JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6, JUNE 2011, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.

COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG

130

A Comparative Genomics based evaluation on Evolutionary aspect of Cystinosin: the Protein defective in Cystinosis
Manish Dwivedi and Dwijendra K. Gupta
Abstract— Lysosomes are intracellular sacs of various hydrolases enzymes which cause the degradation of the macromolecules inside the
cell. The hydrolytic digest products are then transported across the lysosomal membrane via specific membrane transporters proteins, to be either reused by the cell or excreted outwards. In this computer-aided effort, we reported a bioinformatics based sequence analysis of cystinosin proteins, using different bioinformatics tools like BLAST, ClustalW, MEGA4, BioEdit (version 7.0.0) etc. to analyze the cystinosin protein sequences with the prospects of molecular evolutionary relationship among 18 taxa as well as to explore the different analytics on sequence. In our study we find out the number of coserved domains and established a evolutionary tree and hydrophobicity profile along with the entropy plot. This protein is basically hydrophobic in nature as most of the positions were an above mean hydrophobicity with hydrophobic amino terminal and non hydrophobic carboxy terminal end in case of most of the organisms studied here. This approach help to reveal the molecular basis of the disease cystinosis and cell bilogic features with the subcellular localization of the protein cystinosin. This information also assist to predict the exact function of the cystinosin in the lysosomal membrane and enable us to understand the critical regions of cystinosin. Index Terms— Bioinformatics, cystinosin, evolutionary, lysosomes.

——————————  ——————————

1 INTRODUCTION
tion  in  mammalian  cells.  An  imperfection  in  either  the  transportation  or  degradation  process  can  result  in  an  accumulation of the undigested substrate or the hydrolyt‐ ic  degradation  product  within  the  lysosomes,  affecting  the cell physiology and causing a disorder called as lyso‐ somal  storage  disorder.  Number  of  such  disorders  have  been  investigated  and  classified  according  to  the  mole‐ cules  deposited  intra‐lysosomally  [1].    Most  of  these  dis‐ orders  are  caused  by  the  defects  in  one  of  the  lysosomal  hydrolases,  however,  some  of  the  lysosomal  disorders  arises due to defects in one of the membrane transporters  proteins  [2]. Cystinosis  (MIM  21980)  is  one  of  such  auto‐ somal  recessive  disorder  which  is  caused  by  defects  in  cystinosin transporter proteins.  Cystinosin  is  a  lysosomal  membrane  transporter  protein  but  how  it  is  targeted  to  this  lysosome  organelle,  is  still  under  investigation  and  any  mutation  in  cystinosin  lead  to  the  cystinosis.  This  inherited  lysosomal  transport  dis‐ order, cystinosis is distinguished by defective transport of  cystine  amino  acid  from  the  lysosomes  to  cytosol  results  in to accumulation of intra‐lysosomal cystine and it is the  most  frequent  inherited  cause  of  the  renal  Fanconi  syn‐ drome.  Several  biochemical  researches  showed  that  the 

L YSOSOMES  are  major  sites  for  the  intracellular  diges‐

lysosomal  cystine  transporter  exclusively  transports  the  cystine amino acid therefore it is distinct from the plasma  membrane cystine transporters proteins.    This  autosomal  recessive  disorder  cystinosis  represents  three allelic clinical forms, depending on severity and age  of onset. The infantile form (MIM 21980) usually emerges  at  6–8  months  of  age  with  a  proximal  renal  tubulopathy,  can  lead  to  death  by  10  years  of  age  due  to  renal  failure  and  in  the  absence  of  renal  transplantation  (Gahl  et  al.,  1995). Additional clinical symptoms are retinal blindness,  hypothyroidism,  diabetes  mellitus,  swallowing  difficulties and neurological deterioration, which appears  ultimately due to the extensive accumulation of cystine in  most  tissues.  The  juvenile  form  (MIM  219900)  is  represented by glomerular renal damage, which apparent  at  around  10–12  years  of  age  and  gradually  leads  to  glo‐ merular  insufficiency  and  corneal  cystinecrystal  deposi‐ tion  causing  photophobia.  Finally,  the  ocular  non‐ nephropathic  form  (MIM  219750)  is  solely  characterized  by a mild photophobia but no renal anomalies.  Cystine  is  a  byproduct  of  lysosomal  protein  hydrolysis,  and is reduced to the disulfide cysteine amino acid in the  cytoplasm.  Cystinotic  cells  normally  contains  the  en‐ zymes  involved  in  cyst(e)ine  redox  reactions,  it  has  been  postulated that the underlying metabolic disorder of cys‐ tinosis  is  a  imperfect  lysosomal  membrane  cystine  trans‐ ————————————————  M. Dwivedi is a Doctoral scholar at the Center of Bioinformatics, Univer- port (Gahl et al., 1995). Support for this postulate has been  provided  by  the  investigation  showing  that  cystine  is ra‐ sity of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002 INDIA.  Prof. Dwijendra K Gupta is Coordinator-Chair at the Center of Bioinforpidly vanished from artificially loaded normal lysosomes,  matics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211002, INDIA. whereas  egress  of  cystine  from  cystinotic  lysosomes  is  almost  non‐existent  (Gahl  et  al.,  1982b;  Jonas  et  al., 
© 2011 Journal of Computing Press, NY, USA, ISSN 2151-9617 http://sites.google.com/site/journalofcomputing/

JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6, JUNE 2011, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG

131

1982a,b;  Steinherz  et  al.,  1982).  Furthermore,  carrier  me‐ diated cystine transport has been observed across the ly‐ sosomal membrane which is approved by the representa‐ tion of saturation kinetics by the velocity of cystine efflux  from normal lysosomes (Gahl et al., 1982a) and the coun‐ ter  transport  exhibition  of  the  cystine  amino  acid  across  the  normal  lysosomal  membrane  (Gahl  et  al.,  1983)  which are two important hallmarks representing the car‐ rier‐mediated transport.  The  cystinosin  protein  containing  367  amino  acids,  is  coded by the gene CTNS, and positional cloning strategy  (Town  et  al.,  1998)  was  used  to  identify  this  gene.  The  amino terminal end of the protein is highly glycosylated  whereas  carboxy  terminal  end  carries  a  GY‐XXF  lyso‐ somal  targeting  motif  comprising  seven  predicted  transmembrane  domains,  a  N‐terminal  region  of  128  amino  acid  bearing  seven  N‐glycosylation  sites  and  a  cytosolic  C‐terminus  with  10  amino  acid  having  a  tyro‐ sine‐based lysosomal sorting motif (GYDQL).   At present, Homo sapiens online databases comprises sev‐ eral cystinosin isoforms [isoform CRA_b (gi: EAW90495),  cystinosis nephropathic (gi: AAH32850), cystinosis neph‐ ropathic isoform 1 (gi: NP_001026851), unnamed protein  product  (gi:  BAF84708)].  Among  these,  presence  of  a  longer  transcript  is  designated  by  the  partial  expressed  sequence  tag  sequences  and  complete  sequences  from  human spleen and testis (gi: AAH32850 and BAF84708),  as  a  consequence  of  an  alternative  splicing  of  the  ulti‐ mate  exon.  Protein  databases  (XP_001089495.1,  XP_854520.1,  XR_021668.1)  and  nonhuman  DNA  also  have some                                similar isoforms, although  these alternative cystinosin                 sequences  are not  supported by functional data.  Although  any  defects  in  cystinosin  proteins  have  been  linked  to  the many  forms  of  cytinosis  (Shotelersuk  et  al.,  1998;  Town  et  al.,  1998; Attard  et  al.,  1999;  Thoene  et  al.,  1999), it has not yet been concluded whether this cystino‐ sin protein is directly or indirectly responsible for the de‐ fective  cystine  transport  across  the  lysosomal  membrane  in  cystinotic  cells.  Lysosomal  cystine  transporter  may  be  represented  by  Cystinosin  itself.  However,  recently  known  transporters  do  not  illustrate  similarity  with  its  sequence  or  predicted  topology.  On  the  basis  of  these  facts,  alternatively  it  has  been  suggested  that  cystinosin  might indirectly affect lysosomal cystine egress (Attard et  al., 1999; Mancini et al., 2000).   In  this  study,  we  addressed  the  evolutionary  account  of  cystinosin with respect to 18 selected organisms as shown  in  table‐1  by  using  a  strategy  that  exploited  our  recent  knowledge  of  the  Phylogenetic  relationship  of  the  mem‐ brane proteins. We also reported the hydrophobicity pro‐ file, entropy and conserved domain within the cystinosin  protein family.   

TABLE 1 CYSINOSIN SEQUENCES WITH THEIR LENGTH AND NCBI ACCESSION CODE

Length Organism Mus musculus Bos Taurus Homo sapiens Rattus norvegicus Caenorhabditis elegans Gallus gallus Canis familiaris Aedes aegypti Caenorhabditis briggsae Drosophila melanogaster Ornithorhynchus anatinus Caligus clemensi Trypanosoma cruzi Perkinsus marinus Schistosoma mansoni Ixodes scapularis Pediculus humanus corporis Culex quinquefasciatus NCBI Accession code gi|11967808|emb|CAC19455.1| gi|182639279|sp|A7MB63.1| gi|3036840|emb|CAA11021.1| gi|109491251|ref|XP_001080248.1| gi|32565006|ref|NP_872022.1| gi|50758292|ref|XP_415851.1| gi|73967295|ref|XP_548340.2| gi|157167697|ref|XP_001655585.1| gi|215275218|sp|A8WN56.1| gi|34223744|sp|Q9VCR7.2| gi|149641786|ref|XP_001508868.1| gi|225717886|gb|ACO14789.1| gi|71422082|ref|XP_812021.1| gi|239885524|gb|EER09461.1| gi|238665302|emb|CAZ36053.1| gi|240999715|ref|XP_002404776.1| gi|242006380|ref|XP_002424029.1| gi|170044802|ref|XP_001850022.1| (aa) 367 367 367 392 374 377 367 367 403 397 605 409 383 302 359 266 356 399

2 MATERIALS AND METHODS
In  order  to  search  cystinosin  family  members  we  per‐ formed BLAST [3] by using blastp program in the protein  database  at  NCBI  [4].Homo  sapiens  cystinosin  proteins 

gi|3036840|emb|CAA11021.1|  amino  acid  sequence  was  selected  as  query.  From  the  hits  18  sequences,  each  from  different species (organism) were selected for further stu‐ dies. All the sequences were taken in FASTA format. The  sequences were examined individually and aligned using  CLUSTALW [5]. Bioedit version 7.0.0. [6] was used for ma‐ nual editing and analysis of sequences. Kyte J and Doolittle  [7]  method  was  used  to  plot  hydrophobicity  profile.  En‐ tropy is then calculated as:    H(l) = ‐Σf(b,l)ln(f(b,l))  where  H(l)  =  the  uncertainty,  also  called  entropy  at  posi‐ tion  l,  b  represents  a  residue  (out  of  the  allowed  choices  for the sequence in question), and f(b,l) is the frequency at  which  residue  b  is  found  at  position  l.  The  information  content  of  a  position  l,  then,  is  defined  as  a  decrease  in  uncertainty  or  entropy  at  that  position. As  an  alignment  improves  in  quality,  therefore,  the  entropy  at  each  posi‐ tion  (especially  conserved  regions)  should  decrease,  which  gives  a  measure  of  uncertainty  at  each  position  relative  to  other  positions.  Maximum  total  uncertainty  will  be  defined  by  the  maximum  number  of  different  characters  found  in  a  column. A  window  of  defined  size  that  was  13  is  moved  along  a  sequence,  the  hydropathy  scores  are  summed  along  the  window,  and  the  average  (the  sum  divided  by  the  window  size)  is  taken  for  each  position in the sequence. The mean hydrophobicity value  was plotted for the middle residue of the window. Eisen‐ berg  et.  al.  method  [8]  was  used  to  plot  hydrophobic  mo‐ ment profile with a window size of 13 residues having six 

© 2011 Journal of Computing Press, NY, USA, ISSN 2151-9617 http://sites.google.com/site/journalofcomputing/

JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6, JUNE 2011, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG

132

residues on either side of the current residue and rotation  angle, θ =100 degrees.  μH= {[Hnsin(δn)]^2+[Hncos(δn)]^2}  Where  μH  is  the  hydrophobic  moment,  Hn  is  the  hydro‐ phobicity  score  of  the  residue  H  at  position  n,  δ=100  de‐ grees,  n  is  position  within  the  segment,  and  each  hydro‐ phobic  moment  is  summed  over  a  segment  of  the  same  defined window length. 

Segment Length: 38 Segment Length: 83 Average entropy (Hx): 0.9289 Average entropy (Hx): 0.6944 Consensus:              Consensus: 
469 PVDLNDVFFSLHAVAATLITILQCCFYERGGQRVSWPA 506
543 WLDFLYCFSYIKLAITLIKYFPQAYMNFRRKSTVGWSIGNILLDFTGGSLSLLQMFLQAYNNDDWTLIFGDPTKFGLGVFSIF 625

3 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION
3.1 Multi ple  seq uen ce al ignme nt:   
Fig. 2. Four conserved domains obtained with their length.

The  Multiple  alignment  of  cystinosin  proteins  (Figure  1)    3.3  Entropy  pl ot  resulted  into  an  alignment  having  680  positions.  By       statistical  analysis  of  multiple  aligned  sequences  it  was  An  entropy  plot,  measure  of  the  lack  of  the  information  observed  that  phenylalanine,  isoleucine,  leucine,  serine,  valine and glycine are the most frequently present amino  acids with frequency percentage of 7.80, 8.40, 10.95, 7.95,  9.39  and  6.26  respectively.  While  within  conserved  sites  glycine,  lysine,  asparagine,  proline,  glutamine  and         tyrosine  are  the  most  frequently  occuring  amino  acids  with frequency percentage of 19.10, 15.45, 7.73, 7.73, 15.24  content  and  the  amount  of  and  11.37  respectively.  The  multiple  aligned  sequence  of  cystinosin  protein  was  found  with  No.  of  conserved  variability,  was  generated  for  all  the  aligned  positions  sites=27,  No.  of  parsimony  informative  sites=  293,  No.  of  (Figure  3).  The  plot  shows  that  entropy  rarely  touches  a  scale  of  two,  showing  minimal  entropy  at  several  singleton sites= 101 and no. of variables 400.   positions from position 400 to position 650 where entropy  3.2  Conse rve d  regio n  search  A conserved region search resulted into four regions from  rarely  crosses  a  scale  of  one,  which  is  a  sign  of  better  position  374  to  421  (segment  length  =  48),  429  to  447  alignment  in  the  region.  Any  position  before  375  doesn’t  (segment  length  =  19),  469  to  506  (segment  length  =  38)  show much conservedness.  and 543 to 625 (segment length =83) with an average  en‐ 3.4  Hy dr op ho bi city  profile  a nd   hy dr op ho b‐ tropy of 1.0170, 0.8865, 0.9289, and 0.6944 respectively as  i c  mo me nt  A  hydrophobicity  profile  plot  shows  that  mean  hydro‐ phobicity of the protein for most of the positions is in all 

Fig. 1. M u l t i p e p r o t e i n s .   

sequence

alignment

of

Cystinosin

Fig. 3. E n t r o p y ( H x ) P l o t .

shown  in  figure  2.  This  conservation  has  already  been  upheld  by  minimal  entropy  shown  by  positions  374  to  625.     
Region 1: Position 374 to 421              Region 2: Position 429 to 447                    Segment Length: 48                              Segment Lengths: 19            Average entropy (Hx): 1.0170      Average entropy (Hx): 0.8865  Consensus Consensus:
374 NQTDPRIRFLVIHSRILSIISQVIGWIYFVAWSVSFYPQVILNWRRKS 421

429 FDFLALNLTGFVAYSVFNI 447

Region 3: Position 469 to 506

Region 4: Position 543 to 625

the species is around zero, occassionaly it turns to be pos‐ itive  or  negative  (Figure  4).  N‐terminal  domain  and  C‐ terminal  domain  is  non‐hydrophobic  in  Ornithorhynchus  anatinus. Maximum hydrophobicity is observed from po‐ sitions  240  to  270  and  between  370  to  630  positions  in  Aedes  aegypti,  Drosophila  melanogaster,  Schistosoma  mansoni  and  Perkinsus  marinus.  N‐terminal  domains  are  more  hy‐ drophobic  while  c‐terminal  domains  are  non‐ hydrophobic in the most of the organisms. A long chain of  the  protein  in  the  Ornithorhynchus  anatinus  from  position  1‐230  shows  non‐hydrophobicity.  Culex  quinquefasciatus  and Trypanosoma cruzi exhibits high jump in hydrophobic‐

JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6, JUNE 2011, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG

133

ity  from  position  240  to  260  and  500  to  540  respectively.  These  proteins  are  basically  of  hydrophobic  in  nature  as  most  of  the  positions  are  across  show  the  above  mean  hydrophobicity  in  the  case  of  most  of  the  organisms       studied here. 

3.5  P hylo ge ne y 
The  phylogenetic  trees  were  constructed  by  using            Neighbour  –joining  method  (Figure  5‐6).  The  tree  shows  different  organisms  on  tree  nodes  branched  on  the  basis 

Fig. 4. K y t e profile plot.

and

Dolittle

scale

mean

hydrophobicity

of  their  cystinosin  proteins.  Perkinsus  marinus  and  Trypa‐ nosoma  cruzi  makes  a  totally  diverged  branch  from  the  across  family  of  organisms  with  special  reference  to  main tree among the selected proteins. Node for inverte‐ mammals. The study established an overall framework of  brates  is  supported  by  lower  bootstrap  values  while  the  information  for  the  family  of  Cystinosin  proteins,  which  node  for  vertebrates  (Homo  sapiens,  Mus  musculus,  Gallus  may facilitate and stimulate the study of this gene family  gallus)  is  supported  by  very  high  bootstrap  value  i.e.  across  all  organisms.  This  approach  help  to  reveal  the  100%.  Branches  corresponding  to  partitions  reproduced  molecular  basis  of  the  disease  cystinosis  and  cell  bilogic  in less than 50% bootstrap replicates are collapsed. There  features  of  the  protein  cystinosin  and  their  subcellular  were a total of 223 positions in the final dataset. This tree  localization.  This  information  also  assist  to  predict  the  gives  an  idea  about  the  evolutionary  order  of  Cystinosin  exact  function  of  the  cystinosin  in  the  lysosomal  proteins. This phylogeny does not seem to be completely  membrane  and  can  allow  a  better  undersatanding  of  the  consistent  with  the  current  view  of  taxonomy  perhaps  critical regions of cystinosin.  due  to  use  of  a  specific  protein  rather  than  complete     genomes. 

Fig. 6. Bootstrap original phylogenetic tree of Cystinosin proteins created by Neighbour-joining method showing bootstrap support values on the nodes.

AUTHOR’S CONTRIBUTION

4

CONCLUSION

This study presents the first comparative genomics study  and  evolutionary  analysis  of  the  cystinosin  proteins 

Authors performed the method, evaluation and prepared  the datasets and conceptualized the work.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
MD is thankful to Department of Science and Technology,  New  Delhi  for  a  research  fellowship.  The  work  has  been  supported by a DBT‐BIF Grant to DKG under its BTISNet  scheme  and  University  Grants  Commission‐  Innovative  Grant Sceme.  

REFERENCES
[1] [2] [3] Neufeld, E. F, Annu Rev Biochem., 60, 257‐80, 1991.  Mancini,  G.  M.,  Havelaar,  A.  C.,  and  Verheijen,  F.  W.,  J  Inherit  Metab Dis., 23(3), 278‐92, 2000.  Altschul, Stephen F., Thomas L. Madden, Alejandro A. Schäffer,  Jinghui  Zhang,  Zheng  Zhang,  Webb  Miller,  and  David  J.  Lip‐ man, ʺGapped BLAST and PSI‐BLAST: a new generation of pro‐ tein database search programsʺ, Nucleic Acids Res. 25:3389‐3402,  1997.  www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez  (National  Centre  for  Biotechnol‐ ogy Information).  Higgins D., Thompson J., Gibson T. Thompson J. D., Higgins D.  G., Gibson T. J.: CLUSTAL W, Improving the sensitivity of pro‐

Fig. 5. Bootstrap consensus phylogenetic tree of Cystinosin proteins created by Neighbour- joining method showing bootstrap support values on the nodes

[4] [5]

© 2011 Journal of Computing Press, NY, USA, ISSN 2151-9617 http://sites.google.com/site/journalofcomputing/

JOURNAL OF COMPUTING, VOLUME 3, ISSUE 6, JUNE 2011, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG

134

[6]

[7] [8]

[9]

[10]

[11] [12] [13]

[14]

[15]

[16] [17] [18]

[19] [20]

gressive multiple sequence alignment through sequence weight‐ ing,  position‐specific  gap  penalties  and  weight  matrix  choice.  Nucleic Acids Res. , 22:4673‐4680, 1994.  Hall,  T.A.:  BioEdit:  a  user‐friendly  biological  sequence  align‐ ment editor and analysis program for Windows 95/98/NT.  Nucl.  Acids. Symp. Ser. , 41:95‐98, 1999.  Kyte  J  and  Doolittle  RF,  A  simple  method  for  displaying  the  hydropathic character of a protien. J. Mol. Biol., 157:105, 1982.  Eisenberg D. E. Schwarz, M. Komaromy and R.Wall, Analysis of  membrane and surface protein sequences with the hydrophobic  moment plot.  J. Mol Biol., 179(1):125‐42, 1984.  Anna T,Stefania P,Veronica D L, Francesco E et al, Identification  and  subcellular  localization  of  a  new  cystinosin  isoform.,  Am  J  Physiol Renal Physiol, 294: F1101–F1108, 2008.  Tamura  K,  Dudley  J,  Nei  M  &  Kumar  S:  MEGA4:  Molecular  Evolutionary  Genetics  analysis  (MEGA)  software  version  4.0,  Molecular Biology and Evolution, 24:1596‐1599, 2007.  Robert K, William A, Cystinosis, Gene Review, 2005.  Vasiliki K and Corinne, Cystinosis: from gene to disease, Nephrol  Dial Transplant, 17: 1883–1886, 2002.  Mushfequr  R.  ,Vasiliki  K.,  Adrian  S.  W.  et  al.,  Immunolocaliza‐ tion of Cystinosin, the Protein Defective in Cystinosis, J Am Soc  Nephrol , 13: 2046–2051, 2002.  Vasiliki K, Stephanie C, Corinne A and Bruno G: Cystinosin, the  protein defective in cystinosis, is a H+‐driven lysosomal cystine  transporter. The EMBO Journal, 20, 5940–5949, 2001.  Stéphanie C, Vasiliki K, Germain T and Corinne, The targetting  of  cystinosin  to  the  lysosomal  membrane  requires  a  tyrosine‐ based signal and a novel sorting motif, J. Biol. Chem. 2001.  Altschul  S.F.  and  Gish  G.,  Local  alignment  statistics,  Methods  Enzymol., 266:460‐480 1996.   Fukuda,  M.  N.,  Dell,  A.,  and  Scartezzini,  P.,  J.  Biol.  Chem.,  262:7195‐7206, 1987  Saitou N & Nei M: The neighbor‐joining method: A new method  for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Molecular Biology and Evo‐ lution, 4:406‐425, 1987, 1987.  Felsenstein  J,  Confidence  limits  on  phylogenies:  An  approach  using the bootstrap., Evolution, 39:783‐791, 1985.  Zuckerkandl  E  &  Pauling  L,  Evolutionary      divergence  and  convergence  in  proteins,  Evolving  Genes  and  Proteins,  Academic  Press, New York, 97‐166, 1965. 

  M. Dwivedi, Senior Research Fellow, Center of Bioinformatics, University of Allahabad,INDIA, a paper published in BIJIT (ISSN No. 0973-5658),currently involved in the membrane protein characterization by using the IgYs and Bioinformatics Tools, Member of Indian Science Congress Association and International Academy of Physical Science. Prof. Dr. Dwijendra K. Gupta, Professor is Cordinator-Chair at Center of Bioinformatics, and former Head, Department of Biochemistry at University of Allahabad.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful