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Universal Design for Learning
This page was originally authored by Jody Onuma (2007). This page has been further authored (major entry) by Camille Maydonik (2009). In 2011, Laura Bonnor, edited this page and moved some of the information to Differentiated Instruction, Understanding by Design and Universal Design for Learning: A stable planning approach.

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Contents 1 What is Universal Design for Learning? (UDL) 1.1 Dr. David Rose: Podcast - An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning.

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1.2 Dr. David Rose: Keynote Address 2 Framework of UDL 2.1 Recognition Networks 2.2 Strategic Networks 2.3 Affective Networks 3 Using UDL to Support Every Student's Learning 3.1 Recognition Support 3.2 Strategic Support 3.3 Affective Support 4 Using Multiple Means 4.1 Representation 4.2 Expression 4.3 Engagement 5 Outcomes of UDL 6 See Also 7 References / External Links
Hangaram Design Museum Seoul Arts Center Playground based on Universal Design

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What is Universal Design for Learning? (UDL)
Universal Design is a term coined by Ron Mace in the 1960s applied to the design of “barrier-free” or accessible architecture. The principles were of benefit to people with disabilities but also found to be universally beneficial leading to the development of Seven Principles of Universal Design . Universal designers began their work with the "user" in mind. The idea of applying the Seven Principles of Universal Design to education resulted in the beginnings of Universal Design Learning (UDL) . The paradigm of UDL, which was first developed by the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) , is a means of respecting a variety of Ron Mace diverse individual learning styles without requiring adaptation. This theoretical framework promotes the success for all learners by inherently having the flexibility to support each individual's needs. UDL applies to all learners, not exclusively to individuals with disabilities, but aims to provide everyone with equal access to learning. This includes diverse learners recognized by various frameworks such as Multiple Intelligence and Mel Levine's neurodevelopmental constructs . What follows on this page is a summary of selected sections of the book Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning written by David H. Rose and Anne Meyer (2002).

Dr. David Rose: Podcast - An Introduction to Universal Design for Learning .

Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the Digital Age : Universal Design forGenerated Learning

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Alexandria, Va: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the Digital Age : Universal Design for Learning - Chapter 4 Alexandria, Va: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Dr. Rose delivered an inspiring keynote address for a Showcase of Universal Design for Learning on the provincial (British Columbia) non-instructional day, October 24, 2008.

Dr. David Rose: Keynote Address

Framework of UDL
Effective teaching and learning engages all three brain networks:

Recognition Networks
Recognize essential cues and patterns. Recognition Networks are located in the back of the brain. They enable us to identify and interpret patterns of sound, light, taste, smell, and touch. These networks enable us to recognize voices, faces, letters, and words, as well as more complex patters, such as an author's style and nuance, and abstract concepts like justice.

Strategic Networks
Master skillful strategies for action. It is through strategic networks that we plan, execute, and monitor our internally generated mental and motor patters-actions and skills as diverse as sweeping the floor, deciding a chess move, or choosing a college. What most of us do not realize is that conscious or not, strategy is involved in essentially everything we do.

Affective Networks
Engage with learning. Learning requires interaction with the external world-with varied materials, tools, people, and contexts. Different students experience the same situations in very different ways.

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Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the Digital Age : Universal Design for Learning - Chapter 2 Alexandria, Va: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Using UDL to Support Every Student's Learning
Recognition Support
Numerous programs offer supports for reading. Texts can be customized according to the needs and preferences of students through the use of web-browsers, word processors and screen reading software. Designing Instruction to support Recognition Learning: Teaching Methods provide multiple examples highlight critical features provide multiple media formats support background knowledge

Strategic Support
Offered through programs or alternative keyboards that allow alternative ways of navigating through a text. Students can digitally draw, write, record their voices, take notes or write text comments using digital tools in order to support their expression. Designing Instruction to support Strategic Learning: Teaching Methods provide flexible models of skilled performance provide opportunities to practice with support provide multiple media formats offer flexible opportunities for demonstrating skills

Affective Support
Digital media provides flexible options that engage all learners, providing digital media that appropriately challenges all students, allowing them to make connections to background knowledge, vocabulary and reading support, as well as offering students varied choices of media for representing their knowledge. Designing Instruction to support Affective Learning: Teaching Methods offer choices of content and tools provide adjustable and tiered levels of challenge offer a choice of reward offer choices of learning context

Using Multiple Means
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UDL principles help educators customize their teaching for individual differences in each of the three brain networks. UDL framework consists of three principles each formed to minimize barriers and maximize learning through flexibility.

Representation
(the "what" of learning) Students differ in the ways that they perceive and comprehend information that is presented to them. For example, those with sensory disabilities (e.g., blindness or deafness); learning disabilities (e.g., dyslexia); language or cultural differences, and so forth may all require different ways of approaching content. Others may simply grasp information better through visual or auditory means rather than printed text. In reality, there is no one means of representation that will be optimal for all students; providing options in representation is essential.

Expression
(the "how" of learning) Students differ in the ways that they can navigate a learning environment and express what they know. For example, individuals with significant motor disabilities (e.g. cerebral palsy), those who struggle with strategic and organizational abilities (executive function disorders, ADHD), those who have language barriers, and so forth approach learning tasks very differently. Some may be able to express themselves well in writing text but not oral speech, and vice versa. In reality, there is no one means of expression that will be optimal for all students; providing options for expression is essential.

Engagement
(the "why" of learning) Students differ markedly in the ways in which they can be engaged or motivated to learn. Some students are highly engaged by spontaneity and novelty while other are disengaged, even frightened, by those aspects, preferring strict routine. In reality, there is no one means of representation that will be optimal for all students; providing multiple options for engagement is essential.

CAST (2008). Universal design for learning guidelines version 1.0. Wakefield, MA: Author. Retrieved February 27, 2009 from http://www.cast.org/publications/UDLguidelines/version1.html#go

Flexible digital media

makes it easier than ever to provide these multiple alternatives and therefore customize teaching and learning.

Outcomes of UDL
Common recommendations from all three principles provide students with a wider variety of options in their learning. Alternatives in curricula reduce barriers for students with disabilities and also enhances opportunities for every student. UDL is implanted by using instructional approaches that provide students with choices and alternatives in the materials, content, tools, contexts and supports they use. Generated by www.PDFonFly.com at 7/11/2011 8:57:50 PM UDL challenges teachers to be more flexible and also provides guidelines for creating this flexibility through research on the learning URL: http://sites.wiki.ubc.ca/etec510/Universal_Design_for_Learning

brain and knowledge of the qualities of digital media. Digital media offers a more feasible foundation for the UDL framework due to it's versatility, transformability, capacity to be marked and capacity to be networked. Assistive technology keyboards) allows students to overcome barriers in the curriculum. (video enlargers, single ability switches, alternative

UDL provides a framework for individualizing learning in a standards-based environment through flexible pedagogy and tools. It challenges teachers to use flexibility in instruction and materials in order to accommodate every student in the classroom.

See Also
Special Education Technology British Columbia SET-BC University of Guelph UDL website is a comprehensive website addressing Universal Design for Learning. This site offers resources for designing UDL computer-mediated distance education courses. Universal Design Learning: Language Arts Models Interactive Whiteboards

References / External Links
All Kinds of Minds Retrieved February 27, 2009 Retrieved February 27, 2009 Retrieved February 27, 2009 Alexandria, Va: Birmingham Grid for Learning | BGfL Secondary CAST: Center for Applied Special Technology

Rose, D. H., & Meyer, A. (2002). Teaching every student in the Digital Age : Universal Design for Learning Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Retrieved February 27, 2009 from http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ideas/tes/ SNOW: Chat & Learn - Universal Design for Learning Special Education Technology - British Columbia Wikipedia Retrieved February 27, 2009

Retrieved February 27, 2009

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