized in-ground
pool. Paved,
circular drive.
$550,000
MLS# 11-939
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
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IN CLASSIFIED!
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It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 9D
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
Saturday, July 9
th
At 1:00 PM
88 Lockhart Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
HURRY!!!
Surprising 3 Bedroom, 2 Story Single
Family Home. Freshly Painted Interior,
Newer Carpeting, Modern Bath, Full
Basement and Covered Front Porch
SAVE $$$
800-262-3050
www.auctionworldusa.com
Auction World USA, Inc.
PA License #AY-59-L
Bank Ordered
Auction
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
6 Morris Circle
“Best Buy”…Not the
store, but this ele-
gant home in Over-
brook Estates, Dal-
las. Recently
reduced! Three fin-
ished floors with
over 5,000SF from
the grand two-story
foyer and hardwood
staircase to the fin-
ished lower level
with gym, game
room, guest bed-
room and bath.
Your purchase will
be an investment in
luxury! One year
new 20x42 Skovish
Brothers in-ground
kidney shaped pool.
Cherry kitchen with
upgraded appli-
ances. 5 bedrooms,
5 baths, first floor
den. A must see!
MLS#11-1067
$599,000
Maribeth Jones
696-6565
DALLAS
705 The Greens
Impressive, 4,000
sq. ft., 3 bedroom,
5 1/2 bath condo
features large living
room/dining room
with gas fireplace.,
vaulted ceilings
and loft; master
bedroom with his
& hers baths;
2 additional bed-
rooms with private
baths; great eat-
in kitchen with
island; den; family
room; craft room;
shop. 2 decks.
''Overlooking the
ponds''
$499,000
MLS# 11-872
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
DALLAS
NEW LISTING!
Secluded on a hill
but part of High
Point Acres. 2 story
Colonial, 4 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths.
Large family room
with fireplace and
sliding door to
screened porch. 2
car garage. Central
AC. Wooded lot.
$275,000.
11-1077
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Nice 2 bedroom
ranch in Great
Neighborhood!
Large Living Room,
sunny eat-in kitchen
& oversized bath.
Perfect place to
start out or down-
size to.
REDUCED PRICE
$50,000
MLS# 10-4624
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
DALLAS
Private setting, con-
temporary home
with 3 bedrooms, 2
1/2 baths, attached
garage, living room,
dining room, mod-
ern eat in kitchen,
fireplace in family
room,large deck.
MLS 11-210,
$259,000
Call Susan Pall @
(570) 696-0876
LEWITH & FREEMAN
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Reduced Price!
3 bedroom ranch,
refinished hard-
wood floors. Stone
fireplace and living
room. Newer deck,
roof & heat. Close
to Dallas schools. In
New Goss Manor.
$149,900.
10-2787
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Spacious floor plan.
Hardwood floors
throughout. Recent-
ly remodeled
kitchen & master
bath. Sunroom
heated. Overlooking
a beautiful waterfall.
MLS # 11-1781
$237,000.
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DUPONT
Quality 3 bedroom
ranch home on
large lot. Family
room with cathedral
ceiling, gas fire-
place, 2 car
garage. Access to
flagstone patio from
family room and
master bedroom.
Above ground pool
with deck.
$165,000
MLS# 10-2905
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DURYEA
122 Lackawanna Ave
Just a few more
finishing touches
will complete the
renovations. This
home has a new
kitchen, new
drywall & new
carpeting.
$59,000
MLS #11-1502
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DURYEA
96 Main St.
Updated inside and
out, 3 unit home in
move in condition.
Live in one apart-
ment and the other
2 can pay the mort-
gage. Modern
kitchens and baths.
Large 2nd floor
apartment has 3
bedrooms, large
eat in kitchen, and
1.5 baths and laun-
dry room. 1st floor
units have 1 bed-
room and 1 bath. 2
car garage and 4
off street parking
spaces. For more
info and photos, go
to www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1447
$129,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041 or
Angie
570-885-4896
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED!!
Three bedroom
ranch home,
completely
renovated (tile,
hardwood, gran-
ite, carpet, roof,
Stainless steel
appliances) two
baths, Dining
room, Living
room, Family
Room, Laundry,
Garage, office,
rec room, utility
room, lot is 75 x
150. Over 2,500
sq ft of living
space, finished
basement.
$159,900.
Call Jim
570-212-2222
EDWARDSVILLE
9 Laurel Street
Ranch with newer
roof, newer win-
dows, 100 amp
service, & main-
tained furnace. Cur-
rently rented, this
property would
make a nice invest-
ment. MLS# 11-1108
$30,000
Call Stacey L
Lauer Mobile:
570-262-1158
EDWARDSVILLE
9 Williams St.
Large 4 bedroom
home with nice rear
deck, replacement
windows, off street
parking. Possible
apartment in sepa-
rate entrance.
Loads of potential.
For more info and
pictures visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2091
$69,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
EXETER
Sunday 1pm-3pm
362 Susquehanna Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular, 2
story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms and 1.5
baths, new rear
deck, full front
porch, tiled baths
and kitchen, granite
countertops, all
Cherry hardwood
floors throughout,
all new stainless
steel appliances
and lighting, new oil
furnace, washer
dryer in first floor
bath. Great neigh-
borhood, nice yard.
$174,900
Owner financing
available.
570-654-1490
EXETER TWP.
Come & see this
stately brick 2-story
with 4 bedrooms, 2
full & 2 half baths.
In-ground pool,
covered patio,
finished lower level,
fireplace & wood
stove, 3-car
attached garage, 5-
car detached
garage w/apart-
ment above.
$739,000
Joe Mantione
613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
FALLS
REDUCED!
RR1, Box 297
MAJESTIC VIEW!
3 bedroom brick
Ranch home nes-
tled on approxi-
mately an acre of
well groomed river-
front land with
breathtaking scenic
views, cascading
tree lines and the
legendary cliffs of
Falls. Beautiful bird
and wildlife to daz-
zle the eye and
excellent fishing
and hunting for your
enjoyment. Living
room w/fireplace,
family room, full
heated basement,
riverfront deck,
central A/C and
much more. A one
of a a kind find.
Must see!
MLS #10-3751
$182,000
Call Debbie
McGuire
570-332-4413
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
FORTY FORT
1301 Murray St.
Very nice duplex,
fully rented with
good return in great
neighborhood. For
more information
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2149
$129,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
FORTY FORT
1382 Murray Street
Extensively remod-
eled with new
kitchen, stainless
steel appliances, 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, new gas fur-
nace, central air, 2
car garage, walk-up
attic. Gorgeous
home with new win-
dows, vinyl siding,
doors, laminate
floors, new rugs &
ceramic tile & much
more. $179,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
FORTY FORT
CHECK CHECK THIS OUT! THIS OUT!
NEW PRICE! NEW PRICE!
1509 Wyoming Ave.
A large private back
yard provides a
peaceful and
serene setting! This
immaculate house is
located on presti-
gious Wyoming
Avenue close to
everything you
need! Central air,
hardwood floors
throughout, modern
kitchen, laundry
room, 1.5 baths are
just a few of the
many features.
Move in condition
and all appliances
are included.
For more details
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-604
$172,900
Call Kim
570-466-3338
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
599 Shawnee St
This Duplex will let
you live in one unit
and rent out the
other to help with
the mortgage pay-
ment. It was once a
single family home
and can most likely
be converted back.
Desirable location.
This is an estate and
there is no seller’s
disclosure. 11-1223
$69,500
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
710 Church Street
Exceptionally well
care for home in
move in condition.
Everything is new,
roof, siding, win-
dows, porches,
kitchen and baths.
MLS 11-2309
$129,000
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Reduced!
Bi-Level. 1,750 sq ft.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths, 1 car garage.
New carpeting,
paint, etc. Large lot.
Asking $99,900.
Deremer Realty
570-477-1149
HANOVER TWP.
103 Claymont Ave.
Just starting out or
looking to down-
size? This is the
home for you! This
3 bedroom home
offers a finished
lower level with
coal stove, large
fenced rear yard,
spacious
kitchen/dining area.
Worth a look!
MLS#11-1793
$129,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
HANOVER TWP.
146-148 Regal St
Well located
in Hanover Twp.
just off the San
Souci Highway.
Newer kitchens,
large baths & 3
bedrooms each.
Both sides are
presently occupied.
Call for appointment
$79,300
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
2 story in good
condition with 3
bedrooms, 1 full
bath, eat-in
kitchen, 2 car
garage, fenced
yard & new
gas heat.
MLS # 10-4324
$59,900
Call Ruth at
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
HANOVER TWP.
26 Spring Street
Single family home
located on a well
manicured fenced
corner lot. This
home provides
paved off street
parking & a single
car detached
garage. Entering
the front door
you’re greeted by
hardwood floors,
updated windows
& a pleasant floor
plan. Seller will
pay 3% towards
closing costs.
Call for appointment
$79,900
MLS# 10-4598
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
275 Phillips Street
Well kept 2
bedroom ranch with
new kitchen, fenced
yard, one car
garage.
$79,900
MLS #11-638
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
HANOVER TWP.
290-292
Lee Park Ave.
Very nice all brick
double block has
front and back
porches. Beautiful
yard with mature
plantings, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
detached 1 car
garage in back of
the home.
MLS#11-1988
$135,000
Christine Pieczynski
696-6569
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. COnvenient
location. To settle
estate. Affordable
@ $39,500
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
8 Diamond Ave.
Loads of space in
this modernized tra-
ditional home. 3rd
floor is a large bed-
room with walk-in
closet. Modern
kitchen, family room
addition, deck over-
looking large corner
lot. Not just a
starter home but a
home to stay
in and grow! For
more informaton
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-622
$122,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HARDING
105 Circle Drive
Well maintained
Bi-Level on nicely
landscaped corner
lot. Finished lower
level with gas
fireplace & sliding
doors to private
patio. Totally fenced
yard, 1 car garage.
$149,900
MLS# 11-1271
Call Cathy
(570) 696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
HARVEYS LAKE
13 Carpenter Road
Make it your own!
The potential has
not yet been fully
realized with this
home. Some reno-
vations were start-
ed, now bring your
hammer and finish
it up. This home is
on a large lot locat-
ed just a short walk
from the lake and
beach area.
MLS#11-1442
464,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
143B GROVE ST.,
Like to entertain?
This floor plan lends
itself to that with a
large kitchen, formal
dining and living
rooms. A car enthu-
siast? This garage
will hold 4 cars
comfortable. Enjoy a
hot tub, this workout
room has one and
French doors open-
ing to the rear yard.
Spacious bed-
rooms, wood burn-
ing fireplace. The list
goes on and on! Did
I mention you are
just ¼ of a mile from
the lake?!
MLS#11-1994
$249,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
HARVEYS LAKE
Baird St.
Ranch, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 bath
rooms, eat-in
kitchen, dining
room, living room,
bonus room, fin-
ished basement,
deck. Two car
garage. Double
Lot.
www.harveyslake
house.com
$189,900 Call
(570) 639-2358
HARVEYS LAKE
Pole 131
Lakeside Drive
Lake front home
with 2-story livable
boathouse! Year
round home offers
fireplace, cathedral
ceiling, cedar panel-
ing. Boat house has
a patio for grilling,
open dock space as
well as enclosed
area for your boat.
2nd floor is a studio
style kitchenette/
living room, full bath
plus a deck. Take a
look! MLS#11-1379
$399,900
Bob Cook 262-2665
Jill Jones 696-6550
HARVEYS LAKE
Pole 165
Lakeside Drive
A truly unique
home! 7,300 sq.ft.
of living on 3 floors
with 168' of lake
frontage with
boathouse.
Expansive living
room; dining room,
front room all with
fireplaces.
Coffered ceiling;
modern oak kitchen
with breakfast
room; Florida room;
study & 3 room &
bath suite. 5
bedrooms & 4
baths on 2nd.
Lounge, bedroom,
bath, exercise room
& loft on 3rd floor.
In-ground pool & 2-
story pool house.
AC on 3rd floor.
$1,149,000
MLS# 10-1268
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
HARVEYS LAKE
Ridge Ave
Modern 2 story
home on 1 acre.
Duplex. Excellent
starter home,
retirement home,
or investment
property Public
sewer,deep well.
$109,000
Negotiable
570-287-5775
or 570-332-1048
HARVEYS LAKE
POLE 265
LAKESIDE DRIVE
44’ of lakefront!
This home offers
recently remodeled
kitchen with Cherry
cabinetry, granite
counters. Hard-
wood floors through
the kitchen and din-
ing area. Stone fire-
place, enclosed
porch to enjoy the
lake view! The
boathouse has a
second level patio,
storage area, plus
dock space. A must
see! MLS#11-2018
$369,900
Bob Cook
570-262-2665
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
Main Road
Country Living
At It’s Best.
Well Maintained
farmhouse on 6+
acres. Garage,
stream. Easy
access to Route 11.
Affordable at
REDUCED TO
$159,500
Call Jim
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HUNLOCK CREEK
New construction,
3 bedroom, 2 bath
tan brick ranch on
1 acre. Features
include pella
windows, oak hard-
wood floors, car-
peted bedrooms,
tiled kitchen &
baths, maple
kitchen cabinets,
hanstone counter-
tops, propane fire-
place, walk up attic,
tray ceiling in living
room & attached
2 car garage.
$279,900
MLS# 10-4527
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
JENKINS TOWNSHIP
2 Owen Street
This 2 story, 3 bed-
room, 1 1/2 bath
home is in the
desired location of
Jenkins Township.
Sellers were in
process of updating
the home so a little
TLC can go a long
way. Nice yard.
Motivated sellers.
MLS 11-2191
$95,000
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
JENKINS TWP
1717 River Road
Compact 2
story home with
3 bedrooms, 1st
floor bath with
laundry, large
kitchen. Parking
in rear with
alley access.
$39,900
MLS 11-99
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
JENKINS TWP.
23 Mead St.
Newly remodeled 2
story on a corner
lot with fenced in
yard and 2 car
garage. 4 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
1,660 sq. ft. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$89,900
MLS 10-3684
Call Bill
570-362-4158
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
JENKINS TWP.
250 Susquehan-
nock Drive
Immaculate Cape
Cod home features
1st floor master
suite with office and
3/4 bath. 2nd floor
has 2 large bed-
rooms with walk in
closets and adjoin-
ing bath. 1st floor
laundry and 1/2
bath, modern
kitchen with bam-
boo floors, living
room with stone
fireplace. 2 tier
deck overlooks
above ground pool,
ready for summer
fun! For more infor-
mation and photos,
please visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-657
$299,000
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP./
INKERMAN
45 Main St.
Own this home for
less than $400 a
month! Large 3
bedroom home with
formal dining room,
off street parking
and large yard. For
more information
and photos, log
onto www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#09-2449
$64,900
Call Charles
KINGSTON
125 3rd Ave
Well kept 2 story
with 3 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths situat-
ed on a nice street
in Kingston. Newer
roof, furnace, water
heater, electric
service. Replace-
ment windows
throughout. Base-
ment has high ceil-
ings, ideal for re-fin-
ishing or workshop!
MLS 11-2167
$144,000
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
167 N. Dawes Ave.
Move in condition 2
story home. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
hardwood floors,
ceramic throughout.
Finished lower level,
security system
MLS 11-1673
$159,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
KINGSTON
40 N. Landon St.
Residential area,
4 bedroom plus 2 in
attic totaling 6. 1 1/2
baths. Half block
from schools. All
new rugs and
appliances, laundry
room, two car
garage, off street
parking, $139,900.
Call 570-829-0847
KINGSTON
46 Zerby Ave
Sunday
2pm-5pm
Lease with option
to buy, completely
remodeled, mint,
turn key condition,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, large
closets, with
hardwoods, carpet
& tile floors, new
kitchen and baths,
gas heat, shed,
large yard.
$134,000, seller
will pay closing
costs, $5000 down
and monthly
payments are
$995/month.
WALSH
REAL ESTATE
570-654-1490
KINGSTON
510 Gibson Ave
PRICE REDUCED!
Well constructed
all brick 2 story
tudor on a beautiful
landscaped corner
lot. Includes hard-
wood floors, double
crown moldings,
ultra-modern
kitchen, built ins,
woodburning fire-
place, rear stair-
case, patio with
pergola, sprinkler
system, waterfall
and pond. Heated
garage. Impeccable
condition inside
and out.
$349,900
MLS# 10-3870
Call Cathy
(570) 696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
549 Charles Ave.
A quality home in a
superior location!
Features: large
living room; formal
dining room with
parquet flooring;
oak kitchen with
breakfast area; 1st
floor master
bedroom & bath
suite; bedroom/
sitting room; knotty
pine den; half-bath.
2nd floor: 2
bedrooms & bath.
Finished room in
lower level with
new carpeting &
wetbar. Central air.
2-car garage. In-
ground concrete
pool with jacuzzi.
$324,900
MLS# 10-1633
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
KINGSTON
663 Westmoreland
Avenue
Charming 2-1/2
story with 3 bed-
rooms on 2nd + a
4th (12x24) on 3rd,
full bath upstairs,
half bath with laun-
dry on 1st floor, lots
of closet space, fin-
ished walk-out
basement and much
more! MLS 11-2340
$214,900
Jay A. Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
KINGSTON
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Very well main-
tained 2 bedroom
home with updated
kitchen with granite
counter. Large sun-
room over looking
private back yard.
Attached garage,
large unfinished
basement.
MLS 11-2278
$139,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
KINGSTON
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace, hard-
wood floors &
more. Call Ann
Marie to schedule a
showing.
$114,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
(570) 288-6654
KINGSTON TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
8 Circle Drive
Only one lucky
family will be
able to make
this home their
own! Beautifully
kept Ranch with
2 car garage,
new bath, par-
tially finished
basement, 3
season room,
almost 1 acre in
Dallas School
District. Home
Warrancy includ-
ed. For more
information and
photos visit our
website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-370
$174,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Looking for Work?
Tell Employers with
a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PAGE 10D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
TWP.
PRIVACY & SERENITY!
This 40 acre
estate features:
living room with fire-
place & hardwood
floor; family room
with vaulted ceiling
& fireplace; 1st floor
master bedroom &
bath with jetted tub
& stall shower; pan-
eled den; dining
room with stone
floor & skylight; 3
additional bedrooms
& 2 baths. Central
A/C, 3 out buildings.
MLS#11-2101
$725,000
Call Joe Moore
Nancy Judd
570-288-1401
LAFLIN
44 Fordham Rd
Oakwood Park
Over 5,000 sf of
gracious living in
this completely
redone all brick
home. Two first
floor guest suites.
New hardwood, tile
and granite floors
throughout. 5 bed-
rooms, 4 full baths
and 3 half baths.
Lovely master suite.
Five zoned heat. All
this on private large
lot with in ground
pool and great
views.
See virtual tour on
www. l ewi t h- f r eeman. c om
MLS#11-1085
$599,000
Call Marcie at
(570) 714-9267
LEWITH & FREEMAN
LAFLIN
5 Fairfield Drive
Don’t travel to a
resort. Live in your
vacation destination
in the 3 bedroom,
2.5 bath home with
gourmet kitchen
and fabulous views.
Enjoy the heated in-
ground pool with
cabana, built-in
BBQ and fire pit in
this private,
tranquil setting. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1686
$319,900
Call Keri
570-885-5082
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LAFLIN
7 Hickorywood Dr.
Wonderful 4 bed-
room Ranch with
sweeping views of
the valley. Master
bedroom with walk-
in closet and bath,
ultra modern eat-in
kitchen with granite
counters and cherry
cabinets with large
island and stainless
steel appliances.
2 car garage, full
unfinished base-
ment with
walk-out to yard.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4060
PRICE REDUCED
$267,500
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LAFLIN
SUBURBAN OASIS!
Two story 4 bed-
rooms with 3.5
baths. Fully finished
lower level with
home theater. 2 car
garage. Central air.
Eat-in kitchen.
Price: $379,000
Please call
(570) 466-8956
906 Homes for Sale
LARKSVILLE
111 Falcon Drive
Brand new since
2004, 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, central air,
2 car garage, shed,
6 car driveway.
Roof, kitchen, fur-
nace, a/c unit and
master bath all
replaced. Modern
kitchen with granite
island, tile floors,
maple cabinets.
Fireplace in family
room, large closets,
modern baths.
Stamped concrete
patio. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #11-1166
$279,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LARKSVILLE
2340 Mountain Rd
Architecturally built
split level on one
acre lot with stun-
ning Wyoming Val-
ley views. Great
room with fireplace,
formal dining room,
eat-in kitchen.
Potential 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
detached 2-car
garage. Green-
house, fish pond,
raised gardens,
beautifully mani-
cured 1 acre lot.
REDUCED to
$299,000
MLS# 11-1079
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
LARKSVILLE
45 First Street W.
Fantastic Foreclo-
sure! Just the room
you need at a price
you can afford. Nice
home with off-street
parking on a quiet
dead end street. A
modern kitchen with
hardwood floors. A
great backyard for
summer fun. Terrific
potential. $64,439.
MLS 11-676
570-696-2468
LARKSVILLE
Beautiful Bi-Level
with Oak Hardwood
Floors in Living
room, Dining room,
Hallways &
Staircase.
Upgrades Galore,
central air, gas
heat, 16x32
in-ground pool
surrounded with
Perennial Gardens
& Fenced yard with
Hot Tub, shed,
deck, oversized
driveway, 1 car
garage. 1 year
warranty. $179,900
MLS# 10-3677
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LEHMAN
Immaculate inside
and out! 3 bedroom
1.5 bath raised
ranch on approx 9
scenic acres.
Central air, 6 car
garage with 6
garage door open-
ers, 2 out buildings,
paved driveway,
inground pool with
gas & solar heat
with 12X18' cabana,
many fruit trees
and more.
$410,000
MLS# 11-1629
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
MESHOPPEN
Novak Road
Lovely, nearly com-
pleted, renovated
Victorian farmhouse
sits high on 7.81
acres featuring
panoramic pastoral
views, high ceilings,
original woodwork,
gutted, rewired,
insulated and sheet-
rocked, newer roof,
vinyl siding, kitchen
and baths. Gas
rights negotiable.
Lots of potential
with TLC. Elk Lake
School District.
$175,000
MLS# 11-525 Call
570-696-2468
MOOSIC
Glen Dale Area
(Off 502)
Treasure Chest Of
Charm. MAX Space!
Max Value! Smart
spacious floor plan
in this renovated 2
story features heat-
ed sun room off
modern kitchen with
granite island,DR
with built-ins and
window seat and
picture seat,
Den,new hardwood
floors and hot water
heater. All this for
$60,400. 11-401.
Tracy McDermott
570-332-8764
570-696-2468
MOUNTAIN TOP
122 Kestrel Road
Move in condition
located in “Forest
Pointe”, this 2-story
home with an open
floor plan has 8
rooms, 4 bedrooms
and 3 baths, a duel
sided stone fire-
place separates the
family room and liv-
ing room. Enjoy
your summer on the
spacious deck and
in the 16x34 in-
ground swimming
pool Make an
appointment today!
MLS#11-1822
PRICE REDUCED
$289,500
Karen Altavilla
570-283-9100 x28
MOUNTAIN TOP
139 Sandwedge Dr
Beautiful setting for
this 4 bedroom, 3
bath colonial.
Almost 2 acres to
enjoy. Backs up to
the 7th hole on golf
course. Crestwood
School District. Very
motivated Seller!
MLS 11-1330
$276,500
Gloria Jean Malarae
570-814-5814
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
ext. 1366
MOUNTAIN TOP
460 S. Mtn
Blvd.
NEW PRICE!
Large well cared
for home! 4 bed-
rooms, lots of
storage. Enjoy
your summer in
your own 18x36,
In-ground, Solar
Heated Pool,
complete with
diving board and
slide. Pool house
with bar and room
for a poker table!
Large L-shaped
deck. Don't worry
about the price of
gas, enjoy a stay-
cation all summer
long! Family room
with gas fireplace.
4 zone, efficient,
gas hot water,
baseboard heat.
Hardwood floors.
Huge eat-in
kitchen with large,
movable island.
Large, private
yard. Replace-
ment windows.
Home warranty
included.
$222,900
MLS# 11-382
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
6 Merganser Ct
In Forest Pointe
Attractive Fine
Line Home
''Charleston'' floor
plan. Stacked
stone, masonry,
wood burning fire-
place in family
room, brick
accents on front.
Upgraded appli-
ances. 2nd floor
laundry. Large
master bath with
whirlpool tub.
Large yard.
$265,000
MLS# 11-1264
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
P
E
N
D
IN
G
MOUNTAIN TOP
BUTLER TWP.
109 North St.
NEW PRICE!
4 bedroom ranch
with large updat-
ed kitchen, open
floor plan, living
room with fire-
place, hardwood
floors in living
room, bedrooms
and kitchen.
Updated bath.
Sunroom over-
looks state game
lands. Walk out
lower level, easily
finished-only
needs carpet. This
is a must see!
$159,500
MLS# 11-1349
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
NANTICOKE
129 Welles St
Lovely 2 story, 3
bedroom single
family home. Large
master bedroom
suite with walk in
closet and addition-
al closet and full
time bath. Wall to
wall carpeting
throughout. Addi-
tional 1 1/2 tile
baths. Modern
Kitchen with all
appliances including
laundry. Very large
dining / living room
area and extra first
floor room for office
or den. Nice back-
yard and deck.
Friendly neighbor-
hood. Immaculate
move-in condition.
Don’t miss this
one! Asking
$137,500.
Please call
570-650-3358
for more info and
for an appoint to
see this ‘beauty!’
No Realtors
NANTICOKE
Honey Pot Section
109 North St.
Nice double block
in Honey Pot sec-
tion of Nanticoke.
2 car garage, cov-
ered patio, off
street parking.
Each side has 3
Bedrooms. 1 side
has updated
kitchen and 1.5
baths. Used as
single family, can
be 2 units by
removing doors.
$59,900
MLS# 11-2202
Call Michael Pinko
(570) 899-3865
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
NANTICOKE
REDUCED
8PM
25 West
Washington St.
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Kitchen appliances
and wall to wall car-
peting approxi-
mately 1 year old.
Home also has a
one car detached
garage.
$82,900
MLS 11-347
Call John
570-704-6846
Antonik & Associ-
ates, Inc.
570-735-7494
906 Homes for Sale
PARDESVILLE
The charming cape
is just minutes from
Route 309 in Hazle
Township and fea-
tures a 1st floor
bedroom with mas-
ter bath, semi-mod-
ern kitchen with
dining area, spa-
cious Living room
plus a 1 car
detached garage.
100% Vendee
Financing
REDUCED!!
$40,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
(570) 288-6654
PITTSTON
12 George Street
Two story single
with 7 rooms,
3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, new
windows, modern
kitchen, some
appliances includ-
ed, electric service,
some carpeting and
hardwood floors.
Call Rita for details
$68,900
570-954-6699
Walsh
Real Estate
570-654-1490
LINEUP
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PITTSTON
150 Carroll St.
Modern 3 bedroom
home with large
yard, off street
parking with car-
port, 1st floor laun-
dry, new flooring,
great condition.
Move right in! For
more info and pho-
tos please visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-1685
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
PITTSTON
214 Elizabeth St.
3 BR Victorian in
the Oregon section
of Pittston. Semi
modern kitchen
w/gas stove, 1st
floor laundry, fin-
ished lower level
with 1/2 bath.
Newer gas furnace,
storage shed. 13
month home war-
ranty. MLS 11-1677
$86,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
PITTSTON
44 Lambert St
Beautiful, cozy
home. Upstairs
laundry, lots of clos-
et space.Tastefully
renovations. extra
large driveway.low
maintenance.ther-
mostats in each
room. all measure-
ments approximate.
MLS 11-2210
$89,900
David Krolikowski
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON
85 La Grange St
Good investment
property. All units
are rented. All utili-
ties paid by tenants.
MLS 11-1497
$85,900
Gloria Jean Malarae
570-814-5814
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
ext. 1366
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
88 Maple Lane
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 2.5 bath
Cape Cod with
great open floor
plan, hardwood
floors, first floor
master bedroom
and bath. Screened
porch off kitchen
and lower covered
deck from walkout
basement. Walk-in
attic, oversize one
car garage. All in a
quiet desirable
neighborhood. For
more information
and pictures go to:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-2243
$159,000
Angie 885-4896
Terry - 885-3041
PITTSTON
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more square
footage than most
single family
homes. 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen and remod-
eled baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$63,000
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
LINE UP
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PITTSTON
Duplex. Aluminum
siding, oil heat, semi
- modern kitchens,
long term tenant. On
a spacious 50’ x
150’ lot. Motivated
Seller. $44,900
Anne Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
GEORGE T. BELL
REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654
PITTSTON
New on the Market.
2 bedroom brick &
aluminum ranch
with formal living
room, eat in
kitchen, sunroom, 1
1/2 baths, 1 car
garage and Central
air. MLS#11-1583
$129,900
Call Ruth
570-696-1195 or
570-696-5411
SMITH HOURIGAN GROUP
PITTSTON TWP.
120 Parnell St.
Classic Ranch in
great location. 3
bedroom, 3 baths,
high quality
throughout. 3 sea-
son porch over
looking private rear
yard. Owners says
sell and lowers
price to
$219,900. For
more information
and photos please
visit our website at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-2817
Call Charlie for
your private
showing.
VM 101
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
PRICE REDUCED
40 Gain St.
Be the first
occupants of
this newly con-
structed Ranch
home on a low
traffic street. All
you could ask
for is already
here, 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
hardwood and
tile floors with
granite and
stainless steel
kitchen, gas
fireplace, cen-
tral air, 2 car
garage and rear
patio and full
basement. For
more informa-
tion and photos,
log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-3676
$219,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
S
O
L
D
PITTSTON TWP.
STAUFFER POINT
42 Grandview Drive
Just like new end
unit condo, with 1st
floor master bed-
room and bath, Liv-
ing room with gas
fireplace, hardwood
floors in living ,din-
ing room and
kitchen, granite
countertops and
crown molding in
kitchen, w separate
eating area, lst floor
laundry, heated sun-
room with spectac-
ular view, 2 addi-
tional bedrooms, full
bath and loft on the
2nd floor , 2 car
garage, gas heat
and central air,
priced to sell
$277,000 MLS 11-
2324
call Lu-Ann
602-9280
additional photos
and information can
be found on our
web site, www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
PLAINS
117 Mara Lane
This townhome is
better than new! It
has been upgraded
with bamboo floors
in Living Room &
Dining Room. Only
lived in for 6
months & includes
all stainless kitchen
appliances & large-
capacity high-
efficiency washer &
dryer. HUGE 12x26
Deck. Walk-out
basement. QUIET
cul-de-sac location.
Bonus Room on
second floor has
been carpeted- just
needs to be
finished. $224,900
MLS #11-334
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
PLAINS
1610 Westminster Rd
DRASTIC
REDUCTION
Gorgeous estate
like property with
log home plus 2
story garage on 1
acres with many
outdoor features.
Garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS# 11-319
$300,000
Call Charles
PLAINS
17 CEDAR RD
Birchwood Hills
Charming, well
maintained home
on oversized lot. 40
ft. deck overlooks
beautiful, private
fenced yard with
mature shrubs,
flower gardens and
in-ground pool. 4-
bedrooms, 2.5
baths, security, fire
and sprinkler sys-
tem. Two zoned
gas heat and cen-
tral air.
Agent owned.
See pictures on
www. l ewi t h- f r eeman. c om
MLS#11-2239
$265,000
Call Marcie at
(570) 714-9267
LEWITH & FREEMAN
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
433 N. Main St,
REDUCED! Large
home in advanced
stage of remodel
ready for drywall
and your choice of
extras to be
installed. Studded
out for vaulted
master suite with 2
closets,separate
tub/shower and 2
more bedrooms,
even an upstairs
laundry planned!
Large foyer &
kitchen, formal Din-
ing Room. Ready
for new furnace/
water heater. Can
lights, outlets
already placed!
Large lot with room
for garage/deck/
pool. MLS# 10-4611
Price Reduced to
$89,500!
Call Amy Lowthert
at (570)406-7815
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
PLAINS
For sale by owner.
Single family home.
3 bedrooms.
Fenced in yard. Off
street parking. Flex-
ible Terms. $75,000.
570-829-2123
PLYMOUTH
139 SHAWNEE AVE W
Lovely home in
good condition. 4
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
spacious living
room, formal dining
room, Florida room
w/stone fireplace &
oak walls. Ceramic
tile baths, lots of
closet space, secu-
rity system & 2 car
garage. Perfect for
a growing family!
Nice neighborhood.
MLS#10-3020
$127,000
Call Debra at
(570) 288-9371
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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PLYMOUTH
44 Church St
46 Church St. Rear
Package Deal, sold
together for
$115,000. 2 units.
MLS 10-3634
MLS 10-3635
Maria Huggler
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-587-7000
PLYMOUTH
Spacious 1791 sq. ft.
1/2 double with
wrap around porch,
shed & garage.
Semi modern
kitchen and bath. 3
bedrooms with gas
heat and plenty of
storage.
Anne Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
GEORGE T. BELL
REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654
PLYMOUTH
Townhouse with
5 rooms, 2 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths.
Kitchen, stove,
refrigerator &
dishwasher, wall
to wall carpeting,
covered patio,
assigned parking
space, convenient
location.
REDUCED PRICE
$55,000
MLS# 10-1062
Call Kathie
(570) 288-6654
BELL REAL ESTATE
PRINGLE
372 Hoyt Street
This two story home
has 4 bedrooms
with space to grow.
First floor has gas
heat and second
floor has electric
heat. Off street
parking for one in
back of home.
MLS 11-640
$62,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
PRINGLE
50 Broad Street.
Solid, meticulous,
1500 S.F., brick
ranch, containing 6
rooms, 3 bedrooms
and 1 full bath on
the main level and
full bath in base-
ment, situated on
1.03 Acres. NEW
kitchen with granite
counter tops, wood
cabinetry, new
stove, dishwasher,
microwave, tiled
floors. Bath has
new tile floor and
tub surround, dou-
ble vanity and mir-
rors. Lower level
has summer
kitchen, full bath
and large, dry-
walled area. Over-
size, 2 car garage/
workshop and
shed. Property has
been subdivided
into 4 lots. Call Pat
for the details.
$249,900.
Pat McHale
(570) 613-9080
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SCRANTON
1504 Euclid Ave
Charming 3 bed-
room, 2 1/2 bath,
oversized 2 car
garage built in 2004
in the beautiful
Tripps Park Devel-
opment in Scranton.
Modern eat-in
kitchen with maple
cabinets, tiled floor,
center island and
French doors lead-
ing out to large deck
overlooking the
fenced yard. New
hardwood floors in
the family room.
Formal living and
dining rooms. Mas-
ter bedroom with
master bath and
walk-in closet. 2nd
floor laundry
MLS 11-1841
$259,000
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
SCRANTON
1738 Sumner Ave N
MultiFamily...Duplex
(Up & Down). In
need of TLC.
MLS# 11-730
$ 33,000
Jill Shaver Hunter
Office: (570) 328-
0306 for more
information today!
SCRANTON
341 Lincoln St. N,
Investment proper-
ty, double with very
nice size back yard.
Access to off street
parking from rear
alley. MLS# 11-1116
WOW! $26,000
Call Stacey L Lauer
570-262-1158
Today for an
appointment.
SCRANTON
416 Prospect Ave
NEW ON THE MARKET!
MultiFamily...4 UNIT
PROPERTY. Great
for investors!
MLS# 11-1217
WOW! $ 25,000
Call Jill Shaver
Hunter Office :
(570) 328-0306
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Sutton Road
Attractive, well-
maintained saltbox
on 2 private acres
boasts fireplaces in
living room, family
room & master
bedroom. Formal
dining room. Large
Florida room with
skylights & wet bar.
Oak kitchen opens
to family room. 4
bedrooms & 3 1/2
baths. Finished
lower level.
Carriage barn
$449,000
MLS# 10-3394
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
12 Windy Drive
New construction in
the exclusive
Slocum Estates.
Stone & Stucco
exterior. All the
finest appoint-
ments: office or 5th
bedroom, hard-
wood floors, crown
moldings, 9' ceil-
ings 1st & 2nd floor.
Buy now select
cabinetry & flooring.
MLS #11-1987
$499,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SHAVERTOWN
13 Lehigh St., N.
Lovingly cared for 2
bedroom, 1 bath
bungalow with
many improve-
ments done includ-
ing new (2 yrs. old)
central air and fur-
nace. 1 car garage
with attached cus-
tom built carport.
This property is a
“must see”!
MLS #10-3624
REDUCED!
$134,900
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
SHAVERTOWN
138 Wakefield Road
Inviting contempo-
rary with breathtak-
ing sunsets fea-
tures an open floor
plan, ultra kitchen,
hardwoods
throughout, two-
sided gas FP, spa-
like master bath,
very generous
room sizes, 5 bed-
rooms, 4 baths, fin-
ished walk-out
lower level.
$583,000
MLS #11-952
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SHAVERTOWN
142 Cedar Ave
4 bedroom cape
cod with family
room addition. Fin-
ished basement. 2
½ bath. 1 car
garage. 120’ x 240’
lot. $130,000.
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
SHAVERTOWN
16 year old
ranch house.
3 spacious bed-
rooms. 2.5 baths.
3/4 walk-in attic.
Full basement.
Approx. 1 acre.
Move in condition.
$180,000
Call 570-690-3613
for appointment.
SHAVERTOWN
2542 CHASE ROAD,
New kitchen, new
windows and doors
and siding. All that
is needed is a new
owner! This 3 bed-
room ranch offers a
country feel, just off
the beaten path
while still in a con-
venient location.
Lower level has
recreation room, ½
bath plus room for
storage. Move right
in! MLS#11-2009
$139,900
Jill Jones or Bob
Cook 696-6550
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new apartment?
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Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
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new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
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TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 11D
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
OFFICENTERS - Pierce St., Kingston
Professional Office Rentals
Full Service Leases • Custom Design • Renovations • Various Size Suites Available
Medical, Legal, Commercial • Utilities • Parking • Janitorial
Full Time Maintenance Staff Available
For Rental Information Call: 1-570-287-1161
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
304 Vista Dr
Owner financing
available. Beautifully
remodeled home,
new cabinets, gran-
ite countertops,
ceramic tile floor in
kitchen, pantry,
large master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets and study,
corner lot, partially
enclosed yard with
vinyl fencing, deck
with gazebo.
$289,900
MLS 10-1123
570-696-2468
SHAVERTOWN
57 Sara Drive
Bright and open
floor plan. This 6
year old home
offers premium fin-
ishes throughout.
Beautiful kitchen
with granite tops.
Finished Lower
Level with French
doors out to patio.
Set on private 1.16
acre lot.
MLS# 11-1991
$432,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SHAVERTOWN
91 GATES ROAD,
Great 3 bedroom
ranch home on over
2 acres of land!
This home offers an
oversized garage
with carport in rear.
A large tiled sun-
room to enjoy year
round. Master bed-
room with ¾ bath.
First floor laundry.
Schedule your
appointment today!
MLS#11-1911
$157,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
SHAVERTOWN
380 Lantern Hill Rd
Stunning describes
this impressive 2
story with views
from every room.
Architectural design
which features
gourmet kitchen
with granite tops.
Office with built-ins.
Finished lower level
with 2nd kitchen.
Family room with
French doors out to
rear yard. 4 car
garage. $ 775,000
MLS# 11-1241
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
SHICKSHINNY
52 Cherokee Dr
Great ranch home
situated on 1+ acre
lot with Shickshinny
Lake rights. Dock
area to launch boat.
This 4 bedroom
home has an open
floor plan with hard-
wood floors and a
stone fireplace.
Home warranty is
included. Heat is
GEO Thermal with
airduct. MLS 10-3213
$228,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
Completely
remodeled 3 bed-
room, 1.75 bath
brick & aluminum
ranch on over 4
acres with Pond.
New stainless steel
appliances, 2 car
attached and 1 car
built-in garage,
paved driveway,
open front porch,
3 season room,
rear patio, brick
fireplace & property
goes to a stream
in the back.
PRICE REDUCED
$179,900
MLS# 10-4716
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SHICKSHINNY
OWNER SAYS: “SELL!”
Spectacular sunlit
great room with
floor to ceiling
stone fireplace &
vaulted ceiling adds
to the charm of this
11 year young 3-4
bedrooms, 2 story
situated on almost
an acre of tranquili-
ty with fenced
above ground pool,
rocking chair porch
and a mountain
view – there’s a
formal dining room
& large living room,
2.5 Baths, new
Kitchen with dining
area & a master
suite complete with
laundry room, walk
in closet & master
bath with jetted tub
& shower and an
oversize 2 car
gar – Priced Under
Market Value
@$189,900!
MLS #10-906
Don’t delay, call
Pat today at
570-714-6114 or
570-287-1196
CENTURY 21 SMITH
HOURIGAN GROUP
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SWEET VALLEY
101 Lakeview Drive
Lovely lake commu-
nity features com-
munity lake rights &
pavilion. Cozy home
with native stone
fireplace, rocking
chair front porch
and newer kitchen.
MLS# 11-1353.
$74,900! Call Tracy
570-696-2468
SWEET VALLEY
4 Oliver Road
Located in the back
part of Oliver Road
in a very private part
of North Lake in
Sweet Valley. Yearn-
ing to be restored,
lake front cape cod
in a very tranquil
setting was formerly
used as a summer
home. MLS 11-2113
$110,000
Jay Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
Price Reduced!!
236 Poland St.
Cute 2 bedroom
starter home in
need of some cos-
metic updating.
Great for first time
homebuyers. Huge
lot, patio, newer
windows, shed,
nice location.
MLS #11-772
$55,000
Call Karen Ryan
570-283-9100
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
70 Grandview Dr.
Beautiful open
plan. Huge rooms,
hardwood floors,
tile, gas fireplace,
modern kitchen. All
in a desirable
neighborhood.
REDUCED PRICE
$179,900
MLS #11-352
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
SWOYERSVILLE
Investors Wanted!
Stone front 2 bed-
room, 2 story on
nice lot. Open 1st
floor with nice eat-in
kitchen. 2nd floor
needs tlc. Gas heat.
Space Heaters.
$32,000. Call Pat
570-885-4165
Coldwell Banker
Gerald L. Busch
Real Estate, Inc.
TRUCKSVILLE
172 SPRI NG GARDEN ST.
NEW ON THE
MARKET! Cozy up
in this lovely cape
cod. Charming inte-
rior, nice size deck,
fenced rear yard,
shed, rec room in
basement, utility
room, & workshop.
Attic is also partially
finished w/pull
down & many pos-
sibilities to add
more space. Paved
driveway & parking
for 6 cars, this is
not just a driveby.
MLS# 11-1363
$ 109,900
call Stacey L Lauer
Mobile: 570-262-
1158 for an appoint-
ment today!!
TRUCKSVILLE
Seller will contribute
toward closing
costs on this 1997
Yeagley built home.
Home is on a large,
private lot but con-
venient to every-
thing. Bonus room
in lower level. Built-
in 2 car garage.
$147,500
MLS# 10-4348
Call Betty
(570) 510-1736
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
906 Homes for Sale
WANAMIE
950 Center St.
Unique Property.
Well maintained 2
story. 10 years old.
Privacy galore.
3.5 acres. Pole
Barn 30 x 56 for
storage of equip-
ment, cars or
boats. A must
see property.
$289,000
MLS# 10-3799
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-288-9371
WAPWALLOPEN
359 Pond Hill
Mountain Road
This 4 bedroom
home features a
great yard with over
2 acres of property.
Situated across
from a playground.
Needs some TLC
but come take a
look, you wouldn’t
want to miss out.
There is also a pond
at the far end of the
property that is
used by all sur-
rounding neighbors.
This is an estate
and is being sold as
is. No sellers prop-
erty disclosure. Will
entertain offers in
order to settle
estate. MLS 11-962
$69,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
WEST PITTSTON
210 Susquehanna
Avenue
Well cared for 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
modern kitchen,
sunroom, 1st floor
laundry. Updated
electric, replace-
ment windows, gas
heat, off street
parking. Beautifully
landscaped proper-
ty with pond and
fish, storage shed,
river view, no flood
insurance required.
For additional info
and photos view
our site at
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1641
$134,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
WEST PITTSTON
322 SALEM ST.
Great 1/2 double
located in nice
West Pittston loca-
tion. 3 bedrooms,
new carpet. Vertical
blinds with all appli-
ances. Screened in
porch and yard. For
more information
and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS#10-1535
$59,000
Charlie VM 101
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING
101 Boston Ave.
Quality home in
great location
w/custom features
throughout. Won’t
last long.
$257,900.
Call Joe or Donna,
613-9080
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
Well cared for and
nicely kept. A place
to call home! Com-
plete with 2 car
oversized garage,
central air, first floor
laundry, eat in
kitchen. Convenient
to shopping, West
Pittston pool and
ball fields.
PRICE REDUCED!
$134,500
MLS 11-583
Call Judy Rice
570-714-9230
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WEST WYOMING
119 Lincoln Ave.
Perfectly remodeled
cape in toy town!
Nothing to do but
move in! Newer
kitchen, bath, win-
dows, carpet, elec-
tric service and gas
hot air furnace.
Currently 2 bed-
room, 1 bath with a
dining room that
could be converted
back to a 3rd bed-
room. Low taxes!!
Great home for
empty nesters, first
time buyers!
MLS 11-1630
$105,000
Call Mark R.
Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
SUNDAY
1:00PM-3:00PM
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (835.00 /
30years/ 5%)
570-654-1490
WEST WYOMING
NEW LISTING – Cozy
cape cod with semi-
modern kitchen and
bath. 2 bedrooms
on 1st floor with
additional 3rd bed-
room on 2nd floor
ready to be com-
plete. Fenced yard
and drive. Needs
updating but a great
buy at $40,500
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
BELL REAL ESTATE
(570) 288-6654
WEST WYOMING
Nice 3 bedroom
Ranch home in
good condition.
Hardwood floors,
family room & office
in basement.
$124,900
MLS #11-169
Call Toni Ranieli
570-237-1032
570-288-1444
WEST WYOMING
REDUCED!!!
536 W. Eighth St.
Nice starter home
with 7 rooms, 3
bedrooms, 1.25
baths. 1 car garage
and carport. Home
has plenty of park-
ing in rear with
shed and great
yard. MLS #536
$85,000
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
TOY TOWN SECTION
148 Stites Street
CHARMING
BUNGALOW
$74,500
On corner lot with
2 car garage.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
walk up attic & full
heated basement,
hardwood floors
with three season
room. Freshly paint-
ed & move in condi-
tion. 570-446-3254
WHITE HAVEN
28 Woodhaven Dr S
Exquisite Inside! 4
bedroom, 2.5 bath,
formal dining room,
family room, mod-
ern eat-in kitchen,
Master bedroom
and bath, front and
side porches, rear
deck, 2 car
attached garage.
Property is being
sold in “as is” condi-
tion. MLS 11-1253
Huge Reduction!
$169,000
Jean Malarae
570-814-5814
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
ext. 1366
WILKES-BARRE
108 Custer St.
Move-in condition -
New replacement
windows, furnace &
water heater - New
deck & front porch
- A must see prop-
erty - Don't Delay!
MLS#11-2201
$72,500
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
WILKES-BARRE
129 & 131 Matson Ave
Double Block, 6
rooms + bath on
each side. $79,000
Call 570-826-1743
WILKES-BARRE
134 Stanton Street
Nicely kept 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath
home. Fantastic
price, also included
is a home warranty
with a service plus
package. Don’t
miss out. 10-3827
$44,000
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
1400 N. Washington St
Nice 2 story in need
of some TLC with
low taxes, near the
casino. Roof is 5 yrs
young. Newer water
heater (installed
'09), replacement
windows through-
out, 100 AMP elec-
tric, tiled bath, wall-
to-wall carpeting
entire 1st floor.
MLS 11-2383
$58,900
Donald Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
156 Sherman Street
HANDYMAN SPE-
CIAL. Extra Large
duplex with 7 bed-
rooms, 2 baths, fire-
place, screened
porch, full basement
and 2 car garage on
double lot in Wilkes-
Barre City. $59,500
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
WILKES-BARRE
178 High Street
Three unit property
in good condition
with first floor com-
mercial store front
with many possibili-
ties. The second
floor is a two bed-
room apartment
and the third floor is
a 1 bedroom apart-
ment. Additional lot
included with sale
for future growth
and parking. MLS
10-3120. $63,500.
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
191 Andover St.
Lovely single family
3 bedroom home
with lots of space.
Finished 3rd floor,
balcony porch off of
2nd floor bedroom,
gas hot air heat,
central air and
much more.
Must see!
MLS 11-59
$69,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
231 Poplar St.
Nice 3 bedroom
home in move-in
condition.
Hardwood floors in
living & dining
room. Upgraded
appliances including
stainless double
oven, refrigerator &
dishwasher. Great
storage space
in full basement
& walk-up attic.
REDUCED PRICE
$75,000
MLS# 10-4456
Barbara Young
Call 570-466-6940
COLDWELL BANKER,
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340
Ext. 55
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
254 N. Penna. Ave
Not a drive-by. This
clean, 3-4 bedroom
has a newly added
1st floor laundry
room and powder
room. All new floor
coverings, replace-
ment windows.
Interior freshly
painted, updated
electric, etc. Ready
to move in. Off
street parking for 2
cars and a large,
fenced-in back yard
w/storage shed.
Across street
from playground.
MLS 11-1713
REDUCED!
$44,500
Call Michelle T.
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
29 Amber Lane
Remodeled 2 bed-
room Ranch home
with new carpeting,
large sun porch,
new roof. Move
right in! For more
info and photos
please visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-749
$89,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
313 N. River Street
Nice 2 bedroom
single home, A/C,
well maintained.
Near courthouse
& colleges.
Affordably Priced
@ $44,900.
Call Jim
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
WILKES-BARRE
320 Stanton St.
Large well built
brick ranch. All
plaster walls. Lower
level mostly finished
with kitchen area
but no heat. Needs
new carpet and
some updating.
Nice Yard.
$99,000
Call Connie
Eileen R. Melone
Real Estate
570-821-7022
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
35 Hillard Street
Great neighborhood
surrounds this
updated 2 story
home with orignal
woodwork. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath, 1,500
sq. ft. oak eat-in
kitchen, hardwood
floors, stained glass
windows, large
room sizes, fenced
yard, deck. Zoned
R1 Single Family
Zone
$59,000
MLS #11-599
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
WILKES-BARRE
382 Parrish St
3 Bedroom 1 1/2
baths with natural
woodwork and
stained glass win-
dows throughout.
MLS 10-4382
$49,900
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
39 W. Chestnut St.
Lots of room in this
single with 3 floors
of living space. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
with hardwood
floors throughout,
natural woodwork,
all windows have
been replaced,
laundry/pantry off of
kitchen. 4x10 entry
foyer, space for 2
additional bed-
rooms on the 3rd
floor. Roof is new.
MLS 11-325
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
46 Bradford St.
Well maintained 3
bedroom home with
off street parking
and large side yard,
newer roof, vinyl
siding, porches,
windows, furnace,
hot water heat, and
electrical panel. All
the big ticket items
have been replaced
for you. Home is
ready to move
right in!
MLS 11-510
$78,000
Call Terry
Solomon August
570-735-7494
Ext. 301
Antonik & Associ-
ates Real Estate
570-735-7494
WILKES-BARRE
62 Schuler St
3 bedroom, 1 3/4
bath in very good
condition. Hard-
wood floors
throughout, updat-
ed kitchen and
baths, natural
woodwork, over-
sized yard on a dou-
ble lot. Off street
parking.
MLS 10-4349
$79,900
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
73 Richard Street
3 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Traditional in Very
Good Condition.
Open Layout. Off
Street Parking, Yard
& Shed. Many
Updates.
Asking $47,900
Call 570-762-1537
for showing
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
76 Moyallen Street
An absolute “must
see”. Charming
home with many
updates. Move-in
condition on two
lots. Granite and
stainless kitchen,
hardwood floors,
and many great
architectural fea-
tures. Perfect for
anyone looking for
affordable gracious
living. See pictures
www. l ewi t h- f r eeman. c om
MLS#11-1889
$84,000
Call Marcie at
(570) 714-9267
LEWITH & FREEMAN
WILKES-BARRE
84 Madison Street
Nice duplex.
Renovated 2nd
floor. Great invest-
ment or convert
back to single.
3 bedroom, 1 bath
on 1st Floor.
2 bedroom, 1 bath
2nd floor. Detached
garage.
Price Reduced!!
$75,000
MLS# 11-1095
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
WILKES-BARRE
9 Stark Street
Well cared for 3
story home with 5
bedrooms. Move in
condition. Come
take a look. You
don’t want to miss
out on this one.
MLS 10-3911
$69,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
By owner. 178 Kid-
der St. 100% owner
financing with
$4,900 down,
$489.83 per month.
3 bedroom, 1 bath
Asking 59.9K.
jtdproperties.com
(570) 970-0650
WILKES-BARRE
Centrally located
this charming 3
bedroom, 1 Bath 2
story, with hard-
wood floors, eat in
kitchen, fenced
yard. Is an ideal
starter home. Good
potential at $18,900
Anne Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
GEORGE T. BELL
REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Centrally located,
this triplex is fully
occupied and has 2
bedrooms in each
unit. Nicely main-
tained with one long
term tenant on 3rd
floor and off street
parking. An annual
income of $17,520
makes it an attrac-
tive buy. $99,000
MLS 11-825
Anne Marie Chopick
GEORGE T. BELL
REAL ESTATE
570-288-6654
570-760-6769
WILKES-BARRE
FREE
informational
workshop on
how to
qualify for a
Habitat
house
Saturday
July 23
10:30 am to
12:30 pm
at Boscov’s
downtown
Wilkes-Barre
Affordable newly
built 3 bedroom
home. 20-year
no-interest mort-
gage. Must meet
Wyoming Valley
Habitat for
Humanity eligibil-
ity requirements.
Inquire at
570-820-8002
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Miners Mills Section
Gracious home with
updated roof, fur-
nace and kitchen.
Three bedrooms,
spacious living
room, large dining
room, updated eat-
in kitchen, hard-
wood and pine
floors, offices
attached (was den-
tist). Separate 1-car
garage and carport.
Reduced for you!
$119,000
MLS# 11-1010
Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
116 Amber Lane
Very nice Bi-level
home with 2-3 bed-
rooms, open floor
plan, built in
garage, driveway,
on corner lot.
Lower level family
room with pellet
stove. Move in
condition home.
For more informa-
tion and photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$95,000
MLS 10-4538
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
522 Pennsylvania
Avenue
GET STARTED
AFFORDABLY and
move up later.....
Solid and cared for
3 bedroom home
w/walk-up attic,
roofs within 6
years, bright and
open eat in kitchen,
bath with claw foot
tub. Enclosed back
porch, yard and
basement for extra
storage. Pleasant
neighborhood
home. MLS 11-899
$30,000
Call Holly
EILEEN MELONE
REAL ESTATE
570-821-7022
YATESVILLE
PRICE REDUCED
12 Reid st.
Spacious Bi-level
home in semi-pri-
vate location with
private back yard. 3
season room. Gas
fireplace in lower
level family room. 4
bedrooms, garage.
For more informtion
and photos visit
wwww.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 10-4740
$154,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
YATESVILLE
REDUCED!
61 Pittston Ave.
Stately brick Ranch
in private location.
Large room sizes,
fireplace, central
A/C. Includes
extra lot. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-3512
PRICE REDUCED
$189,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PAGE 12D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
For Home Delivery!
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909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
BACK MOUNTAIN
Great Investment
Opportunity Prime
Location On Rt.118 -
Turn Key Gas Sta-
tion W/Convenient
Mart. 2 Fuel Pumps,
(1) Diesel.
MLS # 11-1809
$299,000.
Call Geri
570-696-0888
570-696-3801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
DURYEA
REDUCED
921 Main St.
Over 2,000 S/F of
commercial space +
2 partially furnished
apartments,
garage, and off
street parking.
Great convenient
location.
MLS #11-1965
$229,000
Call Tom
570-282-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
EDWARDSVILLE
62-67 ½Thomas St
This would make an
awesome family
compound. No
shortage of parking
on this unique prop-
erty. One single
home, one duplex
and an extra lot all
included. Homes
are right on the
Edwardsville/Larksvi
lle border.
$129,900
11-252
Call Betty
(570) 510-1736
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-287-1196
EDWARDSVILLE
Lawrence St.
Nice 3 unit
property. Lots of
off street parking
and bonus 2 car
garage. All units are
rented. Great
income with low
maintenance
$159,900
MLS# 10-2675
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
FORTY FORT
138-148 Welles St.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION!
Be part of the
Welles Street
Revitalization! 2
buildings with
offices & ware-
house/garage
areas. Zoned M-1.
Office space for
lease. Call agent for
more details. 138-
142 Approx 9784
sq. ft. & 144-146
approx 5,800 sq ft.
$335,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-4293
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
KINGSTON
6 unit apartment
building. Each has
1 bath, bedroom,
Parlor & Kitchen,
Centrally located,
all electric, good
condition. Gross
income $28,000,
net $20,000. All
offers considered.
$114,900
570-829-0847
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
KINGSTON
7 Hoyt St
Nice duplex zoned
commercial, can be
used for offices as
well as residential.
All separate utilities.
Keep apt. space or
convert to commer-
cial office space.
Adjacent lot for sale
by same owner.
MLS 11-2176
$85,900
Jay A. Crossen
CROSSEN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
KINGSTON
Wyoming Avenue
Highly visible office
building w/ample off
street parking.
Executive office on
1st level. Potential
for 2 tenants in
lower level.
PRICE REDUCED
$414,900
MLS #11-995
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
LEWITH & FREEMAN
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
MOOSIC
530 Rocky Glen Rd.
Industrial property
in a convenient
location! Many pos-
sibilities for busi-
ness, 3,000 sq ft of
warehouse/work
space. 1,000 sq ft
of office space.
Perfect for tractor/
trailer repair stor-
age, repo car, boat
or RV storage. 220
ft of road frontage,
perfect for car
sales on 2 plus
acres. Close to 81,
turnpike and air-
port. MLS# 11-847
$ 499,900
Call Brenda Suder
332-8924.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
423 E. Church St.
Great 2 family in
move in condition
on both sides, Sep-
arate utilities, 6
rooms each. 3 car
detached garage in
super neighbor-
hood. Walking dis-
tance to college.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1608
$127,500
Call Tom
570-262-7716
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PITTSTON
118 Glendale Road
Well established 8
unit Mobile Home
Park (Glen Meadow
Mobile Home Park)
in quiet country like
location, zoned
commercial and
located right off
Interstate 81. Con-
venient to shopping
center, movie the-
ater. Great income
opportunity! Park is
priced to sell.
Owner financing is
available with a
substantial down
payment. For more
details and photos
visit www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-1530
$210,000
Call Kim
570-466-3338
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON
Township Blvd.
MAKE AN OFFER!
Ideal location
between Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton.
Ample parking with
room for additional
spaces. Perfect for
medical or profes-
sional offices. Con-
tact agent to show.
Contact Judy Rice
570-714-9230
MLS# 10-1110
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
PLAINS
107-109 E. Carey St.
High traffic, high
potential location
with enough space
for 2 second floor
apartments. A
stones throw away
from the casino.
Large front win-
dows for showroom
display. Basement
& sub-basement for
additional storage
or workspace.
PRICE REDUCED
$110,000
MLS# 10-1919
Call Stanley
(570) 817-0111
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLYMOUTH
155 E Walnut St.
Good investment
property knocking
on your door. Don't
miss out, come and
see for yourself.
Also included in the
sale of the property
is the lot behind the
home. Lot size is
25X75, known as
147 Cherry St.
$82,000
MLS# 10-2666
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
819 North
Washington St.
2020 Sq. Ft,
Commercial build-
ing on corner lot
with parking. Prime
location. Lower
level street
entrance. Close to
major highways.
PRICE REDUCED
$147,000
MLS# 10-3225
Call Jeff Cook
Realty World
Bank Capital
570-235-1183
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WYOMING
14 West Sixth St.
Former upholestry
shop. 1st floor in
need of a lot of
TLC. 2nd floor
apartment in good
condition & rented
with no lease. Stor-
age area. Off street
parking available.
PRICE REDUCED!
$65,000
Contact Judy Rice
714-9230
MLS# 11-572
WYOMING
PRICE REDUCED!
285 Wyoming Ave.
First floor currently
used as a shop,
could be offices,
etc. Prime location,
corner lot, full base-
ment. 2nd floor is 3
bedroom apartment
plus 3 car garage
and parking for
6 cars. For more
information and
photos go to
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS #10-4339
$172,400
Call Charlie
VM 101
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
912 Lots & Acreage
DRUMS
Lot 7 Maple Dr.
Private yet conven-
ient location just
minutes from inter-
states. You can fish
in your own back
yard in the
Nescopeck Creek
or use the nearby
state game lands.
Perfect for your
vacation cabin or
possible year round
home! MLS#11-1492
$19,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
912 Lots & Acreage
DURYEA
44.59 ACRES
Industrial Site. Rail
served with all
utilities. KOZ
approved. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
$2,395,000
MLS#10-669
Call Charlie
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
GOULDSBORO
902 Layman Lane
Wooded lot in Big
Bass Lake. Current
perc on file. Priced
below cost, seller
says bring all offers.
MLS#10-3564. Low
price $10,000
Thomas Bourgeois
516-507-9403
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-842-9988
MOUNTAIN TOP
200 Kirby
Beautiful piece of
property located in
a nice area waiting
to be built on. Most-
ly wooded. Water,
sewer and gas are
adjacent. Going
towards Mountain-
top left onto Kirby
Ave just past Grey-
stone Manor.
$59,000
MLS 11-429
570-696-2468
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood Schools!
126 Acres for Sale!
Mostly wooded with
approx. 970 ft on
Rt. 437 in
Dennison Twp.
$459,000
Call Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
570-474-9801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
912 Lots & Acreage
MOUNTAIN TOP
GREAT OPPORTUNITY
SPRING IS HERE!!
4C Liberty St.
Diamond in the
rough - Over 23
acres of land wait-
ing to be improved
by energetic devel-
oper. Lots are level
& nestled at the
end of quiet street.
Liberty St. is a right
off 309 south at
Januzzi's Pizza.
Land is at end
of street.
$199,900
Call Jill Hiscox
570-690-3327
LEWITH & FREEMAN
570-696-3801
MOUNTAIN TOP
Several building lots
ready to build on!
ALL public utilities!
Priced from
$32,000 to
$48,000! Use your
own Builder! Call
Jim Graham at
570-715-9323
570-474-9801
LEWITH & FREEMAN
MOUNTAINTOP
ICE LAKES
2.51 Acre
Wooded Lot
Ice Harvest Drive
$115,000
CAROLEE.O@VERI ZON.NET
“LOT” In Subject
NEWPORT TOWNSHIP
2 LOTS - 1 mile south
of L.C.C.C. Estab-
lished residential
development,
underground utili-
ties including gas.
1 - Frontage 120’x
265’ deep $38,000.
2 - Frontage 210’x
158’deep $38,000
Call 570-714-1296
PLAINS TOWNSHIP
8.65 acres on end
of cul-de-sac in
Laurelbrook Estates
10 minutes from
Blakeslee and
Wilkes-Barre on Rt.
115. Perc certficate
available.
MLS 11-53
$127,000
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
POTENTIAL RESIDENTIAL
BUILDING SITES
ESTATE SALE
Dallas Heights
Lot 4 $35,000;
Lot 5 $28,000;
Lot 6 $45,000,
or all 3 lots for
$89,000.
Frontage 220x120.
Call 757-350-1245
912 Lots & Acreage
PRICES REDUCED
EARTH
CONSERVANCY
LAND FOR SALE
46+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$89,000
10+/- Acres
Hanover Twp.,
$69,000
28+/- Acres
Fairview Twp.,
$85,000
32+/- Acres
Wilkes-Barre Twp
REDUCED!
61+/- Acres
Nuangola
$118,000
JUST SOLD!
40+/- Acres
Newport Twp.
See additional Land
for Sale at
www. earth
conservancy.org
570-823-3445
SHAVERTOWN
1195 Lantern
Hill Road
Prime residential
wooded lot with
plenty of privacy.
Gently sloping.
$150,000
MLS# 11-1601
Call Joe Moore
570-288-1401
SHAVERTOWN
LAND
Harford Ave.
4 buildable residen-
tial lots for sale indi-
vidually or take all
4! Buyer to confirm
water and sewer
with zoning officer.
Directions: R. on
E. Franklin, R. on
Lawn to L. on
Harford.
$22,500 per lot
Mark Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
1 Kidder & Walnut
Buildable 1.5 acre
lot in Wilkes-Barre
Township. Utilities
available. Lot is
located in a
residential area.
$39,500
MLS 11-583
Call Judy Rice
570-714-9230
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 PAGE 13D
To Place Your Professional Services Ad, Please Call 829-7130
CALL
AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
CALL
AN EXPERT
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
AIR CONDITIONING
DUCTLESS/CENTRAL
Immediate installa-
tion. Lowest prices.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-817-5944
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1015 Appliance
Service
LEN HOSEY
Appliance Service
Washer/Dryer
Range/Dishwasher.
Whirlpool, Maytag,
Kitchenaid & Roper
287-7973
1024 Building &
Remodeling
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Windows
& Doors
Call the
Building
Industry
Association of
NEPA to find a
qualified mem-
ber for your
next project.
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
References. Insured
Free Estimates
570-899-4713
Shedlarski Construction
Home improvement
specialist, Licensed,
insured, PA
registered.Kitchens,
baths, vinyl
siding & railings,
replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
570-287-4067
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1039 Chimney
Service
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
CHRIS MOLESKY
CHIMNEY SPECIALIST
New, repair, rebuild,
liners installed.
Inspections. Con-
crete & metal caps.
Licensed & Insured
570-328-6257
COZY HEARTH
CHIMNEY
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel Lin-
ing, Parging, Stuc-
co, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
1-888-680-7990
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
A+ CLEANING BY VERA
Homes, apartments
& offices. Day,
evenings &
weekends.
570-309-8128 or
570-709-3370
RELAX THIS SUMMER
Let Us Do The
Cleaning!!!
Christopher’s
Cleaning Service
Call Today
570-299-9512
or email us at:
nepacleaning@
gmail.com
Residential /
Commercial
Cleaning by Lisa.
Pet Sitting also
available. Call Today!
570-690-4640 or
570-696-4792
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
BGD CONCRETE
All Phases of
Concrete Work
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
570-239-9178
CONCRETE CONCRETE
SIDEW SIDEWALKS, ALKS,
P PA ATIOS & TIOS & DECKS DECKS
Many references,
free estimates
Call 570-704-8134
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount,
Free estimates
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
GMD MASONRY
All types of All types of
concrete, concrete,
masonry and masonry and
stucco stucco
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
570-451-0701
gmdmasonry.com
1057Construction &
Building
1st. Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
GARAGE DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
(570)606-7489
(570)735-8551
1069 Decks
DECK STAINING &
PRESSURE WASHING
Interior/Exterior
Painting.
Experienced,
Reliable & Honest.
570-899-5759
1078 Dry Wall
MIKE SCIBEK DRYWALL
Hanging & finishing,
design ceilings.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
570-328-1230
MIRRA DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Drywall Repair
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
(570) 675-3378
1084 Electrical
GETZIE ELECTRIC
Licensed & Insured.
100 & 200 amp
service upgrades.
No job too small!
570-947-2818
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Bucket truck to 40’
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
EXCAVATING & MODULAR HOMES
6’-9’ ARBORVITAE
Tree Planting Available
Driveways,
concrete pads & all
types of Excavating!
(570) 332-0077
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
CARPET REPAIR &
INSTALLATION
Vinyl & wood.
Certified, Insured.
570-283-1341
1105 Floor Covering
Installation
MCGINLEY FLOORS LLC
Wood, Laminate &
Ceramic
570-895-4350
Get 20% Off Get 20% Off
With This Ad! With This Ad!
PADDY@MCGI NL E YFL OORS . COM
NORTHEAST FLOORING
SYSTEMS, INC
Installing
& Refinishing
Hardwood floors.
We install laminate
flooring too!
570-561-2079
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER 2 GO, INC.
PA#067136- Fully
Licensed & Insured.
We install custom
seamless rain
gutters & leaf
protection systems.
CALL US TODAY ABOUT
OUR 10% OFF WHOLE
HOUSE DISCOUNT!
570-561-2328
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning.
Regulars, storms,
etc. Pressure
washing, decks,
docks, houses,Free
estimates. Insured.
(570) 288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
All in a Call
Painting, Grass Cut-
ting, floor mainte-
nance, basements /
attics cleaned. Free
Estimates. Depend-
able & Reliable.
Package deals
available. Call
570-239-4790 or
570-388-3039
ALL
MAINTENANCE
WE FIX IT
Electrical,
Plumbing,
Handymen,
Painting
Carpet Repair
& Installation
All Types
Of Repairs
570-814-
9365
Call Johnnie
Need help with a
project or small
jobs done?
Evenings & week-
ends. References.
570-855-3823
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of home repairs,
also office cleaning
available.
570-829-5318
Licensed Contrac-
tor. Free Estimates.
No job too big or
small! 10% off with
this ad. Great
prices. Call today.
570-852-9281
1132 Handyman
Services
PORCH REPAIR
& REPLACEMENT
INTERIOR &
EXTERIOR
PAINTING.
ALL TYPES OF
REMODELING.
PLUMBING
FREE ESTIMATES.
(570) 793-4468
The Handier
Man
We fix everything!
Plumbing,
Electrical &
Carpentry.
Retired Mr. Fix It.
Emergencies
23/7
299-9142
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, Fire &
Flood Damage.
Free Estimates,
Same Day
Service!
570-822-4582
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
CASTAWAY
HAULING JUNK
REMOVAL
823-3788 / 817-0395
S & S TOWING
& GARBAGE
REMOVAL
Free estimates.
Clean out attics,
basements, estates
We buy junk cars
too! 570-472-2392
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
Charlie’ Charlie’s s Hauling Hauling
Residential &
Commercial,
Licensed & Insured.
Free estimates.
Whole estates, yard
waste, construction
Spring cleanup.
570-266-0360 or
570-829-0140
Ever Ready Hauling
We do cleanups -
basements,
garages, etc. Yard
waste removal,
small deliveries, cut
grass & more.
Same day service.
Cal l Mi ke 826- 1883
WILL HAUL ANYTHING
Clean cellars,
attics, yards &
metal removal.
Call John
570-735-3330
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
EARTHTONES HARDS CAPE
Walkways, Paver
Patios, Retaining
Walls. Repairs
Welcome. Creative,
Reliable & Honest.
570-899-5759
MOWING, TRIMMING
EDGING, SHRUBS
& HEDGES. YARD
LEVELING. LAWN
CARE. MULCHING.
FULLY INSURED.
CALL & SAVE 10%
OFF LAST BILL.
FREE ESTIMATES
570-814-0327
Patrick & Deb’ Patrick & Deb’s s
Landscaping Landscaping
Landscaping, basic
handy man, house
cleaning & help
moving. We even
do inside painting.
Any salvageable
items can be picked
up for free.
Free estimates.
Call 570-793-4232
Or 570-793-4773
Rainbow
Landscaping
& Lawn Service
Spring & Fall
Cleanups. Trimming,
mulching, complete
landscape installa-
tion. Lic. & Insured.
Call 570-674-2418
  JOHN’S  
“Picture Perfect”
LANDSCAPING
Bobcat : Grading
Excavator : Digging
Shrub/Tree Trimming,
Install or Removal
“Be safe, not sorry.”
Edging/Mulch/Stone
Lawns, Tilling & more
Hauling / Removal
Handyman, all types.
Fencing / Deck Wash
Blinds/Closets & more!
Reasonable & Reliable
 570-735-1883 
TOP SOIL
SCREENED & BLENDED
Delivery Available
Hunlock Sand
& Gravel
570-336-0411
1186 Miscellaneous
WINDOWS
INSTALLED FREE
with small investment
* Limited time only *
570-855-6127
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
Assisting the Elderly &
Disabled in their homes.
See ad in “Elderly
Care” Section 350
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BDMhel pers. com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A & N PAINTING
Airplane Quality at
Submarine Prices!
Interior/Exterior,
pressure washing,
decks & siding.
Commercial/Resi-
dential. Over 17
years experience!
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
570-820-7832
A + CLASSICAL
Int./Ext. Experts!
Aluminum, Wood
& Deck Staining
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
30 Years
Experience
Locally Owned
Sinced 1990
570-283-5714
A&A Painting
Single Home $1,100
Double - $2,300 &up
Free Estimates.
Call Bob
570-212-0266
AMERICA PAINTING
Interior/Exterior.
20 years experi-
ence. Insured.
Senior Discount
570-855-0387
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet Refinish-
ing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Summer & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719 or
570-288-4311
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARD’S ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
3 Generations
of Experience.
Celebrating 76
Years of Pride
& Tradition!
Licensed and
Insured.
Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed Bonded
Insured
570-868-8375
SEAL COATING
Asphalt mainte-
nance service
We offer a full line
of Commercial,
Industrial & Resi-
dential services.
570-394-9794
1234 Pressure
Washing
RUSSELL’S
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
Licensed & insured.
30+ yrs experience.
POWER WASHING,
PAINTING, CARPENTRY
& ALL HOME REPAIR.
Free Est.
570-406-3339
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
D & D
REMODELING
From decks and
kitchens to roofs,
and baths, etc.
WE DO
IT ALL!!!!!!!
CALL US FOR CALL US FOR
ALL OF YOUR ALL OF YOUR
INTERIOR AND INTERIOR AND
EXTERIOR EXTERIOR
REMODELING REMODELING
NEEDS NEEDS
570-406-9387
Licensed/Insured
YOU’VE TRIED
THE REST NOW
CALL THE
BEST!!!
1252 Roofing &
Siding
J&F ROOFING
SPECIALISTS
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed / Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards accepted.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SUMMER
ROOFING
Special $1.29 s/f
Licensed, insured,
fast service
570-735-0846
1336 Window
Cleaning
Professional
Window Cleaning
& More.
Gutters, carpet,
pressure washing.
Residential/com-
mercial. Ins./bond-
ed. Free est.
570-283-9840
912 Lots & Acreage
WYOMING COUNTY
Route 29, Noxen
14.2 Acres border-
ing State Game
Lands. Wyoming
County. Would make
a great family
homestead or pri-
vate hunting retreat.
$117,500. Please call
570-905-0268
915 Manufactured
Homes
ASHLEY PARK
Laurel Run & San
Souci Parks, Like
new, several to
choose from,
Financing&Warranty,
facebook.com/
MobileOne.Sales
Call (570)250-2890
930 Wanted to Buy
Real Estate
WE BUY HOMES
Any Situation
570-956-2385
938 Apartments/
Furnished
WILKES-BARRE
FULLY FURNISHED
1 BEDROOM APT.
ŠShort or long term
ŠExcellent
Neighborhood
ŠPriv. Tenant Parking
Š$595 includes all
utilities. No pets.
(570) 822-9697
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
BACK MOUNTAIN
2 bedroom, large
eat in kitchen with
appliances, tiled
bath, carpeting,
deck, ample park-
ing, no pets. $495.
570-696-1866
BACK MOUNTAIN
3 large 1 bedroom
apts, 3 kitchens
with appliances, 3
baths. Apts. have
access to one
another. No lease.
$795 for all 3 apts
($265 per apt.)
Convenient to all
colleges and gas
drilling areas.
Call for more info
570-696-1866
BACK MOUNTAIN
All heat, hot water,
basic cable &
garage included.
Spacious 2 bed-
room on quiet resi-
dential street.
Separate kitchen,
living & dining
rooms.$700/mo. No
pets. References
& security.
570-675-4128
BEAR CREEK
New furnished 3
room apartment
Includes water,
septic & most of
the heat. No
smoking & no
pets. $750/
month. + security,
references.
Could be unfur-
nished. Call
570-954-1200
DALLAS
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, 2 story,
townhouse style.
Laundry room,
deck, $650/month +
utilities. No pets.
1 year lease, credit
check & references
required. Call
570-696-0842
DALLAS TWP
CONDO FOR LEASE:
$1,800. 2 bedroom/
2 Bath. Call Us to
discuss our great
Amenity & Mainte-
nance program!
Call 570-674-5278
Dallas, Pa.
MEADOWS
APARTMENTS
220 Lake St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized program.
Extremely low
income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,250.
570-675-6936,
8 am-4 pm, Mon-Fri.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
DUPONT
LARGE 1ST FLOOR
219 Quality Rd.
Available immedi-
ately. 2 bedrooms,
1 bathroom, all
appliances provid-
ed, off-street park-
ing. $650/month,
water & sewer
paid.
(570) 441-4807
or email
cmdraus@ptd.net
DUPONT
Large completely
remodeled 2 bed-
room. Stove &
fridge included.
Private interior
attic & basement
access. Washer/
dryer hookup. Nice
yard. $650. No
pets. Call
570-479-6722
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
FORTY FORT
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor apartment
in a great neighbor-
hood. Wall to wall
carpet, large living
room, stove, refrig-
erator, dishwasher,
coin-op laundry,
bath with shower &
off street parking.
$550 + utilities. Ref-
erences required.
No pets. Call
570-407-3991
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
FORTY FORT
Winterset Estates
1170 Wyoming Ave.
Spacious, newly
renovated. 2nd
floor, 1 bedroom.
Off street parking.
Washer & dryer
available. Absolutly
NO PETS. $800/
month. Everything
included. 1 month
Security & refer-
ences required.
Call 570-814-1316
COLONIAL
BEAUTY
FORTY FORT.
Modern & man-
aged professionally,
4 rooms, appli-
ances, laundry,
parking, 2nd floor,
porch, 2 YEAR
SAME RENT/LEASE.
NO PETS/NO
SMOKING. APPLI-
CATION/EMPLOY-
MENT VERIFICA-
TION required.
$500 plus utilities.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HANOVER SECT.
3 bedroom 1/2 dou-
ble. Washer/dryer
hookup, sewer &
garbage included.
Off street parking.
No pets. $500
month plus utilities
& security.
570-220-6069
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Great location, 1
bedroom apartment
in residential area,
all utilities included.
$600/month
+ security.
908-482-0335
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
West End Road
Clean & bright 3
bedroom apart-
ments. Heat, water,
garbage & sewer
included with appli-
ances. Off street
parking. No pets,
non smoking, not
section 8 approved.
References, securi-
ty, first and last
months rent.
$725/month
570-852-0252
570-675-1589
HANOVER TWP.
1 bedroom, first
floor, off street
parking, stove &
fridge included.
No Pets.
$400/mo, + utilities
NEWLY REMODELED.
(570) 357-1138
HARVEY’S LAKE
1 bedroom, LAKE
FRONT apartments.
Wall to wall, appli-
ances, lake rights,
off street parking.
No Pets. Lease,
security &
references.
570-639-5920
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HUNLOCK CREEK
Nice 2 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
large kitchen, oil
heat, lots of closet
space, large lot. No
pets. $525 + securi-
ty & references. Call
570-814-5088
KINGSTON - 2 APTS.
902 MARKET ST.
Two very large 2
bedroom apart-
ments washer/
dryer hookup, all
appliances, recently
renovated, quiet
neighborhood, land-
lord pays water.
$625 month per
unit. 1 month rent &
security. Available
now! Near college.
570-807-2594
KINGSTON
1 bedroom, all appli-
ances. $450 + utili-
ties & security.
Available now. Call
570-829-0847
KINGSTON
1st floor, 2 bedroom,
all appliances
included, coin-op
washer / dryer in
basement with
extra storage, off-
street parking, No
pets. $600 + utilities
Call 570-287-9631
or 570-696-3936
(after 5:00)
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
2 bedroom. $675/
month. Includes gas
heat. Security & ref-
erences required
No pets. Call
570-288-4200
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
2nd floor, located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living
room, dining room,
sun room, bath-
room. 2 large and 1
small bedroom, lots
of closets, built in
linen, built in hutch,
hardwood and car-
peted floors, fire-
place, storage
room, yard, w/d
hookup and new
stove. Heat and hot
water incl.
1 yr. lease + security
$900/month
570-406-1411
KINGSTON
AVAILABLE NOW!
2nd Floor, 1 Bed,
1 Bath, modern
kitchen, living room,
washer & dryer.
Next to the Post
Office, off street
parking, $500 +
utilities, water &
sewer included, 1
year lease, security
& references. No
Pets. No Smoking.
Call 570-822-9821
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 1st
floor, 2 bedrooms,
elevator, carpet-
ed, Security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $840.
570-287-0900
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
EXECUTIVE STYLE
LIVING
1st floor
apartment
in beautiful
historical home.
2 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, large
sunken living
room, hardwood
floors, fire place
with French
doors leading to
sunroom, newly
remodeled
kitchen with
granite counters
and all appli-
ances provided,
including
washer/dryer,
off-street park-
ing, plenty of
storage. Avail-
able July 1.
$1,000/mo.
570-472-1110
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
SDK GREEN
ACRES HOMES
11 Holiday Drive
Kingston
“A Place To
Call Home”
Spacious 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apts
3 Bedroom
Townhomes
Gas heat included
FREE
24hr on-site Gym
Community Room
Swimming Pool
Maintenance FREE
Controlled Access
Patio/Balcony
and much more...
Call Today
or stop by
for a tour!
570-288-9019
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
LARKSVILLE
Cute 3 bedroom
apartment, just
renovated, quiet
neighborhood, no
pets, washer/dryer
hook-up, off-street
parking, $515/
month + utilities &
1 month security.
845-386-1011
LUZERNE
1 bedroom, wall to
wall, off-street
parking, coin
laundry, water,
sewer & garbage
included. $495/
month + security
& lease. HUD
accepted. Call
570-687-6216 or
570-954-0727
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
MOUNTAIN TOP
1 Bedroom apart-
ments for elderly,
disabled. Rents
based on 30% of
ADJ gross income.
Handicap Accessi-
ble. Equal Housing
Opportunity. TTY711
or 570-474-5010
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider &
employer.
MOUNTAIN TOP
WOODBRYN
1 & 2 Bedroom.
No pets.
Rents based
on income start
at $405 & $440.
Handicap
Accessible.
Equal Housing
Opportunity.
Call 570-474-5010
TTY711
This institution is an
equal opportunity
provider and
employer.
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
MOUNTAINTOP
1,200 s/f Ranch
style house with
3 bedrooms,
hardwood floors,
basement & yard.
Sewer & water
included.
Security & refer-
ences required.
$1,095/month
(570) 498- 1510
NANTICOKE
2 bedroom, wall to
wall carpet, off-
street parking, $495
per month+ utilities,
security, lease.
HUD accepted. Call
570-687-6216
or 570-954-0727
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
APARTMENTS FOR RENT.
Deposit & 1st
months rent
required. No pets.
Section 8 Welcome.
$450-$550
Please leave mes-
sage 516-216-3539
NANTICOKE
East State St.
2nd floor, 2 large
bedrooms. Modern
kitchen & bath, all
appliances including
dishwasher, w/d.
Ample closets and
storage. No smok-
ers. $580/month
includes sewer,
garbage & water.
570-239-2741
NANTICOKE
First floor, 1 bed-
room. Sewer &
garbage included.
Cats ok. $375 + util-
ities & security. Call
570-740-2009
NANTICOKE
Hanover Section
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room. Stove &
Fridge. $425 + gas
& electric. Call
570-417-0088
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
NANTICOKE
Hanover Section
2nd floor, 3 rooms.
Stove, fridge, wash-
er/dryer. $400 + utili-
ties & security.
Sewage & Sanitary
included. No pets.
570-735-3969
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PARSONS
2nd floor, 1 bed-
room, wall to wall.
GREAT LOCATION
near library, laundry,
bus stop & casino.
Sewer, garbage &
heat included.
$475/month.
Tenant pays electric
& water. Available
7/1. (570) 823-0864
PITTSTON
NEW EFFICIENCY
Furnished or
unfurnished.
1 bedroom,
kitchen, living
room. All appli-
ances included.
BEAUTIFUL VIEW
OFF BACK DECK
$700/per month.
Call
(570) 814-2752
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PITTSTON
South Main Street
5 rooms, 2nd floor,
includes heat, appli-
ances, sewer, front
& back porch,
fenced yard & pri-
vate parking. Lawn
maintained. Section
8 Welcome. No
Pets. $695/month
654-2257
PLAINS
2 BEDROOM, 2nd
floor, off street
parking, large living
space. $400/mo +
utilities. No pets or
smoking. Call
570-820-8822
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
PAGE 14D TUESDAY, JULY 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
962 Rooms 962 Rooms
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
2
9
6
2
3
1
NEWPORT TWP.
PRIME APARTMENTS STILL AVAILABLE!
ST. STANISLAUS APARTMENTS
143-145 Old Newport Rd., Newport Twp.
Affordable, Accessible 1, 2 & 3
Bedroom Apartments
Income Eligibility* Required.
Rents: $455-$656 plus electric
(*Maximum Incomes vary according to household size)
• High Efficiency Heat/Air Conditioning
• Newer Appliances • Laundry Rooms
• Community Room • Private Parking
• Rent Includes Water, Sewer & Refuse
For more info or to apply, please call:
570-733-2010
TDD: 800-654-5984
Apply Today!
Great, Convenient
Location!
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
• Affordable Senior Apartments
• Income Eligibility Required
• Utilities Included! • Low cable rates;
• New appliances; laundry on site;
• Activities!
• Curb side Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
TDD/TTY 800-654-5984
CEDAR
VILLAGE
Apartment
Homes
Ask About Our
Holiday Specials!
$250 Off 1st Months Rent,
& $250 Off Security
Deposit With Good Credit.
1 bedroom starting @ $690
F e a t u r i n g :
‹ Washer & Dryer
‹ Central Air
‹ Fitness Center
‹ Swimming Pool
‹ Easy Access to
I-81
Mon – Fri. 9 –5
44 Eagle Court
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706 (Off Route 309)
570-823-8400
cedarvillage@
affiliatedmgmt.com
TR PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
570-899-3407
APT RENTALS
1, 2 & 3
Bedroom
Available
WILKES-BARRE
PLAINS
KINGSTON
WYOMING
References,
credit check,
security,
and lease
required.
EAST
MOUNTAIN
APARTMENTS
The good life...
close at hand
Regions Best
Address
• 1 & 2 Bedroom Apts.
822-4444
www.EastMountainApt.com
• 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts.
288-6300
www.GatewayManorApt.com
M ond a y - Frid a y 9 -5
Sa tu rd a y 1 0-2
W IL KE SW OOD
822-27 1 1
w w w .liv ea tw ilk esw ood .com
1 Bedroom Sta rting
a t$675.00
• Includes gas heat,
w ater,sew er & trash
• C onvenient to allm ajor
highw ays & public
transportation
• Fitness center & pool
• P atio/B alconies
• P et friendly*
• O nline rentalpaym ents
• Flexible lease term s
APARTM E NTS
*RestrictionsAp p ly
Rooms starting at
Daily $39.99 + tax
Weekly $179.99 + tax
WiFi
HBO
Available Upon Request:
Microwave & Refrigerator
(570) 823-8027
www.casinocountrysideinn.com
info@casinocountrysideinn.com
Bear Creek Township
C
o
u
n
t
r
y
s
i
d
e
I
n
n
C
a
s
i
n
o
BLACK LAKE, NY
NEED A VACATION?
Come relax and enjoy great
fishing & tranquility at it’s
finest. Housekeeping cot-
tages on the water with all
the amenities of home.
(315) 375-8962
www.blacklake4fish.com
daveroll@blacklakemarine.com
$50 off Promotion Available Now!
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PLYMOUTH
Nice, recently reno-
vated 1st floor 1
bedroom. Stove &
Fridge included.
$500 + electric &
garbage. Lease,
security, references
Call for appointment
and application.
570-417-0088
SHAVERTOWN
One or 2 bedroom
apartment for rent.
Heat included.
Laundry facilities,
Off-street parking,
No Pets. Call
570-675-3904
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom efficien-
cy plus extra room.
Appliances includ-
ed. Off street park-
ing. No Pets.
$475/month.
All utilities included.
(570) 417-4311 or
(570) 696-3936
WEST PITTSTON
First floor 1 or 2
bedroom apart-
ment. Dining room,
living room, kitchen.
Washer dryer
hookup. Call
570-430-3095
West Pittston, Pa.
GARDEN VILLAGE
APARTMENTS
221 Fremont St.
Housing for the
elderly & mobility
impaired; all utilities
included. Federally
subsidized
program. Extremely
low income persons
encouraged to
apply. Income less
than $12,250.
570-655-6555,
8 am-4 pm,
Monday-Friday.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
HANDICAP ACCESSIBLE
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
1 bedroom, 3rd
floor, No pets. Ref-
erences, security &
lease. $310. (570)
825-5945
Before 9:00PM
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor 1 bed-
room, heat, water,
stove & fridge
included. Security &
background check.
$500 to $550.
Call 570-332-8114
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
2nd floor, 1 bed
apartment. $475.
Lease, references,
gas heat. No pets.
Call 570-760-1819
after 4:30 pm
Leave Message
WILKES-BARRE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT!
425 S. Franklin St.
For lease. Available
immediately, wash-
er/ dryer on premis-
es, no pets. We
have studio & 1 bed-
room apts. On site
parking. Fridge &
stove provided.
24/7 security cam-
era presence and all
doors electronically
locked. Studio -
$450; 1 bedroom -
$550. Water &
sewer paid. One
month / security
deposit. Call
570-793-6377 or
570-208-9301 after
10:00 a.m. to sched-
ule an appointment.
Or email
shlomo_voola
@yahoo.com
wilkesliving.com
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
Formerly The
Travel Lodge
497 Kidder St.,
Wilkes-Barre
Rooms Starting
at:
Daily $44.99 +
tax
Weekly $189.99
+ tax
Microwave,
Refrigerator,
WiFi, HBO
570-823-8881
www.Wilkes
BarreLodge.com
WILKES-BARRE WILKES-BARRE
LODGE LODGE
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Modern 1 & 2 bed-
room apartments.
Cats welcome.
Washer/dryer hook
up. $425-$495
+ utilities.
973-508-5976
WILKES-BARRE
Modern, 1 bedroom,
1st floor. Ceiling
fans, dishwasher,
deck, yard, off
street parking.
$410/month +
utilities, security &
references.
(570) 678-5455 or
(570) 868-7020
WILKES-BARRE
Scott St. Efficiency
1st floor, heat & hot
water, stove, fridge,
off street parking.
No Pets. $450 +
security,references.
(570) 696-3381
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
SECURE BUILDINGS
1 & 2 bedroom
apartments.
Starting at $440
and up. References
required. Section 8 ok.
570-332-5723
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
Totally gorgeous 2
bedroom, 2 bath.
Newly renovated
and waiting for the
sophisticated ten-
ant. Located in the
Historic District of
Central Wilkes-
Barre is a stunning
buIlding. $1200/mo
plus security.
No Pets.
Call Eileen
570-821-7022
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL
ESTATE
570-821-7022
WILKES-BARRE
Very Large apart-
ment located in
desirable neighbor-
hood. Within walk-
ing distance to
Wilkes & Kings.
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 2 bathroom
includes a private
balcony/deck over-
looking an in-
ground pool, off-
street parking,
hardwood floors,
washer/dryer
hookup and a room
that could be used
as a small 4th bed-
room. No pets.
$1,650/month +
security deposit
Email: cshovlin@fcla
wpc.com or call
(570) 718-1444 and
ask for Chris.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WILKES-BARRE
Š1 & 2 bedrooms
ŠLaundry facility
ŠStove, fridge
ŠSecure building
ŠCommunity
Rooms.
ŠElevator
Š2 fully handicap
accessible apts.
also available
RECENTLY RENOVATED
Call Christy
570-417-0088
FRANKLIN GARDENS
SENIOR LIVING
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
West River Street
Several 1 bedroom
apartments avail-
able. Hardwood
flooring & appli-
ances included.
Heat, water, sewer
& trash also includ-
ed. Walking dis-
tance to Wilkes Uni-
versity. Pet Friendly.
Available July 1.
Starting at $600.
570-969-9268
Wilkes-Barre
Š2 bedroom
single,
exceptional
Š1 bedroom,
water included
Š2 bedroom,
water included
Š3 bedroom
single family
exceptional
Hanover
Š4 bedroom,
large affordable
Duryea
Š2 bedroom,
affordable, water
included
Nanticoke
Š2 bedroom,
large, water
included
Pittston
ŠLarge 1
bedroom water
included
Plymouth
Š3 bedroom half
double
Old Forge
Š2 bedroom
exceptional
water included
McDermott &
McDermott
Real Estate
Inc. Property
Management
570-821-1650
(direct line)
Mon-Fri. 8-7pm
Sat. 8-noon
WYOMING
BLANDINA
APARTMENTS
Deluxe 1 & 2 bed-
room. Wall to Wall
carpet. Some utili-
ties by tenant. No
pets. Non-smoking.
Elderly community.
Quiet, safe. Off
street parking. Call
570-693-2850
WYOMING
Clean, 1st floor effi-
ciency. Separate
kitchen & bath.
Includes stove,
fridge, sewer &
garbage. Laundry
facilities. Storage.
$415 + security &
references. No Pets
Call (570) 388-6468
or (570) 466-4176
WYOMING
Recently remodeled
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room. New carpet-
ing & Kitchen. Off
street parking. $500
+ utilities. Call
570-714-7272
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
AFRAID TO MOVE?
Are you paying
too much for your
current office, but
dread the incon-
venience of mov-
ing? We can help!
We not only offer
less expensive
rent, but we will
also help you
move to our mod-
ern office space in
the Luzerne Bank
Building on Public
Square. Rents
include heat, cen-
tral air, utilities,
trash removal,
and nightly clean-
ing - all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Access
parking at the the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
COMMERCIAL
422 North Main
Street, Pittston
Flexible commer-
cial/office space on
Main Street.
Includes 4 separate
offices, large room
which could be used
as a conference
room and a rest-
room. Very high
traffic area. Locat-
ed in a strip mall
that is fully occu-
pied. Parking avail-
able. For more
details and pictures,
visit www.atlasreal-
tyinc.com. MLS 11-
1832. $750/month +
utilities.
Call Kim at
570-466-3338.
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,000 SF
Office / Retail
2,000 SF
Restaurant/Deli with
drive thru window
4,500 SF Office
Showroom,
Warehouse
Loading Dock
4 Acres touching
I81 will build to suit.
Call 570-829-1206
944 Commercial
Properties
FORTY FORT
Free standing build-
ing. Would be great
for any commercial
use. 1900 sq. ft. on
the ground floor
with an additional
800 sq. ft in finished
lower level. Excel-
lent location, only 1
block from North
Cross Valley
Expressway and
one block from
Wyoming Ave (route
11) Take advantage
of this prime loca-
tion for just $995
per month!
570-262-1131
JENKINS TWP
21 Industrial Drive
Warehouse or light
manufacturing.
4,000 sq. ft. with 2
offices. $800/month
Call 570-654-2426
LEASE
NOW
FORTY FORT
PRIME
WYOMING AVE
RETAL 3,000 +/- sq.
ft. approximate.
APPLICATION, 2
YEAR SAME RENT
REQUIRED.
Managed. Serious
inquiries only.
AMERICA REALTY
570-288-1422
LUZERNE
262 Union Street
Lease-Quonset
building approxi-
mately 4,536SF of
floor space. Loca-
tion - Cross Valley
exit 6 in Luzerne.
$1,250/month
Call Maribeth Jones
570-696-6565
PITTSTON
328 Kennedy Blvd.
Modern medical
space, labor &
industry approved,
ADA throughout, 2
doctor offices plus
4 exam rooms, xray
and reception and
breakrooms. Could
be used for any
business purpose.
Will remodel to suit.
For lease
$2,200/MO.
Also available for
sale
MLS #11-751
Call Charlie
VM 101
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
PLAINS TWP
7 PETHICK DRIVE
OFF RTE. 315
1200 & 700 SF
Office Furnished.
570-760-1513
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
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in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
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with classified!
PLYMOUTH
STORE FOR RENT
Large store. Busy
location on Main St.
$700/month. Also,
large warehouse
for rent, 40’ x 70’,
$800 monthly. Call
570-362-1111
315 PLAZA
1750 & 3200 SF
Retail / Office
Space Available
570-829-1206
WAREHOUSE
WILKES-BARRE/
PLAINS TWP
LAIRD STREET
COMPLEX, easy
interstate access.
Lease 132,500 sf, 12
loading docks, 30 ft
ceilings, sprinkler,
acres of parking.
Offices available.
call 570-655-9732
WAREHOUSE/LIGHT
MANUFACTURING
OFFICE SPACE
PITTSTON
Main St.
12,000 sq. ft. build-
ing in downtown
location. Ware-
house with light
manufacturing.
Building with some
office space. Entire
building for lease or
will sub-divide.
MLS #10-1074
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
944 Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
Lease this free-
standing building for
an AFFORDABLE
monthly rent. Totally
renovated & ready
to occupy. Offices,
conference room,
work stations, kit
and more. Ample
parking and handi-
cap access. $1,750/
month. MLS 11-419
Call Judy Rice
5701-714-9230
947 Garages
COMMERCIAL
GARAGE SPACE
Kingston. 1,250 sf.
Excellent for
mechanic or ship-
ping & receiving.
Separate over
head and entrance
doors. Gas Heat.
Easy Access.
$450 + security &
references.
570-706-5628
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
950 Half Doubles
EDWARDSVILLE
182 Summit St.
5 rooms + bath.
New carpeting
throughout, repaint-
ed & newly remod-
eled. Air condition-
ing, dishwasher &
gas stove. Yard &
carport. No pets.
$600/month + first
& last months rent.
Call (570) 836-7861
after 6pm
KINGSTON
2 bedroom. No
pets. References &
security deposit
$525/mos + utilities
Call (570) 430-1308
KINGSTON
Nice Street. 3 bed-
room, 1 bath, hard-
wood floors, appli-
ances included. Off
street parking.
$700/mo, + utilities,
security and refer-
ences required. Call
(570)283-3086
LARKSVILLE
6 rooms, bath/
shower, 3 bed-
rooms, stove,
refrigerator, wash-
er/dryer, carping,
off-street parking,
NO PETS, security.
Gas heat. Utilities
by tenant. Section 8
accepted. $595.
570-714-5588
NANTICOKE
West Ridge St.
2 bedroom. $570/
month + utilities &
security. No Pets.
(570) 474-6477
950 Half Doubles
PITTSTON
107 LAGRANGE ST
Available immedi-
ately, 3 bedrooms, 1
bathroom, washer/
dryer hookup, no
pets, Garbage and
sewer included.
$550. per month,
plus utilities, $550.
/security deposit.
Call 570-362-2828
to set an
appointment
PITTSTON
3 bedrooms, 2
large living rooms,
large eat-in kitchen,
1.5 baths. All appli-
ances, garbage &
sewer included. No
pets. Plus utilities.
$600/month +
1 month security
(570) 883-0012
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
2 bedroom in
Great Location,
Off-Street Parking.
All appliances
included. No Pets/
No Smoking. $600 +
electric, security &
last months rent.
570-237-6000
PLAINS
2 bedroom. No
pets. References &
security deposit
$500/mos + utilities
Call (570) 430-1308
PLAINS
Quiet neighborhood
Newly remodeled,
freshly painted. 2
bedroom, stove &
fridge, full attic &
basement. Yard.
2 porches. Private
parking. No pets,
non smoker. Refer-
ences & security
required. $700 +
utilities. Call
570-824-7539
WEST PITTSTON
2 bedroom, 1.5
bath, new tile
kitchen, large yard,
Off street parking.
$700/month+utilities
570-655-1238
570-237-2076
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WEST WYOMING
Half double. 2 bed-
rooms, freshly
painted, new car-
peting, off street
parking, big back
yard, no smoking.
Finished basement.
Available August 1.
$600 + utilities &
security. Call
570-855-3008
WILKES-BARRE
2 Half Doubles
Both located in nice
neighborhoods. Off
street parking.
Large back yards.
No pets. Security &
all utilities by ten-
ant. 3 bedrooms,
1 bath, huge attic.
$625/month. Also,
Adorable 2 bed-
room. $550/month
570-766-1881
953Houses for Rent
BEAUMONT
Country 2nd floor
apartment. 2 bed-
rooms, kitchen &
living room. Water,
sewer & heat
included. Nice Yard.
No Pets. $600/
month + security.
570-639-2256
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DALLAS
In town 2 bedroom,
1st floor, full kitchen
& living room.
Water, sewer &
garbage included.
Nice yard. No Pets.
Off street parking.
$575 + security
570-639-2256
Leave a Message
DALLAS TOWNHOME
Living room, dining
room, modern gal-
ley kitchen. All appli-
ances included. 2
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, deck, off
street parking. No
pets. $750/month +
utilities. Call Kevin
(570) 696-5420
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Lyndwood Section
Single home, 1 bed-
room, large living
room, totally
remodeled, gas
heat, off street
parking. No Pets.
No Smoking.
$625/month
+ security
570-793-5333
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom home.
All appliances, trash
& sewage included.
$600/month.
NO PETS. Security
and lease. Call
570-762-6792
HARVEYS LAKE
Stonehurst Cot-
tages
Weekly & monthly
rentals. Lake priv-
ilidges with private
beach & docks.
$525-$825/week.
Call Garrity Realty
(570) 639-1891
HARVEYS LAKE
Sunset Area
2 Bedroom, living
room, kitchen. Wall
to wall carpet. Cov-
ered off street park-
ing. Yard. All appli-
ances included. Gas
heat. No pets $700
+ utilities, security,
references, first /
last. 570-829-0780
KINGSTON
200 Main Street
Single home
excluding base-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
living room, dining
room, large kitchen,
full bath, w/d hook
up, off street park-
ing, attic storage.
All utilities included,
except phone,
garbage & cable.
$925/month + $925
security, references
& 1 year lease.
570-760-5949
570-760-5948
KINGSTON
54 Krych St.
Single: 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
gas heat, wall to
wall, kitchen with
stove & refrigera-
tor. Quiet street.
No pets. Not Sec-
tion 8 approved.
$675/mo.
570-288-6009
953Houses for Rent
MOUNTAINTOP
HOUSE FOR RENT
Bowcreek, available
immediately, 5 bed-
rooms, 3 bath-
rooms, stove pro-
vided, washer/dryer
hookup, double car
attached garage, no
pets. Bonus second
Master bedroom,
Great room with sky
lights, Study room,
Modern Kitchen
with Granite counter
tops, large Deck,
$1700 /per month,
plus utilities, One
month rent/security
deposit. Call (570)
406-0231 before
9:00 p.m. to set an
appointment or
email leamonvin
@yahoo.com.
MOUNTAINTOP
Private setting, 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home. Hardwood
floors, area rugs,
large kitchen, dish-
washer, stove &
fridge. Office & sec-
ond floor bonus
areas. Laundry
hook up in base-
ment. Sewer, water
& lawn mainte-
nance included. No
Pets. No Smoking.
$1,250/month +
security, lease &
background check.
570-678-5850
NANTICOKE
2 bedrooms, 2
bath single home.
Freshly painted,
hardwood floors,
dishwasher, w/d
hookup, porch. No
pets or smoking.
$565/per month,
plus utilities, Call
466-6334
NANTICOKE
Desirable
Lexington Village
Nanticoke, PA
Many ranch style
homes. 2 bedrooms
2 Free Months With
A 2 Year Lease
$795 + electric
SQUARE FOOT RE
MANAGEMENT
866-873-0478
PITTSTON
2 bedroom Ranch
home - 1 block from
Main Street. Fenced
in yard with front
covered porch.
Includes refrigera-
tor & stove.
$595 + security.
570-457-0877
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570-829-7130
PLYMOUTH
3 bedroom + wash-
room. Gas heat.
Carpeted. Off street
parking. $700 + utili-
ties & security. Call
570-430-7901
PLYMOUTH
3 to 4 bedroom,
1.5 bath, newly
remodeled, washer,
dryer hook-up, 1 car
garage. $950/
month + utilities.
No Pets.
Call 570-954-5253
953Houses for Rent
WILKES-BARRE
3 bedroom. New
rugs. Fresh paint.
Refrigerator, stove,
yard. $525 / month.
Sewage included.
No pets. Refer-
ences & Security
required. Call
570-283-3887
WILKES-BARRE
MONARCH RENTALS
3 bedrooms,
all appliances
provided.
Call 570-822-7039
WILKES-BARRE SOUTH
Great neighbor-
hood, 3 bedrooms,
modern kitchen &
bath. Wall to wall
carpet. Off street
parking. $595 +
security & utilities.
Call 570-856-3700
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
3 bedroom Town-
house, yard. Permit
parking. Section 8
welcomed. $595
+ utilities & security.
Call 570-735-2285
962 Rooms
KINGSTON HOUSE
Nice, clean
furnished room,
starting at $315.
Efficiency at $435
month furnished
with all utilities
included. Off
street parking.
570-718-0331
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
Stonehurst Cot-
tages
Weekly & monthly
rentals. Lake priv-
ilidges with private
beach & docks.
$525-$825/week.
Call Garrity Realty
(570) 639-1891
HARVEY’S LAKE
Summer Rental.
Week of 4th of
July still available
and weeks in
August. Accepting
applications for
college students
for September.
570-639-5041
for details.
OCEAN CITY
MARYLAND
Reasonable sum-
mer vacation!
Beautiful well kept 1
bedroom, 1 bath
condo. 120th Street
Bayside at Heron
Harbour. Fully
equipped. Sleeps 4.
3 large pools &
more. Rents Satur-
day to Saturday.
570-825-6177
WILDWOOD CREST
Ocean front, on
the Beach. 1 bed-
room Condo, pool.
06/24 - 09/09
$1,550/week
570-693-3525
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130