Caribbean Fest a ‘beach party in park.

’ p8
B.C. Views
A decade on, Nisga’a
no panacea. p6
Five companies that are part of
the Aquilini Investment Group
have been given a licence to pump
water from the North Alouette
River, even though they still face
environmental charges.
The pump that will be used to
move water under the new licence
is the same one which led to the
charges.
A short-term water permit was
issued June 24 to numbered com-
panies 374917 B.C. Ltd. to 374921
B.C. Ltd., inclusive for watering,
harvesting, frost protection and
storage purposes for cranberry
fields in north Pitt Meadows.
Those same companies face
six charges under the Water
Act, including diverting water
without authority, illegal use of
water, and installing a pump into
the river without authorization.
The charges were filed in Port
Coquitlam Provincial Court last
February in connection with the
2009 installation of a 45-centime-
tre-wide water intake pipe in the
North Alouette River.
In total, 11 charges were filed
under the Water Act, the Fisher-
ies Act and Dike Maintenance Act.
The counts, regulatory offences
rather than criminal matters, are
filed against five individuals, two
companies, as well as the six num-
bered companies, by the Ministry
of Environment’s conservation of-
ficer service.
Named in the charges are Elisa
Aquilini, Francesco Aquilini, Pau-
lo Aquilini, Roberto Aquilini and
Richard Matis, as well as CPI –
Cranberry Plantation, and Global
Coin Corp. Their next court date is
July 12 in Port Coquitlam.
Environmental activist Jack Em-
berly said the charges should be
dealt with before the government
issues more water permits.
“I don’t think this licence should
be granted until this case is re-
solved and we have a system in
place that monitors how much
they’ve used.”
Even though charges are
still before the courts
THE NEWS
Water licence issued for berry farm
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
A summer’s day
Veronica Wyatt, 6, out of school for summer, tries to net some fsh in the Alouette River by Maple Ridge Park on Monday. See slideshow @ mapleridgenews.com.
User fees
for Thornhill
water?
Maple Ridge will study who uses
two new roadside water stations in
eastern Maple Ridge and why, and
may use the data to slap a user fee
on residents who do.
The district built a new water
pumping station on Jackson Road
and 106th Avenue last year and is
planning another this year for Roth-
say Street.
The new stations replace old stand
pipes on 102nd Avenue, at 244th
Street and another on 256th Street
that Fraser Health wanted shut
down for health and security rea-
sons.
The new water station has card
locks so that not just anyone can
drop by and help themselves to the
fresh water provided by Metro Van-
couver’s system.
See Water, p4
See License, p4
Opinion 6
Tom Fletcher 6
Parenting 17
Arts&life 20
Sports 23
Community Calendar 27
Seniority 30
Index
Wednesday, July 6, 2011 · Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows · est. 1978 · 604-467-1122 · 50¢ www.mapleridgenews.com
Arts&life
‘Rollicking
band of
pirates we.’
p20
Information sought on who’s
using it, from where, why?
by Phi l Mel nyc huk
staff repor ter
by Phi l Mel nyc huk
staff repor ter
THE NEWS/files
The same pump that led to charges against
members of Aquilini family will be used.
TOYOTA
WEST COAST
FORD
LINCOLN
WEST COAST WEST COAST WEST COAST
TOLL FREE
1-866-772-1929
TOLL FREE
1-866-208-8820
located at the north end of the new golden ears bridge
westcoastautogroup.com
TOLL FREE
1-866-910-1579
TOLL FREE
1-866-334-2119
19950 Lougheed Hwy.,
Pitt Meadows
20000 Lougheed,
Pitt Meadows
20370 Lougheed Hwy.,
Maple Ridge
19625 Lougheed Hwy.,
Maple Ridge
See page
15
2 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
SUMMER HOURS
• Mon - Sat 9 am - 5:30 pm
• Closed Sundays
22381 Dewdney Trunk Road,
Maple Ridge
604-467-3897
604-467-3884
canada week sale
MINX S215 HOME CINEMA 5.1 SPEAKER SYSTEM
With Äve Min10 satellite speakers placed at the front, centre and rear of your room and
a tiny X200 subwoofer located wherever you wish; this amazing system will instantly
transform your living space into a private cinema. Whether you’re watching the
grittiest action thriller or engrossed in the big game, you’ll be blown away by Minx's
epic delivery and amazed at the amount of bass this tiny
set-up can deliver when required. But micro size and potent
power is just half the story. Where Minx really excels is in its
ability to deliver utter composure and perfect integration.
Establishing the source of Minx’s deep rumbling bass will
fox even the most Änely-tuned ear since all the sound
appears to emanate from the miniscule satellite speakers
rather than the subwoofer which is hidden out of view.
$
429
RXV567
7.1 3D READY DIGITAL
HOME THEATER RECEIVER
7.1-channel AV Receiver with HDMI 1.4a support for 3D and
Audio Return Channel. HD Audio decoding with CINEMA DSP
enjoyment, YPAO and SCENE for ease-of-use.
W AUDI O W VI DEO W APPLI ANCES W SEWI NG MACHI NES W VACUUMS
NO
HST
NO
HST
NO HST ON
MANY MORE
SELECTTED
ITEMS IN
STORE
SAVE HALF THE HST ON ALL APPLIANCES
PAY NO HST ON ALL VACUUM AND SEWING PRODUCTS
FRIGIDAIRE 30”
FREESTANDING
ELECTRIC RANGE
CFEF3007LW
Our convenient drawer gives you extra
storage space in your kitchen.
Stylish look with a large window makes
it easy to check on what’s cooking
without opening the door. Oven light.
Manual clean.
3.6 CU. FT. SUPER
CAPACITY, 14 CYCLES
TOP-LOAD WASHER
Practical laundry solutions that Ät
your lifestyle.
Features: •
3.6 Cu. Ft. I.E.C.* Super Capacity •
14 Cycles •
5 Water Levels •
Detergent, Bleach and Fabric Softener •
Dispenser
Double Action Plus Agitator •
Porcelain Wash Basket •
2 Speed Combinations •
4 Temperatures •
Extra Rinse Knob •
GENIUS
®
INVERTER
®

OVER-THE-RANGE
MICROWAVE
NNSD277S
Distinctive dial control system •
Stylish Green Colour LED display •
2.0 cu. Ft. •
1100W high power output •
Flush front cosmetic design with push •
button door
42 dB Extra quiet fan with high outside vent •
Turntable On/Off switch •
Super powerful and quiet fan (up to 420 •
CFM)
Half mirror door •
Stainless steel Änish •
Exterior Dimensions (H x W x D): •
418 x 759 x 390 mm / 16.5ã x 29.9ã x 15.4” •
6.5 CU. FT CAPACITY,
9 CYCLES DRYER
Practical laundry solutions that Ät
your lifestyle.
Features: •
6.5 Cu. Ft. Capacity •
9 Cycles •
4 Temperature Settings •
70 min Timed Dry •
Wrinkle Prevent Option •
Energy Preferred Setting •
Reversible Swing Door •
Super-Wide Opening Door •
End of Cycle Signal •
PLUS
SAVE HALF
THE HST
PLUS
SAVE HALF
THE HST
PLUS
SAVE HALF
THE HST
$
399
NOW ONLY
$
699
FOR THE
PAIR
NOW ONLY
$
499
NOW ONLY
Toshiba’s Natural 3D LED TV utilizes economical
polarized 3D glasses and RealD™ 3D technology
used in movie theatres around the world. The
beneÄt is less eye strain, and more suitable for
prolonged viewing and 3D gaming.
TL515 Series
Natural 3D LED TV
$
1299
42” SCREEN
42TL515
$
1599
47” SCREEN
47TL515
$
1999
55” SCREEN
55TL515
FOUR PAIRS OF 3D
GLASSES INCLUDED
A panel control and processing technology that
provides 240 frames per second screen refresh rate.
Enjoy smooth motion with no image distortion or loss
in image brightness. Watching fast paced sports or action movies are clearer than ever.
CLEAR SCAN
NO
HST
COMPARE THE
SIZE
$
899
Minx S215
SALE ENDS JULY 9th, 2011
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 3
Armed with a camera, Will Dugger
has been spending his free time, seat-
ed at an intersection in south Haney,
eyeing every car that slows down.
He makes it rather obvious he’s
documenting their license plates, es-
pecially if he catches them approach-
ing a sex trade worker.
“I’m not playing a game,” says Dug-
ger, who was propelled into action
last month after a man propositioned
his 18-year-old daughter.
“If I can do something to effect
change, I will.”
Initially, Dugger stapled large hand-
written signs to telephone and hydro
poles in the Maple Ridge neighbour-
hood, along North Avenue, 224th and
Fraser streets, warning sex trade
workers and their clients, or “johns,”
they were being watched.
The signs, however, contravened a
municipal bylaw and were promptly
taken down by district staff.
Dugger now plans on using his
truck as a billboard to shame the
folks who are travelling to his neigh-
bourhood to buy sex.
“I’m not going away,” he says.
“I’m just saying, ‘move, go some-
where else. Do it on the main strip on
Lougheed. Not in a residential area.’

Dugger’s approach, however, isn’t
supported by groups that advocate
for sex trade workers because it leads
to displacement and pushes the trade
further underground, thus making it
more dangerous.
“He is complicating an already dif-
ficult situation,” said Susan Davis, a
sex trade worker, advocate and activ-
ist from Vancouver.
“You are putting people in harm’s
way by forcing them to move. If they
really want to do something, they
should sit down with the women,
meet with them and try to find a
way to meet everybody’s safety con-
cerns.”
Even local Mounties recommend
that Dugger cease his shaming tac-
tics.
The Ridge-Meadows detachment
reports it has received just four com-
plaints about prostitution from the
south Haney neighbourhood since
the beginning of the year.
Sgt. Daryl Creighton’s Street En-
forcement Unit last conducted an un-
dercover sting a year ago.
He disagrees with Dugger and
other residents who claims that the
neighbourhood lacks police patrols.
“We have maintained a police pres-
ence in the area between Dewdney
Trunk Road, the Fraser River, 222nd
Street and 228th Street,” said Creigh-
ton.
The Ridge Meadows RCMP Com-
munity Resource Team continues
both foot and bike patrols of the
neighbourhood, and general duty of-
ficers are in the area daily.
“All of our officers have gotten to
know the street survival workers,
and they check up on them on a regu-
lar basis,” Creighton said.
“RCMP strongly discourage citi-
zens taking the law into their own
hands. If anyone observes this, or
any other type of criminal event oc-
curring, we ask they call our office.
All police officers are trained in deal-
ing with these matters, and diffusing
conflicts.”
Resident keeping eye on sex trade
A young sex offender from Maple Ridge
has been released from custody less than
two months after he violated his bail condi-
tions.
James Edward Harry, 19, pleaded guilty to
two counts of breaching probation and was
sentenced on Thursday to a day in jail and a
three-year probation order.
Harry was arrested in May, two weeks af-
ter being released from a remand centre for
violating bail conditions imposed on him for
a similar breach in January.
Ridge Meadows RCMP allege Harry left his
apartment unescorted.
Mounties characterize him as a “danger-
ous sexual predator” and issued a warning
about him a day before he was arrested in
May.
Cpl. Alanna Dunlop said the public interest
notification was made under the Privacy Act
of Canada, in the interest of public safety.
At the time of his arrest, Harry was being
supervised by the Maple Ridge probation
office and is still being monitored by Ridge
Meadows RCMP’s serious crimes unit, which
first became aware of Harry when he was a
youth.
Court records show
Harry was placed under
a peace bond in Octo-
ber 2009 because police
feared he may commit a
sexual offence against a
person under 16.
The peace bond was
sworn just three months
after Harry turned 18.
He breached the peace
bond on Sept. 8, 2010 and
spent 16 days in jail. He
also received a 12-month probation order.
Harry, however, violated the probation or-
der in January and proceeded to violate bail
conditions in May.
Under the terms of his latest probation or-
der, Harry is prohibited from having contact
with anyone under 16.
He is also required to stay away from
parks, playgrounds, swimming pools, day-
cares, schools and anywhere else children
are present.
He is not allowed to use a computer or the
Internet to communicate with anyone under
16 or access social networking sites such as
Facebook.
He is not allowed to work where he can
come in contact with anyone under 16.
He also has a daily curfew for the next
three years from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. and must
attend counselling.
Maple Ridge
bylaws has taken
down Dugger’s
signs along North
Avenue, between
Fraser and
224th streets.
THE NEWS/files
As one president steps
away, a new one steps for-
ward to take charge of the
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows
Chamber of Commerce.
Ken Holland is replacing
Jeremy Bekar, the chamber
of commerce said in a Tues-
day news release. The an-
nouncement confirms what
Bekar said last week after
he resigned. Bekar had been
president of the chamber for
the past 18 months, but de-
cided to step down before his
second term expired.
Holland takes over with
four years experience with
the chamber.
He was unanimously elect-
ed by the board of directors.
“[Holland] passionately be-
lieves in the role of the cham-
ber as a bridge to the growth
and development of busi-
nesses in our region and is
dedicated to maintaining and
strengthening the chamber’s
ties with local government,”
said a chamber news release.
Holland leads a board of di-
rectors “who are enthusiastic
about the revitalized strategic
vision of the chamber and its
growing relationship with the
business community.”
Bekar said his resignation
this month was a “positive
and it means they’re [board of
directors] doing a great job,”
and don’t need him around
anymore.
Bekar was president in 2010,
during the chamber’s 100th
year, and stayed on this year
to help out following the res-
ignation of previous execu-
tive-director Dean Barbour.
‘Dangerous’ sex ofender gets probation, released
Holland
new chief
of chamber
RCMP have discouraged
Will Dugger from taking
law into his own hands
James Harry can’t be in contact
with anyone under the age of 16
by Moni s ha Mar t i ns
staff repor ter
Harry
by Moni s ha Mar t i ns
staff repor ter
Dr. Schnarr • Dr. Trotter • Dr. Lennox • Dr. Gill • Dr. Bains
22320 Brown Avenue, Maple Ridge
eyedoctorsmapleridge.ca 604-463-7127
For the month of July, try on
any pair of sunglasses and receive
a $25 GIFT CARD toward
the purchase of sunglasses!
4 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
But Tim Bennett, with
the Ministry of Forests,
Lands and Natural Re-
source Operations, said
Tuesday that the court
proceedings and the appli-
cation are independent.
“If there was ongoing
diversion of use, then
that may change us look-
ing at the licence.”
He said the Aquilini
group has complied with
requests to do several
environmental impact
assessments and had
disconnected the pump.
Bennett confirmed that
the existing pump will
be used to haul water
and that it was left in the
river because it could
have caused more envi-
ronmental damage by
removing it.
Golden Eagle Group,
also part of the Aquilini
Investment Group, which
owns the Vancouver Ca-
nucks, said in 2009 that
it pumped water from
the river briefly to save
young cranberry plants
during a dry spring. It
had applications pending
for that use.
Bennett said the new
permit is stricter than
usual because it requires
an environmental moni-
tor to observe the site
and that Geri Partner-
ship, also part of the
Aquilini group, must pro-
vide monthly reports of
the daily water volumes
diverted.
“That is definitely
more prescriptive than
would be typical on one
of these kinds of permits.
That level of reporting
wouldn’t be normal.”
The company’s consul-
tant prepared the envi-
ronmental assessment,
which was reviewed by
the ministry and for-
warded for comment by
Fisheries and Oceans
Canada. But the depart-
ment didn’t respond.
“We’ll make a decision
in the absence of a re-
sponse,” Bennett said.
“I wouldn’t have ex-
pected to see a red flag
from DFO [Dept. of Fish-
eries and Oceans], but
you never know.”
Amanda Crowston, ex-
ecutive-director with the
Alouette River Manage-
ment Society, wonders
why a new water permit
was issued while charges
are still before the court.
But she likes some of
the conditions that have
been added to the per-
mit, such as the require-
ment to only take water
when river levels are
high, at 0.6 metres above
sea level.
“We are pleased that
it’s being handled in such
a way that there will be
more reporting and ac-
countability.”
That could serve as a
model for future licences,
she added.
Data collected by the
environmental consul-
tant should also be acces-
sible to the public, said.
“Accountability is key
here.”
One of the conditions
says the monitor can stop
the pump if it’s too risky
and that any violations of
the conditions have to be
reported to the ministry.
Emberly also said the
requirement for a moni-
tor “sounds like a move
in the right direction,”
but also wants testing
of water that’s released
back into the river after
it has been used for farm-
ing purposes.
“We have to know that
the water is pure and
there’s nothing harm-
ful to the habitat or fish.
If these things happen,
we’ll be one step for-
ward, knowing that our
environment and health
are safer.”
The water permit was
issued for specific peri-
ods, for the fall, begin-
ning Sept. 1, for flood
harvesting and frost pro-
tection.
The permit also allows
water used for irrigation,
April 1 to Sept. 30.
An acre-foot is the
amount of water needed
to cover an acre one foot,
or 33 centimetres deep.
More water is allowed
to be pumped for storage
purposes over the next 12
months. Total water au-
thorized is 1,469 acre-ft.
The Water Manage-
ment branch of the new
Ministry of Forests,
Lands and Natural Re-
source Operations is-
sued the licences. That
replaces the former Wa-
ter Stewardship Division
in the Ministry of Envi-
ronment.
Bulk water carriers
can access the old stand
pipes, a staff report
notes.
Once data is collected
about how who’s using
the water stations, from
where and how much,
staff will present op-
tions to council, which
could include user fees.
But before any fee is
put on water from the
stations, Thornhill resi-
dent Betty von Harden-
berg says there should
be district-wide meter-
ing to curb waste by
those who are in the po-
sition to do so by having
access to piped water.
People in the Thornhill
area only use the water
station for emergencies,
for a couple of the hot-
ter months in the year,
when their wells dry up,
von Hardenberg said.
She had to haul water
for the first time last
year, after living on
Thornhill for 20 years,
because she’d lent out
part of her yard for a
vegetable garden.
But most on wells in
eastern Maple Ridge
use the water stations
only to haul water for
drinking and bathing
purposes. Neither does
it make sense for people
to drive here from out
of the district, she said,
just to fill up their con-
tainers with water.
“It’s not something
they use and abuse.”
Meanwhile, there’s
only a small percentage
of Maple Ridge homes
that have water meters,
allowing people to waste
water without penalty.
“There’s nothing to stop
someone from abusing
that,” she added.
Langley township re-
cently metered most of
its residents before put-
ting a fee on its water
station.
Coun. Al Hogarth
pointed out most resi-
dents on the Metro
Vancouver system pay
for their water (through
the flat fee). “We have to
realize, there is a cost to
provide water.”
And others who pay
that flat rate could ask
to have their rates re-
duced if others are get-
ting water for free, said
Coun. Judy Dueck.
“I think it’s inevitable
that there has to be
some cost, there has to
be some cost recovery.”
Coun. Mike Morden
wanted to know if it was
worth the cost to build
the new bulk water sta-
tions.
But public works gen-
eral manager Frank
Quinn said the old
standpipes raised sever-
al concerns with Fraser
Health and have to be
replaced. The old stand
pipes have no backflow
preventers to stop con-
taminants from flowing
down the pipes and pos-
sibly contaminating the
water supply.
Von Hardenberg
wanted to know why
Fraser Health ordered
the district to replace
the standpipes now.
“It’s a real concern if
there’s a health issue.”
An open house takes
place in a few weeks.
Water from front
‘Old standpipes raised concerns’
A new water
station was set
up on
Jackson Road by
106th Avenue
last year.
Colleen Flanagan/
THE NEWS
‘Monitor can stop pump if too risky’
License from front
It’s no wonder
we’re voted
Best Pub
T
HE NEWS 2010 T
HE NEW EE S 22001100
F
AVO
URITE PUB G
R
U
B
#
1
604-476-1008 12968 232
nd
Street theblacksheeppub.ca
SEAFOOD
FETTUCCINI
Prawns, scallops, shrimp and
crab in a white wine and garlic
cream sauce with red onions
and peppers.
$
13.89
LOUGHEED HWY
MCMYN ROAD
H
A
R
R
IS
R
O
A
D
Meadow
Vale Mall
IGA
Shoppers Drug
Mart
9
Pawsitively Paradise 109-19070 Lougheed Hwy., Pitt Meadows
604.465.8046
HOURS :
Daycare: Tues. to Fri. 7 am – 6:30 pm
Grooming: Monday to Saturday
We provide a clean spacious
bright atmosphere for our
daycare and grooming dogs.
WE SUPPORT THE
SPCA!
CRATE-FREE


GROOMING
& DRYING
(playtime fun
before & after!)
We’re Moving
50% off
most merchandise in store
While quantities last.
Sales • Rentals • Repairs • Music Lessons
Customer Service • Community Support
#1 20475 Lougheed Hwy.
gandgmusiconline.com 604.465.4900
FREE INSTRUMENT
RENTAL FOR UP TO 3 MONTHS
WHEN YOU SIGN UP FOR MUSIC LESSONS.
MUST PRESENT COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER.
SIGN UP
FOR SUMMER & SEPTEMBER
MUSIC LESSONS
STARTING FROM
$59/MONTH
REGISTER TODAY!
SPOTS ARE FILLING UP FAST!
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 5
Grounds crews at
Golden Ears Provincial
Park were busy Mon-
day, cleaning up trash
left behind by thou-
sands of long-weekend
revelers.
More than 5,000 peo-
ple visited the park’s
camping grounds and
day-use area each day
over the long weekend.
Parks manager Stu
Burgess estimated that
more than 100 cubic
yards of trash were
generated by parks us-
ers over the weekend.
“It’s amazing how
much trash people
make when they are up
here,” he said. “It takes
about a day and a half
to completely clean up
the park, so we’d like
people to clean up after
themselves.”
The park’s 409 camp-
grounds were fully
booked Friday and Sat-
urday night, while the
Alouette Lake beach
areas were packed
with sun-worshippers
throughout the week-
end.
“The weather wasn’t
the greatest, but it was
a nice improvement
on what we’ve had so
far this year,” said
Burgess. “For a lot of
people, this was their
first taste of summer,
so they seemed to be
really enjoying them-
selves.”
Burgess said the
weekend went largely
without incident, de-
spite a pair of minor in-
juries that required an
ambulance, as well as
some underage drink-
ing.
“We had a few people
who had a bit too much
to drink,” he said. “But
in all, it was a pretty
average weekend for
us.”
Parks staff are get-
ting ready for another
onslaught again this
weekend. While the
park’s campgrounds
and day-use areas are
all open for the season,
some hiking trails in
the park are still bur-
ied under snow.
The Golden Ears
peaks are currently
inaccessible, while the
hiker’s shelter near the
peak is still half buried
in snow, Burgess said.
More than 100
cubic metres of
trash left behind
Busy, messy weekend at park
River at its peak
Rainfall in the upper Fraser River and North
Thompson River watersheds is bringing up the
fast-running Fraser River in the next day or so,
says the B.C. River Forecast Centre.
The Fraser should peak at six metres at the Mis-
sion gauge on Wednesday, Maple Ridge district
said in a news release.
But that is still below the 2007 level, when food
fears were heightened.
The District of Maple Ridge has been doing daily
dike patrols since early June and staf have been
in regular contact with colleagues in the lower
Fraser Valley, monitoring the conditions and
forecasts for each fve-day weather cycle.
Prior to this recent expected slight increase,
water levels peaked at 5.65 metres from June
10 to 15.
• Levels at the Mission gauge can be obtained
online @ http://www.waterof ce.ec.gc.ca/
graph/graph_e.html?stn=08MH024.
by Rober t Mangel s dor f
staff repor ter
ABBOTSFORD Hearing Centre Only • Seven Oaks Shopping Centre • 604-504-3277
WHITE ROCK • Semiahmoo Shopping Centre • Optical: 604-541-3937 • Hearing : 604-541-8599
CHILLIWACK • Southgate Shopping Centre • 604-795-5367
LANGLEY • Unit C101-20159 88 Avenue, Walnut Grove, Thunderbird Village • 604-881-4937
NORTH VANCOUVER • Lynn Valley Centre • 604-983-3277
YOUR DIGITAL
HEARING EXPERTS
Registered under the
Hearing Aid Act of BC
MAPLE RIDGE • 22540 Dewdney Trunk Rd. •
604-466-3277

604-466-3937
FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED. LEONA WIENS AND SONS GEORGE AND STEVE. FRIENDLY, PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
7
/
1
1
M
R
C
V
5
www.crystalvisionandhearing.com
* Some restrictions apply
HEARING OPTICAL
22 Customer Service Awards
A+ Better Business Bureau Rating
Locally owned & operated for
over 14 years
George, (Son) Leona, (Mom) and Steve Wiens (Son) and Nicole
OVER
3000
DESIGNER FRAMES
TO CHOOSE FROM
• BIFOCALS • TRIFOCALS
• PROGRESSIVES
IN ABOUT 1 HOUR
ON-SITE LAB
DON’T PAY A
MIDDLE MAN &
*
FRAME STYLISTS
TRAINED TO
ASSIST YOU IN
FINDING THE
PERFECT LOOK!
Let the sun shine!
Free
Free* prescription sunglasses when you purchase
a complete pair of prescription glasses.
$355
SAVE
UP TO
F
AA
FF
BB
AA
U
B
L
UU OO L
UU
OO
S
U
FFF
EE
FF
EE
TTT
EE S
c
S
h
o
ol of Dan
c
e
l
t
ll
d
tt
604.467.9846
Where can
your feet
take you?
Register now
for September
Wed. July 13, 4–7pm
Wed. Aug 24, 4–7pm
Sat. Aug 27, 10–1pm
Wed. Aug 31, 4–7pm
TAP • JAZZ • ACRO • BALLET
HIP HOP • TECHNIQUE
TINY TUMBLERS • PRESCHOOL
ADULT TAP • ADULT STAGE
We have classes for all ages, recreation,
competitive and exams.
TO THE PLACE THAT
LOVES TO DANCE!
#3–22826 Dewdney Trunk Road •
www.fabulousfeet.ca fabulousfeet@telus.net
director
Linda Carter
Member c.d.t.a.
THE NEWS 2009
F
A
V
O
U
R
ITE DANCE INSTR
U
C
T
O
R
#
2
F
A
V
O
U
RITE DANCE SCHO
O
L
THE NEWS 2009
F
A
V
O
U
R
ITE DANCE INSTR
U
C
T
O
R
#
1
6 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
THE NEWS/opinion
VICTORIA – There
were high hopes and
harsh words in 2000,
when the provincial
and federal govern-
ments signed Can-
ada’s first modern-
day treaty with the
Nisga’a people of
northwestern B.C.
The four villages
are now governed by
the Nisga’a Lisims
government, which
holds broad authority
transferred from the
federal and provincial governments.
While Canada’s financial support
continues to flow, the Nisga’a Nation is
nearing the stage where it must begin to
collect taxes and become self-sustaining.
A new study by the Winnipeg-based
Frontier Centre for Public Policy offers
a unique look behind the scenes of this
remote experiment. And judging by the
hostile response of the Nisga’a govern-
ment to the findings, it may be the last
one for some time.
Is the Nisga’a Nation ready to support
itself? The short answer is no, according
to polling data and extensive interviews
with “key informants” who are not identi-
fied.
Co-author Joseph Quesnel told me he
interviewed 15 influential people, both
supporters and critics of the treaty, since
he first visited the region last fall.
A larger phone survey by COMPAS Re-
search found that more people trust the
Nisga’a government compared to the old
Indian Act regime. But divisions remain,
particularly over giving up aboriginal tax
exemptions.
Quesnel said he met people who have
left the Nisga’a villages for nearby
Tsimshian communities, before sales and
income taxes take effect in 2013.
According to the study, a culture of
dependency that grew up during a
century of colonial-style rule remains
pervasive. The authors report many of
the same problems that plague Indian Act
reserves, such as willful damage to hous-
ing, accusations of nepotism and failed
business investment.
“More than one key informant observed
that old attitudes and mentalities persist
regarding public services,” the report
states. “Expectations at the local level
that the village government will provide
everything are still rampant.”
Quesnel said the Nisga’a Nation’s recent
move to allow fee-simple ownership of
municipal-style lots is a key step towards
self-sufficiency. But the land title system
is still in development and it’s too soon to
see results.
The study notes that economic condi-
tions in Nisga’a territory have become
worse since the treaty. Quesnel agreed
with my suggestion that this has more to
do with the decline of forestry and fishing
than any failure of governance.
Nisga’a Lisims President Mitchell
Stevens issued a statement rejecting the
report’s findings, citing two factual errors
and denying that he had participated.
Quesnel, a Quebec Metis with a
background in journalism, said he was
welcomed on his initial visit and was even
invited to attend a Nisga’a Lisims execu-
tive meeting. But he said Stevens and
other officials “stopped responding” as
the project progressed.
In his statement, Stevens described the
code of conduct for Nisga’a officials and
the complaint process people can use to
hold them accountable for decisions. The
president dismissed the “colourful com-
mentary” of a few “key informants” who
didn’t expect to be quoted.
Quesnel says that despite the slow prog-
ress, he remains convinced the Nisga’a
treaty is a positive step. Now investors
have only one government to deal with,
and the region has electricity, mining and
gas development on the drawing board.
And there are lessons to be learned
by other aboriginal communities, such
as tackling dependency and addiction
problems before a treaty is signed, and
bringing in outside experts to set up busi-
nesses.
“Mitchell Stevens, when I spoke to him,
was optimistic about the ability to reduce
transfers, even eliminate them,” Quesnel
said. “Without financial independence, I
think political self-government is really
an illusion. Ultimately, you’re still depen-
dent.”
Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and
columnist for Black Press
and BCLocalnews.com
(tfletcher@blackpress.ca).
A decade on, Nisga’a no panacea
Hold the applause
Ingrid Rice News Views
Published and printed by Black Press at 22328 –119th Avenue, Maple Ridge, B.C., V2X 2Z3
@ Online poll: cast your vote at www.mapleridgenews.com, or e-mail your vote and comments to editor@mapleridgenews.com
This week’s question: Do you support keeping the HST?
B.C. Views
Tom Fletcher
The Aquilini group has been issued a license to
withdraw water from the Alouette River to irrigate
berry fields even though environmental charges
against members of the Vancouver company for do-
ing so without one are still before the courts.
Francesco, Paulo, Elisa and Roberto Aquilini, along
with Richard Matis were charged in February with
11 counts under the Water Act, the Fisheries Act
and the Dike Maintenance Act, in connection with
the installation of an irrigation pipe in the North
Alouette River in May 2009. CPI – Cranberry Planta-
tion, and Global Coin Corp. were also charged.
The Golden Eagle Group, which is part of the
Aquilini Investment Group and owns almost 5,000
acres of berry fields in Pitt Meadows, has said it in-
stalled the pipe, then pumped at least 100,000 litres
of water in order to save young cranberry bushes,
while waiting for approval.
Penalties under the Water Act can range from
fines of up to $200,000, or six months in jail, or up to
$200,000 daily for continuing offences.
Environmentalists question why a water licence
has been granted before those charges have been
dealt with.
But they are satisfied that as part of the new per-
mit, a monitor has been appointed to observe the
site and file monthly reports. That is stricter than
usual, and could serve as a model for future water
licences.
A qualified environmental monitor will visit the
site monthly to observe water diversion and has
the authority to shut down the pump if it poses any
environmental risk. The monitor must also call the
water management of Ministry of Forests, Lands
and Natural Resource Operations to report any vio-
lations.
This is one step away from making the informa-
tion publicly accessible, a critical component to ac-
countability that’s needed when allotting water.
Presumably, any incidents reported to the min-
istry could be available to the public. This could
be a precedent for future water permits and the
government should be applauded for setting
these conditions.
Depending on the outcome of the court case,
and the performance on this permit, the ap-
plause for the Aquilinis will have to wait.
– The News
Jim Coulter, publisher
publisher@mapleridgenews.com
Michael Hall, editor
editor@mapleridgenews.com
Carly Ferguson, advertising, creative services manager
admanager@mapleridgenews.com
Kathy Blore, circulation manager
circulation@mapleridgenews.com
Ad control: Mel Onodi
Creative services: Kristine Pierlot, Annette WaterBeek,
Chris Hussey, Brian Holt
Classifed: Vicki Milne
22328 – 119th Avenue,
Maple Ridge, B.C.,
V2X 2Z3
Of ce:

604-467-1122
Delivery:

604-466-6397
Website:

mapleridgenews.com
Email:

newsroom@mapleridgenews.com
The News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-
regulatorybodygoverningtheprovince'snewspaper industry. Thecoun-
cil considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member
newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input
from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the
editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or
story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written
concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201
SelbySt., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or
go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.
CCAB audited circulation: (as of September 2010):
Wednesday - 30,753; Friday – 30,748.


Ser vi ng Mapl e Ri dge & Pi tt Meadows si nce 1978
THE NEWS
“Expectations at the local level
that the village government
will provide everything are still
rampant.”
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 7
Letters to the editor should be exclusive to The News
and address topics of interest to residents of Maple
Ridge and Pitt Meadows. Include full name and address,
as well as daytime phone number for verification. Keep
letters to 500 words or less. Letters may be edited for
length and clarity.
@ E-mail letters to editor@mapleridgenews.com.
Letters welcome
EDITOR, THE NEWS:
Re: Nobody died, give kid a break (Commentary, July 1).
I totally agree with Phil Melnychuk. He makes a lot of
sense in what he says in defense of a teenager who, in the
midst of a riot, lost control of his better judgement, and
has since sincerely apologized for it.
What disturbs me most is the vigilantly attitudes of peo-
ple who want to crucify this poor kid, including Christy
Clark’s knee jerk comment that they should all be jailed.
What an ignorant statement from our premier.
What do you really think would have been gained by
putting this kid in jail for a spur-of-the-moment mistake,
where he didn’t hurt or injure anyone?
It has certainly displayed a darker side of what lurks
inside all of us, in our lust for revenge.
The same venom which drives the vigilantly crowd, is
just as bad, if not worse than what these kids did in the
riot.
We’d be well advised to look deeply into our own mo-
tives for wanting to crucify these kids, and show some
compassion and forgiveness. We all make mistakes –es-
pecially teenagers. Give this kid a break.
Let’s keep it in perspective, as Mr. Melnychuk suggests,
and realize that no one was killed, and hopefully these
kids learn a hard lesson about not getting sucked into a
mob mentality riot in the spur of the moment.
JOHN MCKENZIE
MAPLE RIDGE
Don’t get sucked in
to mob mentality
Consumption is a fair tax
EDITOR, THE NEWS:
Re: Don’t be fooled by HST propa-
ganda (Letters, July 1).
Figures do not lie, but liars do fig-
ure.
I cannot recall where I heard this,
but the quote certainly stuck in my
mind, since it is so true.
Even if it is not an outright lie, one
can easily mislead people with the sig-
nificance of numbers.
For example, if a researcher reports
on the effectiveness of a new vaccine
for a problem where normally 50 per-
cent succumbs if nothing is done and
states that only one third died after
the vaccination, then one would eas-
ily come to the conclusion that this is
quite an improvement.
However, the picture changes dras-
tically when one discovers that only
three patients received the new vac-
cine.
Speaking about questionable num-
bers, Wayne Clark writes that we
should not be fooled by the HST pro-
paganda and proceeds to present us
with some numbers how the new tax
is affecting him.
He claims to have to pay in excess of
$1,000 more for his registered thera-
peutic massage than before.
Since the $1,000 represents seven per
cent of his total outlay for the treat-
ment, he spends more than $14,000 on
treating his fibromyalgia, or about $40
a day, every day of the year.
One consolation is that much of that
amount is tax deductible, if indeed he
spends that much.
He also claims to have spent and ex-
tra $2,000 in new taxes in the past 11
months.
Since the HST applies to about 20
per cent of the goods and services that
were PST exempt before, Mr. Clark
must have spent $28,500 on items that
only had the GST before the HST.
If that applies to the 20 per cent of
his spending, then he supports our
economy at the tune of over $160,000
annually.
If he is that wealthy, then I do not
feel sorry for him.
After all, the HST is a consumption
tax and, therefore, a fair tax.
Poor people spend far less than rich
people, and with this tax the rich pay
considerably more to provide the gov-
ernment with the funds to pay for
public services such as education and
health care, and let us not forget the
wages of all the government employ-
ees.
I find it ironic that the very people
who object the most to the HST are
the same who want more money from
the government.
Where is that money going to come
from?
The glib answer is, of course, that the
big bad corporations should be taxed
more to pay for their wage increases.
Do they remember what happens
when the government does that?
The corporations either pack up and
leave and many people lose their jobs,
or they have to increase the prices of
the goods or services they provide to
remain in business.
One way or another, the consumer
ends up having to paying more for just
about everything and, therefore, will
curtail their spending.
The combined result of that is that
the provincial economy tanks and we
once again will become a ‘have not’
province.
I, therefore, prefer to keep the HST.
Not because I like to pay more in tax,
but I do not want to see the inevitable
cuts in health care and education if we
go back to the antiquated GST/PST
combination.
MARCO TERWIEL
MAPLE RIDGE
Vote without bias
EDITOR, THE NEWS:
Re: Anti-HST signs OK in city now
(The News, July 1).
I am disappointed to see Corisa Bell
claiming that her ‘Yes’ signs must have
been removed by Liberals.
It is not so long ago that Ms. Bell
was vehemently complaining that her
anti-HST campaign was assumed to
be NDP-motivated. She is now making
similar unfounded assumptions.
For you information, Ms. Bell, not all
HST supporters are Liberals, and con-
versely, not all Liberals are HST sup-
porters.
If this referendum is decided on party
lines, then we will be doing ourselves a
disservice.
Yet the longer the campaign contin-
ues, the more likely it is that this will
be the case.
I urge everyone to read all the repu-
table information on the subject, ig-
noring the hype, political posturing
and blatant inaccuracies that are be-
ing published.
Ask yourself if it’s reasonable for
someone to claim he spends $1,000 in
HST on massage therapy – that equates
to more than $8,000 in fees in one
year.
As advertising on both sides of the
argument becomes more frenzied, it
is increasingly difficult for the gen-
eral public to make a balanced and in-
formed decision.
It is essential that we vote without
political bias and that we research ac-
curate information that will give us a
more complete picture of all the rami-
fications of this tax, provincial, nation-
al and international.
ANNE ROSTVIG
MAPLE RIDGE
Vote for more or less
EDITOR, THE NEWS:
It seems that every time I pick up the
news, there are the same half dozen
anti-HST writing their narrow focus of
why the government should go back-
wards and spend billions bringing
back a poor tax because it did not tax
one of two things.
If the HST is so bad because it now
taxes a couple of other things, perhaps
these writers could petition to exempt
those items.
When the government has to pay $2
billion, they may have to continue tax-
ing those items, anyways.
If those who are prepared to vote yes
because they want to send a message,
try sending a letter instead of insisting
on a policy that will cost billions.
Governments must tax to provide
services. We vote for a government
that will tax to provide the services we
want.
We vote on better services for more
taxes or less services and less taxes.
We have an election to do that.
DAN BANOV
MAPLE RIDGE
THE NEWS/letters
chat@www.mapleridgenews.com
Moving on
From: Elizabeth Rosenau, posted on mapleridgenews.com.
Re: Nobody died, give kid a break (Commentary, July 1).
Phil Melnychuk: I appreciate that you showed balance in your article; there
is so much hysteria and witch-hunting these days. I do not condone for one
minute what the rioters did. It was definitely a huge embarrassment for us.
But people need to have some perspective. By pointing out how often the
police involved in serious incidents resulting in injury or death avoid charges
and get to keep their jobs, you have provided food for thought. Our justice
system is far from perfect, but mob justice or vigilante justice is not the way to
go. Let’s hope we can learn some lessons from this, hold people accountable
for their actions in court and move on.
Not over it
From: Jeromie Williams, posted on mapleridgenews.com.
Re: Nobody died, give kid a break (Commentary, July 1).
Dear editor, as a columnist myself, I was shocked and disheartened to see that
your paper would run such a blatantly callous and biased article, and that is
saying something for an opinion piece. Your article shows a cavalier disregard for
the hundreds who were stabbed, beaten, punched and attacked by roving bands
of thugs during the riots, in some cases, such as the story of the teen girl who
punched so hard in the face by a 220-pound male that her jaw was unhinged at
both sides and her chin is now being held together with metal plates. The fact
that no one died should not be an excuse to tell people to “get over it.”
Not acceptable
From: Kim Johnston, posted on mapleridgenews.com.
Re: Nobody died, give kid a break (Commentary, July 1).
It infuriates me that you think it is OK, that when Van city puts up screens
for our people to watch the game, for people that night to gather about
in festive mood to celebrate – win or lose – and people parked their cars
in parking garages or the street, that that was an invite for some scum to
come and burn down the city and smash everything in site, including the
young girl who had to have her jaw wired back together because some
220-pound idiot smashed her in the face for being in his way. Maybe that is
the mentality down your way, but that is just not acceptable behavior here.
EDITOR, THE NEWS:
Re: Pitt mayor accepts city insurance
contract (The News, June 17).
I would like to express my disdain over
the way that Pitt Meadows Couns. Deb
Walters and Tracy Miyashita handled
the award of the City of Pitt Meadows
insurance business to Sharpe’s Insur-
ance, which is owned by Mayor Don Ma-
cLean.
This reeks of political grandstanding.
I have not always voted for Mayor Ma-
cLean. In fact, I haven’t voted for him
during the past two elections.
But politics aside, I would have to
say that the political knives were being
brandished with self-gain being the mo-
tivation.
First of all, the mayor’s agency has
owned and paid property taxes on a
business and building in Pitt Meadows
for 55 years. The other two insurance
businesses that put forth proposals to
handle the City of Pitt Meadows insur-
ance portfolio do not have solid roots in
Pitt Meadows.
Meier and Company is a New West-
minster-based insurance business and
Johnston Meier (no relation to Meier and
Company) owns 35 offices, with only one
office leasing space in Pitt Meadows.
Is Mayor MacLean not allowed to put
in a bid for the city’s business?
If that were the case, then Coun. Doug
Bing, who is a Pitt Meadows dentist,
should not allow any of the City of Pitt
Meadows staff to get their teeth cleaned
by him, nor should Coun. John Becker,
who is a Pitt Meadows lawyer, allow any
City of Pitt Meadows staff to use him for
conveyance or wills services.
Should city staff have acknowledged
that Mayor MacLean’s insurance busi-
ness put in a bid for the city’s insurance
business?
Absolutely, they should have.
But I firmly believe that this was sim-
ply a mistake.
Couns. Walters and Miyashita seized
the opportunity and spun it into a politi-
cal circus for their own benefit.
Shame on them.
I, for one, will not vote for individuals
who put their own political gain ahead
of the facts.
Sharpe’s Insurance is a pioneer busi-
ness in our community and deserves the
insurance business of the city.
MICHELLE DANIELSON
PITT MEADOWS
Editor’s note: Pitt Meadows Mayor
Don MacLean did violate a section
of the B.C. Community Charter
regarding disclosure of
municipal contracts.
‘Pitt councillors were just grandstanding’
8 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
More than 200 enter-
tainers will be taking
part in the 11th annual
Maple Ridge Caribbean
Festival this year at Me-
morial Peace Park.
The two-day festival,
which attracted about
18,000 people last year,
will feature 15 bands on
two outdoor stages, en-
tertaining festival-goers
with the sounds of reg-
gae, calypso, salsa and
soca music, said Deddy
Geese, entertainment
organizer.
Saturday’s activities
have been extended
this year, from noon to
9 p.m.
Headlining on Satur-
day is Mike Amaral’s
California Beach Boys
Tribute Band.
“I’ve seen a lot of the
band’s material,” says
Geese. “It is original. It
is absolutely fabulous.”
Geese wants to invite
the community to put
on their surf gear and
have a great time with
the band, which is trav-
elling from California to
perform.
“We have been wait-
ing for summer for three
months now,” Geese
said of what he hopes
will be a “beach party in
the park.”
On Sunday, the en-
tertainment again goes
from noon to 9 p.m.,
starting with Bounty
Hunta, Vancouver’s first
reggae recording art-
ist, followed by the steel
drums of Tropical Heat.
The costume parade
follows at 2 p.m.. Before
that, children can make
their own costumes at
craft stations, then join
the parade.
Headlining Sunday
night, at 8 p.m., will be
Steele, a Juno-nominat-
ed reggae artist based
out of Toronto, and
Natural Flavas, a reggae
and roots musical group
based out of Vancouver.
Natural Flavas have
backed up Tosh1 (the
son of Peter Tosh) and
Errol Blackwood of Mes-
senjah on live perfor-
mances and have also
performed with the reg-
gae groups Inner Circle
and Easy Star All-Stars.
During both days,
224th Street in Maple
Ridge will be closed
from 119th Avenue to
Dewdney Trunk Road to
accommodate food and
craft vendors, as well
as a kids zone, extend-
ing north from McIntosh
Avenue.
The kids zone will
have lots of activities
and crafts for children,
as well as children-ori-
ented vendors.
More than 15 food ven-
dors will feature authen-
tic Caribbean food.
• Tiffany Chen, festival
volunteer coordinator,
is still looking for volun-
teers. Anyone interested
should call 604-467-7459.
Caribbean Festival a ‘beach party in park’
Members
of the Afro-Caribbean
dance troupe per-
formed at last year’s
event.
THE NEWS/files
by Col l een Fl anagan
staff repor ter
WIN
this Amazing
Grand Prize
South Surrey Kitsilano Cultus Lake
Winner will choose 1 prize option; other prize options will not be awarded. For more information & Rules of Play: HeroesLottery.com
HeroesLottery.com
Supporting the BC Professional Fire Fighters’ Burn Fund and VGH & UBC Hospital Foundation
604-648-4376
Know your limit, play within it.
Problem Gambling Help Line 1-888-795-6111
www.bcresponsiblegambling.ca
19+ to play!
Chances are 1 in 390,000 (total tickets for sale) to win a grand prize. BC Gaming Event Licence #33049
Tickets at Prize Homes and
South Surrey Home or Kits Home or Cultus Home or choose $1.6 Million Tax Free Cash.
A
B
S
O
L
U
T
E
F
I
N
A
L
D
E
A
D
L
IN
E
F
R
ID
A
Y
Cut off for tickets is this Friday midnight July 8th...
DON’T MISS OUT!
Visit the SOUTH SURREY Prize Home - 3211 – 141st St,. ~Noon to 6 pm & the CULTUS LAKE Prize Home -1728 Painted Willow, Lindell Beach. Thurs & Fri only~ Noon to 5 pm.
11995 Haney Place, Maple Ridge, B.C. V2X 6A9
Tel: 604-463-5221 • Fax: 604-467-7329
www.mapleridge.ca
Invitation to Tender
ITT-PL11-42 - LOADING AND UNLOADING AREA:
11900-224 STREET (AT MEMORIAL PEACE PARK)
The Corporation of the District of Maple Ridge (hereinafter referred to as “the District”)
invites tender offers from interested and experienced contractors for the supply of all
labour, materials and equipment required for the construction and installation as per
specifications for the Loading and Unloading Area located at 11900 – 224 Street, Maple
Ridge, B.C., adjacent to Memorial Peace Park.
Scope of works involves the construction of a vehicular loading and unloading area /
transit pad, street furniture (e.g. bike racks), the installation of a new lighting system,
sanitary and storm sewer pipes and catch basins, water main extension, irrigation system,
water vault and fire hydrant. Landscaping in this area will also be required to make
repairs to the existing soft landscape areas with protection to existing trees, installation
of a partially paved public space suitable for public events.
Sealed tenders clearly marked, “ITT-PL11-42 Loading and Unloading Area – 11900
224th Street (at Memorial Peace Park),” must be received by the undersigned, no later
than 2:00 P.M. Local Time: Tuesday, July 20, 2011 at the following address:
Nichole Walsh, Purchasing Supervisor
The District of Maple Ridge
11995 Haney Place, Reception Desk (Main Floor)
Maple Ridge, B.C., V2X 6A9
A Non-MANDATORY site tour will be held at 11900 224 Street, in Maple Ridge, B.C.,
Monday, July 11, 2011 at 9:00 am, local time.
Tender submissions must be accompanied by the specified 10% Bid Bond and Consent
of Surety. The successful Tenderer will be required to provide a Performance Bond and
Labour and Material Payment Bond, each in the amount of 50% of the Contract Price.
The lowest or any tender may not necessarily be accepted and the District will not be
responsible for any cost incurred by the Tenderer in preparing the Tender. Award of
Contract is subject to funds being legally available for this project.
Tender Documents may be obtained from the address listed above during normal
business hours (Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, except holidays), upon payment
of a non-refundable amount of $50.00 (not including HST) made payable to the District
of Maple Ridge.
Documents may be downloaded, at no charge, from the District website at
www.mapleridge.ca. Bid documents transmitted by facsimile machine or electronic media
will not be considered. Bid documents submitted are irrevocable after the closing time.
All questions regarding this Invitation to Tender should be submitted in writing to Nichole
Walsh, Purchasing Supervisor at nwalsh@mapleridge.ca.
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 9
In other towns try your local health food stores first. If they don’t
have it and don’t want to order it for you. Order on our website or
call us with Visa or Mastercard. S & H $9.95.
www.BellLifestyle.com
1-800-333-7995
Store
inquiries
welcome.
ABBOTSFORD: Abbotsford Vitamin Centre 33555 South Fraser Way; Alive Health Centre Seven Oaks Shopping Centre, Fraser Way; Herbs & Health
Foods West Oaks Mall, 32700 S. Fraser Way; Living Well Vitamins 4-32770 George Ferguson Way ALDERGROVE: Alder Natural Health 27252 Fraser
Hwy. BURNABY: Alive Health Centre Metropolis at Metrotown - 4700 Kingsway Ave.; Best Choice Health Food 4323 East Hasting St.; Health Natural Foods 4435 E. Hastings St.; Natural Focus Health Foods
Kensington Plaza, 6536 E. Hastings St.; Nutrition House Brentwood Mall, 4567 Lougheed Hwy.; Nutrition House Eaton Centre, 4700 Kingsway Ave; Nutrition House Lougheed Mall, 9855 Austin Ave.; Pharmasave 4367 E.
Hastings St. CHILLIWACK: Alive Health Centre Cottonwood Mall, 3-45585 Luckakuck Way; Aromatica Fine Tea & Soaps 10015 Young St., North; Chilliwack Pharmasave 110-9193 Main St.; Living Well Vitamins
45966 Yale Rd.; Sardis Health Foods Chilliwack Mall, 134 45610 Luckakuk Way COQUITLAM: Alive Health Centre Coquitlam Centre, 2348-2929 Barnet Hwy.; Green Life Health Cariboo Shopping Ctr.; Nutrition
House Coquitlam Centre, 2929 Barnet Hwy.; Ridgeway IDA Pharmacy Ltd. 1057 Ridgeway Ave.DELTA: Parsley, Sage & Thyme 4916 Elliott St.; Pharmasave 1244 - 56 St.; Super Gym 145-1440 Garden Pl.
Wellspring Health 1248 56 St. Wellspring Health 4802 Delta St.LANGLEY: Alive Health Centre Willowbrook Shopping Centre, 19705 Fraser Hwy.; Country Life Health Food 4061 200th St.; Grove Vitamins &
Health Centre 8840 210 St.; Langley Vitamin Centre 20499 Fraser Hwy.; Natural Focus 340-20202 66th Ave.; Nutrition House Willowbrook Mall, 19705 Fraser Hwy.; Valley Natural Health Foods 20425 Douglas Cres.
MAPLE RIDGE: BC Vitamin Expert 11968 - 207th St.; Maple Ridge Vitamin Centre 500-22709 Lougheed Hwy.; Roots Natural 22254 Dewdney Trunk Rd.; Uptown Health Foods 130-22529 Lougheed Hwy.
MISSION: Mission Vitamin Centre 33139 1st Ave.; NEW WESTMINSTER: Alive Health Centre Royal City Centre, 610 6th St. PITT MEADOWS: Mint Your Health 19150 Lougheed
Hwy.PORT COQUITLAM: Cranberry Lane 7-2755 Lougheed Hwy.; Nutrilife Health Food 3200 Westwood St.; One Whey Nutrtion 2885 Shaughnessy St.;Pharmasave 3295 Coast Meridian Rd.; Planet Organic
Market 10-2755 Lougheed Hwy.; Poco Natural Food & Wellness Centre 2329 Whyte Ave; RICHMOND: Alive Health Centre Richmond Centre, 1834-6060 Minoru Blvd.; Basic Nature Health 12420 no.1 Rd.;
Consumer's Nutrition Centre Richmond Centre 1318-6551 3rd Rd.; Great Mountain Ginseng 4151 Hazelbridge Way; Your Vitamin Store Lansdowne Mall; Nature's Bounty 110-5530 Wharf Rd. SOUTH SURREY:
Ocean Park Health Foods 12907 16th Ave.; Pure Pharmacy Health Centre 111-15833 24th Ave. SQUAMISH: Health Food Heaven 520-1200 Hunter Place, Squamish Station SURREY: Alive Health Centre
Guildford Town Centre, 2269 Guildford Town Centre; Alive Health Centre Surrey Place Mall, 2712 Surrey Place Mall; Grand Nutrition Centre 102 18640 Fraser Hwy.; Health Food Shop #1-15357 104 Ave.; Health Town
Vitamin Guildford Place Plaza, 45-10330 152nd St.; Lifetime Organics 2099 152 St. Natural Focus Health Foods 102-3010 152nd St.; Natural Focus Health Foods Boundary Park Plaza, 131-6350 120th St.; Nutrition
House Guildford Town Ctr., 2695 Guildford Town Centre; Nutrition House Semiahmoo Shopping Centre, 1711 152nd St.; Punjabi Whole Health Plus 12815 85th Ave.; The Organic Grocer 508-7388 King George Hwy. Purity
for Life 9520 120 St. Surrey Natural Foods 13585 King George Hwy;The Energy Shop 13711 72 Ave. VANCOUVER: Alive Health Centre Bentall Centre Mall 595 Burrard St.; Alive Health Centre Oakridge Centre,
650 W. 41st Ave.; Body Energy Club 746 Davie St.; Body Energy Club 555 west 12th Ave.;Famous Foods 1595 Kingsway Finlandia Natural Pharmacy 1111 W Broadway; Garden Health Foods 1204 Davie St.; Green
Life Health 200 - 590 Robson St.; Lotus Natural Health Centre 3733 10th. Ave. W.; Kitsilano Natural Foods 2696 West Broadway MJ's Natural Pharmacy 6255 Victoria Dr. @ 47th Ave.; MJ's Natural Pharmacy 6689
Victoria Dr.; MJ's Nature's Best Nutrition Ctr. Champlain Mall, 7130 Kerr St. & 54 Ave.; Nature's Prime 728 West Broadway; Nutraways Natural Foods 2253 West 41st Ave.; Nutrition House 1194 Robson St.; Save On
Nutrition 5693 Victoria Dr. Supplements Plus Oakridge Ctr.; Sweet Cherubim Natural Food Stores & Restaurant 1105 Commercial Dr.; Thien Dia Nhan 6406 Fraser St. Unique Nutrition 555 W 12TH Ave. NORTH
VANCOUVER: Cove Health 399 North Dollarton Hwy. N.; Lynn Valley Vitamin House 3022 Mountain Hwy. Health Works 3120 Edgemont Blvd.Nutraways Natural Foods 1320 Lonsdale Ave.; Nutrition House
Capilano Mall, 935 Marine Dr.; Victoria's Health 1637 Lonsdale Ave WEST VANCOUVER: Alive Health Centre Park Royal Shopping Centre, 720 Park Royal N.Health Works 5351 Headland Dr. ; Nutrition House
2002 Park Royal S. WHITE ROCK: Health Express 1550 Johnston Rd.; Alive Health Centre Semiahmoo Shopping Centre.
AVAILABLE HERE:
FOR MEN
GUARANTEED
FOR WOMEN
GUARANTEED
for couples is
a satisfying
love life.
Eroxil is the best of all the supplements for men I’ve
tried. Boosts my sex drive and I’m able to function anytime.
Angus Gutke, 45, Calgary, AB Regained virility in 3
days. My libido was restored for good sex. I’ve given it also
to friends with the same results. One of themis a diabetic and
overweight. Dr. Louis Rolland, 72, St. Hyacinthe, QC
Having orgasms off the Richter scale. It’s like I’m a
teenager again. The world owes you big time. Lawrie Roberts,
47, Toronto, ON Wonderful to feel like a man again.
It’s wonderful to feel close to my wife again. God bless you!
Charles E. Palen, 77, Burnaby, BC.
TRUE EVIDENCE that we are helping people.
Eroxil
TM
helps most men to perform like in their 20’s.
Evidence of a few hundred testimonials on our web site with
full names and towns. All 100% true:
Evidence from our web site: Erosyn saved my
marriage. I’m overjoyed! My libido is back. Words cannot
describe how grateful I am. Carla Daunais, 32, St-Hubert, QC
I’ve been married for 13 years and never experienced
climaxes in the last 12 years - untill I took Erosyn. New sex
life is exciting! What a miracle! Jeane Adams, 37, American
Fork, UT My sexual desire is greater nowthan it was
for 30 years. It’s wonderful to have such ecstatic joy. I’ve tried
others that didn’t work. Eve Jameson, 58, Kingman, AZ
I’m 92 and sex is good again. Regained intimacy makes
life more interesting. Florence Fryer, Edmonton, AB
People’s phone numbers on our website.
Erosyn
TM
is the only product that helps most
women to restore libido, desire and the ability to climax.
There is no drug or natural product like it.
Happiness
Relief in 3-5 days from dribbling, burning and
rushing to the toilet. If you are considering surgery,
try this tea first. Must work of money refunded. 99%
success rate. Helps virtually everybody quickly. The
only prostate remedy that works so well that it comes
with a money-back guarantee. Literally hundreds
of delighted men testifying on our web site:
Doctor said to keep on drinking the tea.
Prescribed prostate drugs did not help. Leonard
Pearcey, Wassis, NB I cancelled my prostate
surgery. Get up once a night. I'm so happy not to
have to face the torment of a prostate operation and
incontinence or impotency. Albert E. Blain, 74,
Schumacher, ON Even after TURP prostate surgery and microwave therapy had to get
up many times. Now down to 1-2 times. Tea is 100% better than drugs. Robert G. Stocker,
Eustasis, FL After 1st year drinking tea my PSA went down to 4.5; after 2nd year to 2.9;
after 3rd year to 2.3. I highly recommend the tea. A real life saver. Thomas M. Thurston, Forsyth,
GA All true experiences from real people.
Bell Prostate Ezee
Flow Tea #4a
Frequent
BATHROOM TRIPS?
Other Bell products for relief of the following chronic ailments
(All guaranteed):Intestinal Cleansing & Weight Control #10 Migraine & Headache
Relief in 30 minutes #15 Blood Pressure Combo #26Wrist Pain Carpal Tunnel
#30HRT Menopause Relief # 33 PMS Relief #34Stops Blood Sugar Imbalance
& Weight Gain #40Curcumin Leg & Back Pain #67Calcium Build-up Hardening
Arteries #71. All products guaranteed to work.
Don’t be alarmed this sum-
mer if you glance over your
shoulder and a member of the
RCMP or fire department is
chasing you down.
You are, more than likely,
doing something right rather
than wrong.
This summer marks the 11th
year of the Summer Safety
Smart Card program, spon-
sored by the Maple Ridge Fire
Department, local McDonald’s
Restaurants and RCMP Com-
munity Policing Team.
From June 1 until the end
of September, yellow cards
will be handed out for free ice
cream cones at McDonald’s,
rewarding people who are en-
joying the outdoors safely.
Assistant fire chief Timo
Juurakko says many injuries
that occur during summer are
preventable, and the program
rewards positive and safe be-
haviour.
And it’s not just for children
either.
Last year, he says, a card
was given to a man using a
weed eater wearing his gog-
gles and another to a person
who pulled their car over to
use their cell phone.
Adults and children alike
will be rewarded for wear-
ing helmets when cycling,
wearing protective gear on
skateboards or roller blades
or to children who hold their
parents’ hands while using
crosswalks.
RCMP Cnst. Alanna Dunlop
says that the community po-
licing team is well received by
the youth every year.
“It is a really good way to
engage with young people,”
she says. “To approach them
about safety.”
The safety smart cards will
be good until the end of Sep-
tember at any one of the three
McDonald’s locations in Ma-
ple Ridge.
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
Assistant fire chief Timo Juurakko and Cnst. Alanna Dunlop
hand Summer Safety Smart Cards to Aidan Kelly (left) and
Gavin Making.
Rewards for smart, safe behaviour
by Col l een Fl anagan
staff repor ter
10 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
Barnet and Lougheed Hwy l 604.464.1414 l coquitlamcentre.com
Get dressed for less with the lowest prices of the season throughout the centre.
On Saturday, July 9 at 11am, fifteen Coquitlam Centre Stylistas will compete in our
“Best-Dressed-For-Less Fashion Challenge”. With $150 and one and a half hours of
shopping time, competitors will strive to put together the best outfit, for less.
At 1:30pm, Fashion Stylist Catherine Dunwoody will share fabulous summer fashion tips
during the Stylistas Fashion Show between Gap and Jacob. Don’t miss out on the fun!
Visit coquitlamcentre.com/real-deals for a list
of retailer discounts and offers.
Best-Dressed-For-Less Sale
July 1-10
Killer deals.
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 11
WE DELIVER
$
4
75
INCLUDES
TAXES!
The
19167 Ford Road, Pitt Meadows
604-465-9911
PUB & LIQUOR STORE
Jolly Coachman
OPEN 9AM - 11PM EVERY DAY
IN OUR LIQUOR STORE
Check out our website: www.jollycoachman.com
Ford Rd.
H
a
r
r
i
s
Lougheed Hwy.
Call us 604-465-9911
All free items while supplies last.
ALL OUR ICE COLD BEER, LIQUOR, WINE, CIDERS AND
COOLERS AT OR BELOW LIQUOR STORE RETAIL PRICES
IN OUR PUB
FREE DOLE’S
PINEAPPLE
JUICE
with Malibu
Coconut Rum
750 ML
FREE
COOLER
BAG
with 12 Pack
Corona bottles
FREE AIR
FRESHENER
with
Old
Milwaukee
15 CANS
BUDWEISER
8 PACKS
Back by
popular
demand
FREE
CANDLE
with
Hardys
Wine
750 ML
FREE SUN-
GLASSES
with
Growers
Cider
6 Pack or 2 L
THURS. JULY 7th 6–10 JOIN US FOR
BEER & FOOD
SAMPLING & PRIZES
SAWMILL
CREEK
White or Red 3L
$
19
99
works out to $4.99/bottle!
NEARLY
NEIL
LIVE
JULY 15
$
40
49
+ deposit
FREE T-SHIRT
with
Bud
24 CANS
FREE GOLF
BALLS
with
Banff Ice
Vodka
750 ML
CORONA
6 BOTTLES
$
11
99
+ deposit
N
O
COVER!
CANADIAN OR
COORS LIGHT
BONUS 18 CANS
$
27
29
+ deposit
KEYSTONE
REG. OR LIGHT
15 PACK
$
18
99
+ deposit t
12 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where
quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the
right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography.
Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets.
Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad
are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2011 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.
©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks
of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s
Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s
Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by
President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice
Financial banking services are provided by the direct
banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program
is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC,
President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and
Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of
Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.
>ÃÌiÀ>À`
* Look for the Ad Match symbol in store on items we have matched. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket competitors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the time of our Ad Match checks,
quantities may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket competitors’ flyers throughout the week. Major supermarket competitors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store location. We match
identical items (defined as same brand, size, and attributes) and for fresh produce, meat and bakery, we match a comparable item (as determined solely by us). Some items may have ‘plus deposit and/or environmental charge’ where applicable.
NEW
STORE
HOURS:
NOW OPEN
6:00 am - 11:00 pm
2
49
.96
2
47
4
97
3
99
2
28
4
96
1
99
4
99
5
99
$
69
whole, dressed,
2 fish per bag
product of USA, no. 1 grade
selected varieties, 500 g
selected varieties,
6 X 591 mL
selected varieties
club size
Tommy or Hayden variety,
product of Mexico
or sandwich bread, white
or whole wheat, 570 g
selected varieties,
6 X 100 mL
45 g
fresh pink salmon
fresh red or
black plums
Kraft processed
cheese slices
Gatorade thirst
quencher
Colgate children’s
power toothbrush
pork side ribs
fresh mangoes
Wonder
Texas toast
PC
®
Decadent ice
cream sandwiches
Secret Clinical
deodorant
/lb
5.49/kg
/lb
2.12/kg
each
each
each
/lb
5.03/kg
each
each
each
each
after savings
247118
724289
440019
272279
107059
236770
700414
306565
186471
102411
Portobello
conversation set
782112
Also save 30% on the
matching PC woven lounger.
321008
Limit 2,
after limit price 5.47 ea.
Limit 4,
after limit price 7.29 ea.
Limit 4,
after limit price 8.99 ea. 1
88
3
99
3
98
6
98
6
98
product of China
whole, frozen, 1 kg box
850 g
454 g
long grain, 8 kg
fresh lychee fruit
California squid
M.Y. San Skyflakes
crackers
Rooster
dried flower
mushrooms
Fortune rice
white
/lb
4.14 kg
each
each
each
each
728845
219941
837175
561535
894881
save
65%
199
94
after
savings
now
was
$
599
approx.
4 kg case
First of
Season
Limit 8,
after limit price 9.98 ea.
Limit 8,
after limit price 8.98 ea.
Limit 8,
after limit price 4.98 ea.
Effective July 6-10, 2011.
Some items may not be available in all stores.
JULY
Prices are in effect until Thursday, July 7, 2011 or while stock lasts.
THURSDAY
7
WEDNESDAY
6
TO
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 13
A First Nations man
who sold halibut to the
owners of two fish and
chip shops in Maple
Ridge and Pitt Mead-
ows has been found
guilty of three charges
under the Fisheries
Act.
James Robert Wad-
hams, a resident of Port
McNeill on Vancouver
Island, faced a total of
10 charges under the
act for allegedly ped-
dling the fish that had
been caught under an
aboriginal communal
license for food, social,
ceremonial purposes.
He will be sentenced
in October.
Crown prosecutor
Digby Kier called the
conviction important
because halibut is an
important resource
and is threatened by il-
legal harvesting.
The Department of
Fisheries and Oceans
began a year-and-a-
half-long investigation
into Wadhams after it
received tips from the
public on Vancouver
Island.
Surveillance was con-
ducted on Wadhams,
who was seen deliver-
ing fish to Amy Zhuo
Hua Zheng and Mi-
chael Kam Fuk Ching,
who have since pleaded
guilty to the offences.
Ching, who owns
Austin Fish and Chips
in Valley Fair Mall in
Maple Ridge, was fined
$5,000 for three Fisher-
ies Act contraventions,
while Zheng, who owns
Austin Fish and Chips
in Pitt Meadows, got a
$500 fine for two viola-
tions.
Wadhams has been
in trouble with the De-
partment of Fisheries
before.
In 2005, he was
charged after fishery
officers observed him
and another man sell-
ing sockeye salmon to
the public in the com-
munity of Woss, B.C.
Wadhams was fined
$5,000 in Port Hardy
Provincial Court on
Nov. 19, 2008 after
pleading guilty to sell-
ing fish caught by a
harvester without a
license authorizing
sales.
Crown would not say
what kind of a sentence
it would be seeking this
time.
Man guilty of selling illegal halibut
Ridge Meadows
RCMP welcomed 11
new auxiliary consta-
bles to the detachment
on Thursday night.
A graduation cer-
emony, attended by
Maple Ridge Mayor
Ernie Daykin and Pitt
Meadows Mayor Don
MacLean, was held at
Thomas Haney Second-
ary School.
The grad class per-
formed a foot drill be-
fore receiving badges
from RCMP Supt. Dave
Walsh, the officer-in-
charge of Ridge Mead-
ows RCMP.
Walsh praised the
constables for dedi-
cating three months
to training and called
them “ultimate volun-
teers.”
The new auxiliary
constables didn’t have
long to rest, as they
were on duty for Can-
ada Day at 6 a.m. the
next day on foot patrols
in both Pitt Meadows
and Maple Ridge.
RCMP photo
The graduation ceremony was held Thursday at Thomas
Haney secondary.
Ridge RCMP add 11 new auxiliary constables
by Moni s ha Mar t i ns
staff repor ter
Sunshine
Daycare
We cater to teachers
Summer, Christmas & Spring Break
• Licensed for 16 years •
• First Aid •
• Food Safe • Workshops •
Call for more information
and for our daily activities
Rhonda Mayers 604-861-0376
rmayers@shaw.ca
NO CHARGE!
0 - 4 Years
RICHMOND 4591 Garden City Rd
Fabricana 604-273-5316
Interior Delights 604-276-2553
COQUITLAM 1348 United Blvd.
Fabricana 604-524-5454
Interior Delights 604-528-9100
INTERIOR
DELIGHTS
1st time
EVER!
I
n
d
o
o
r
Thousands of 1-of-a-kind designer cuts & direct import fabrics
CLEAR OUT
$
1-
$
5
•Wools • Silks • Cotton
• Viscose and more…
per
meter (min. 1 meter cut)
ALL SUMMER &
QUILTING FABRICS
20
%
to
50
%*
Off!
PILLOW FORMS
(Poly filled)
BUY 1 GET 1
1/2 Price!**
July 11-17
Regular Priced
DECORATIVE
TRIM
20
%*
Off!
July 9-17
Sahara
DECORATIVE
HARDWARE
20
%*
Off!
July 4-10
ALL
OUTDOOR
FABRICS
20
%*
Off!
July 1-10
Selected
Christmas
FABRICS
50
%*
Off
REMNANTS
BUY 1 GET 1
FREE!
**
(Min 1 meter cut)
July 11-17
SIMPLICITY
PATTERNS
(Max 5 per customer)
$
1
98
each!
July 11-15
Gutterman Thread
BUY 1 GET 2
FREE
**
Max. 24 Free per customer
July 11-17
"Toscana"
SILK
70
%*
Off!
"Curtain Calls"
Wood Drapery -
3/4" Steel
Rod Set
50
%*
Off!
Regular Priced
HOME DECOR
FABRICS
10
%*
Off
Selected
Embroidered Silks,
Trims, Drapery &
Upholstery Fabrics
50
%*
Off!
ALL QUILT
BOOKS &
PATTERNS
20
%
Off!
July 4-10
MCCALL'S
PATTERNS
(Max 5 per customer)
$
1
98
each!
July 4-10
$
3
00
/m
$
1
00
/m
50
%
OFF
$
2
00
/m
70
%
OFF
* off the everyday low prices. **of equal or lesser value. www.fabricana.com
Your Local Jeweller since 1979
102 - 11811 224th street • 604-467-1433
Monday - Thursday 9:30 - 5:30

Friday 9:30 - 8:00
Saturday 9:30 - 5:00

email: goldrush@telus.net
Jewellers
WE BUY OLD GOLD
& DIAMONDS
at the best price
in Maple Ridge
www.cruiseencounters.com
604.888.1756
8850 Walnut Grove Dr., Langley A+ rating!
Our package prices ALWAYS include airfare, transfers & all taxes!

$
2849
Total Charges!
CDN Dollars
pp 2 sharing
Includes, airfare, hotel, cruise,
transfers & all taxes!
Europe’s best weather time!
A top-ranked cruise!
Europe Blowout!
13 nights package aboard Mariner of the Seas
Fly Vancouver to Rome, Sept. 06 on British Airways!
Overnight at Hilton Hotel Rome Sept 7
Board Mariner of the Seas Sept. 08, for 12 nights
with full-day stops in: Messina (Sicily), Athens
(Greece), Ephesus (Turkey), Rhodes (Greece), 2 days in
Istanbul (Turkey), Naples (Italy), arrive Rome
Fly Rome to Vancouver with British Airways Sept. 20,
arrive YVR 640 pm!
Must book by July 9th at 3pm
GO TO OUR WEBSITE!
Join our e-mail list for our free July report: 3 ways to
make the most of Cruise-Line loyalty programs!
A Gangster Caper directed by
John Stuart
Emerald Pig Theatrical Society
presents
William Shakespeare’s
The Comedy of Errors
July 14th - 17th in Pitt Meadows - Spirit Square
July 21st - 24th in Maple Ridge - Memorial Peace Park
Showtime: 8:00 p.m.
Pre-show entertainment: 7:00 p.m.
July 17th & 24th (Matinee only) showtime: 1:00 p.m.
A FREE
COMMUNITY EVENT!
Bring a lawn chair, a blanket,
your family & a donation for the
Friends in Need Food Bank
EastRidge
Animal Hospital
Be a part of your community paper. Comment online.
there’s more online »
voices
v
www.mapleridgenews.com
• W
e speak for those •
w
h
o
c
annot speak for them
se
lve
s
ADOPT A PET
463-9511
SPCA
BOOTY
THE NEWS
22745 Dewdney Trunk Rd.,
Maple Ridge
604-463-3855
Sponsored by
Booty is a SWEET
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
cross who is looking for
a guardian who is home
most of the time as she is
used to having a constant
companion. Her previous
owner said she is good
with cats & dogs. If you are
looking for a new BEST
FRIEND please come
and visit Booty.
Where can you find me?
We are at the Maple Ridge
SPCA.
You can contact me by
Email mapleridge@spca.bc.ca
Phone 604-463-9511
10235 Jackson Rd., Albion
KEEP YOUR PETS
ALIVE & HEALTHY!
DON’T LEAVE
THEM IN THE CAR
14 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
A pair of would-be
thieves set off a blast
of pepper spray before
fleeing a house early
Monday in Maple Ridge.
Wearing balaclavas to
hide their faces and dark
clothing, the men forced
their way into the home
on 124 Avenue around 4
a.m.
Insp. David Fleugel
said the men damaged
the house, but did not
take anything.
The occupants of
the home were pepper
sprayed before the men
left the house. They
were last seen driving
towards 232nd Street.
“The occupants of the
home were not injured,
and the motive for this
crime is unknown at this
time but it’s suspected
to be drug-related,” said
Fleugel.
Drugs, Taser, knives
Drugs and weapons
were found in a pickup
truck early Monday af-
ter Mounties stopped
the driver for driving
while uninsured.
The 39-year-old woman
was pulled over around
1:30 a.m. in 23800-block
of River Road.
While conducting a
search of the truck, Insp.
Dave Fleugel said police
found several individual
packages of what they
believe is crystal meth,
along with other items
consistent with drug
trafficking.
A Taser and knives
were also seized. The
woman was arrested
and held in custody for
a court appearance later
in the day.
No breath sample
Ridge Meadows RCMP
are seeking impaired
driving charges against
a 50-year-old Maple
Ridge man involved in a
car crash on Sunday.
The two-vehicle crash
happened just before 3
p.m. on 228th Street and
Lougheed Highway.
Police allege the man
showed signs of being
impaired by alcohol, so
he was asked to provide
samples of his breath for
analysis.
Insp. Dave Fleugel
said the man refused to
comply with the officer’s
demand.
The man was arrested
and released on a prom-
ise to appear in court.
His pickup truck was im-
pounded.
Robbed, assaulted
A man who assaulted
and robbed another man
was arrested Friday.
The theft took place
along railway tracks in
the 22200-block of River
Road around 8:30 p.m.
Police allege the
20-year-old from Coquit-
lam stole cigarettes, a
small amount of money
and a cellular phone be-
fore running off.
The man met up with
a group of friends in the
area, but was eventually
found by police.
Police said he was
found drinking alcohol,
violating a probation
order.
During the investiga-
tion, police found a teen-
age boy, who is a friend
of the accused, in pos-
session of marijuana.
The marijuana was
seized and charges of
drug possession are
being recommended
against the youth.
Van recovered
A routine traffic stop
on Thursday led Ridge
Meadows RCMP to a
stolen van.
The white van was
pulled over around 10:20
a.m. in the 11900-block
of 227th Street in Maple
Ridge. A police check
of the licence plate
showed it had been re-
ported stolen to Burna-
by RCMP and resulted
in all three occupants
being placed under ar-
rest.
Two men from Burn-
aby, ages 31 and 30, as
well as a 28-year old
Langley man were re-
leased from custody,
but will have to appear
in court to face charg-
es.
The stolen licence
plates were seized as
evidence and the van,
which is owned by a
rental company, was
returned to its owner.
Cedar shakes stolen
Twenty packs of ce-
dar roofing shakes
were stolen last week
during a break-in in
Maple Ridge.
Thieves entered the
sawmill on 287th Street
sometime between 3:30
p.m. Wednesday and
8 a.m. on Thursday by
cutting a hole in the pe-
rimeter fence.
Golf carts missing
A pair of golf carts
was stolen early Thurs-
day during a break-in
at the Maple Ridge Golf
Course.
Thieves managed
to get into a locked
compound and drive
off with the golf carts
around 2:20 a.m.
Police said the thieves
may have loaded the
golf cars onto another
vehicle or driven them
to an unknown loca-
tion.
Both carts are marked
with ‘Maple Ridge Golf
Course’ logos.
Pepper-spray set of in invasion
wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww...wwwwwwiiiiiiinnnnnndddddddssssssoooooorrrrrr--pppppplllllllyyyyyywwwwwwooooooooooooddddddd...ccccccoooooommmmmm
604.941.1768
2700 Barnet Hwy.
Coquitlam
Family Law
• Separation Agreements
• Divorce • Custody • Mediation
• Emergency Restraining Orders
I.C.B.C. Claims
• Free Initial Consultation
Criminal Law
• Impaired Driving • Drug Offences
#204-2922 Glen Drive, Coquitlam
Tel: 604-945-2043 Fax: 604-945-2063
ROY SWARTZBERG
Barrister & Solicitor
When you need a helping hand!


T Th he e B BC C L Li ib be er ra al l/ /B Bi ig g B Bu us si in ne es ss s
T
T
O
O
P
P
7
7
H
H
S
S
T
T
M
M
Y
Y
T
T
H
H
S
S


The BC Liberal “myths” about the HST just keep piling up.
Following is their latest Top Seven – all new
and misleading as ever – HST Myths:

1. The HST is now 10% - False
The HST is 12% and will not be 10% for three years – if ever. There will be an election before
that, and even if the HST were to miraculously drop to 10% - it will still apply to hundreds
more goods and services than a 12% PST/GST for a total tax increase to consumers of $1.6B
per year. And who says it won’t go right back up again later?

2. The HST will lower taxes – False
This one is hilarious. The HST increases taxes for British Columbians by $2.8 Billion per year.
That’s an average annual increase of $500 per person - or $1208 per average family –
forever. Finance Minister Falcon says if his side loses he may disregard the result and expand
the PST to items previously exempt – which would be illegal. Do you really trust this guy to
cut the rate if he wins?

3. The HST will save you money - False
And the tooth fairy is going to leave you a quarter under your pillow too. To get their
numbers to show the HST actually “saving” you money they are calculating only “routine
purchases” and that 90% of what you pay in HST will be passed back to you in lower prices.
Have you seen lower prices?... We didn’t think so.

4. The HST benefits seniors - False
Seniors and people on fixed incomes are some of the hardest hit by the HST. A one time
rebate of $175 if you vote in favour of their tax in exchange for paying it for the rest of your
life is a deal only a snake oil salesman would offer. Why take $175 when you can vote to
cancel the HST and keep all your money? How dumb do they think we are?

5. The HST benefits families – False
Next to seniors, working families are hardest hit by the HST because they are among the
largest consumers and have dependent children. Bribes of $175 per child when your cost is
closer to $400 a year each makes you wonder if they think all of us failed math as badly as
they did. And what about a single mom with two kids going to college? She gets nothing
while the Premier and Finance Minister who earn big six figure salaries get the rebate. Nice.

6. Business will pay more so you pay less - False
A temporary increase of 2% in corporate taxes will be passed on to consumers with
increased prices. Either way you pay the final bill whether it’s in HST or higher prices.

7. We’ll owe $1.6 Billion if we cancel the HST - False
The “Independent Panel” says the HST generated $850 million more than budgeted. Setting
aside that is the biggest tax grab in BC history, it means government already has $850
million to repay Ottawa. BC has only received $1B, and Ottawa collected $300M more in
corporate taxes under HST than under PST. So it’s a wash. And keeping the HST would cost
British Columbians alot more than killing it – over $28 Billion in new taxes in just 10 years.

Vote YES to extinguish the HST and save your province,
your democracy, and your money!






www.fightHST.com

With a couple of clicks,
add your event today.
there’s more online »
voices
v


w
w
w
.
m
a
p
l
e
r
i
d
g
e
n
e
w
s
.
c
o
m
If you fit into one of these
categories and have
not been contacted by
Welcome Wagon please call
Maple Ridge
Pitt Meadows
Kay 604-463-9376
www.welcomewagon.ca
Do you fit
into one
of these
categories?
✓ Did you move into
the area recently?
✓ Are you a new
mom or a
mother-to-be?
✓ Are you a new
Business or
Manager?
✓ Are you getting
married?
✓ Are you a Business
interested in
Welcome Wagon
Programs?
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 15
A
lthough most
people are
familiar with
the Alouette River
from walking the dikes,
there are many tribu-
taries that feed into the
river and lake.
The water flows
through Maple Ridge
Park, Allco Park, the
224th Street area and
up near Academy Park
and the Malcolm Knapp
UBC Research Forest,
at the east end of Maple
Ridge.
There are also many
lesser streams feeding
into these tributaries.
All of these waterways
are important to the
health of the river
bank and the spawning
Salmon.
One of the delightful
things to see at this
time of year in the
grasses and under the
trees along the river
banks are the many
wild flowers.
The trillium, which
has three large white petals and
dark green leaves, stands tucked
in the grass. It is easy to identify
because it is always growing by
itself. The flower is part of the
lily family and, if picked, will be
seriously injured and not grow
again for many years. In fact, it is
protected in our parks bylaw.
It is one of the plants that has
its seeds spread by ants, who like
the sticky coating around the
seeds and carry them off to their
nests, where they eat the coating
and discard the seed in their
garbage dump, giving the flower
a fertile place to grow.
See River, p16
Lovely flowers on the river banks
River tales
Liz Hancock
78(6'$<6
Afternoon & Evening
Spin-To-Win Draws!
2:30pm & 7:30pm
WIN Up To $500!
Evening Games
$300 On Triple Pay!
%,1*223(1'$,/<
Afternoon Bingo @ 11:30am
Evening Bingo @ 6:30pm
Fridays & Saturdays
Bingo sessions at
11:30am, 3:30pm,
6:30pm & 10:15pm
)$%8/286
)5,'$<(9(1,1*
Evening Session
July 29th!
$200 Regular Games!
$400 Double Pays!
6$785'$<6
Evening Session
$250 Regular Games!
$500 Double Pays!
Plus 10 x $500
Bonus Line Games!
$25 Evening Pack
22366 119th Ave., Maple Ridge • 604-467-1723 • mapleridgecgc.com
SLOTS

SLOTS

Hundreds of GREAT DEALS plus more VEHICLES arriving EVERY DAY!
WEST COAST
FORD LINCOLN
Sales Toll Free
1-888-251-7930
DL 6077
WE ACCEPT VISA, MASTERCARD &
AMERICAN EXPRESS V
N SAVE-ON-
FOODS
BURGER
KING
DEWDNEY TRUNK
LOUGHEED
HWY.
STAPLES
2
0
3
R
D
MAPLE RIDGE
20370 Lougheed Hwy.
www.westcoastautogroup.com
Parts & Service Toll
Free 1-888-889-7826
All prices and payment are plus taxes and $399 Dealer Admin Fee. *48 month finance **60 month finance ***72 month finance ****84 month finance.
Ex. 2009 Focus UC265187 Sale Price $15,984 plus taxes and $399 Dealer Fee, $158 bi-weekly X 72 months @7.99%, Cost of Credit $4690. OAC
QUALITY PRE-OWNED
EMPLOYEE PRICING
IS BACK!!!
On all used in stock SAVE THOUSANDS on hundreds of vehicles in stock.
2007 Dodge
Magnum
save
$
7997
Stock# UC766296
sale
$
10,994 only
$
129 bi-weekly**
2009 Toyota
Yaris Sedan
Was $14,991
STD trans, power group
save
$
4997
Stock# UC301231
sale
$
9,994 only
$
89 bi-weekly***
Was $32,991
2007 Harley
Davidson F150
save
$
10,007
Stock#
UT038458
sale
$
25,984 only
$
309bi-weekly**
Stock#
UT078548
Was $39,991
2007 F350
Diesel Dually
Crew Cab Lariat, Loaded
save
$
6997 sale
$
32,994 only
$
379 bi-weekly**
Stock#
UT078548
92000 kms, SILVER
2007 FOCUS ZX3
COUPE SE
Was $14,991
Stock# UC304555
sale
$
8,994 only
$
99 bi-weekly**
save
$
5,997
Leather, moonroof, trailer tow
2008 EXPLORER
XLT 4X4
save
$
5998
Was $28,991
Stock# UT034811
sale
$
22,993 only
$
219 bi-weekly**
Stock#
UT078548
4WD, V6, loaded stock.
Was $31,991
2009 Sport Trac
sale
$
26,994 only
$
259bi-weekly***
save
$
4997
Stock# UT003342
sale
$
27,984 only
$
319bi-weekly**
5.4L V8, loaded, navigation.
Was $31,991
2007 F150 Supercrew
King Ranch 4X4
save
$
4007
Stock# UT054756
Fully loaded truck
Low kms
was $18,991
STOCK# YR MODEL DESCRIPTION KMS COLOR WAS SAVE SALE PRICE
UT000172 2011 EDGE LIMITED AWD 16369 BLACK 48709 5799 42,910
UC136745 2011 FIESTA SE SEDAN 15430 GREY 20991 3000 17,991
UT001986 2011 LINCOLN MKX AWD W/ NAV 13174 BLACK 57400 6075 51,325
UC105007 2011 MUSTANG GT CONVERTIBLE 3425 BLACK 42991 4998 37,993
UT004835 2010 EDGE LIMITED AWD W/ NAV 28876 GRAY 39991 3000 36,991
UT089511 2010 ESCAPE 4X4 XLT 4CYL 28386 BLUE 28991 3999 24,992
UT013959 2010 ESCAPE 4X4 XLT V6 W/SYNC 18076 GREY 29991 3999 25,992
UT045986 2010 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 32661 WHITE 32991 3000 29,991
UT042872 2010 F150 SUPERCREW XTR 4X4 56745 GRAY 34991 3000 31,991
UT014572 2010 F150 SUPERCREW XTR 4X4 6556 GRAY 39991 4998 34,993
UT021411 2010 F150 SUPERCREW LARIAT 4X4 7711 RED 45991 3000 42,991
UT038181 2010 F150 157" SUPERCREW XTR 4X4 27226 SILVER 35991 3000 32,991
UT030444 2010 F350 KING RANCH W/ CANOPY 36533 WHITE 54991 3000 51,991
UC379992 2010 FUSION SPORT AWD SEDAN 15485 BLACK 32991 3000 29,991
UC114440 2010 MUSTANG V6 CONVERTIBLE AUTO 43047 BLACK 32991 3000 29,991
UT027571 2010 RANGER SUPERCAB SPORT 2WD 31035 BLACK 19995 5002 14,993
UT007959 2010 SPORT TRAC ADRENALIN AWD V8 41952 GRAY 38991 4998 33,993
UT065412 2009 F150 SUPERCREW FX4 LOADED 22501 BLACK 39991 3000 36,991
UC228915 2009 FOCUS 4DR SDN SE 57596 WHITE 17991 3000 14,991
UC39467A 2009 FOCUS 4 DOOR SES LOADED 36383 SILVER 19991 4998 14,993
UT003342 2009 SPORT TRAC XLT 4X4 V6 56468 SILVER 31991 5997 25,994
UT000188 2009 SPORT TRAC XLT 4X4 V6 W/ROOF 37000 BLACK 32991 3999 28,992
UT018268 2009 SPORT TRAC ADRENALIN AWD V8 75921 SILVER 35991 3000 32,991
UC301231 2009 TOYOTA YARIS SEDAN 80294 GREY 14991 4997 9,994
UC137948 2008 BUICK LUCERNE CXL LOADED 78037 BLACK 19991 3000 16,991
UC297468 2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LS 4 DOOR 52036 RED 12990 3000 9,990
UT683046 2008 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE 88834 GRAY 18991 3999 14,992
UT093236 2008 E250 CARGO VAN 65887 WHITE 22991 3000 19,991
UT41079A 2008 ESCAPE XLT V6 4X4 LOADED 88409 GRAY 23991 2000 21,991
UT034811 2008 EXPLORER XLT 4X4 V8 87514 BROWN 28991 4998 23,993
UT035835 2008 F150 SUPERCAB XTR 4X4 115069 BLACK 22991 3000 19,991
UT027345 2008 F150 SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 53081 WHITE 27991 4998 22,993
UT047921 2008 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 73623 WHITE 28991 4998 23,993
UT026087 2008 F150 SUPERCAB XTR 4X4 34449 BROWN 28991 4998 23,993
UT085341 2008 F150 SUPERCREW XTR 4X4 66395 GRAY 29991 4998 24,993
UT057946 2008 F150 SUPERCREW XLT 4X4 62793 BROWN 29991 4998 24,993
UT026092 2008 F150 SUPERCREW FX4 W/ROOF 49099 GRAY 29991 3000 26,991
UT058333 2008 F350 SUPERCAB XLT DIESEL 127021 SILVER 29991 3000 26,991
UT072254 2008 F350 CREW FX4 DIESEL 80298 BLACK 39991 3000 36,991
UT079110 2008 F350 CREW LARIAT DIESEL 93497 BLACK 40991 3000 37,991
UC277129 2008 FOCUS 4 DOOR S SEDAN 66634 GRAY 14991 3998 10,993
UC258378 2008 FUSION SEL FWD V6 71663 SILVER 19991 3000 16,991
UC023510 2008 HONDA CIVIC 4 DOOR 33664 GREY 18991 4998 13,993
UT605267 2008 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED X 84615 YELLOW 21991 4998 16,993
UT043360 2008 RANGER SUPERCAB SPORT 2WD 19000 BLACK 19991 3000 16,991
UT037153 2008 TAURUS X LIMITED AWD W/ DVD 66541 BLACK 28991 3000 25,991
UC535375 2007 CHRYSLER SEBRING LIMITED 59206 BLACK 18991 3000 15,991
UT654471 2007 COLORADO COLORADO TRAILER WHITE 26991 3000 23,991
UC121721 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXT 52296 RED 15991 4998 10,993
UC766296 2007 DODGE MAGNUM WAGON 60364 RED 18991 6997 11,994
UT547242 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 4X4 93564 BLACK 23991 2999 20,992
UT175073 2007 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT 4X4 84481 SILVER 25991 3000 22,991
UT070144 2007 EDGE SEL+ AWD ROOF & NAV 81175 GRAY 27991 3000 24,991
UT049485 2007 F150 SUPERCREW XTR 4X4 72064 BLACK 25991 3997 21,994
UT038458 2007 F150 HARLEY DAVIDSON AWD 90302 BLUE 35991 10007 25,984
UT054756 2007 F150 KING RANCH 4X4 94145 WHITE 31991 4007 27,984
UT040603 2007 F150 LWB SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 114275 GRAY 19991 3000 16,991
UT058887 2007 F150 LWB SUPERCAB XLT 4X4 115761 SILVER 19991 3000 16,991
UT078548 2007 F350 DUALLY CREW LARIAT DIESEL 78199 BLACK 39981 7997 31,984
UC304555 2007 FOCUS ZX3 COUPE SE 92000 SILVER 14991 6997 7,994
UT41096A 2007 FREESTYLE SEL AWD LOADED 145001 GRAY 16991 3000 13,991
UC306570 2007 MUSTANG V6 CONVERTIBLE AUTO 51441 BLACK 28991 3000 25,991
UT19717C 2007 RANGER 2WD SUPERCAB 126" 123083 GREY 14991 3000 11,991
UT092344 2007 RANGER SUPERCAB SPORT 4X4 72501 GRAY 19991 3000 16,991
UT19717B 2007 SPORT TRAC LIMITED 4X4 V6 89588 STONE 27911 3000 24,911
UT070246 2006 ESCAPE LIMITED V6 4X4 82468 BLACK 22991 5998 16,993
UT062194 2006 ESCAPE 4X4 XLT V6 W/LEATHER 80357 BLUE 21991 4998 16,993
UT73369A 2006 F150 LWB SUPERCAB XL 4X4 109099 BROWN 17991 3000 14,991
UT017647 2006 F350 KING RANCH DIESEL 115544 BLACK 37991 7998 29,993
UC271302 2005 CHEVROLET IMPALA 78883 RED 14991 4998 9,993
UT434113 2005 NISSAN FRONTIER *IN MILES* 85239 SILVER 13991 3499 10,492
UT103122 2005 SUZUKI 4DR 4WD LX AT 127164 BLACK 13991 3000 10,991
UT47757A 2004 EXCURSION 4X4 LIMITED 180550 BLACK 29991 3000 26,991
UC158542 2002 SEBRING 4 DOOR SEDAN 117642 GRAY 10991 3999 6,992
UT646242 1999 DODGE RAM 2500 150471 GREEN 13991 4998 8,993
UT098999 1999 TOYOTA SIENNA LE LOADED 196954 GREEN 9991 3999 5,992
16 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
River from p15
Another flower you
will find is the wild
bleeding heart. Smaller
than the garden variety,
it spreads like a pale
pink carpet under the
trees. The heart-shaped
flowers hang like small
bells along the stem of
the plant and are sur-
rounded by feather-like
leaves. This, too, is a
flower that has its seeds
spread by ants.
The fringe cup is
a member of the
saxifrage family. It is
scented and you can’t
mistake its long stems
with deeply fringed
small round flowers
running along it. The
leaves are round with
frilly edges and they
grow in clumps. They
used to be used as a
herb to aid the appetite
but I would not recom-
mend trying it.
These are just three of
the many lovely flowers
growing in the forest
and along the river
banks, all part of the
fragile eco-system of
the area.
Liz Hancock is a
member of the Alouette
River Management
Society.
T
he City of Van-
couver and our
civic pride are
still trying to recover
from the damage done
on June 15.
We shake our
heads in disbelief
when we see such
violence, such self-
centeredness, such
blatant disregard for
other people and their
property.
What gives us hope,
though, was the strik-
ing contrast of people
who do care, like the
police who put them-
selves in harm’s way,
the selfless citizens
who linked arms to
protect an officer and
the injured person he
was rescuing, and the
hundreds who showed
up the next morning to
clean up the mess.
What can we learn
about love in the after-
math of a riot?
In April, I wrote
about God’s love.
The Easter season
is a vivid reminder of
God’s unconditional
love for all of us.
The command that
Jesus gave us just
before he went to the
cross was “to love one
another as I have loved
you” (John 13:34).
This month, I will
focus on how we can
live out God’s kind of
love in our homes and
on the streets of our
community.
While our city of-
ficials consider how to
react better to pre-
serve the peace, you
and I can take a more
proactive, preventative
approach.
Let’s work together
to come up with some
long-term solutions
that just may influence
the next generation to
be more loving.
According to the
Bible, loving other
people is the most ob-
vious sign of maturity.
1 Corinthians 13
is known as “the
love chapter” and is
frequently read at
weddings.
But it’s too late to
wait until marriage
to learn how to truly
love.
We need to start
passing on the virtues
of love to our young
children:
• Love is
patient and
kind.
Love is
not jealous
or boastful
or proud or
rude.
Love does
not demand
its own way.
Love is not
irritable,
and it keeps
no record
of when it has been
wronged.
It is never glad about
injustice but rejoices
whenever the truth
wins out.
Love never gives up,
never loses faith, is
always hopeful, and
endures through every
circumstance.
Love will last forever.
(1 Corinthians 13:4-8)
Right after this pas-
sage the Apos-
tle Paul writes,
“when I was a
child, I spoke
and thought
and reasoned
as a child does.
But when I
grew up, I put
away childish
things.” (vs.
11).
Let’s face
it – babies and
young children,
as cute as they
are, are really very
self-centered. Our job
as parents, teachers,
and concerned citizens
is to teach the next
generation how to
grow up and genuinely
care for others.
I invite our read-
ers to email me at
rbuzza@nrchurch.ca
with their tried and
proven ideas for teach-
ing their children how
to love.
Watch for your sug-
gestions in print in the
weeks ahead and let’s
do our part to take
love to the streets.
Rob Buzza is lead
pastor at NorthRidge
Church.
What can we learn about love?
Acts of Faith
Rob Buzza
Ants held spread the seeds of wild fowers
“Let’s work together to come up
with some long-term solutions
that just may influence the next
generation to be more loving.”
3 ROOM
PAINTING
SPECIAL
Brent Klemke OWNER/MANAGER
A+Rating
BOOK TODAY! 604.803.5041
www.benchmarkpainting.ca
* Some restrictions apply. Ceilings and trim extra. Based on room size up to 120 sq ft.
A little paint
never hurt
anyone!
VOTED BEST
PAINTING
COMPANY 2010
BY CONSUMERS
– HOMESTARS.COM
$
299
00
*
Helping you
turn the page
RDM’s divorce and family lawyers.
Here for you.
Karen McNeilly David Robertson Nora Radac
604.853.0774 Abbotsford
www.rdmlawyers.com
Ending a relationship is never easy. Sorting out your
options, rights and legal obligations can be daunting.
RDM’s family law team is experienced at all levels of
court in British Columbia and also offers family law
mediation, collaborative divorce, and related services.
We provide advice and representation on:
separation and divorce
asset division
custody and access
child and spousal support
adoption
marriage and separation agreements
WALMART CORRECTION NOTICE
The following items will not be available for our flyer
effective July 1 – 7/11. Page 4: Wholesome Good-
ness Chips (#9228877/84/91/9226). Page 5: Blue Jay
and Cardinal Bird Food (#30162282). Page 7: Pestell
Prairie Meadow Grass Hay (#844874). We apologize
for any inconvenience this may have caused.
A Gangster
Caper
directed by
John
Stuart
Emerald Pig
Theatrical
Society
presents William Shakespeare’s
The Comedy
of Errors
Name:
Phone:
Age:
W
I
N
T
I
C
K
E
T
S
!
www.missionracewaypark.com
Drop off your
completed entry
form at these
participating
Black Press
Community
Newspapers
•The Chilliwack Progress
•The Langley Times
•The Surrey/
North Delta Leader
•The Maple Ridge News
•The Tri-City News
PRO_MOD CHALLENGE
July 1, 2, & 3 at Mission Raceway Park
Age:
missionracewaypa
CHALLENGE
DRAW DATE: MONDAY, JUNE 27TH
WINNER WILL RECEIVE 4 TICKETS!
kkkk mmmmm coo
Drop off your p off
completed entry
form at these
participating
Black Press
Community
Newspapers
•The Chilliwack Progress
•The Langley Times
•The Surrey/
North Delta Leader
•The Maple Ridge News
•The Tri-City News
PRO_MOD CHALLENGE PRO_MOD CHALLENGE
, & 3 2, y 1 JJJu uly ly 1, 2, at Mission Raceway Park arrk
LENGE LL CHAL
DRAW DATE: MONDAY, JULY 18
TH
WINNER WILL RECEIVE 4 TICKETS!
Drop off your
completed entry
form at these
participating
Black Press
Community
Newspapers
•The Chilliwack Progress
•The Langley Times
•The Surrey/
North Delta Leader
•The Maple Ridge News
•The Tri-City News
CANADIAN NATIONAL OPEN
July 22 - 24 at Mission Raceway Park
Unit C 22316 Dewdney Trunk Rd
canvashairsalon.ca 604-477-0060
Canvas is happy to introduce
Adela Zavorol.
Adela is a strong technical stylist for
both Classic and Avant Garde looks.
Please call us to book in advance
as she is very popular.
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 17
I
wrote my first
column for a local
newspaper in On-
tario in 1983 and have
continued to do so,
on a weekly
basis, in vari-
ous communi-
ties in which
I have lived
since then.
The basic
premise of
the column
has always
been about
education or
parenting and,
as I have said
before, it’s not
from some
feigned position of ex-
pertise that I write, but
more from an explora-
tion of my own learning
as I have gone through
the stages of teaching,
educational administra-
tion and parenting.
I can assure you, I
have never lacked for
topics nor for experi-
ences that have given
rise to much thinking
about what seems to
make the most sense,
even if it is from my
own limited perception.
Now that all of my
children are grown and
I have officially retired
from the education
world, I have
found myself
pausing to
think about
what my
writing should
entail. While
I have a long
list of issues
related to
parenting and
education that
I have not yet
addressed, I
am also enter-
ing a new
phase of my life, one in
which I will be caring
for my aging and ill
parents.
In essence, I am going
to be the child in their
home, wrestling with
a new role in which I
have little experience.
Having been a
decision-maker for
many years now, my
new role is not to
make decisions for my
parents, although that
moment might well
come at some point,
but to facilitate them
being able to make their
own decisions with as
much independence or
dignity as possible.
I’ll be treading a new
fine line in so doing.
To some extent, my
writing for this column
has been a journal of
my family’s experiences
and I plan to continue
that format.
However, I will likely
be expanding the notion
of topics to include a
wider range than the
issues of parenting and
educating youth and
teens.
The reality is that
many readers will
be entering a similar
phase to me over the
next few years, when a
large generation of ag-
ing parents will bring a
new and different chal-
lenge to our collective
skills of caring for each
other.
Just as we’ve shared
ideas about parenting,
so too might we share
ideas of caring for our
parents.
For me, the feedback
I have received from
readers has often been
helpful in forming my
own strategies and so
this column has, indeed,
been a forum of shar-
ing, and I invite readers
to send stories, tips and
questions as this topic
of elder care develops.
Ten years ago, I had
a list of about 500 top-
ics I wanted to cover
in the parenting and
education field. I’ve
used many and added
new ones so the length
of that list has not
changed much.
But 10 years ago I had
no list of elder care top-
ics; it simply wasn’t on
my radar, despite my
parents being in their
late 70s at the time.
In the past two years,
and particularly in the
past six months, that
list has exploded. I’ve
begun reading a lot
and talking to a lot of
people with experience,
both in elder care and
in health care, trying
to understand the chal-
lenges faced by both
the elderly and their
families.
At this point, I have
many more questions
than answers, but
you can’t start a plan
without asking those
questions and seeking
some answers.
In my first week of
moving back with my
parents, after leaving
home at 16 and never
returning, I am faced
with a challenging
problem already: how
do I live in their home
and provide the infra-
structure they need
without making them
feel helpless or with-
out interfering with
the systems they have
developed in coping
on their own up to this
point?

Graham Hookey is an
educational and par-
enting writer (ghook-
ey@yahoo.com).
Education and parenting, now add elder care to the list
Parenting
Graham Hookey
The first Ridge Meadows Job Fair will take place
on July 21, 4-8 p.m. at Golden Ears Winter Club.
The job fair is an initiative by Peter Tam to con-
tinue his commitment to Maple Ridge and Pitt
Meadows, made during the recent Federal Elec-
tion, to create jobs for youth and help improve the
local economy.
Tam followed the FaceBook Group created by Ni-
cole VanDerEst called “Jobs for Everyone,” to help
youth in Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows find local
work.
In addition, he believes that youth want to get
into jobs that are more meaningful and could point
them towards a career path.
Business in technology, tourism and recreation,
as well as environmental products and public
services are invited to present at the job fair and
encouraged to take advantage of a variety of gov-
ernment incentives, such as Youth Skill B.C., a
program administered by Bowman Employment.
This program provides qualified businesses or
organizations $2,000 per new hired, plus $1,000 for
training for the new young employees.
Tam said the job fair will present an opportunity
for employers to meet potential employees, as well
as present keynote speakers on careers, a resume
workshop, an opportunities for employers to net-
work.
There is no cost for job seekers who attend with
resumes, but without, is $5.
This event is partially sponsored by Bowman
Employment, the District of Maple Ridge and Pe-
ter Tam.
More information is available on Facebook “Jobs
for Everyone” and “Ridge Meadows Job Fair.”
Golden Ears Winter Club is located at 23588 – 105
Avenue.
Job fair at Planet
Ice in Maple Ridge
Contact info.
• Business can contact Peter Tam (ACS Software):
604-467-1888; email – mailto:peter@petertam.ca or peter@
petertam.ca. For more information on Youth Skill B.C. funding
and applications, or participation in the job fair, contact Susan
Sambol (Bowman Employment Services): 604-466-1375, ext.
213; email – ssambol@bowmanemployment.com.
LOCAL. FRESH. INSPIRED.
EAT. DRINK. SOCIALIZE.
20690 LOUGHEED HWY, MAPLE RI DGE
CORNER OF LOUGHEED HWY. & 207
TH
ST.
-- 
TEXT “BUFFALO” TO 57000
OR “LIKE” US ON FACEBOOK & GET A $10 GIFT CARD
MMMMMMMMMOOOOOOOOONNNNNNNNNDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYY
PASTA NI GHT
Choice of 5 different pastas
with a 6 oz glass of house wine

$
12
00
TTTTTTTTTTUUUUUUUUUUEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY
LADI ES’ NI GHT
All of our Pizzas
$
9
00
All Signature Martinis
$
4
95
Bellinis
$
2
95
Raspberry Ale 14 oz
$
3
95
SSSSSSSSSSUUUUUUUUUUNNNNNNNNNNDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY
STEAK NI GHT
10oz AAA Steak Dinner with
a 6 oz glass of house wine or a
sleeve of Buffalo Club draft beer
$
15
00
WWW. BUFFALOCLUB.CA
THIS SUMMER,
TASTE HISTORY
IN A GLASS
Stanley Park
Pilsner & Amber Pints
JUST
$
4
95

July & August y g y g
PREMIER LI VE MUSIC VENUE
IIIIIIIINNNNNNNN MMMMMMMMAAAAAAAAPPPPPPPPLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEE RRRRRRRRIIIIIIIIDDDDDDDDGGGGGGGGEEEEEEEE WWWWWWWWIIIIIIIITTTTTTTTHHHHHHHH LI VE MUSIC EEEEEEEEVVVVVVVVEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRYYYYYYYY
TTTTTTTTTTUUUUUUUUUUEEEEEEEEEESSSSSSSSSSDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY,,,,,,, TTTTTTTTTTHHHHHHHHHHUUUUUUUUUURRRRRRRRRRSSSSSSSSSSDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY,,,,,,, FFFFFFFFFFRRRRRRRRRRIIIIIIIIIIDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY &&&&&&&&& SSSSSSSSSSAAAAAAAAAATTTTTTTTTTUUUUUUUUUURRRRRRRRRRDDDDDDDDDDAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYY NNNNNNNNNNIIIIIIIIIIGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHTTTTTTTTTT
20 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
THE NEWS/arts&life
Sectioncoordinator:
MonishaMartins
604-467-1122ext. 217
newsroom@mapleridgenews.com
Contributed
The California Beach Boys tribute band features Mike Amaral, Josh Meschi, James Nobriga, Jim Sealy, Richard Schmidt and Dennis Buldo.
‘Rollicking band of pirates we’
T
his year, Poppy Welsh will trying for a
more prominent place on stage.
Perhaps she’ll be one of General Stanley’s
daughters, a pirate maid or a police constable
dressed in blue.
“I’ve played a lot of different roles in school,”
says 12-year-old Welsh, who started a summer
musical theatre workshop run by Odeum The-
atre at the ACT in Maple Ridge this week and
which will culminate in a performance of Gilbert
& Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance on Saturday.
“I think I’m ready for a bigger part.”
Welsh and 25 other young thespians have 10
days to master comic opera about Frederic, the
pirate apprentice, who is indentured to the sea-
faring scoundrels until his 21st birthday.
The actors get their scripts on Day 1, immerse
themselves into learning a range of parts and
need to know every note, rhythm and word by
Day 3.
The cast, costumes, props and staging are only
introduced – on Day 5.
“We only give them 10 days, but what we pro-
duce is anything but a mediocre performance,”
says artistic director Rayne Beveridge, who is
sharing duties with Clarke Schaufele, from the
University of Indiana, and Cari Russell, an actor
and theatre instructor from Calgary, Alberta.
Even parents are surprised their children
were capable of staging an entire operetta in
little more than a week.
Ian McDonnell, whose son Trevor is enrolled
in the workshop for the third year, admits he
wasn’t expecting much when he watched last
year’s performance of another Gilbert and Sul-
livan classic H.M.S Pinafore.
If everybody had an ocean, across Canada
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
(From left) Cayla Lynn, Becky King, Graham Strang, Trevor McDonnell, Hannah Lynn and Poppy Welsh stage a scene from Pirates in Penzance.
M
ichael Amaral can whip up a beach party
anywhere. As the lead singer of the tribute
band California Beach Boys, he’s equipped
with a ready formula – the tunes written by the leg-
ends of surf music: Brian Wilson, Carl Wilson, Den-
nis Wilson, Mike Love, David Marks, Al Jardine,
Bruce Johnston, and Dick Dale.
“We’ve all been playing music since we were
kids,” says Amaral, whose tribute band features his
cousin, just like the original Beach Boys.
“We all grew up with it. I used to surf and I’d lis-
ten to them on AM radio sing about California Girls
and Surfing U.S.A. It was just so perfect.”
Often dressed the part in Beach Boys’ signature
blue and white striped short-sleeved shirts and
white pants, the six-man combo blends dreamy vo-
cal harmonies with instrumental expertise.
Amaral admits the hardest part about saluting
the Beach Boys is memorizing their layered vocals.
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
(Left) Kate Taylor, Alysha Hall, Sofia Acciarresi, Alex Shankland have yet to learn who they’ll be playing in the Odeum Theatre production of
Pirates In Penzance, which plays the ACT on Saturday; (right) Cayla Lynn, Tianna Hall, Eric Dand, Marlee Macdonald, Sofia Acciarresi try out cos-
tumes and characters before the workshop starts.
Odeum Theatre stages Gilbert & Sullivan’s
Pirates of Penzance at the ACT
by Moni s ha Mar t i ns
staff repor ter
See Pirates, p21
by Moni s ha Mar t i ns
staff repor ter
The California Beach Boys promises to
bring the sounds of surf and sand to
Memorial Peace Park
See Caribbean Fest, p21
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 21
“After all how good could it be after
just a week to get ready?,” he says.
“I was expecting it to be like a
school Christmas pageant, where
you are happy to see your own child
perform for five minutes and then
groaning through the rest. To my
surprise and the director’s credit,
the show was fantastic. The kids
were well-prepared and enthusias-
tic. I really enjoyed it, and my son
did too.”
• Pirates of Penzance plays the
ACT on Saturday, July 16 at 3 p.m.
and 7 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance
or $20 at the door. Tickets are avail-
able at the Bergthorson Academy of
Musical Arts (604-467 6613) or at the
ACT in Maple Ridge.
Musicians needed
The Bergthorson Academy of Musi-
cal Arts is looking for a talented troupe
of musicians for the comic opera Io-
lanthe, to play the ACT next year. It’s
the first time the school will use live or-
chestration for a musical production; it
will feature 30 performers, aged 13 to
60. Bergthorson is currently accepting
applications from musicians with at
least three years experience.
• For more information, call Rayne
Beveridge at 604-716 3057 or the Bergth-
orson academy at 604-467-6613
Arts&Life
Two performances at ACT
Colleen Flanagan/THE NEWS
Natasha Krilow, Carly Strang stage a scene from Pirates in Penzance.
Caribbean beach party
“You want to make sure all the parts are
right,” he says. “There aren’t a lot of Beach Boy
cover bands because a lot of people don’t want
to take the time to learn all the parts.”
Members of the band – which features Ama-
ral, Josh Meschi, James Nobriga, Jim Sealy,
Richard Schmidt and Dennis Buldo – have
shared the stage with Surfaris and Ventures
and count The Fireballs, The Atlantics, The
Chantays, The Shadows, and the Ripcords
among their influences.
The melodic tunes of the 1960s, says Amaral,
can even get the most flat-footed, left-legged
audience on the floor.
“When I’m on stage, I never see anybody who
doesn’t have a smile on their face,” says Ama-
ral.
“If there’s no smile on their face, they don’t
hang around for long. It’s all about fun.”
• The California Beach Boys tribute headline
the Caribbean Festival in Maple Ridge on Sat-
urday, July 9 at 7 p.m.
The festival takes place on 224th Street in
Maple Ridge, between Lougheed Highway and
Dewdney Trunk Road, Saturday and Sunday.
Festival lineup
Saturday, July 9
• Noon -1 p.m. - DJ Kizum
• 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. - Nick
Hope
• 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. - 3 The
Hard Way
• 3 p.m. - 4 p.m. - Daddy
Roy The Messenger
• 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. - Tropiton-
ics Steel Band
• 5 p.m. - 6 p.m. - The
Fireband
• 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. - Los Furios
and Mama Pulpa
• 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. - California
Beach Boys
Sunday, July 10
• Noon - 1 p.m. - Bounty
Hunta
• 1 p.m. - 2 p.m. - Tropical
Heat
• 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. - Costume
parade
• 3 p.m. - 4 p.m. - Maf e
and Crew
• 4 p.m. - 5 p.m. - Rumba
Calzada
• 5 p.m. - 6 p.m. - Out of
Many, accompanied by
Tamasha Dancers
• 6 p.m. - 7 p.m. - Phase 3
Steel Band, Brazilian Beat
Dancers
• 7 p.m. - 8 p.m. - DJ Carl’s
Soundvibes
• 8 p.m. - 9 p.m. - Steele
and Natural Flavas
Contributed
Vancouver roots-reggae band Natural Flavas close
the festival on Sunday at 8 p.m.
Caribbean Fest from p20
Pirates from p20
HOT TICKETS
sponsored by the:
Volunteer at the ACT.
Call Landrie:
(604)476-2786
at the
THE NEWS
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978
Call or visit the
Act Ticket Centre to
purchase tickets.
(604) 476-ARTS (2787)
Ticket prices include taxes & fees
www.theactmapleridge.org
Ticket Centre Hours
Monday and Wednesday
10 am to 9 pm
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday: 10am - 5pm
Sunday: Closed
11944 Haney Place,
Maple Ridge, BC
Friday Night
Dance with
Robyn Picard
Friday, July 8 & 29,
7:00 p.m.
$12 lesson & dance,
$9 dance only
July 16
The Pirates of
Penzance
Presented by Odeum
Theatre Society &
Bergthorson Academy
Arts Club ON TOUR
2011/2012
Purchase your Season
Subscription to all
3 shows
Save over $17!
Oct 7 & 8, 2011,
8:00 p.m.
Buddy: The Buddy
Holly Story
By Alan Janes and
Rob Bettinson featuring
Zachary Stevenson
The world’s
greatest rock
and roll musical.
Jan 14, 2012 8:00 p.m.
Don Quixote
By Peter Anderson
& Colin Heath
An epic comedy
of love and delusion
Feb 18, 2012 8:00 p.m.
Circle Mirror
Transformation

By Annie Baker
A comedy of secrets.
Maple Ridge
Art Gallery
Biennale
Until – July 30
Register Now
for Summer Arts
Programs
Space is Limited Register
Early www.recreg4u.ca
or call 604 465-2470
Visit the ACT
website for further details
www.theactmapleridge.org/
programs
#4 - 21621 Lougheed Hwy., Maple Ridge
604-466-1488
Home of the
10 MINUTE OIL CHANGE
$
6

Discount
on regular
Drive Thru
Quality
Oil Changes
Not be combined with any other offers. Must present coupon. Expires July 31/11
CHOOSE PENNZOIL AND YOU COULD WIN THE
PENNZOIL ROAD TO MONTREAL EXPERIENCE.
A TRIP FOR 2 TO THE NAPA AUTO PARTS 200
PRESENTED BY DODGE - AUGUST, 2011
Enter to
Win an
Apple iPad
See in-store for
details.
No purchase
necessary
A Gangster Caper directed by
John Stuart
Emerald Pig Theatrical Society
presents
William Shakespeare’s
The Comedy of Errors
July 14th - 17th in Pitt Meadows - Spirit Square
July 21st - 24th in Maple Ridge - Memorial Peace Park
Showtime: 8:00 p.m.
Pre-show entertainment: 7:00 p.m.
July 17th & 24th (Matinee only) showtime: 1:00 p.m.
A FREE
COMMUNITY EVENT!
Bring a lawn chair, a blanket,
your family & a donation for the
Friends in Need Food Bank
EastRidge
Animal Hospital
MOOve It On Over,
a 70’s Theme
at the
2011 Maple Ridge/Pitt Meadows
July 23 & 24
The deadlines for entries
in the home arts & gardening section for
COUNTRY FEST
HAS BEEN EXTENDED!
If you haven’t already entered, go to our website at:
www.mrpmcountryfest.com
click on Prize Book and click on the section that you need.
Then download the entry form & bring it into the office.
The categories you can enter are:
• Home Cooking • Photography • Scrapbooking
• Crafts & Hobbies • Arts • Needlework & Textiles
• Homemade Wine & Beer • Eggs • Garden Produce
Enter individually or make it a Country Fair family event
Extended Deadline is
July 15th, 2011 for ALL ENTRIES
Office hours: 9 am - 5 pm Monday to Friday
Office Phone No.
604-463-6922
COUNTRY FEST
22 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
Gallery 7 Theatre
will be offering chil-
dren and teens a
unique opportunity to
explore all things the-
atrical this summer.
“We’re super-stoked
to be offering another
year of fun and learn-
ing for both young chil-
dren and youth,” says
Gallery 7 Theatre’s ex-
ecutive artistic direc-
tor Ken Hildebrandt.
“Summer Drama
Blast is a great op-
portunity for young
people to explore their
creative sides in a life-
affirming environment
while exploring impor-
tant life-skills such as
team-work, coopera-
tion, self-confidence
and a healthy self-im-
age.”
Catering to children
aged 6–12, Summer
Drama Blast allows
kids to explore their
creative sides and to
learn about basic and
intermediate theatre
skills, such as block-
ing, line memorization
and characterization.
Each camp ends with
a short performance
, during which camp-
ers can showcase
what they’ve learned
throughout the week
for family and friends.
These age-specific
camps are lead by
trained and experi-
enced theatre practi-
tioners: Joyce Chung
of Vancouver, B.C. will
lead Creative Explo-
sions for ages six to
seven; Danielle Spam-
pinato of Langley will
teach Dramatic Rum-
blings for students
aged eight and nine;
Alayne Cheny of Ab-
botsford will lead
Stage Eruptions for 10
and 11-year-old; and
Megan Mackenzie will
teach Dynamite Play-
makers for students
aged 12 and 13.
Young people aged
14-18 who are looking
to enhance their high-
school theatre experi-
ence, or are preparing
for college and profes-
sional theatre training
or deeper involvement
in community theatre,
will benefit from spe-
cialized theatre camps
such as Performance
Intensive with Van-
couver actor, director
and publicist Andrea
Loewen, or Improvisa-
tion with Panic Squad
team leader Andrew
Bright, or Acting for
the Camera, lead by
Maple Ridge actor, di-
rector and actor coach
Annette Reilly.
These topic-specific
camps offer youth the
opportunity to explore
performance at a more
advanced level while
rubbing shoulders
with professionals
who live and breathe
theatre.
Summer Drama Blast
2011 is well-suited for
both the aspiring actor
and for kids looking to
get out of their shell.
“The core idea is to
help kids grow into
well-rounded indi-
viduals with a healthy
appreciation of how
theatre can entertain
and communicate. No
matter what the expe-
rience or talent, kids
will have a great time,”
says Hildebrandt.
Summer Drama Blast
2011 runs July 11 – 29
at the MEI campus,
4081 Clearbrook Road
in Abbotsford. For
complete information
on instructors, avail-
able camps, pricing or
registration, call 1-604-
504-5940 or visit www.
gallery7theatre.com.
Arts&Life
Summer theatre camps for teenage thespians
Maple Ridge actress Annette Reilly will
be teaching ‘Acting for the camera’
Contributed
Annette Reilly will teach a course in acting for the
camera at MEI school in Abbotsford.
Get In. Get Out. Get Working.
We Believe in You.
Small$MBTT4J[FTtMonthly Intakes
Qualified*OTUSVDUPSTt Latest Software
Financial OptionstFree Lifetime Refreshers
No8BJUJOH-JTUTtCareer Fairs
Job1MBDFNFOU"TTJTUBODFt4LJMMT Warranty
}Practical Nursing
}Health Care Assistant
(Formerly Resident Care Attendant)
}Community Support Worker
}Medical Office
}Legal Secretary
}Business
}Social Services
}Assisted Living
Call Our MAPLE RIDGE Campus:
(604)
466-3600
www. sprottshaw. com
JOIN US ON:
Would you
like to swallow 20 pills every day,
just to digest your food?
If you had cystic fibrosis,
you’d have no choice.
Please help us.
1-800-378-CCFF • www.cysticfibrosis.ca
A Gangster
Caper
directed by
John Stuart
Emerald
Pig
Theatrical
Society
presents
William
Shakespeare’s
The
Comedy
of
Errors
Allure Hair Fashions
The Act
Perkin’s Automotive
Anthony’s Fine Dry Cleaning
Javan Beauty Salon
Capital West Insurance
Cameo Stamp, Coin & Hobby
Temptations Hair
Starbuck’s 227th
Leisure Centre
Orange Julius
Bella Vita Restaurant
Jim’s Pizza
Local Ride Bike Shop
West Ridge Drycleaners
C.C. Auto
Stag Barber Shop
Super Bargain Store
Kintec Footwear
Canadian Tire
Roving Eye Optical
Fitness Unlimited
Mr.Lube
Hatch Match’r Fish & Tackle
Five Star Catering
Sportstrader
Photo Express
Black Sheep Pub
Jazz Ma Tazz
Triple Tree Nursery
Maple Ridge Eye care
Hammond Jewellers
Fountain Tire
Fowle Foto
GIB Motors
Staples
Heads Up Hair Salon
Westridge Dry Cleaners
Marcie Batty
Mr. Wallace
Favorite Finds
KD Creations
Champion Fitness
FVCC Carol Novakowski
Tamara Gardner
Gillian Goodrich
Save-on Foods -
Valleyfair Mall
Regency Men’s Wear
Royal Lepage Realty
West Coast Toyota
Lordco
T&T Auto
Dominos Pizza
Jaycee Trucking -
Kitty Affeldt
Outerlimits
Tim Hortons -
248th & Dewdney
Dan & Jamie Currie
(Tim Hortons - Vernon)
RTech Repairs -
Richard Timmer
to all the wonderful businesses of Maple Ridge and Pitt Meadows
who supported our Garibaldi Secondary Grads by making donations.
Garibaldi Secondary 2011 Dry Grad was an amazing success.
We couldn’t have done it without you!
Thank You…
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 23
THE NEWS/sports
Sectioncoordinator:
Robert Mangelsdorf
604-467-1122ext. 216
sports@mapleridgenews.com
Greg Sakaki/BLACK PRESS
Maple Ridge Burrards players Creighton Reid (front) and Sam Cook check Nanaimo Timbermen opponent Scott Ranger during Saturday’s Western Lacrosse Association game
at Nanaimo’s Frank Crane Arena. The home team won 10-8.
The Maple Ridge Burrards find
themselves at the bottom of the
Western Lacrosse Association
standings after dropping another
pair of games over the weekend.
The Burrards lost 10-8 to the
Nanaimo Timbermen on the road
Saturday before coming home to
host the Burnaby Lakers on Sun-
day, losing 12-8 in that game.
The losses drop the Burrards to
4-8 this season, tying them for last
place in the league with the Coquit-
lam Adanacs.
After a 3-3 start, the Burrards
have won just one game in their last
six. The Burrards have also yet to
win on the road this season, going
0-6 away from Planet Ice.
With six games left to play, Fridge
admits the Burrards have a tough
row to hoe to the post-season.
“I think 6-0 is an unrealistic expec-
tation,” said Burrards head coach
Daren Fridge. “But going 4-2 might
not be enough.”
The Burrards were in a similar
position last season when they
were 6-9 with three games to play.
They went on to win three games in
a row to squeak into the playoffs for
the first time in five years.
While the Burrards are only three
points out of a play-off berth, if they
are going to make a run at the post-
season, they will have to do it with-
out the services of forward Joel
Dalgarno.
Dalgarno, who has 31 points in
eight games with the Burrards this
season, has missed the past four
games due to work commitments
and is unlikely to return this sea-
son.
“It’s a significant blow,” said
Fridge.
The Burrards are also without
their top scorer from last season,
Jarrett Davis. They lost him to the
Hamilton Nationals of the profes-
sional field lacrosse league, Major
League Lacrosse, prior to this sea-
son.
Making matters worse, Curtis
Dickson, the Burrards top scorer
this season with 50 points in 11
games, was unavailable to play
Saturday in Nanaimo against the
Timbermen due to family commit-
ments. Starting goaltender Ron
Schibild was also out of the line-up
with work commitments.
“I thought the guys did a good
job of stepping up,” said Fridge of
Saturday’s game. “[Back-up
goalie Chris Seidel] gave
us a chance to win,
but we just didn’t
score enough
goals.”
“Basically, our
top three scorers
were gone.”
The team’s depleted roster of late
has underscored the team’s need
for secondary scoring.
“We are trying to fill the gaps as
best as we can,” said Fridge. “But
this has really exposed some depth
issues on the team, and that puts
pressure on everyone.”
Fridge said if the team is going to
rally for a playoff spot, every play-
er will have to step up.
“One thing I know about this team
is that we never give up,” he said.
“We are always in every game, so
it’s not a question of effort.
“We just need that consistency.”
The Burrards opened the scoring
with a pair of goals in the first pe-
riod Saturday against the Nanaimo
Timbermen. However, Nanaimo
rallied with six unanswered goals
t o take a 6-2 lead
midway through
the second pe-
riod. Maple
Ridge potted
three of their
own to cut the
lead to one, only to have
Nanaimo score with 12 seconds left
in the middle frame.
After trading goals early in the
third, the Burrards were able to tie
the game thanks to a pair of goals
by Randy Daly with six and a half
minutes to play.
It was all Timbermen from that
point on, however, as Scott Rang-
er potted a pair of his own to give
Nanaimo the 10-8 win.
Daly led all Burrards scorers
with a hat trick, while rookie Riley
Loewen had a pair of goals and an
assist.
If there was a bright
spot to the Maple Ridge
Burrards’ weekend,
it was the play of vet-
eran forward Randy
Daly, who in scoring
five times, reached the
200-goal plateau in the
Western Lacrosse Asso-
ciation.
Daly has played in the
WLA for more than 10
seasons, and has earned
a reputation as a potent
scorer and a solid team-
mate.
“It is quite an accom-
plishment,” Burrards
head coach Daren
Fridge said of 200 goals.
“I told him he’s got 28 to
go to catch me.”
Despite his small size,
at just five-foot-nine,
Daly has proven himself
to be one of the hardest-
hitting players on the
team, Fridge said.
“He’s found a role
that works for best for
him, and he can finesse
his way through situa-
tions.”
There was some de-
bate as to wether Daly
would be coming back
this season for the Bur-
rards due to work com-
mitments.
“I’m glad I was able to
talk him into playing,”
said Fridge.
“He’s been the biggest
contributor in Dalgar-
no’s absence, he’s really
stepped up when we’re
desperate for goals.
“The way he is play-
ing right now, he could
probably play another
three or four years.”
Daly has 10 goals and
six assists in nine games
with Maple Ridge this
season.
Daly came to the Bur-
rards in 2006 after a stint
in the National Lacrosse
League with Colorado
and the now-defunct
Vancouver Ravens. That
year Daly had 65 points
to lead the team in scor-
ing.
Daly tops
200-goal
mark
by Rober t Mangel s dor f
staff repor ter
Randy Daly
Depleted Burrards drop a pair
Maple Ridge without
Dalgarno, Dickson, Schibild for
Nanaimo visit Saturday
by Rober t Mangel s dor f
staff repor ter
See Burrards, p24
24 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
Sports
Derek Lowe had one goal
and two assists, while Aaron
Pascas has one goal and one
helper. Aaron Davis had the
other Burrards goal. Peter Tel-
lis had a pair of assists, while
Ben Davies and Tyler Miotto
each had helpers.
The Burrards made the trip
back to the mainland on the
last ferry Saturday night in
time to face the Burnaby Lak-
ers Sunday night.
Again the Burrards got out to
a 2-0 lead midway through the
first period, but found them-
selves down by three goals
after the Lakers went on a 6-1
run.
Burnaby was able to stay
at least one goal
ahead of thew Bur-
rards for much of
the game, and with
less than eight
minutes left, the
Lakers held a slim
9-8 lead.
However, Burn-
aby finished with
three unanswered
goals to put the game out of
reach for the Burrards.
Daly again led Burrards scor-
ers with a pair of goals and a
pair of assists, while Dickson
had a pair of goals and one
assist. Tyler Miotto had two
goals, while Jeff
Sauve and Ben Da-
vies had the other
Burrards goals.
The Burrards
travel to Bill Cope-
land Arena for a
rematch with the
Burnaby Lakers
this Friday, before
returning home
to take on the Victoria Sham-
rocks at home this Sunday,
July 10, at Planet Ice in Maple
Ridge at 6:45 p.m.
The Ridge Meadows
Royals midget AAA
baseball team had an
up-and-down weekend
in Kamloops, ending
up finishing fifth in the
10-team Daley & Sons
Can-Am Tournament
this past weekend.
The Royals split
games on both Friday
and Saturday to finish
the round-robin por-
tion of the tournament
with a 2-2 record, good
enough for third in the
five-team pool. The
tournament started off
with a game against the
Mid-Island Mustangs,
and saw the Royals
come out flat and were
down 6-0 after four
innings. The Royals
avoided the shut-out
by pushing two across
in the seventh, but still
came out on the losing
end of a 6-2 score. The
Royals rebounded with
a solid 11-4 win over
the Sherwood Park A’s
on Friday night to end
the first day with a 1-1
record.
Saturday saw the
team face the Spruce
Grove Sox and their
starting pitcher man-
aged to hold the Roy-
als bats in check with
one of the best fast-
balls the team has seen
this season, accord-
ing to manager Nor
Ljunggren. The Roy-
als eventually scored
a couple of runs but it
was too little too late
as they lost 8-2. The
final game of the round
robin matched the Roy-
als against the Red
Deer Braves under the
lights at Norbrock Sta-
dium. Cole Johnson
started for the Royals
and pitched six solid
innings before run-
ning into trouble in
the seventh when Eric
Blower, who saw his
first mound action of
the year this weekend,
came on for the save.
On Sunday they
faced off with the Ed-
monton Cardinals. The
Royals jumped out to
an early 6-1 lead and
looked to be well on
their way to victory
when the Cards came
back with five runs in
the fourth and added
another in the fifth to
take a 7-6 lead. In the
sixth, Lucas Tillotson
hit a booming two-run
double to give the Roy-
als the lead and then
scored the insurance
run on a Keanen Buck-
ley single to help pre-
serve a 9-7 win.
The team battled
through injuries and
put forth a strong ef-
fort to finish out the
tournament. Catcher
Dylan MacDermid
played the final two
games after being
used sparingly at the
position this season,
and Eric Blower, who
made three appearanc-
es on the mound after
not pitching since last
season didn’t allow an
earned run in 6.2 in-
nings. The team now
gets a couple of days
off before returning
to league play tonight
against Tri-City before
hosting the Interior
teams, South Okana-
gan and Kamloops, this
weekend at the Albion
Sports Complex.
Burrards host Shamrocks this Sunday
Game time
• The Maple Ridge Burrards
take on the Victoria Sham-
rocks at home this Sunday,
July 10, at Planet Ice in
Maple Ridge at 6:45 p.m.
Burrards from p23
The Ridge Meadows Novice
A1 box lacrosse team headed
to Calgary this past weekend
to participate in the 35th an-
nual Canada Day Lacrosse
Tournament, bringing home a
bronze medal.
The tournament is consid-
ered to be one of the longest
running and largest box la-
crosse tournaments in the
world, with more than 92
teams in age groups from nov-
ice to midget competing over
the three days.
The Burrards played hard in
two games Friday, two games
Saturday and finished on Sun-
day playing against the Cal-
gary Sabrecats with a score
of 5-3 to win bronze, coming
up just short of playing in the
finals.
Winning MVP awards over
the weekend were Cole Leon,
Drew Andre, Lochlan Munro
and Caleb Foley.
The boys also had a great
time competing Saturday and
Sunday in a fun team chal-
lenge against a novice team
from California. The Bur-
rards team came out on top
in the events which included
mechanical bull riding, radar
gun, obstacle course, top shot,
and jousting.
The coaches, consisting of
Lance Andre, Ron Williams
and Ryan Brandon, said they
were proud of how the team
played and the way the boys
finished the season.
The Burrards team mem-
bers include: Cole Leon,
Ben Williams, Cody Zachow,
Trevor Funk, Kyle Brandon,
Jake Bailuk, Caleb Foley,
Joel Thomson, Ethan Grant,
Chase Johnson, Drew Andre,
Brayden Hamilton, Kurt Can-
tello, Dawson McGuinness,
Jack Williams and Lochlan
Munro.
Ridge Royals finish fifth at
Kamloops tourney
Novice Burrards win bronze
Decide for yourself. Learn more at HSTinBC.ca
Before you vote, understand the referendum question:
To lower the HST from 12% to 10%, vote NO.
To bring back the GST & PST at 12%, vote YES.
Are you in favour of extinguishing the HST and
reinstating the PST in conjunction with the GST?
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 25
Sports
Jennifer Gauthier/BLACK PRESS
Horsin’ around
Kylie Morford, 14, of the Haney Seahorses competes in the girls’ 100-metre breast-
stroke event at the Hyack Summer Solstice swim meet June 19 at the City Centre
Aquatic Complex in Coquitlam.
Got community sports results?
Call THE NEWS at 604-467-1122.
CAMEO STAMP
COI N & HOB BY
(SERVING MAPLE RIDGE & PITT MEADOWS SINCE 1981)
OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK
MONDAY TO FRIDAY 10 TO 6. SATURDAY 10 TO 5
22756 Lougheed Hwy., Maple Ridge
604.463.6113
Great Selection • Great Prices
• Collector Coins
• Stamps
• Plastic Model Kits
• Diecast Models
• Slot Cars
• Rockets
• HO & N Trains
• Movies
• Supplies &
Accessories
WE BUY COINS, GOLD
& SILVER
“Qepothet te Mestiyexw - Bringing People Together”
“Honouring our ancestors through our elders & recognizing
our future through our youth”
Hosted by the Sto:lo and Coast Salish Communities
July 12 - 14, 2011
Tradex, Abbotsford, British Columbia
Sponsorship opportunities still available.
For more information visit www.35theldersgathering.com
Reaching back to move forward...
Presented By
G
r
a
n
d
P
r
iz
e
N
e
w
Je
e
p
4
x
4
W
r
a
n
g
le
r
1st. Maple Ridge Chrysler: 2011 Jeep Wrangler Sport 4x4 (Value: $24,692.64)
2nd. Holland America Line & Hagen’s Travel: One Week Luxury Cruise for two Ocean view or
better with no expiry date (Approximate value $3,200)
3rd. Mark’s Work Warehouse: $2,500 Gift Certificate (No cash value—expires within a year)
4th. Fuller Watson: G.E. Stainless Fridge, Stove & Dishwasher (Approximate value $2,500)
5th. Meyers Norris Penny Chartered Accountants: Apple i-Pad (Approximate Value $850)
6th. Haney Sewing & Sound: 32” Flat Screen TV (Approximate Value $550)
7th. Meadow Gardens Golf Course: 3 Rounds of Golf for Two with Cart (Approximate Value $575)
8th. Lordco Auto Parts: Car Top Carrier (Approximate Value $500)
9th. Rebel Coatings Inc: Pick-up truck Box Liner (Approximate value $500)
1 in 10,000 Chances of winning nces oooffff wwwwwwwiiiinnnnnning
2nd Pri ze
Holland Ameri ca Li ne
1 Week Luxury
Crui se for 2
For more information visit…
w w w . R o t a r y D u c k R a c e . c a
BC GAMING EVENT LICENCE #33210
TICKET PURCHASERS MUST BE 19 YEARS OF AGE OR OLDER.
WINNERS CONSENT TO THE RELEASE OF THEIR NAMES BY LICENSEE.
HOLDERS OF WINNING TICKETS DO NOT NEED TO BE PRESENT TO CLAIM PRIZES
y Maple Ridge Chrysler Jeep Dodge - 11911 West St.
y Maple Ridge - Pitt Meadows Times #2-22345 North Ave.
y Remax Lifestyles Realty – 22308 Dewdney Trunk Rd.
y Remax Lifestyles Realty -PM -#2 - 19126 Ford Rd.
y Paterson Shultz Volpatti – 22715 119th Ave.
y Canadian Tire (Customer Service) – 11969 200th St.
y Hagen’s Travel - 11958 224th St.
y Haney Sewing & Sound – 22381 Dewdney Trunk Rd.
y Fuller Watson – 22390 Lougheed Hwy.
y Marks Work Wearhouse – 22722 Lougheed Hwy.
y Independent Lifestyle Store - #185 Haney Place Mall
Whe r e t o buy t i c ke t s
2nd Pri ze
Holland Ameri ca Li ne
1 Week Luxury
Crui se for 2
For more information visit…
w w w . R o t a r y D u c k R a c e . c a
For all your Awards
& Recognition Needs
Friendly Customer Service
Top Quality Workmanship
Engraving Specialists
TROPHY CENTRE
Serving The Community
For Over 30 Years!
#114 - 2071 Kingsway Ave., Port Coquitlam
604-941-4944 • www.trophycentre.ca
t
ea
qu
.c
ty
ars!!!!
y
uitlam
ca
Where Everyone’s A Winner!
26 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
M
o
r
e

P
o
w
e
r
.
L
e
s
s

F
u
e
l.
G
r
e
a
t

V
a
lu
e

is

a

c
o
m
p
a
r
is
o
n

b
e
t
w
e
e
n

t
h
e

e
n
t
ir
e

c
u
r
r
e
n
t

C
h
r
y
s
le
r

C
a
n
a
d
a

lin
e
u
p

a
n
d

t
h
e

e
n
t
ir
e

2
0
1
0

C
h
r
y
s
l
e
r

C
a
n
a
d
a

lin
e
u
p
.
W
is
e

c
u
s
t
o
m
e
r
s

r
e
a
d

t
h
e



n
e

p
r
in
t
:
º
.
¯
.
±
.
f
f
.
§
.
'

T
|
e

S
u
r
r
e
(

O
(
|.
e

0
|
e

H
c
r
e

E
.
e
|
|
c
||e
(
º

a
(
e

||r
||e
d

||r
e

c
||e
(
º

W
|
|:
|

a
p
p
|]

|c

(
e
|a
||
d
e
||.
e
(
|e
º

c
|
º
e
|e
:
|e
d

|
e
W

a
|
d

u
|
u
º
e
d

r
c
d
e


p
u
(
:
|
a
º
e
d

|(
c
r

p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

c
|

c
(

a
||e
(

J
u
|]

1
.
2
0
1
1
.
O
e
a
|e
(

c
(
d
e
(
/
|(
a
d
e

r
a
]

o
e

|
e
:
e
º
º
a
(
]
.
0
||e
(
º

º
u
o
|e
:
|
|c

:
|
a
|
c
e

a
|
d

r
a
]

o
e

e
/
|e
|
d
e
d

W
|||
c
u
|
|
c
||:
e
.
S
e
e

p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º

a
|
d

:
c
|
d
|||c
|
º
.
º
$
2
1
./
9
8

P
u
(
:
|
a
º
e

P
(
|:
e

a
p
p
||e
º

|c

2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

0
(
a
|
d

C
a
(
a
.
a
|

C
a
|
a
d
a

V
a
|u
e

P
a
:
|
a
c
e

|2
9
E
+
C
|
9
ì
c
|
|]

a
|
d

||
:
|u
d
e
º

$
/
.0
0
0

C
c
|
º
u
r
e
(

C
a
º
|

O

:
c
u
|
|.
P
(
|:
||
c

||
:
|u
d
e
º

|(
e
|c
|
|
|$
1
.4
0
0
ì
a
|
d

e
/
:
|u
d
e
º

||:
e
|
:
e
.
||
º
u
(
a
|
:
e
.
(
e
c

|(
a
||c
|
.
a
|
]

d
e
a
|e
(

a
d
r
||

|(
a
||c
|

|e
e
º

a
|
d

c
||
e
(

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

|e
e
º

a
|
d

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

|a
/
e
º
.
O
e
a
|e
(

c
(
d
e
(
/
|(
a
d
e

r
a
]

o
e

|
e
:
e
º
º
a
(
]
.
O
e
a
|e
(
º

r
a
]

º
e
||
|c
(

|e
º
º
.
S
e
e

p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º
.
¯
C
c
|
º
u
r
e
(

C
a
º
|

O

:
c
u
|


a
(
e

c
||e
(
e
d

c
|

r
c
º
|
|
e
W

2
0
1
0

a
|
d

º
e
|e
:
|
2
0
1
1

.
e
|
|:
|e
º

a
|
d

a
(
e

r
a
|
u
|a
:
|u
(
e
(-
|c
-
d
e
a
|e
(

||
:
e
|
||.
e
º
.
W
|
|:
|

a
(
e

d
e
d
u
:
|e
d

|(
c
r

||
e

|
e
c
c
||a
|e
d

p
(
|:
e

o
e
|c
(
e

|a
/
e
º
.
A
r
c
u
|


.
a
(
]

o
]

.
e
|
|:
|e
.
S
e
e

]
c
u
(

d
e
a
|e
(

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º
.
±
V
a
(
|a
o
|e

P
(
|r
e

R
a
|e

| |
a
|
:
||
c

u
p

|c

8
4

r
c
|
||
º



c
||e
(
e
d

c
|

a
p
p
(
c
.
e
d

:
(
e
d
||
c
|

r
c
º
|
|
e
W

2
0
1
1

.
e
|
|:
|e
º

|c

u
u
a
||| e
d

(
e
|a
||
:
u
º
|c
r
e
(
º

||
(
c
u
c
|

T
O

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

S
e
(
.
|:
e
º
.
R
c
]
a
|
B
a
|
|

c
|
C
a
|
a
d
a

a
|
d

S
:
c
||a
o
a
|
|
.
B
|-
W
e
e
|
|]

p
a
]
r
e
|


º
|
c
W
|

a
(
e

o
a
º
e
d

c
|

8
4
-
r
c
|
||

|e
(
r
º
.
V
a
(
|a
o
|e

(
a
|e

º
|
c
W
|



o
a
º
e
d

c
|

T
O
.
R
B
C

a
|
d

S
:
c
||a
o
a
|
|

P
(
|r
e

R
a
|e

a
|
d

1 u
:
|u
a
|e
º

a
:
:
c
(
d
||
c
|]
.
P
a
]
r
e
|


a
|
d

| |
a
|
:
||
c

|e
(
r

r
a
]

||
:
(
e
a
º
e

c
(

d
e
:
(
e
a
º
e

W
|||

(
a
|e

1 u
:
|u
a
||c
|
º
.
T
O

c
||e
(



|
c
|
c
p
e
|

|c

(
e
º
|d
e
|


c
|
\
e
W
|c
u
|
d
|a
|
d

a
|
d

|
a
o
(
a
d
c
(.
\
u
|
c
|
.
\
u
|
a
.
u
|

a
|
d

\
c
(
||
W
e
º
|
T
e
(
(
||c
(
|e
º
.
S
c
r
e

:
c
|
d
|||c
|
º

a
p
p
|]
.
S
e
e

p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º
.
f
f
C
u
º
|c
r
e
(

C
|
c
|:
e

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

|c
(

8
O
-
.
4
8
-

a
|
d

O
0
-
r
c
|
||

|e
(
r
º

c
|

a
p
p
(
c
.
e
d

:
(
e
d
||
||
(
c
u
c
|

T
O

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

S
e
(
.
|:
e
º

a
|
d

A
||]

C
(
e
d
||
C
a
|
a
d
a



a
.
a
||a
o
|e

a
|
p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º
|
|p
º

|c

u
u
a
||| e
d

(
e
|a
||
:
u
º
|c
r
e
(
º

c
|

º
e
|e
:
|
|
e
W

2
0
1
1

C
|
(
]
º
|e
(.
J
e
e
p
.
O
c
d
c
e

a
|
d

R
a
r

r
c
d
e

.
T
a
x
e
s

o
n

t
h
e

f
u
ll
n
e
g
o
t
ia
t
e
d

p
u
r
c
h
a
s
e

p
r
ic
e

a
r
e

p
a
y
a
b
le

a
t

t
h
e

b
e
g
in
n
in
g

o
f

t
h
e

c
o
n
t
r
a
c
t

t
e
r
m

r
e
s
u
lt
in
g

in

h
ig
h
e
r

p
a
y
m
e
n
t
s

t
h
a
n

p
a
y
m
e
n
t
s

t
a
x
e
d

o
n

a

p
e
r
io
d
ic

b
a
s
is

a
n
d

a
r
e

n
o
t

r
e


e
c
t
e
d

in

a
d
v
e
r
t
is
e
d

p
a
y
m
e
n
t
s
.
T
|
e

|c
||c
W
||
c

|e
(
r
º

a
p
p
|]

|c

T
O

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

S
e
(
.
|:
e
º

:
c
|
|(
a
:

.
(
D
if
f
e
r
e
n
t

c
o
n
t
r
a
c
t

t
e
r
m
s

a
p
p
ly

t
o

A
lly

C
r
e
d
it

C
a
n
a
d
a

o
f
f
e
r
s
.
S
e
e

y
o
u
r

d
e
a
le
r

f
o
r

c
o
m
p
le
t
e

d
e
t
a
ils
.)

V
e
|
|:
|e
º

a
(
e

| |
a
|
:
e
d

c
.
e
(

a

8
O
-
.
4
8
-

c
(

O
0
-
r
c
|
||

|e
(
r

W
|||

p
a
]
r
e
|


a
r
c
(
||/
e
d

c
.
e
(

a

|e
(
r

c
|
u
p

|c

9
O

r
c
|
||
º

a
|
d

||
e

p
(
e
-
d
e
|e
(
r
||
e
d

(
e
º
|d
u
a
|
o
a
|a
|
:
e

p
a
]
a
o
|e

a
|
||
e

e
|
d

c
|
||
e

:
c
|
|(
a
:
|.
A
|
:
c
|
|(
a
:
|'º

e
|
d
.
:
u
º
|c
r
e
(
º

|
a
.
e

||
e

:
|
c
|:
e

c
|
(
e
|u
(
|
||
c

||
e
|(

.
e
|
|:
|e

||
(
c
u
c
|

a

C
|
(
]
º
|e
(.
J
e
e
p
.
O
c
d
c
e
.
R
a
r

d
e
a
|e
(
º
|
|p

W
|||

|
c

|u
(
||
e
(

c
o
||c
a
||c
|
º

|e
/
:
e
p
|
p
a
]
r
e
|
|
c
|
a

$
1
9
9

(
e
|u
(
|

|e
e

a
|
d

e
/
:
e
º
º

W
e
a
(

a
|
d

|e
a
(.
r
||e
a
c
e

a
|
d

º
|r
||a
(

:
|
a
(
c
e
º
ì.
| |
a
|
:
||
c

||
e

(
e
r
a
||
||
c

o
a
|a
|
:
e

|c
(

||
e

(
e
º
|
c
|
||
e

a
r
c
(
||/
a
||c
|

p
e
(
|c
d

a
|
||
e
|
-
:
u
(
(
e
|
|
º
|a
|
d
a
(
d

(
a
|e
º

c
(

p
a
]
||
c

||
e

(
e
º
|d
u
a
|
o
a
|a
|
:
e

||

|u
||.
S
c
r
e

:
c
|
d
|||c
|
º

a
p
p
|]
.
C
u
º
|c
r
e
(

C
|
c
|:
e

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

c
||e
(
e
d

o
]

T
O

||

0
u
e
o
e
:



º
u
o
|e
:
|
|c

d
|||e
(
e
|
|
|e
(
r
º

a
|
d

:
c
|
d
|||c
|
º
.
A
||
a
d
.
e
(
||º
e
d

C
u
º
|c
r
e
(

C
|
c
|:
e

|
||
a
|
:
||
c

c
||e
(
º

a
(
e

T
O

c
||e
(
º
.
E
/
a
r
p
|e
.
2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

0
(
a
|
d

C
a
(
a
.
a
|

S
/
T

|2
9
0
ì
W
|||

a

P
u
(
:
|
a
º
e

P
(
|:
e

c
|
$
2
8
.1
9
b

| |
a
|
:
e
d

a
|
4
.9
9
º

A
P
R

c
.
e
(

O
0

r
c
|
||
º

W
|||

p
a
]
r
e
|


a
r
c
(
||/
e
d

c
.
e
(

8
4

r
c
|
||
º

e
u
u
a


1
8
0

o
|-
W
e
e
|
|]

p
a
]
r
e
|


c
|
$
1
8
4

a
|
d

c
|
e

| |
a
|
p
a
]
r
e
|
|
c
|
$
9
.0
/
8

|c
(

a

:
c
º
|
c
|
o
c
(
(
c
W
||
c

c
|
$
4
./
8
8

a
|
d

a

|c
|a
|
c
o
||c
a
||c
|

c
|
$
8
2
.9
8
8
.
T
a
/
e
º
.
||:
e
|
:
e
.
||
º
u
(
a
|
:
e
.
(
e
c

|(
a
||c
|
.
e
/
:
e
º
º

r
||e
a
c
e

a
|
d

W
e
a
(

a
|
d

|e
a
(

:
|
a
(
c
e
º
.
a
|
]

d
e
a
|e
(

a
d
r
||

|(
a
||c
|

|e
e
º

a
|
d

c
||
e
(

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

|e
e
º

a
|
d

:
|
a
(
c
e
º

|
c
|
||
:
|u
d
e
d
.
O
e
a
|e
(
º

r
a
]

º
e
||
|c
(

|e
º
º
.
S
e
e

p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º
.
§
2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

0
(
a
|
d

C
a
(
a
.
a
|

C
(
e
W

º
|
c
W
|
.
P
(
|:
e

||
:
|u
d
||
c

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

C
c
|
º
u
r
e
(

C
a
º
|

O

:
c
u
|
|.
$
2
8
.8
9
b
.
P
(
|:
||
c

||
:
|u
d
e
º

|(
e
|c
|
|
|$
1
.4
0
0
ì
a
|
d

e
/
:
|u
d
e
º

||:
e
|
:
e
.
||
º
u
(
a
|
:
e
.
(
e
c

|(
a
||c
|
.
a
|
]

d
e
a
|e
(

a
d
r
||

|(
a
||c
|

|e
e
º

a
|
d

c
||
e
(

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

|e
e
º

a
|
d

a
p
p
||:
a
o
|e

|a
/
e
º
.
O
e
a
|e
(

c
(
d
e
(
/
|(
a
d
e

r
a
]

o
e

|
e
:
e
º
º
a
(
]
.
O
e
a
|e
(
º

r
a
]

º
e
||
|c
(

|e
º
º
.
'
|
c
]
a
||]

B
c
|
u
º

C
a
º
|



a
.
a
||a
o
|e

a
|
p
a
(
||:
|p
a
|||
c

d
e
a
|e
(
º

|c

e
||c
|o
|e

(
e
|a
||
:
u
º
|c
r
e
(
º

c
|


||
e

p
u
(
:
|
a
º
e
/
|e
a
º
e

o
]

A
u
c
u
º
|
2
.
2
0
1
1

c
|
a

|
e
W

2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

C
|
(
]
º
|e
(.
J
e
e
p
.
O
c
d
c
e
.
R
a
r

r
c
d
e
|
|W
|||

||
e

e
/
:
e
p
||c
|

c
|
2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

R
a
r

1
b
0
0

R
e
c
u
|a
(

C
a
o

a
|
d

R
a
r

C
a
o

&

C
|
a
º
º


C
a
o

4
/
2

a
|
d

4
/
4
.
2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

C
a
||o
e
(

S
E
.
2
0
1
0

J
e
e
p

C
c
r
p
a
º
º

a
|
d

P
a
|(
|c
|
4
/
2

a
|
d

4
/
4
.
2
0
1
1

J
e
e
p

C
c
r
p
a
º
º

a
|
d

P
a
|(
|c
|
S
p
c
(
|
4
/
2

a
|
d

S
p
c
(
|
4
/
4
.
2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

J
e
e
p

w
(
a
|
c
|e
(

S
p
c
(
|.
2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

J
c
u
(
|
e
]

S
E
.
2
0
1
0
/
2
0
1
1

O
c
d
c
e

0
(
a
|
d

C
a
(
a
.
a
|

C
V
P

a
|
d

C
a
(
c
c

V
a
|

|C
/
V
ì
a
|
d

2
0
1
2

|
|A
T

b
0
0
ì
a
|
d



d
e
d
u
:
|e
d

|(
c
r

||
e

|
e
c
c
||a
|e
d

p
(
|:
e

a
||e
(

|a
/
e
º
.
E
||c
|o
|e

:
u
º
|c
r
e
(
º

||
:
|u
d
e

||
c
º
e

W
|||

0
c
|d

|
e
]

|
e
a
º
e

r
a
|u
(
||]

d
a
|e
º

|a
||||
c

c
|

c
(

a
||e
(

J
u
|]

1
.
2
0
1
1

a
|
d

:
u
(
(
e
|
|
|e
º
º
e
e
º

c
|
a

|
e
W

C
|
(
]
º
|e
(.
J
e
e
p
.
O
c
d
c
e

c
(

R
a
r

.
e
|
|:
|e

.
|a

|
||
a
|
:
|a
|
||
/
.
S
c
r
e

:
c
|
d
|||c
|
º

a
p
p
|]
.
S
e
e

]
c
u
(

d
e
a
|e
(

|c
(

:
c
r
p
|e
|e

d
e
|a
||º
.
'
B
a
º
e
d

c
|

J
a
|
u
a
(
]

||
(
c
u
c
|

|
a
]

2
0
1
1

R
.
|
.
P
c
||

º
a
|e
º

|c
|a
|
(
e
c

|(
a
||c
|
º
.
O
B
a
º
e
d

c
|

W
a
r
d
’s

2
0
1
1

S
r
a
||
V
a
|

S
e
c
r
e
|
|a
||c
|
.
E
/
:
|u
d
e
º

c
||
e
(

C
|
(
]
º
|e
(

0
(
c
u
p

|
|
C

d
e
º
|c
|
e
d

a
|
d
/
c
(

r
a
|
u
|a
:
|u
(
e
d

.
e
|
|:
|e
º
.
¤
B
a
º
e
d

c
|

2
0
1
1

E
|
e
(
0
u
|d
e

|
u
e
|
C
c
|
º
u
r
p
||c
|

0
u
|d
e

(
a
|||
c
º

p
u
o
||º
|
e
d

o
]

\
a
|u
(
a
|
R
e
º
c
u
(
:
e
º

C
a
|
a
d
a
.
T
(
a
|
º
p
c
(
|
C
a
|
a
d
a

|e
º
|
r
e
||
c
d
º

u
º
e
d
.
\
c
u
(

a
:
|u
a
|
|u
e
|
:
c
|
º
u
r
p
||c
|

r
a
]

.
a
(
]
.
T
|
e

B
e
º
|
B
u
]

S
e
a
|


a

(
e
c

|e
(
e
d

|(
a
d
e
r
a
(
|

c
|
C
c
|
º
u
r
e
(
º

O
|c
e
º
|
C
c
r
r
u
|
|:
a
||c
|
º

|
|
C
.
u
º
e
d

u
|
d
e
(

||:
e
|
:
e
.
®
S
|R
|U
S

a
|
d

||
e

d
c
c

|c
c
c

a
(
e

(
e
c

|e
(
e
d

|(
a
d
e
r
a
(
|
º

c
|
S
|R
|U
S

S
a
|e
||||e

R
a
d
|c

||
:
.
®
J
e
e
p



a

(
e
c

|e
(
e
d

|(
a
d
e
r
a
(
|

c
|
C
|
(
]
º
|e
(

0
(
c
u
p

|
|
C
.
C
u
º
|c
r
e
(

C
|
c
|:
e

|
||
a
|
:
||
c



a

|(
a
d
e
r
a
(
|

c
|
C
|
(
]
º
|e
(

0
(
c
u
p

|
|
C
.
S£AN
P£9£
F09 H09£
69£A1 0FF£9S
Þl05 6£t
1P£ uL1IHA1£ V£PI£L£.
F£A1u9IN6 1P£ uL1IHA1£ FAHIL¥ £XÞ£9I£N££ ÞA£kA6£.
£uS10H£9
£P0I££ FINAN£IN6
wlth th£ 0Þtl0N t0 k£t0kN
Aft£k 60 H0Nth5
$
184
th th£ 0Þt
8l-w££kl¥
4.99
%
tt
f0k 60 H0Nth5
AN0 S0 00wN
@
º lndustry-£xclusIve 2nd ruw Super Stuw 'n 6u
=

with une-hand uperatiun
º Air cunditiuning with 1ri-Zune
1emperature £untrul
º 2nd ruw puwer winduws
º ucunnect
1H
vuice cummand with 8luetuuth
=
º SI9IuS
=
Satellite 9adiu (includes une year
uf service)
º 2nd ruw uverhead 9-inch videu screen
º Hedia £entre 430 with 6.5-inch tuuch screen
º 16" aluminum wheels
$
2l,798
º
IN£LuߣS $7,000 £0NSuH£9 £ASP
*
ANß F9£I6P1.
º #2 Selling Vehicle in £anada fur 2011
^

º All-new, 8est-in-£lass
O
Pursepuwer 3.6L Þentastar
1H
VV1 V6 with 283 hp & 36 HÞ6
º All-new Interiur with Þremium Suft-tuuch Haterials
º New Suspensiun & Steering fur better ride, handling and cumfurt
º Pighway: 7.9LJ100 kH (36 HÞ6)
¤

º £ity: 12.2LJ100 kH (23 HÞ6)
¤

P0RLPASL F0R
2011 ßudge 6rand £aravan £rew shuwn.
§
IH£ N£W 2011 ß0ß6£ 6kANß £AkAVAN
£ANAßA VAL0£ ÞA£KA6£
LANAßA'S 8LS1 SLLLIN6 HINIvAN F0R H0RL 1PAN 27 ¥LARS
283RP
8LS1-lN-CLASS
36
7.9L/100 KH RW¥
¤
HPL
RW¥
A vAklA8l£
ÞklH£ kAt£ 0f
3.00
%
z
f0k 84 H0Nth5
AN0 S0 00wN
k£I0kNlN6 L£A5£ £05I0M£k5, 6£I $3,000 L0¥ALI¥ £A5H.
Ľ
ßudge.caJ0hers
09
£P00S£
M0V£ 0Þ 10
1PL 0L1IHA1L FAHIL¥
LXPLRILNLL PALkA6L
ANß RLLLIvL A
101AL 0F
$
8,000
IN ßISL00N1S
*
H09£ Þ0W£9. L£SS Fu£L. 69£A1 VALu£.
Community Calendar
C
ommunity Calendar lists
events inMaple Ridge and
Pitt Meadows. Notices are
free tolocal non-proft groups
courtesy of The News. Dropof
details to22328119Ave., fax to
604-463-4741or e-mail events@
mapleridgenews.comat least a
week before the event. Include a
contact name andnumber. (No
submissions by phone.) Listings
appear as space permits. For guar-
anteedpublication, ask our classi-
feddepartment at 604-467-1122
about non-proft rates.
Wednesday, July 6
• The Maple Ridge Public
Library presents Puppets in
the Park at 6:45 p.m. Come and
meet the library’s smallest stars,
our talented puppets and pup-
peteers who will tell all types of
tales to amuse the whole family.
Pack your dinner and bring it
along to our fabulous evening
of entertainment at Memorial
Peace Park Bandstand. In case
of rain, this program will take
place in the Fraser Room of the
Library. For more information,
please call the Maple Ridge
Public Library at 604-467-7417.
Friday, July 8
• Discover the wonder and
surprises of reading with Read-
ing Magic with Peter Rooke
from 10:30 and 11:15 a.m. at
Memorial Peace Park Bandstand.
This magic show is flled with
tricks involving books and the
importance of reading, and is
flled with plenty of laughs and
lots of audience participation.
For more information, please call
the Maple Ridge Public Library at
604-467-7417.
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 27
TERRYINKLER
Canadian Collectors Roadshow
Staff Writer
After very successful shows in
Penticton and Tsawwassen, The Road-
show is now in Pt. Coquitlam. So you
had better search through your attics and
garages, go through your lock boxes and
jewellery, because you may be sitting
on a small fortune and not even know it!
Roadshow experts are here to examine
all your antiques, collectibles, gold and
silver.
During a show near Toronto, a woman
came in with a jewellery box that she
had just inherited from her late aunt. “I
don’t wear jewellery,” explained Barbara
Engles, “so it was an easy decision to
come down to the Roadshow to sell it”.
She was very excited when she was able
to walk away with a cheque for over
$2,100 for jewellery she was never going
to wear anyway.
Expert Elijah Gold explains, “We have
noticed a substantial increase in the
amount of precious metals such as gold
and silver coming to the Roadshow,
which makes sense considering how
high it’s currently trading at. He added,
“The Roadshow is great because it puts
money in people’s pockets, especially
during such hard times. Lots of items
that are just sitting around collecting dust
in basements and jewellery boxes can be
exchanged for money, on the spot!”
At another Roadshow event, a woman,
named Mira Kovalchek, walked in with
a tin full of hundreds of old coins that
were given to her as a young child by her
grandfather. She Ànally decided to come
in to the Roadshow and see what he
had given her. She was ecstatic to learn
she had coins dating back to the late
1800’s, some of which were extremely
rare. Roadshow consultant Perry Bruce
explains “We had uncovered an 1871
Queen Victoria 50 Cent piece, valued at
over $2,000!! She had a nice assortment
of coins that were not rare dates, but
she was able to sell them for their silver
content”. She explains, “I never would
have thought that my old tin of coins was
worth so much! I can Ànally afford to
renovate my kitchen”. Perry Bruce con-
tinued, “Canadian coins prior to 1967,
and American coins prior to 1964 are all
made with silver, and we have noticed
a large increase of customers coming to
the Roadshow with coins and cashing
them in for their silver value”.
Experts at the Roadshow will evalu-
ate and examine your items, FREE OF
CHARGE, as well as educate you on
them. The Roadshow sees hundreds of
people during a one week event, and
they have been travelling across Canada
to different cities and towns, searching
for your forgotten treasures.
Trains, dolls, toys, old advertising signs,
pocket watches, porcelain and bisque
dolls, pretty much everything can be
sold at the Roadshow. Any early edition
Barbie’s are sought after by the Road-
show collectors, as well as a variety of
Dinky Toys and Matchbox cars. Lionel
Trains and a variety of tin toys can also
fetch a price, especially if they are in
their original box or in mint condition.
If a collector is looking for one of your
collectibles, they can always make an
offer to buy it.
Aman brought in a 1950’s Marx Tin Toy
Robot, in fairly good condition, still in
its original box. They were able to locate
a collector for that speciÀc toy within
minutes, and that gentleman went home
with over $700 for his Toy Robot and a
few other small toys.
So whether you have an old toy car, a
broken gold chain, or a Barbie sitting
in the closet, bring it down to the Road-
show, they will take a look at it for FREE
and it could put money in your pocket!
See you at
the roadshow!
Local Roadshow Expert
Examines Some Gold Jewellery
Roadshow is in Pt. Coquitlam: 4 More Days!
Bring in your old unwanted or
broken jewelry, coins, antiques &
collectibles for cash.
HERE’S HOW
IT WORKS
• Gather all your collectibles
and bring them in
• FREE admission
• Free Appraisal
• NO appointment necessary
• We will make offers on the spot
if there is interest in the item
• Accept the offer & get paid
immediately
• FREE coffee
• Fully heated indoor facility
• FREE Shuttle Service (pickup &
drop-off)
• FREE House Calls
TOP 5 ITEMS TO BRING...
Gold Jewellery, Gold Coins, Silver Coins, Sterling Silver, Collectibles
In Pt. Coquitlam: July 6, 7, 8, 9
POCO Inn & Suites, 1545 Lougheed Hwy., Pt. Coquitlam | 604-941-6216
9am - 6pm (except Saturday, July 9th, 9am-5pm)
• SILVER: Any silver items such as flatware, tea
sets, charm bracelets, jewellery & anything
marked Sterling or 925
• COINS: Any coins before 1967 (Silver Dollars,
Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes,
Nickels, Large Cents and all others) collectible
foreign coins, rare coins & entire collections
• GOLD COINS: All denominations from all parts
of the world including Gold Olympic coins
• INVESTMENT GOLD: Canadian
Maple Leaf, Double Eagle, Gold Bars,
Kruggerands, Pandas, etc
• SCRAP GOLD: All broken gold, used
jewellery, any missing pieces (Earrings,
Charms, gold Links etc), Dental Gold,
Class Rings, Charm Bracelets, etc
• PLATINUM: Jewellery, Dental, Wiring
and anything else made of Platinum
• WAR ITEMS: WWI, WWII, War Medals, Swords,
Daggers, Bayonets, Civil War Memorabilia, etc.
• JEWELLERY: Diamond Rings, Bracelets,
Earrings, loose Diamonds, All Gem Stones etc
• PAPER MONEY: All denominations made before
1930, Confederation bills, Large Bills
• OTHER COLLECTIBLES: Toys, Train Sets,
Dolls, Advertising, Cast Iron Banks, Pottery, etc.
THE ITEMS WE MAKE AN OFFER ON MAY INCLUDE:
GOLD ITEMS OF INTEREST: SCRAP GOLD • GOLD COINS • GOLD OUNCES • GOLD PROOF SETS • DENTAL GOLD
NOT SURE IF IT’S GOLD? Bring it in and one of our experts will be glad to examine it for you!
We represent thousands of collectors who are all looking for a variety of collectibles! We have purchased a wide selection of items for our group of collectors.
The CCG (Canadian Collectors Group) are a private group of collectors who are looking for unique items in a wide variety of categories.
1.877.810.GOLD • COLLECTORSROADSHOW.CA
DON’T MISS OUT
4 M
ore Days!
STORES s FLYERS s DEALS
COUPONS s BROCHURES s CATALOGUES
CONTESTSs PRODUCTS
Save time, save money.
:PV think
ZPVLOPXB
great deal?
1SFQBSFUPCF
TIPDLFE
Visit our other Black Press sites
With a couple of clicks,
add your event today.
there’s more online »
voices
v
www.mapleridgenews.com
Community Calendar
Saturday, July 9
• Maple Ridge’s 11th an-
nual Caribbean Festival
takes place in the downtown
core of Maple Ridge on 224th
Street and the Memorial
Peace Park. The festival will
feature two stages with 15
live bands from the Lower
Mainland’s Caribbean com-
munity entertaining with
Reggae, calypso, salsa, and
soca music. More than 200
entertainers and 60 to 70
street vendors will be taking
part. For more information,
visit www.caribbeanfest.ca.
The festival continues all day
Sunday, July 10.
Sunday, July 10
• Pitt Meadows Farmers
Market has Pirate’s Day
treasure and a map to follow
to the gold. The draw for the
$100 Farmers’ Market Shop-
ping Spree is at noon. There
is still time to sign up. Riosa-
mayo entertains. www.
haneyfarmersmarket.org
28 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com y y
CANADA USA JAPAN AUSTRALIA VENEZUELA
WOMEN’S INTERNATIONAL
CHAMPIONSHIP
CELEBRATE. INSPIRE. YOUTH.
Softball City, Cloverdale Athletic Park and Sunnyside Park,
Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
July 9 - 17, 2011
ELITE YOUTH TOURNAMENTS
Futures (U19), Showcase (16U)
Like us on Facebook:
facebook.com/
CanadianOpenFastpitch
Connect on
Twitter: @CdnOpen
For all your
Canadian Open
news
use your smartphone
to scan this code
peacearchnews.com
Tickets available online at CanadianOpenFastpitch.com
or by calling 604.536.9287
Sat. - Sun. (July 9 - 17) Day Passes Day Pass

Evening Rates

(starting at 5:30 pm)
Adults (ages 20-60) $16.00 $13.00
Seniors (61+) & Students (age 13-19) $13.00 $10.00
Children (age 3-12) $7.00 $5.00
Tournament Passes - Valid anytime
Adults (ages 20-60) $120.00
Seniors (61+) & Students (age 13-19) $100.00
Children (age 3-12) $50.00
Reserved Tournament Pass $220.00
For community news frst, visit
www.mapleridgenews.com
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 29
business PROFILE
ADVERTORIAL
Grand J&K Cabinetry opened in Maple Ridge
in March and is already seeing plenty of interest
in its cabinets and countertops.
Sky Luo, who co-owns the Maple Ridge
location (No. 403 – 20285 Stewart Crescent)
with Ronald Zhang, said the key to the business’
success so far has been satisfied customers.
“We have good references from customers,”
he said.“It’s a lot of word of mouth.”
Luo said the business offers cabinets,
countertops and sinks in a wide variety of
designs.
On the cabinet
front, Grand J&K has
a variety of different
styles that use lots
of different colours,
including a cherry
maple glaze, a honey
maple design, a
mocha maple glaze,
a chocolate maple
glaze and an espresso
maple.
“The door and the
frame is solid wood,”
Luo said.“We supply a
classical style and an
older style.”
The cabinets’ doors and frames are made
of solid wood, with the box constructed of
plywood. Compressed and particle boards
aren’t used.
The cabinets feature a full overlay door,
a raised door panel, concealed hinges and
adjustable shelves. Basic models come with an
undermount glide system and a three-quarters
extension dovetail drawer.
More advanced models use a soft-closing
undermount glide system and a full extension
dovetail drawer. Grand J&K’s sinks are double-
bowl models that can come either with bowls
of equal size or with a larger right or left bowl. It
also sells prefabricated granite and marble.
The Maple Ridge Grand J&K Cabinetry outlet
is a dealer for a larger cabinet company. Its
products and styles can be seen on the parent
company’s website, www.grandjk.com.
Luo said the large amount of information and
photos of the products available on the website
has proven quite helpful to sales.
“The website is perfect,” he said. “The colour
display, it’s perfect.”
Luo said the cabinets are pre-made, so the
business is able to turn orders around very
quickly.
“If someone comes in today, the cabinet
will be in in seven to 10 days,” he said. “With
installation, it can be as quick as two weeks or
20 days.”
Grand J&K
C a b i n e t r y
takes pride in
its installation
expertise, as
pr of es s i onal
i n s t a l l a t i o n
is a key part
of keeping
c u s t o m e r s
satisfied.
“We have a
pr of es s i onal
i n s t a l l a t i o n
team and
an interior
designer,” Luo said. “For the service, we have
good references from customers.”
Grand J&K does cabinets, sinks and
countertops, and Luo said the business has
already seen lots of business from both
commercial and residential customers.
“It’s been very good,” he said.
Potential customers can come into the store
and check out the various designs to see what
might work for them, but Luo recommends
taking measurements ahead of time.
“It’s easier if you have the dimensions before
you come in,” he said.
Despite only being around for a few months,
Grand J&K has already seen plenty of business
and referrals. Luo said the focus for the future is
to keep excelling in all areas of the business and
keep the positive word of mouth spreading.
“We have good prices, good service and good
quality.”
403-20285 Stewart Cr. Maple Ridge B.C.
grandjkcabinetry@gmail.com www.grandjk.com
604.459.1168
Grand J & K Cabinetry Inc.
Stainless Steel Under Mounted Sink .. FREE
with any granite counter top purchase over $3000 before taxes
Handles ............................................................ FREE
with any cabinet purchase over $4000 before taxes. Reg $5.00 each
Granite Counter tops........................starting from
$
45 sq. ft.
Includes delivery & installation
Design and Job site Measurements FREE
Hours:
Monday to Saturday
10:00am to 4:30pm
*Not including labour
*
Building? Renovating?
CALL FOR AN IN-HOME CONSULTATION.
Lougheed
H
w
y
113 B AAA
2
0
3
S
t
Stew
a
r
t
C
r
e
s
G
o
ld
e
nn
EEE
a
r
s
W
a
y
Av AA e vv
e
s
• Tree Removals • Pruning • Stump Grinding
• Retopping • Hedge Trimming • Strata Work
Residential and Commercial • Insurance Claims
24 Hour Emergency
|
Storm Service
Fully Insured
|
WCB
604-618-0333
email scott@urbanlumberjack.ca
F
r
e
e

E
s
t
i
m
a
t
e
s
• ISA Certified Arborist
• Certified Tree Risk Assessor
• Arborist Reports
OnStaff Scott McConkey
PN-6085A
+++++++++++
FABRICS
++++++++
22255 Dewdney Trunk Rd., Maple Ridge (in Haney Plaza)
604.477.0910
Save ti me, money and
the drive. SHOP LOCAL
R
i
c
h
i
l
a
Ask us about
sewing classes
starting
September
NEW
ARRIVALS
Now in
Great Selection
for your Summer
projects B
B
B
BOOK YOUR 2011 SUMMER GOLF TOURNAMENT BOOK YOUR 2011 SUMMER GOLF TOURNAME
Golf Season

in
Full Swing
NT NT
21770 Ladner Rd, Pitt Meadows 604.460.1111
www.goldeneaglegolfclub.com
2011 SEASON RATES
Regular $39 $49
1st Twilight
2pm -5pm
$29 $39
2nd Twilight
5pm- dark
$19 $29
Senior $29
Junior 13-19 $19 $29
Little Jr.
12 & under
pay their age
Powercarts reg $35 $35
Mon - Fri
Sat - Sun
& Holidays
is
Every
TUESDAY
9 holes
$
44 incl tax
18 holes
$
50 incl tax
Golf • Buffet Dinner • Prizes
LADIES’ NIGHT
9 holes
$
45 incl tax
18 holes
$
54 incl tax
Every
THURSDAY
Golf • Buffet Dinner • Prizes
MENS’ NIGHT
Visit us for quality in price,
service and product.
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- 31
“Making these adjustments will be good
for businesses in B.C., and good for the
health and long-term independence of all
customers.”
The province has made a number of
commitments to seniors in the past
week.
Last week, Premier Christy Clark an-
nounced $3.5 million to support an inno-
vative project at the University of Victo-
ria that will help seniors and people with
disabilities remain as independent as
possible while still living at home.
The province also unveiled a suite of
multimedia training resources that will
support physicians and other health pro-
fessionals to educate seniors in ways to
prevent falls and stay healthy.
Every year, the province publishes the
easy-to-read B.C. Seniors’ Guide, con-
taining information on a range of topics
including transportation options, hous-
ing, health services and healthy living. It
is also available in Chinese, Punjabi and
French translations and includes tele-
phone numbers and website information
for frequently used resources.
• Creating an Age-friendly Business in
B.C. can be accessed through any B.C.
Chamber of Commerce or online at http://
bit.ly/iw48IE.
The B.C. Seniors’ Guide can be accessed
at www.gov.bc.ca/seniors/guide.
Seniority
Business guide available online
Business from p30
Seniors Calendar
• Award-winning local historian Fred Braches
will be at the Maple Ridge Public Library Saturday, July
16 at 1 p.m. for a fascinating presentation of Slumach
and the Pitt Lake Gold Mine. Braches will talk about the
history and legends surrounding Slumach and the Lost
Mine, as well as discuss the current eforts used to fnd
it using new discoveries from historic records. For more
information, please call the Maple Ridge Public Library
at 604-467-7417.
• I Love To Dance returns to the Ridge Meadows
Seniors’ Activity Centre Saturday, July 23. This month’s
event features a West Coast swing lesson from 7 to 8
p.m. tickets are $20, and includes food and refresh-
ments. Singles welcome. For more information, visit
www.ilovetodance.ca or call Ray at 604-836-7295
• Pitt Meadows Secondary School hosts it 50th
birthday open house on Sept. 30. If you graduated from
the school or have a child who attends or has graduated
from PMSS, contact Gerri (Laseur) Willms (PMSS grad
1969) at 604-465-7141, ext. 265 or email gwillms@
sd42.ca.
• The Ridge Meadows Seniors’ Society hosts
a seniors’ lounge at the Pitt Meadows Recreation
Centre, 12027 Harris Rd. Open Monday to Friday, from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come by for tea, cofee and lively
conversation. Memberships also available. More info at
604-465-2478.
• Ridge Meadows Hospice Society is hosting Meat
Draws at the Jolly Coachman Pub, 19167 Ford Road, Pitt
Meadows, every Saturday. Draw times at 4:30 p.m. and
5:30 p.m. All proceeds go to support the Hospice society
programs.
• Do you play music or love to listen? Come to
Kanaka Cofee’s open mic/stage night, an acoustic
evening, open to musicians and audience alike every
Wednesday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Kanaka Creek Cofee
is located at No. 101-24155 102nd Avenue (Turn left at
Lougheed and 240th and then right at 102nd).
22141-119th Avenue
mapleridgeseniorsvillage.com
Maple Ridge Seniors Village offers
a complete “Campus of Care”,
Ask about our Trial Stay
We’re turning 2!
Please join us on Saturday, July 9th
for our Birthday Celebration 2 - 4 pm
Call Jane to schedule your personal visit 604.764.8877
Do you know someone
who needs our help?
Let’s talk about how we can help.
Call 604-468-2273 today for a
free in-home consultation.
Making Lives Better One Visit at a Time

nursenextdoor.com
Nurse Next Door delivers peace of mind with
home care customized especially for you...
Our clients tell us
it is our Caregivers’
genuine compassion
and professionalism
that makes us stand
apart - and helps them
live independently
and with dignity in the
comfort of their own
home. Whether it is
the house you have
lived in for years, or an
independent or assisted
living facility...it’s home
- and we are here to
provide as much, or as
little care as you need.
Home Management • Personal Care • Companionship
Nursing Care • Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care
Live-in Care • End-of-life Care
Walter Used To Eat Frozen
Dinners Alone
Now he enjoys a varied menu and great company
Willow now offers Independent Living,
Assisted Living Plus & Complex Care.
All inclusive pricing starting at $1900.00
PROMO
SPECIAL
Suites Staring at
$
1,900.00
12275 - 224th St. Maple Ridge BC
Call 604-466-8602
Visit us online at www.chartwellreit.ca
At Chartwell, the chef changes the menu daily, so Walter not only
gets to choose from a variety of balanced meals, but he enjoys
them with a side dish of laughter and conversation.
CALL TO
BOOK YOUR
VISIT TODAY!
A32 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
604-722-2410
Little Explorers Preschool
“Where Children Can Learn By Exploring”
NOW ACCEPTING
REGISTRATION
FOR SEPT. 2011
LIMITED SPACE
AVAILABLE
12145 Laity St. St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
Little Explorers Preschool
• Educational & Nurturing Environment
• Qualified Early Childhood, Montessori
and Special Needs Educators
• Ages 2-1/2 to 5 years
NEW LOCATION!
www.blackpress.ca
The Morning Star in Vernon, B.C. has an opening for the
position of Publisher.
The Morning Star, one of Canada’s leading community
newspapers, is published every Wednesday, Friday and
Sunday and has an extensive distribution network
throughout the North Okanagan. More than 33,000
homes and businesses are reached in the communities
of Vernon, Coldstream, Armstrong, Enderby, Lumby,
Cherryville, Oyama, Spallumcheen, Grindrod, Falkland
and Silver Star.
The Morning Star is the No.1 news source in the
North Okanagan and has been committed to serving
its communities with in-depth local news, sports,
entertainment, events and happenings since 1988.
The Morning Star is part of Black Press, Canada’s
largest private, independent newspaper company, with
over 150 community, daily and urban newspapers
located in BC, Alberta, Washington State, Ohio and
Hawaii.
Black Press is seeking a proven leader with an
impressive track record in newspaper management, to
build on the considerable growth the Morning Star has
experienced over the past 23 years.
Ideally, you should have a good understanding of all
facets of newspaper operations with emphasis on sales,
marketing and financial management. As publisher,
you will be instrumental in developing a multi platform
strategy for the newspaper and its online initiatives, as
it continues to serve a rapidly expanding and diverse
marketplace.
If you are a critical thinker, customer driven and
possess strong entrepreneurial skills, Black Press wants
to hear from you. Please send your resume by July 22,
2011 to:
Bruce McAuliffe, President
Black Press BC South
c/o Kelowna Capital News
2495 Enterprise Way, Kelowna, B.C. V1X 7K2
Email: brucem@blackpress.ca
Publisher
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
2 BIRTHS
Gabriella Grace Vero
Big sister Alyson is proud to
announce the safe arrival of
her baby sister, Gabriella
Grace, born May 15th, 2011
at 8:36am weighing 6lbs
10oz. Proud parents: Daniel
and Robyn Vero. Grandpar-
ents: Rick & Brenda
Schmidt, Peter & Yolanda
Vero. Great Grandmothers:
Norah Gallagher, Anne
Schmidt & Giuseppina Nardi.
Aunts and Uncles: Rich &
Sarah Lovett, Joseph &
Jessica Vero, Ryan Schmidt,
Cristina, Adriana, Matthew
Vero, Cousins: Zachary,
Jackson, & Maddox Lovett.
Thank you to all the wonder-
ful doctors and nurses at BC
Women’s Hospital and a
special thank you to every-
one for all your love, support
and especially your prayers.
xoxo
4 FUNERAL HOMES
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
5 IN MEMORIAM
In Loving Memory of
Bob & Barb Swanson
July 7 & Sept 5, 2010
As we loved you,
so we miss you;
In our memory you are near.
Loved, remembered,
longed for always,
Bringing many a silent tear.
Miss & Love you forever
Helen & family
7 OBITUARIES
BRECH – Gertrud (Oma)
Born in Speyer, Germany on
June 28, 1919. Passed away
three days after her 92nd
birthday on July 1, 2011.
Survived and much loved by
her family; son, Gunther
(Jacqueline), grand-daughters,
Susan (Simon) Hall and
Debbie (Murray) Davisson;
great-grandchildren, Michael,
Amy and Nicholas Hall; great-
granddoggies, Sadie, Ally and
Bobby. Will be dearly missed
by her sister-in-law, Lienchen
Holdermann of Speyer. A sin-
cere and heart-felt “Danke
schon” to Dr. Milewski for the
many years of thoughtful care.
Many thanks also to the com-
passionate staff at McKinney
Creek Hospice and Ridge
Meadows PATH unit. In lieu
of flowers, donations to McKin-
ney Creek Hospice appreciat-
ed. Funeral Service Saturday,
July 9th at 3:30pm at Maple
Ridge Funeral Chapel, 11969
– 216th St. We take comfort
knowing that Oma is reunited
with Opa in heaven; some-
thing Oma was looking for-
ward to for many years now.
Condolences may be sent to
www.mapleridgefuneral.ca
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS
7 OBITUARIES
SHARPE,
George James (Jack)
Jan 15, 1923 - June 30, 2011
It is with great sadness that we
announce the passing of Jack
Sharpe, of one of the founding
families of Pitt Meadows, after
a lengthy illness. He was pre-
deceased by his loving wife,
Lane and granddaughter,
Melissa. Jack is survived by
daughters Susan, Debbie,
Holly, their partners, 7 grand-
children, and 10 great grand-
children. Jack was a dispatch
rider in WWII and shared
many stories of his adven-
tures. He was a proud mem-
ber of RCL-Branch 88. Jack
worked for Fraser River Pile
Driving. This job took him up
and down the B.C. coast and
he made many friends along
the way. Jack enjoyed his
1928 and 1931 Model A
Fords, and was a Life Member
of Totem A & T Car Club. He
was an avid fisherman, hunter,
and cribbage player.
A sincere thank you to Dr.
Surgenor, Dr. Evans, the nurs-
ing staff at Ridge Meadows
Hospital, his Access helpers,
the Jolly Coachmen Girls, and
his many friends and family. A
Memorial Service will be held
on Saturday, July 9th, 2011 at
10:00am at the Maple Ridge
Legion. Flowers are gratefully
declined. Donations may be
made in Jack’s name to a
charity of your choice.
Tight Lines, Dad!
Poor Canada
Expressions of sympathy can
be made at www.gardenhill.ca
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS
21 COMING EVENTS
MEDICAL MARIJUANA
Seminar , Vancouver July 30th
& 31st at UBC. Tickets at
www.greenlineacademy.com
WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE!!!
Win prizes and cash$$ 80 people
wanted to join a 12-week weight
loss challenge. Meetings once a
week. $35.00 entry fee. Call Mark
or Jane at 604-467-2362 or see us
at our kiosk at Haney Place Mall
July 9/10 for details and FREE
samples!!
041 PERSONALS
DATING SERVICE. Long-
Term/Short-Term Relationships,
Free to Try!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live
intimate conversation, Call: #4011
or 1-888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1
Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #4010.
Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-
804-5381. (18+).
TRAVEL
74 TIMESHARE
CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE No
Risk Program. STOP Mortgage &
Maintenance Payments Today.
100% Money Back Guarantee. Free
Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can
Help! 1-888-356-5248
SELL/RENT YOUR TIMESHARE
FOR CASH!!! Our Guaranteed Ser-
vices will Sell/ Rent Your Unused
Timeshare for CASH! Over $95 Mil-
lion Dollars offered in 2010!
www.BuyATimeshare.com 888-
879-7165
75 TRAVEL
Sunny Summer Specials At Flori-
da’s Best Beach-New Smyrna
Beach Stay a week or longer Plan a
beach wedding or family reunion.
www.NSBFLA.com or 1-800-541-
9621
CHILDREN
PUDDLE D (Duck)
Children’s Ctr
Preschool
Daycare 2
1/2
to 5 years
Before &/or After school care
K ~ 12 years
Davie Jones
Edith McDermott
Highland Park
Pitt Meadows
Programs included:
Arts, Science, Music,
Math, Dramatic Play & Sports
Fully licensed,
Qualified E.C.E.
Caregivers & Teachers
Close to major route
604.465.9822
98 PRE-SCHOOLS
CHECK CLASSIFIEDS
bcclassified.com
604-575-5555

CHILDREN
98 PRE-SCHOOLS
MONTESSORI
HEADSTART PRESCHOOL
~ 2 1/2 to 5 years ~
Would you like your child to
develop good reading,
pre-reading & number skills, high
self esteem, great socialization
skills, a LOVE of LEARNING?
Small groups NURTURE your
child’s UNIQUE needs
W Professional staff W Affordable
W AM spaces available
Register now for September
Call BETTY (604)467-3204
21882 124th Ave.
www.montessoriheadstart.com
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
COKE & CANDY Vending Route.
Local Hi-Traffic Locations. Earn
$40+ per year. Fast & Safe Invest-
ment Return. Secure Your Future-
Be the Boss! Factory Direct Pricing
1-888-570-0892 Must Sell
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
108 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
GET PAID DAILY! NOW ACCEPT-
ING: Simple P/T & F/T Online Com-
puter Related Work & Paid Surveys
is available. No fees or charges to
participate. Start Today,
www.BCWOC.com
Make $$$ being your own boss! No
Experience Necessary. 100’s of
Business and Franchise Opportu-
nities. LOW cost! FREE informa-
tion! Visit www.franchiseex-
po.com/123
109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Start Losing Weight Tomorrow!
The # 1 weight loss product
in the world is now available
in Canada. Easy to do, no
exercise necessary. Amazing
taste. Start seeing results right
away. 100 % money back guar-
antee. Also promotes lean
muscle development and opti-
mum nutrition. Everything your
body needs is in here.
www.lightweight.bodybyvi.com
or call 778-887-5610
for FREE sample.
TRAVEL with bcclassified.com
604 575 5555
604.575.5555
fax 604.575.2073 email ads@bcclassified.com
I=:C:LH
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978
Your community. Your classifieds.
INDEX IN BRIEF
AGREEMENT
It is agreed by any Display or
Classified Advertiser requesting space
that the liability of the paper in the
event of failure to publish an adver-
tisement shall be limited to the
amount paid by the advertiser for that
portion of the advertising space
occupied by the incorrect item only,
and that there shall be no liability in
any event beyond the amount paid for
such advertisement. The publisher
shall not be liable for slight changes
or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value of an advertisement.
bcclassified.com cannot be
responsible for errors after the first
day of publication of any advertise-
ment. Notice of errors on the first day
should immediately be called to the
attention of the Classified Department
to be corrected for the following edi-
tion.
bcclassified.com reserves the
right to revise, edit, classify or reject
any advertisment and to retain any
answers directed to the
bcclassified.com Box Reply Service
and to repay the customer the sum
paid for the advertisment and box
rental.
DISCRIMINATORY
LEGISLATION
Advertisers are reminded that
Provincial legislation forbids the pub-
lication of any advertisement which
discriminates against any person
because of race, religion, sex, color,
nationality, ancestry or place of origin,
or age, unless the condition is justified
by a bona fide requirement for the
work involved.
COPYRIGHT
Copyright and/or properties subsist in
all advertisements and in all other
material appearing in this edition of
bcclassified.com. Permission
to reproduce wholly or in part and in
any form whatsoever, particularly by a
photographic or offset process in a
publication must be obtained in writ-
ing from the publisher. Any unautho-
rized reproduction will be subject to
recourse in law.
Advertise across the
lower mainland in
the 17 best-read
community
newspapers.
ON THE WEB:
FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . . . . . . 1-8
COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS . . . . 9-57
TRAVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-76
CHILDREN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80-98
EMPLOYMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102-198
BUSINESS SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . 203-387
PETS & LIVESTOCK . . . . . . . . . . . 453-483
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE . . . . . . 503-587
REAL ESTATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-696
RENTALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 703-757
AUTOMOTIVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 804-862
MARINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 903-920
Advertise across the
Lower Mainland in
the 18 best-read
community
newspapers and
5 dailies.
Advertise across the
Lower Mainland in
the 18 best-read
community
newspapers and
3 dailies.
ON THE WEB:
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- A33
Opportunity for outstanding
Disability Claims
Coordinator
Black Press is looking for a Disability Claims
Coordinator, to be located in our central
compensation office in Abbotsford. Black Press is
Canada’s largest independent newspaper group with
more than 150 community, Daily and urban weekly
newspapers in B.C., Alberta, Washington State,
Hawaii and Ohio.
Reporting to the Director, Human Resources, you
will be responsible for the coordination of non-
occupational and workers’ compensation claims for
our Canadian Division.
Summary:
The Disability Claims Coordinator will be responsible
for the management of ill/injured employee claims
focusing on the development and implementation of
proactive stay at/return to work plans. The successful
applicant will work directly with insurance companies,
third party adjudicators, medical professionals and
internal stakeholders to ensure all documentation is
received and processed in a timely manner.
Requirements:
• Post-secondary certification in disability claims
management and a minimum 3 years direct
experience administering the disability management
process. Equivalent combinations of specialized
education and experience will be considered.
• Must be thoroughly familiar with laws, regulations,
and guidelines governing disability management.
• Good working knowledge of workers’ compensation
regulations and practices, occupational health and
safety and employment legislation.
• Experience implementing and promoting safe
work practices and policies within a manufacturing
environment is considered a strong asset.
• A well-defined sense of diplomacy, including
solid negotiation, conflict resolution, and people
management skills.
• Computer literacy, including effective working skills
of MS Word, Excel and e-mail required.
• Excellent teamwork and team building skills.
• High degree of resourcefulness, flexibility, and
adaptability.
• Able to effectively communicate both verbally and
in writing.
• High level of critical and logical thinking, analysis,
and/or reasoning to identify underlying principles,
reasons, or facts.
• Proven ability to maintain confidences and ensure
confidentiality of information and records.
This is a full-time position with a competitive
compensation and benefits package. Qualified
applicants should send a resume and covering letter
before July 7, 2011 to:
Robin Clarke
Director, Human Resources
Black Press Group Ltd.
34375 Gladys Avenue,
Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 2H5
E-mail: rclarke@blackpress.ca
We thank all those who are interested in this position; however only
those selected for an interview will be contacted.
www.blackpress.ca > www.bclocalnews.com Division of Black Press
The Langley Times is looking for an outstanding
Graphic Designer, to work on-call.
The successful applicant will be a creative and
highly-motivated team-player, able to work
independently and effectively within deadlines.
A comprehensive working knowledge is required
of CS3 on Mac OS X.
If you’d like to be part of a great company, please
send a resume with a portfolio showcasing your
talent to:
Millie McKinnon
Manager, Creative Services
The Langley Times
20258 Fraser Highway
Langley, BC V3A 4R3
or email to: millie@langleytimes.com
Closing date: Friday, July 15, 2011
No phone calls please.
Opportunity for an outstanding
Graphic Designer
www.blackpress.ca
Black Press is Canada’s largest independent newspaper group with more
than 150 community, daily and urban weekly newspapers located in BC,
Alberta, Washington State, Ohio and Hawaii.
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
114 DRIVERS/COURIER/
TRUCKING
CLASS 1 AND 3 DRIVERS. Day
and hourly rates. Work in Rocky
Mountain House area. Current oil-
field tickets. Fax resume 403-845-
3903.
CLASS 1 DRIVERS & O/O req w/
flatdeck exp. for Canada/USA and
Canada only. Exc pay & benefits.
Fax resume & abstract to 604-594-
8565 or email lpsvad@hotmail.com
DRIVERS
NEEDED
Busy local Messenger Co. has
immediate openings for drivers
with own vehicle: hatchback or
minivan preferred.
Call Mike 604-276-9732
109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
114 DRIVERS/COURIER/
TRUCKING
HUDD Transportation, a division
of Damco Distribution Canada,
Inc. is looking for experienced,
full time company drivers.
• Local, lower mainland
routes/various shifts
• Clean drivers abstract with
minimum 2 years class 1
driving experience
• Multi combination equipment
experience preferred (but not
mandatory)
• Excellent wages and benefits
starting at $20.55 + shift
differential + special equip-
ment certification bonus
Damco is a global company
delivering innovative logistics.
Fax your resume and Driver’s
abstract (N and P print) to
604-940-9319.
109 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
115 EDUCATION
AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for
high paying Aviation Maintenance
Career. FAA approved program. Fi-
nancial aid if qualified- Housing
available. CALL Aviation Institute of
Maintenance (877)818-0783
DGS CANADA
2 DAY
FORKLIFT
WEEKEND
COURSE
Every Saturday at 8:30am
#215, 19358-96 Ave. Surrey
NO reservations: 604-888-3008
www.dgscanada.ca
Ask about our other Courses...
*Stand up Reach *Fall Protection
*Aerial Lift *RoughTerrain Forklift
*Bobcat *WHMIS & much more.
“Preferred by Employers
OPTICIAN TRAINING
*6 - month
course starts
Sept.12, 2011
BC College Of Optics
604.581.0101
www.bccollegeofoptics.ca
TRAIN TO BE AN Apartment/Con-
dominium Manager at home! We
have jobs across Canada. Thou-
sands of graduates working. 31
years of success! Government cer-
tified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-665-
8339, 604-681-5456.
125 FOSTER/SOCIAL CARE
Some great kids aged 12 to 18
who need a stable, caring home
for a few months. Are you
looking for the opportunity to do
meaningful, fulfilling work?
PLEA Community Services is
looking for qualified applicants
who can provide care for youth in
their home on a full-time basis or
on weekends for respite.
Training, support and
remuneration are provided.
Funding is available for
modifications to better equip your
home. A child at risk is waiting
for an open door.
Make it yours.
Call 604-708-2628
www.plea.bc.ca
127 HAIRCARE
PROFESSIONALS
DYE TO BE DIFFERENT
Chair rental available
Starts @ $500. 604-375-3219
130 HELP WANTED
FLAGGERS NEEDED
If not certified, training available for
a fee. Call 604-575-3944
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
CARRIERS NEEDED
The following routes are now
available to deliver the NEWS
in Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows
40109 - Lougheed Hwy, Harrison
St, Olund Cres, Gillis Pl,
113 Ave
40113 - Lougheed Hwy, River
Rd, Carshill St, 221 St,
Cliff Ave
40219 - 122A Ave, 121A Ave,
Apple Grove, Dewdney
Trunk, Cherrywood Dr,
230 St
40223 - Eagle Ave, 122 Ave,
121A Ave, Peach Tree
Crt, 231 St, Blossom St
40369 - 122 Ave, 121B Ave,
Dewdney Trunk Rd,
230 St
40370 - Davenport Dr, 201 St,
McIvor Ave, 202 St, 203
St, Chatwin Ave, 123 Ave
40373 - Lindsay Ave, 121 Ave,
Makinson St, Lindsay Pl,
Irving St
40375 - 122B Ave, 122 Ave,
Tyner Ave, 205B St,
206 St
40377 - Powell Ave, 125 Ave,
124 Ave, 203 St, 202B St,
202A St
40378 - Brooks Ave, Powell Ave,
204 St, 205 St
40384 - 125 Ave, Meadow Pl,
124 Ave, Blanshard St,
209 St
40432 - Docksteader Circ,
Docksteader Loop,
Foreman Dr, 229 St,
229B St, 230 St,
139A Ave
41004 - Oak Terr, Park Rd,
Bonson Rd
41021 - Davison Rd, 192A St,
193B St, 194 St
If you live on or near one of
these routes and you are
interested in delivering papers
please call circulation @
604-466-6397 and quote
the Route number.
FULL TIME Green House workers
$10/hour. Apply in person 13460
Rippington Rd., Pitt Meadows.
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
130 HELP WANTED
Holbrook Dyson Logging Ltd
Has vacancies in the following
jobs: 1)Heavy Duty Mechanic.
2)Driller Blaster Details can be
seen at http://hdlogging.com/
Fax resume to 250-287-9259
139 MEDICAL/DENTAL
Meadow Ridge Dental Centre
requires an experienced
part-time CDA.
Please fax resume to
604-467-6231
or drop at 11934 207
th
St
in Maple Ridge
MODEL/TALENT AGENCIES
MOVIE EXTRAS !
WWW.CASTINGROOM.COM
Register Now for upcoming
Film Season!!!
All Ages, All Ethnicities
CALL 604-558-2278
156 SALES
TOM Harris Cellular is looking for
Wireless Sales Professionals in
Surrey, White Rock, Abbotsford,
and Chilliwack. If you want to work
for Telus’ premier wireless dealer,
apply to hr@tomharris.com.
157 SALES - INSIDE
TELEMARKETING
Show Home HOSTESS
Needed for The Pointe Project in
Maple Ridge. Must be outgoing,
positive, a quick learner and a
team player. Real Estate Sales
experience a must. P/T hours.
Must be available weekends. Pay
commensurate on experience.
Email to:
vicky@concordiahomes.ca
SECURITY GUARD TRAINING
Classes in Abbotsford.
604-870-4731 First Career Institute
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL
Carpenters & Carpenters Helpers
needed. Must have own transporta-
tion. (604) 819-8167 (Chilliwack).
DIAMOND Drillers Wanted. We are
currently looking for Sr. Drillers to
provide services for our Sr. Clients
programs in Gold, Zinc, Coal, and
Copper drilling projects. Projects
will be located near towns in the
South and Interior of BC. Clean
Safety and Performance references
are mandatory. Apply via Fax at
250-314-4865, Email at ad-
min@scsdrilling.com or by phone at
250-572-2614.
E CONSTRUCTION Ltd. is one of
Western Canada’s largest PAVING
CONTRACTORS. Currently seek-
ing EXPERIENCED FINISH GRAD-
ER OPERATORS for Ft. McMurray.
Competitive Wages, Medical and
Dental Benefits, Employer matched
Pension Plan. Email Human Re-
sources at hrecltd.ca OR FAX: 780-
743-5946. www.ecltd.ca
EDMONTON STEEL FABRICA-
TION shop requires STRUCTURAL
STEEL FITTERS, up to
$32.72/hour; CWB FCAW WELD-
ERS, to $31.68/hour. Overtime,
benefits, relocation/accommodation
assistance. Resume: Fax: 780-939-
2181 or Email: careers@gar-
weld.com.
LEAD ROOF TECHNICIAN
$28.00 - $38.00 per hour based
on experience. Commercial roof-
ing co. hiring lead roofers with
extensive exp. in commercial
roofing, including: two - ply torch,
single ply, sloped and metal.
Offering Great Benefits
Including: Company Vehicle,
Paid Travel, Support Crews,
Top Wages, Health/Dental,
Pension & Company Uniforms.
Must have proven ability to install
using RCABC roofing practices
and follow WCB regulations.
Fax resume: 604-944-2916, Call
Adam: 604-944-2977 or e-mail
aknipfel@designroofing.ca
Visit: www.designroofing.ca
LOUISIANA-PACIFIC Canada Ltd.
requires an experienced Jour- ney-
man Electrician for our EWP Opera-
tion in Golden B.C. Email resume
to: Audra.Stanton@LPCorp.com or
fax to 250-344-8859.
PAINTING Labourers for Port
Moody project. Own transportation
a must. Call Roger 604-314-3256
EMPLOYMENT/EDUCATION
160 TRADES, TECHNICAL
Multiple Positions
Due to continuous growth,
Knelson is once again looking for
talented tradesmen to add to our
production team on a full time
basis for both day and afternoon
shifts.
Fabricators/Welders
3 years fabricating experience in
steel manufacturing environment.
3-5 years welding experience.
Proficient in stainless steel, mild
steel, and aluminum. $23-$31/hr.
Fabricators - Material Prep
3 years fabricating experience in
steel manufacturing environment.
Experience in brake press, rolls,
punches, saws, and burn table.
$23-$31/hr.
Machinists
Minimum 4th year apprentice or
journeyman. Experience in steel
manufacturing environment. Ex-
perience in manual operation of a
lathe, vertical boring mill, horizon-
tal milling machine, and radial
arm drill. No CNC required.
$23-$31/hr.
Assembly Technician
Minimum 3rd year apprentice or
Millwright certification. 3 years
experience in a manufacturing
environment, Precision and
attention to detail is imperative for
run-up tests and quality control.
Self-starter with ability to use own
judgment, effective communica-
tion, and problem solving skills on
a daily basis. Must be able to
multi-task and understand the
pressures of manufacturing
timelines. $23-$30/hr.

All successful candidates must
be able to read blueprints, have a
personal drive to succeed, and
work well in a team. Preference
will be given to journeymen and
ticketed applicants.
Compensation depending on
tickets and experience, includes
competitive benefit package with
RRSP match program and
profit sharing.
Explore this opportunity by
submitting your resume to
careers@knelson.com
Attn: Production Manager.
STORES MANAGER
Torbram Electric Supply is an
international family owned electri-
cal distributor with 71 branches in
Canada, 9 in the lower mainland.
Due to an internal promotion our
Langley branch has an opening
for the prestigious position of
Stores Manager. This position
brings with it training for Branch
Manager and beyond!
The ideal candidate will …
-have an attitude for winning, for
solving problems, and be ready
to be challenged.
-be able to multi - task, be an
excellent communicator,
-have experience in the electrical
field, in managing people and
controlling inventory.
Please submit your resume in
confidence to Eldon Friesen at
efriesen@torbramelectric.com
or via fax to 604-539-9338
TECHS LIVE Large in Western
Canada! Go Auto has 23 dealer-
ships/18 brands. Journeymen can
earn $120K+. Specialists can earn
$150K+. Full benefits. Investment
Program. Moving/training/tool allow-
ances. Apply now! careers@goau-
to.ca or www.goauto.ca.
TIRE TECHNICIAN
Required. Experienced
in medium truck and
agricultural tire repair.
Call Larry or Jason
604-826-9119
or email:
sympaper@telus.net
PERSONAL SERVICES
171 ALTERNATIVE HEALTH
# 101-1125 Nicola Avenue
Port Coq. (behind COSTCO)
604-468-8889
candymassage.blogspot.com/
PERSONAL SERVICES
171 ALTERNATIVE HEALTH
604-460-8058
#7 - 20306
Dewdney Trunk, M. Ridge
Corner Max Gas Station
JASMINES RELAXATION TOUCH
Pain/ Stress Relief. Country Setting
*Easy Prkg *7Days. 778-888-3866
173A COUNSELLING
DO you have a problem with
alcohol or drugs?
Call Alouette Addiction
Services at (604)467-5179
Check our website
www.alouetteaddictions.org
173E HEALTH PRODUCTS
Bergamonte- The Natural Way To
Improve Your Glucose, Cholesterol
& Cardiovascular Health! Call today
to find out how to get a free bottle
with your order.! 888-470-5390
182 FINANCIAL SERVICES
GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad cred-
it? Bills? Unemployed? Need Mon-
ey? We Lend! If you own your own
home - you qualify. Pioneer Accep-
tance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-
987-1420.
www.pioneerwest.com
IF YOU own a home or real estate,
ALPINE CREDITS will lend you
money: It’s That Simple. Your Cred-
it / Age / Income is NOT an issue.
1.800.587.2161.
MoneyProvider.com. $500 Loan
and +. No Credit Refused. Fast,
Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-
1660.
NEED CASH TODAY?
✓ Do you Own a Car?
✓ Borrow up to $20000.00
✓ No Credit Checks!
✓ Cash same day, local office
www.REALCARCASH.com
604-777-5046
.Own a home? Need Money? Origin Home Financial Partners
188 LEGAL SERVICES
DENIED CANADA PENSION plan
disability benefits? The Disability
Claims Advocacy Clinic can help.
Call Allison Schmidt at 1-877-793-
3222. www.dcac.ca
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
203
ACCOUNTING/TAX/
BOOKKEEPING
.Sigma Solutions
236 CLEANING SERVICES
3 Ladies Maid Service
Fast and Reliable. $25/hr.
778-318-4716
“AN EXTRA HAND” Exp. Hardwork-
ing, reliable cleaning lady. Rea-
sonable rates Louise 604.467.3665
CLEANING SPECIAL
$25/hour minimum 2hrs.
Price includes cleaning supplies.
Also laminate flooring and paint
specials. Free estimates.
A-TECH Services at 604-230-3539
242 CONCRETE & PLACING
HERFORT CONCRETE
NO JOB TOO SMALL
Serving Lower Mainland 23 Years!
*Prepare *Form *Place *Finish
*Retaining Walls *Stairs *Driveways
Exposed Aggregate & Stamped
Concrete ***ALSO...
Interlocking Bricks &Sod Placement
-Excellent Ref’s -WCB Insured
LEO: Mobile #657-2375, 462-8620
UNIQUE CONCRETE
DESIGN
F All types of concrete work F
F Re & Re F Forming F Site prep
FDriveways FExposed FStamped
F Bobcat Work F WCB Insured
778-231-9675, 778-231-9147
FREE ESTIMATES
A34 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
257 DRYWALL
45 Years in the drywall trade. All
size jobs boarding, taping, spraying.
Big or small. Wayne 778-242-2060
Ceiling Restoration: taping & board-
ing, respray, repaint, trowel over.
30 yrs exp. Del 604-505-3826
Ceiling Restoration: taping & board-
ing, respray, repaint, trowel over.
30 yrs exp. Del 604-505-3826
260 ELECTRICAL
104607
Big Mountain Electric
Bonded, experienced
Friendly service
Reasonable price
No job too small
Reno’s/Additions
778-892-4299
DC ELECTRIC (#37544). Bonded.
24 hr service. We specialize in jobs
too small for the big guys! 30 yrs
exp. Free est. 460-8867.
REISINGER Electrical (#102055)
Bonded, Specializing in Renos,
New Const, (Comm./Res.)Free Est
25 Yrs Exp. 778.885.7074 Trent
YOUR ELECTRICIAN $29 Service
Call Lic #89402 Same day guarn’td
We love small jobs! 604-568-1899
263 EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE
A-1
EXCAVATING
Specializing in
drain tile,
old & new.
Excavations &
Demolitions.
Bobcats &
Excavators
all sizes.
Site Servicing &
Site Preparation.
(604)465-4718
269 FENCING
FENCE-IT-RIGHT Installations --
604.639.6626 Cedar, Chain Link,
Ornamental iron, Vinyl (Insured,
Experienced, Competitive Pricing)
275 FLOOR REFINISHING/
INSTALLATIONS
Ceramic Tiles, Hardwood Laminate
Guaranteed work, Free Estimate.
Cell 604-618-6401 Marcel.
281 GARDENING
Prompt Delivery Available
Seven Days a Week
Meadows Landscape
Supply Ltd.
✶ Bark Mulch
✶ Lawn & Garden Soil
✶ Drain Grave Lava Rock
✶ River Rock ✶Pea Gravel
(604)465-1311
meadowslandscapesupply.com
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
281 GARDENING
283 GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS
M.T. GUTTERS
Professional Installation
5” Gutter, Down Pipe, Soffit
28 YRS EXP. *FULLY INSURED
Cleaning & Repairing
Call Tim 604-612-5388
287 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
A-1 CONTRACTING. Renos. Bsmt,
kitchens, baths, custom cabinets,
tiling, plumbing, sundecks,
reroofing. Dhillon 604-782-1936.
BATHROOM SPECIALISTS, com-
plete renos, tub to counter, from
floor to wall, proud BBB Member.
Refs. 30 yrs. exp. Call John 604-
779-4029 www.bcbwreno.ca
BELRON
RENOVATIONS INC.
HOME RENOVATIONS
Decks - Bathrooms - Kitchens
Local Maple Ridge company
Lic / Ins 25 Years Exp
(778)233-1114 Ray
Home Renovations and
New Construction
Kitchens, Bathrooms, Flooring,
Drywall, Garages, Decks & more
* 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE*
INSURED ~ WCB
Dean 604-834-3076
MDG HOME SERVICES
Does your house have
the blues?
Need to spruce up the yard?
Just can’t find the time?
W Lawn Mowing WHedge Trimming
W Power wash the house
W Sidewalks and driveways
W Gutters W Painting
W General yard cleanup
W Any little job....
Let MDG Home Services
do the work for you...
Just pick up the phone
and give us a call!!!
(604)999-5454

CHECK CLASSIFIEDS
bcclassified.com 604-575-5555
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
287 HOME IMPROVEMENTS
SWANSON
RENOVATIONS
Patios ~ Painting ~ Sundecks
Inlaw Suites ~ Additions
Bathrooms ~ Kitchens & More
Free Estimates
604.619.6561
288 HOME REPAIRS
If I can’t
do it
It can’t be
done
Call Robert 604-941-1618
OR 604-844-4222
INTERIORS: Baths (renos/
repairs) specializing in drywall,
doors, flooring, tiling, plumbing,
painting, miscellaneous, etc.
EXPERIENCED IN OVER
30 LINES OF WORK!
* Quality work * Prompt Service
* Fair prices
For positive results Call Robert
SERVICE CALLS WELCOME
IF I HAD A HAMMER
Handyman Services
W Special Needs
equipment installed
W Reno’s & Repairs
Fully Insured
Great Work. Will
604-764-1036
Repairs, Maintenance, Renovation
Guaranteed work, Free Estimate.
Cell: 604-618-6401. Marcel.
RETIRED carpenter wants to keep
busy. Looking for small carpentry
jobs. Will repair or build new. Will
also do small painting & plumbing
jobs. Call Ken 604-460-7803.
300 LANDSCAPING
All aspects of Landscaping
and Landscaping Maintenance
Strata, Commercial, Residential
Pavers, Patios & Retaining walls
Spring clean ups
Fully INSURED
Call (604)763-8795

D Garden Blend Soil
D Lawn Blend Soil
D Custom Blends avail.
D Composted Mushroom
Manure
NO Wood byproducts used

When QUALITY Matters
all soils are tested for Optimum
growing requirements
17607 FORD ROAD,
PITT MEADOWS
PICK-UP ...... OR .... DELIVERY
604-465-3189
DUTCH TOUCH
Green Services Ltd
Landscape Construction
Renovations W Maintenance
604-463-3644
604-861-1490
JAGUAR LANDSCAPING
Lawn & Garden Service. Design,
Pruning, Lawns, Cleanups,
Comm/Res. (604)462-1369
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
300 LANDSCAPING
Instant
Grassifacation!
16897 Windsor Road
Pitt Meadows
(Turn right 1st road
East of Pitt River Bridge from
Vancouver)
604-465-9812
1-800-663-5847
SAWDUST
Hemlock, Fir & Cedar
Available for Delivery
Call for pricing
604-465-5193 or 604-465-5197
www.augustinesoilandmulch.com
317 MISC SERVICES
GET RESULTS! Post a classified in
123 newspapers in just a few clicks.
Reach nearly 2 million people for
only $395 a week - only $3.22 per
newspaper. Choose your province
or all across Canada. Best value.
Save over 85% compared to book-
ing individually. www.community-
classifieds.ca or 1-866-669-9222.
✶Dump Site Now Open✶
SBroken Concrete RocksS
$22.00 Per Metric Ton
SMud Dirt Sod ClayS
$22.00 Per metric Ton
GrassSBranchesSLeavesSWeeds
$59.00 Per Ton
Meadows Landscape Supply
604-465-1311
320 MOVING & STORAGE
1PRO MOVING & SHIPPING.
We move - We ship - We recycle.
Senior- Student Discount available.
604-721-4555 or 604-800-9488.
AFFORDABLE MOVING
Local & Long Distance
From $45/Hr
1, 3, 5, 7,10 Ton Trucks
Licenced ~ Reliable ~ 1 to 3 Men
Free estimate/Seniors discount
Residential~Commercial~Pianos
604-537-4140
SPARTAN Moving Ltd.
Fast & Reliable. Insured
Competitive rates. Wknd Specials.
Call Frank: (604) 435-8240
329 PAINTING & DECORATING
AAA PRECISION PAINTING. Quality work. 778-881-6096.
2 HUNGRY PAINTERS & Power
Washing. Low prices. Int/Ext. Man
& wife 75 years combined exp.
604.467.2532 twohungrypainters.ca
A-1 EXTERIOR/ INTERIOR. Quality
job, senior rates, free est, residen-
tial, commercial. Refs. 15 yrs exp.
No job too small.Call 604-476-0766
A-1 PAINTING CO.
604.723.8434
Top Quality Painting
Exterior / Interior
• Insured • WCB
• Written Guarantee
• Free Est. • 20 Years Exp.
A-TECH Services 604-230-3539
Running this ad for 7yrs
PAINT SPECIAL
3 rooms for $269, 2 coats
(Ceiling & Trim extra) Price incls
Cloverdale Premium quality paint.
NO PAYMENT until Job is
completed. Ask us about our
Laminate Flooring &
Maid Services.
www.paintspecial.com
“ ABOVE THE REST “
Int. & Ext., Unbeatable Prices,
Professional Crew. Free Est.
Written Guarantee. No Hassle,
Quick Work, Insured, WCB.
Call (778)997-9582
MILANO PAINTING. Int./Ext. Prof.
Painters. Free Est. Written Guar.
Bonded & Insured. 604-551-6510
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
329 PAINTING & DECORATING
SEASIDE PAINTING
& Decking 604-462-8528, 218-9618
Stardust Painting Commercial & Residential Service, Interior & Exterior. Member of BBB since 1975 Call John (604)889-8424
332 PAVING/SEAL COATING
ALLAN Const. & Asphalt. Brick,
conc, drainage, found. & membrane
repair. 604-618-2304; 820-2187.
338 PLUMBING
✔ ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS
Call Niko Plumbing Ltd. 24/7.
Res/Com, plugged drains. h/w
tanks. ★15 yrs exp. 604-837-6640
$69/HR. Lic., Insured. Experienced
& friendly service. Clogged drains,
garburators, leaks & more. Sm jobs
OK. Call anytime 604-805-2488.
341 PRESSURE WASHING
POWER WASHING
GUTTER CLEANING
SAME DAY SERVICE AVAILABLE
Call Ian 604-724-6373
353 ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS
RIDGE MEADOWS ROOFING.
Res Re-roofing & repairs WCB BBB
A+ rating Free est. 604-377-5401
356 RUBBISH REMOVAL
RECYCLE-IT!
JUNK REMOVAL
EARTH FRIENDLY
On Time, As Promised,
Service Guaranteed!
604.587.5865
www.recycle-it-now.com
ALL JUNK
Rubbish Removal
Residential & Commercial
We do almost anything
Free Estimates 7 days a
week 10% off with this ad
604-537-8523
A-1 RUBBISH REMOVAL. House-
hold & Yard Waste. Up to 100% re-
cycle. Reasonable. 604-786-2948
359 SAND, GRAVEL & TOPSOIL
TOPSOIL
• SCREENED TOPSOIL
• MUSHROOM MANURE
• BARK MULCH
604-467-3003
372 SUNDECKS
Aluminum patio cover, sunroom,
railing, gates. 604-521-2688
www.PatioCoverVancouver.com
The DECK Guys
D Sundeck / Patio Construction
D Re-build/Extend Existing Decks
D Authorized vinyl deck installers
D Aluminum, glass, wood railings
D Sundeck & Vinyl Repairs
D 5 Year Warranty on Vinyl
*Work Guaranteed *References
*Over 20 Years Experience.
Free estimates 604-418-8340
373A TELEPHONE SERVICES
A FREE TELEPHONE SERVICE -
Get Your First Month Free. Bad
Credit, Don’t Sweat It. No Deposits.
No Credit Checks. Call Freedom
Phone Lines Today Toll-Free 1-
866-884-7464.
374 TREE SERVICES
A1-TRI-CRAFT Tree Serv.
Dangerous tree
removal, spiral pruning
hedge trimming, stump
grinding, topping.
Insured, WCB Free Est
Arborist Reports
Andrew 604-618-8585
$ Best Rates $
TRI CITY TREE SERVICE
All Tree Services -- Fully Insured --
24 Hrs 604-462-0865
HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES
374 TREE SERVICES
A.C.
TREE SERVICE
30 years experience
Bob Fitz-James
604-467-0333
.
Tree removal done RIGHT!
• Tree & Stump Removal
• Certified Arborists
• 20 yrs exp. • 60’ Bucket Truck
• Crown Reduction • Spiral Pruning
• Land Clearing • Selective Logging
~ Fully Insured • Best Rates ~
604-787-5915, 604-291-7778
Info: www.treeworksonline.ca
info@treeworksonline.ca
10% OFF with this AD
PETS
477 PETS
AMERICAN COCKER Vet ✔, cud-
dly, family raised, paper trained.
Exc pet! $700. 604-823-4393 Chwk.
ARCTIC WOLF/Husky X- Social-
ized, well tempered, paper/outside
trained. $500. firm. (604)309-3774
Beautiful & adorable purebred
German Shepherd puppies born on
Apr. 27, no papers. Loving &
affectionate parents, vet checked,
1st shots, dewormed. Good family
dogs. 604-796-3561
Boston Terriers pups, ckc reg, vet
checked, reputable breeder, excel-
lent pedigree. (604)794-3786
CATS GALORE, TLC has for
adoption spayed & neutered adult
cats. 604-309-5388 / 604-856-4866
CHIHUAHUA 4 yrs old, female,
friendly & sweet personality. $400
Call (604)794-7347 Chwk
CKC Reg.soft coated Wheaten Ter-
rier pups, hypo-allergenic. Guarntd.
Vet ✓ $1200. Call 604-617-3470
PETS
477 PETS
GERMAN SHEPHERD all black
pure bred, 9 mo/old male, all shots,
neutered, very good with kids, great
guard dog. $700. 604-897-3139.
GERMAN SHEPHERD PUPS.
2 Male & 2 Fem. $550. 1st shots &
dewormed. Call 778-863-6332.
JACK RUSSELL pups, cute, short,
stocky, smooth coat, tails doc, dew
claws 1st shot. $495 (604)798-9233
MINI SCHNAUZER POMERANIAN
X, 3F, 5 weeks old, tails docked,
dewormed $500 (604)826-0257
NEED A GOOD HOME for a good
dog or a good dog for a good
home? We adopt dogs! Call 604-
856-3647 or www.856-dogs.com
PRESA CANARIO pups, $500-
$1200. Black, fawn & brindle. Dad
150lbs, Mom 120lbs. 778-552-1525
SHELTIE SABLE PUPPIES 4
months old, asking to go out! $400-
$600 (604)826-6311
SHIH TZU X Bichon pups, 8 wks,
Vet ck’d, 1st shots, $500. Fam
raised 604-860-4654/604-793-0552
TOY POODLE puppies. 2 apricot,
Adorable. Ready to go June 25.
$700. 778-240-2400 (Cloverdale)
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
506 APPLIANCES
RECONDITIONED Newer style
Inglis Washer & Dryer sets $275
& up; Washers $220 & up; Dryers
$75 & up. *** Also: Electric Ranges.
REMPELS SERVICE 604-467-2794
542 FRUIT & VEGETABLES
U-PICK STRAWBERRIES. $1.25
lb. 19478 Dewdney Trunk Rd. Pitt
Meadows. 604-763-2808
548 FURNITURE
#1 Cash Buyer
“Since 1987”
$$CASH $$ for your furniture,
tools, electronics, antiques,
appliances, computers
& collectibles.
WW ANYTHING OF VALUE WW
Single items to entire
households
463-4449 or
209-6583
560 MISC. FOR SALE
BRINKMAN “All In One” BAR-B-Q
Great for smoking, grilling, boiling,
& crab boils. Uses propane or
briquettes. Competition grade. $75.
604-928-6687
SAWMILLS from only $3997 -
MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY
with your own bandmill - Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock ready to
ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-
566-6899 Ext:400OT.
STEEL BUILDING SALE...SPE-
CIALS from $5 to $12/sq.ft. Great
pricing on ABSOLUTELY every
model, width and length. Example:
30’Wx50’Lx16’H. NOW $10,500.00.
End walls included, doors optional.
Pioneer Steel Manufacturers 1-800-
668-5422.
551 GARAGE SALES
MAPLE RIDGE BIG FAMILY gar-
age sale 21508 spring ave maple
ridge - Saturday July 9th from 9am-
2pm. Selling lots of childrens items,
toys and household items! Rain or
shine!
MAPLE RIDGE
Multi-Family
GARAGE SALE
Sat/Sun, July 9 & 10,
9am - 4pm
22705 - 123 Ave
MOVING SALE
SILVER VALLEY
Top of the World - (232nd St.)
Friday, July 8th, 12pm-8pm and
Sat July 9th, 10am-4pm.
Chairs, art, old windows, hall
tree, caddy parts, 5ft. farmhouse
sink, china, books & more.
14202 Marc Rd.
Whether it is comic books,
dirt bikes or video games
you crave…
You will find something
for the kid in you in the
Classifieds!
www.mapleridgenews.com - THE NEWS -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- A35
MERCHANDISE FOR SALE
566 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
STERLING PIANO
Low style. Very good ring. $800.
Call 604-557-9644
REAL ESTATE
603 ACREAGE
20 Acre Ranch Foreclosures Near
Booming El Paso, Texas Was
$16,900 Now $12,900 $0 Down,
take over payments, $99/mo.
Beautiful views, owner financing,
FREE map/pictures 800-755-8953
609 APARTMENT/CONDOS
Maple Ridge
Peaceful & secure retirement living
$215,000 ~ 12148 224
th
St
1 Bedroom and solarium,
large rooms, full tub with grab-bars.
Retirement community.
Pool tables, workshop, hairdresser,
Rec Centre
Quick possession available
Brookside Realty ~ Dave
604.240.3523
Maple Ridge
Spacious 2 Bdrm apartment
Great view ~ Gas fireplace
Covered wrap-around sun deck.
2 underground parking stalls.
$224,800
Brookside Realty ~ Dave
604.240.3523
630 LOTS
TEXAS LAND FORECLOSURES!
20/40 acre tracts. Near growing El
Paso-Was $16,900 (USD) Now
$12,900 (USD) $0 Down, take over
payments,$99/mo. (USD) Beautiful
views, owner financing, FREE
map/pictures. 866-484-0857 (US)
633 MOBILE HOMES & PARKS
Canadian CSA Modular, Manufac-
tured, and Park Model Homes @
US factory direct wholesale prices.
Starting @ 39,824 better features
+ more options = best value. The
Home Boys 877-976-3737 or 509-
481-9830 www.hbmodular.com
We will beat anyone’s price.
Guaranteed!
636 MORTGAGES
Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates
for purchases and refinances, im-
mediate debt consolidation, foreclo-
sure relief, and equity loans. Free,
fast, friendly, private consultations.
Call 1-888-685-6181
www.mountaincitymortgage.ca
660 LANGLEY/ALDERGROVE
HOMES FOR SALE-SUPER BUYS
www.dannyevans.ca
Homelife Benchmark Realty Corp. Langley
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
COQUITLAM, low rise concrete
bldg, 2nd flr, 2 bdrm, 2 baths, undg
sec. prk, gas F/P, balcony, $1150.
Avail. immed. Call (778) 889-3731.
Derek Manor
2048 Manning Ave.
Port Coq ~ 604-941-5452
or 604-944-7889
FREE PREMIUM CABLE
$80 Value
S Impeccably clean S Heat
S H/water S Parking S Ldry
1 bdrm. $780/mo.
Available June 15th
MAPLE INN
11695 -224th St

Maple Ridge 1 bdrm
$500-$550 includes hot water
Certified Crime Free Building
Mature adult oriented.
Close to uptown
604-463-4131 for appointment
(9am-5pm)
MAPLE RIDGE: 11671 - Fraser St.
Spac 1 bdrm, nr town centre. Avail
now. $820/mo. (604)880-7137
MAPLE RIDGE
1 & 2 Bdrs from $750/
mo
GREAT LOCATION
Queen Anne Apts.
* Renovated Suites *
Clean, very quiet, large,
INCLUDES: HEAT,
HOT WATER & HYDRO
Near Shopping & Amenities.
604-463-7450
604-463-2236
12186-224 St, Maple Ridge
Certified Crime Free Buildings
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
MAPLE RIDGE
1 BEDROOM SUITES
✶ Move In
Allowance
McIntosh Plaza
Suit Mature Adults
Highrise 1/2 Block to Town
F/F fridge & easy clean stoves
Avail Aug 1. NO PETS
22330 McIntosh Avenue
(604)463-6841
Maple Ridge
22450-121st Street
2 Bedroom Apt $820/mo
3 Bedroom Apt $950/mo
Attractive modern unit, in a safe,
all ages community in beautiful
Maple Ridge. Amenities include
community gardens, playground,
amenity rooms, on site laundry
facilities & secure parking in a
certified Crime Free Multi Hous-
ing complex. Pet friendly (some
exceptions apply). The tenant
and other occupants must
demonstrate they meet eligibility
criteria related to income, number
of occupants, and other similar
criteria. Please note that fully
subsidized, or Rent Geared to
Income (RGI) units are filled via a
waiting list called The BC
Housing Central Registry
(www.bchousing.org/applicants).
No RGI subsidy available at this
time.
Call 604-451-6075 to view.
Metro Vancouver
Housing Corp.
MAPLE RIDGE
2 Bdrm, 2 bath, on 2nd Floor
amenities room, weight room,
f/p, new appl’s, insuite laundry,
Beautiful master ensuite,
2 u/g parking, 24hr monitored
security, avail in URBANO com-
plex for July, credit checks & ref-
erences mandatory
Walk to shopping, schools.
$1200/mo
604-463-1731
MAPLE RIDGE
AVAILABLE NOW
1 & 2 BDRM SUITES
Heat, hot water & parking.
Close to stores & schools.
MAPLE COURT I
22437 121
st
Ave
604-467-0715
&
MAPLE COURT II
22423 121
st
Ave
604-467-4894
MAPLE RIDGE
AVAILABLE NOW
1 Bedroom
Heat, hot water & parking.
Close to stores & schools.
SUNRISE APARTMENT
22292 - 122nd Ave
604-319-9341
Maple Ridge
Central
Certified Crime Free
Multiple Housing
New renovated 1 Bdrm suites.
$575/mo. incl hot water, cable.
Ref’s req’d. N/P.
Adult only building
Mon to Fri 9am ~ 6pm
By appointment only
604-418-1932
MAPLE RIDGE CENTRE

1 & 2 Bdrm apts, newly
renovated, hardwood
floors or carpet, heat &
hot water included. No
pets. From $700/mo for 1
bdrm; $900 for 2 bdrms.
Available now. Close to
amenities.

Call 604-467-5677
MAPLE RIDGE - Condo Suite
11671 Fraser St. Large 2 BR
Reno’d! 1 Bath; 800 sf; $850 NOW
Peak Property Mgmt 604-931-8666
MAPLE RIDGE Ctrl adult building.
Large 1 Bdrm $750/mo incls heat/
hot water, ref’s, N/P (604)467-2606
Maple Ridge
Glenwood Manor
Apartments
1 & 2 Bdrms from $685 & $850
& renovated suite with
dishwasher $45. extra.
Clean, Spacious
Includes cable, heat,
hot water & parking
Seniors discount
21387 Dewdney Trunk Rd
(604)466-5799
RENTALS
706 APARTMENT/CONDO
Maple Ridge
Swan Court Apartments
Large 1 & 2 Bedrooms.
Hardwood floors, adult oriented,
heat, h/w & cable incl’d, f/p, n/pets.
Criminal Record check may be reqd
Resident Manager Onsite
Now with
SENIORS DISCOUNT
604.477.9189
MAPLE RIDGE W. New quiet bldg.
2 bdrm. condo. 3rd flr. 5 appl., u/g
prking. $1100/mo. Avail. now. 604-
467-4450 or 604-833-4450.
PITT MEADOWS
CHELSEA PARK APTS
1 & 2 Bdrms Apts, Also
3 Bdrm T/Homes Avail
Conveniently located. Nice,
bright & large suites. No pets.
Call 604-465-8088
PITT MEADOWS
The Meadows
Gated underground parking,
heated outdoor pool. Heat, hot
water & 3 appliances included.
2 min. walk to Westcoast
Express.
Large 1, 2 & 3 Bdrm Suites
Available
Call: 778-882-8894
604-465-0008 or 604-465-5818
PORT COQUITLAM
1 Bdrm Top flr apt. $775
2 Bdrm Corner apt. $925
S Incl heat/hot wtr, wndw cvrngs
S Close to bus stop
S Walk to shpng/medical/WCE
S Across from park w/Mtn views
S Gated parking and Elevator
S Adult oriented building
S References required
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT
604-464-3550
709 COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL
PORT COQUITLAM, 2043 sq ft.
Ground floor, dance/fitness area.
Facing onto city park. 1 blk from
Lougheed/Shaughnessy intersec-
tion. 604-464-3550.
715 DUPLEXES/4PLEXES
MAPLE RIDGE / Albion 1/2 duplex
2 Bdrm, 5 appl’s, very clean, $875 +
util’s (604)831-5302 call before 8pm
736 HOMES FOR RENT
ANMORE 2 bdrm + den ste above
garage 1100sf 5 appls $1500m. Min
to Buntzen Lake N/P. 778-688-6622
MAPLE RIDGE 1 BDRM HOUSE,
$650/mo. Avail now. 604-462-0387
MAPLE RIDGE - 3000sf. 2 storey 4
bdrm. 4 bath + finished basement.
Kanaka Elementary area, double
garage, quiet family street, A/C,
fenced yard. $2200/mo. No pets.
Now! Rick 604.790.7425
741 OFFICE/RETAIL
MAPLE RIDGE Central Office/
Retail space approx 800 sqft.
$920/mo + hst (604)467-2606
MAPLE RIDGE
OFFICE
& RETAIL SPACE
Various downtown locations.
Avail. Now! Updated and well
maintained. Various sizes 320sf.
- 2000sf. Starting at $495/month.
Call: Rick Medhurst,
Royal LePage
6 0 4 - 4 6 3 - 3 0 0 0
743 PROPERTY MANAGEMENT
Call Maria at ridgemeadows
property management
Mon Fri 9-6 604-466-2838 or visit
www.ridgemeadowsproperty
management.com
Maple Ridge
2 Bedroom basement suite.
Great location
near schools & parks.
Avail immed $875/mo
Brookside Realty ~ Dave
604.240.3523
RENTALS
746 ROOMS FOR RENT
$75 OFF 1
ST
MONTH
Rooms from $435/mo. Fully Furn,
weekly maid service, cable TV,
private bath, on bus route, 5/min
walk to commuter rail.
Haney Motor Hotel
22222 Lougheed Hwy.,
Maple Ridge
Inquire in person between
9am - 3pm or
Call 604-467-3944
747B SENIOR ASSISTED LIVING
POCO DOWNTOWN
All-Inclusive
Seniors Residence
1 Bdrm. Apartment
Rent incls. freshly prepared
meals, cable, housekeeping,
emergency response & activities.
www.rjkent.com
2675 Shaughnessy St.
Call: 778-285-5554
748 SHARED ACCOMMODATION
MAPLE RIDGE lrg bright furn’d or
unfurn room for female only in char-
acter home. Sml pet ok. Now. $500
incl strg/utils/internet. 604-374-8850
750 SUITES, LOWER
EAST ABBY. 1 bdrm. Bright and
spacious. All appliances, gas fire-
place. Private yard. Excellent neigh-
borhood. N/S, N/P. Avail immedi-
ately. .Call 604-850-7008.
MAPLE Ridge Central. Large, bright
1 bdrm suite. Sep ent and lndry,
fireplace, new flrs/paint, close to
bus. Suitable for single person, NS.
elect/gas/grbg pu.$750 call
604 220-9225
MAPLE RIDGE 1 bdrm. grnd. level
suite. Priv. ent. CDS. Avail. immed.
$775 mo. incl. utils. (604)764-8563
MAPLE Ridge. Albion area. 1 bdrm.
Sep entry. Ns/np. On bus rte. Shrd
W/D. $625 incl utils. Ref’s. Immed.
778-549-9526 or 604-463-9122.
MAPLE RIDGE central bright g/l 1
bdrm sh w/d, N/S. Cats ok. Cls to
transit. Gas f/p, prkg $725 incl util &
full cble. Avail Aug 1 604-463-5592
MAPLE RIDGE, Harrison St. Large
bright 1/bdrm suite. Shared W/D.
Sep entry. $700/mo incl util. N/S,
N/P. Avail Aug 1. (604)496-4899
MAPLE RIDGE spacious 2 bdrm
a/g, NEW carpet, paint & brand
new 3 appl’s, np, $950 incls utils sh
W/D604-466-6343 / 778-862-1542
PITT MEADOWS, Newer home, 2
bdrm suite, W/D, nr amenities,
NS/NP, avail now. Refs. $950 incl.
utils & cable. Phone (604)764-6821.
752 TOWNHOUSES
CITY LIVING IN a Westcoast set-
ting! Beautiful rentals available now
in Wesbrook Village at UBC. Studi-
os, 2-bedrooms and Townhouses.
Call 604-228-2025 today, or mail
DiscoverWesbrook@
ubcproperties.com
www.DiscoverWesbrook.ca/bcy
PITT MEADOWS: 2 - 3 bdrm co-op
T/H $1005/mo - $1089/mo. Shares
req’d. No subsidy available. Orien-
tation 2nd & 4th Sun. 2 pm & 3rd
Tues. 7 pm each mo. 19225 119th
Ave., Pitt Meadows, BC V3Y 2B2.
Leave msg 604-465-1938
PITT MEADOWS - Osprey Village
2 Bdrm row townhouse, 2 baths,
5 appls. Near river, shops, transit,
dyke & Golden Ears Bridge. Ns/np,
Avail Aug 1 or 15. 778-837-1499.
TRANSPORTATION
806 ANTIQUES/CLASSICS
1955 BUICK 4 dr. h/t, red & black,
auto, 264 eng., 6,000 mi. on rebuilt
motor. $32,000. 1(250)765-0112
1962 Cadillac DeVille, 2dr, hardtop,
$21,000 obo. Calif car, new
paint/chrome. (604)463-7367
1964 Pontiac Sport, 2dr, hardtop,
$16,000 obo. 1 owner, mint. (origi-
nal) blue on blue. (604)463-7367
810 AUTO FINANCING
FREE CASH BACK WITH $0
DOWN at Auto Credit Fast. Need a
vehicle? Good or Bad credit call
Stephanie 1-877-792-0599
www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309.
Free Delivery
INSTANT AUTO CREDIT Buying a
used car is hard enough without
having to worry about financing!
Get APPROVED for your car loan
in minutes: www.NanaimoCars.com
WANT A VEHICLE But Stressed
About Your Credit? Last week 23
out of 27 applications approved! We
Fund Your Future Not Your Past.
Any Credit. Receive a $500 Gift
Card. 1-888-593-6095
TRANSPORTATION
810 AUTO FINANCING
821 CARS - SPORTS & IMPORTS
2004 CROSSFIRE Mercedes built,
new Perf.tires,paid$53,000,like new
in/out, orig.owner.778-232-3578
2009 TOYOTA MATRIX 4/dr auto
p/w, p/l, AC, cd player, 89K, silver.
$8800. Call 604-825-9477.
827 VEHICLES WANTED
TRANSPORTATION
838 RECREATIONAL/SALE
1993 PHOENIX. 26’ Motorhome,
Class A. GM chassis, rear queen
bed, awning, 62K, nice shape,
$13,500/obo. 604-536-8379.
2008 CLASSIC cruiser 18’ trailer,
new cond. Only used 6 times. De-
luxe model, incl high quality mat-
tress, toilet & shower, A/C, furnace,
microwave, lge. fridge. $9900 Pls
call 604-463-1644 for more info
LAKEFRONT Properties, For Sale
20 minutes from Qualicum
www.hornelake.bc.ca
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL

Autos • Trucks
• Equipment Removal
FREE TOWING 7 days/wk.
We pay Up To $500 CA$H
Rick Goodchild 604.551.9022
ALWAYS CA$H
Scrap Vehicle &
Equipment Removal.
Don 778.938.6277
AAA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
Minimum $150 cash for full size
vehicles, any cond. 604-518-3673
The Scrapper
#1 FREE SCRAP VEHICLE
REMOVAL
ASK ABOUT $500 CREDIT
$$$ PAID FOR SOME
604.683.2200
SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We
buy scrap batteries from cars,
trucks & heavy equip. $4.00 each.
Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Min.
10. Toll Free Call:1.877.334.2288
TRANSPORTATION
845 SCRAP CAR REMOVAL
CA$H for CAR$ No Wheels -No Problem! Servicing the Fraser Valley 604-746-2855
847 SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES
1996 SUZUKI auto, 4 cyl. 1.3L,
$1250. (778)551-1662
851 TRUCKS & VANS
2003 DODGE DAKOTA, ext cab, 2
wheel drive, auto, canopy, 105K,
$8000 firm. Call 604-538-4883.
MARINE
912 BOATS
BARGE: WOOD Camp
131’LX38’4.5”WX9’8.5” D. c/w:
Atco trailer complex mounted
on barge deck, 20 rooms,
kitchen, pantry, dining room,
head, shower facilities, laun-
dry, small repair shop, twin
Cummins 60Kw diesel gen-
sets. Survey available. Loca-
tion: Zeballos. $95,000. For
more details, 250-703-3551.
Includes one week in the
Maple Ridge News, the Tri-City News,
and the Golden Ears Daily.
Includes:
TRUCKS, CARS, BOATS,
TRAILERS, RV’S, VANS
3 lines in all listed publications
for one week only $10 + tax.
Includes a listing on bcclassified.com
(private party ads only)
604-575-5555
– or pay $25 + tax for one week –
in all Lower Mainland publications
1.5 million households
Reach 180,000
Households
for
only
plus tax
AUTO
SPECIAL
$
10
00
S
ell it N
o
w
!
36 -- Wednesday, July 6, 2011 -- THE NEWS - www.mapleridgenews.com
Vancouver Langley Surrey Port Moody North Van Maple Ridge Abbotsford Richmond
Bring in this coupon for use towards any regularly priced pair of footwear on your
next visit, and a free bio-mechanical assessment by our Fitting Experts.
Staff: Use code 90370 / Expires: July 30, 2011
WITHOUT SUPPORTIVE FLIP-FLOPS
so why should your flip-flops be
WITH SUPPORTIVE FLIP-FLOPS
#640-22709 Lougheed Hwy
Maple Ridge (Valleyfair Mall)
Tel. 604.463.3338
www.kintec.net
MONTRAIL’s Molokai and Molokini supportive flip-flops
are heat moldable and orthopaedically designed.

Their soft micro-pillowed footbed ensures comfort and support for walking long
distances. It also creates a customized fit by conforming to the structure of your foot.
Our Fitting Experts will match the features of the flip-flops with the needs of your feet
and activities.
Visit us and try the most comfortable flip-flops you have ever worn, guaranteed.
22381 Dewdney Trunk Road, Maple Ridge
604-467-3884 604-467-3897
Hours:
Monday - Saturday 9am - 5:30pm
Sunday 11am - 5:00pm
PORTABLE AIR CONDITIONER DPAC10011
NOW ONLY
While quantities last
10,000 BTU air conditioner cools approximately 450 sq.ft.
$
399
LAWYERS & NOTARIES
Beckerlawyers.ca · 604-465-9993
Meadowvale Shopping Centre, Pitt Meadows
6 lawyers.
100 years of experience.
30 years in the region.
Test your new driver
Be certain about your law firm.
Serving the Community for Nearly 40 Years
604-465-5464 · 1-800-592-5550
20611 Lougheed Hwy, Maple Ridge
www.marvjoneshonda.com
Oil Change
Special
Some restrictions apply.
Honda cars/trucks only.
Expires Sept. 30, 2011.
$
29
95
22222 Lougheed Highway, Maple Ridge BC
604.463.3811 www.thehaney.com

est 1948
1/2 PRICE
APPIES
3pm - 6pm
“Our passion for health
is the heart of our
products.”
www.straussherbco.com
Marketplace IGA
19150 Lougheed Hwy.,
MeadowVale Plaza
Pitt Meadows
Find Strauss Herb Co. products at:
Uptown Health
130 - 22529 Lougheed Hwy.,
Maple Ridge
HEALTH
FOODS
UPTOWN
Organic World
22225 Dewdney Trunk Rd.,
Maple Ridge
Mint
112 - 19150 Lougheed Hwy.,
MeadowVale Plaza,
Pitt Meadows
#10 - 20475 Lougheed Hwy. (Regency Centre)
604-460-8077
MAPLE RIDGE
Westgate
Shopping
Centre Regency
Centre
Lougheed Hwy
2
0
3
S
t
Triple Tree
Nursery
Land
Packs a kick. Costs hardly a lick.
Limited time offer.
$
2
79
Only
20468 Lougheed Hwy. • Haney Place Mall • 22805 Lougheed Hwy.
No HST for
the month
of July
www.mapleridgelighting.ca
11947 227th Street 604.463.8682
Maple Ridge Lighting
We’re open: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 - 5:30 • Sat. 10-5:30 • Closed Sunday
* some conditions may apply
SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE OAC* *See store for details endoftheroll.com
Maple Ridge: 20610 Lougheed Hwy
604.465.2930
Monday–Friday: 8:30–5:30, Saturday: 9–4, Sunday: 11–4
Cork ....................................
$
1.99
Area Rugs ..................25
%
OFF
Huge selection to choose from!
sq ft
& up
up
to
Was
$3.99
Your Flooring...
RIGHT HERE. RIGHT NOW.
RIGHT PRICE.
22722 Lougheed Hwy., Maple Ridge 604-463-7277
BOGO
70
%
OFF
BUY 1 CLEARANCE/SALE ITEM AND GET ANOTHER AT 70%
OFF. SECOND ITEM MUST BE AT EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE.
Amico Portable14,000
BTU’s Air Conditioner
3 in 1 tankless for the convenience of
staying cool 24/7 in the summer heat.
Special Pricing of
$
710
00
while supplies
last last

B
I
G
VALLE
Y
Since 1986
HEATING & SHEET METAL LTD.
11868 216th Street, Maple Ridge
604-467-6474
NISSAN
NISSAN
EMPLOYEE
WEST COAST
19625 Lougheed Hwy.,
Pitt Meadows
While Supplies Last!
1-866-208-8820
DL 30501
Large selection of models in-stock to choose from
TOLL FREE
www.westcoastautogroup.com
PRICING EVENT
H
E
L
D
O
V
E
R

First Time Ever
20430 Lougheed Hwy. Maple Ridge 604-465-0441
www.mapleridgemotorsports.com
The best drive
you’ll have all
summer
Open
Mon. - Fri. 9-6,
Sat. 9-5:30, Sun. 10-5
604-463-4663
11768 - 223rd St.,
Maple Ridge
Bistro
Sets
your
choice
*
ONLY
$
99
* Limited Time Offer
3 styles to choose from
224th & Lougheed 604.467.1554
SUMMER SIZZLER SIDEWALK SALE
UNTIL JULY 24
3 in 1 Danby
Air Conditioner
*
22390 Lougheed Hwy Maple Ridge 604-463-4168
Monday - Thursday 9am - 5:30pm Friday 9am - 9pm Saturday 9am - 5:30pm
Closed Sundays throughout the summer
Brand Source Home Furnishings
*Limited Quantities Available
$
449
00 ON
SALE
C ME IN&
BEAT THE HEAT!
604-467-3401 or
1-800-561-3891
23213 Lougheed Hwy,
Maple Ridge
AND
RIGHT NOW GET
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
MONTHS
0
%
84
GLS Sport model shown
FINANCING FOR
84 MONTHS
0
%
BI-WEEKLY
PAYMENT
$
91

0WNlT WlTh
p
NO DOWN PAYMENT
ELANTRA TOURING L 5-SPEED.
DELIVERY & DESTINATION INCLUDED.
2011 ELANTRA TOURING
EUROPEAN INSPIRED 5-DOOR
hl0hWAY
L/100 KM - 43 MF0ʈ
†plus taxes and fees
18
Holes
of Golf
presents the 11th annual
I=:C:LH
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978 You could WIN a…
TOSHIBA 32”LCD
FLATSCREEN T.V.!
SHEPPARD’S
SHEPPARD’S
Haney
Sewing & Sound
*Must be acceptedas awarded
Name:________________________________________ Phone: ______________________
Address: _________________________________________________________________
Date: July 6, 2011.
The ball is lost on the ad for:___________________________
There is a lost ball in one of these ads. Find it, and you could WIN a FREE round of golf at Swan-e-Set Golf Course. Deliver your entry by
Tuesday, July 12, 2011 to the Maple Ridge News at 22328 - 119th Avenue, Maple Ridge, BC, V2X 2Z3. One winner per week. Good luck!
FIND THE LOST BALL
WIN 18 HOLES OF GOLF EACH WEEK!
Tree
ery
nd
12
Par
5
4
Par
3

THE NEWS
Serving Maple Ridge & Pitt Meadows since 1978
Email either editor@mapleridgenews.com
or newsroom@mapleridgenews.com
Call 604.467.1122 or Fax 604.463.4741

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful