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QUIZ 1 Submission View

Your quiz has been submitted successfully. T/F Question 1 1 / 1 point An box starts from rest and accelerates uniformly. It travels one third as far during the first second of its motion than in the next second. 1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 2 0 / 1 point An ball is thrown vertically upward. At the top of its flight, both the ball's velocity and acceleration are zero. 1) True 2) False View Feedback MC Question 3 The term "uniform motion" means 1) velocity is constant 2) velocity is zero 3) speed is constant 4) displacement is constant 5) acceleration is constant View Feedback Question 4 0 / 1 point
A spark timer/air table produced the tape pictured above. The object, moving to the right, was

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1) accelerating then moving with constant speed 2) moving with uniform motion 3) speeding up 4) travelling with constant speed

5) slowing down View Feedback Question 5 1) five 2) seven 3) three 4) four 5) six View Feedback Question 6 1 / 1 point An object is thrown downward with a speed of 10 m/s from a bridge. Accelerating under gravity (9.8 m/s2), the object strikes the water 1.8 s later. From what height above the water was the object thrown? (Assume 2 significant digits.) 1) 34 m 2) 3 m 3) 50 m 4) 27 m 5) 15 m View Feedback Question 7 1 / 1 point 1 / 1 point
How many "base" quantities are there from which all other quantities are derived?

Using a variety of stopwatches, four students reported the time for a ball to drop to the ground from the same height. The recorded times were 1.85 s, 1.8 s, 1.9 s, and 2 s. The average time, expressed in the correct manner, is

1) 1.8 s 2) 1.89 s 3) 1.888 s 4) 1.9 s 5) 2 s View Feedback Question 8 1 / 1 point

An 80.4-km trip takes a time of 0.75 h to complete. The average speed, expressed in the correct manner, is

1) 1.072 102 km/h 2) 1 102 km/h 3) 1.1 102 km/h 4) 29.8 m/s 5) 107.2 km/h View Feedback Question 9 1 / 1 point An rockis thrown vertically upward at 25.0 m/s. If it experiences an acceleration due to gravity of 9.8 m/s2 [down], what is the rock's velocity 3.0 s later? 1) 4 m/s [down] 2) 22 m/s [up] 3) 22 m/s [down] 4) zero (it has hit the ground) 5) 4 m/s [up] View Feedback Question 10 1 / 1 point In a triathlon participants swim for 750 m, bike for 30 km, and run for 5 km. If the time taken to complete the entire course is 1.5 h, the average speed, expressed in the proper manner, is (Assume all distances are accurate to the number of digits given.) 1) 2 101 km/h 2) 23.833 km/h 3) 23.8 km/h 4) 24 km/h 5) 23.83 km/h View Feedback

QUIZ 2
Submission View
Your quiz has been submitted successfully. T/F Question 1 0 / 1 point The slope of the line that joins two points on a velocity-time graph represents the average acceleration during that time interval. 1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 2 1 / 1 point

An ball dropped from a window falls to the ground. The position-time graph representing the ball's motion would be a straight line.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 3 1 / 1 point

A velocity-time graph that consists of a straight, non-horizontal, line represents an object that is travelling with uniform motion.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 4 1 / 1 point

A runner leaves the starting blocks at the sound of the starter's pistol. The positiontime graph representing the runner's motion during the first few strides would be a straight line.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 5 0 / 1 point The slope of the tangent to a point on a curve that is part of a position-time graph represents the instantaneous velocity.

1) True 2) False View Feedback MC Question 6

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The position-time graph pictured above represents the motions of two objects, A and B. Which of the following statements concerning the objects' motions is true?

1) Object B travels the greater distance. 2) Object A has the greater speed. 3) Object A is travelling for a longer period of time. 4) Both objects have the same speed at the point where the lines cross. 5) Object A leaves the reference point at an earlier time. View Feedback Question 7 1) velocity 2) change in acceleration 3) change in velocity 4) displacement 5) distance View Feedback Question 8 1 / 1 point
The area under an acceleration-time graph always represents

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The position-time graph above depicts the motions of two objects, A and B. Which of the following statements concerning the objects' motions is NOT true? 1) The two objects travel the same distance. 2) The two objects have the same speed. 3) The two objects travel with uniform motion. 4) The two objects travel for the same amount of time. 5) The two objects have the same velocity. View Feedback Question 9 1 / 1 point

The above velocity-time graph that represents "uniform motion" is

1) A 2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 10 1 / 1 point

The slope of a position-time graph always represents

1) displacement 2) change in velocity 3) velocity 4) acceleration 5) distance View Feedback Question 11 1 / 1 point

The position-time graph pictured below depicts a person, P, running to catch a bus, B, that has just begun to pull away. Which of the following statements is true?

1) The speed of the bus is always greater than that of the person. 2) The person's acceleration is greater than that of the bus. 3) The person's speed is always greater than that of the bus. 4) The person has two opportunities to catch up to the bus. 5) The person has no chance of catching the bus. View Feedback Question 12 1 / 1 point

A ball is thrown vertically upward into the air. Which of the above acceleration-time graphs represents the ball's motion?

1) A 2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 13 1 / 1 point

Four of the five graphs pictured below could all represent the same motion. Which graph does not belong to this group?

1) A 2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 14 1 / 1 point

The velocity-time graph pictured above represents the motion of a police car, P, in pursuit of a motorcycle, M. The motorcycle has just passed the police car. Which of the following statements is true?

1) Both vehicles are at rest when the pursuit begins. 2) The police car passes the motorcycle. 3) The police car eventually catches the motorcycle. 4) The motorcycle accelerates and then slows down. 5) At the end of the recorded time interval, the police car has yet to catch the motorcycle. View Feedback Question 15 1 / 1 point

The above velocity-time graph depicts the motions of two objects, A and B. Which of the statements describing the graph is true?

1) Object A travels farther than object B. 2) Object B travels farther than object A. 3) Both objects start from rest. 4) The two objects are travelling in opposite directions. 5) Both objects are accelerating uniformly. View Feedback

QUIZ 3
Submission View
Your quiz has been submitted successfully. T/F Question 1 1 / 1 point

Consider a trip from your home to your school and back home again. The magnitude of your displacement is equivalent to your distance travelled.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 2 1 / 1 point When a vector is multiplied by a scalar the resultant vector's direction is unchanged. 1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 3 1 / 1 point

An airplane is flying on a course directed 60 E of S. If this course is maintained, the plane will fly farther south than east.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 4 0 / 1 point Consider one complete orbit around Earth as taken by astronauts aboard a space shuttle. The magnitude of the average velocity is equivalent to the average speed. 1) True 2) False View Feedback MC Question 5

1 / 1 point

You set out in a canoe from the east shore of a south-flowing river. To maximize your velocity relative to the shore you should point your boat

1) west 2) east 3) north 4) south 5) southeast View Feedback Question 6 0 / 1 point A bike goes 6.0 km [E], then 8.0 km [S] in a total time of 0.30 h. What is the bike's average speed? 1) 47 km/h [E of S] 2) 33 km/h [E of S] 3) 47 km/h 4) 47 km/h [S of E] 5) 33 km/h View Feedback Question 7 1 / 1 point

A cyclist rides a bicycle 4.0 km west, then 3.0 km north. What is the cyclist's displacement?

1) 5.0 km [37 W of N] 2) 5.0 km [37 N of W] 3) 7.0 km [37 N of W] 4) 7.0 km [37 W of N] 5) 1.0 km [37 W of N] View Feedback Question 8 1 / 1 point Over a period of 2.0 s a car's velocity changes from 16 m/s [W] to 10 m/s [W]. What is the value of the car's acceleration during this time? 1) 3.0 m/s2 [E] 2) 13 m/s2 [E] 3) 3.0 m/s [E] 4) 13 m/s2 [W] 5) 3.0 m/s2 [W] View Feedback

Question 9

Which of the following is a "scalar" quantity?

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1) none of the above 2) distance 3) displacement 4) acceleration 5) velocity View Feedback Question 10 1 / 1 point
A pilot flies to a destination due north from the departure point. During the flight there is a wind blowing from the west. What direction must the pilot point the plane during the flight?

1) east of north 2) west of north 3) due west 4) due east 5) due north View Feedback

QUIZ 4
Submission View
Your quiz has been submitted successfully. T/F Question 1 0 / 1 point

When dynamics problems are analyzed, it is best to resolve forces both parallel and frictional to the object's motion. 1 True ) 2 Fals ) e View Feedback Question 2 1 / 1 point

A car accelerates from rest when a traffic light turns green. A cup of coffee that was sitting on the dashboard of the car falls into the driver's lap. The driver could rightly argue that the cup's apparent motion was due to its inertia. It had a tendency to stay still and the car accelerated from beneath it. 1 True ) 2 Fals ) e View Feedback Question 3 1 / 1 point

The sum of all the forces acting on a stationary object is the same as that acting on an object in uniform motion. 1 True

) 2 Fals ) e View Feedback Question 4 1 / 1 point

The normal force FN that acts on an object is always equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the gravitational force FG that is acting on it. 1 True ) 2 Fals ) e View Feedback Question 5 1 / 1 point

Earth's frame of reference is considered to be strictly an "inertial" frame of reference. 1 True ) 2 Fals ) e View Feedback Multiple Choice Question 6 1 / 1 point

Which of the following observations would be adequately explained by Newton's third law? 1 The friction of a surface causes a sliding object to come to ) rest. 2 When turning a corner, a passenger in a car feels pushed ) against the door.

3 One skater pushes against another and both move off in ) opposite directions. 4 The Earth is held in orbit around the Sun by a gravitational ) force of attraction. 5 A car's tires slip on an ice-covered surface. ) View Feedback Question 7 1 / 1 point

Which of the following fundamental forces is the weakest? 1 electromagnetic ) 2 weak nuclear ) 3 strong nuclear ) 4 They are equally ) strong. 5 gravitational ) View Feedback Question 8 1 / 1 point

Study the free-body diagram above and choose the statement that best describes the dynamics of the situation. 1 The net force acting is 30 ) N. 2 The net force acting is 6

) N. 3 The net horizontal force is ) 10 N. 4 There is no net horizontal ) force. 5 The net force acting is 26 ) N. View Feedback Question 9 1 / 1 point

A rocket accelerates upward and the thrust of the engines overcome the frictional forces and the gravity acting against the rocket. Which of Newton's laws of motion best explains this situation? 1 Newton's second law ) 2 Newton's third law ) 3 Newton's law of universal gravitation ) 4 All the laws combine to explain this ) situation. 5 Newton's first law ) View Feedback Question 10 What is the weight of one metric ton? 1 ten kilonewtons ) 2 ten newtons ) 3 one kilonewton ) 1 / 1 point

4 one ton ) 5 one hundred ) newtons View Feedback Question 11 1 / 1 point

Study the free-body diagram above and determine what additional force(s) would be required for the object to achieve uniform motion. 1 2 N [N] and 1 N ) [W] 2 1 N [E] ) 3 1 N [W] ) 4 2 N [S] and 1 N ) [W] 5 2 N [S] and 1 N ) [E] View Feedback Question 12 1 / 1 point

A heavy crate is pushed across a rough surface. The force that is ultimately responsible for the crate's motion is the 1 net force ) 2 normal force

) 3 gravitational ) force 4 frictional force ) 5 applied force ) View Feedback Question 13 1 / 1 point

Two identical arrows, A and B, are fired with different bows. The bow that fires arrow A exerts twice the average force as the bow that fires arrow B. Compare the accelerations of the two arrows. 1 Arrow B will have four times the acceleration ) of arrow A. 2 Arrow B will have twice the acceleration of ) arrow A. 3 Arrow A and arrow B will have the same ) acceleration. 4 Arrow A will have four times the acceleration ) of arrow B. 5 Arrow A will have twice the acceleration of ) arrow B. View Feedback Question 14 1 / 1 point

Study the free-body diagram above and choose the statement that best describes the object's motion.

1 The object will accelerate northeast. ) 2 The object will accelerate north. ) 3 The object will be motionless. ) 4 The object will travel with uniform motion. ) 5 The object will travel north with a ) constant velocity. View Feedback Question 15 1 / 1 point

Which of the following would Newton's first law alone NOT account for? 1 A rocket accelerates upward from a launch pad and the engines' thrust ) overcomes gravity. 2 During launch, astronauts feel that they are being pushed back into their ) seats. 3 No matter how hard you push against it, the boulder would not move. ) 4 Passengers on board an elevator undergoing uniform motion can't tell that ) the elevator is really moving. 5 A passenger leans forward in her seat when the car's brakes are applied. ) View Feedback Question 16 1 / 1 point

A hockey puck of mass 150 g is sliding south along the ice and slows at a rate of 1.2 m/s2. What is the net force acting on the puck? 1 1.9 10-1 N ) [S] 2 1.8 102 N ) [N]

3 1.8 102 N ) [S] 4 1.8 101 N ) [N] 5 1.8 10-1 N ) [N] View Feedback Question 17 1 / 1 point

When you place your hand on a desk, the pressure you feel against your hand results from 1 the strong nuclear force ) 2 a combination of the weak and strong ) nuclear forces 3 the electromagnetic force ) 4 the gravitational force ) 5 the weak nuclear force ) View Feedback Question 18 1 / 1 point

A hockey puck slides along an ice surface shortly after it has left the hockey stick that propelled it. Which of the above free-body diagrams best represents the hockey puck? 1) A

2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 19 1 / 1 point

What force would be required to support the weight of 1.0 t? 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) View Feedback Question 20 1 / 1 point 1.0 103 N 1.0 104 N 1.0 102 N 1.0 106 N 1.0 105 N

Which of the following fundamental forces only exerts forces of attraction, never repulsion? 1 gravitational ) 2 weak nuclear ) 3 electromagnetic )

4 gravitational and ) electromagnetic 5 strong nuclear ) View Feedback

QUIZ 5
Submission View
Your quiz has been submitted successfully. Multiple Choice Question 1 1 / 1 point

Which of the following statements concerning gravitational fields is true?

The strength of an object's gravitational field is inversely proportional to the square of its mass. The gravitational field strength of an object is one-quarter as great at twice the distance 2) from the object's centre. 3) The strength of an object's gravitational field is inversely proportional to its mass. The strength of an object's gravitational field is inversely proportional to the distance 4) from the object's centre. 5) Only very massive objects have gravitational fields. 1) View Feedback Question 2 1 / 1 point

Which of the above graphs best represents the relationship between the gravitational force, F, that Earth exerts and the mass, m, of an object sitting at Earth's surface, that the force is
exerted upon?

1) A 2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 3 1 / 1 point

The value of "g" at the surface of Mars is 3.7 N/kg. How much would a 60.0-kg person
weigh at an altitude above the Martian surface equivalent to the planet's radius?

1) 1.6 102 N 2) 1.1 102 N 3) 56 N 4) 2.2 102 N 5) 28 N View Feedback Question 4 0 / 1 point
If Earth's mass was four times what it is presently, what would its radius have to be (comparably) so that the gravitational field strength at its surface would remain 9.8 N/kg?

1) four times larger 2) twice as large 3) one-half as large 4) the same size 5) one-quarter as large View Feedback Question 5 0 / 1 point Consider two planets, A and B. Planet A has twice the mass and twice the radius of planet B. The ratio of gA : gB would be 1) 1 : 4 2) 2 : 1 3) 4 : 1 4) 1 : 1 5) 1 : 2 View Feedback Question 6 1 / 1 point

What would the gravitational field strength be on a planet with twice Earth's mass and twice its radius?

1) 19.6 N/kg 2) 78.4 N/kg 3) 9.8 N/kg

4) 4.9 N/kg 5) 39.2 N/kg View Feedback Question 7 1 / 1 point Which of the following graphs best depicts the relationship between the gravitational force, F, that two masses exert on one another and the distance, d, which separates their centres of mass? 1) A 2) B 3) C 4) D 5) E View Feedback Question 8 1 / 1 point

If the Moon was twice the distance from Earth as it is now, the gravitational force of attraction between the two bodies would be half as great.

1) True 2) False View Feedback Question 9 1 / 1 point

Your "weight" is properly defined as

1) the gravitational force you exert on Earth 2) the amount of material of which you are composed 3) none of the above 4) the force you exert on a set of bathroom scales 5) the gravitational force which Earth exerts on you View Feedback Question 10 1 / 1 point What would the gravitational field strength be on a planet with half Earth's mass and half its radius? 1) 19.6 N/kg 2) 4.9 N/kg 3) 9.8 N/kg 4) 78.4 N/kg

5) 39.2 N/kg

QUIZ 6
Submission View
Your quiz has been submitted successfully. Multiple Choice Question 1 1) strong nuclear force 2) a combination of all forces 3) gravitational force 4) electromagnetic force 5) weak nuclear force View Feedback Question 2 1 / 1 point 1 / 1 point

Which of the fundamental forces is directly responsible for frictional forces?

A chalk brush sits on a metre stick as pictured in the diagram above. As one end of the metre stick is elevated, the chalk brush eventually begins to slide. Why?

1) The gravitational force begins to act along the metre stick. 2) The coefficient of friction changes. 3) The gravitational force on the brush changes. 4) An applied force is created. 5) The normal force on the brush changes. View Feedback Question 3
Which of the following statements concerning friction is true?

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1) The frictional force always acts oppositely to the applied force. Two very highly-polished surfaces in contact with one another will have very little 2) friction between them. 3) Friction always acts in the direction of motion. 4) Friction is a force which is unavoidable and serves no practical purpose. For two given surfaces, the coefficient of static friction is generally greater than the 5) coefficient of kinetic friction. View Feedback Question 4
The coefficient of friction stems from the

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1) strength of the applied force 2) nature of the two surfaces in contact 3) strength of the gravitational force 4) strength of the normal force 5) mass of the object View Feedback Question 5 1 / 1 point

If the strength of the frictional force is equal to the applied force and oppositely directed, and assuming that all other forces may be ignored, the object

1) must be accelerating 2) must be just about to move 3) must be slowing down 4) must be at rest 5) may be at rest or moving at uniform velocity View Feedback