“NATIONAL THERMAL POWER CORPORATION LTD.

PROJECT REPOR ON “UNDERSTANDING THE organization STRATEGIES OF NTPC” Submitted for the partial fulfillment of the degree of
MASTER OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT & PGPM TILKMAHARASTRA University PUNE Submitted to:NTPC HRD CENTRE DWIVEDI Vindhyanagar, Dist. Singrauli(MP) Submitted By:ASHOK KUMAR
From

Date:-………

Guide Certificate

This is certify this project report entitled “understanding the organization Strategies of NTPC” Has been prepared by Mr. Ashok Kumar Dwivedi session 2009-2011in partial fulfillment for the requirement for the master degree Of “Master Of Business Administration” from Tilak Maharashtra Vidyapeeth, Pune under my supervision and guidance and recommend that it nay be accepted for examination I wish him all success for his butter future

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Und er guide’

index

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S.N Guide’s certificate

TOPIC

PAGE NO. 1

Organization’s certificate Preface Acknowledgement Objective of the study Methodology Limitation of study Scenario of power sector in india Introduction of NTPC Overview of NTPC power plants Awards and accolades won by NTPC Introduction to VSTPP Material management system at NTPC Risk management ‘5s’ Pledge Questionnaire Finding&Conclusion Bibliography
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4 5 6 7 9 20 27 35 39 42 50 57 60 66 71&72 73
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Preface
An organization oriented at growth, looking ahead, aiming high, with clarity of vision and mission. Lightening one fourth of the nation, NTPC India’s largest and premiere power company, playing its leadership roles. With its ambitious growth strategy and successful corporate plan, NTPC is pursuing the path of excellence. Making the best use of available resources and thereby powering India’s growth. I got the opportunity to do my vocational training at NTPC Vindhyachal, DistSingrauli, Madhya Pradesh, which is a great achievement for me. I have worked with my full dedication and determination. I have made this report in a simple manner covering the Overview of Power Sector Scenario, study of different aspects of NTPC and different working methods & manuals which reflects the Business Strategies of NTPC, Vindhyanagar including supporting documents. I have made all my sincere efforts to complete the project within the stimulated time period and I have enjoyed my training very much.

ASHOK KUMAR DWIVEDI AIBM,pune

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Acknowledgement
With deep reverence and profound gratitude I express my sincere thanks to Mr. R.S. Rathore (DGM, Operations) & Mr. S.K. SHARMA (Engr. HR-ED) for giving me an opportunity to do training at NTPC Vindhynagar. I also want to thank Mr. N.K.L. DAS (AGM, C&M), Mr. S.P. Acharya (Sr. Manager, PURCHASE), Mr. John Philip (Manager HR-EB), who has allowed me to do training in various departments of NTPC, Vindhyanagar. Further, I thank to Mr. Sudeer I. (Engr. C&M planning) Mr. Hemant Narvariya(Engr. PURCHASE) and who have properly guided me during my training period and provided me with all the theoretical & practical knowledge necessary for the training. At last I would like to thank Mr. Sunil Joshi, Engr. (EMD) who has helped me at the working sites, explaining and giving me all the information I needed to complete this report.

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At last I would like to convey my thanks to all the members of the C&M, PURCHASE, HR-EB and Coal Handling Plant, who have helped me at every stage of training.

Ashok kumar dwivedi
Place- NTPC, Vindhyanagar Dist- Singrauli Madhya Pradesh Date- 10.08.2010

Objective of the Study
The above study is aimed at: ➢ To gain the overall idea about the organization.

To gain a firsthand knowledge about the structure and the functioning of the various departments of NTPC.

➢ To find out the financial performance of the organization.

To find out the importance of Contract & Purchases in business. To study the investment decisions based on the understanding of future return.
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➢ To find out the future requirements of finance in business.

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Methodology
The information was collected from various sources which are listed below:➢ From the official documents. ➢ From records and manuals of different departments of the organization. ➢ From a close observation of the functioning of various departments of the organization.
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Last but not the least, knowledge, both negative and positive precipitated through informal discussions with the employees of different departments.

Research Methodology
Plan of Study

:

A proper and systematic approach is essential in any project work. Proper planning should be done for conducting the data collection, completion and presentation of the project. Each and every step must be so planned that it leads to the next step automatically. This systematic approach is a blend of planning and organization and major emphasis is given to interdependence of various steps. The plan of this study is as follows:
A.

Research Purpose: The purpose of the research was to know the criteria on which investment of the company is raised every year and a favorable rate of return is arrived at, increasing the net result of the company as per their budget.

B. Research Objective : The main objective of the research is: ➢ To know the Business strategies & investment decisions.

To analyze the investment depending on internal rate of return.

DATA PRESENTATION & ANALYSIS
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Respondent: 100
1. The training centre at my unit is well equipped. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

1 Srongly Agree 12% 6% 2% 2 Agree 3 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 20% 60% 4 Disagree 5 Srongly Disagree

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2. Training centre at unit is well maintained. (i) Strongly agree ii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

2. Training centre at unit is well maintained. 5% 3% 2% 40%

50%

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3. A mix of internal and external faculty takes training session at EDC. (i) Strongly agree (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv) Disagree

1 Srongly Agree 5% 0% 15% 2 Agree 3 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 4 Disagree 80% 5 Srongly Disagree

4. Most training needs of employees are addressed by the local EDC. (i) Strongly agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees

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1 S n ly A re ro g g e 5 % 5 % 0 % 2 A re g e 4% 2 3 N ith r A re N r e e g e o D g e isa re 4D g e isa re 4% 8 5 S n ly D g e ro g isa re

5. Faculty knowledge and training methodology at EDC are to my satisfaction. (i) Strongly agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees

(v) Strongly disagree

3 %

2 % %0

2% 0

1S n ly A re ro g g e 2A re g e 3N ith r A re N r e e g e o D g e isa re 4D g e isa re

7% 5

5S n ly D g e ro g isa re

6. Training nomination takes place as per the training needs of the employee. (i) Strongly agree (ii) Agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees Page 13

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(iv) Disagree

(v) Strongly disagree

1 Sron ly Agre g e 1 0% 0 % 2 7% 2 Ag e re 3 N ith A ree N e er g or D isag ree 4 D gre isa e 63 % 5 Sron ly D gre g isa e

7. Reporting officer takes active interest in training of their subordinate. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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0% 3%

1 Srongly Agree 3% 30% 2 Agree 3 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 4 Disagree

64% 5 Srongly Disagree

8. Employees are given as per their development plan by their reporting officer for job rotation etc. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

1 Sro ly A ree ng g 5 % 2% 3% 3% 3 2 Ag ree 3 N ithe Ag e N r e r re o D g e isa re 5% 7 4D isag ree 5 Sro ly D g e ng isa re

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9. Employees actively apply their learning from training at work place. (i) Strongly agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees

1 Srongly Agree 10% 2% 6% 19% 2 Agree 3N either Agree N or D isagree 4D isagree 63% 5 Srongly D isagree

10. Employees are given time for attending training programs. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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1 Sro g Ag e n ly re 2 1% % 7 % 1% 7 2 Ag e re 3 N ith r A re N r e e g e o D g e isa re 4D g e isa re 7% 3 5 Sro g D g e n ly isa re

11. In my opinion training and development system of NTPC adds value to organization. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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12. I look forward to take up special assignment as a part of cross functional teams. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

1 Srongly Agree 9% 12% 9% 12% 2 Agree 3 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 4 Disagree 58% 5 Srongly Disagree

13. All employees in my department get nominated for training programs uniformly. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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1 S n ly A re ro g g e 1% 0 5 % 5 % 1% 8 2 A re g e 3 N ith r A re N r e e g e o D g e isa re 4D g e isa re 6% 2 5 S n ly D g e ro g isa re

14. Employees in my department almost get same number of training man days per annum. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

1 Sron ly Ag g ree 13 % 4 % 11 % 2 Ag e re 3 N ithe Ag N r e r ree o D isag e re 4 9% 4D isag e re 5 Sron ly D g g isa ree

23 %

15. Seniors readily share their knowledge and experience with their juniors. “A Government of India Enterprise” Page 19

(i) Strongly agree Disagree

(ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree

(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees

(iv)

1 Srongly Agree 3% 43% 35% 4% 5 Srongly D isagree 15% 2 Agree 3N either Agree N or D isagree 4D isagree

16. People openly share their knowledge and ideas with each other. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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1 Sro g A ree n ly g 3% 3% 0 3 N ith r Ag e N r e e re o D g e isa re 7% 4D g isa ree 38 % 5 Sro g D n ly isag e re 22 % 2 Ag e re

17. I have imported adequate training needed to carry out my responsibility effectively. (i) Strongly agree Disagree (ii) Agree (v) Strongly disagree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv)

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1 Srongly Agree 7% 11% 4% 32% 2 Agree 3 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 4 Disagree 46% 5 Srongly Disagree

18. I feel NTPC as an organization is committed towards training and development of its employees. (i) Strongly agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree

1S n ly A re ro g g e 5 % % 3 % 2 2% 8 2A re g e 3N ith r A re N r e e g e o D a re is g e 4D g e isa re 6% 2 5S n ly D a re ro g is g e

Scope and Limitations :
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Research Boundaries: This study is based on the consolidated data of the
organization; as such the IRR cannot be calculated region wise.

Limitation of the study:
➢ The time was a big constraint as the two months was a short span of time. ➢ As the respondents are on high designations, reaching them was hectic task.

The respondents were to be reached through emails and by personal contacts and the time were not enough to get the response about the quarries and doubts raised.

Research design: Research design helps in proper collection and analysis of the
data. It helps in further course of action.

Research approach: The most appropriate research is Descriptive. This is
because the goal of the study is clear and a detailed research will help to understand the concept better.

Classification of Data: The data used for this study is Primary data and
Secondary data. Primary data includes the information collected mainly from the office. This has served as primary source of data for this study. Secondary data includes the information gathered from various websites.

Sampling Technique: The sampling procedure employed for this project is
judgmental sampling, a convenience sampling technique in which elements are based on the judgment of researcher.
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Statistical Analysis;
➢ Information collected was classified and tabulated for further analysis. ➢ Calculations were done for the interpretation of the data e.g. Discount factor, Averages, etc. ➢ The report is covered with various data and tables on which the project has been carried out.

Software tools used for the data analysis: The software tool used for data
analysis is MS WORD & MS EXCEL.

Limitations of the Study
The limitations faced during the summer course are:➢ First – it was not possible to study various aspect of the organization in detail. ➢ Employees were apprehensive of secrecy of data and therefore hesitated in disclosing all the data regarding some of the points concerning to this study. ➢ As this is a general study, hypothesis could not be drawn. ➢ Some executives could not afford time because of their busy schedule.

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Scenario of Power Sector in India
Growth of economy calls for a watching rate of growth in infrastructure facilities. Power sector is one of the major aspects of this infrastructure building. Some prominent people like the Ex Chairman of GE Jack Welch have gone to the extent of saying, “You dont have a chance to stand in the 21st century without lots of power………Without this you miss the next revolution”. India is the emerging giants of the world economy and international energy markets. Energy developments in India are transforming the global energy system by dint of their sheer size and their growing weight in international fossilfuel trade. India is increasingly exposed to changes in world energy markets. The staggering pace of Indian economic growth in the past few years, outstripping that of all other major countries, has pushed up sharply their energy needs, a growing share of which has to be imported. The momentum of economic development looks set to keep their energy demand growing strongly. As they become richer, the citizens of India are using more energy to run their offices, factories and
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buying more electrical appliances and cars. These developments are contributing to a big improvement in their quality of life, a legitimate aspiration that needs to be accommodated and supported by the rest of the world. The consequences for India, the OECD and the rest of the world of unfettered growth in global energy demand are, however, alarming. If governments around the world stick with current policies – the underlying premise of our Reference Scenario – the world’s energy needs would be well over 50% higher in 2030 than today. China and India together

account for 45% of the increase in demand in this scenario. Globally, fossil fuels continue to dominate the fuel mix. These trends lead to continued growth in energy-related emissions of carbon-dioxide (CO2) and to increased reliance of consuming countries on imports of oil and gas – much of them from the Middle East and Russia. Both developments would heighten concerns about climate change and energy security. The challenge for all countries is to put in motion a transition to a more secure, lower-carbon energy system, without undermining economic and social development. Nowhere will this challenge be tougher, or of greater importance to the rest of the world, than in China and India. Vigorous, immediate and collective policy action by all governments is essential to move the world onto a more sustainable energy path. There has so far been more talk than action in most countries. Were all the policies that governments around the world are considering today to be implemented, as we assume in an Alternative Policy Scenario, the world’s energy demand and related emissions would be reduced
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substantially. Measures to improve energy efficiency stand out as the cheapest and fastest way to curb demand and emissions growth in the near term. But even in this scenario, CO2 emissions are still one quarter 4 World Energy Outlook 2007 above current levels in 2030. To achieve a much bigger reduction in emissions would require immediate policy action and technological transformation on an unprecedented scale. Both the Reference and Alternative Policy Scenario projections are based on what some might consider conservative assumptions about economic growth in the two giants. They envisage a progressive and marked slow-down in the rate of growth of output over the projection period. In a High Growth Scenario, which assumes that China’s and India’s economies grow on average 1.5 percentage points per year faster than in the Reference Scenario

(though more slowly than of late), energy demand is 21% higher in 2030 in China and India combined. The global increase in energy demand amounts to 6%, making it all the more urgent for governments around the world to implement policies, such as those taken into account in the Alternative Policy Scenario, to curb the growth in fossil-energy demand and related emissions. Moreover, the growth rate of demand for power in developing countries is generally higher than that of GDP. In India, the elasticity ratio was 3.06 in 1st plan, and peaked at 5.11 during 3rd plan and came down to 1.65 in 80s. For 90s a ratio of around 1.5 was projected. Hence, in order to support a growth of GDP of around
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7% the rate of growth of power supply of 10% is required. If we look at current scenario, electricity consumption in India has more than doubled in the last decade, outpacing the economic growth. If we analyze the various statistics of Indian power sector, we will find that the generating capacity has gone up tremendously from a meager 1712MW in 1950 to a whooping 112000MW today.

Generating capacity has grown manifold from 1,712 MW in 1950 to more than 112,000 MW today. At the same as a result of growing installed capacity, the power produced has also gone up. In 1950, the total power produced by Indian power sector was a meager 50BU and that is now 587.3BU. The Indian govt. emphasized the need of independence in power generation and in all subsequent
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five-year plans the allocated budget for power sector development was increased. But despite all these efforts by our govt., there is an acute power shortage in the country.

Structure of Power Supply Industry
In December 1950 about 63% of the installed capacity in Utilities was in the private sector and about 37% was in the public sector. The Industrial Policy Resolution of 1956 envisaged the generation, transmission and distribution of power almost exclusively in the public sector. As a result of this Resolution and facilitated by the Electricity (Supply) Act 1948 the electricity industry developed rapidly in the State Sector. In the Constitution of India “Electricity” is a subject that falls within the concurrent jurisdiction of the Centre and the States. The Electricity (Supply) Act, 1948 envisaged creation of State Electricity Boards (SEBs) for planning and implementing the power development programs in their respective states. The Act also provided for creation of central generation companies for setting up and operating generating facilities in the Central Sector. The Central Electricity Authority constituted under the Act is responsible for power planning at the national level. In addition the Electricity (Supply) Act also allowed from the beginning the private licensees to distribute and/or generate

electricity

in

the

specified

areas

designated

by

the

concerned

State

Government/SEB. The National thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) and
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National Hydro-electric Power Corporation (NHPC) were set up for the generation and bulk transmission of power to supplement the efforts at the State level and took upon itself the responsibility of setting up large power projects these purposes in 1975. North- Eastern Electric Power Corporation (NEEPCO) was set up in 1976 to implement the regional power projects in the North-East. Subsequently two more power generation corporation was set up in 1988 viz. Tehri Hydro Development Corporation (NJPC). To construct, operate and maintain the inter-state and interregional transmission systems the National Power transmission Corporation (NPTC) was set up in 1989. The corporation was renamed as POWER GRID in 1992. The policy of liberalization the Government of India announced in 1991 and consequent amendments in Electricity (Supply) Act have opened new vistas to involve private investment and the major policy changes have been announced by the Government in this regard.

Regional Power System:
In order to optimally utilize the dispersed sources for power generation it was decided right at the beginning of the 1960’s that the country would be divided into 5 regions and the planning process would aim at achieving regional self sufficiency.

Viability of SEBs:
The financial health of the SEBs will be improved through rationalization of tariff, restructuring and reforms to make economically viable and their projects bankable
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to generate energy on economic rate, to provide quality services to the consumers and to ensure a fair return to the investors. This can be best achieved by unbundling single entity (SEBs) and corporatizing the same for the above activities. In this context, some of the States have taken initiative by unbundling their respective SEBs into separate companies for Generation & Transmission & Distribution.

Regulatory Bodies:
The Government of India has promulgated Electricity Regulatory Commission Act, 1998 for setting up of Independent regulatory bodies both at the Central level and at the State level viz. the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC) and the State Levels respectively. These regulatory bodies would primarily look into all aspects of tariff fixation and matters incidental there to.

Technology Up gradation:
Refurbishment of existing Thermal Power Station Continuous deterioration in performance of thermal power stations had been observed during early 80’s. Therefore, Renovation and Modernizations Scheme (R&M Schemes) were drawn and executed for improving the performance of existing thermal power stations. Pollution control measures in these power stations being a capital-intensive activity, it accounted for major portion-around 40% of
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Rs.12billion kept for R&M schemes under phase-Ι. During phase-Ι, 163 units of 34 thermal power stations were covered. As a result of R&M schemes these achieved 10,000 million units of additional generation per annum against the target of 7000 million units. Encouraged by the results achieved, R&M phase-ΙΙ programme is

presently under progress. Total estimated cost of these works is Rs.24 billion. Most of the Electricity Boards or other generating agencies are facing financial constraints to carry out R&M activities. Therefore, this area has to be taken on priority to arrange financial assistance.

Overview of Organization:
India’s largest power company, NTPC was set up in 1975 to accelerate power development in India. NTPC is emerging as a diversified power major with presence in the entire value chain of the power generation business. Apart from power generation, which is the mainstay of the company, NTPC has already ventured into consultancy, power trading, ash utilization and coal mining. NTPC ranked 317th in the 2009 by the Forbes Global 2000’ ranking of the World’s biggest companies.

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Introduction to NTPC

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Vision:

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"A world class integrated power major, powering India’s growth, with increasing global presence."

Mission:

“Develop and provide reliable power, related products and services at competitive prices, integrating multiple energy sources with innovative and eco-friendly technologies and contribute to society.”
Core Value: “BCOMIT”
• • •

Business Ethics
Customer Focus Organizational & Professional Pride
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• • •

Mutual Respect & Trust Innovation & Speed Total Quality for Excellence

NTPC Limited (Formerly
Known as

National Thermal

Power Corporation)
NTPC Limited is the largest thermal power generating company of India. A public sector company, it was incorporated in the year 1975 to accelerate power development in the country as a wholly owned company of the Government of
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India. At present, Government of India holds 89.5% of the total equity shares of the company and the balance 10.5% is held by FIIs, Domestic Banks, Public and others. Within a span of 31 years, NTPC has emerged as a truly national power company, with power generating facilities in all the major regions of the country.

The total installed capacity of the company is 30, 144 MW (including JVs) with 15 coal based and 7 gas based stations, located across the country. In addition under JVs, 3 stations are coal based & another station uses naphtha/LNG as fuel. By 2017, the power generation portfolio is expected to have a diversified fuel mix with coal based capacity of around 53000 MW, 10000 MW through gas, 9000 MW through Hydro generation, about 2000 MW from nuclear sources and around 1000 MW from Renewable Energy Sources (RES). NTPC has adopted a multi-pronged

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growth strategy which includes capacity addition through green field projects, expansion of existing stations, joint ventures, subsidiaries and takeover of stations. NTPC has been operating its plants at high efficiency levels. Although the company has 18.79% of the total national capacity it contributes 28.60% of total power generation due to its focus on high efficiency.

Establishing a Global Presence
To become a truly global company serving global markets, it is essential for NTPC to establish its brand equity in overseas markets. NTPC would continue to focus on offering Engineering & Project Management Services, Operations & Maintenance services, and Renovation & Modernization services in the international market. Establishing a successful services brand would be a precursor to taking higher investment decisions in different markets. Going forward, NTPC would continue to evaluate various options for strengthening its presence in global markets including setting up power generation capacity, acquisition of gas blocks etc. By the year 2017, NTPC would have successfully diversified its generation mix, diversified across the power value chain and entered overseas markets. As a result NTPC would have altered its profile significantly. Elements of the revised profile that NTPC would seek to achieve are: ➢ Amongst top five market capitalization in the Indian market
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➢ An Indian MNC with presence in many countries ➢ Diversified utility with multiple businesses ➢ Setting benchmarks in project construction and plant availability & efficiency ➢ Preferred employer ➢ Have a strong research and technology base ➢ Loyal customer base in both bulk and retail supply

A leading corporate citizen with a keen focus on executing its social responsibility.

Services offered by NTPC
An entire gamut of services is offered in the areas mentioned above. These are: ➢ Owner's Engineer Services

Lender's Engineer Services

➢ Environment Engineering and Management ➢ Procurement Services

Project Management Materials Management

➢ Quality Assurance and Inspection Services

➢ Construction Management, Erection and Commissioning ➢ Financial Systems and Modeling

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Operation and Maintenance HRD and Training Information Technology Management Consultancy In October 2004, NTPC launched its Initial Public Offering (IPO)

➢ Restoration, Efficiency Improvement and Renovation and Modernization

➢ Research and Development
➢ ➢

consisting of 5.25% as fresh issue and 5.25% as offer for sale by Government of India. NTPC thus became a listed company in November 2004 with the government holding 89.5% of the equity share capital. The rest is held by Institutional Investors and the Public. The issue was a resounding success. NTPC is among the largest five companies in India in terms of market capitalization. NTPC’s core business is engineering, construction and operation of power generating plants. It also provides consultancy in the area of power plant constructions and power generation to companies in India and abroad. As on date the installed capacity of NTPC is 27,904 MW through its 15 coal based (22,895 MW), 7 gas based (3,955 MW) and 4 Joint Venture Projects (1,054 MW). NTPC acquired 50% equity of the SAIL Power Supply Corporation Ltd. (SPSCL). This JV company operates the captive power plants of Durgapur (120 MW), Rourkela (120 MW) and Bhilai (74 MW). NTPC also has 28.33% stake in Ratnagiri Gas & Power Private Limited (RGPPL) a joint venture company between NTPC, GAIL,
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Indian Financial Institutions and Maharashtra SEB Holding Co. Ltd. The present capacity of RGPPL is 740 MW. NTPC has set new benchmarks for the power industry both in the area of power plant construction and operations. It is providing power at the cheapest average tariff in the country. With its experience and expertise in the power sector, NTPC is extending consultancy services to various organizations in the power business. NTPC is committed to the environment, generating power at minimal environmental cost and preserving the ecology in the vicinity of the plants. NTPC has undertaken massive a forestation in the vicinity of its plants. Plantations have increased forest area and reduced barren land. The massive a forestation by NTPC in and around its Ramagundam Power station (2600 MW) have contributed reducing the temperature in the areas by about 3°c. NTPC has also taken proactive steps for ash utilization. In 1991, it set up Ash Utilization Division to manage efficient use of the ash produced at its coal stations. This quality of ash produced is ideal for use in cement, concrete, cellular concrete, building material. A "Centre for Power Efficiency and Environment Protection (CENPEEP)" has been established in NTPC with the assistance of United States Agency for International Development. (USAID). Cenpeep is an efficiency oriented, ecofriendly and eco-nurturing initiative - a symbol of NTPC's concern towards
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environmental protection and continued commitment to sustainable power development in India.

As a responsible corporate citizen, NTPC is making constant efforts to improve the socio-economic status of the people affected by the its projects. Through it's Rehabilitation and Resettlement programmers’, the company endeavors to improve the overall socio-economic status of Project Affected Persons. NTPC was among the first Public Sector Enterprises to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Government in 1987-88. NTPC has been Placed under the 'Excellent category' (the best category) every year since the MOU system became operative. Recognising its excellent performance and vast potential, Government of the India has identified NTPC as one of the jewels of Public Sector ‘Maha Navratnas’- a potential global giant. Inspired by its glorious past and vibrant present, NTPC is well on its way to realise it’s vision of being “A world class integrated power major, powering India’s growth, with increasing global presence”.

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Overview of NTPC Power Plants

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AN OVERVIEW PROJECT PROFILE Coal Based Power Stations Coal based 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Singrauli Korba Ramagundam Farakka Vindhyachal Rihand Kahalgaon NTCPP Talcher Kaniha State Uttar Pradesh Chattisgarh Andhra Pradesh West Bengal Madhya Pradesh Uttar Pradesh Bihar Uttar Pradesh Orissa Uttar Pradesh Orissa Andhra Pradesh Uttar Pradesh Delhi Commissioned Capacity (MW) 2,000 2,100 2,600 1,600 3,260 2,000 1,340 840 3,000 1,050 460 1,000 440 705
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10. Unchahar 11. Talcher Thermal 12. Simhadri 13. Tanda 14. Badarpur

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Projects NTPC OWNED COAL GAS/LIQ. FUEL TOTAL OWNED BY JVCs Coal Gas/LIQ. FUEL GRAND TOTAL

No. of Projects

Commissioned Capacity (MW)

15 07 22

22,895 3,955 26,850

3 1 26

314* 740** 27,904

* Captive Power Plant under JVs with SAIL ** Power Plant under JV with GAIL, FIs & MSEB Projects under Implementation Additional Capacity Under Implementation (MW) 500 500
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Coal / Hydro

State

Fuel

Kahalgaon 1. Stage II (Phase I) Bihar (Phase II)
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Coal

2.

Sipat (Stage (Stage II)

I)

Chhattisgarh Coal Bihar Coal

1980 500 1980 500 500 500 980 1000 800 600 520 10,860

3. Barh

Bhilai (Exp. Power 4. Project-JV with Chhattisgarh Coal SAIL) 5. Korba (Stage III) Chhattisgarh Coal

6. Farakka (Stage III) West Bengal Coal 7. NCTPP (Stage II) 8. Simhadri (Stage II) 9. Koldam (HEPP) 10. 11. Loharinag (HEPP) Pala Uttar Pradesh Andhra Pradesh Himachal Pradesh Coal Coal Hydro

Uttarakhand Hydro

Tapovan Uttarakhand Hydro Vishnugad (HEPP)

Total (Coal + Hydro)

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AWARDS NTPC:

AND

ACCOLADES

WON

by

➢ Shell Helen Keller Award 2002 for promoting employment opportunities to disabled people. ➢ Plats Global Energy Award 2002 for commitment to community development. ➢ CORE-BCSD corporate social responsibility Award 2001- 02 instituted by TERI. ➢ AICC-UNEP World Summit Business Award for Sustainable Development Partnership ➢ National Safety Award 2002 instituted the British Safety Council, to seven NTPC stations ➢ Best HR Practices Award 2002 instituted by Indian Society of Training and Development ➢ World HRD Congress Award instituted by World HRD Congress ➢ Golden Peacock National Training Award 2003 instituted by Institute of directors to PNI
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➢ Meritorious Productivity Award of the Government of India to 12 stations

Prime minister’s Shram Award for the 17th year, including to SHRAM RATNA

➢ Vishwakarma Award by Ministry of Labour, Government of India ➢ Climate Technology Initiative Award ➢ MOU Excellence Award of Government of India ➢ CII-Award for Excellence in Infrastructure

➢ Greentech Environment Excellence Award ➢ Best Employer National Award for the Welfare of Physically Challenged ➢ People ➢ Business Today-Hewitte Best Employers Award

Subsidiaries Of NTPC
NTPC Electric Supply Company Ltd. (NESCL) The company was formed on August 21, 2002. It is a wholly owned subsidiary company of NTPC with the objective of making a foray into the business of distribution and supply of electrical energy, as a sequel to reforms initiated in the power sector.
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NTPC Vidyut Vyapar Nigam Ltd. (NVVN) The company was formed on November 1, 2002, as a wholly owned subsidiary company of NTPC. The company’s objective is to undertake sale and purchase of electric power, to effectively utilize installed capacity and thus enable reduction in the cost of power. NVVN NTPC Hydro Ltd. (NHL) The company was formed on December 12, 2002, as a wholly owned subsidiary company of NTPC with an objective to develop small and medium hydroelectric power projects of up to 250 MW.

Pipavav Power Development C o. Ltd. (PPDCL) A memorandum of understanding was signed between NTPC, Gujarat Power Corporation Limited (GPCL) and Gujarat Electricity Board (GEB) in 2004 for development of a 1000 MW thermal power project at Pipavav in Gujarat by forming a new joint venture company between NTPC and GPCL with 50:50 equity participation. Pursuant to the decision of Gujarat Government, NTPC Ltd. has dissociated itself from this company. PPDCL is under winding up. Kanti Bijlee Utpadan Nigam Limited It was formerly known as Vaishali Power Generating Company Limited.
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To take over Muzaffarpur Thermal Power Station (2*110MW), a subsidiary company named ‘Vaishali Power Generating Company Limited (VPGCL)’ was incorporated on September 6, 2006 with NTPC contributing 51% of equity and balance equity was contributed by Bihar State Electricity Board. This company was formed to renovate the existing unit and run the plant. The second unit has been successfully re-synchronized on October 17, 2007 after 4 years of being idle. Renovation and modernization of the first unit is under progress. The company was rechristened as ‘Kanti Bijlee Utpadan Nigam Limited’ on April 10, 2008. Bharatiya Rail Bijlee Company Limited (BRBCL) A subsidiary of NTPC under the name of ‘Bharatiya Rail Bijlee Company Limited’ was incorporated on November 22, 2007 with 74:26 equity contribution from NTPC and Ministry of Railways, Govt. of India respectively for setting up of four units of 250 MW each of coal based power plant at Nabinagar, Bihar. Investment approval of the project was accorded in January, 2008.

Introduction to VSTPP

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NTPC-Vindhyachal Super Thermal Power Project is one of the most prestigious flagships of NTPC striving ahead to bridge the country generation gap especially in the western region. It is the largest power station in Asia. Presently it has the capacity of 3260 mw. The station is located in Sidhi district in MP in the northwestern side of the country. It has secured ISO 14001 and ISO 9001 certificate in the field of environment and power generation but also in various other fields. On September 2002, it made glorious achievement by ensuring production up to 2260 MW. And the Unit # 10 commercial operation started on 15/07/2007 and the total capacity of the plant became 3260 MW.

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It has won number of awards from government of India for proper utilization and consumption and has bagged the safety awards presented by U.S.A. and British safety council.

COAL SOURCE: Northern coal fields limited (NCL) mines at Dudhichua (7Km) and Nigahi (10Km) and Jayant (5Km). FUEL OIL SOURCE:
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Indian Oil Corporation (IOC), deposit) at Jayant (5Km). WATER SOURCE:

COLD (Customer operated lubricant and oil

Discharge canal of Singrauli Super Thermal Power Station (SSTPS). BENEFICIARY STATES: Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh, Maharastra, Gujarat, Goa, Daman & Diu and Dadar & Nagerhaveli. INTERNATIONAL ASSISTANCE: USSR and World Bank under time slice loan. UNITS COMMISSIONED: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 7 Unit 8 Unit 9 210MW 210MW 210MW 210MW 210MW 210MW 500MW 500MW 500MW October 1987 July 1988 February 1989 December 1989 March 1990 February 1991 March 1999 February2003 March 2007
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10.

Unit 10

500MW

July 2007

Vindhyachal station belongs to the western region and feeds power to states and union territories of: Madhya Pradesh Chattisgarh Maharastra Gujarat Goa, Daman & Diu Dadar& nagerhaveli Unallocated 24.4% 4.7% 32.3% 20.8% 2.4% 0.4% 15.0 %

The power flows out from Vindhyachal through 400KV power transmition system. VINDHYACHAL Capacity: 3260MW= [St.1 (6x210MW) + St.2 (2x500MW)] St.3 (2x500MW)
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THERMAL POWER PLANT OVERVIEW: A modern boiler has capacity of burning pulverized coal at rates up to 200 tones an hour (32000 metric ton per day). From the coal store, fuel is carried on a conveyor belt and discharged by means of a coal tipper into the bunker. It then falls perhaps through a weigher into the coal pulverizing mill where it is grounded to a powder as fine as flour. The mill usually consists of a round metal table on

which large steel rollers or balls are positioned. The table revolves, forcing the coal under the rollers or balls which crush it. Air is drawn from the top of the boiler house by the Forced Draught (FD) Fan and passed through the air preheaters, to the hot air duct. From here some of the air passes directly to the burners and the remainder is taken through the Primary Air (PA) Fan to pulverizing mill, where it is mixed with powdered coal, blowing it along pipes to burners of the furnace. Here, it mixes with the rest of the air and burns with great heat. The boiler consists of a large number of tubes extending the full height of the structure and the heat produced raises the temperature of the water circulating in them to create stem which passes to the steam drum at very high pressure. The steam is then heated further in the super heater and fed through the outlet valve to

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the high pressure cylinder of the steam turbine. It may be hot enough to make the steam pipe glow a dull red (around 540°C). When the steam has been through the first cylinder (High Pressure) of the turbine, it is returned to the boiler and reheated before being passed through the other cylinder (Intermediate and Low Pressure) of the turbine. From the turbine the steam passes into a condenser to be turned back into water called ‘condensate’. This is pumped through feed heaters (where it may be heated to about 250°C) to the economizer where the temperature is raised sufficiently for the condensate to be returned to the lower half of the steam drum of the boiler. The flue gases leaving the boiler are used to reheat the condensate in the economizer and then pass through the air –preheater,

to the Electrostatic Precipitor (ESP). Finally, they are drawn by the Induced Draught (ID) Fan into the main flue and to the chimney. The ash is either sold for use in road and building constructions or piped as slurry of ash and water to a settling lagoon, where the water drains off. Once this lagoon (which may originally have been a worked out gravel pit) has been filled, it can be returned to agricultural use, or the ash removed for other purposes. The electrostatic precipitator consists of metal plates which are electrically charged .Dust and Grit in the flue gases are attracted on to these plates, so that they do not pass up the chimney to pollute the atmosphere. Regular mechanical
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hammer blows cause the accumulations of ash, dust and grit to fall to the bottom of the precipitator, where they collect in a hopper for disposal. Additional accumulations of ash also collect in the hoppers beneath the furnace.

Conversion of Steam to mechanical power:
From the boiler, a steam pipe conveys steam to the turbine through a stop valve (which can be used to shut off steam in an emergency) and through control valves that automatically regulate the supply of the steam to the turbine. Stop valve and control valves are located in a steam chest and a governor, driven from the main turbine shaft, operates the control valves to regulate the amount of steam used. (This depends upon the speed of the turbine and the amount of electricity required from the generator). Steam from the control valves enters the high pressure cylinder of the turbine, where it passes through a ring of stationary blades fixed to the cylinder wall. These act as nozzles and direct the steam onto a second ring of moving blades mounted on a disc secured to the turbine shaft .This second ring turns the shafts as a result of the force of the steam. The stationary and moving blades together constitute a ‘stage’ of the turbine and in practice many stages are necessary, so that the cylinder contains a number of rings of stationary blades with rings of moving blades arranged between them. The steam passes through each stage in turn until it reaches the end of the high pressure cylinder and in its passage some of its heat energy is changed into mechanical energy.

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The steam leaving the high pressure cylinder goes back to the boiler for reheating and returns by further pipe to the intermediate pressure cylinder. Here it passes through another series of stationary and moving blades. Finally ,the steam is taken to the low pressure cylinders, each of which it enters at the centre flowing outwards in opposite directions through the rows of turbine blades – an arrangement known as double flow – to the extremities of the cylinder. As the steam gives up its heat energy to dive the turbine, its temperature and pressure fall and it expands .Because of this expansion and blades are much larger and longer towards the low pressure ends of the turbine. The turbine shaft usually rotates at 3000 revolutions per minute. This speed is determines by the frequency of the electricity system used in this country and is the speed at which a 2- pole generator must be driven to generate alternating current at a frequency of 50 /cycles per second. When as much energy as possible has been taken from the steam it is exhausted directly to the condenser. This runs the length of the low pressure part of the turbine and may be beneath or on either side of it. The condenser consists of a large vessel containing some 20,000 tubes, each about 25 mm in diameter. Cold water from river, estuary, sea or cooling tower is circulated through these tubes and as the steam from the turbine passes round them it is rapidly condensed into water – condensate .Because water has a much smaller comparative volume than steam, a vacuum is created in the condenser. This allows the steam to be used down to pressures below that of the normal atmosphere and more energy can be utilized.
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From the condenser, the condensate is pumped through low pressure feed heaters by the extraction pump, after which its pressure is raised to boiler pressure by the boiler feed pump. It is passed through further feed heaters to the economizer and the boiler for reconversion into steam. Where the cooling water for power station s is drawn from large rivers, estuaries or the coast, it can be returned directly to the source after use. Power stations situated on smaller rivers and inland do not have such vast water resources available, so the cooling water is passed through cooling towers (where its heat is removed by evaporation) and re- used. A power station generating 2000000kw of electricity required about 227,500 cubic meters water an hour for cooling purposes. Where cooling towers are used, about one hundredth part of its source to carry away any impurities that collect. Most of it, however, is recalculated.

Switching and transmission:
The electricity is usually produced in the stator windings of large modern generators at about 25000 volts and is fed through terminal connections to one side of a generator transformer, that steps up the voltage to 132kv or 400kv. From here conductors carry it to a series of three switches comprising an isolator, a circuit –breaker (CB) and another isolator.
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Three wires are used in a three phase system for large power transmission as it is cheaper than two wire ‘single phase’ system that supplies the home. The centre of the power station is control room .Here engineer monitor the output of the electricity, supervising and controlling the operation of generating plant and high voltage switch- gear and directing power to the grid system as required .Instruments on the control panels show the output and conditions which exist on all the main plant and a miniature diagram indicates the precise state of the electrical system.

Material NTPC
Quality Policy

Management

System

at

Corporate Materials and Contract &Material department of NTPC is committed to follow the Quality Management System and continual improvement of its effectiveness through issuance of policies and guidelines for Materials Management functions to facilitate uniform implementation by the stations to achieve transparency, cost effectiveness and time frame for execution.

Corporate Materials shall effectively implement the above policies in all its functions specifically in the area of procurement and customs clearance meeting customer, statutory and regulatory requirements.

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Quality Objectives

To optimize insurance coverage for NTPC stations in succeeding year keeping in view past experience and business environment. To reduce spares inventory and improve plant availability of stations through identification of interchangeable spares and allotment of common code to these spares.

➢ To reduce the import clearance cost and time.

To finalize the contract and arrange availability of indented materials, works and services within scheduled time and at optimum cost.

The Stores of an industrial set-up is considered as a measuring point to judge the effectiveness of Material Management Services. Stores operation involves multidimensional activities including clearance and despatch of goods, inspection and inward movement of materials, claims and settlement, receipt, stocking, issue, preservation, safety and security of materials, indenting for recoupment, disposal of scraps etc.The fundamental requirement for success of Stores Management is it's proper functioning. As such stores function should be organized systematically so as to enable the stores personnel to discharge their duties effectively. For this
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purpose, a systematic guide for stores function has been envisaged through Stores Management System Manual. This Manual will act as a guide book for facilitating stores personnel to perform their activities with confidence within the framed rules and regulation of the company so that uniform / standardized procedures are practiced in all projects / stations / offices. Since the earlier manual was prepared quite a long time ago, it is felt necessary to review and recast the same to include additional guidelines / information pertaining to technological advancement / up gradation of modern storage system and computerization of Materials Management activities with exclusion of obsolete systems. This 2nd edition is also provided with direction towards "Benchmarking" ascertaining performance standard of any unit, including some special features e.g. Stores Layout, Modern Storage Systems, Handling Equipment, Modern Preservation Methods etc. Main Objectives of Material & store Manual are: ➢ To define scope of each stores activities ➢ To guide execution of activities ➢ To spell-out the interfaces among other Material Management functions ➢ To detail the uniform/standardized procedures However, the objectives of Manual will be fulfilled only on implementation of the procedures / guidelines by stores personnel at each step for betterment / streamlining the stores management system

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GOODS RECEIPT
INTRODUCTION This section initiates all prerequisites in smooth transfer of materials on its arrival to the custody section. This section shall be responsible for getting the goods cleared from different transporting agencies. On receipt of the materials, Unloading Report (UR), MIS cum SRV are prepared, goods get inspected and finally handed over to the custody section. This section also raises discrepancy and rejection memos whenever damages, rejections and short falls are noticed and deals with the concerned authorities which includes Insurance Companies, Transporters, Suppliers etc. and makes settlement of claims. This section is further sub-divided into three functional groups for monitoring and control: A) Goods Clearance and Despatch Group. (GCDG)
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B) Goods Inspection and Inward Group. (GIIG) C) Risk Management Group.(RMG) GOODS CLEARANCE AND DESPATCH GROUP FUNCTIONS. The function of Clearance and Despatch group is to arrange receipt of goods and transfer the same to GIIG and performs the following activities in general. A. To receive Documents. B. To maintain LR/RR register. C. To arrange clearance of materials from different clearing point of various transport agencies / authorities e.g., i) Road Transport / Railway Go-down. (ii) Railway Yard. (iii) R P P. iv) Domestic Airport / Seaport for Imported consignments through T & CC. D. To receive materials at receipt section itself in case of door delivery. E. To prepare unloading report (UR). F. To maintain accounts for different incidental charges towards Clearance & Despatch including Imprest account. G. To obtain Shortage / Damaged certificate from appropriate transporting agencies. H. To handover the material to GIIG. I . To despatch rejected & other materials for repair or transfer to other Plants.
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J. To inform Risk Management Group (RMG) for abnormally delayed consignment in transit. K. To obtain sanction of payment of Demurrage / Wharf age charges. GOODS INSPECTION AND INWARD GROUP FUNCTION After receipt of material from supplier and prior to taking the same in stock, GIIG is responsible for the following activities: A. To receive material from Goods clearance and despatch Group. B. To arrange inspection of material. C. To keep material in GIIG custody till it is inspected. D. To hand over material to concerned Custody section / Rejection cell. E. To prepare Discrepancy Memo.

RISK MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW The dimension of insurable assets (approx. 40000 crores) and its corresponding annual premiums (approx. 70 crores) are so large that it requires prudent policies and practices in the portfolio of Risk Management. For wide coverage of power stations NTPC has brought the concept of Mega risk - Package policies from Insurance Company. Due to liberalization of Insurance sector and as the present scenario is so rapidly changing that one has to face true competitive environment
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and induct professional approach while finalizing any insurance policy. To get the maximum insurance coverage out of optimum premium and to get the maximum benefit out of insurance it has become very much essential to make the decision making the process faster as well as accurate and necessary corrective steps are to be taken while procuring insurance policies, fixing time frame for claim settlement and periodical review of claim status etc. through MOU's with Insurance Companies. Risk Management Group at site shall work and coordinate closely with Corporate RMG to get the best out of insurance companies. 3.3.2 RISK MANAGEMENT CONCEPT & PHILOSOPHY A. What is a risk ? ➢ An uncertain chance or a probability of an outcome. ➢ Risk is degree of variation in possible outcome from uncertain Event.

B. Why risk management? ➢ High Capital Intensive. ➢ Substantial Risk Exposure. ➢ Risks Beyond Human Control. ➢ Financial/ Social Catastrophe. ➢ Element of Uncertainty.
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➢ Dynamic process of Planning & Decision-Making. ➢ Protection and Security for Growth. ➢ Rigorous Review of Experience & Developments. C. What is a risk management? Planning, Arranging & Control of Activities & Resources to Minimize the Impact of unforeseen Adversities. D. Types of risks ➢ Pure or Static Risks ➢ Speculative or Dynamic Risks E. Risk management ➢ Risk Identification. ➢ Risk Analysis / Measurement. ➢ Risk Elimination/ Avoidance. ➢ Risk Reduction. ➢ Risk Impact Evaluation. ➢ Risk Transfer By Insurance. ➢ Risk Assumption / Risk Retention. ➢ Risk / Cost / Profit / Evaluation (Monitoring).

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‘5-S’ PLEDGE
WE, ARE COMMITTED TO IMPLEMENT ‘5-S’ PRINCIPLES THROUGH OUR INVOLVEMENT, COOPERATION AND CONTINUIALLY IMPROVE THE STANDARDS OF HOUSE KEEPING. TOWARDS THIS OBJECTIVE, WE ALSO DEVISE BETTER METHODS REGULARLY AND ATTAIN HIGH STANDARDS OF CLEANLINES, SAFETY, QUALITY, HEALTH AND PRODUCTIVITY.

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FIRST STEP (1S) - SORT / SEIRE / WARGIKARAN PURPOSE – DEFINITION
PORPUSE: - Details the procedure for identification of unwanted material and its Disposal. DEFINATION: Sort: Identify and remove unnecessary items from the work place. The Usefulness of the items should be decided based on the work in hand (Current work). Red–tag Area: Red tag areas are identified locations in different work places were the Unnecessary items are shifted for further evaluation.
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Red-tags: - Red tags are the tags to be used on the unnecessary items by the Employees. It should contain the relevant details and also provision for Evaluation.

.

SECOND STEP (2S) –SET IN ORDERT /SEITON/ SUVYAWSTHA PUSPOSE DEFINITION-SCOPE-RESPOSIBILITY

PURPOSE :Details the procedure for keeping things in order. DEFINITION :Set in order :- Necessary items in the work place are re-arranged after considering the frequency of use so as to utilize the newly available space ( after 1S ). The

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items and its locations are also properly labeled so that anyone could find, use and replace the items with ease. SCOPE: This procedure is applicable to all the departments including plant area, offices, canteen, stores, hospital, township, IT, EDC etc. RESPONSIBILITY: DC Members shall evaluate needed items in their respective sections and suggest bringing better layout, storage changes and visual display methods in the work place. They shall also take follow up action to implement improvements and liaison with HOD and other departments. DC Members shall prepare reports of improvements with documentation and take necessary steps for its display and publication.

THIRD STEP (3S) – SHINE / SEISO / SWACHHATA PURPOSE DEFINITION- SCOPE- RESPONSIBILITY

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PURPOSE: Details the procedure for cleaning and maintaining the items in good working condition. DEFINATION: Shine: - Shine means sweeping floors, wiping off machinery and furniture and gene Rally making sure that everything in the factory stays clean. Shine should be integrated into daily maintenance tasks to combine cleaning checkpoints with inspection and maintenance checkpoints. This helps in keeping the things in good working condition at all times. SCOPE: This procedure is applicable to all the departments including plant area, offices, canteen, stores and township.

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FOURTH STEP (4S) STANDARDISATION-SEIKETSU-MANAKIKARAN

PURPOSE: Details the procedure for devising standardized schedules for maintaining the first 3S (SORT/SET IN ORDER/ SHINE) so that everybody is clear about the best methods for doing all 3S activities.

Definition: Standardize: - standardize means defining the one best method and all its required tools and accessories with duration of the activity so that all 3S is always maintained at highest level of performance. Whenever any productivity improvement tool devises a new standardized schedule. The same shall replace the previous one as the accepted schedule. SCOPE: This procedure is applicable to all the departments including plant area, offices, canteen, township, IT and stores.

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FIFTH STEP (5S)-: SUSTAIN SHITSUKE-ANUSHASAN PURPOSE DEFINITION-SCOPE-RESPONSIBILITY PURPOSE: Details the strategies and promotional activities which may be adopted for the continuous maintenance of high standards of 5s. DEFINATION: Sustain: sustain means making a habit of properly maintaining correct procedures. Sustain holds together all other 4S SCOPE: This is applicable to all employees “5S” PLEDGE WE, ARE COMMITTED TO IMPLEMENT ‘5S’ PRINCIPLES THROUGH

OUR INVOLVEMENT AND CO-OPERATION AND CONTINUALLY OF IMPROVE THE KEEPING ALSO
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STANDARDS TOWARDS

HOUSE

THIS

OBJECTIC, WE

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DEVISE BETTER METHOODS REGULARLY AND ATTAIN HIGH STANDARDS OF

CLEANLINESS, SAFETY, QUALITY, HEALTH ANDPRODUCTIVITY,

Questionnaire
NAME :-------------------------------------DESIGNATION :-------------------------------------PLACE DATE :------------------------------------:--------------------------------------

I am ashok Kumar dwivedi MBA (marketing) &PGPM(H.R.) II Sem. From TILAK MAHARASTRA University PUNE, doing my project on Training & Development at ntpc (VSTPP) .As part of my summer project work, I request you to kindly fill this questionnaire. Your response will be used only for academic purpose and will be kept confidential.
1. The training centre at my unit is well equipped.
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(i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree

(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

2. Training centre at unit is well maintained. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

3. A mix of internal and external faculty takes training session at EDC. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 4. Most training needs of employees are addressed by the local EDC. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 5. Faculty knowledge and training methodology at EDC are to my satisfaction. (i) Strongly agree
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(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

(ii) Agree
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(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (i) Strongly disagree

(iv) Disagree

6. Training nomination takes place as per the training needs of the employee. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

7. Reporting officer takes active interest in training of their subordinate. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

8. Employees are given as per their development plan by their reporting officer for job rotation etc. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 9. Employees actively apply their learning from training at work place. (i) Strongly agree
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(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

(ii) Agree
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(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv) Disagree (v) Strongly disagree 10. Employees are given time for attending training programs. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 11. In my opinion training and development system of NTPC adds value to organization. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

12. I look forward to take up special assignment as a part of cross functional teams. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees
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(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree
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(v) Strongly disagree 13. All employees in my department get nominated for training programs uniformly. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 14. Employees in my department almost get same number of training man days per annum. (i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree 15. Seniors readily share their knowledge and experience with their juniors. (i) Strongly agree (ii) Agree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree (ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv) Disagree (v) Strongly disagree

16. People openly share their knowledge and ideas with each other.
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(i) Strongly agree (iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (v) Strongly disagree

(ii) Agree (iv) Disagree

17. I have imported adequate training needed to carry out my responsibility effectively. (i) Strongly agree (ii) Agree

(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv) Disagree (v) Strongly disagree 18. I feel NTPC as an organization is committed towards training and development of its employees. (i) Strongly agree (ii) Agree

(iii) Neither agrees nor disagrees (iv) Disagree (v) Strongly disagree

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Finding
• NTPC have good harmonic relationship and co-ordination between the staff members. • Better understanding of the recruitment process of organization. • Planning to become a 75,000 MW company by 2017. • NTPC, setup in 1975 is India’s largest power company • NTPC must target to reduce transmission losses to 15 % for improving the financial health of the sector.

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CONCLUSION
The training season was very educational and informative. Being a BHARAT MAHANAVARATNA, this NTPC have good harmonic relationship and co-ordination between the staff members. As the vocational training seem laborious job to get in touch with the activities. It was nobility of people to provide the information and required theoretical background at their continuous job hour. Most of the equipments were technically strong for huge production. Doing training in NTPC, I hope it would be useful in my future not only in academic but also in professional carrier. Electricity is much more than just another commodity. It is the life-blood of the economy and our quality of life. Failure to meet the expectations of society for universally available low-cost power is simply not an option. As the world moves into the digital age, our dependency on power quality will grow accordingly. The infrastructure of our power delivery system and the strategies and policies of our insurers must keep pace with escalating demand.

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Unfortunately, with the regulators driving toward retail competition, the utility business priority is competitiveness (and related cost-cutting) and not reliability.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOKS: 1. ORGNISATIONAL BEHIVOUR 2. PRODUCTION AND MATERIAL MANAGEMENT
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WEBSIDES: 1 www.ntpc.com 2. vindhyachal inranet 3. www.google.com

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