1

Executive Summary and Key Findings
Similar to state governments across the nation, Minnesota’s state employees are older than nongovernment employees and large numbers will be eligible to retire very soon. State government workforces, including Minnesota’s, are aging faster than federal and local governments. Financial pressures posed by Minnesota’s state budget point toward a workforce reduction, which in turn poses important considerations for workforce planning and development. In 2000 the median age of state employees was 45.5. In 2010 median age for state employees has increased to 50.5. In fiscal year 2010, within the executive branch of state government, the average retirement age was 61.30. There were fewer retirements than average in fiscal year 2009, likely due to employees’ desires to rebuild the value of retirement savings after a global economic decline. It is anticipated that those who did not retire for economic reasons in 2009 will retire soon, as will those who are imminently eligible to retire. Retirements increased over 16 percent between fiscal years 2009 and 2010 and are likely to increase even more in 2011. Typically, organizations hire new employees to fill workforce gaps left by high rates of retirement. Employees who are preparing to retire transfer knowledge and train in new employees in order to retain organizational knowledge and productivity. Because of the financial constraints on agency budgets vacancies have not been filled for many positions. There has been an overall reduction in permanent hiring, and the overall size of the workforce is reduced. In fact, most hiring in fiscal year 2010 has been on a contingent basis, which provides short-term budget relief, however, it does not support a long standing, well-trained and developed workforce. The reduction in permanent rehiring can lead to a high level of uncertainty in the workplace. In the past year, only 26 percent of new employees were hired on a fulltime, permanent basis. The increasingly transient nature of new hires combined with the departure of retirees and their institutional knowledge create a situation that will increase struggles with job retention, retaining organizational knowledge, and developing talent of Minnesota’s government workforce.

Key Findings
1. The median age of Minnesota’s workforce is increasing. In 2000, the median age of Minnesota’s workforce was 45.5. It was 50.5 in 2010. 2. Almost 60 percent of new hires in fiscal year 2010 were hired on an emergency, provisional, seasonal, temporary, or limited status. There are approximately 10 percent fewer permanent new hires than in 2009 and 15 percent fewer than in 2008. Only 26 percent of new hires in fiscal year 2010 were hired on a full time, permanent status. This is a three percent decrease from 2009 and six percent decrease from 2008. 3. The total cost of compensation increased only 1.03 percent since fiscal year 2009. That is a much smaller change than in prior years (4.84 percent increase in 2009, 7.28 percent increase in 2008). 4. In the last 10 years, full-time equivalency (FTE) increased by approximately one-half percent in Minnesota’s state government. 5. Retirements have increased over 16 percent since fiscal year 2009. They are expected to increase even more in 2011 according the state demographer. 6. The number of years that an average employee has stayed employed with the state of Minnesota in fiscal year 2010 is 12.92 years. The average length of employment has increased by 1.86 percent since fiscal year 2009, when the average length was 12.68 years. 7. The cost of overtime decreased by approximately $2 million since fiscal year 2009.

2010 Minnesota Workforce Report, 2

Table of Contents
Executive Summary and Key Findings ............................................................................................................................... 1 Key Findings ............................................................................................................................... 1 About this Report ......................................................................................................................... 4 Key Facts to Consider .................................................................................................................. 5 Definitions .................................................................................................................................. 5 2010 Workforce Profile ........................................................................................................................................................ 6 The State Government Workforce Separated by Branch .................................................................. 7 Workforce Counts ........................................................................................................................ 8 Full-time Equivalencies (FTEs)................................................................................................... 10 Workforce Distribution by Agency (FTE) .................................................................................... 11 Workforce Diversity Profile ............................................................................................................................................... 15 Overall Workforce Diversity Profile ............................................................................................ 15 Increasing Median Age of State Government Workforce .............................................................................................. 16 Retirement ........................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Average Age of Retirement has Increased .................................................................................... 20 Employee Turnover ............................................................................................................................................................ 21 Employee Retention ............................................................................................................................................................ 22 New Hires............................................................................................................................................................................. 23 Agencies that did the Most Hiring in 2010 ................................................................................... 25 New Hire Profile ........................................................................................................................ 25 Age Distribution of Full-Time New Hires in 2010 ........................................................................ 26 New Hires and Churnover ........................................................................................................... 27 A Glance at Compensation ................................................................................................................................................. 28 Bargaining Unit Information ............................................................................................................................................. 29 Minnesota’s Workforce at Work ....................................................................................................................................... 30 A Recent Story of How State Employees Made a Difference… ..................................................... 30 Tables Table A: State Government Workforce at a Glance (as of July 2010)............................................... 6 Table B: Workforce Separated by Branch (supporting table) .......................................................................................... 7 Table C: Size of Minnesota’s Workforce (Appointment Count) by Calendar and Fiscal Year (supporting table) .......... 8 Table D: FTE Count by Fiscal Year ............................................................................................. 10 Table E: Appointment Count and FTEs by Agency ....................................................................... 12 Table F: Workforce Distribution by County ................................................................................. 14 Table G: Workforce Diversity Comparison .................................................................................. 15 Table H: Retirement and Age Profile by Agency .......................................................................... 16 Table I: Total Retirements by Year ............................................................................................. 19

.....2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.............. 29 ...... 23 Chart 8: New Hires with Full-time................................... 25 Table S: Age Distribution of New Hires in 2010 (supporting table) ..................................................................................................................................... 26 Table T: Internal and External Hires (supporting table)....................................................................................... 22 Table O: New Hires by Year (supporting table)... 28 Table V: Overtime in Hours and Dollar Amount.............. 7 Chart 2: Minnesota’s Workforce Size 2001-2010 (Appointment Count) .............................................................. 23 Table P: Jobs of New Hires .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 Chart 7: New Hires by Year ................................. 20 Table K: 15 jobs with the Highest Turnover in Fiscal Year 2010 ................................................................................ 11 Chart 4: Workforce Distribution by County (Appointment Count) ......................... 24 Chart 9: New Hires with Part-time or Contingent Status .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Table M: Workforce Totals .................................................................................... 25 Table R: New Hire Profile ............................... Unlimited Status ........................................................................................ 8 Chart 3: Ten agencies employ over 82 Percent of the workforce................................................................................................... 24 Table Q: Agencies with Highest Number of New Hires................... 3 Table J: Average Age of Retirement (supporting table).................................................................... 21 Table L: Agencies with Highest Total Turnover Rates in Fiscal Year 2010*................................................................................................................. 28 Table W: Who is Represented in the Union? .............................................................. 27 Chart 12: 2010 Union Representation........................................................... 29 Charts Chart 1: Workforce Distribution by Branch .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Chart 6: Average Age of Retirement .............................................................................. 13 Chart 5: 2010 Minnesota State Workforce Diversity Profile ......................................................................................................................... 27 Table U: Total Compensation 2006-2010 ............................................................................ 21 Table N: Years of Service – Fiscal Years 2006-2010 ............................................................................................................. 24 Chart 10: New Hires ................. 26 Chart 11: Comparison of Internal and External Hires ..............................................................

and development of compensation plans for all state employees. consultation and technical assistance to ensure compliance with state and federal requirements for the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 4 Minnesota Management and Budget (MMB) is the employee relations and finance agency of Minnesota’s executive branch of government. human. Coordinating the state’s personnel and labor relations activities. State Demographic Center. The agency is committed to the continuous improvement of human capital management and services that support state government. public higher education (specifically MnSCU or University of Minnesota). offers diversity leadership. information and analytical resources to ensure exceptional service and value for Minnesota’s citizens. provides guidance to local governments in achieving and maintaining gender equity in their compensation plans. MMB also manages the insurance benefits for all employees and their dependents.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. The data contained in this report represents the status of the state government workforce as of July 2010. About this Report The 2010 Minnesota Workforce Report focuses on state employees in the executive branch of state government. The primary source of the Minnesota Workforce Report data is the State’s Human Resources Information System. Some of the tasks include policy development. and MMB’s Budget Division. negotiation and administration of labor agreements. a division of MMB. Information was also provided by Minnesota State Retirement System (MSRS). . referred to as SEMA4. and puts forth custom-designed services and training to public service clients through Enterprise Learning and Management (ELD). or the retirement agencies (Minnesota State Retirement System [MSRS]. Teacher’s Retirement Association [TRA]. This information reflects all permanent and nonpermanent employees in state agencies under the jurisdiction of the governor and other executive officials. MMB assists statewide agencies with issues relating to state employment. MMB’s mission is to increase state government’s capacity to manage and utilize financial. Workforce Planning and Development provides guidance to state agencies in preparing workforce plans. This report was completed by Workforce Planning and Development. This report does not include information on the legislative or judicial branches. administration of the state’s merit system. or Public Employee Retirement Association [PERA]).

and Office of Enterprise Technology. July 2010 – Contracts and plans for employees contained no salary increases. Churnover – Intra. Employment and Economic Development. Commerce. Natural Resources. emergency. Public Safety. Definitions Average – The most representative score in a distribution. which is at the control of management. Others are hired on seasonal. The center point of a distribution. Turnover – Turnover can be voluntary. emergency. limited. Contingent workforce . limited.and inter-agency movement. Agriculture. Revenue. Human Services. which has been determined to be beyond the control of management. Labor and Industry. 5 Key Facts to Consider The following key events impacted the workforce during the past two years: July 2009 – Contracts and plans for employees contained no salary increases. and Veterans Affairs.Agencies of state government established by statute or constitution who have within their particular field of responsibility statewide jurisdiction and who are not within the legislative or judicial branches of government. Median – The point at which 50 percent of cases in a distribution fall below and 50 percent fall above. Transportation. Fiscal year 2010 was the time parameter used for this report. promotion. the Housing Finance and Pollution Control Agencies. . transfer. or involuntary. Human Rights. temporary. the Bureau of Mediation Services. and provisional employees hired expecting to be terminated at the end of his or her time of employment. Education.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. the Office of Iron Range Resources and Rehabilitation. Calendar year – January through December. or provisional status. and demotion. Performance-based increases stopped for fiscal year 2010. Fiscal Year – July through June. Executive Branch . Enterprise – Refers to the entire executive branch. Cabinet-level agency – The following agencies are considered cabinet-level: The Departments of Administration.Refers to seasonal. temporary. Management and Budget. Unlimited status – Employees hired on a permanent status. Health. Each has appointed commissioners or executives who are part of the Governor’s Cabinet. Corrections.

92 years 84.63% 12.43% 61.3 727 590 398 * It is important to note that gender.1 50. 6 2010 Workforce Profile This report provides an overview of employment in the executive branch.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.786.123 32. ethnicity and disability data are voluntarily provided by state employees. . Table A: State Government Workforce at a Glance (as of July 2010) Total workforce appointment count Total FTEs (fiscal year 2010) Median age Average age Female* Ethnic minority* Persons with disability* Veteran* Veteran with disability* Average annual salary (full-time employees) Represented by a bargaining unit Permanent or unlimited status Average length of service Full-time employees Hires (fiscal year 2010) Layoffs (fiscal year 2010) Retirements (fiscal year 2010) Total turnover percentage (fiscal year 2010) Average age of retirement (fiscal year 2010) Number of employees currently at age 61 Number of employees currently at age 62 Number of employees expected to be age 62 in 2015 34.11% .04% 4.17 49. and veteran data are voluntarily provided prior to the start of employment. Employees are often reticent to indicate this private data or do not identify with only one ethnic group.916.80 88. and therefore do not provide the information.5 46.6% 8.61% 90. As a result. Table A provides a snapshot of the executive branch employment profile in fiscal year 2010.01% $51.68% 12. the state’s workforce may be more diverse than the numbers reflect.86% 3793 247 892 6.

It should be noted that judicial.3% Retirement Agencies 268 .7% Total 38. Chart 1: Workforce Distribution by Branch Table B: Workforce Separated by Branch (supporting table) Executive 34.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. and retirement agency employees (Minnesota State Retirement System.339 100% . legislative. and is the largest group of employees in the chart below. 7 The State Government Workforce Separated by Branch The Executive Branch comprises 89 percent of state government employees.123 89% Judicial 3803 10% Legislative 145 . and Public Employees Retirement Association) formulate a total of 11 percent of the rest of the workforce. Teacher’s Retirement Association.

519 32. which will be discussed later in this report.206 33.56%* 2010 33. For example.26%* 2009 32.510 33.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.347 +4.648 32.410 +2. A high number of contingently hired employees does not maintain a welldeveloped workforce.123 +3.12%* *** Calendar year: January through December ** Fiscal year: July through June . The reasons for the decrease were hiring restrictions that resulted in only critical positions being filled and budget cuts that prevented rehiring with a vacant position.683 +2.251 34.04%* Calendar*** Year Count (January) Fiscal** Year Count (July) % change between fiscal and calendar yr appointment counts 2002 33.976 +5. some employees hold multiple appointments. then increased between 2005 and 2009.60%* 2006 31. In 2010.19%* 2003 32.213 +3. the size of the workforce decreased by .937 33. Each employee counts as one. In addition. an employee may have a part-time position with one agency and a seasonal position with another.09%* 2007 32. Chart 2: Minnesota’s Workforce Size 2001-2010 (Appointment Count) Table C: Size of Minnesota’s Workforce (Appointment Count) by Calendar and Fiscal Year (supporting table) 2001 33.82%* 2004 31.58%* 2008 32.37%* 2005 31.596 +4.909 +1.25 percent.434 32.527 -. The size of Minnesota’s workforce decreased in 2002.492 +3.799 32. 2003 and 2004.996 34. regardless of their unlimited or contingent employment status or full or part-time hours. 8 Workforce Counts The size of Minnesota’s workforce fluctuates throughout the year due to seasonal appointments in programs throughout various agencies. Appointment count is defined by the number of active appointments working for the state of Minnesota.090 34. Most new employees of 2010 were hired on a contingent basis.

9 *There is a change in workforce size from January to July. or seasonal (contingent) employees for spring and summer months. This is because of the additional of limited. . temporary. provisional. mostly to Department of Natural Resources and Department of Transportation. emergency.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.

To determine FTEs. For example.532. four half time employees would be described as two FTEs. regardless of the terms of his or her employee status.8 +2.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.72% 2005 30.17% 2004 30.607. budget planners use full-time quivalencies (FTEs).1 +2.3 +1. In the last year.78% .088 hours per year.6 +1. a calculation is made based on the actual number of hours paid to employees divided by 2.3 +.4 +.8 -2.206.92% 2009 32.987.1 FTEs during fiscal year 2010.1 +.20% 2010 32. 10 Full-Time Equivalencies (FTEs) To establish a more consistent measure of workforce.06% 2003 31.820.786.26% 2007 31. In the last 10 years the FTE size of the workforce has only increased by a total of . Table D: FTE Count by Fiscal Year Year FTE % Change 2001 32.786. The Executive Branch had 32.97% 2008 32.906.78 percent when calculating FTEs.55 percent.35% 2006 31. the workforce has increased in .6 -3.430.797.934. The resulting number indicates the equivalent of employees’ hours.9 2002 31.

Also listed in the table is the appointment count of each executive branch agency. and commissions saw a reduction in their appointment count. and Corrections (DOC). All information in the Table E is listed in rank order by FTE. Transportation (MnDOT). over 42 percent of state agencies. board and commission. Agencies that experienced gains were primarily in response to legislative initiatives. 11 Workforce Distribution by Agency (FTE) Ten agencies employ over 80 percent of the workforce. did not experience loss or gain. federally funded programs. most agencies experienced a decrease in appointment count during the past year. including boards that have one employee to meet the needs of the organization. Eighteen agencies. State agency sizes range from the largest. Over 47 percent of the state workforce is employed by three agencies: Departments of Human Services (DHS). which indicates the equivalent of full-time employees within each agency. In fact. such as the implementation of Statewide Integrated Financial Tools (SWIFT). boards. such as DHS which employs approximately one-fifth of the executive branch employees. or short-term efforts. Chart 3: Ten Agencies Employ Over 82 Percent of the Workforce . boards and commissions experienced a gain in appointment count. boards and commissions. They are the largest in size. and change in each agency’s appointment count since 2009. while almost 32 percent of agencies. respectively. or almost 23 percent. As illustrated in Table E. to very small.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. the current percentage of the workforce that each agency employs.

03% 0.85% 1.30% 2.90% -3.35% -9.94% 0. Engineering Board Tax Court Indian Affairs Council Ombudsperson for Families Black Minnesotans Coun Accountancy Board Chiropractic Examiners Bd Behavioral Health and Therapy Board Capitol Area Architect Asian-Pacific Council Chicano Latino Aff Council Amateur Sports Comm Physical Therapy Board Combative Sports Comm Higher Ed Facilities Authority Barber Examiners Board Veterinary Medicine Bd Marriage & Family Therapy Board Private Detectives Board Optometry Board Dietetics & Nutrition Practice Podiatric Medicine Board 10 9 9 10 11 9 0.69% -7.23% 0.25% 5.06% 0% -4.02% 0.92% 1.00% -25.04% 0.00% 0% -50.61% 4.20% 0.03% 0.34% 1.43% 5.51% -1.00% -50.45% -.83% -2.35% -15.00% 0.03% 0.06% 0.96% .93% 0.10% 0.55% 7.03% 0.03% 0.97% 0.01% 0.27% 0.35% -13.69% -3.88% 1.57% 0% 0% 14.00% 0% 0% 0% -5.03% -6.92% 0% 12.02% 0.09% 0% 10.05% .01% 0.01% 0.24% 0.01% 0.01% 0.00% 0% .07% 0.19% 0.01% 0.11% 0% 900% 28.14% -4.33% -50.14% 0.03% -4.38% Psychology Board Nursing Home Admin Bd Public Facilities Authority Cosmetologist Examiners Board Campaign Finance Board Sentencing Guidelines Commission Disability Council Architecture.99% 5.21% -4.86% 12.93% 0.47% 1.00% 0.01% 0.05% 0.41% 9.01% 0.99% 0.44% 1.11% 0.03% 0.00% -25.02% 0.47% -3.01% 0.00% 9.51% 20. 12 Table E: Appointment Count and FTEs by Agency Ran k by FTE Agency FTE Head count % of current workforce (head count) Chang e in head count since FY09 Ran k by FTE Agency FTE Head count % of current workforce (head count) Chang e in head count since FY09 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 Human Services Dept Transportation Dept Corrections Dept Natural Resources Dept Public Safety Dept Employment & Economic Development Revenue Dept Health Dept Veterans Affairs Dept Pollution Control Agency Administration Dept Labor & Industry Dept Agriculture Dept Education Department Office of Enterprise Technology Commerce Dept Attorney General Minnesota Management and Budget Military Affairs Dept Zoological Board Housing Finance Agency MN State Academies Lottery State Auditor Water & Soil Board Secretary of State Administrative Hearings Center for Arts Education Iron Range Res & Rehab Office of Higher Education Animal Health Board Explore MN Tourism Public Utilities Comm Human Rights Dept Governor's Office Nursing Board Gambling Control Board Medical Practice Board Investment Board Emergency Medical Services Board Ombudsman MH/MR Mediation Services Dept Workers Comp Court of Appeals Racing Commission Peace Officers Bd (POST) Pharmacy Board Social Work Board Arts Board Dentistry Board 6527 4969 4195 2665 2061 1798 1423 1381 1088 927 484 447 421 402 332 322 313 286 278 228 208 180 142 106 80 79 76 70 69 67 52 50 45 41 36 33 31 23 22 21 16 13 13 13 12 11 11 10 10 6883 5051 4217 3145 2037 1838 1504 1495 1320 963 489 445 499 407 321 338 317 316 300 354 204 328 138 109 80 91 78 82 58 67 52 64 48 37 47 34 31 24 22 20 19 14 13 22 11 12 11 11 11 20.02% 0.01% 0.30% 14.06% 0.32% 0.31% 1.04% 0.06% 0.04% 0.21% -4.00% 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 9 8 7 8 8 6 5 5 5 5 5 2 3 3 3 3 3 16 2 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 0.01% 0.60% 0.01% 0.41% 0.17% 0.88% -.00% 0.88% 2.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.46% 5.25% 14.24% 0.86% -2.03% 11.01% 0.70% -3.04% 0.83% 1.20% 0.30% -4.30% 0% 0% 0% 0% -17.01% 0.41% 4.33% -1.62% 7.95% -17.09% 5.88% -33.30% 9.03% 4.17% 3.06% 0.14% 0.00% 0% -50.15% 3.00% 0% 0% -50.69% -2.40% 3.01% 0.42% 4.81% .54% 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 3.02% 0.15% 0.09% 0.

Louis Red Lake 0 1200 303 Lake Cook 269 38 Polk Norman 95 en m no ah 18 4 Clay 14 M 302 Hubbard Cass Becker 103 Aitkin 109 265 Otter Tail Wadena Wilkin Crow Wing 52 Carlton 4 Grant 462 Douglas 42 Todd 956 Anoka Pine 724 Morrison Ka na be c 1108 16 4 Traverse Big Stone Mille Lacs 220 14960 Hennepin Chisago 25 Stevens 126 Pope Stearns 246 Benton 47 41 15 37 Swift 31 7 38 Kandiyohi 440 Meeker 254 420 Isanti Sherburne 1786 Carver 25 Scott Dakota 1341 14 Lac Qui Parle 430 4 Chippewa 414 18 20 Wright 115 McLeod Renville Yellow Medicine co ln 57 316 Le Sueur Waseca 901 14 Redwood Sibley Lyon 11 Goodhue Rice 3 11 204 Murray 40 83 J ackson 105 Brown Nicollet 1159 331 45 1145 8 135 48 213 50 Mower 27 Wabasha Pi pe sto ne Li n 16 Nobles Earth Watonwan Blue Steele Dodge 32 510 Olmsted 126 Winona Houston Rock Martin Faribault 220 56 5 37 18 Freeborn Fillmore Out-of-State 41 60 66 22 . as well as the percentage of the workforce within each county.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. Kittson Roseau 20 Marshall 49 16 32 Lake of the Woods Koochiching Beltrami Pennington 96 Clearwater 47 431 Itasca St. 13 Chart 4: Workforce Distribution by County (Appointment Count) The following map indicates the number of employees employed by appointment count within each county throughout the state of Minnesota. On the page 13 is the supporting table (Table F) listing each of the counties in alphabetical order.

04% .01% .13% 0. and Nicollet Counties are the next largest for employing state workers.11% 1.62% 0.11% 0.28% 0. and Washington counties) while greater Minnesota employs 40 percent of executive branch employees.12% 0.60% 0.30% 0.23% 0.89% 0.16% 0.32% 0.35% 0.14% 0.64% 0.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.05% 0.09% 0.39% 0.12% 0.74% County Itasca Jackson Kanabec Kandiyohi Kittson Koochiching Lac Qui Parle Lake Lake Of Woods Le Sueur Lincoln Lyon Mahnomen Marshall Martin McLeod Meeker Mille Lacs Morrison Mower Murray Nicollet Nobles Norman Olmsted Otter Tail Pennington Pine Pipestone Polk Pope # 303 5 15 414 20 47 4 269 32 45 3 204 18 16 37 57 20 47 246 60 16 1159 56 4 510 462 96 220 11 95 31 % 0.01% .14% 0.74% 2.01% 0.25% 0. Revenue. Table F: Workforce Distribution by County County Aitkin Anoka Becker Beltrami Benton Big Stone Blue Earth Brown Carlton Carver Cass Chippewa Chisago Clay Clearwater Cook Cottonwood Crow Wing Dakota Dodge Douglas Faribault Fillmore Freeborn Goodhue Grant Hennepin Houston Hubbard Isanti # 52 1108 265 431 41 14 331 105 956 25 103 38 420 109 14 38 83 724 901 50 126 18 66 48 213 25 1786 22 302 254 % 0. The Departments of Transportation.04% . The majority of employees in Washington County are employees with the Department of Corrections.19% 2.03% 0.07% 5.89% 0.26% 0. Natural Resources. respectively. Hennepin County.01% 1.06% 0.07% 0.34% 0.29% 0.01% 0.03% 3.28% 0.15% 3.49% 1.05% 3. Scott.36% 0.08% 0.05% 0.23% . Dakota.52% 1.09% County Ramsey Red Lake Redwood Renville Rice Rock Roseau Scott Sherburne Sibley St Louis Stearns Steele Stevens Swift Todd Traverse Wabasha Wadena Waseca Washington Watonwan Wilkin Winona Wright Yellow Medicine # 14920 0 40 18 1145 220 49 316 430 11 1200 440 135 37 7 16 4 27 42 8 1341 32 4 126 115 14 % 43. Washington.72% 0.79% 0. 14 Approximately 60 percent of state employees work in the seven-county metro area (Anoka. 43 percent of whom work in Ramsey County.14% 0. is the second largest and holds the largest residential population in the state. Human Services.12% 0.01% 1.21% 0.06% 0.11% 0.01% 0. and Public Safety have large numbers of employees in St.04% 0.09% 0.05% 3.72% .64% 0.11% 0.00% 0.04% 1.05% 0. Louis.06% 0. Carver.17% 0. Ramsey.18% 0.80% 0.97% 0. Almost 60 percent of state government employees work in five counties. Hennepin.37% 0. Louis County.05% 0. boards and commissions are located. which is where the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater is located.12% 0. Almost all the employees in Nicollet County are employed with Human Services.02% 3.02% 0.37% 0.40% 0.15% 0.19% 0.93% 1. St.24% 1.26% 0.17% 0. A large number of the employees are also employed with the Department of Transportation.93% 0. Ramsey County is the largest and is where the state Capitol and many central offices of the various agencies.

11%* 71. As a result.07% 9. Chart 5: 2010 Minnesota State Workforce Diversity Profile Table G: Workforce Diversity Comparison 2010 Minnesota State Government Workforce 2000 Minnesota Private Sector Workforce 2000 US Private Sector Workforce Ethnic Minority Persons with Disability Female Veteran with Disability Veteran Age 40 or Older 8. state private sector workforce. private sector workforce. and therefore do not provide the information. and veteran data are voluntarily provided prior to the start of employment.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. Employees are often reticent to indicate this private data or do not identify with only one ethnic group. .23% 19% 46.6%* . Minnesota’s government workforce is close in comparison to the private sector workforce in ethnic minority private sector workforce. ethnicity and disability data are voluntarily provided by state employees.S.8% 47.01%* 12. and U. the state’s workforce may be more diverse than the numbers reflect. Minnesota’s government workforce is close in comparison to the private sector workforce in ethnic minority. 15 Workforce Diversity Profile Overall Workforce Diversity Profile The census data from 2010 data is not yet available.4% n/a n/a n/a 27. with state employment representing about half of the employee base. .30% 15. The percentage of female employment is relatively equal across the state government workforce. with state employment representing about half of the employee base.8% n/a n/a n/a * It is important to note that gender. therefore.S.04%* 4. and U. 2000 census data was utilized for comparisons in this report.68%* 49. private sector workforce.

5 . the median age of the Minnesota state workforce will be 55.5. and commissions listed in the table below. Table H: Retirement and Age Profile by Agency Agency Administration Dept Administrative Hearings Agriculture Dept Animal Health Board Arts Board Attorney General Combative Sports Commission Commerce Dept Corrections Dept Emergency Medical Services Board Employ & Econ Development Dept Explore Minnesota Tourism Minnesota State Academies Ave age of retirement in 2010* Median Age in 2010 Tns 20s 30s Ages of Employees 40s 50s 60s 70+ 60.5. boards.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. This represents an increase in median age of five years over the last decade. The age distribution lines represent a clear picture of the ages of Minnesota’s workforce by agency.80 55.86 61.65 60. The median age of the Minnesota state workforce is currently 50. 28 have an employee base with a median age of 50 or higher.80 52 55 50. 27 agencies.50 62. agencies. if there was only one retiree per agency. Furthermore. in 2020. There are some agencies that do not have a high level of employees age 45 or above. Of the 51 agencies. boards.72 64. while there are several that will be vulnerable to retirement trends during the upcoming years and need to build their employee pipeline with the hiring and development of new. If this trend continues.38 * 59. There are 51 agencies. boards and commissions needed to have 11 employees.5 51 47 41.5 in 2000.5 51 54 50. compared to 45.5 52 49 49 31. 16 Increasing Median Age of State Government Workforce The median age of the workforce is increasing across the nation. Below is an example of the current age trends in the state workforce. and commissions were fully redacted for data privacy reasons. boards and commissions listed below.89 65.00 63. To be included in the table. therefore. their ages were not listed due to data privacy. According to demographic experts. unlimited hires. state government workforces across the nation are especially at risk because of the high numbers of baby boomers in state employment nearing retirement age.

25 * 60.5 50 51 50 48 39 Office of Enterprise Tech Office of Higher Education Ombudsman MH/DD Peace Officer’s Board (POST) Pharmacy Board 62.56 61.29 60.5 52 50 56.15 * 58.36 58.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.43 - 52 46 49 51 51 48 49 51. 17 Agency Gambling Control Board Governor’s Office Health Department Housing Finance Agency Human Rights Dept Human Services Dept Investment Board Iron Range Resources Labor & Industry Dept Lottery Mediation Services Medical Practice Board Military Affairs Dept Minnesota Management & Budget MN Center for Arts Education Natural Resources Dept Nursing Board Nursing Home Admin Board Ave age of retirement in 2010* Median Age in 2010 Tns 20s 30s Ages of Employees 40s 50s 60s 70+ * 61.41 * 50 47 45 51 50 .67 62.5 45 42.

50 .72 * 61.5 60 37 50. 18 Agency Ave age of retirement in 2010* Median Age in 2010 Tns 20s 30s Ages of Employees 40s 50s 60s 70+ Pollution Control Agency Public Safety Dept Public Utilities Commission Racing Commission Revenue Dept Secretary of State Social Work Board State Auditor Transportation Dept Veterans Affairs Dept Water & Soil Board Worker’s Comp Court of Appeals Zoological Board TOTAL AGENCIES IN 2010 .30 45 50 54 51 44 50 44.5 37 49.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.08 61.47 62. * Information redacted due to data privacy * 56.67 * 61.63 61.No retirement in fiscal year 2010.5 46 43.

14% 2010 892 +16. The actual number of upcoming retirees is difficult to project at this time because of sporadic trend patterns. There was a significant drop of approximately 14 percent in fiscal year 2009 and a significant increase in 2010 of over 16 percent. Potential events that precipitate retirement are numerous and may include the addition of early retirement incentive (ERI). restoration of retirement portfolios.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.7% 2008 891 +. Transportation. Table I: Total Retirements by Year 2006 831 2007 887 +6. Over 64 percent of retirements in the past year occurred in the four largest agencies: Corrections. It is expected that there are people who wanted to retire. 19 Retirement Minnesota state government employee retirement trends of the previous five years reflect the nation’s economic challenges. and Natural Resources.29% .45 2009 767 -14. The state of Minnesota is projecting an increase in retirement for the next several years. but have held onto their jobs during the past two years because of economic recession. Upcoming patterns are difficult to assess because of sporadic patterns. Human Services. workplace and programming change. legislative changes. and personal readiness.

depending upon his or her current age.23% +.pdf.1% +.1% +. More information on retirement eligibility can be found in the Minnesota State Retirement System Handbook at http://www. 20 Average Age of Retirement has Increased The chart and table below represent the increase in the average age of retirement over the last 10 years. to be eligible for normal retirement benefits.mn.us/pdf/hbgerp09.62% +1.89% -.81 2005 60. Currently. This ERI may have impacted the average age of retirement. an employee must have worked with the state until the age of 65 or 66. 1989.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.msrs.10 2007 60. An early retirement incentive (ERI) was authorized by the legislature for certain retirement-eligible employees who have 15 years of service. An employee can also meet Rule of 90 if hired before June 30.88 2008 60. as well as the number of retirees for fiscal years 2010 and 2011.99 2009 60.94 2010 61. The average age of retirement within the Executive Branch has increased by 1.11% -.30 -. Chart 6: Average Age of Retirement Table J: Average Age of Retirement (supporting table) Fiscal Year Average Age Percentage 2001 60.19 2002 60. One factor that may influence the continued increase is the age at which a person can accrue full benefits continues to change.state.13 2003 60.36% +.59% .84 percent in the last 10 years. It is expected that the average age of retirement will continue to increase.43 2006 61.18% -.27 2004 60.

Also listed are the four agencies that experienced the highest turnover in fiscal year 2010.5% 8.92% 11. and natural resources nursery field workers. When analyzing this information. because the Departments of Transportation and Natural Resources hire the highest number of seasonal and temporary employees each year for projects such as maintaining parks and road construction.87% 6.75% 100% Table L: Agencies with Highest Total Turnover Rates in Fiscal Year 2010* Agency Human Services Dept Transportation Dept Natural Resources Dept Corrections Dept % of Agency Position Student Workers Human Service Technicians Transportation Generalists Office and Administration Generalists Corrections Officers Laborer General LPNs RNs Office Specialist Information Specialists 1-5 Security Counselors Agriculture Technicians Transportation Associates General Maintenance Natural Resources Nursery Field Worker Number 889 561 393 350 2193 12. Personal reasons 5.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. it has been difficult to fill these vacancies. transportation generalists and associates.43% TOTAL WORKFORCE *Excludes layoffs. their turnover numbers will naturally be higher. In areas of Corrections and Human Services. and churnover Table M: Workforce Totals Total Resignations Total Layoffs 1232 247 . and provisional employees.51% 18.30% 75% 24. it is important to understand the intent of hiring employees for time limited work. retirements. and general maintenance specialists. There may be several reasons for the high turnover rates regarding these positions: 1. risks and needs. Utilizing this position as a starting point and then moving up a career ladder 3. and office and administration generalists.08% 74. seasonal. This in turn creates further turnover and no long-term development. such as a resignation which is the choice of an employee. particularly human service technicians. nurses. Work-related reasons The following table is a list of the 15 jobs with the highest turnover in fiscal year 2010. Changing careers 4. Obtaining a higher rate of pay for a similar position in a different organization 2. Other positions have been filled by temporary.79% 8.71% 0% 96.14% 56.3% 6. or involuntary which is at the control of the agency.64% 1. especially now when contingent hiring is an important asset to completing governmental work on a reduced budget. limited. Both involuntary and voluntary turnover results in vacancies within the Executive Branch of the state. agriculture technicians. However. depending upon the season. length of time it takes to complete the job. Many vacancies have remained unfilled and tasks have been left uncompleted or partially fulfilled by others.52% 5. with hiring restrictions. There are particular jobs with higher turnover rates due to the general nature of the work. which are often entry points for other jobs.11% 12. turnover is often higher because of the involvement in providing direct services to client populations who have greater challenges. 21 Employee Turnover Turnover is both voluntary. In the past few years. Table K: 15 jobs with the Highest Turnover in Fiscal Year 2010 Number of positions turned over in 2010 346 321 204 189 148 138 112 86 79 70 66 60 51 48 47 Percent of positions terminated because of temporary status 83. Also listed in the table is the percentage of employees hired on a temporary basis. and corrections officers. Some jobs are created to be filled temporarily such as student workers. emergency. or related task.96% 15. IT specialists.67% 74.

Promotion of internship. new employee retention time decreased between fiscal years 2006 to 2009. apprenticeship and training opportunities 6.33%) 12.87%) 12. Retention increased from fiscal years 2009 to 2010.83 (-1. including community based organizations and higher education to help identify and develop potential state employees 5.85 years. The increase in retention time during the past year is likely due to a general decrease in job openings in state agencies. Minnesota agencies are implementing several strategies that focus on meeting the needs of the state while increasing employee retention. Increasing telecommuting opportunities and flexible work schedules 2.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. Retention is nearly at the same level it was five years ago.68 (-. In looking at each of the last five years.00 12.86%) .92 (+1. Adding pro-appointments. 22 Employee Retention Employees who enter Minnesota state employment stay for an average of 12.31%) 12. Developing relationships with external partners. Increasing the use of a contingent workforce in appropriate jobs 3. where retirees return by invitation for a period of time on a contractual basis to provide expertise 4. These strategies include: 1.79 (-. Enhancing state employee learning and development opportunities to increase skills that promote adaptability and career flexibility Table N: Years of Service – Fiscal Years 2006-2010 Fiscal Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Average years of service 13.

23% 2006 5515 +15. this has impacted the workforce as well in several ways.92% 2008 5192 -8. In fact. There have been hiring restrictions since 2008 requesting agencies only fill positions that are critical to their ongoing processes. When new employees are not hired or there is an overreliance on a contingent staff. However.65% 2004 4550 +14. 32 percent of new hires were acquired on a full-time. adding innovation and creativity in the workforce. unlimited employees during fiscal year 2010.53% 2009 4586 -11. Agencies are generally not creating new positions or not refilling positions after a vacancy. In fiscal year 2009. unlimited status.67% 2010 3793 -17. the increasing age of the general workforce will continue to generate issues with loss of talent without the transfer of knowledge. As a result.6% 2003 3962 -42. 23 New Hires Minnesota state government hired fewer new employees in fiscal year 2010 than at any time in the past 10 years.29% . and in fiscal year 2008.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. Chart 7: New Hires by Year Table O: New Hires by Year (supporting table) Fiscal Year New Hires Change 2001 6345 2002 5165 -18. there were 29 percent. unlimited status. This has been important in reducing salary burdens to the government. Typically the state hires unlimited employees for reasons including transferring knowledge from experienced staff to new staff. There has been a reduction in hiring full-time. the long-term development process does not happen. building skills.18% 2007 5676 +2. and pinpointing talent for future leadership roles. there was over a 17 percent reduction in new hires in fiscal year 2010.84% 2005 4788 +5. This year 26 percent of new hires were on a fulltime. The expected upswing in retirement will leave many agency programs without needed skills and talents.

Table P: Jobs of New Hires Number of new hires in fiscal year 2010 407 229 205 179 163 113 106 102 86 83 76 74 68 64 63 2077 Percentage hired on an unlimited or trainee status Job Student Workers (Paraprofessional. 24 Chart 8: New Hires with Full-Time. This list corresponds closely with the turnover list previously addressed. or assistance to professional jobs. Unlimited Status Chart 9: New Hires with Part-Time or Contingent Status Of the new employees that joined the workforce during fiscal year 2010. Clerical) Human Services Technician Transportation Generalist and Senior Natural Resources Nursery Field Worker Laborer .9% 45.9% 0% 0% 90. while others last as long as a season or as long as a school year. The table below also demonstrates that many new employees are hired on a contingent basis. snow and ice removal.General Corrections Officer Trainee & 2 Office Specialist Revenue Tax Specialist. clerical work.5% 93. Principal & Senior Information Technology Specialist 1-5 Unemployment Insurance Operations Analyst Revenue Collections Officer 1 & 2 Licensed Practical Nurse 1 & 2 Natural Resources Worker Transportation Associate Agricultural Technician Total of these positions 2. depending on the season of the year or type of work needed.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.0% 86.28% 10. Custodial.35% 0% 98.24% 0% 18. Some of these jobs last for a few weeks. They may complete road work. More than 10 percent of the new state employees are listed as student workers. almost 55 percent took positions in one of the 15 jobs listed on the table below.38% 0% 98. Maintenance. custodial work.75% 0% . state park assistance and/or maintenance. Many of these individuals are rehired annually for same or similar positions.

The Transportation and Natural Resources Departments hire the most contingent employees based on their types of work projects. Almost 67 percent are full-time and over half are female.65% 35 42 $36.62% 2. which is likely one reason for the decrease in age.57% 37.43% 66.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.64% . These are four of the six largest agencies in the state.88% 26% 40.108. The average salary for a new.05% 7. Table R: New Hire Profile Ethnic minority Female Disability Special disabled veteran Veteran Full-time Unlimited (permanent) status Full-time. Other agencies often face new hiring demands that correspond with recent federal or state funded initiatives that must be completed within specific time parameters. Many contingently hired employees participate in jobs during school breaks or as part of their school year. Less than 40 percent of new employees are hired on an unlimited or permanent status. unlimited Age 40 or older Median age of all new hires Median age of unlimited. Table Q: Agencies with Highest Number of New Hires Agency Transportation Dept Human Services Dept Natural Resources Dept Employ & Econ Development Dept Total of these four agencies Number of New Hires 637 488 461 297 1883 New Hire Profile The following table is the profile of the state’s new hires in fiscal year 2010.108 . 25 Agencies that did the Most Hiring in 2010 Approximately half of the state’s new hires from fiscal year 2010 were employed by four agencies. or sudden changes in the economy that generate increased demands for state services provided by agencies. full-time hires Average yearly compensation rate for new full-time hires 8. The median age of all new hires is much younger than just the median age of unlimited or permanent new hires.3% 51. full-time employee is $36.

the largest proportion of employees is between the ages of 20 and 24.39% 19.3% 9.23% 8.1% 15. 26 Age distribution of full-time new hires in 2010 When looking at all full-time new hires. Data showed that over 71 percent of 20 to 24 year olds were hired on a contingent basis. Chart 10: New Hires Table S: Age Distribution of New Hires in 2010 (supporting table) Age of all new hires in 2010 16-19 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70+ Percentage 4.16% .67% 7. the largest group of new hires in fiscal year 2010 is in the 25 to 29 year age category.13% 8.26% 1.24% 5. It is approximately 20 percent.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.78% 8. When looking specifically at full-time. unlimited employees.73% 10.01% 2.

or movement. the closure in that gap demonstrated an increase in hiring internal candidates to fill open positions which assists in retaining and developing current employees. Jobs change over time and may require a change in skill.76% 1645 . “why?” Possible explanations include: 1. During these years. Chart 11: Internal and External Hires Table T: Internal and External Hires (supporting table) New Hire 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 5515 – 59. limited. Lack of advancement.88% 1137 .50% 1173 . emergency. if an internal employee transitioned out of or into a MnSCU position from a different state agency through transfer.14.56.13% Total 9276 9871 9215 8320 6454 .24% 2060 .57. or provisional. A specific position may have been a demotion or lateral move for an already employed.03% 558 – 5.5% 5192 .77% Promotion 2413 – 26. When considering both intra.45% 5676 .96% 2326 .06% 427 – 6. however.12. The gap between hiring external and internal employees closed during fiscal years 2006 to 2009. Most permanently hired staff would not change into a contingent position. the amount of external hiring has declined during the past five years. seasonal. promotion.11.62% Movement 881 – 9. a specific skill may not have been transferred from a previous employee to an internal employee. A large percentage of open positions were of a temporary. however transfers to different positions and movement from temporary to unlimited positions has increased. Furthermore.33% 1170 . The amount of internal hiring or what Minnesota employees refer to as “churnover” has also decreased. The question is.24.34% 4586 .12% 3793 – 58.49% Transfer 467 – 5.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. it is important to remember that MnSCU (Minnesota State Colleges and Universities) information is not directly included.07% 504 – 6. 3. interested candidate. 2. Demotion activity is not reported in this count.and inter-agency transition. However the gap opened again in 2010 by over seven percent. When analyzing the information noted below.24.25. Skills gaps. 27 New Hires and Churnover Overall.55. the amount of internal promotions has decreased in the past five years.06% 589 – 9. An external candidate may have been more qualified than an internal candidate. their information is counted.65% 560 – 6.25.01% 2464 .

To learn more about agency-specific salaries. and FICA.84%) 2010 $2. providing safety and assistance in natural disasters. has increased in the past five years on an annual basis.216 (+1.065.pdf . eliminating overtime altogether is not possible. Overtime is used to complete important projects and provide essential services.122.026 (-2.298.218 1.198.65%) 1.mn. health insurance.725. visit the Executive Branch Total Compensation Report at http://www.051 (+8. retirement.148 (+1.13%) Source: IA Warehouse Both the number of overtime hours and the overtime compensation have decreased in the last two years.277.28%) Total Overtime Paid $38. Agencies are constantly working to find ways to contain costs. and retirement expenditures. which includes the employer’s cost for salary.016 2007 $2. These increases have occurred because of general salary increases that were granted from fiscal years 2006 to 2009.13%) $42.215.238 (+4. coverage during unexpected absences in prisons and health care facilities. The state of Minnesota has aggressively managed its use of overtime during this period.30%) $44. and so it is noteworthy that the number of overtime hours utilized has declined by 13. especially in this time of diminishing budgets. pay differentials. Table V: Overtime in Hours and Dollar Amount Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Overtime Hours Used 1.182. benefits.us/doc/comp/tc/tc-rpt.465 $42. and keeping the community safe on a daily basis. This is due to there being no general salary increases and no step progression increases given to employees in fiscal year 2010. However.034.197.mmb.10%) 2008 $2.972 (+11.420.453.924.172. Some examples of overtime uses include completing roadways before the end of the construction season.172.03%) Source: IA Warehouse-Executive Branch Payroll Expenditures Total compensation.85%) $45.28%) 2009 $2. 28 A Glance at Compensation Table U: Total Compensation 2006-2010 Fiscal Total Compensation Year 2006 $1.110 (+7.562.72%) 1.602 (+4. the legislatively mandated increases in employer and employee retirement contributions from fiscal years 2007 to 2010 and the rising cost of employer-paid health insurance benefits over the entire five year period.244.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.02%) 1. Please note that the increase in overall compensation has significantly dropped from fiscal years 2009 to 2010 compared to previous years.323.304 (+6.984.628 (-6. overtime.state.149 (-5.5 percent in the past two fiscal years.347. maintaining the performance and security of the state’s many and varied information systems. .922 (-7.

the Middle Management Association (MMA). Minnesota Association of Professional Employees (MAPE).56% . Minnesota Law Enforcement Association. More specifically.03% 67. Minnesota Government Engineers Council. County. and Municipal Employees (AFCSME). close to 89 percent of the workforce is represented by the American Federation of State.13% 91. provisional) employees Trainees Percentage of employees represented 90. Residential Schools Educators. 29 Bargaining Unit Information Chart 12: 2010 Union Representation Table W: Who is Represented in the Union? Employment Status Full-time employees Part-time employees Unlimited employees Contingent (limited. or Health Treatment Professionals. Approximately 11 percent of the workforce is not represented by a union. emergency.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.7% Almost all of the state’s employees are represented by a union. seasonal. These individuals include but are not limited to specified managers and executives and employees with insufficient work time. Minnesota Nurses Association.99% 88. 55. temporary.

The National Guard. DNR kept enforcement officers assigned and standing by throughout the entire situation. Department of Agriculture: The Department of Agriculture advised farmers with crops on how to evaluate their flooding situations thoroughly. and flooding in homes. MnDOT also participates in resolving many of the long-term damage of flooding to roads and bridges. Department of Commerce: The Department of Commerce provided helpful information to lowincome flood victims on how to receive Weatherization and Energy Assistance from their Office of Energy Security. road wash outs. The removal process was started immediately. Department of Corrections: DOC facilitated Sentence to Service work crews to do flood clean up. a state of emergency was issued after two days of “extreme” rainfall. with city officials to remove chemical containers and propane tanks. MDH also worked to address behavioral health by mobilizing strike teams to meet recovery phase needs. Department of Human Services: DHS monitored the needs of deaf and hard of hearing individuals in the flooded area. businesses. Flooding caused damage to a trail bridge making it unsafe and irreparable. parks. which they communicated through their website. Many agencies work together to respond to disasters and assist citizens during crisis events. American Red Cross. • Department of Military Affairs: The Minnesota National Guard supported communities. and continues long-term assistance to Minnesota districts impacted by the flood. 30 Minnesota’s Workforce at Work A Recent Story of How State Employees Made a Difference… On September 23. They provided testing kits to private well owners in the flood area to assess their drinking water situations. and provided updated website assistance. 2010. They issued warnings due to the danger of the high levels of water in combination with fall debris from trees and hunting. • • • • • • • • • • . below are some examples of how Minnesota’s government workforce brought their expertise and experience together to provide service and support to Minnesota’s citizens. Department of Transportation: MnDOT quickly identified which roads were closed. They also provided compliance monitoring for care facilities and worked with other facilities on relocations as needed. various community officials and employees. The emergency order triggered an immediate response from several state agencies to ensure the safety of Minnesota’s citizens. In addition. Department of Public SafetyDepartment of Homeland Security and Emergency Management immediately responded by facilitating the coordination of disaster relief with FEMA. One news story stated that a wedding couple directed all of their guests to the MnDOT website to find the best detoured and safest routes so their guests could still attend their special event. and facilities that needed to be closed until the water receded. Pollution Control Agency: MPCA worked with wastewater facility owners to get resumption of normal treatment. They managed the packing. and coordinators by assisting with traffic. security and other activities around the Southern Minnesota area. has informed the districts of available grants. and disposing of collected waste. and volunteers. Department of Education: The Department of Education has collected flood damage estimates from school districts. The tremendous amount of rain caused strain on sewer systems. officials. which ones travelers should not drive on. community members. apartments. and with household hazardous waste programs to organize collection events. Department of Health: MDH provided information regarding environmental health. Severe living and traveling difficulties existed for residents in the southern portion of Minnesota and surrounding areas. and which ones had levees and/or damage. Department of Public Safety: When the state of emergency was issued.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report. trails. troopers assisted with traffic control and detour routes for the next several days. Department of Natural Resources: DNR identified state lands. While this report does not list all of them. buildings and field crops. General information regarding health and safety was provided on their website for people experiencing flood. control points. They also monitored the needs of individuals in state-run facilities. transporting.

mmb.state. 31 Minnesota Management and Budget 400 Centennial Office Building 658 Cedar Street St.2010 Minnesota Workforce Report.mn.us . Paul MN 55155 Phone: (651)201-8000 http://www.

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