Trinity Preparatory School 2006-2007 Course Descriptions

Revised 2/1/06

COMPUTER In our ever-changing world, knowledge in computer science has become a necessity. The goal of the department is to provide each student the opportunity to develop his/her skills in word processing, spreadsheets, presentation formats, programming, web design, and multimedia by providing courses that are current in today's society. All Trinity students are required to complete Computer I, which introduces them to the basic concepts of Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This course provides the basic skills required to complete projects for all subject areas at Trinity. A sequential development in the programming courses allows students to maintain competency with current programming trends. In the programming field, students may elect to take Programming I and II JAVA, Hon Programming C++, and AP JAVA. Due to changes at the College Board Level, Programming I and II became JAVA starting with the 2003-2004 school year. Students with interest in media develop skills in web design, animation, digital video, and sound. Programs such as Macromedia Dreamweaver MX, Adobe Photoshop, Sound Recorder, Macromedia Director, and Adobe Premiere Pro provide a foundation for artistically oriented students. 859. Computer I (semester) This introductory project-based course builds keyboard and word processing skills with emphasis on personal and manuscript papers. A major objective is to assist students in using word processing both for producing and for correcting and revising papers and essays assigned in other courses. Students complete a semester project (with the aid of on-line internet research) requiring the full use of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and power point. Required for graduation and may be taken from grades 7-12. 860. Computers: Multimedia I (semester) Students in Upper School learn how to use many of the tools for developing multimedia. In the first portion of the course students will work with web design software and Photoshop to create websites. In the second portion, students learn to develop animation using Macromedia Director and Sound Forge. Students will participate in integrated projects, develop an educational training site, and learn to create animation. Prerequisite: Computer I. 861. Computers: Multimedia II (semester) Students in Upper School learn how to use many of the tools for developing multimedia – sound, images, animation and movie clips – through specified up-to-date media software. Students using Macromedia Director and Adobe Premiere Pro learn how to edit video, use blue screen technology, and create media presentations. Students are also instructed on developing a media project through storyboarding, record keeping, lighting, and use of the digital video camera. Prerequisite: Multimedia I. 862. Advanced Animation (semester) Students in Upper School learn how to develop advanced animation techniques. The class will incorporate cut out animation, stop action, object animation, lip synch, and sound. Students will develop project ideas and produce short films. Prerequisite: Multimedia I and II and Visual Foundations (course #630 or #631). 864. Introduction to Computer Programming (spring semester - grade 7 and 8) Students are introduced to the basic elements of the programming language JAVA such as hardware vs. software and use of existing methods to create graphical images. There will be an introduction to variables, constants, selection structures, iteration structures, and file processing. Students learn how to write objectoriented programs as individuals and in groups. Coding and testing requires a high degree of interaction with the computer. This course is designed for math levels that have been attained by these grades. Prerequisite: Computer I.

detect and respond to mouse events. and implement new graphics classes on a higher level. Graphic II (semester) In this class students will continue expanding their knowledge of geometric shapes. Students are introduced to much of the world's great literature with selections chosen from all genres to . The students will also learn how to pick the most sufficient solution for their computer problems. Coding and testing requires a high degree of interaction with the computer. selection structures. variables. charts from data. detect and respond to mouse events. The curriculum is developmental and sequential. and learning to work as a team to complete a large project. pure object-oriented programming. and learning to work as a team to complete a large project. Students learn how to write object-oriented programs as individuals and in groups. algorithms. Graphics I (semester) Students will write original source code using the JAVA programming language to create geometric shapes. Animation and html will be covered to the extent that will lead into the web design course offered. writing the methodology.865. There will be an introduction to file processing and the execution of swing comments. Prerequisite: Computer I 868. Students are given a real-world problem to solve by breaking it down. manipulate fonts. Prerequisite: Computer Programming I. pure object-oriented programming. They will also learn to use existing methods to create and manipulate graphical images and their surroundings. There will be an introduction to variables. Projects that will require the use of existing knowledge will be assigned and students will be required to use their organizational skills to meet deadlines. iteration structures. and iteration structures. constants. algorithms. Prerequisite: B+ in AP JAVA and permission of the instructor. allowing students to progress from simple sentence structure and syntax in Middle School to a complex and articulate use of language in Upper School. matrices. Students learn how to write object-oriented programs as individuals and in groups. software. Computer Programming I (semester) Students are introduced to the basic elements of the programming language JAVA such as hardware vs. Random access files will be discussed in depth but not addressed in a practical form. Students are given a real-world problem to solve by breaking it down. to increase the students' understanding of literature. constants. The students will specifically study the differences in programming styles and syntax between JAVA and C++. and file processing. and to encourage critical thinking and analysis. 866. English is required of all students each year. and implement new graphics classes. This course also prepares students for the challenging AP JAVA course. writing the methodology. Prerequisite: Computer I. and computer platforms. 870. manipulate fonts. selection structures. Students learn to read existing code and make changes to create a more efficient end-user product. 867. Students learn to read existing code and make changes to create a more efficient end-user product. Prerequisite: B+ in Computer Programming I and II and permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Graphics I 778. The students will specifically study the differences in programming styles and syntax between JAVA and C++. AP JAVA This advanced full-year elective course includes a study of programming methodology. ENGLISH English courses have three main objectives: to develop the capacity for both expository and imaginative writing. and computer platforms. Honors Computer Programming C++ This advanced full-year elective course includes a study of programming methodology. charts from data. vectors. and binary searches with sequential access files. Computer Programming II (semester) Students continue from Programming I by adding advanced JAVA features such as structures.

and To Kill a Mockingbird. Fall semester includes reviews of vocabulary and test-taking strategies. The Merchant of Venice. vocabulary. as well as from a vocabulary text. The writing component of the class is an important one. point of view. the English 11 curriculum continues to complement what students are learning in their history courses. The writing process is stressed as students begin learning proofreading and rewriting techniques. English 8 Beginning with a unit on short stories. and punctuation and are expected to apply these skills in their writing. poetry. During the process they expand their vocabularies. is introduced. Honors English 11 Concentrating on the 20th century. architecture. music. Basic reading comprehension skills are honed through the reading of short stories. and interpretative speeches. and reasoning. drama. Honors English 9 Ninth-grade English complements "Honors World History to 1700. Honors English 10 This course complements “Honors World and American History 1700-1900” and includes the major art. English 6 Sixth-grade English incorporates the study of literature. Vocabulary skills are expanded through the study of words found in the literature read. This study includes sentence structure. Students also develop their public speaking skills and increase their confidence in front of an audience by performing informative. Grammar is learned through written assignments. Major literary selections include Romeo and Juliet. essay. and the short story. Writing focuses on critical thinking. persuasive. with special emphasis on sentence variety and common grammatical errors. 107. Interdisciplinary writing is also a part of the program as students write in the content areas of science and history. Works studied were either written during this time period or are about the culture being studied. and students learn the skills of library research and literary criticism. usage. especially the five-paragraph essay format as the foundation for future analytical and research writing in later years. and short stories. punctuation. history and includes art. Critical and analytical essays involve multi-step development of a thesis supported and developed by examples. prejudice.S. grammar. poetry. architecture. and philosophy. with emphasis on plot structure. and novels. and ideas of this era. and students submit pre-writing and several drafts with formal papers. argumentative writing. essays. symbolism. introducing the principles of good writing and providing numerous opportunities for students to write. and the essay. 109. Major genres of literature include the novel. Basic grammar. Research techniques are adapted to each grade level. The writing process is emphasized. English 7 Seventh-grade English is an interdisciplinary course taught in conjunction with seventh-grade U. and the courage needed to make moral choices. Themes include justice. Major genres include the novel. identity. literary analysis. is integral. Representative American and British literature as well as literature from other cultures either written during or written about the period is studied. Critical reading and thinking skills are developed through class discussions of these works. Animal Farm. and ideas of this era. They engage in portfolio and journal writing and write response journals each quarter for their outside reading. music. reading response. correlating historical and social principles and specific themes with the literature they read. in preparation for the PSAT. usage. music. details. and modeling.acquaint students with works from many nations. and parts of speech. The Catcher in the Rye. applying skills learned in English class. and find relevancy in what they read. including multiple sample tests. refine their writing skills. 110. Students write both personal and analytical papers of varying lengths. Students learn vocabulary through literature as well as the vocabulary text. 106. English 8 deepens and further develops the students' critical vocabulary as they study the elements of the literature. They study sentence structure. and allegory. upon which subsequent English classes build. Writing assignments include journal entries. 108. The Old Man and the Sea. and writing. Knowledge of the literature of this time period is enriched by . poetry. reaction papers. Process and portfolio writing. Of Mice and Men." and includes the major art. 111. drama.

Students write personal essays in preparation for the college essay. and critical papers on longer works. Prerequisite: A or B in all previous English classes and demonstrated ability to work independently. meet deadlines. There will be no appeals process for students who do not meet the grade prerequisite. 114. the class studies the genres of comedy and tragedy in drama. Fall semester includes reviews of vocabulary. Newspaper adviser approval is required. photography. desktop publishing. theatre. motion pictures. AP Language and Composition (for juniors only) This course is designed for juniors with exceptional verbal ability. and writing critically as they prepare and practice for the AP exam. Students also develop their writing skills by paying particular attention to style. produces. Honors English 12 Senior English offers a different approach to literature than previous years because it focuses less on a specific chronological period and more on examining different genres of literature. 19th. In the fall semester. as well as informal daily writing. Journalism/Newspaper Students learn the techniques and obligations of journalism writing. students explore 19th and 20th century works--reading. Prerequisite: B+ or better in previous English course. drama. With emphasis on principles of journalism. poetry. organization. test-taking strategies. Students learn skills that are in high demand in the workplace: writing. and leadership skills.supplementary studies of art. short stories. computer graphics. 121. Grammar. and major inventions of the past 100 years. it also includes additional works from the 18th. focusing mainly on the works of Shakespeare. Yearbook The yearbook staff plans. ethics. There will be no appeals process for students who do not meet the grade prerequisite. Covering most of the works studied in English 11. Also included are a survey of critical approaches. music. and essays. . Analytical reading and writing remain an integral part of the curriculum. Writing focuses on formal explication of shorter works and formal essays relating to issues attending the longer works. 120. and grammar. AP Language and Composition is not a prerequisite for AP Literature and Composition. students learn how to plan assignments. projects involving works of short fiction and selected schools of poetry. and 20th centuries. 115. Prerequisite: B+ or better in previous English course. and multiple choice tests in preparation for the critical reading and writing portions of the PSAT and SAT. and style are emphasized. students will study two additional genres of literature: autobiography and detective fiction. standards. and students take the AP Language and Composition examination in May. Literature is both traditional and multi-cultural in scope. In the spring. mechanics. Members of the class publish The Trinity Voice. 112. During spring semester. and distributes a well-designed and accurate yearbook to the Trinity community. One of the main objectives of Senior English is to build a bridge between high school level work and college. Students write on a variety of topics including but not limited to the literature studied in class. analysis. diction. AP Literature and Composition Fall semester begins with discussion and writing about two 20th-century novels assigned as summer reading followed by an in-depth study of five plays: four by Shakespeare and one by another significant playwright. and styles. The accelerated pace of reading includes novels. This college-level course involves challenging material and assignments. thinking. communications. and accept and/or give editing advice. but students will be asked to expand their repertoire of writing modes to reflect those that occur in many of the college Freshman Composition courses.

field trips. Due to the diversity of disciplines within the Fine Arts Department. art shows. and assigned readings of the literary masters serve as informative and instructional models for student pieces. Because prose and poetry are divided into separate courses. students have opportunities to concentrate their efforts within the genre of their particular interest. Many courses require the instructor's permission. Through ongoing study and application of their craft. Workshop participants will be engaged in a variety of writing strategies. Students participate in and observe various aspects of the arts through interdisciplinary ventures. Darkroom skills are refined and polished. Open to students in grades 10-12. all designed to trigger and promote the imaginative process with respect to poetry." Genesis 1 "To be creative is to be human. Class limited to 12 students. Writing Workshops I and II (semester) Writing Workshops I and II are designed for Upper School students as intensive experiences in the creative-writing process. drafting. editing. Workshops limited to 15 students. brainstorming. Students will supply their own 35mm SLR camera.FINE ARTS "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth…and on the sixth day he made man after his own image. the students begin to hone their artistic skills as they seek to elevate their capacity for creative expression. Creative Writing 614. music." Unknown The Fine Arts Department approaches each student grounded in the belief that everyone has a fundamental and insatiable urge to create. each student will have a finished portfolio of original work. peer/instructor feedback. principles of composition. Emphasis is on the rigid rules of an exacting craft as well as on the imaginative freedom inherent in an expressive and creative visual medium. computer. developing. and classroom projects. cropping. we offer opportunities for exploration of the disciplines and their potential to communicate the truth of the human spirit. the personal essay.g. Time is spent on learning advanced photographic techniques involving creative use of shutter speed. and revision). 125/126. safe handling of chemicals. Subjects covered include camera care and operation. 666. In order to guide the student to a full expression of that urge. productions. more polished level of completion. Round-table group workshops of selections from each writer’s work allows for a diversity of important feedback and constructive criticism that promotes taking a manuscript to a higher. memoir. Creative Writing 8 (semester) This fine art course for eighth graders includes publishing a Middle School literary magazine and creating a personal anthology of poems and short stories. black and white film processing and printing. rotating quarters) Sixth grade classes focus on the basic skills and introductory concepts in art. and theatre. Photography I (semester) Students become proficient in taking. . students are urged to consult with the instructors of the course(s) they are considering. students may take both writing workshops in succession for a full-year credit. and image evaluation. and short fiction. 606. Photography II (semester) Students continue to build on skills learned in Photography I. and printing black and white photographs. Class structure focuses on immersion in all phases of the writing process (e. Fine Arts 6 (full year. proper exposure. Although Writing Workshop I focuses on literary prose and Writing Workshop II on poetry. The emphasis is on creativity and craft. and care of equipment. By semester’s end. Photography 665.

Experiencing live theatre is an integral part of this course. The course concludes with an exploration of American social pro-active/documentary style of theatre and playwriting. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 645. pantomime. moving through and introductory exploration of Commedia Dell’Arte and into a study of American theatre. Prerequisite: Photography I Photography III Students who have successfully completed Photography I and II may choose from the following offerings of single-semester Photography III tracks. Experiencing live theatre is an integral part of this course. 615. as well as assignments that will build a portfolio in photographic news coverage. The Art in Pop Culture: Finding Meaning in the Madness (fall semester) What is the meaning and message in our society’s current artistic expression? By treating current literature. voice and diction work. Through a sampling of current literature. different aspects of theatre (language. improvisation. delving into and exploring the conscious and unconscious messages and thoughts inherent in our current media climate. and alternate image presentation modes. Theatre 609. film. design. 612. 648. Through timed writings. Each student will supply his/her own digital camera and will learn image capture and manipulation in Photoshop. this course will challenge the student to examine culture and society from an artistic vantage point. Theatre 8 (semester) Eighth graders learn and develop their acting abilities through mime. theatre. Theatre 7 (semester) Seventh graders learn and develop their acting abilities through mime. Theatre I (fall semester) Upper School students embark on a journey through World Theater starting with the Greeks and ending with the political theatre of Brecht. Prerequisite: Theatre I or permission of the instructor. and television. and monologues. and monologues. theatre. 646. Space is limited in each track. character. A history component will familiarize students with the history of photography. . Experimental (spring semester) Students will explore non-traditional photo image reproduction and presentation. During the course of each play. Photojournalism (semester) Students shoot assignments for the newspaper and yearbook. Open to students in grades 9-12. Theatre II (spring semester) Upper School students continue their exploration of theatre beginning with unarmed stage combat. and performance art. Students begin to do character analysis work and rehearse and perform traditional scenes and monologues in the classroom. scenes. Students are required to attend live theatre performances. Students should be prepared to write weekly papers and participate in lively classroom discussions. 677. students will begin to awaken a discerning eye toward the constant barrage of society’s media frenzy. film and television as art. 620. Experiencing live theatre is an integral part of this course. These classes meet during the same period but follow different tracks. voice and diction work. Digital (semester) Students work entirely in digital imagery.aperture. improvisation. scenes. they will hone their response. direction) are explored in individual and group creative projects. theatre. timed writing. creative composition and point of view.

II. Through the use of IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet). Students will not only explore the writings of William Shakespeare.621. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Within a cultural and historical framework. Prerequisite: Advanced Acting I. direction. Prerequisite: Audition/Tech interview in November 2006. Performance (spring semester) The primary focus of this class is the technical and emotional skills needed to perform the works of William Shakespeare with a secondary focus on The Tempest. lights. Within a cultural and historical framework. 623. ad sales). and Shakespearian text. Art 8 (semester) Eighth graders explore more advanced techniques and materials used in artistic expression. but also study the history. The focus of their semester’s work will be determined by instructor/student conference and will culminate in a theatrical production. seventh graders explore with many tools and materials used in artistic expression. 611. students learn to standardize their pronunciation of American English. No previous theatre classes or experience needed. Advanced Acting I (fall semester) Advanced students work on vocal development using Linklater techniques. or permission of the instructor. plot. draw. Musical Theatre (spring semester) This course is performance-based with an emphasis on putting together a showcase at our annual Fine Arts Day. mores. Art 607. In addition to preparing all the aspects of the production for an April run (acting. Experiencing live theatre and auditioning is an integral part of this course. costumes. poster. set. Prerequisite: Advanced Acting I and II or permission of the instructor. Quarterstaff and single-handed Broadsword will be introduced according to student ability level. The necessary skills to perform Shakespeare are introduced. stage management. paint. or a combination of these three. . Technical Theatre I and II (fall and spring semester) Students in this Upper School course are the creative force behind all the physical aspects of the department's productions. 622. paint. Prerequisite: Theatre I. and assist with all productions on the Trinity stage. program. and work with clay. they sculpt. 682/683. however not all cast members are required to take this class. 617. create. They will design. this class will also focus on an in depth exploration of character. An audition is required. Experiencing live theatre and auditioning is an integral part of this course. Socially active theatre is explored through The Living Newspaper Project and IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) is reviewed when students learn a standard British dialect. exploring and increasing their emotional range. Stage Combat (spring semester) A specialized class for the focused theatre student who wishes to learn the basics of stage combat with an emphasis on unarmed combat. Master Class (fall and spring semester) Upper School students may elect to take this independent study class upon permission of the instructor. draw. students continue their exploration of Shakespeare’s characters and language moving onto an in-depth study of Commedia Dell’Arte (Italian street theatre) and the comedic style of Moliere. and college level text analysis. and work with clay. culture. 618. Students will learn to notate and reproduce the combat of other choreographers as well as create their own unique choreography. Art 7 (semester) In this course. they sculpt. Advanced Acting II (spring semester) As continuation of Advanced Acting I. and language of the Elizabethan period. sound. It surveys the history of American musical theatre and gives the student an opportunity to learn choreography and songs. They may choose their own focus—performance. no exceptions. 679. playwriting.

664. watercolor. 631. ink. The course may be taken more than once. ink. Assignments include a combination of specific design assignments and self-directed projects. or 3-D.and three-dimensional art. 637. glazing. 633. Pottery I (fall semester) This course teaches the fundamentals of hand building. Prerequisite: Four semesters of art classes. students should . Prerequisite: Visual Foundations. Offered at the same time as AP Studio Art. pencil. Painting (spring semester) Beginning. Art 8: Ceramics (semester) Ceramic students will learn traditional skills including hand building. Pottery II (spring semester) Advanced-level assignments in hand building. 635. Portfolio Development (semester) This course is designed for the serious art student who wishes to create a portfolio for college or to develop one section of the AP Studio Art portfolio without submitting it to the College Board for grading. and firing. and three-dimensional art. Submission of a portfolio of thirty or more works of art is required for completion of an AP portfolio. and more are included. This course may be taken more than once. oils. The student will become familiar with a variety of materials and techniques. pen. and glaze techniques are included. 639. painting. Drawing. 630. wheel throwing. which can include one semester of photography. It will cover a variety of methods of drawing and rendering in pencil. 632. pastels. wheel throwing.to intermediate-level painting assignments using watercolor. Visual Foundations (course #630 or #631) is required for students who plan to continue to the advanced-level courses of Painting. Prerequisite: Visual Foundations. It includes an exploration of materials and techniques of both two.to advanced-level drawing assignments in charcoal. Prerequisite: Visual Foundations. Drawing. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of the instructor. and more are included. The course may be taken more than once. pastels. 638. or 3-D.610. wire. Prerequisite: Drawing I or permission of the instructor. Drawing II (spring semester) Intermediate. Prerequisite: Pottery I. 634. The course may be taken more than once. Drawing I (fall semester) This course teaches the basics of drawing and the art of seeing. For a detailed description of the course.to advanced-level sculpture assignments using wood. Visual Foundations: 15th Century through Modern Art (semester) This Upper School course covers the time periods of art including European and Modern Art. and Photography) This course requires advanced skills and a strong work ethic. Study of color is emphasized in this course. acrylics. and glaze techniques. plaster. Class size limited to 14. clay. Prerequisite: Art 7 and permission of the instructor. Visual Foundations (course #630 or #631) is required for students who plan to continue to the advanced-level courses of Painting. and permission of the instructor. Visual Foundations: Ancient Art through 15th Century (semester) This Upper School course covers the time periods of art history while exploring the methods and materials of drawing. Students will work on individual and group projects while studying historical and contemporary examples of pottery from various cultures. stone mixtures. surface decoration. and pastels. 3-D. wheel throwing. AP Studio Art (2-D. students create works that demonstrate broad experience and accomplishment or works organized around a compelling visual concept. Sculpture (fall semester) Intermediate. and more are included.

Middle School Chorus Middle School Chorus is a full-year. on and off campus. Music of various genres is explored. daily ensemble class in which the primary focus is the preparation of music for public performance. and tone production. which can include one semester of photography. students choose an instrument and selected students are allowed to switch to percussion by the end of the first quarter. and ear training are discussed and demonstrated on a daily basis. A planned sequence of appropriate pedagogical materials and repertoire are explored through daily rehearsal and performance. this course prepares the student for the rigors of Advanced Strings IV. Intermediate Strings III Strings III is a continuation of the skills developed in Strings II. vowel formation. One semester of drawing is recommended. and Contemporary periods. this ensemble is designed to expand the musical.speak with the instructor. music theory. such as breathing. and performed on a regular basis. The violin. Beginning Band This ensemble is open to Middle School students who have had no prior experience playing a band instrument. and listening skills. The ensemble performs frequently throughout the school year. With the aid of the instructor. and to execute the fundamentals of proper singing. Concepts of rhythm. Designed for the intermediate player. to read music. cello. Prerequisite: Four semesters of art classes. hand positions. sightreading. embouchure. breathing. 680. music theory. viola. 678. sight-reading. and to execute the fundamentals of proper singing. Music of various genres will be explored. A planned sequence of appropriate pedagogical materials and repertoire is explored through daily rehearsal . and vowel formation. and string bass are introduced. The primary goal of this course is the preparation of music for public performance. technical. i. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 681. 698. and ear training are discussed and demonstrated on a daily basis. Vocal Society Vocal Society is a full-year. 691. Romantic. with particular emphasis on ensembleship. Students learn to practice good rehearsal etiquette. Advanced Strings IV Building on the foundations laid in Strings III. tone production. Classical. this ensemble is designed to expand the musical. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. and aesthetic awareness of an experienced string student. Strings I Strings I introduces the beginning-level string student to the many aspects of ensemble rehearsal and performance. Advanced Strings V Building on the foundations laid in Strings IV. daily ensemble class which explores the art of small ensemble and choral singing. posture. Fundamental concepts of music theory and relevant aspects of music history are presented daily. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Instrumental Music 695. The ensemble performs frequently throughout the school year. Fundamental concepts of rhythm. to read music. The emphasis of this class is to develop solid fundamentals. on and off campus. rehearsed. Students learn to practice good rehearsal etiquette. Intermediate Strings II Strings II is an interactive exploration of the wealth of masterpieces composed for string orchestra. 686. Vocal Music 628. such as breathing. technical.e. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students gain an essential perspective on the performance practice of music during the Baroque. and each student can explore the various characteristics of the string instruments. Music of diverse musical styles is introduced. and permission of the instructor. and aesthetic awareness of an experienced string student.

Concert Band This ensemble is designed for the Middle School musician who has had at least one year of experience on his/her instrument. body language. . public address. and national levels is required. AP Music Theory . 692. Jazz Band This ensemble is designed for Middle School and Upper School students who desire to examine the distinct style of jazz. Wind Ensemble This ensemble is designed for the Upper School musician who has demonstrated a solid command of the fundamentals on his/her instrument. and thirty minutes per day of home practice is required. Speech 8 (semester) This introductory course in public speaking for eighth graders focuses on informative and persuasive speeches as well as on oral interpretation of literature. students should speak with the instructor. harmonizing given melodies. regional. to attend regional. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. and jazz rock forms. For a detailed description of the course. but not required. sight-reading. 675. Fundamental concepts of rhythm. 642. logical support. sight-reading. Forensics/Speech 613. Concepts of ensemble balance and blend are introduced. In these semester courses. Competition at the local. Students will be exposed to swing. Students learn effective structures. Students will attend one sectional rehearsal and two full rehearsals each week and receive . Fundamental concepts of rhythm. Private lessons are strongly encouraged. emphasis is on all three areas of competition: debate. Prerequisite: Score of 70% on the entrance exam. and thirty minutes per day of home practice is required. and valid evidence. be-bop. Prerequisite: Forensics III.and local-level competitions to fine-tune their skills. and gestures are discussed. Multiple-eventing is also required at this level. Students are also exposed to principles leading toward good improvisational skills. 643. While performance and listening skills are the primary goals of the course. Forensics III Students learn the techniques required to win at the national level in forensics competition. Fundamental concepts of rhythm. Prerequisite: Forensics I or II. Concert band meets every school day and performs several times throughout the year. and twenty minutes per day of home practice is expected. sight-reading. music theory. 694. music theory. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. and ear training continue to be discussed and developed on a daily basis. and dramatic interpretation. Private study is strongly encouraged.Composition This course is designed for the serious musician who intends to pursue music at the college level. Students are encouraged.5 credit for the school year. Forensics I and II (semester courses) Upper School students learn the techniques required for successful competition in forensics speaking. this course requires students to participate in nationallevel competition. and four-part chorale writing. and independent study is encouraged. sight singing. 640/ 641. 689.and performance. Private lessons are strongly encouraged. and ear training continue to be discussed and developed. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Forensics IV A continuation of the independent study program. music theory. They may choose areas of expertise to explore in depth. blues. Skills learned include realizing figured bass. Opportunities for solo and chamber performance are provided outside of the class time. and ear training continue to be discussed and demonstrated on a daily basis. stage fright.

Prerequisite: Forensics IV. and writing activities. Multiple-eventing is also required at this level. French IB In this continuation of French IA. Frequent compositions are assigned throughout the year. Prerequisite: B+ in French II and permission of the instructor. Three consecutive years of one language is recommended. students build on their skills and appreciation of French. Students are also introduced to the poetry of Victor Hugo. Syntax continues to be stressed. the most competitive colleges prefer four years. French II Both oral and written aspects of the French language are equally emphasized to promote a balanced proficiency. Honors French III This course is designed for students who. grammar. 2) department chair meeting with principal to evaluate student’s overall academic performance. 207. during their level II academic year. French I In this introduction to French language and culture. Oral proficiency. speaking. Cultural and linguistic elements are enriched through projects. Oral aspects are again emphasized and the vocabulary base broadened. . and songs. The course continues the acquisition of vocabulary. Open to students in grades 8 and above. Open to students in grades 7 and 8 who have completed French IA. Very strong language students could graduate with sequential language study through 5 or 6 years and AP courses in two languages. 203. The painting of Monet and the Impressionistic movement are studied. The textbook used is Discovering French Level III. reading. 204. Forensics V A continuation of the independent study program. writing. Upon successful completion of French IB. and its application is demonstrated through frequent compositions. Oral presentations. and 3) final decision made by department chair and principal. have consistently shown superior skills in both the written and the oral aspect of the French language. Open to students in grades 8 and above. is developed and strengthened through frequent oral presentations. French III This continuation of French strengthens and develops skills learned in French I and II. and cultural aspects of French life. 201. students master elementary concepts of basic vocabulary and grammar through listening. 206. play a significant role in the development of oral proficiency. Students who change or add a second language are required to take a minimum of two years of the new language. FOREIGN LANGUAGE Trinity's minimum foreign language requirement for graduation is two consecutive years of one language and continuous language study through the sophomore year. students master elementary concepts of basic vocabulary and grammar through reading. a major component of the course. 202. students enroll in French II. Emphasis is placed on the development of oral proficiency through group and individual work. games. this course requires students to participate in nationallevel competition. Open to students in grades 6 and 7. French IA In this introduction to French language and culture. Cultural study includes specific lessons about France. Students who do not meet the grade prerequisite for a course may initiate an appeals process which includes 1) recommendation from previous foreign language teacher.644. and listening activities. as in the previous levels.

and culture. Prerequisite: Permission of the AP instructor. students expand their English vocabulary through the study of derivatives. French IV Designed to serve as a transition from the study of language to the study of literature. and Voltaire. In addition to new Latin vocabulary. the poetry is that of Baudelaire. Latin IA In this introduction to the language and culture of the Roman world. Selections from each genre are chosen for additional reading. Prerequisite: French IV or Honors Pre-AP French IV. 209. Prerequisite: B+ in French III or French IV and permission of the instructor. this course is geared to students who have demonstrated the ability to express themselves well in oral and written forms. students expand their English vocabulary through the study of derivatives. . In addition to Latin vocabulary. this course is equivalent to a junior-level college-survey course in literature.230. Du Bellay. Open to students in grades 6 and 7. The goal is to teach students to read. Baudelaire. Frequent compositions and oral presentations are part of the course and grammar is reviewed. Hebert. 211. Its content focuses on the plays of Moliere et Giraudoux. students acquire the skills needed to read and use Latin as soon as possible. Students read a wide variety of short stories and poems written in contemporary French. Labe. Cultural study includes the geography and the history of France. Open to students in grades 8 and above. Prerequisite: B+ in Honors Pre-AP French IV and permission of the instructor. 210. students are introduced to more sophisticated sentence patterns and grammatical concepts are reinforced and augmented. The history of France is emphasized. AP French Literature Offered to students who have successfully completed the AP Language exam. Students develop the skills needed to read Latin immediately. Students analyze the poetry of Paul Verlaine. 208. and the poetry of Apollinaire. The required works determined by the College Board may be subject to change. and understand French literary texts with particular attention to character and theme as well as structure and style. completed the following year. They read and discuss a variety of French authors and genres from various periods including Le Petit Prince. French V This course is designed for all French IV students who desire to continue their apprenticeship of the French language. Upon successful completion of Latin IB. grammar. The text is Maupassant's Pierre et Jean. French literature is studied in preparation for the AP French Literature course. they discover the music of Claude Debussy and the painting of Antoine Watteau. both in speaking and in writing. analyze. development of vocabulary for reading a variety of non-technical writings without dependence on a dictionary. AP French Language The objectives are understanding French in various conversational situations. Oral proficiency will be given strong emphasis through the use of frequent oral presentations. and La Fontaine. Written competence will be strengthened through the continuous study of grammar and periodic written compositions. Frequent oral presentations and compositions are assigned throughout the year. Medieval literature through the Lais of Marie de France is studied during the second semester. Open to students in grades 7 and 8 who have completed Latin IA. and ability to express oneself in French accurately and resourcefully. students enroll in Latin II. The study of English derivatives based on Latin vocabulary is an important element of the class. 212. Latin IB In this continuation of Latin IA. Students learn to speak accurately and confidently. 231. the novels of Laye. Honors Pre-AP French IV Designed to serve as a transition from the study of language to the study of literature. this course introduces students to 20th-century literature. 233. Maupassant. Latin I Students are introduced to the language and culture of the Roman world and learn basic grammatical concepts and terminology.

Latin II Students learn more sophisticated sentence patterns and grammatical concepts. reading. Oral proficiency is emphasized through group and individual work. Open to students in grades 8 and above. students develop the four skills of listening. AP Latin (Vergil) Students study Vergil's Aeneid. students are exposed to a variety of authentic materials. The syllabus is determined by the College Board AP Latin Committee. and writing are taught through the study of a wide range of materials. Spanish IA In this introductory Spanish course. and improves writing skills. 258. games. The skills of listening. and writing. 223. Ovid. Upon successful completion of Spanish IB. From the first day of class. 257. Open to students in grades 8 and above with recommendation of current instructor and completion of Latin I. thus. Catullus/Horace. Derivative work continues. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. They learn about Hispanic culture. Students translate original Latin authors. There is study of more diverse meters and poetic devices. 225. student must have a B+ or above in Honors Latin IV. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish. Spanish I This introductory course is for students with no prior knowledge of the language. students enroll in Spanish II. 220. speaking. They expand their knowledge of Latin vocabulary. Spanish II This course builds oral proficiency. and students prepare for the national examination in May.213. Spanish IB This course continues the skills and mastery developed in Spanish IA and is designed to build on oral and written skills and appreciation of Spanish. Open to students in grades 6 and 7. student must have a B+ or above in Honors Latin IV. both prose writers and poets. There will be selections from the following authors: Sallust/Cicero. Honors Latin IV Students read only original authors. and. AP Latin Literature Students study the poetry of Catullus and of a second author. Honors Latin III This course completes the introductory curriculum and refines and reviews knowledge of grammar and vocabulary from previous years. increases reading comprehension. During the second semester more emphasis is given to reading and writing skills. Open to students in grades 8 and above. 217. and poetic devices. Grammar is reviewed and tested within the literary contexts. Open to students in grades 7 and 8 who have completed Spanish IA. 216. reading. The historical backgrounds are discussed. The Latin authors are presented within historical context. Spanish III This course focuses on everyday communication and prepares the student to use the language appropriately in a variety of situations and contexts. Students learn how to listen and speak in Spanish. both in speech and writing. Vergil. speaking. Cultural and linguistic elements are enriched with projects. Students acquire an appreciation of the customs and traditions of Hispanic cultures in Latin America and Spain. or Plautus. they are introduced to Latin meter. 222. The syllabus is determined by the College Board AP Latin Committee. and students prepare for the national examination in May. Speaking Spanish at all times is required. Students practice conversation in small groups. and Roman culture. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. scansion. some of whom are part of. for the first time. good preparation for the AP curriculum. Prerequisite: Recommendation of current instructor and completion of Latin III. and students are expected to participate in class discussions and to speak Spanish at all . English derivatives. 221. and songs. Prerequisite: Recommendation of current instructor and completion of Latin II.

A hand-held recorder is required for three tests during the year. Students are responsible for taking notes and communicating at all levels in Spanish. Students read selected works by Spanish and Hispanic contemporary writers and continue a review of the grammatical points and verb tenses presented in Spanish III. Study of advanced grammar structures complements an increased emphasis on composition writing. Students are encouraged to follow the honors sequence leading to AP language and literature. as well as discussions and analyses. acquire extensive vocabulary. Supplemental reading. or Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture of Spain. The class is conducted entirely in Spanish. and speaking activities are included. write expository passages. Students read selected works by Hispanic writers. points of view. The course includes an overview of Latin American culture and geography as well as insights into the culture of Spain. AP Spanish Literature Open to qualified students. and writing skills through a variety of authentic materials and internet resources. this course is equivalent to a junior-level college-survey course. reading. The course will provide students with the fundamental concepts of discourse analysis applied to culture and cinematography. and students are expected to participate in class discussions and to speak Spanish at all times in order to increase oral proficiency. and to enrich students’ understanding of Hispanic cultures as expressed in literary readings and on screen. both orally and in written form. 234. It focuses on strengthening all four language skills according to the Advanced Placement guidelines. and writing. Prerequisite: B+ in Spanish II and permission of the instructor. writing. The main focus is preparation for the AP exam in May. Prerequisite: B+ in Honors Pre-AP Spanish IV and permission of the AP instructor. 227. 228. Prerequisite: B+ in AP Spanish Language and permission of the AP instructor. Speaking Spanish at all times is required. Hon Pre-AP Spanish IV. Advanced Spanish Conversation and Culture of Hispanoamerica This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice the language through discussion of selected films and topics of interest. The course will enable students to better understand Hispanic cultures as reflected in its cinema through the study of fundamental concepts of analysis. Honors Spanish III This course focuses on enhancement of listening. speaking. The reading list is determined by the College Board and may be subject to change. AP Spanish Language Offered to qualified students. The reading selections are chosen to be representative of a particular author's style. Honors Pre-AP Spanish IV This intensive course is a continuation of Honors Spanish III and is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Spanish Language examination. speaking. reading. as well as to prepare students to express fluently their opinions. This course includes an overview of Latin American culture and geography as well as insights into the culture of Spain. They make cross-media presentations of selected works in Spanish in order to rework the themes and materials studied. and express ideas with accuracy and fluency. Prerequisite: Spanish III. and criticism on readings and films. Prerequisite: B+ in Honors Spanish III or Spanish IV and permission of the instructor. .times in order to increase oral proficiency. this course is equivalent to a college course in advanced composition and conversation. 229. 226. The main objectives are to understand formal and informal spoken Spanish. ideas. 237. Spanish IV Enrichment activities using a variety of media communication furthers proficiency in the four skill areas of listening. Course content focuses on the works of Spanish and Latin American writers from medieval times to the 20th century. Prerequisite: Spanish IV.

as well as review and maintenance of basic math skills. The program of continuous review of these operations uses whole numbers. inequalities. Our Middle School curriculum is accelerated so that students in grade 8 take Algebra I/Honors Algebra I. proportion. Students must take three years of mathematics in the Upper School to meet graduation requirements. equation solving in one variable. Students who complete the latter before their senior year may take an independent study of selected topics or more advanced classes at area college campuses. above all. critical thinking. decimals. to be particularly industrious. integers and rational numbers. and problem solving. Crossovers are possible in appropriate/exceptional cases and may be made at the beginning of a school year or other convenient times with departmental approval. ratio. standardized test scores. Additionally. Tracking begins with Math 7. ratios. and the geometry of plane figures are also included. Students who fall short of an honors or AP math course prerequisite by no more than one percentage point may appeal for placement in that course provided they have an overall GPA of no less than 3. Students learn the skills necessary for successfully analyzing and solving verbal problems. Advanced Math 7 Students learn the skills necessary for success in Honors Algebra I and are expected to excel in computational skills. 408. ratio and proportion. and integers. graphing. These skills include computation with whole numbers. and polynomials and graphing. decimals.MATHEMATICS Trinity's mathematics program aims to provide students whose abilities range from average to gifted with the quantitative. and every effort is made to place students appropriately so that they may experience success in their classes. probability. College Algebra is offered as a year-long course to students in grades 11 and 12 who may take it to meet graduation requirements or as an elective. The courses offered range from Math 6 through AP Calculus BC. Math 7 Students learn the skills necessary for success in Algebra I. The four basic course sequences listed below provide guidelines for course selection. and strong recommendations from their current and past math teachers. measurement. to understand and use mathematical theory. percents. a final math exam grade of B or better. and/or placement exams as well as teacher recommendations. Topics include the use and properties of number systems. statistics. fractions.5. four years of math in the Upper School is recommended and sought by highly selective colleges. and creative problem-solving skills necessary for success at college and in the real world. Track 1 Math 6 Math 7 Intro to Algebra Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Precal or Prob/Stat or College Algebra Track 2 Math 6 Math 7 Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Precal or Prob/Stat or College Algebra Hon Calculus or AP Stat Track 3 Math 6 Adv Math 7 Hon Algebra I Hon Geometry Hon Algebra II Hon Precalculus AP Calculus AB or AP Statistics Track 4 Math 6 Adv Math 7 Hon Algebra I Hon Geometry Hon Algebra II AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC 406. . probability and statistics. problem solving. students are introduced to informal geometry. 407. and. Honors courses are recommended for students whose strength is in mathematics and who can work independently on more challenging problems. solving equations. informal geometry. polynomials. Topics include elementary algebraic equations. Math 6 Mastery of numeration and computation skills in the four basic operations are learned. Fundamental concepts of number theory. and working with percents. The criteria used to place students include prior records.

Honors Algebra I Providing a rigorous and in-depth study of algebra and emphasizing deductive reasoning skills. quadratic equations. 412. but are not limited to. algebraic structure. inequalities. Topics include sets. polynomial equations.on the Algebra I placement test for new students. conic sections. solving and graphing first degree equations/inequalities. tessellations in the plane. systems of linear equations/inequalities. combinations. 413. polynomials and rational expressions. structure and properties of the real number system. or B+ on Honors Algebra I placement test for new students. relations and functions.Prerequisite: A+ average in Math 6. and summer work. direct and inverse variation. angle relationships. gain understanding of the deductive method of thinking. and logic. firstdegree equations in one and two variables solved algebraically and graphically. triangles. 414. Concepts as well as practical applications are discussed. or B+ in Advanced Math 7. irrational numbers. functions and graphs. Honors Geometry Students begin the first semester with a rigorous. polynomials and rational expressions. algebraic and graphical solutions to first-degree equations and inequalities in one and two variables. integers. and word problems. percents. geometric inequalities. Topics include. relations. rational and irrational numbers. permission of the department chair. Prerequisite: A+ in Introduction to Algebra and A on the Honors Algebra I placement test. constructions. quadratic equations. Prerequisite: B+ in Honors Geometry. Algebra I This course provides the foundation for more advanced mathematics courses. An introduction to algebra is presented through equation solving. Algebra II This course continues the study of the structure of algebra and the foundation for applying the skills to other mathematical and scientific fields. and two-step problem solving. sequences and series. or A+ in Math 7. area. relations and functions.average on Trinity's seventh grade placement test for new students. Major areas of study include the decimal system. permission of department chair. systems of equations and inequalities. and other polygons. and logarithms. Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry. logarithms. congruence. Introduction to Algebra Fundamental mathematical concepts and operations are learned as a firm base to prepare for Algebra I. and geometry. develop creative thinking involving the discovery of relationships and proofs. 411. similarity. Topics include. Geometry Students learn about sets of points in the plane and space. polynomial functions. planes. emphasizing basic concepts and properties. operations with polynomials. or A+ in Geometry and a teacher recommendation. permutations. Conic sections are introduced if time permits. methods of proof. or at least a B+ on Honors Algebra II placement test for new students. angles. functions and relations. proof. and matrices. polygons. quadrilaterals. real exponents. triangles. . operations and properties used within the real number system. and development of formulas. 409.in Introduction to Algebra or B. and summer work. complex numbers. operations with rational algebraic expressions. Honors Algebra II This advanced course presents an in-depth study with emphasis on theory. Prerequisite: C. exponents and radicals. word problems. probability. factoring.in Math 7 or B. Topics include extending the study of the structure and properties of the real number system. or an A. It develops the skills needed to solve mathematical problems. For students with a C+ or below in Math 7. in-depth study of geometry. circles. 416. graphing. 410.on Honors Algebra I placement test. as well as their applications. and quadratic functions. but are not limited to. quadratic inequalities. integral exponents. this course is a foundation for more advanced mathematics courses. Prerequisite: Algebra I. variables. quadratic equations and inequalities. volume. complex numbers. rational and irrational algebraic expressions. and develop skill in applying the deductive method to mathematical situations. radical expressions. operations with polynomials including all forms of factoring. Topics include the Euclidean geometry of lines. B.

exponential. AP Calculus BC This highest-level course reviews all the topics of AP Calculus AB and progresses through the study of more advanced topics in calculus in preparation for the BC exam. non-calculus-based college course in statistics. and estimation. general probability theory. Probability and Statistics This course includes work in conditional probability. and logarithmic functions. 422. normal distribution. the AB syllabus. Honors Calculus This course provides an introduction to topics covered in a college level calculus class. linear transformations. analytic geometry (including coordinate proofs of geometry theorems and the conic sections). and statistical report writing. exponential. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors with a C+ or above in Geometry and Algebra II and permission of the department chair. and in business. circles and spheres. and human sciences. congruence and similarity of geometrical figures.or above in Precalculus and permission of the department chair. They may then have an option for which exam to sit. Relevant aspects of algebra. or a minimum of B+ on the Honors Geometry placement test for new students. or B+ in Probability and Statistics. transformation geometry. but not limited to. binomial distribution. Prerequisite: C or above in Honors Precalculus or B. Prerequisite: B+ or above in Honors Algebra I or A+ in Algebra I and permission of department chair. AP Statistics This course covers the entire AP Statistics syllabus. and geometric constructions are integrated into the curriculum throughout the course. the analysis of correlation and regression. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors who have a minimum of B. limits and continuity. Prerequisite: A minimum score of 3 on the AP Calculus AB exam or A+ in Honors Precalculus with permission of the department chair. conic sections.in Honors Precalculus. 2) planning a study (deciding what and how to measure). but are not restricted to. as a minimum course content. B+ in Precalculus. Prerequisite: B+ in Honors Precalculus or A+ in Precalculus or A+ in Honors Geometry and Honors Algebra II with permission of the department chair. algebraic. Prerequisite: B+ or above in Honors Geometry and Honors Algebra II. geometric probability. Topics in the second semester include. and areas and volumes. sequences and series. Precalculus Three broad areas are covered: algebraic functions (including polynomial. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: 1) exploring data (observing patterns and departures from patterns). introductory. 426. The characteristic properties of these functions and their use as mathematical models for solving real world quantitative problems are explored. which is equivalent to a one-semester. Prerequisite: C+ or above in Geometry and Algebra II. as well as random variable functions. and trigonometric functions (including triangle trigonometry and the circular functions). Students enrolled in this course who are interested in physics should enroll in AP Physics C. and an introduction to trigonometry. and logarithmic functions). polynomial. All classes cover. . 425. AP Calculus AB The level of course work each year depends upon the preparation of that particular class. 420.perpendicularity and parallelism in the plane and in space. 3) anticipating patterns (producing models using probability theory and simulation). rational. limits. Some may proceed to the BC level. biological. 418. the derivatives and antiderivatives/integrals of functions and their applications to real world problems encountered in the physical. These include a review of the properties of functions studied in precalculus. 4) statistical inference (confirming or disconfirming models through inferential and diagnostic methods). rational. Honors Precalculus This advanced course covers selected topics including. 435. vectors. 434. numerical data sampling and analysis. and an introduction to calculus.

Students are assessed in five areas: participation. All activity classes are separated by gender. This course satisfies the graduation requirement. proper use of the equipment. but space is limited. soccer. The class will give students the knowledge and desire to establish personal health and fitness programs. recreational games. PE 7 812 (girls)/822 (boys). log of out-of-class physical activity. The curriculum includes the following units of activity: badminton. communicable and chronic diseases. PE 6 807 (girls)/817 (boys). The goal of this course is to provide participants an overall health and wellness awareness that will lead to behavior change. Some basic trigonometry may be covered as well. track and field. and probability theory. emotional. Life Management Skills (semester) Life Management Skills is offered as a semester course in the eighth grade. 829 (girls)/819 (boys). The curriculum includes units on mental. and safety precautions. Students in grade eight participate daily in PE for one semester. effects of supplements and drugs.439. The purpose of the course is to expand the student's background on the basic fundamental principles of weight training and conditioning and explore the areas of proper nutrition. Prerequisite: Conditioning I. and family health. sequences and progressions. softball. 843. Life Management Skills 8 (semester) 809. and injury prevention and safety. and content knowledge. Conditioning I (semester) This course is for students in grades nine through twelve.in Geometry and Algebra II or any higher-level course in the regular math track and permission of the department chair. and general fitness. mathematical induction. Daily PE is required for students in grades six and seven throughout the school year. pickle ball. the binomial theorem. swimming. consumer and community health. social. Students learn the skills they need to become health literate. fall. team handball. and creation of an individual fitness program. physical fitness. tobacco. This course satisfies the graduation requirement. Areas that will be covered include identifying muscles of the body. growth and development. stretching and flexibility. nutrition. alcohol. volleyball. 810 (girls)/811 (boys). basketball. This course is designed to increase the student's personal fitness level through daily exercise and training. Prerequisite: Personal Fitness. Conditioning II (semester) This course is designed for students in grades nine through twelve. tennis. prevent disease. 842. Prerequisite: Open to juniors and seniors who have a minimum of C. PE 8 (semester) Trinity's physical education program is based on the standards developed by the National Association of Sports and Physical Education (NASPE) and Sunshine State Standards (SSS). The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to the basic fundamental principles of weight training and conditioning. and provide lifetime fitness activities. Upper school students who have not yet received credit for this course can take it during the summer. flag football. They may complete the course during the summer session prior to their ninth grade year. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 806 (girls)/816 (boys). College Algebra This course reviews basic algebra and progresses through more advanced topics including polynomial and rational functions. and reduce health related risk behaviors. systems of equations and inequalities. Personal Fitness (semester) Ninth grade students are encouraged to complete this course in the fall or spring semester. identifying physiological considerations. . and drugs. personal health. maintain and improve health. or spring semester. motor skills. help them realize that daily physical activity will increase their energy level and productivity.

students examine concepts of motion. . bocce ball. 507. earth and space science. energy. 506. rules and regulations of individual or dual sports such as tennis. Prerequisite: Personal Fitness. chemical reactions. Students who do not meet the grade prerequisite for a course may initiate an appeals process which includes 1) recommendation from previous science teacher. Students discuss contemporary topics as well as the moral issues surrounding biology. attitudes. SCIENCE To be an informed citizen today. Prerequisite: Personal Fitness. bonding. Science 6 An introduction to the major areas. 509. This course is a prerequisite for all Upper School science courses. environmental interaction. flag football. ecology. inheritance by reproduction. Laboratory work is central to every course. resistance to the tendency to make generalizations on the basis of insufficient data. and strategies in sports such as basketball. cell theory. 845. power. problem solving. Critical thinking skills and practical laboratory methodology are further developed. and learning content. accurate and critical observations. Laboratory skills are continually reinforced with particular emphasis on data accumulation and interpretation. Lifetime Sports (spring semester) Participants will be exposed to skills. strategies. it is this experimentation which distinguishes science from other disciplines. Students learn the proper use of basic laboratory equipment and procedures. discovery approach. energy. badminton. Science 7 This class focuses on utilizing scientific methods to produce original studies and learning/reinforcing content. and scientific writing. cooperative strategies. They examine concepts of atomic theory and structure. Physical Science Students in grade 8 are introduced to the basic concepts of chemistry and physics through a hands-on. In the physics semester. Team Sports (fall semester) Students will participate in a variety of traditional team sports. A successful science student develops the characteristics. and stoichiometry in the chemistry semester. evolution and adaptation. Honors Biology This required Upper School freshman course emphasizes the ten major themes of biology: biological systems. genetics and heredity. regulation. Students learn to become proficient in critical thinking. one must understand the language. and electricity. the scientific method. human biology. alertness to recognize the unexpected. Class time will include skill development. A "hands on" approach develops the students' powers of observation and critical thinking skills. and 3) final decision made by department chair and principal. and techniques of a scientist. Units studied include scientific methods and measurement. work.844. the attitudes. this course focuses on selected topics in marine biology. and other recreational sports. 2) department chair meeting with principal to evaluate student’s overall academic performance. and science as inquiry. some of which are an inquiring mind. forces. willingness to reject old ideas and to accept new ones when sufficient data warrant. Special emphasis is placed on use of the microscope. form and function. and collection of data. bioethics. and the methods of science. rules and regulations. and volleyball. 508. The science department strives to develop scientific literacy by having the student obtain a thorough understanding of scientific principles.

A formal research project on histology and significant dissection (including. Honors Anatomy and Physiology This advanced course is designed for the self-motivated student who has a strong interest in the biological sciences. and linear momentum). 515. 535. thermodynamics. genetics and evolution. and decision-making. but not limited to. Prerequisite: B+ in Biology and recommendation of biology instructor. Laboratory activities supplement the lecture material and include physiology experiments to demonstrate functions of various systems and major units on histology.510. biodiversity. biodiversity. Coverage of three general areas is emphasized: molecules and cells. Anatomy and Physiology Students receive an overview of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on a systematic approach to the study of the human organism. Honors Chemistry Students learn the basic principles of chemistry. mechanical energy. Students are responsible for several research projects during the year. and recommendation from chemistry instructor. This course is NOT recommended for students who have taken or intend to take Advanced Placement courses. The second semester includes studies of fluid mechanics. dynamics. One full semester is devoted to Newtonian mechanics. Topics include population dynamics. including a logical problem-solving approach as applied to chemical theories. 540. including geometric optics. atomic theory and structure. Some concepts examined include states of matter. Introductory topics include chemistry and review of cell biology. Prerequisite: B+ in biology. Laboratory experimentation reinforces the theoretical modes studied in the classroom. as well as field investigations of the Trinity campus are used to reinforce and apply theories taught in the classroom. and organisms and populations. Prerequisite: B in Algebra I or Honors Algebra I. An overnight field trip to the Riverwoods Field Station. resource supply and depletion. AP Physics B In this introductory course in college physics. AP Environmental Science This course is designed to provide students with the scientific principles. concepts. environmental ethics. electricity and magnetism. 520. thermodynamics. a cat) are integral to the course. forces. Twelve major lab topics are also covered. resource supply and depletion. stoichiometry. These subjects are presented in a context that is related to everyday. Exceptions may be made for seniors who are concurrently enrolled in precalculus. 525. The textbook used is college level. Prerequisite: B+ in Biology and Chemistry. population dynamics. Laboratory activities are used to reinforce anatomical and physiological concepts. Students study ecosystems. and decision-making. the skeletal system. Students are responsible for research projects during the year and discuss bioethical issues relating to topics of study. momentum. students learn the basic natural laws governing the following specific areas: mechanics (kinematics. Students develop an understanding of these complex interrelationships while working on field investigations and a study of Lake Martha. and methodologies required to understand the complex interrelationships of the natural world. We strongly recommend but do not require that students have taken Honors Anatomy. AP Biology This course meets seven periods per week and stresses the basic facts and synthesis of these facts into major concepts and themes. 545. observable phenomena. Honors Physics Students learn the fundamental laws of physics in four major subject areas. fluid . 530. and energy. B+ in chemistry. All systems and their interdependence are discussed. and the wave nature of light. Students are responsible for completing several projects during the year. and dissections (including a cat and various organs). and are accompanied by numerous demonstrations and laboratory exercises. which is the study of motion. Prerequisite: A math course that includes trigonometry. environmental ethics. The course includes an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. and qualitative analysis. Environmental Science This course deals with man's impact on the environment.

Middle School students are required to complete a three-year sequence: World History and Geography. AP Chemistry This course meets seven periods per week and is structured according to the course description for AP Chemistry. steady flow. and social groups. and Asia. developing and preserving democratic institutions. equilibrium. chemical reactions. and culture of regions of the world. thermodynamics. AP Calculus AB and recommendation of current science teacher. Concepts are reinforced with numerous laboratory investigations and experiments. and beliefs within our society. gas laws. heat and thermodynamics (thermal properties of matter. History. SOCIAL SCIENCE Charting a Course: History for the 21st Century The vision of the social science department is to develop well-educated people who share a body of knowledge. people. economic. political system.S. state. beginning with a required three-year sequence (two options): . and the functions of the U. foreign affairs. 550. to the emergence of the nations of the Western Hemisphere. They follow the sweep of history from its beginnings in the Middle East through the growth of Europe. and twentieth century physics (the photoelectric effect. 307.mechanics (Archimedes principle. and nuclear reactions). wave interference. electricity and magnetism (electrostatics. and moving forward in a global perspective. It includes a detailed study of bonding. history. sound. Important themes include the shaping of a national identity from our diverse population. 308. History The seventh-grade course presents a lively chronological history of the United States from the period of early exploration to the present day. Concepts are reinforced with numerous laboratory investigations and experiments. economic. if time permits. acknowledge the role of religion and ethics. U. wave phenomena (periodic waves. Prerequisite: Completion of. direct current. the structure. Civics The eighth-grade course is directed toward developing a sound. basic understanding of the theories. or current enrollment in. the role of the political parties.S. Students also learn about careers. preserve a set of values. and are prepared to participate with confidence in the dynamics of political. Africa. Prerequisite: B+ in Chemistry and recommendation by chemistry instructor. Upper School students must complete 4-1/2 credits. Students must take the AP Physics C (mechanics) exam and may take the AP Physics C (electricity and magnetism) exam if they do the extra work required. and kinetics.S. and electrodynamics). 306. and political problems. electron energy levels. World History and Geography This sixth-grade course offers students a look at the geography. and economic fundamentals. Students learn the rights and responsibilities of citizens and the importance of individual civic participation in the democratic process. and selected social. light and geometric optics). It includes an in-depth study of Newtonian mechanics and an introduction to electricity and electrodynamics. AP Physics C This is a calculus-based course in introductory university physics for scientists and engineers. understand common cultural references. and federal levels. and heat engines). U. 546. Prerequisite: Completion of Honors Precalculus and recommendation of current science teacher. Through this course students will become more aware of and understand the impact of relevant historical events. and the Bernouli effect). electrochemistry. and Civics. energy of photons. Topics include analysis of the three branches of government at the local.

Option 1: Honors World History to 1700 (9th). the role of the major religions. Students must take AP United States History in 11th grade. Subsequent units examine circumstances in the U. There will be no appeals process for students who do not meet grade prerequisites. 322. codification of law. and human gains and losses incurred by the populations. the transition to agriculture. this course is organized around particular global historical themes and frameworks. The course focuses primarily on the past one thousand years. environmental transformation. or Comparative Religions. 311. and AP United States History (11th) Seniors take one of the following: 1) Honors Economics/Honors Government. and African colonies). the industrial and technological revolutions. technological innovation. Honors World History to 1700 This ninth-grade study of world history and geography provides an extensive survey of history from ancient civilizations to 1700. Prerequisite: A. Other changes (intensified communications. natural law. and the consequent impact to the environment. new weaponry. the evolution of social classes. or 3) AP Economics. with emphasis on critical thinking and evaluative writing. AP World History (10th). AP World History Available to qualified sophomores. Confucian family. and Honors World and American History since 1900 or AP United States History (11th) OR Option 2: Honors World History to 1700 (9th). The salient characteristics of classical civilizations are identified and reviewed. certain themes such as gender roles. Topics studied include the revolutions (French. and the modern growth and mobility of populations. and geographic change. 310. As students proceed in their study from one civilization to another. The course begins with the study of ideas and ideals which shaped the American Revolution and analyzes the documents that expressed those concepts. and the structure and types of government are considered so that students will develop several bases for comparison. history. World Wars I and II receive special attention. growth of bureaucracy. and the collapse of the European colonial empires. Introduction to the Bible. 2) Honors Economics/Honors Personal Finance. The additional half credit is satisfied by selecting one of the following courses: Introduction to Ethics. Asian. Students study the spread of liberal democratic ideas in the U. It emphasizes major civilizations with some study of other societies as well and begins with a review of hunting and gathering societies.S. The course is an in-depth study of the entire scope of U. and other areas of the world with regard to the development of governments which claim to be freelyconstituted. AP United States History This junior-level course must be taken as a follow-up to AP World History or can be taken in place of Honors World and American History Since 1900 by students who meet entry requirements and wish the additional challenge of college-level work. including caste. and democracy. the rise of Marxist and fascist challenges to capitalistic liberal democratic ideals. industrial. 314. Honors World and American History 1700-1900 (10th). the spread of technology and capitalistic enterprise. and beyond the western world.S. It begins with a review of the industrial and technological revolutions of the world in the later years of the 19th century. technological.in ninth grade English and history. Text material is college-level. Honors World and American History Since 1900 The theme of this junior-year course is how the three dominant movements of the 19th century were resolved in the 20th century. three transformational themes of modern times are emphasized: the democratic revolution.S. institutional. Honors World and American History 1700-1900 During the sophomore year. and . and global environmental change and pollution) are studied as well. and South American) and the rise of European empires (the American. 309. Students learn specific factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills in order to understand and interpret the causes and consequences of cultural.

and the development of writing and critical thinking skills vital to success on the Advanced Placement examination. abnormal psychology and treatment of psychological disorders. Topics include development. market structures. It also explores topics from micro and macroeconomics such as supply and demand. sensation and perception. and motivation and emotion. Prerequisite: B+ or higher in previous year's social science course and permission of the department chair. A variety of perspectives—political. 317. 316. the students will use newspaper articles. and the impacts of those policies. cognition and language. intellectual. editorials. This is an elective course open to juniors and seniors. social. and cultural—will be explored so that students can enhance their understanding of Europe’s impact on all aspects of the modern world. theory of the firm. It focuses on the economic way of thinking about incentives. public policy. this advanced course is a survey of the development of the American political system and its operative institutions with particular emphasis on legal interpretations of the Supreme Court in defining the character of American governance. Prerequisite: B+ or higher in previous year’s social science course. investments. and trade. Supreme Court cases.students are encouraged to read outside sources of historical interpretation. This survey course exposes students to the history of Europe since 1450. 342. identification and evaluation of historical interpretation. While much of the course is devoted to study from these perspectives. Major psychological theorists' lives. taxation. Prerequisite: B+ or higher in previous year's social science course and permission of the department chair. theoretical concepts. Prerequisite: B+ or higher in previous year's social science course and permission of the department chair. and important research are discussed. cost. learning and memory. AP European History While a global approach to the study of history is important. cash management. . Honors Personal Finance (semester) Available to juniors and seniors as an elective. diplomatic. this course fulfills one-half of the history/social studies requirement for seniors not taking AP Economics. insurance. It fulfills the senior social science requirement. Honors Economics (semester) This course examines how markets for goods and services operate to solve the basic economic problem of scarcity. Case studies and independent analysis of political scenarios require critical thinking and writing skills. Psychology (semester) Available to juniors and seniors. the world in which we live today has been significantly shaped—for better and for worse—by the inhabitants of Europe. this course is devoted to the study of macroeconomics with selected micro topics covered as an introduction. this course examines the history of psychology from ancient to modern times. In addition to the text. Federal Reserve. political debates. and decision-making. 319. This college-level program encompasses a high level of reading and interpretative skills. AP Economics Designed for stronger students. Honors Government (semester) This course examines the structure and function of our government with regard to the current political system. Students study basic financial planning: budgeting. Introduction to experimental methods and to influential experiments in the history of psychology are also covered. 315. and retirement planning. intelligence and its measurement. there will also be an emphasis on analysis of primary documents. 318. speeches. and political films to explore the contemporary scope of government in the United States. social psychology. AP United States Government and Politics Available to juniors and seniors. Early philosophers and schools of psychology are studied. personality. Juniors enrolling have a choice of AP Economics or Honors Economics/Honors Government their senior year. 335. Participation in the Florida Stock Market Game is required. fiscal policy. economic.

Through these primary-source readings the class considers each tradition in the light of the basic questions of a worldview: Is there a god. Introduction to the Bible (semester) This course is a survey of the Hebrew and Christian Testaments of the Bible with emphasis on the major stories and passages. Students are exposed to the psychological facts. this advanced course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Comparative Religions (semester) This course is open to sophomores and above. what is his/her/their/its nature? What are human beings. history. Christian. to establish the relationship between worldview and ethics. biological bases of behavior. and. 345. motivation and emotion. and social psychology. Reading and discussing biblical texts and connecting the texts to the development of both Judaism and Christianity are the focus of the class as well as the premise that knowledge of the Bible is essential to understanding western literature. 355. and special emphasis is placed upon the intellectual/moral trends which attract attention in the university setting. personality. The second portion of the class is application. Jewish.341. to encounter different ethical situations through primary readings. and if so. Introduction to Ethics (semester) This course is open to sophomores and above. The first portion of the class is theoretical and has two goals: first. AP Psychology Available to juniors and seniors. does it have any bearing on my current existence? Discussion and group readings are the primary means of instruction. developmental psychology. principles. . if so. and phenomena associated with each of the major sub-fields within psychology and learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice. Buddhist. during which the class examines current moral issues from the perspectives of these varying ethical systems. and Islamic sources and seek to hear the voices from within each tradition. Students read many of the sacred texts from Hindu. Discussion and group readings are the primary vehicles for the critical work which occurs during the semester. Main topics include methods. treatment. sensation and perception. testing. 348. Prerequisite: B+ or higher in previous year's social science course and permission of the department chair. and do we have a purpose? What constitutes the "good life?” Why is there suffering? Is there an afterlife. abnormal psychology. second.

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