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English 12 EN12 Leanne Engbers and Matthew Beimers Unit: Length: Worldview: Modernism and Postmodernism 10 classes What

t are your answers to lifes big questions (why am I here? What happens after I die? Why is there suffering in the world?) Why are peoples answers to lifes questions similar and different from each other? What influences lifes questions? Why has Western societys answers to lifes questions changed over history? How does Christian theology fit into lifes answers? How does it fit into your answers? The following Prescribed Learning Outcomes, taken from the English 11 and 12 IRP 1996, will be ongoing throughout the year, and addressed in some form in all of the units. They are labeled Common PLOs in each unit (found in first unit).

Essential Questions (Thematic Statements) Learning Targets (Ministry IRPs or School Mission related ILOs)

Comprehend and Respond (Strategies and Skills) - use and evaluate a wide variety of strategies before, during, and after reading, viewing, and listening for different purposes - describe what they already know about and experiences they have had with specific topics - use efficient strategies for recording, organizing, and storing information that they read, hear, or view - describe and apply a variety of literary devices and techniques to create particular effects, including figurative language, symbolism, parody, and irony Comprehend and Respond (Comprehension) - paraphrase the main ideas, events, or themes in a variety of sophisticated literary, technical, and information communications - develop coherent and plausible interpretations of sophisticated or abstract materials - interpret ambiguities in written, oral, or visual works and support their interpretation with evidence from that work - interpret details of, and draw conclusion from, information presented in a variety of specialized and complex print, graphic, and electronic formats Comprehend and Respond (Engagement and Personal Response) - demonstrate a willingness to reread selections and materials for various purposes - make connections between their own values, beliefs, and cultures and those reflected in literature and mass media - demonstrate a willingness to explore diverse perspectives to develop or modify viewpoints - support a position, interpretation, or response by citing specific details, features, and information from what they have read, viewed or heard - analyze ways in which literature and mass media have dealt with issues involving personal identity and community and respond to those in term of their own ideas, experiences, and communities - demonstrate an appreciation of the power and beauty of language, past and present Communicate Ideas and Information (Knowledge of Language) - evaluate the conventions of language used in a variety of literary and non-literary forms Communicate Ideas and Information (Composing and Creating) - select, synthesize, organize, and document information that is appropriate for particular purposes, modes of presentation, and audiences - apply various strategies to generate and shape ideas Communicate Ideas and Information (Improving Communications) Through the use of peer editing groups, students will work in cooperation to improve their individual writing. In these groups they will also accomplish the following PLOs. - assess their own and others work for sentence clarity, precision, and variety and artistry expression

- critique, defend, and appraise the effectiveness and organization of their own and others work - critique, defend, and appraise the effectiveness of their own and others use of language and presentation forms relative to the specific purpose and audience - demonstrate a willingness to accept and provide constructive criticism and feedback to revise and edit communications for clarity, meaning and style - monitor their own spelling, grammar, mechanics, and syntax using strategies and techniques including the use of electronic technology Communicate Ideas and Information (Presenting and Valuing) - demonstrate pride and satisfaction in using language to create and express thoughts, ideas, and feelings in variety of written, oral, visual, and electronic forms - create presentations in forms, persuading, and entertaining - create a variety of academic, technical, and personal communications, including personal and formal essays, documented research reports, multimedia presentations, panels or debates, summaries, explanations, instructions, letters, and real and invented narratives Self and Society (Personal Awareness) - demonstrate confidence in their abilities to communicate effectively in a variety of school, community, and work contexts - develop communication goals and monitor their action plans - demonstrate their understanding of themselves as self- directed, curious, self- appraising, and openminded learners Self and Society (Working Together) The following PLOs will be accomplished through the group work of various units, including censorship, The Handmaids Tale, and others. - evaluate and adjust their own roles to reflect the groups purpose - apply a variety of strategies including formal decision-making techniques and consensus-building skills to solve problems and achieve group goals - use a variety of resources and technologies when working with others -assess the value, limitations, and ethical issues associated with collaborative work - establish and use criteria to evaluate group process and their own roles and contributions to the group process Self and Society (Building Community) - interact purposefully, confidently, and ethically in a variety of interpersonal and electronic school, community, and career-related contexts - demonstrate respect for the ways in which individuals and communities use and respond to language - demonstrate a willingness to present, seek out, and consider diverse, contrary, or innovative views - assess personal, classroom, and community interactions - demonstrate a willingness to contribute to language activities that celebrate school and community values, events, or accomplishments - describe and evaluate a variety of strategies for locating information in print and electronic resources, including mass media - interpret and synthesize information from more then one source to develop and explain positions - develop criteria for evaluating the accuracy and objectivity of the information found in a variety of print and electronic sources, including mass media - assess the accuracy and balance of news and information presented in print and other media - describe potential sources of bias

Learning Strategies (Assignments, Activities, etc.)

Each number represents one 70 minute class period: Lifes big questions: Why am I here? What happens after I die? Why is there suffering in the world? - Students write out 10 of their essential questions about life. - Worldview powerpoint: Three families of thought (Theism, Naturalism, Pantheism) - Homework: Find a song lyric that asks an essential question to life. Modernism: - Discussion of advances in technology (ex: video games, cloning, space settlements, microchips etc). - Introduction to worldview (brief, brief history of worldviews).

- Powerpoint on the historical period of Modernity. - Reading: article called Believe in a god if you want the top US job. Students underline the modern ideas in the article. Breakdown of Modernism - Discussion of why the optimism of the modern era historically might have begun to breakdown. - Powerpoint on the breakdown of modernity. - Reading: article called Nihilism + answer comprehension questions. Breakdown of Modernism continued Students, in partners or small groups, go over Yeats poem The Second Coming and make links to the breakdown of modernity (the age of anxiety) They continue the partner work by reading the article The Modern Period, and discussing and answering the questions based on article. Introduction to Postmodernism + Writing Workshop Students receive an essay written in past literature unit (Of Mice and Men) and a blank Writing Log Students learn the Provincial breakdown of the grading scale for literary essays on the provincial exam (their pieces were graded with the same scale). Students synthesize common errors (grammatically and in context) and document/track them on the new Writing Log. They will add to this log with each writing assignment. In groups, students brainstorm what the characteristics of a postmodern society is (in other words, what will be on the upcoming powerpoint on Postmodernism) Postmodernism Look at predictions from last class and discuss as a class. Powerpoint presentation on Postmodernism Reflection on the powerpoint and the predictions Reading: Pics and Pans . . . and Pantheism . . . Students highlight postmodern comments in the articles. Postmodernism continued Review postmodernism by discussing the homework articles (Pics and Pantheism Review by doing a comprehensive comparison between Modernism and Postmodernism (using an over head chart) Discuss the implications of Postmodernism on Christianity. Present some concrete examples of postmodernism both in the church and in society in general (ex: MTV quote). Introduce the assignment of finding Evidence of postmodern thinking in commercials, or song lyrics, or movie plots/themes . . . Homework: Find evidence of postmodern characteristics in our culture Worldview Review Activity: In the Elevator. In groups of 4, students must present to the class a conversation (a simple one) that takes place in an elevator. Each student takes on the perspective of one of the worldviews; the fourth is neutral and guides the conversation. Students spend the class preparing for this. Homework: Have elevator skit ready as well as postmodern evidence Worldview Review continued Students present their skits called In the Elevator. After each skit, they orally present the evidence of postmodernism they found (each student individually found). Students work in pairs on the review sheet. Unit test - Students write a unit test (short answers, mostly designed as application questions)

Assessment (Make a distinction between assessment for learning and assessment of learning)

Assessment for learning: - Song lyric that asks an essential question - Modern elements found in article Believe in god . . . - Answers to questions from Nihilism article - Links between Yeats poem The Second Coming and the breakdown of modernity - Answers to questions from The Modern Period - Writing Log synthesis of writing - Predictions of postmodern characteristics - Postmodern ideas in articles Pics and Pans and Pantheism Assessment of learning: - Evidence of postmodern thinking - In the Elevator skit - Unit test Files on the FVCH network: teachers courses How should we then live by Francis Shaeffer Modern Art and the Death of a Culture by H. Rookmaaker The Age of Belief by Anne Fremantle Lectures by Susan Gallagher at Calvin College, NT Wright at Regent College, and Mike Goheen from Redeemer University College Four power point presentations (made from the resources) found on the schools network under this course (EN12) Current magazines, newspaper articles, TV guides etc.

Resources (Books, ppts, websites, etc.)

English 12 EN12 Leanne Engbers and Matthew Beimers Unit: Length: Of Mice and Men 14 classes Am I my brothers keeper? Who are my brothers/sisters? Where is hope in the hopeless situations? (Steinbecks reflection of the breakdown of modern thought). Are we cursed like Cain? Do the best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry? Are we meant to be community or alone? Why is loneliness so hard? Should Christians read dirty books? (censorship: What are your boundaries and codes for choosing what to watch on TV, movies, what to read etc.) Common PLOs in each unit (found in first unit) make connections between their own values, beliefs, and cultures and those reflected in literature and mass media support a position, interpretation, or response by citing specific details, features, and information from what they have read, viewed, or heard interpret and synthesize information from more than one source to develop and explain positions analyze, compare, and critique different presentations of the same ideas, information, or issues explain and evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive strategies and techniques independently develop questions about challenging or abstract issues to suit specific presentation forms, purposes, and audiences

Essential Questions (Thematic Statements)

Learning Targets (Ministry PLOs or School Mission related ILOs) Learning Strategies (Assignments, Activities, etc.)

Each number represents one 70 minute class period: 1

Introduction to the novel (setting): Bring out the backpack and introduce the lifestyle of the main characters in Of Mice and Men. - didnt own a house (or land) - dust storms/drought - traveled to find the jobs (had to get there fast) - most traveled alone (competition for the jobs) - lived in bunk cabins - 17 cents per hour of work - Some growers just walked away from their orchards/farms or houses - Theyll never own or get ahead its survival Show pictures of my 2000 California trip to Salinas and Soledad Guesswork at characterization . . . What do you imagine their characters to be? Begin reading chapter one. Then stop and discuss briefly CENSORSHIP. Why would we choose a book that will use language like this? Gods grace and redemption are only found in ugly places. Homework: Read all the articles hand out on censorship. For each article, write out three to five main points Censorship: Put students into groups to come up with the main point(s) of the article writers + their own


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censorship they apply to their choices of movies/ tv shows etc. Debate: Divide the class in half. Pretend they are parents at a school meeting. The task is to decide whether Of Mice and Men should remain in the curriculum Have them become a team that is preparing a defense or prosecution for keeping Steinbecks novel in the curriculum at a school. .Debate: Each person has three slips of paper. The slip is collected each time a person speaks (encouraging people to speak/ limiting people from controlling the debate). Wrap up: Looking at censorship and a Christians role (See Transform our world!) Homework option: Students work on Censorship conclusions: Some Biblical principals Character and Setting: Remind students of the setting: the Great Depression. Last class we looked at Georges use of language and how, in general, he is a rough guy, trying to survive. Show the power point presentation on the Depression (made by Matthew Beimers), focusing on the visuals of that time, more so than the facts: the faces, the houses, the dust, the poverty (powerpoint found on network drive under this course). Finish reading Chapter one aloud Look at the characters of George and Lennie Homework: Read chapter 2 Characterize the ranch hands: Quiz on chapter two Have students break into groups. Assign each group a character from the list. Have them find details/quotes that work together to fully characterize them. They should find 2 or 3 quotes to fit these categories: appearance, things they say/emotions, others reaction/comments to the character, actions the character does. - Curley - Curleys wife - Candy - the Boss - Slim - Carlson and Candys dog (two sketches) Steps for characterizing: research, type up a potential overhead, organize a talk-through of the information (each researcher presents his/her work). Character presentations: Students meet with groups to organize character presentations of information Remind students to use good public speaking skills Each group presents: 1 Curly 2 Curlys wife 3 Slim 4 Candy 5 the Boss BONUS: the dog Students take notes on characteristics. Have students journal (in their notes) impressions of the characters: who do they like? Who do they mistrust? We all know a novel has conflict; so far there is no conflict. Who will be involved in some conflicts in the novel, do they think? Read chapter three (quiz next class) B (oddly numbered to match error in files on network) Am I my brothers keeper? Quiz on chapter three Review with the students the structure and evaluation of the literary essay and the composition on the EN12 provincial exam. Go over the composition scoring guide (0-6 scale) Have students write on one of two given topics: Censorship or Am I my brothers keeper? (See expanded topic overhead) Introduction to writing improvement Teach mini lesson on sentence structure and avoiding common writing errors like the run-on sentence, the sentence with a comma splice, and a fragment sentence. This concept will be tested and practiced through out the year (on the provincial exam too!) Students complete some practice exercises. Students should read chapter four for homework Steinbecks life + Impressions of chapter four

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Quiz on chapter four Go over the overhead on Steinbecks life (focusing on comments of his themes) Considering those themes, read the quote from his acceptance speech Have students work on Impressions on chapter 4 with a partner. Homework: Complete Impressions if not completed; Read chapters 5,6 (finish the novel) End of the novel impressions Quiz on chapters 5 and 6 Put students into discussion groups. Their group needs a spokesperson. Put (on the overhead) the End of the novel Impressions. Students discuss the topics in groups. Discuss as a class (using the spokespeople). Robert Burns To a Mouse + The Curse of Cain Read Robert Burns poem as well as the translation Discuss the theme of futility in the poem as well as contextual/historical background to the poem. Move into a discussion of the essay Curse of Cain and how the theme of loneliness and isolation is woven through the novel and the Biblical text. Go through one last set of notes: Themes and Imagery in Of Mice and Men Reflection and/or discussion: What does the theme of loneliness mean to you? What will it mean as you explore life in the next few years?

10 Writing improvement continued + Censorship revisit/chat Censorship chat: compositions showed some misunderstandings on both sides of the spectrum. . . re-discuss the issues. Hand back the graded compositions: go through the grading scale again. Grammar: avoiding fragments, run ons, comma splices Revision of composition 11 Essay introduction + Theme in the novel Go over the theme of Naturalism with the students: SURVIVOR analogy (handout for the students) Review good essay style and structure (possibly take them outside on a tour to parallel how an essay is a tour through your ideas you need map-like elements, reminders, guides etc) Introduce the topics students may pick from to prepare and write in an upcoming class (in-class essay). They may bring in a prepared outline. 12 Movie Review part one Students in pairs, think of character/traits etc and make a cast for Of Mice and Men with known celebrities. Share and defend choices. Give students the film review (handout) Have them view the first half of the film and fill in the review. 13 Movie Review part two Complete viewing the movie Discuss changes the director made in the film. Defend or critique the changes in a class discussion. 14 In-class essay Students are given the full class period to complete the essay on one of two assigned topics. They may bring in a prepared outline.

Assessment (Make a distinction Assessment of learning: between Understanding/participation in censorship debate assessment for Character sketch presentation Am I my brothers keeper or Censorship composition learning and Composition corrections assessment of In-class essay learning)

Assessment for learning: Reading quizzes on the chapters Comprehension assessment of articles on censorship and the Curse of Cain Assessment of links between the novel and To a Mouse as well as The Curse of Cain Written responses to questions (ex: Impressions of chapter four) Movie review

Resources (Books, ppts, websites, etc.)

Files on the FVCH network: teachers courses Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck 1992 film with John Malkovich and Gary Sinese Of Mice and Men: John Steinbecks parable of the curse of Cain by William Goldhurst To a Mouse by Robert Burns G-rated Education for a Leave it to Beaver World by Stefan Ulstein Should Christians read Dirty Books? by Barbara Pell Thoughts on censorship written by Hugh Cook (in The Banner 1981) Morals and Education: Whose responsibility? by Carolyn Moulton

Unit: Length:

Flannery OConnor 10-12 classes

English 12 EN 12 Leanne Engbers and Matthew Beimers

Essential Questions (Thematic Statements)

What is the mystery of God? How is lifes texture and experience different in those felt-moments, poignant life moments, small beautiful moments, moments of raw reality? How is God connected to these moments? How would you live and think differently if you were always in the state of raw reality (ex: paraphrase from Good Man, Shed be a good woman if she had a gun to her head every minute of her life.) What is sentimental fiction? Is Flannery OConnor a Catholic writer? What is the technique of the grotesque? How does it connect to OConnors themes and style? What literary techniques does OConnor use?

Common PLOs in each unit (found in first unit) describe and apply a variety of literary devices and techniques to create particular effects, including figurative language, symbolism, parody, and irony describe and apply a variety of literary devices and techniques to create particular effects, including figurative language, symbolism, parody, and irony adapt their use of language register and the sophistication of grammatical constructs for specific audiences and purposes use a variety of planning tools, including outlines, webs, flow charts, and diagrams to communicate their plans to others

Learning Targets (Ministry IRPs or School Mission related ILOs) Learning Strategies (Assignments, Activities, etc.)

1 Introduction to OConnor Without any introductory comments on it, tell the students the class will dive into OConnors story. Assign readers theatre roles in which students take on the dialogue parts of different characters. I, the teacher, will narrate. (Mrs. Hopewell, Mrs. Freeman, Joy/Hulga, The Bible Salesman) Enjoy the story. Students will most likely be shocked at the odd plot line and grotesque elements of the story particularly the line Show me your leg. Enjoy their reactions. Allow it to be an interest catcher to hook them for the next story, A Good Man is Hard to Find. 2 Good Country People discussion and Intro to Seminars Introduce the idea of the seminars they will work on and present. Use the notes from Good Country People as an example of the order: reading quiz, visual/indirect teaching method (the pictures), seminar explanations (the notes). Go through the notes on Good Country People in the expected seminar format. Give students the handout on OConnors world view for homework. *3 A Good Man is Hard to Find discussion (either as another teacher lead seminar, or could be one of the stories students research in groups) 4 Seminar work/research Students work on individual stories they have been assigned to (in groups of about 4). Each student receives a topic within that story to research (images, character study, theme etc). Students plan an overall visual or concrete connection to emphasize (and make plain) the theme of the story. Students are given some secondary resources and research at the library for secondary resources.

Seminar work/research part 2 More class time given for research. Review on citing sources and implementing research properly time permitting, another class could be given for this research

6-10 Seminar presentations Each group presents a seminar (The Life You Save May Be Your Own, The River, Temple of the Holy Ghost, The Artificial Nigger (pardon the title; context reviewed)). Time: due to extra curricular events, these seminars have sometimes taken an extra class In-class essay Students are given ahead of time two topics that combine symbols, imagery, themes of several stories. They prepare for each essay ONE topic is chosen in class and the students write out a literary essay analyzing OConnors themes and techniques.

Assessment (Make Assessment for learning: Participation in discussions a distinction Quizzes on individual stories between Assessment of learning: assessment for Student-lead seminar learning and In-class essay test assessment of learning)

Resources (Books, ppts, websites, etc.)

Files on the FVCH network: teachers courses Mystery and Manners by Flannery OConnor Anthology A Good Man is Hard to Find by Flannery OConnor Miscellaneous academic articles exploring OConnors stories

English 12
EN12 Leanne Engbers and Matthew Beimers Unit: Postmodern Literature (novel groups): Cry, the Beloved Country; Handmaids Tale; Life of Pi; or Life After God (newly approved by the 13 classes General essential questions: How does postmodernism come out in art, literature, film in our culture? Is it wrong to be postmodern? Can one be a Christian and postmodern? How does story tell truth in a way that fact cant? For Cry the Beloved Country: How does South Africas history and current culture affect me today? Am I racist? Is racism an issue in Canada today? How do I find and give hope in a world of hate and revenge? For Handmaids Tale: What is the importance of individuality? Am I an individual or unknowingly controlled by something or someone else? (ex: media, fashion) What is the link between sexuality and power? Who do I have power over? Do I use sexuality for power? Where, in the world, have people lost individual rights? What is the ideal society? (utopia?) For Life of Pi: What is spirituality in todays culture? What are the foundations and basic beliefs of Islam, Hinduism and Christianity? Why did Pi want to embrace all religions? What is at the heart of human behaviour? Are we just animals? How does one survive tragedy and loneliness? How does story contain truth that facts do not?

lit review committee implemented 2007-2008)

Length:

Essential Questions (Thematic Statements)

For each novel unit: Common PLOs in each unit (found in first unit) make connections between their own values, belief, and cultures and those reflected in literature and mass media analyze ways in which literature and mass media have dealt with issues involving personal identity and community and respond to these in terms of their own ideas, experience, and communities describe and apply a variety of literary devices and techniques to create particular effects, including figurative language, symbolism, parody, and irony explain and evaluate the effectiveness of persuasive strategies and techniques

Learning Targets (Ministry IRPs or School Mission related ILOs)

Learning Strategies (Assignments, Activities, etc.)

1 Introduction to novels Give each small group the introductory assignment: (ex: sexuality/power/ideal society; South Africa; anthropomorphism/zoology/hinduism) Meet with each group to set up context, explain confusion in the novel etc. The group on the Handmaids Tale particularly needs context because much of what they will discuss is earlier than where they are at in the chapters (the discussion is on sexuality and Atwoods use of harsh language, but the Ceremony hasnt taken place yet). Explain its meant to be discussed BEFORE getting to that passage, so the reader has some context already. Groups work to get the assignment done. One copy is handed in with the group members names on it. 2 Research and Creative Response Give students the research assignments (ex: Pis pretend funeral of 3 religions; Shantytown vs Afrikaaners houses; Iranian women after the Revolution) They may either work alone or with a partner on this assignment. They will be given two class periods to work on it. Allow students to go to the library or research in the classroom. 3 Discussions on each novel Have students put into groups for discussion. Consider the groups to make the best discussion potential. Discussions are on novels characters, plot points, some thematic topics (see individual assignment on course drive for specifics) 4-5 Interactive whole class discussions: Preparation Students are given thematic discussion topics for the whole class to discuss (even students who havent read the novel). Day one: Go over the instructions, giving some ideas/examples to help them understand the expectations (goal: to get their classmates to feel the tension of their topic, and not to sit back and watch in an uninvolved way. In other words, make it an experience for the class that is opposite of the experience of the OConnor seminars this year ) Allow students to tackle this assignment alone, or within a group of 2-4 people. Topics are first come, first serve Give them time to discuss the topics and begin planning. Day two: Give the students some ideas on how to lesson plan (how to engage the class). Remind them of the time restriction. Go over the evaluation rubric. 6.8 Discussions Students lead the class in 15 minute discussions. 9-11 Video thematic comparison Students view either Big Fish or The Power of One and complete a written thematic comparison 12 Post reading Assignment Life of Pi: Summarize in 10 sentences of point form (make them complete sentences for clarity), Pis story if Pi's mother, along with a sailor and a cannibalistic cook, had perhaps been in the lifeboat with him instead of the animals? Look at the details of the animals at the beginning of the life raft journey, and translate those events into what would have happened to the people on the life boat. Consider that most people presume Richard Parker is Pi.

Cry, the Beloved Country: Find the story of King Davids song Absalom in the Bible. Summarize in 5-10 points (make them complete sentences for clarity), the Biblical allusion in the novel (the character Absalom). The Handmaids Tale: Browse through the novel, and list 10 Biblical references in the novel

(ie: names, titles etc). Beside each one, explain the Biblical story/person, then what you believe Atwoods strategy is for using that name/allusion. 13 Unit test Students write an in-class test. Questions are thematic and thought provoking, rather than content based

Assessment (Make Reading quizzes a distinction Homework assignments between Assessment of learning: assessment for Interactive discussion Creative research assignment learning and Unit test assessment of learning)
Files on the FVCH network: teachers courses Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood Life of Pi by Yann Martel SCSBC unit on Cry, the Beloved Country c. 1984 Cry, the Beloved Country The Centre for Learning 1988 Cry Freedom, starring Denzel Washington The Power of One movie Big Fish movie The Handmaids Tale teachers guide Society of the Future by H. VanRiessen

Assessment for learning:

Resources (Books, ppts, websites, etc.)

English 12
EN12 Leanne Engbers and Matthew Beimers Unit: Length: Provincial exam preparation 6-7 classes

Essential Questions (Thematic Statements)

How do I prepare for the provincial exam? What are the evaluators looking for in an essay? In a composition? What strategies and hints will help me write the exam?

- describe and apply a variety of literary devices and technique to create particular effects, including

Learning Targets (Ministry IRPs or School Mission related ILOs) Learning Strategies (Assignments, Activities, etc.)

figurative language, symbolism, parody, and irony - adapt their use of language register and the sophistication of grammatical constructs for specific audiences and purposes - describe and evaluate alternative approaches to presentations for specific audiences and purposes

1 Overall exam structure and introduction


Introduce the different sections of the exam (all sight passages and written essays/composition) Note for students: they have been studying all year long in the essays and reading they have been doing. Introduce the project in which they must complete each section of the exam, as well as edit classmates written portions (to get a clear sense of the evaluation rubrics and the #6 voice/style) Part A: Informational Text Students complete a sample and hand it in.

2 Literary terms Students review old literary terms from previous years and learn some more abstract terms. Students complete an assignment, allowing them to practice multiple choice questions similar to those on the exam (all literary terms) Take up assignment, explaining and teaching the terms 3 Poetry Give the students a sheet on advice for the poetry section (from previous exam evaluators) Present to them the grading scale/rubric the ministry uses (used throughout the year on assignments). Show them sample 6 essays Students complete Part B of exam: Poetry multiple choice and short essay. 4 Prose Give the students a sheet on advice for the prose section (from previous exam evaluators) Present to them the grading scale/rubric the ministry uses (used throughout the year on assignments). Show them sample 6 essays Students complete Part C of exam: Prose multiple choice and multi-paragraph essay

5 Composition Give the students a sheet on advice for the composition section (from previous exam evaluators). The main advice is to make the composition engaging, therefore they recommend making it a narrative, rather than an essay. Present to them the grading scale/rubric the ministry uses (used throughout the year on assignments). Show them sample 6 compositions, noting the voice and style Students complete Part D of exam: Write a composition on assigned topic 6 Editing (timing could be after all sections are written, or time permitting between each section to benefit from the editing experience) Remind students of grading rubric from ministry for each section Read more samples of each level: 6, 5, 4, 3 Have students edit in groups in a similar format as the evaluators do. They must discuss and argue their assessment to come up with one common score in the end. The teacher can be the mediator if necessary. Record results, browse written pieces for accuracy of assessment, hand pieces back to students Final advice for the exam (general advice); practice resources; how to come up with composition ideas, review of the years grammar topics to improve writing etc (see documents in teachers_courses drive).

Assessment (Make a distinction Assessment for learning: between Poetry assignment assessment for Editing task learning and Assessment of learning assessment of Evaluation of each section of the mock exam learning)

Resources (Books, ppts, websites, etc.)

Files on the FVCH network: teachers courses The Poets Craft by Robert J. Ireland The Key (from the Ministry) English 12 Handbook (from the Ministry) BC Provincial Exam web page (Ministry web site)