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Elementary Vocal and General Music Curriculum Framework Overview

Prince George’s County Public Schools Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772 June 2006

PGIN#: 7690-3468

BOARD OF EDUCATION OF PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MARYLAND
Beatrice P. Tignor, Ed.D., Chair Howard W Stone, Jr., Vice Chair John R. Bailer, Member Abby L. W. Crowley, Ed.D., Member Charlene M. Dukes, Ed.D., Member Robert O. Duncan, Member Jose R. Morales, Member Judy G. Mickens- Murray, Member Dean Sirjue, Member Leslie Hall, Student Board Member Dr. John E. Deasy, Ph. D, Chief Executive Officer

Shelley Jallow, Chief Academic Officer Patricia Miller, Director of Curriculum and Instruction Gladys Whitehead, Ph.D., Coordinating Supervisor, Academic Programs Anita Lambert, Supervisor of Vocal/General Music, K-12

Acknowledgements: The following individuals were responsible for the development of this document: Wayne Brookover, Carolyn Brown, Dara Case, Lynette Truske, and Kathy Wesley.

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Table of Contents
Overview of the Elementary Music Curriculum Guide SECTION I – Curriculum Framework and Pacing Guide for Elementary Vocal and General Music VSC Overview and Scope and Sequence for Music Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides SECTION II – Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Assessment Strategies and Grading Students Guidelines for Incorporating Students with Special Needs Guidelines for Itinerant Teachers of Music Guidelines for Incorporating Multicultural Music Guidelines for the Use of Religious Music Recommended Resources and Equipment Guidelines for Integrating Music and Technology Suggested Repertoire Lists – Pre-K to 6th Grade Chorus SECTION III - Instructional Activities for Elementary Vocal and General Music Musical Concepts and Skill Development Rhythm Activities Melody/Harmony Activities Form Activities Tone Color Activities Music In Relation to People and Other Arts Music Careers SECTION IV - Sample Lessons for Elementary Vocal and General Music Instruction Guidelines for teaching Pre-Kindergarten Music Pre-Kindergarten Lessons and Activities Guidelines for Recommended Music Activities in Primary Grades Kindergarten Lessons and Activities First Grade Lessons and Activities Second Grade Lessons and Activities Third Grade Lessons and Activities Guidelines for Recommended Music Activities in Intermediate Grades Fourth Grade Lessons and Activities Fifth Grade Lessons and Activities Guidelines for Teaching Sixth Grade Using the Middle School Model Sixth Grade Lessons and Activities Appendix 2 4 5 18 26 27 30 32 33 34 35 36 39 43 46 47 48 63 71 75 81 102 107 108 109 113 115 129 148 168 194 196 218 236 237 269

OVERVIEW
The Vocal and General Music Program of Instruction provides all students with appropriate resources and experiences to develop positive attitudes and sensitivities toward music. Through the implementation of sequential musical skills and concepts students will develop an understanding of the intrinsic value of music and its relationship to diverse cultures, traditions, values and beliefs. The Program is also designed to foster enjoyment and appreciation of music beyond the limits of classroom instruction. Overview of the Music Guide The Elementary Vocal and General Music Guide is designed to assist teachers with music instruction in Pre - Kindergarten through Grade Six. The guide is in alignment with the Maryland Music Voluntary State Curriculum as well as the Scope and Sequence of musical concepts for Prince George’s Public Schools. It is divided into four sections. Section I – Curriculum Framework and Pacing Guide for Elementary Vocal and General Music An “Overview of the Voluntary School Curriculum” has been included in this section. The overview explains the connection between the approved Scope and Sequence and the Draft Voluntary State Curriculum for the state of Maryland. Section I also contains the Vocal and General Music Scope and Sequence for Prince George’s County Public Schools. The format has been changed so that the Scope and Sequence is presented with all the expectancies and indicators for a given grade level on the same page so that teachers may look at all the outcomes for a grade level. The Voluntary State Curriculum has not been included due to the fact that at this time it is still in draft form. Long range planning and pacing guides follow the Scope and Sequence. With the limited amount of available instructional time, it is recommended that music teachers use long range planning and regular monitoring through the use of a pacing guide in order to cover the scope of the music program, contained in the indicators. Each pacing guide represents the concepts that must be covered for each grade level. However, teacher discretion may be used in relation to which concepts are taught per quarter. Section II – Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Assessment of students in the music program must be done based on specific criteria as indicated in the Scope and Sequence. There is no room for grades based on personality or behavior. Participation following specific criteria is a valid assessment tool. Music is a performance-based discipline and a student’s participation is often the only way to assess the mastery of skills. Guidelines for assessing students are part of this section of the guide. There are guidelines to assist with a number of other aspects of the job of the vocal and general music teacher including incorporating students with special needs, itinerant teachers’ needs, incorporating multicultural music, recommended resources and equipment, as well as guidelines for integrating music and technology. A suggested repertoire for each grade level is included. There may be many different opinions of what should be included on this list so this is not included with the intention that it is mandated but more to provide a guide as to appropriate song literature for each grade level. Chorus ideas are also included in this section of the guide. Intermediate students may elect to audition for chorus. Suggestions for scheduling and managing the Chorus in the school are provided. Chorus students have the opportunity on the County level to participate in the Elementary Honors Chorus. Selected students, who successfully complete the required auditions, receive extended opportunities to sing and participate in concerts with other ensembles throughout the county; and to perform at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

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Section III – Instructional Activities for Elementary Vocal and General Music A variety of activities for teaching the indicators in the Scope and Sequence are given here. This section of the guide is divided into three parts based on the outcomes: musical concepts and skill development, music in relation to people and other arts, and music careers. These items are not presented in any intended sequence nor are they intended to be a complete lesson in this section of the guide. However any of the activities may be developed into a complete lesson by the music teacher with attention to the needs of the students in their individual building as well as resources and equipment that is available. Section IV – Sample Lesson for Elementary Vocal and General Music Instruction The elementary music teacher is responsible for the instruction of children of a variety of different ages from Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 6 in some buildings. This eight year span contains a wide range of developmental stages for children. With that in mind, this section contains guidelines for working with students of different age levels and information on their development stages as well as what is appropriate for their music instruction. Sample lesson plans have also been included and can be used as a model for lesson plan development for music teachers. These lessons are merely suggestions and not intended to be the complete curriculum for any grade level nor are they intended to be required lessons. Appendix The final section of the document contains the Maryland State Department of Education Music Glossary from the Voluntary State Curriculum. A list of professional organizations for music teachers can also be found in this section.

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Prince George’s County Public Schools 4 .SECTION I Curriculum Framework and Pacing Guide for Elementary Vocal and General Music Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

” The writers tried to protect the integrity of those original documents. then type in the box “Maryland Voluntary State Curriculum” and click on the first hit. It takes you right to the page where ALL of the VSC documents are available for ALL subjects. and aligns them with the “Maryland Assessment Program. Eighth grade was written first. In our county. and indicators as a subdivision under each of the expectancies. (Some are still in draft form. It was edited many times. but ALL are available online at http://www. The music document is found. Who wrote it? Representatives from 24 of the districts across the state of Maryland served on writing teams. with expectancies as a subdivision under each of the outcomes. so that teacher can read it two ways: (1) horizontally for teachers who want to see the development of concepts across the grade levels (2) vertically for teachers who want to view all concepts taught within one grade level This format was mandated by the MD State Dept.Prince George’s County Public Schools 5 .org/instruction/curriculum/ (The easiest way to get to the document quickly is through Blackboard OR go to your internet home site. followed by sixth and seventh. MUCH OF THE ORIGINAL WRITING WAS KEPT. It was done backwards (beginning with the highest grade) so that a hierarchy of skills could be evidenced in the document. under “Arts. and titles were changed for purposes of consistency with all of the VSC documents for all subjects taught: Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . since every principal in every school is mandating that every teacher of every subject must support reading and math skills. so much of the original information was “re-worked” into the new format and with the new titles that were mandated by the state. of Education. There were some additions.”) Why was it written? (1) (2) (3) to provide consistency across each county in the state of Maryland to provide a structure of support for new teachers to provide an exemplary curriculum for all students in Maryland What is the format? It is written in chart form.VSC Overview What is the VSC? It stands for Voluntary State Curriculum. click search. the scope and sequence (now called the Curriculum Framework Progress Guide) was created to align our curriculum with the MLO’s.” written back in the mid to late 80’s. both internally and externally. grade one and two. K. then grades three. There were four teams of writers. of course.mdk12. Maryland now has VSC for all subjects that are taught in grades pre-K through grade 8. four. and finally pre-K.” Objectives were not entered into the document unless they were “assessable. What is in it? It includes information merged from the “Maryland Essential Learner Outcomes. I recommend that every teacher read the math and reading documents for the grade levels that they teach. and five. It had four outcomes.

measurable statements about what students should know and be able to do. The indicators provide the next level of specificity. so that teachers can narrow their focus. the focus is on writing VSC for grades 9-12. with this year’s ninth grade class being the first group that must pass the HSA in order to graduate. The objectives provide the specific learning that should occur.Prince George’s County Public Schools 6 .) Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Middle and elementary teachers have been living with MSPAP (now MSA) for years. (No objectives could go into the document unless they were measurable!) What are the implications for music teachers? Coming soon to a neighborhood near you: assessment in the arts! (Right now. NCLB has now forced accountability on state assessments all the way to the high school level. the content standards are broad.[Scope and Sequence] [VSC] Used to be called: Now is called: Outcome Content Standard Expectancies Indicators Indicators Objectives In all of the VSC documents. Every objective is measurable.

1. listen for simple directions or verbal cues in singing games D. Develop the ability to formulate. sing from memory 15 songs appropriate to this age level 3. skills.KINDERGARTEN OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. short/long. respond to steady beat through locomotor and non-locomotor movement 2. 1. and tambourines 2. explore creative expression through music. 1. such as a vocal version and a strictly instrumental version. and counting D. perform songs and dances from a variety of historical periods and world cultures. listen for repeated patterns in music 3. listen to two versions of the same piece and identify them as same or different. speaking and singing C. including some connected to general classroom studies C. and movement 4. explore a rich repertoire of music representing its roles in the lives of people. evaluate music performed in class using whole group response strategies OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. explore a range of classroom instruments such as wood blocks. 1. such as lullabies 2. 1. and respond to music. use body percussion to create sound patterns OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers. Develop competence in reading. 1. explore music used in daily living 2. Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. identify musical contrasts such as fast/slow. A. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. sing songs that use the voice in a variety of ways 2. apply. Develop the knowledge. A. explore the use of pictorial representations for sound 2. 1. Develop the skills required for the performance of music. dance. explore the steady beat through singing. Develop the ability to improvise music. sing songs representative of different activities. speaking. 1. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. participate in music activities that emphasize alphabet recognition. OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. 1. 1. spatial relationships. A. holidays and seasons in a variety of cultures B. rhythm sticks. and the visual arts 2. demonstrate mechanics of reading from left to right OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. jingle bells. perform. discuss ways people make music Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . triangles.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. experiment with sound patterns through exploration of classroom instruments 2. Describe the characteristics of musical sound. 1. investigate various vocal timbres through whispering. playing classroom instruments. Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. guiros. Expectancies/indicators A. 1. cymbals. 1. AND RESPONDING .Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music PRE . A. maracas. use the voice to improvise animal and environmental sounds B. Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. PERFORMING. notating and performing music. high/low and loud/soft B. Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. sand blocks. creative dramatics. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. listen to a variety of short musical examples (vocal and instrumental) B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 7 .

A. PERFORMING. dramatize stories of familiar songs using scenery. 1. 1. notating and performing music. perform singing games D. 1. perform. Develop competence in reading. 1. investigate sound production using voices. 1. running. identify musical contrasts such as fast/slow. demonstrate the steady beat playing classroom instruments 4. Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. and respond to music. and other objects that make sound B.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. Describe the characteristics of musical sound. 1. short/long. describe how singing is different than playing instruments OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. Develop the knowledge. Develop the ability to formulate. sing and interpret several songs representative of different activities. props and costumes D. A. walking. A. identify simple formal characteristics in music such as same/different and whole/part 2. accompany songs and stories using student selected instruments and sounds OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. 1.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music KINDERGARTEN OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. 1. 1. A. interpret sounds in music using shapes and pictures OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. holidays and seasons B. clap and sing short rhythmic and melodic phrases 2. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. evaluate music performed in class using whole group response strategies OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. Develop the skills required for the performance of music. Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. Develop the ability to improvise music. Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. 1. investigate various vocal timbres through whispering. bending and stretching to musical sounds 2. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. AND RESPONDING . turning. relate movements such as. Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. skills. skipping. speaking and singing C. high/low and loud/soft B. 1. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. sing from memory 15 songs appropriate to this age level 3. classroom instruments. explain briefly the historical context of selected songs C. 1. apply. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers. list various places where music can be heard Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . demonstrate appropriate audience behavior such as listening attentively and giving appropriate applause B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 8 . Expectancies/indicators A. 1.

1. sing familiar songs in an ensemble C. 1. create an ostinato by clapping. Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. perform. and whole class performances OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. 1. identify the different voices of males and females as well as children B. 1. and patschen simple rhythm patterns to accompany recorded music and familiar songs D. 1.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. stamping. Develop the ability to improvise music. Develop the skills required for the performance of music. A. recognize musical contrasts such as unaccompanied melody/melody with accompaniment 3. find the strong and weak beat pattern in duple meter 2. investigate differences between solo and ensemble performances OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. Expectancies/indicators A. A. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. PERFORMING. Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. examine various jobs involving music Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 9 . notating and performing music. vary familiar songs through changes in tempi and dynamics OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. implement an age appropriate scoring tool for evaluating solo. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. skills. A. Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music FIRST GRADE OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. Develop the ability to formulate. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. Develop competence in reading. sing simple “sol-mi” patterns using hand signs 2. 1. read and sing “sol-mi” patterns as notated on the music staff OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. dramatize and pantomime songs using movement D. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers 1. 1. 1. sing and interpret several songs representative of different countries and cultures B. determine criteria to develop an age appropriate scoring tool for evaluating solo. 1. ensemble. 1. improvise four beat rhythm ostinato B. and respond to music. Describe the characteristics of musical sound. identify and perform music with a variety of tempi and dynamics 3. AND RESPONDING . A. and whole class performances B. Develop the knowledge. apply. Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. read and perform simple rhythmic and melodic notation using quarter and eighth notes and rests 2. ensemble. explain briefly the historical context of selected songs from various cultures C. 1. write new verses to familiar songs 2. 1.

Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. identify sound patterns in simple forms such as AB.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music SECOND GRADE OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. notating and performing music. arrange given musical ideas (excerpts) to create musical forms such as AB. such as marches and lullabies OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. compare widely contrasting styles.Prince George’s County Public Schools 10 . read and sing “sol-mi-la” patterns as notated on the music staff OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. perform simple ostinato patterns to accompany songs using classroom rhythm and melody instruments 2. 1. Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. relate musical sounds to visual art identifying repetition and contrast D. ABA. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. A. A. identify ways of improving a musical performance B. both audio and video Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . relate body movements to tempo. A. ABA. A. melodic direction and like/unlike phrases of songs from various cultures 2. and respond to music. and rondo OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. melodic direction. melody with ostinato. examine ways in which music is a part of each student’s life and the lives of children around the world B. Describe the characteristics of musical sound. Develop the knowledge. sing simple “sol-mi-la” patterns using hand signs 3. describe unaccompanied melody (a capella). 1. and melody with harmonic accompaniment in music from various cultures using appropriate musical terms 3. PERFORMING. identify and sing. 1. 1. improvise simple rhythmic and melodic phrases B. sing and play classroom instruments in an ensemble using music from various cultures C. 1. find the strong and weak beat patterns in duple and triple meter 2. from written notation. Develop the ability to formulate. Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. evaluate the effectiveness and quality of individual contributions to the class musical performance OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. Expectancies/indicators A. rhythmic and melodic patterns. 1. Develop the skills required for the performance of music. skills. 1.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. perform. apply. Develop competence in reading. 1. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers 1. Develop the ability to improvise music. repetition and contrast D. 1. 1. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. AND RESPONDING . 1. 1. and rondo B. construct perspectives from listening to different styles of music from various cultures C. listen to and express opinions about recorded musical performances.

sing simple melodic patterns containing “do” and “re” using hand signs 4. 1. notating and performing music. Develop the skills required for the performance of music. Develop the ability to formulate. compare the music for various groups of people as a part of everyday life B. 1. skills. Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. describe characteristics of music such as crescendo. 1. Describe the characteristics of musical sound. read and sing “mi-re-do” patterns in various keys as notated on music staff OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. perform. 1. apply. decrescendo and accent using appropriate musical terms 3. maintain tempo and pitch while singing familiar rounds 3. A. both audio and video Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . echo) B. sing a variety of western and non-western folk and composed songs including those in other languages 2. read and perform simple rhythmic and melodic notation including half notes 2. dynamics. Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. 1. A. identify sound patterns in phrases (call and response. Expectancies/indicators A. and respond to music.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music THIRD GRADE OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. define tempo. 1. experience a live performance outside the school setting and compare to recorded performances. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. 1. listen to orchestral music which features string and woodwind instruments to introduce classification terms: chordophones and aerophones OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. sing and play classroom instruments in an ensemble matching dynamic levels C. explain preferences for songs to sing. Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. AND RESPONDING . construct perspectives from listening to western instrumental music from various historical periods C. A. 1. 1. and meter using musical terms 2. 1. 1. Develop competence in reading. sequence the events in a musical drama D. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. 1. select and play instruments to match the mood of extra musical ideas OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers. A. improvise simple rhythmic and pentatonic ostinati to accompany familiar songs B. Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. music for listening and related activities B. interpret music in free and patterned forms in various meters using body movements D. construct support for individual interests in different styles and kinds of music OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 11 . perform a rhythmic ostinato while singing familiar songs 2. Develop the knowledge. PERFORMING. Develop the ability to improvise music. instruments to play.

and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances.e. perform simple melodic ostinati to accompany songs 2. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . interpret a song using standard sign language Develop competence in reading. summarize ways in which people from diverse cultures enjoy performing and creating music Develop the ability to formulate. notating and performing music. Develop the ability to improvise music. describe how music reflects traditions in various cultures 2. compose and perform music using simple rhythmic notation for classroom percussion instruments OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. 1. and Native American music 2. examine the use of musical elements and perform music using the style reflective of that culture Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. D. C. band and related folk instruments using sound classification terms (i. B. sing and summarize the historical context of early American music such as spirituals. skills. 1. and idiophones OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. folksongs. ABA and rondo forms 2. 1. 1. 1.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music FOURTH GRADE A.Prince George’s County Public Schools 12 .. 1. and demonstrate an understanding of AB. C. A. read and perform simple rhythmic and melodic notation including the whole note 2. aerophones.. membranophones. A. apply. evaluate individual performances for the reflection of cultural authenticity B. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. PERFORMING. responding to conducting cues Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. perform children’s game songs from various historical periods and cultures Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. 1. D. 1. B. 1. identify and sing octaves as notated on the treble staff 3. sing and play classroom instruments in an ensemble. and respond to music.) Develop the skills required for the performance of music. 1. 1. describe tone color and methods of sound production of orchestral. 1. patriotic songs. sing simple melodic patterns containing high “do” and low “sol” and “la” using hand signs 3. improvise pentatonic melodies on keyboard instruments Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. B. A. identify the main theme of a recorded selection. Expectancies/indicators Describe the characteristics of musical sound. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. perform music with appropriate expression as indicated by the written score OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. relate music in two beat and four beat meter to patterned body movements 2. Develop the knowledge. compare timbre in music to color in visual art Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. perform. listen to orchestral compositions which emphasize brass and percussion instruments and classify using the terms: aerophones. AND RESPONDING .

Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers 1. A.Prince George’s County Public Schools 13 . identify the ways in which elementary music instruction provides preparation for a career in music Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

1. listen to musical compositions and identify selections which emphasize various instrumental ensembles and/or chorus OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. 1. read. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. B. describe tone color and methods of sound production of orchestral. B. 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 14 . proper tempo. 1. relate music in three beat meter to patterned body movements 2. name. Develop the knowledge. 1. OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. apply. C) from the written score 4. such as chorus 4. and appropriate expression Develop the ability to formulate. played and sung in class 2. dynamic. demonstrate and define responsibilities that are a part of singing in an ensemble. perform appropriate dances to accompany traditional folk music Develop competence in reading. 1. interpret in writing an understanding of the relationship between music and events in United States history Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts.. C. apply standard tempo. and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. and articulation (staccato and legato) terminology to music heard. sing. B. compare the uses of music in western and non-western cultures 2. sing songs in major and minor tonalities 3. C. 1. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music FIFTH GRADE A. and play intervals and relate them to song material OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. and perform music in duple and triple meter including dotted half notes 2. perform. Expectancies/indicators Describe the characteristics of musical sound. and respond to music. 1. 1. identify patterns in music and relate them to patterns in visual art Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. identify musical abilities which give personal satisfaction B.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. Develop the ability to improvise music. sing simple partner and two-part songs using a two staff system Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement.e. determine the characteristics of a good performance such as singing or playing in tune. 1. simple melodic patterns containing “fa” and “ti” using hand signs 2. D. B. write. D. A. 1. sing. compose and perform music using simple melodic notation for classroom instruments OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. PERFORMING. identify sections of music (A. improvise vocally using various forms such as call and response and question and answer Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. A. aerophones. AND RESPONDING .. 1.) Develop the skills required for the performance of music. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. band and related folk instruments using sound classification terms (i. improvise simple accompaniments and counter melodies using the voice and other instruments 2. notating and performing music. skills. identify and write the letter names of all lines and spaces on the treble clef 3. determine how lyrics of songs reflect the culture and history of various people Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. A.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 15 .Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. analyze a professional musician’s portfolio for similarities to that of the class’ Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . etc. A. examples of student work and compositions. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers 1. compile a music portfolio including items such as recordings of whole class performances (audio and video). 2.

examine music which is unique to students’ cultural heritage 2. influenced the development of musical styles in the United States Develop a perspective of music’s role in human history. Develop the ability to improvise music. 1. perform dance steps to accompany a variety of songs and musical selections from different cultures Develop competence in reading. relate the ways in which music of various cultures. CULTURAL AND SOCIAL CONTEXTS: Develop an understanding of music as an essential aspect of history and human experience. D. transpose a simple melody 4.e. B. 1. C. investigate the use of electronic instruments and equipment in the making of music Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. 1. D. identify scale patterns. polyphonic and homophonic texture 4. 1. read and play a harmonic classroom instrument using standard chord symbols OUTCOME II: HISTORICAL. B. A. notating and performing music. 1. conduct music in compound meter 2. compare the use of music and the roles of musicians in our culture and those in selected non-western cultures 2. apply. PERFORMING. 1. B. and sensitivity to evaluate musical compositions and performances. analyze musical selections for the use of syncopation and blues notes 3. sing and play melodies and descants to accompany songs 2. skills. C. perform. read and perform simple rhythmic notation including sixteenth notes 2. 1. construct and apply criteria of good musical performances to individual achievements B. A. A. AND RESPONDING . compare folk music to other forms of artistic expression in western and non-western cultures Develop knowledge of a variety of musical styles and genres. write simple rhythmic and melodic patterns from dictation 3. such as African. perform and compare examples of monophonic.AESTHETIC EDUCATION: Demonstrate the ability to perceive. 1. and respond to music. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . describe the tone color and methods of sound production for the piano and electronic instruments using sound classification terms (i. compare dissimilar performances of the same work discussing differences in interpretation and preferences Develop the ability to formulate. and Latin American. blend vocal timbres in an ensemble such as chorus Develop the ability to respond to musical sound through movement. 1. 1. chordophones and electronophones) Develop the skills required for the performance of music. select and play classroom instruments that are appropriate to the non-western music being studied Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. tone centers and solfege syllables in the major and minor modes 2. OUTCOME I: PERCEIVING. identify aurally a repertoire of diverse vocal and instrumental compositions written by exemplary composers OUTCOME III: CREATIVE EXPRESSION AND PRODUCTION: Develop the ability to creatively organize musical ideas and sounds. European. 1. Expectancies/indicators Describe the characteristics of musical sound.Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music SIXTH GRADE A. Recognize music as a form of individual and cultural expression. relate styles in music to styles in visual art 2.Prince George’s County Public Schools 16 . and communicate criteria for evaluating individual performance and creative efforts. compose and arrange descants for familiar melodies OUTCOME IV: AESTHETIC CRITICISM: Develop the ability to make aesthetic judgments. Develop the knowledge. 1. write compositions in complex forms such as fugue and theme and variations 2.

examine several music career choices and discuss the skills and experiences needed 2. examine the role of technology in various music careers Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Curriculum Framework for Elementary Vocal and General Music OUTCOME V: CAREER DEVELOPMENT: Demonstrate knowledge of music careers and career clusters. Recognize the uses of music in everyday life and related careers 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 17 . A.

A.Kindergarten year. 2 II. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the Pre . 1 III. 1 Third Quarter Listen for repeated patterns Identify musical contrasts: high/low Respond to steady beat Listen for directions and cues in games Explore music in daily life Use body percussion for patterns Fourth Quarter Identify musical contrasts: short/long Respond to steady beat Demonstrate mechanics of reading left to right Explore music in daily life Listen and compare two different versions of same music Experiment with sound patterns Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. 1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. A. D. B. 1 III. A. A. B. B. B. D. 2 II. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. 4 III. 1 I. 1 I. C. D. 3 II. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. A. speaking. B. 1 II. C. SP P P P Explore classroom instruments Sing songs from memory Sing different types of songs Explore creative expression I. A. 3 I.Prince George’s County Public Schools 18 . C. singing Use voice to improvise animal and environmental sounds Scope & Sequence Indicator V. B. 1 IV. A. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught. 1 C P CP Sing songs that reinforce classroom concepts Listen to variety of musical examples Evaluate performances II. 1 I. 3 I. A. 2 IV. 1 II. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. B. 3 I. B. 2. B. 3 I. C. 1. B. B. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 3 I. A. C. 1 I. 2 Type of Assessment C S SP SP SP Type of Assessment C SP C CP SP CS Second Quarter Identify musical contrasts: fast/slow Sing songs that use the voice in different ways Explore steady beat Listen and compare two different versions of same music Use pictures for sound Scope & Sequence Indicator I. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator. 2 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. A. A.Kindergarten Pacing Guide Guiding question: What is music? Goal: First experiences with music Type of Assessment C C SP CS CS Type of Assessment C C SP SP CP CS First Quarter Explore ways people make music Identify musical contrasts: quiet/loud Explore steady beat Investigate voices: whispering. 1. 2 II. 1 I. skill or appropriate participation. 2 I.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Pre . A. A. 1 III.

1 P C CP Sing different types of songs Explain historical context of songs Evaluate performances II. 2 I. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the Kindergarten year. 1 I. B. P P SP C Sing songs from memory Relate movement to musical sounds Play singing games Interpret sounds in music using shapes and pictures I. B. 2 I. B. III. 1 III. B. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator. and scenery Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. 3 II. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 3 II. A. 1 Third Quarter Identify musical contrasts: high/low Clap rhythmic phrases Perform the steady beat using instruments Dramatize stories of songs using props. C. 4 II. B. C. 3 IV. 1 I. A. 1 II.1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 I.Prince George’s County Public Schools 19 . singing Describe difference between singing and playing Scope & Sequence Indicator V. B. 2 I. 1 I. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught.A. 1 III. skill or appropriate participation. 1 I. and scenery Investigate voices and instruments Fourth Quarter Identify whole and part Sing melodic phrases Perform the steady beat using instruments Dramatize stories of songs using props. Type of Assessment C C CS CS Type of Assessment C S SP SP CS First Quarter List various places where music is heard Identify musical contrasts: fast/slow & quite/loud Investigate voices: whispering. 1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. A. A. B. 2 I. A. speaking. 1 IV. costumes. costumes.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Kindergarten Pacing Guide Guiding question: What is music? Goal: Exposure to beginning musical experiences. C. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. A. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. B. A. A. C. B.1. 1 IV. 1 I. 1 Type of Assessment C S SP SP Type of Assessment C S SP SP SP Second Quarter Identify same/different Perform the steady beat Demonstrate appropriate audience behavior Use voices and instruments to accompany stories Scope & Sequence Indicator I. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. A. B.D. D.

1 Third Quarter Read and sing with hand signs-Sol-Mi Create and perform rhythm patterns Read and play rhythm with quarter note and rest.1.B.A. 1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I.2 I. III.2 I. A. eighth note I.1 P CP P Perform music from different cultures Explain historical context of music Examine jobs in music II. skill or appropriate participation.1. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .1 I.A. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator.1. 3 II.A. B. B. C. CS P P Demonstrate dynamics and tempo Perform appropriately in an ensemble Evaluate performances I. D. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator.2. 1 II. IV.1. B.A.1 Read and play melodic rhythm with quarter note and rest. III. C. 1 Create new verses III.Prince George’s County Public Schools 20 . A.2 Create and perform rhythm patterns I. 1 II. C. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the first grade year. 1 Find strong and weak beat in duple meter I. 2 III. 1 I. B. 1. D. A. eighth note Dramatize music Scope & Sequence Indicator Read and sing with handsigns-Sol-Mi I.1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides First Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: What do I need to be able to do and know to be a musician? Goal: Develop musical skills and understandings. D.D. 1 Fourth Quarter Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year.1 I. B.B. D. 1.A. 2 V. A. C. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. 1 Type of Assessment CS C P Type of Assessment S CS C C P Second Quarter Read and play quarter note and rest Recognize accompaniment/unaccompanied music Create new verses Scope & Sequence Indicator I. D. III. 3 IV. Type of Assessment CP CP P Type of Assessment CS CS CS P First Quarter Recognize and evaluate solo and ensemble singing Recognize male & female voices Dramatize music Scope & Sequence Indicator II. B. A.

C. A.Prince George’s County Public Schools 21 . C.1 III. A. Improvise rhythmic phrases Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1. B. 2 Third Quarter Recognize and perform simple forms: AB/ABA and rondo Create & perform rhythm patterns in duple meter with ta & rest Improvise rhythmic phrases Read and perform sol. C. 1 II. and la Fourth Quarter Recognize and perform music in triple meter Recognize and perform contrasting phrases Improvise melodic and rhythmic patterns Read and perform melody patterns using sol. 1 I. mi. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. B. Type of Assessment SP C CS P SP Type of Assessment CS CS SP CS First Quarter Perform the beat in tempo Recognize strong and weak beat in duple meter Read and perform rhythm patterns with quarter notes and rests Perform music in different styles.1 I. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. D. C.2 I. 2.B. 2.C.2 Type of Assessment CS CS C CS SP Type of Assessment CS CS SP CS Second Quarter Read and perform melodic direction Read and perform sol.1.3. 1 II. 1 III. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the second grade year.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Second Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: What do I need to be able to do and know to be a part of an ensemble? Goal: Develop and refine musical skills and understandings. 1 III. 1. A. D. and la Recognize solo and ensemble. P P P Perform appropriately in an ensemble Evaluate performances Express opinions about performances I.1 I. D. 1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 III. different accompaniments Recognize and perform contrasting phrases Improvise melodic phrases Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught.B. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. 1 II. B. B. A.D. A. 1 I. D. C. 2. D. 1. 1. A. skill or appropriate participation. A. mi.repetition and contrast II. A. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator.1. 1 I. D. A. A. mi. 1. B. 2 I. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 1 I. D. B.A. B. 3 IV. 1 Scope & Sequence Indicator I. III. and la Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. 1 P CP P Compare music of children from different cultures Construct perspectives from different styles of music Demonstrate the music and art connection . 1 I.C. 1 V.

mi. 2. write and perform pentatonic melodies Read and perform rhythmic & melodic notation Perform folk dances in patterned forms Compare different types of performances Historical/cultural focus: dances from various cultures Scope & Sequence Indicator I. B. D. 1 Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. D. 1 I. 3.Prince George’s County Public Schools 22 . B. 2. A Perform music using patterned forms in triple meter I. 1 III. B. C P CP Define musical terms Perform appropriately in an ensemble Compare music from different cultures I.A. B. 1 I.1.sequence events II. II. 1 V. B. 4 III. 3. 4 I. B. 1 I. A.A. B. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. D. D. D. C. 1. B. 1 I. la. notate. 2 Demonstrate the music. and do Read. A. 2 I. re. and perform melodic patterns Compare different types of performances Select and play instruments to match mood Historical/cultural focus: holiday songs from various cultures Scope & Sequence Indicator I. D. B. 1. C. eighth note Maintain tempo while singing Perform music using patterned forms in duple meter Improvise rhythm patterns in duple meter Historical/cultural focus: beat games from various cultures Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 Perform music in harmony I. A. C. Type of Assessment S CS P CS P First Quarter Sing while performing rhythm patterns Read and perform quarter note & rest. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the third grade year. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .1. 2 I. A. 1 I. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. 1. 1 V. B. 4 Type of Assessment SP CS CS C P Second Quarter Perform dynamics appropriately in an ensemble Read and perform sol. A. 4 II. 1 Express and support personal preferences IV. 1 Improvise pentatonic ostinato Historical/cultural focus: songs in different phrase forms from various cultures Type of Assessment CS CS S C Fourth Quarter Read. C. 2 Type of Assessment CS S S S Scope & Sequence Third Quarter Indicator Recognize and perform music with contrasting phrases I. 3. art. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Third Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: How do we talk about the music we are doing in an ensemble? Goal: Communicate using music language developed and defined through experiences with children’s games.1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught.1 C P P Listen to and classify string and wind ensembles II. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. & literature connection . A. A. skill or appropriate participation. 2 I. B.

1 I. A. 2 I. and Rondo form Classify orchestra instruments Perform children's games from history Historical/cultural focus: African Americans during slavery Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 2 III. 1 II. 3 I.A. 1. D. 1 I. B. 1 V. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. D. A. B. 1. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught. D. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. 1 Type of Assessment CS SP SP Second Quarter Read and perform pentatonic melody patterns Perform melody patterns with octaves Perform melodic improvisation Historical/cultural focus: Cowboys and Native American Scope & Sequence Indicator I. skill or appropriate participation. 1 II. A. B. playing. C. P P CP P Perform appropriately in an ensemble following conductor Perform music with appropriate expression from written score Evaluate performances for cultural authenticity Identify how music in schools prepares for careers I. 2 Type of Assessment CSP SP SP Fourth Quarter Read and perform melody patterns with octaves Perform a song using sign language Perform children's games from history Historical/cultural focus: Colonial and Patriotic music Scope & Sequence Indicator I. B. C. 2. conduct.2.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Fourth Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: How do we know about the music of kids in the past and what can we learn about them especially in Maryland? Goal: Develop music reading. 23 Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . A. B.D. D.1 II. Type of Assessment CS CS SP First Quarter Read and perform all basic rhythm notes Read. II. 2 II. B. 2 Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. and composing using music of children from the past especially in Maryland. C. B. B. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the fourth grade year. A. 1 III. ABA.Prince George’s County Public Schools . 3 IV. and perform rhythms in duple meter Compose and perform rhythms Historical/cultural focus: Musical Elements Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 CP CP C P Describe how music reflects traditions in different cultures Examine and perform the musical elements in music of other cultures Summarize the historical context of early American music Demonstrate the music and art connection II. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. 2 II. 1 Type of Assessment CSP CS SP Third Quarter Perform music in AB. B. writing. A. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator. 1 I.

3 II.1 Scope & Sequence Third Quarter Indicator C Classify instruments I.D. D. 3 IV V P CP C P Compare music from different cultures Determine how lyrics reflect the culture and history Interpret in writing the relationship between music and history Demonstrate the music and art connection II. B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 24 . D. D. skip. 4 S Create an accompaniment using instruments III. C. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. 1. 1 Recognize musical forms I. and sing all melody notes on treble staff I.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Fifth Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: What does the music say about the people and how do the people use music as their voice? Goal: Examine communities from the past to find out what the music says about the people and how the people used music as their voice. 1 II.D. 1. Scope & Sequence Indicator CS Read. D. B. Pioneers and Cowboys Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. D. A.2 Perform folk dances I. B. 1 CS Read and perform music in duple and triple meter I. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the fifth grade year. 1. 2 CS Recognize and sing melodic intervals: step. repeat. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator.B. A. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. CS P P P Perform music using appropriate tempo. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught. 1 I. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . dynamics. 2 Read and perform music in duple and triple meter I. 1. A. 2 I. 3 Historical/cultural focus: Early American including Shakers. C. 1 Historical/cultural focus: American folk songs from different regions including sea shanteys Type of Assessment First Quarter Type of Assessment S S C C Second Quarter Perform music in harmony Perform folk dances Recognize musical forms Identify various instrumental/choral ensembles Historical/cultural focus: Native American Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 II. write. & leap I. 2 C Identify various instrumental ensembles II. B.1 S Perform music in harmony I. skill or appropriate participation. D. B. B. C. 4 S Improvise vocally in various forms III.2 Historical/cultural focus: Revolutionary War songs and Freedom Songs of the Civil Rights Movement Type of Assessment Type of Assessment C S CS C Scope & Sequence Fourth Quarter Indicator Recognize major and minor tonalities I. 2 II. A. 4 I.A. and articulation Perform appropriately in an ensemble Evaluate performances Contribute positively to the creation of a portfolio of class I. A. C. C.

2. 1 Ongoing objectives which should be addressed frequently through the year. 2. 1 V. The assessment suggestions are meant to be a guide as to the type of assessment the teacher may use to determine mastery of the concept. A.A. D. 1 II.Long Range Planning and Pacing Guides Sixth Grade Pacing Guide Guiding question: What “gifts” could different people bring to a contemporary musical ensemble? Goal: Examine the various talents among and within different contemporary ensembles from various cultures. The P stands for a criterion based assessment of the participation level of this indicator. write. B. skill or appropriate participation.1. The C stands for an assessment of the conceptual knowledge of this indicator. 25 Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 1 I. B. 1 P C CP Compare role of musicians from different cultures Examine contemporary music Examine skills and experience for music careers II. 1 I. A. A. African. A.2 I. 1 Professional judgment and an analysis of students' skills and needs should be used to determine in what quarter specific indicators may be taught. C. 2 II. B. A. Type of Assessment CS C C SP CS First Quarter Read. 1 II. D. 1 V. P P P Perform appropriately in an ensemble Evaluate performances Demonstrate the music and art connection I. 1.A.Prince George’s County Public Schools . 4 Type of Assessment CSP SP C C C Second Quarter Performing and recognizing harmonic texture Perform descants Classify instruments (piano and electronic) Compare performances of same piece Identify compositions by exemplary composers Historical/cultural focus: European Scope & Sequence Indicator I. D. B. C. A.B. B. 3 I. 1 Type of Assessment CS SP S P C Third Quarter Read and perform syncopation and sixteenth notes Perform polyrhythmic music with appropriate instruments Improvise a rhythm pattern in a group performance Perform dances from other cultures Compare music to other art Historical/cultural focus: Asian.A. 1 II. B.3. C. A. I. 1 I. A. B.B. The S stands for an assessment of the skill development of this indicator. 2 IV. D.A. C. D. 2 I. 2 Type of Assessment C C S C CSP Fourth Quarter Identify various types of sound equipment Analyze the text of contemporary music Perform music in compound meter Compare performances of same piece Portfolio for music careers Historical/cultural focus: Contemporary American Scope & Sequence Indicator III. A. III.1.2 II.1 I. 1 IV. V.4. III. 2 II. III. A.A. and perform melody notes in scale patterns Identify patterns in major/minor scales Transpose a simple melody Create and perform music in 12 bar blues form Read and perform music with chord symbols Historical/cultural focus: American history including the blues Scope & Sequence Indicator I. Latin American Scope & Sequence Indicator I. 1 I.1 IV. 2.B. 2 III. However this pacing guide contains all indicators for the grade level and they all should be addressed at some point in the sixth grade year.

SECTION II Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 26 .

Unsatisfactory GRADES FOR STUDENTS IN GRADES 1 AND 2: 1 2 1 2 3 satisfactory progress needs more time GRADES FOR STUDENTS IN KINDERGARTEN: mastery of skills skills are improving needs more time A check should be placed in the box on the report card when improvement is needed in the following areas: • demonstrate mastery of skills. These letter grades are to be interpreted as follows: A . GRADES FOR STUDENTS IN GRADES 3 .Below Average E . Music is a performance-based discipline and a student’s participation is often the only way to assess the mastery of skills. There is no room for grades based on personality or behavior.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Assessment of students in the music program must be done based on specific criteria as indicated in the Scope and Sequence. and • participation/effort. Assessment Strategies and Grading Students Participation: The extent to which the student readily participates in the following music class activities: • • • • • • • Singing Playing classroom instruments Moving to music Listening to music Reading music Writing music Creating music Skill Development: The extent to which the student masters musical skills listed in the scope and sequence.Above Average C .Prince George’s County Public Schools 27 . Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Participation following specific criteria is a valid assessment tool. Progress reports should be completed at mid-quarter for those students at risk of receiving a 2 (grade 1 and 2) or lower than a C (grades 3-6). Knowledge of Musical Concepts: The extent to which the student demonstrates an understanding of the musical concepts listed in the scope and sequence.6: It is recommended that letter grades be recorded six to eight times per grading period for each student.Average D . • demonstrates knowledge of concept.Excellent B .

3 Generally written with proper form and somewhat accurate historical/cultural information. D equals 1. General Participation 4 Consistent and appropriate participation 3 Generally appropriate participation 2 Participation is inconsistent but appropriate 1 Participation is rare or frequently inappropriate 0 Seldom participates Performance levels These can be adjusted to fit performance activities where specific skills are being assessed. 2 Attempt is made to answer the prompt. and 0 equals E. Mastery of Skills Performance Assessment 4 Minimal errors in performance 3 Generally accurate with several errors 2 Generally accurate in places but not able to play completely 1 Recognizable attempt 0 No attempt Criterion-based Assessment Rubric 4 Begins and ends at appropriate time. B equals 3.) Grades 3-6 Expressing Personal Preference about Music 4 Fully supported preference clearly stated 3 Somewhat supported preference clearly stated 2 Preference clearly stated but not supported 1 Answer attempted but inappropriate 0 No attempt Grades 3-6 Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers SAMPLE SCORING TOOLS AND RUBRICS FOR ASSESSING INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS The numbers below refer to the four point grading scale where A equals 4.Prince George’s County Public Schools 28 . 1 Writing attempt is late. C equals 2. 0 No attempt (Grade drops one letter grade for missing music information. uses the assigned notes or rhythms Fits with the other music being performed 3 Any one of the criteria is missing 2 Any two of the criteria is missing 1 Attempt is made but doesn’t fit criteria 0 No attempt Grades 3-6 Writing Activities about Music 4 Completely written with proper form and accurate historical/cultural information.

specific criteria could be used for this assessment. 2 General information in complete sentences with several capitalization and punctuation errors. Performance levels Melodic/Rhythmic Performance 1 Performs consistently with few errors 2 Performance demonstrates little understanding/skill development or no attempt was made Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 1 General information in incomplete sentences with several capitalization and punctuation errors. Again. 3 General information written in complete sentences with some capitalization and punctuation errors.Prince George’s County Public Schools 29 . 0 No attempt Primary – grades 1 and 2 Primary students are graded using 1 and 2. A grade of 1 is the higher grade.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Grades 3-6 Rubric for Evaluation of Music Performances 4 Specific information written in complete sentences with minimal capitalization and punctuation errors.

• Materials may need to be developed. • Do not underestimate the power of your relationship with your students – all of them to help you figure how a way to make it work! Working With Children Who Are Emotionally Impaired • Relationship – Acceptance very important. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . geography. • MENC. Resources • Use teacher resource books – all of the series have sections for accommodating special learners. What is So Special about Music? • Music is academic – math. abilities and needs. use of instruments. You may consider using this method for teaching initially. professional organizations specializing in your student’s particular disability – internet. NAMT.Prince George’s County Public Schools 30 . can accommodate a variety of learning styles. depending on your situation. until you see how the entire class and the special students respond. providing opportunities for fun. • Music is a social and cultural experience. social studies – are some of the concepts that are a part of music education. Why Include Special Needs Children in Music? • Non-competitive • Success-guaranteed activities • Meets physical and emotional needs • Makes learning easier When Planning Music Concepts and Learning Skills • Think of co-purposes – musical and non-musical goals • Think conceptually and developmentally • Long-range planning very important • Special education techniques – token economy. and a chance to develop talents and strengths that may not necessarily be cultivated in the average classroom. • Success-guaranteed activities – organize the class so that this child in particular meets with immediate success.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Guidelines for Incorporating the Special Needs Student in the Music Classroom How to make them feel welcome and be productive • In Prince George’s County most special needs students are included in the general music classroom. history. 504 plans Difference between Music for the Average and Special Child • Activities selected for class and adapted to meet special needs • Materials. counselor. science. but not necessarily their behavior. cooperative learning. Then the child is more willing to strive to learn something more difficult. etc. PPW can be valuable resources. contracts (class and individual). • Access your resources in the school building and system – special education teacher. books and supplies may need to be adapted to enable the special child to participate and succeed – thus the importance of long range planning. Let them know you care for them as a person. behavioral management skills. by its very nature. school psychologist. • Music.

etc. The Physically Involved Student • Slow down!! Adjust tempo of songs. • Do not hesitate to share your concerns about particular students. To the extent possible free from obstructions. Summary and Resources • Include non-musical goals in plans and concepts as appropriate • Access your resources – school-wide. • Watch environment.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Emotionally Challenged Students are Challenging • Pace lesson – alternate passive and active components to help the student maintain self-control. accompaniments. etc. Many acting-out behaviors are coping mechanisms. • Look for the student helper who will be a friend when needed • Educate yourself about the student’s needs • Adapt instruments and methods of playing – use your natural creativity. Preparing the student with verbal and/or written alerts may help. Working With Children Who Are Educationally Challenged • Make tapes • Create visual and verbal cues • Take a multi-sensory approach – which is an essential component of music education • Try to consider not making all students “fit the mold” Summary • Communicate with special education staff at the beginning of the school year. • Have a strong behavioral management system that is consistent and dependable. • Expect anxiety and plan for it. • Quality planning is very important! • Do not be afraid to try new activities. Make sure you take the time to plan them to accommodate the needs of all learners. Certain problems may be more obvious in the music classroom. system-wide. barriers.Prince George’s County Public Schools 31 . and professional organizations Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

CD’s. what they are doing in their classroom. You must have space to plan. organize. However you keep your plan book.Prince George’s County Public Schools 32 . copying machine. parents. etc. PERSONAL and PROFESSIONAL • Get to know the secretaries and custodians very well. and administration. Put it in writing. procedures for using equipment. students.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Guidelines for Itinerant Teachers of Music ADMINISTRATIVE • Stay organized. • Make sure you have a place at each school. • Make sure you have a clear understanding of your schedule. • Organize supplies needed for warm-up. and activities. worksheets. • Share good ideas as appropriate and as much as time will allow. • Contact the full time music teacher. Communicate your expectations of teachers. ITINERANT MUST HAVE: • Class lists • Plan book – with space to write comments as needed • Stickers • Flash cards • Working CD/tape player – always secured at the school if possible • Accompaniment instrument of comfort • Large cart – exclusively for music • Sticky notes • Pad to write “to do” list • Easy and portable behavioral management plan Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . and keep a file copy. • Use two plan books – one for A days and one for B days – especially if your grade levels are significantly different. • Let each teacher (and administrator) know what you need to be successful. • Find out early if there are any accompanying and/or performance requirements. keep it current. • Make sure they know what to expect of you. books. etc. • Make sure you let your base school know your needs. songs. Get to know them.

accessible and practical as possible. specific locale (not identified only by continent) Original language with pronunciation. among the Navajo. For example. the songs of the Blessingway.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Guidelines for Incorporating Multicultural Music Look for the following in any resource to be sure that it is as authentic.) • • • • • • • • • Suggestions from: World Music Press.Prince George’s County Public Schools 33 . etc. including the source. Historical/geographical background. • Prepared with the involvement of a culture bearer (someone raised in the culture) In many cultures. (Their presentation may be assisted by a student of the culture. and are not sung out of context without changes even by the Navajo. and most importantly respects the integrity of the culture. literal translation. music and other arts are an integral part of every aspect of the culture. and need to be placed in context by an insider who has the depth of knowledge necessary to increase your understanding. circumstances. maps.) Biographical information about the contributor(s) including their personal comments about the selections Each piece/work should be set in cultural context. interpretation of deeper meanings Photographs. by whom. and employing authentic instrument and arrangements Games include directions No sacred (ritual. if possible Recording of material in the collection using native singers or their long-time students. CT. illustrations (preferably by someone from the culture) Musical transcriptions. 06813 Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . O. when it is performed. Beautyway and Nightway chants are the ritual. holy – this does not refer to hymns or spirituals) materials in a collection intended for casual school/community use (inappropriate in many cultures to use these drastically out of context unless the tradition is your own and you can make any necessary alterations. Box 2565 Danbury. P.

it is an important part of a well-rounded arts education program. They must teach a curriculum that includes music of all styles. Since religious music has an important place in the history of music as well as music in its cultural contexts. To include religious themes on the basis of their academic or aesthetic value. not as a vehicle for promoting religious belief. periods and cultures. drama. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . forms. music or literature with religious themes if it serves a sound educational goal in the curriculum. Music teachers are dedicated to expanding the knowledge and experience of their students.Prince George’s County Public Schools 34 . MENC Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Music in the Schools Music with a sacred text or of a religious origin (particularly choral music) is a very large portion of the music literature. To include a variety of selections (except those given by special ensembles) that includes religious music during school concerts. To accommodate the requests of parents and students to be excused from classroom discussions or activities for religious reasons.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers GUIDELINES FOR THE USE OF RELIGIOUS MUSIC IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS “It is the position of the Music Educators National Conference that the study of religious music is a vital and appropriate part of the total music experience in both performance and listening. To omit sacred music from the repertoire or study of music would present an incorrect and incomplete concept of the comprehensive nature of the art”. MENC and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) have offered these suggested guidelines for incorporating religious music in the public schools: • • • • • • It is generally permissible to use art. To sing or play sacred music as part of the academic study of music. To consider the cultural population of the students and the community in the selection of music.

Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Recommended Resources and Equipment In order to implement the elementary vocal and general music curriculum as outlined in this document it is recommended that each school acquire the musical instruments and equipment items listed below.Prince George’s County Public Schools 35 . Schools with more than one full-time vocal music teacher will certainly require additional musical instruments and equipment. one high and one low acoustic pianos electric keyboard with MIDI compatibility sets of chromatic melody bells resonator bells. QUANTITY 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 2 2 1 10 1 1 1 class set class set class set 8 INSTRUMENT/EQUIPMENT QUANTITY 1 1 1 1 1 1 1-5 1 1 5 8 8 2 2 8 2 8 1 5 1 2 1 1 class set class set INSTRUMENT/EQUIPMENT autoharp guitar set of temple blocks portable stereo shelf stereo system overhead projector music stands staff liner set of 3 step risers – 4 sections triangles tambourines pairs of maracas pairs of claves castenets pairs of finger cymbals guiro pairs of sand blocks large sleigh bells two tone wood blocks cowbell shakere (gourd rattle with beads) cabasa gankogui bean bags scarves soprano glockenspiels alto glockenspiels soprano xylophones alto xylophones bass xylophone soprano metallophones alto metallophones bass metallophone tympani drums. one octave diatonic resonator bells. A minimum number of each is suggested. two octaves chromatic step bells soprano recorders pairs of rhythm sticks/lummi sticks jingle bells hand drums with replaceable heads Additional drums: 2 conga – small and large 2 bongo drums 1 authentic Native American drum 1 African talking drum 1 split log drum various appropriate mallets for different instruments The following instruments are recommended if additional funds are available: rainstick vibraslap clatterpillar chime tree ukelele flexatone (flexible tubing) kalimba slapstick (whip) wood ratchet Native American flute slide whistle gong train whistle Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

MIDI Setup.com/education/default. o Administrative Procedure-Information Technology Services Employee E-Mail Procedure: http://www.swf o Blackboard Online Support Videos. and Application Access.com/Vienna/1655/listhtml.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers GUIDELINES FOR INTEGRATING MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY These guidelines have been created to support teachers as they integrate technology into their teaching. http://www. . Blackboard: http://www.asp?id=ioctut o Finale NotePad .Windows Tutorials.blackboard.org/~mits/email/Admin%20Proc%20E-Mail%20Procedures.html 2 Refer to the Standards for Elaborations developed from Maryland’s Preparing Tomorrow’s Teachers to Use Technology (PT3): USDOE Catalyst Grant P342A99020: http://www.org/~support/blackboard.org/~mits/email/Managing%20email.html o List servers for Music Education (Email Groups) . o PGCPS Web Page and Internet Searching Electronic Learning Page: http://www.com/ 1 Vision Statement: Department of Instructional Technology: http://www.com/ o Using United Streaming .microsoft. .pdf o “The Ten Commandments – Netiquette”: http://www.2 Standard I: Information Access. Collaboration.Prince George’s County Public Schools 36 . It corresponds closely to the Prince George’s County Department of Instructional Technology’s Vision statement whose objective is: “.org/~support/searching.com/corp/objects/images/quicktutorials/collaboration.discoveryeducatornetwork.pdf o Managing your Mail in Outlook: http://www.com/kb/videos.html o On-Line Research Techniques. Unitedstreaming: http://www. “ 1 Support materials have been organized using the Maryland State Department of Education’s Maryland Teacher Technology Standards.Prince George’s County Public Schools. o Text and Graphics . o Blackboard Online Support Videos.skally. and sound.aspx Standard II: Communication Use technology effectively and appropriately to interact electronically. and peers.com/corp/objects/images/quicktutorials/discussionboard.edu/msde-pt3/Docs/MDTchrTechStdsMTTS.smcm. Evaluation.html • Communicate effectively within an electronic learning community. evaluate.html • Use editing features to manipulate a variety of materials such as text. Atomic Learning.atomiclearning.pgcps. Finale Music: http://www. Processing.pgcps.com/windows o In and Out of the Classroom: http://www.net/listowner/10. • Use email effectively for communication with faculty.org/~support/mission.geocities. http://www. • Use the Internet to manage instruction and/or solve problems through research. Blackboard: http://www.pgcps.unitedstreaming.pdf Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .finalemusic.blackboard.pgcps. Discussion Board. process.pgcps. . .html o Discovery Educator Network: http://www. United Learning.Online Support Videos . Use technology to communicate information in a variety of formats. parents. 1998.org/~support/blackboard. and apply information efficiently and effectively.swf o Learn About Blackboard: http://www.pgcps.Directory of Email Lists for Musicians: http://www. graphics. To ensure that all instructional technology programs are available to support an environment in which student achievement is enhanced through a set of information age tools and skills.

microsoft. o A Research Guide for Students: http://www.gradebookpower.about.teacherweb.dell. o Microsoft Desktop Publishing Software: http://desktoppub.net/music/music_strategies/mus_strat_safe.pdf o Indicators of Social.teach-nology.com/education/projects/news/vol_05/elementary2.com/education/default.com/dell/step/1::33732+26+37929+37999+38005:00.com o Grade Keeper: www.pgcps.html • Arrange classroom layout to facilitate monitoring technology within an equitable.aresearchguide.com/od/microsoft/ o Microsoft Education: Resources: http://www.html o Making it Digital (Using Digital Cameras): http://www.org/%7Eprocedur/1000/0700.com/webpages/podcastingIsEasy.com/index.htm o Fair Use Guidelines: http://www.com/ Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .gradekeeper.com SchoolNotes: http://www.html Sites by Music Teachers: http://www.com/ o Grade Book Wizard: http://www.pgcps.htm Developing Web Pages: http://members. o Grade Book Power: www.asp?gclid=CO_F64vl5IUCFU NtFQodpnd3OA Creating Classroom Websites Resources.html o Creating Podcasts: http://www.musiceducationmadness.html • Incorporate proper copyright use in research and writing.org/~support/software.mspx o Troubleshooting LCD Displays: http://service.com Free Teacher Web Site: http://www.com/education/digkids/ o PGCPS Approved Software Database: http://www.pgcps. • Grade book Software and Online Resources. o The One-Computer Music Classroom: http://metmagazine. o PGCPS .htm o Digital Kids Club (Digital Device Tutorials and Instructional Ideas): http://www.com/mag/onecomputer_music_classroom/index.org/~support/copyright.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers • o Teachers Using Weblogs: http://www.com/web_tools/web_site/ How to Create Your Own Website: http://www.org/engauge/framewk/pro/issues/proiss.com/links3.ncrel. safe.podcaststation. • Identify ethical and legal issues using technology and classroom compliance with copyright law.org/~nwest/comp_assistance/digital_camera/index.ca/priscillatheroux/developing. social.Prince George’s County Public Schools 37 . Ethical.schoolnotes.htm Evaluate devices and programs for use as presentation tools.shtml#teachers • Standard III: Legal: Social and Ethical Issues Demonstrate an understanding of the legal.shaw. Fair Use Guidelines. and Legal Issues: http://www.org/~marlton/virtual_library/webclass. o TeacherWeb($): http://www.esc20.html Standard IV: Assessment for Administration and Instruction Use technology for instructional and school-based improvement. and security.pgcps.intel.gradebookwizard. and healthy environment for students.html o Music Safety: http://finearts.adobe. and ethical issues related to technology use.pgcps.Acceptable Use Policy: http://www.com o My Grade Book: http://www.mygradebook.

pgcps.htm • Technology Strategies for Music Education: http://www.org/ • Maryland Department of Education . Behavior Assessment: etc.com/html/rpianosuite.com/ Standard VII: Professional Growth Develop professional practices that support continual learning and professional growth in technology.html • Samples of Instructional/Utility Software for the Classroom o Music Ace: http://www.pgcps. • PGCPS Professional Development Plan: http://www.pgcps.html o File Maker Tutorials: http://www. implement.harmonicvision.html o Article: “Enabling Dreams.html • Vocal/General Music E-organization .): http://www.com/filemaker-6. inquiry.org/~tifa/at. Music Organization Links.pgcps.” http://www.com/web_tools/materials/ • Standard V: Integrating Technology into the Curriculum and Instruction Design. and Standards: http://blackboard. • Assistive Technology.wellesley.com/products_edu. • Sample Technology Integration Lessons . communication.adaysworkmusiceducation.ht m • Maryland Department of Education: http://www.Prince George’s County Public Schools 38 .org/msde/divisions/certification/certification_branch/certification • National Board for Professional Teaching Standards: http://www.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers • Student Data Bases.pdf • PGCPS Guidelines for Acceptable Credit: http://www.com/MMSchools/mar00/robertson.PGCPS Vocal/General Music Curriculum Guide • Integrating Technology into Instruction: http://www.marylandpublicschools. problem solving.html o Finale NotePad: http://www.html o COMAR Legislation: http://www.edu/Computing/Filemaker/filemaker4_tutorial.nbpts.org Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .teach-nology.learningvillage.Technology Standards: http://www. and assess learning experiences that incorporate use of technology in a curriculum-related instructional activity to support understanding.org/~person/CertifForms/Professional%20Development%20Plan. o Getting Started with FileMaker: http://www. o Technology Inclusion for All (TIFA): http://www. o Form Generators (Parent Conference Records.org/~person/acceptcredit.org/~tifa/links.finalemusic. and/or collaboration.pgcps.com/notepad/ Standard VI: Assistive Technology Understand human equity and developmental issues surrounding the use of assistive technology to enhance student learning performance and apply that understanding to practice.Best Practices.htm Sharing Results.teachervision.infotoday.computer-training-software.marylandpublicschools.org/MSDE/programs/technology/techstds/teacher_standards.com/educationaltechnology/music/6929.htm o Piano Suite: http://www.fen.

Knees and Toes Hokey Pokey If You’re Happy and You Know It Jingle Bells London Bridge Muffin Man One Potato One Two Buckle My Shoe Rain Rain Go Away Six Little Ducks Teddy Bear The Farmer in the Dell This Old Man Twinkle Twinkle Little Star The songs suggested here are not intended to be a definitive list. They are provided to be a guide as to the types of appropriate song material for the given age level. Knees and Toes Hickory Dickory Dock Humpty Dumpty If You’re Happy and You Know It I’ve Been Working on the Railroad Jingle Bells Little White Duck Little Red Caboose One Potato One Two Buckle My Shoe One.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Suggested Repertoire Lists Pre . Four. Ha. Bluebird Daddy’s Taking Us to the Zoo Tomorrow Eensy Weensy Spider Engine Number Nine Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed Head and Shoulders. Baby Head. Shoulders. This Away Head and Shoulders. Three. Shoulders. Baby Head. Five Pop Goes the Weasel Sailor Went to Sea Teddy Bear Ten Little Angels The Farmer in the Dell Wee Willie Winkie Wheels on the Bus Kindergarten Alphabet Song Apples and Bananas Baa Baa Black Sheep Bingo Bounce High Bounce Low Clap Your Hands Eensy Weensy Spider Engine Number Nine Ha.Kindergarten Bluebird.Prince George’s County Public Schools 39 . Two. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

Prince George’s County Public Schools 40 . Won’t You Sit Down? Old King Glory Old MacDonald Ring Around the Rosey Sally Go Round the Sun Santa Claus is Coming To Town Shoo Fly Skip to My Lou This Little Light of Mine When The Saints go Marching In Who Built the Ark? Yankee Doodle 2nd grade A Ram Sam Sam America American the Beautiful Button You Must Wander Charlie Over the Ocean Frere Jacques Frog Went a Courting Go In and Out the Window Go Tell Aunt Rhody Jim Along Josie Kookaburra Kum Ba Yah Li’l ‘Liza Jane Little Sally Walker Little Wheel Turning In My Heart Long Legged Sailor Mulberry Bush Old Dan Tucker Old Joe Clark Rocky Mountain There’s a Hole in the Bucket Three Blind Mice Waltzing Matilda Who’s That Tapping at the Window? The songs suggested here are not intended to be a definitive list. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . They are provided to be a guide as to the types of appropriate song material for the given age level.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Suggested Repertoire Lists 1st grade A Tisket A Tasket Bluebird Bow Wow Wow Get On Board Hop Old Squirrel Hot Cross Buns I Know an Old Lady John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt Kye Kye Kule Little Red Caboose Lucy Locket Mr. Rabbit Oh.

They are provided to be a guide as to the types of appropriate song material for the given age level. Dear. Susanna Old Blue Polly Wolly Doodle Sarasponda The Cat Came Back Trampin’ 4th grade Ahrirang Boatman’s Dance Cielito Lindo Colorado Trail Do. What Can the Matter Be? Oh. Lord Funga Alafia Hey. All Day Alouette Chatter With the Angels Crawdad Hole Dance Josie Don Gato Draw me a Bucket of Water Ezekiel Saw the Wheel Ghost of John Good News Hambone Here Comes Sally Hill an’ Gully Jingle at the Window Little David play on Your Harp Loop de Loo Mama Paquita Oh. Ho! Nobody Home I Gave My Love a Cherry I Love the Mountains Joy to the World Michael Finnegan Oh Hanukkah Old Texas Rattlin’ Bog Sakura Scotland’s Burning She’ll Be Comin’ Round the Mountain Sorida Sourwood Mountain Star Spangled Banner Ta-Ra-Ra-Boom-De-Ay The Alpine Song The Goat Zum Gali Gali The songs suggested here are not intended to be a definitive list.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Suggested Repertoire Lists 3rd grade All Night. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 41 .

Prince George’s County Public Schools 42 .Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Suggested Repertoire Lists 5th grade Amazing Grace Battle Hymn of the Republic Cape Cod Chantey Cotton Joe Deck the Halls Dream of Martin Luther King Drill Ye Tarriers Erie Canal Fifty Nifty United States Follow the Drinking Gourd Go Down Moses Going to Boston Haul Away Joe Johnny Come Down to Hilo Joy to the World Lone Star Trail Night Herding Song Pay Me My Money Down Shenandoah Simple Gifts Skin and Bones State Rondo Sweet Betsy from Pike The Old Chisholm Trail We Shall Overcome 6th grade Banana Boat Song (Day-O) Camptown Races Do Do Li Dona Nobis Pacem Dry Bones Everybody Loves Saturday Night Feliz Navidad Greensleeves Hava Nagila Hello My Baby If I Had a Hammer Joe Tuner Blues John B. Sails John Kanaka Lean on Me Let There Be Peace on Earth Morning Has Broken Rocking Around the Christmas Tree Rocky Top Take Me Home Country Roads This Is My Country This Train is Bound for Glory Toembai Woke Up This Morning You’ve Got a Friend The songs suggested here are not intended to be a definitive list. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . They are provided to be a guide as to the types of appropriate song material for the given age level.

However. and spring) will provide motivation and encourage optimum growth throughout the school year. PROGRAMS The number of programs and performances may vary from school to school. The number is often determined by careful planning that involves the music teacher. and school community. • Chorus may be limited to intermediate students. The number of singers will depend upon the available space for rehearsals as well as the number of students the teacher feels is manageable. • Sing in tune with other voices and instruments. The following guidelines are suggestions to be considered during the planning process: • Programs should be spaced to allow for adequate preparation. provides opportunities for developing choral skills and concepts. winter or Holiday. and good teacher/student morale. • Chorus should be scheduled with 30 minute A/B time blocks. attention to instructional guidelines and by encouraging expressive singing will help children gain an understanding and appreciation for aesthetic choral singing. • Respond appropriately to choral direction. The teacher through careful selection of repertoire. • Chorus should be a part of the regular six hour student day. Students participating in chorus will learn to: • Sing with a freely produced tone characteristic of their age. • A minimum of two programs (i. or instrumental music. • Sing with correct diction. unlike the general music class where singing is a tool for developing music reading skills. A school with an enrollment of 300 students should be able to recruit 35 to 40 voices. • Sing in balance with other voices and instruments. Growth toward these ends should be evident as young choristers gain experience. • Sing in parts independently. program facilitators. Although some schools may have interest and physical facilities for 80 or more voices. Chorus students have the opportunity on the County level to participate in the Elementary Honors Chorus. • Chorus should not be scheduled in place of recess. • Sing with controlled breathing. SIZE Before recruiting begins. INSTRUCTIONAL OBJECTIVES The following instructional objectives are designed to assist students in achieving choral skills and musicianship. SCHEDULING Because many schools have their own unique scheduling plan. physical education.Prince George’s County Public Schools 43 . Chorus Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . ideally 50-60 voices usually result in good choral sound. which participates in concerts with other ensembles throughout the county as well as performing at the John F.e. Intermediate students may elect to audition for chorus. • Interpret a choral composition verbally and through performance. school staff. it is important to establish an appropriate size for the chorus. the following guidelines will be helpful to teachers and other program facilitators in establishing appropriate time for the choral experience.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers PURPOSE Singing in the chorus. it would be impossible to suggest a schedule suitable for all. in the same manner as the intermediate vocal music classes. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. optimum learning.

etc. write harmony parts. • Songs that require work (foreign language. rehearsal time. QUANTITY • It is always better to present fewer songs that are performed well. SONG LITERATURE • Use the song literature as much as possible. the more student participation you will get. • This is just like any other skill. • Call and response songs (where students sing back to you) will give you the best idea for voices. use them to fill out a program if necessary. than a long program that is poorly performed. QUALITY vs. INSTANT GRATIFICATION • The more songs that children sing. or create partner songs. etc. a younger class that has several songs. etc. BALANCED PROGRAM • If you present too much of any one style of music. the more they will sing. allow them to “show off”. and probably will add to your chorus. • Songs that are silly. ballads with lots of words) are the pieces that students will remember and will enjoy performing. give them “small solos”. • Adding instruments can make a 2nd grade song into a choral performance piece. Unless you use it regularly. groupings. ADAPTATION • Do not be afraid to adapt songs to the needs of your group. • If you do not have the voices.Prince George’s County Public Schools 44 . • Begin in the early grades actually looking at music. to sing a particular song in three parts. Start singing songs that would be appropriate for programs. it is never learned. or students that play piano. two or more separate parts. • Do not be afraid to add instruments. students will be afraid and/or unwilling to sing anything else. HOW TO PICK LEVELS • Look in all of the song literature. fun.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers Songs for Programs WHAT TO LOOK FOR: BEGIN FROM THE BEGINNING • Begin the first day of school. then see if two parts will work. • Activate your resources! If you have a small recorder group that plays well. There are pieces in the books for younger grades that are wonderful program pieces. Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

EXPECTATIONS • Expect each year to have a different group with different abilities. and add interest to any performance. • The carry over into chorus will be tremendous. • These songs are easy to learn.Guidelines and Recommendations for Elementary Vocal and General Music Teachers CHALLENGING MUSIC • Begin at least one challenging piece at the beginning of the school year. • HAVE FUN!!! Curriculum Framework Overview – Elementary Vocal and General Music . • Teach it to everyone. • Allow students to introduce pieces. This adds interest to a program. with fun accompaniments (or create your own). rounds. composer. or part of the musical instruction. adding historical information about the song. and it may encourage your special needs children to participate. Use it as a warm up. not just chorus. EASY MUSIC • Look for partner songs.Prince George’s County Public Schools 45 . canons. • Adjust your programs accordingly. etc.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 46 .SECTION III Instructional Activities for Elementary Vocal and General Music Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

and Tone Color.Musical Concepts and Skill Development This section of the guide contains a concept sequence which is predominantly music theory. 47 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools . These elements are divided into four categories: Rhythm. Definitions of the musical concepts have been included for clarity. Melody/Harmony. Form. developing students' individual knowledge and skills with regards to specific musical elements.

Ha. Teacher leads students in various movements to keep the beat. A selected recording is played. B. b. c. Draw a box under each. LISTENING: 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 48 . 3. Keep the beat a. d. "Ha. 2. "tai-tai"-two claps. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . "Obwisana.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES BEAT: a repeating pulse that can be felt in most music A. 4. Paper Plate a.. Students hold a paper plate in each hand with bottoms together." MAY . "Epo I Tai Tai. Class sings a 16 beat song. b." Music And You . Spotlight on Music – 6. "e"-four taps on shoulders with arms crossed over chest. Using movement or instruments to keep the beat. 353. b.2. "El Acitron. 2.. "Zudie-O. "A" section . T159 a. c. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. The following actions are done on the steady beat: "Epo"-two pats on thighs." STM . turn the sound off at intervals to test student skill in maintaining steady beat during silences. e. Spotlight on Music – K.use repeated "lap-lap-clap-clap" pattern. C. b. Laminate or cover with contact paper for durability. f. "B" section . p. d. Stick passing game from Latin America. PERFORMANCE: 1. 275 a. Glue magnetic strips onto 16 popsicle sticks. Choose student to play steady beats on rhythm instrument." or "Now we'll go jumping. p. 2. c. Choose four students to step the beat while class sings 16 beat phrase or song.3.. Cut out 16 large hearts for students to step on." Share the Music . 3. Play recordings from several different cultures and genres of music. 257.. Stone passing game from Africa. Heart Beats (Stepping) a. p. Class sits and shows steady beat by clapping stamping or patschen. Choose student to lead as above.".3.change words to reflect movements which can be done on the beat. Partners hold hands across and do a push/pull action while singing the song. p. Students follow a leader in keeping the pulse by hitting or rubbing plates together or against the body. 269 a. c. b.K. This-a-Way" a. p. Place four large hearts on the chalkboard. Heart Beats (Marking) a.. "Now we'll go walking. Student places magnetic sticks in boxes on each beat. Place hearts on the floor in four rows of four. 93 a.

Transfer the tempo to a rhythm instrument. 2. Explain that the beat can be fast or slow. Have them sing the song to match the tempo of the teacher. slows down. b. Some students can make a tunnel for the train while the others sing the song following teacher directions for changing speed-"tempo". move around the room and create the "choo-choo" sound which speeds up. The Metronome a. PERFORMANCE: 1. "Engine Engine #9" a. walking or running. arriving at the next station (decreasing speed). c. b. and to body movement. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . "tempos" you have set using the metronome. Unpitched instruments a. c. Use contrasting instrumental sounds on slow/fast sections. Variation: Use two teams and take turns for points. and show the class how to vary the "tempo" on the metronome. Check for understanding of the concept by asking students to identify fast or slow. traveling to the next station (steady fast speed). Choose students to be the train. B. walking or running. d.Prince George’s County Public Schools 49 . b. and stops during the story. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. stays the same. and stopping at this station while passengers get off and on.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES TEMPO: the speed of the beat in music A. Have the students play rhythm instruments on the steady beat to accompany a listening selection. Tell a story about a train leaving the station (increasing speed).

Teacher or a partner claps a four beat pattern. Teacher dictates four beat patterns using "ta" and "rest". HALF NOTE AND REST. The child finds the card and claps the rhythm back to the teacher. Name the Song a. Dictation a. 2. "Lion Dance #1" (This song is included in the Sample Lessons . On the first line. The second group plays maracas on the second line. Teacher writes rhythm of a familiar song on the board. Practice reading the rhythm of the song and sing with the names of the rhythm notes then the real words. b. Learn the song. Class sight reads the rhythm and identifies song. Clap the rhythm as an ostinato while singing the song. (Song should include the rhythm notes studied. (ta ta rest) d. f. WHOLE NOTE AND REST. Notate the rhythm for these words. Have students clap the rhythm that goes with the words “bow wow wow. c. 3. c. e. Do the same with the drum rhythm. 3. c. e. "Bow Wow Wow" (Quarter note and rest) a. b. b. Transfer to instruments and sing the song. Teacher prepares several flash cards with four beat rhythm groupings with the rhythm notes studied. EIGHTH NOTE. f. b. B.) b. Student echoes then writes the pattern on desk or floor with the sticks. 2. Students echo the pattern. d. b. c. The drum sets the tempo. DOTTED HALF NOTE): notes indicating sound and silence of various durations A. d. Students sit in a circle around the displayed cards. Clap the rhythm for the small gong. Clap that rhythm lightly when it comes in the song. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have students decide which rhythm it matches. Have students clap the rhythms for cymbals and large gong. Last pattern should be one that all students can clap to accompany a familiar song.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES RHYTHM NOTES (QUARTER NOTE AND REST. Teacher claps a rhythm and chooses a child to find the card. Find the Rhythm a. Send groups of four to five students to the board.Prince George’s County Public Schools 50 . Give each student several popsicle sticks (8-10). Rhythm patterns may be extended to eight beats when appropriate. PERFORMANCE: 1.) a. Students immediately write the pattern on the board. c. Popsicle Sticks a. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Assign students to instruments and perform it as an ensemble. one group plays claves and castanets.” c.Grade 6.

b. Students silently show the number of the rhythm performed.) 4.Prince George’s County Public Schools 51 . Repeat at least four times. c.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES RHYTHM NOTES (cont. The teacher performs a card. Variations: The teacher could say or clap the rhythms. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . OR Write these on the board. Magic Number a.five. Students respond with a "zero" (make a zero with their hands). Make sure cards are large enough to be seen from a distance. Write five rhythmic patterns on five separate cards. d." The number "0" or "Big Bagel" means there is no card with that rhythm. The students will hide the "Magic Number" of that card behind their backs until the teacher asks "Show me your magic number. The teacher could say a rhythm that is not shown. Assign each card a number one .

Clap in order. Play the phrases in order as they sing. b. Divide class into two teams. Repeat. 3. On the first line. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. B. Have students find the word that goes with c. Teach counting in Spanish. 293. c. Assign each phrase to a group of students. Name That Tune (for primary grades) a. The teams take turns drawing a song and clapping it for the other team. Name That Tune Charades (for intermediate grades) a. c. Divide class into two teams. b. one group plays claves and castanets. 2.Prince George’s County Public Schools 52 . "Fr'ere Jacques" a. “Pease Porridge Hot” a. Teacher claps the melodic rhythm of a familiar song. as well as eighth note. 2. b. Write the rhythm of the song. b." Share the Music – K. Give each group a percussion instrument. 4.2 a. c. PERFORMANCE: 1. e. Half the class keeps the beat on body or sticks. phrase by phrase. "Yankee Doodle" a. c. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Clap the melodic rhythm. The teams take turns identifying the song. "Los Pollitos. Use other songs containing quarter note and rest. Spotlight on Music . Clap the melodic rhythm. The names of several familiar songs are placed in a hat.93. b. the other half steps the melodic rhythm while all sing. The second group plays maracas on the second line. p. A good partner song with "See My Little Ducklings." Share the Music – 3. Add fingers for numbers. c. d. d. p. b. Divide class into two groups (children and ducks) to act out the song while singing. b. Put students in two groups for the two parts of the song.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES MELODIC RHYTHM: the rhythm of the words A." 5.K a. "Bate Bate Chocolate. Sing the song. Spotlight on Music . Sing the song with the recording. Use body percussion or an instrument to perform the melodic rhythm during the instrumental interlude. switching the tasks.

Writing and Performing Original Ostinati a. The above pattern is to be used with "Old Brass Wagon. d. After practicing the ostinato with the song. Extract a measure or two from a familiar poem. “Kookaburra” Kookaburra sits.” The words for the pattern are "Circle to the left. transfer each of the body sounds to a different rhythm instrument.Prince George’s County Public Schools 53 . c. b. Notate the ostinati using body percussion notation. b. “Hill an’ Gully” Horse done stumble down. b. chant or song and use it as an ostinato. c. 2. snap clap pat stamp c. Divide the class and have half the students perform the ostinati while the others sing the song. Have the class create their own body percussion ostinato to a familiar song. Songs with Ostinati a. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have one group of students perform the ostinato while the others sing the song. 3. Choose an appropriate song and extract a measure or two to be used as an ostinato. Notate the ostinato. Old Brass Wagon. Have students perform their ostinato to the music using either body percussion or rhythm instruments. Percussion Ostinati a. 4. Have students work with a partner and create a four to eight beat rhythmic ostinati using notes they have studied. PERFORMANCE: 1. Notate the ostinato for the children to see and read. Students should write their pattern on a sentence strip. Listen to a selected "pop" recording. b. Difficult ostinati can be made easier for children to perform if words are attached to patterns.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES REPEATED RHYTHM PATTERN (OSTINATO): a short repeated rhythm pattern played throughout a piece or section of a piece A." d. Body Percussion Ostinato a. Creating. Additional songs with suggested ostinati include: “Paw Paw Patch”: Paw Paw Patch “Rocky Mountain”: Hang your head and cry. d. c.

b. Have groups practice playing on beats two and four (off beats) while one student plays the steady beat on a drum. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. 3's. b. Accented off-beats are one of the primary characteristics of African American music.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES ACCENT: a sign indicating that a note should be sung or played with more emphasis A. d. Organize class in one large circle or several small ones. e. Pass the Egg a. 2.) 3. Toreadors Song (A worksheet for this is included in the Sample Lesson. Have the class read and clap the students' composition. c. Familiar spiritual a. The last accented pattern the teacher claps should be one to accompany a familiar song. Divide the class into two teams. Students pass a ball. Pass tambourines to the students. Variation: Have some students play the accents on drums while others play the steady beat on instruments that produce a contrasting sound. On accented beats students change direction. or 4's based on the meter of the song material being used in class. Listen to the song making note of the accents created by the cymbal. earns a point for his/her team. Choose a student to place a specified number of accents under the beats of their choice. Rhythmic Speech a. Place the Accent a. Cut several small squares and draw accent marks on each. PERFORMANCE: 1. Teacher plays steady beat patterns in 2's. Listen to the song. LISTENING: 1. Have students place vocal accents on different words. bean bag or yarn ball on the accented beat. d. b. One person from each team comes to a tag board with several accent squares in hand. c. Whether it's hot. c. C. b.e.) a. Play the tambourines with the song. The student who places accent marks over the correct beats first.Prince George’s County Public Schools 54 . Play the Accents a. i. 2. b.: Whether it's cold. (Do not tell children that the egg has been boiled. To increase student concentration. There will be weather Whether or not. Accent Walk a. Play while singing the song. > > > > > > > > 3. B. Draw large beats on two pieces of tag board (eight on each). Transfer the pattern to percussion instruments. The teacher claps the beats accenting several. use a hard boiled egg. Teacher plays steady beat on a hand drum while students walk freely around the room. Play the accents on cymbals or paper plate “cymbals” with the recording. Draw a line of steady beats on the board or overhead projector using stick notation. b.

Discuss what meter is used. Note that the last beat is always in an upward direction and the first beat is always downward. Conducting Patterns a. states. e. 4 Example: 4 String Beans. 3. Parsnips Turnip Greens g. Clap the words in each measure and write the notation. Play the recording again and have students quietly clap the first beat of each measure and pat the other beats. on the board. 2. Spotlight on Music – 6 p. Have each group share their creations with the total group. Indicate the time signature at the beginning. b. 4. d. as text material. d. Variation: The same activity could be done with Happy Birthday or the Star Spangled Banner. Sing the song. or a song that will be taught that day. cars. 151. PERFORMANCE: 1. Variation: After the children feel comfortable with the process. "Sakura. animals. you could do this as a small group activity.DUPLE AND TRIPLE: the organization of beats and accents in recurring sets of two or four (duple) or three (triple) A. Have the class create a rhythmic phrase of four measures in either two's. b. Select different children to insert the measure lines so that the pattern is divided into the appropriate meter. flowers.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES METER . Have the class perform their creation. Make a chart of each pattern – show the beats and arm direction. c. etc. three's. b. b. Have students listen to Sakura and quietly pat the beat. Compile a list of words in the chosen category on the board. c. f. It could also be done with songs in duple meter. or four's or all of the above. Lima Beans Cauliflower Peas Celery. Category Creations a. Use the names of cities." Music and You .4 p. Divide and Conquer a. Have the class perform the pattern by clapping or playing it on an instrument. e. c. Arrange the words in groups so that they fit the chosen meter.14 a. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . d.Prince George’s County Public Schools 55 . Write an eight beat rhythm pattern of a familiar duple song. Variation: Do the same with a song in triple meter but use a six beat pattern instead.

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . f.measure rhythmic phrase in 4 (B). B. When music stops. Have students do a body percussion pattern to determine the meter. Discuss the upbeat. Repeat the theme to make it eight measures. All students have a pair of sticks. music in three’s – group of three) 2. Perform in ABA form. Upbeat Ballet in Four’s a.) 5. b. Sing the song to determine the meter. e. Listen to music in any meter. “America the Beautiful” a. Have students stand up on the upbeat and sit on the downbeat. When students are familiar with the song. Write a second eight . Have students find the upbeat. Use rhythm notes the students have learned to this point. Rhythm Stick Meters a. C. c. b. I like pizza pie I like pizza pie I like pizza I like pizza I like pizza pie. Use this as the first theme (A). Meter Matters a. b. Choose a song in duple meter. 3 c.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES METER (cont. Changing Meter Piece 4 a. assign contrasting unpitched instruments to each group. (i. 2. have them pat the steady beat while they sing.e. they form groups in the meter of the song. At the upbeat they raise their hands to emphasize the upbeat. b.Prince George’s County Public Schools 56 . d. yeah! Have students use the text to help them memorize the words. When the rhythms are secure. Write an eight measure rhythmic phrase in 4 . LISTENING: 1. Divide the class into three groups – A B A – and have each group perform their pattern. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. While listening to music in two’s or three’s they tap sticks together on the accent and tap the floor on the weak beats. b.

c. e. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. b. Have the first and second person hold the string between them (the tie) while the students clap it. Live Pattern a. Choose four students to come up to the front of the room. then moves to second and third.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES TIE: a musical symbol that connects two notes of the same pitch A. Number each student one through four (representing quarter notes).Prince George’s County Public Schools 57 . Use yarn or string about two feet long. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Variation: Do the same activity as above using popsicle sticks and string. d.

d. Listen to the recording of "The Entertainer" by Scott Joplin. Echo clap numerous patterns. b. "Loco-Motion" Share the Music – 4. PERFORMANCE: 1. Arrange them in any order the class chooses to constitute the A theme. Syncopated Rondo a.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES SYNCOPATION: a type of rhythm in which stressed sounds occur between beats or on the “off beat” A. Spotlight on Music – 4. Variations: When children hear a syncopated pattern they verbalize the pattern as they clap it. Familiar non-syncopated songs. conga drum. d. i. p. Then verbalize it instead of clapping it. For patterns that are not syncopated the children remain in their seats.“'Liza Jane” a. 2. Identify the syncopated patterns. Add body percussion on steady beat while syncopation is played on another instrument. The B and C themes could be: 1. Add the song. c. bongos. LISTENING: 1. Sing or play familiar songs using syncopated patterns.Prince George’s County Public Schools 58 . "The Entertainer" a. 2. 2. Chant the syncopation as an ostinato. 312 a." Ragtime was popularized as piano music. d. c. “Day-O” Share the Music – 6.. c. B. Have the children read and clap each one. b. i. Discuss ragtime music. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . When the class hears a syncopated pattern they "rise" when they echo the pattern. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Students will echo clap four beat syncopation patterns while marching the beat.e. Ex. Students simultaneously clap the syncopation while stamping the beat. b. Are You Sleeping. Rise and Shine for "Syn-co-pah" a. HL 8. Learn the song. (ti-ta-ti ta ta or syn-co-pa ta ta). b. 3. p. Row Your Boat.. Transfer the syncopated patterns to small percussion instruments. C. Synco-beat . Switch parts.) c. refrain of Skip to My Lou. Have students pick out and clap the different syncopated rhythm patterns from the song. 3. Play the rhythmic pattern of different familiar songs on contrasting instruments. b. Students march the beat in a circle while teacher is clapping four beat syncopation patterns. 42 a. Sing the whole song and lightly tap the syncopated parts. b. etc. e.e. Play the song again and have students clap each one with the song. p. Write four syncopated patterns on sentence strips. (Ragtime represents the clearest fusion between African American and European music. Ragtime was the precursor of jazz and is known as the "first black instrumental music in America. Say the words that match.

Have students notate the new lyrics using the sixteenth note for some part of the lyrics.. group A says it in sixteenth notes. sixteenth notes . Say it in three tempi: fast . quarter notes . eighth notes . "Peter Pumpkin Eater" Peter Peter pumpkin eater Had a wife and couldn't keep her Put her in a pumpkin shell And there he kept her very well. b. 4. Add one at a time as the song is learned. Divide the class into two groups. The drum sets the tempo.sixteenth notes. or events.quarter notes. Finally perform the song using only body percussion. i.) a. Encourage the students to compose new lyrics for a song using different topics such as cities. each one uses one of the above tempi.triangles. "Chicken In the Fencepost” Spotlight on Music . b. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . sports. b. c. PERFORMANCE: 1.e. a. 2. e.3 a. foods. Assign each note value a different body sound.Prince George’s County Public Schools 59 . i. Assign students to instruments and perform it as an ensemble. Read this from a chart (see example-next page). and quarter notes . c. Transfer the body percussion sound to contrasting rhythm instruments: sixteenth notes sticks.clap. eighth notes . and group B says it in eighth notes. b. slow .eighth notes.group C says it in quarter notes. Have students clap the rhythms. All students memorize the poem. "Lion Dance #2" (This music is included in the Sample Lesson. Later add a third group . Creating new lyrics a.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES SIXTEENTH NOTES: the subdivision of the beat into four parts when the quarter note gets the beat A. medium . 3. Make note of the sixteenth note rhythm.stamp. states.hand drums. d.pat.

MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT Chicken In the Fence Post clap Chicken in the pat fencepost.ie stamp O.Prince George’s County Public Schools 60 . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . can’t dance Jo. (3X) Hel.sie Brown.lo Su.sie.

Switch parts so that all can experience the uneven pattern. Find the dotted rhythms. Clap just the dotted rhythms. PERFORMANCE: 1. p. c. Present a visual showing the relationship between the even eighth notes and the uneven dotted rhythms.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES DOTTED RHYTHMS: rhythm notes whose duration is extended by half the original note value A. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music ." STM . 226 a. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 61 . Have the class jog in place the steady beat pattern while the other half claps the uneven patterns. The patting and clapping could then be transferred to unpitched instruments. c. Moving with Dotted Rhythms a. B. Note: A metronome can be used to help keep the beat steady if the children have difficulty maintaining an even tempo. Reinforce through physical movement the relationships. d. e. Sing the song with the recording. Clap and speak the words.6. b. "One. Divide the class into two groups half of which will pat the eighth note steady beat while the other half claps the uneven pattern. Later they could be challenged to jog the beat and clap the uneven patterns at the same time. b.

4.Prince George’s County Public Schools 62 . a. The other five beats on smaller blocks or drum. "Night Herding Song. Add a simple melody to the rhythm composition using previously learned melody notes. 2. p. Add a simple melody to the rhythm composition using notes already learned on the recorder. PERFORMANCE: 1. The accented first beat should be played on the large block or drum. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . b. e. Combine the compositions of several groups to form a larger composition. c. Students play the steady beat on bongos or tempo blocks. Place sentence strips of rhythm patterns in 6/8 meter on the board. 50. Playing with 6/8 rhythm patterns a. Spotlight on Music .4. d." Music and You . Have each group select and clap or perform their pattern on rhythm instruments.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT RHYTHM ACTIVITIES COMPOUND METER: a meter in which the beat is subdivided into groups of three A.

re. do. B. low sol. mi. la. d. 2. Cut out several construction paper fish. Can You Play This Tune? a. c. Each student chooses a card and sings the pattern. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . f. Students echo teacher by playing the pattern on a barred instrument. If student sings the pattern on his/her card correctly that team receives a point. d. do. and a magnet in place of hook. Sing the Pattern a. b. c. b. low la. and ti): pitches of notes with respect to highness and lowness A. PERFORMANCE: 1. Going Fishing a.Make a fishing pole using a yard stick. low la. and high do in a hat or other container. Preparation . fa. high do. mi. Choose a student to fish with pole and magnet. Laminate the fish and glue magnetic strips on backs. Teacher sings a four beat melodic pattern on neutral syllable. When the student has caught a fish. Place fish on the floor with magnetic strip side up. Vary game by having students play pattern on melody instruments instead of singing. e. Divide class into two teams.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES MELODY NOTES (sol. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. (lu) b. string. low sol. Place several melody patterns using sol. la.Prince George’s County Public Schools 63 . re. On one side write four beat melodic patterns using letter names or syllables but no notation. he/she goes to the board and writes the pattern on a staff while the next student goes fishing. Team receiving the most points wins.

"Tumbai. (repeat) Yum. Divide the class into four groups and give each group one part to sing.3 a. Variation: Use "Are You Sleeping" and change the text to suit many special occasions. (repeat) Trick or treaters at the door. You may use a Hispanic language version of this melody "Buenos Dias. Yum. Add the BX and AX on the pattern for support. (repeat) Rudolph. "Are You Sleeping?" a. Use Orff instruments and experiment using open fifth E-B. Yum. b.5 a. Start with simple and/or familiar songs and extract a short phrase to be used as an ostinato. d. "Shalom Chaverim" Spotlight on Music . Take turns until both groups have sung all parts." Share the Music – 6." (repeat) 3) "Halloween's comin'. e.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES REPEATED MELODIC PATTERN (OSTINATO): a short repeated melody pattern played throughout a piece or section of a piece A. b. Use the first line as an ostinato.." 2.e." (repeat) 2) "On Thanksgiving. (repeat) Loud and clear. 3. (repeat) Stuff it in the turkey. An easy ostinato would be the last two words. i. (repeat) Do beware. Too.Prince George’s County Public Schools 64 . 1) "I hear sleigh bells. c. (repeat) Don't eat bread. Choose a second melodic phrase to be sung as an ostinato. (repeat) Maybe it is Santa. Everywhere!" (repeat) f. b. PERFORMANCE: 1. Spotlight on Music . Children must be able to sing any song independently before adding a vocal ostinato. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Ghosts and goblins by the score.

e. 2. PERFORMANCE: 1. 5." b. c. Variation: Teacher sings a melodic phrase using melody notes they have learned so far. c. Have students walk the beat in place and draw the phrases. Turning the phrases a. b.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES PHRASING (RHYTHMIC/MELODIC): segments of music that are complete thoughts or ideas A." c. b. e.Answer a. Half the class performs "question". 4. The cards are randomly placed on the floor or a large table and teacher announces the two songs. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . b. Melodic Question – Answer a. Teacher writes several four-beat rhythmic patterns on flash cards and selects two to form a "question. They should end up facing the same direction that they started in when they finish. Students read phrase and create an answer using previously learned rhythms and syllables. Have groups of students sing a phrase from the song. Have students walk the beat in place. mi. Variation: Transfer to melodic notation. Identify the phrases and show by drawing phrase lines in the air. d. b. The teacher claps an eight beat pattern (question). Teach a short rhythmic chant with four phrases. c. Students choose two patterns to create an "answer" to the teacher's "question. 3. Chain Singing a. The students must arrange the phrases in order. Identify the phrases for a familiar song. Teacher writes phrase for sight singing on chalkboard or chart (question). The teacher chooses student to improvise a balanced eight beat response (answer). c. 6. Students choose contrasting percussive sounds to play consecutive phrases. Continue singing in like manner until the song is completed. Mix and Match a. Echo Clapping a. Question . i. Acka Backa. d. Student sings an answer using sol. draw the phrases and turn at the end of each phrase. d. These questions and answers can then be played on bells or other melodic instruments.Prince George’s County Public Schools 65 . and la. half performs "answer". switch. b. Teacher chooses two known songs and writes the rhythmic phrases on sentence strips.

sol-mi-do. Students notate pattern. Teacher dictates a given pattern in C pentatonic. Compose a four beat pattern and notate. Children play the intervals on melody instruments. Then students compose a four measure song using the notes in their scale. Have students improvise using C pentatonic notes to play response. 5. Sing using letter names for C pentatonic. Children sing the song in syllables until comfortable with the song. Teach a rhythm chant. Students notate a C pentatonic scale. mi. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Add a response for call and response form. E. Play with the Mystery Tune. Children sing and sign intervals from the C pentatonic (C. Mystery Tune a. D. re. 4. b. Pentatonic Warm-up a. b. c. G. do): music based on a scale of five pitches A. mi-re-do. sol-la-sol-mi. A) ex.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES PENTATONIC (sol. 3.Prince George’s County Public Schools 66 . PERFORMANCE: 1. Then add the words. Composition a. Notation a. c. la. b. sol-mi. c. 2. Teacher notates a pentatonic tune. b. b. Leave out F and B (“flies” and “bumblebees”). d. Improvisation a.

Create a keyboard pattern using black and white construction paper on the floor. d. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Whole and half steps a. Put two colored dots on notes. etc. third. Variation: Count the whole steps to teach intervals.Prince George’s County Public Schools 67 . c. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Do the same with half steps.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES MELODIC INTERVALS: the distance from one pitch to another A. f. second. e. Have students identify the number of whole steps between the dots. Variation: Use this to teach intervals of a fifth. b.

b. listening for the differences in sound. Play several similar examples and have students identify major and minor for practice. Give each student a flashcard with major on one side and minor on the other. 2. “This Land is Your Land” a. Familiar songs. Have the students signal the change with the flashcards or hand signals. The above piece is minor until the last time through the melody.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES SCALE PATTERNS: an arrangement of pitches from lower to higher according to a specific pattern of intervals or steps A. c. d. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have students listen while someone plays C to C1 on a melody instrument and identify as a major sound. Hide a set of bells. Play the chosen song on the piano changing the sound from major to minor chords. As new songs are introduced. identify whether they have a major or minor sound. Play bells from C to C1 (this is a major scale). Ask students to compare the sound of the two scales. Give students a set of bells. Major and Minor Recognition a. Tell students the tonal center of each scale and that the first is called major and the second is called minor. B. c.Prince George’s County Public Schools 68 . have one student play a scale and have the class identify major or minor. Present several examples of each. LISTENING: 1. d.e. Have students play both scales. Playing Instruments a. Have them identify the scales using the flashcard. Play the selection again and have students listen for major and minor. e. 2. Review a familiar song in a major key. PERFORMANCE: 1. b. e. Ask students to listen while you play a C scale ascending and descending from C to C1 then from A to A1 on any pitched instrument. Have students show that they hear the changes by flipping their flashcards at the appropriate times. c. Now play from A to A1 (this is a minor scale). End with the key of the song you are using. b. It changes to major. i. Then play A to A1 and identify as a minor sound. “Farandole” from L’Arlesienne by Bizet a. b. Play several major and minor scales to warm-up their ears.

changing where the chords change in the song. Building Chords a. Have students sing the song again substituting the letters for the chord changes instead of the words. have them sing the song facing the words. Transfer this to tone bar instruments. Distribute cards with the letter names for a C scale to eight students in the class. teach the song. When students are comfortable playing the chord changes. 3. f. Raise hands to identify these chord changes. Build triads on the highlighted notes. e. c.Prince George’s County Public Schools 69 . e. e. Look at the music for a familiar song with I. Write a scale on a staff on the board. Build the triads for those notes. d. When students can sing the song comfortably. Have the students “build” a chord on a C by having the first. Ask students to identify when the chord changes occur by raising their hand. IV. Repeat this process for several different key signatures. Highlight the first. b. Go through the printed music for a familiar song. Have students with the appropriate letters for the chords in the song step out when their chord occurs in the song. PERFORMANCE: 1. Add the words while playing the chord changes. c. Play the chords that have been built with the song. 136 a.e. “Simple Gifts” Spotlight on Music – 5. d. IV. green dot for G. b. fourth. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Song with I. p. f. Teacher should play the chord roots for a C chord and G chord with the song. c. and V7 chords. Identifying the chord symbols and “build” the chords. V7 a. Have them sing the letters while learning the chord changes. discuss how the chord is built from the root. d. while the teacher plays a tone bar instrument from behind them. third and fifth person step out of the line. Have students put themselves in scale order (ascending). Using a chart with the words of the song. and fifth scale degrees.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES CHORDS: three or more pitches sounded together A. i. Sing the song and listen as the chords are played. Have students put colored dots on the chart with the words to identify where the chord changes are and which chord is played. 2. Have students “build” chords on the fourth and fifth scale degree the same way. d. third and fifth. red dot for C. b. Identify the chord symbols.

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . harmony – two or more pitches sounding at the same time A. All Day. Spotlight on Music .) Show with thumbs up and down when a soloist is featured and when the whole ensemble plays harmony. c.” “Scotland's Burning. LISTENING: 1. Modern Jazz Quartet. Billie Taylor. Have student groups create and perform a body percussion pattern in unison for their solo section. “Hallelujah Chorus” from the Messiah by Handel. 2.Miles Davis. Demonstrate with the first playing of the music. Soul jazz . (Representative musicians include: Bebop Charlie Parker. Have the class listen to the piece.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT MELODY/ HARMONY ACTIVITIES UNISON/HARMONY: unison – all performing the same part at the same time." b. Billy Ekstine. 2.Wynton Marsalis.Ramsey Lewis. Sweet Chariot. Rounds/Canons a. PERFORMANCE: 1. Jazz Activity a. Row. The whole class keeps the beat during the ensemble section which is in harmony. Have students listen again and indicate unison and harmony independently. Partner Songs a. Dizzy Gillespie. “Fre’re Jacques” with “Three Blind Mice” and “Row. Have students indicate whether they hear unison or harmony by holding up one finger for unison and four fingers for harmony." with "Swing Low. c. b. Divide into groups for the number of solo sections in the piece.Prince George’s County Public Schools 70 .5 a. Oscar Peterson. Ho! Nobody's Home.” “Hey. John Coltrane.” B. Have students listen to an example of jazz music. Modern jazz . "All Night. Cool jazz . After learning to play a simple round or canon on the recorder. Thelonius Monk. children can work in groups or with partners to play two or more parts with one of the following pieces: “Hot Cross Buns. Row Your Boat” (sing twice). Discuss unison and harmony. b.

Sing the phrases that are the same to the class. Choose a familiar song with some phrases the same and some different. 2. Singing phrases a. Create a phrase a. Students choose a partner. Students are to work together to create rhythmic or melodic phrases. 3. Make your move a.Prince George’s County Public Schools 71 . Contrasting Instruments a. c.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT FORM ACTIVITIES SAME AND DIFFERENT PHRASES: repetition and contrast of segments of the music A. Have the children sing the different phrase to the teacher. Switch the silent part. b. Have the students perform their movements for the class. Give each pair a sentence strip or staff paper. Students perform phrases for class. Switch parts. Then have the class sing the phrases that are the same aloud and the different phrase silently. b. Class chooses two phrases and arranges them to form a larger composition. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . B. PERFORMANCE: 1. Choose a familiar song. Then divide the class and have half sing the phrases that are the same and the other half sings the phrase that is different. b. Have students select contrasting percussion instruments to accompany the different phrases. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. d. Choose a familiar song with three similar phrases and one different phrase. c. c. Have students create appropriate movements to designate “like” and “unlike” phrases. d. b.

Prepare construction paper cards in the following manner: A B b. bounce and at a faster tempo. triangles. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 2 groups. Instrumental AB/ABA a. . ABA. Example: A = shakers. Creating ABA a.e. Each group would create a movement with instrumental accompaniment. and verse/refrain): the order of different sections in music A. 3 groups. AB. PERFORMANCE: 1. etc. b. etc.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT FORM ACTIVITIES TWO PART FORMS (including AB. Colors and Shapes a. smooth. Ex. Use different tonal colors (instruments) to accompany each musical section of a two part form. 2. Have them listen to a selection and respond by raising the correct shape or color for the corresponding section of the music as they listen.Prince George’s County Public Schools 72 . graceful. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Divide class into the appropriate number of groups (sections) i. twist. B = finger cymbals. b. Display the cards where students can see. LISTENING: 1. ABA. Group Response a. c.movements of longer duration. rattles. metallophones. .movements that shake. Select two different simple songs and create an ABA form. Give every child the appropriate number of colored shapes of paper. congo drums. B. slower tempo C. A = Are You Sleeping? B = White Coral Bells A = Are You Sleeping? 2. Have individuals select the correct shape or color to show which section of music is being sung or played.. etc. Subdivide each group into players and movers. c. Creating ABA movement a.

MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT FORM ACTIVITIES MULTI PART FORMS (including rondo and theme and variations): rondo – a form based on repetition and contrast where the first theme returns after each new section. “Pop Goes the Weasel” – Theme and Variations a. Moving in Rondo Form (ABACA) a. Ask students to combine cards to form four measure phrases. e. b. Place several flash cards containing rhythmic patterns on the floor or board. B. c. Choose a listening selection that is in rondo form. Divide the class into groups A. Rondo Sandwich a. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Assign letter names to each four measure phrase. b. d. d. b. Vary activity by creating three rhythmic ostinati to accompany the music. d. C. b. Creating a Rondo a. Select ingredients for a pretend rondo sandwich. c. and C.Prince George’s County Public Schools 73 . if students are familiar with them). Listen to the piece for each time the theme starts and raise hand quickly and put it back down for each new variation. often organized as ABACA. 2. Divide into cooperative groups. sol and la (add re and do. OR e. List ways that the variations changed from the main theme. f. Play the section again and have groups perform their movement at the appropriate time. B. Extend activity by developing rhythmic phrases into melodic phrases using mi. Have children perform their phrases on melodic instruments. Listen to the music and help each group decide upon an appropriate movement for their section. Create several large size posters of the letter A in different fonts. c. Have selected students hold up one of the posters when each new variation starts. Teacher can decide whether the bread should count or not. Use body percussion or percussion instruments to perform the ostinati. theme and variations – a form in which each section is a variation of the initial theme A. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Students perform phrases in Rondo form using rhythm instruments or body percussion. LISTENING: 1. Groups should draw their creation on the worksheet provided and label each part. Groups should then write a speech rondo about their sandwich. c. PERFORMANCE: 1. Each section of the rondo should be about one of the ingredients of their sandwich. Use contrasting instruments for each section.

Think about: 1. 2. Draw a picture of your sandwich.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT Make a Rondo Sandwich Using your knowledge of rondo form. create a sandwich with the ingredients provided. Label all the ingredients and the rondo sections. the sequence or pattern for this form repeated and contrasting sections Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 74 . Use the space below.

"Lucy Locket" Spotlight on Music – 1. c. c. two or three finger taps. Try this with a listening selection such as Ibert's "Parade". 3. Find the Eraser . Play a listening selection and have the students open and close the puppet's mouth as appropriate to express the dynamic level of the music. "Dance of the Comedians. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . b.Prince George’s County Public Schools 75 . Another student moves around the room to locate it. for example. whole hand claps. Teacher chooses a short listening example that has a wide variety of dynamic levels. Loud and Soft Collage a. One student hides an eraser. and large or small groups of instruments can be used to show changing dynamics. Gradually add fingers then reverse. d. b. b. B. 4. 2. Create paper bag puppets representing an animal that makes a loud sound. b.T253 a. Echo clapping with class may include varying dynamic levels. Children put their hands together like alligator jaws. The class sings song louder when student is close to the eraser and softer when farther away. Caution children not to shout but to sing with a strong full sound. Other activities to reinforce dynamics a. c. Play listening selections and have children indicate the appropriate collage to accompany the sounds they are hearing. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. Ask students to bring in pictures from magazines that depict loud and soft sounds. Have the class begin clapping a steady beat using just one finger." b. One. p. Paper Bag Puppets a. c.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT TONE COLOR ACTIVITIES DYNAMICS: changes in intensity and loudness of sound A. Using two pieces of tag board have children create two collages by pasting appropriate pictures on loud and soft boards. Alligator Jaws a. Children open and close the jaws to show changes in dynamics. LISTENING: 1.

Students should have an opportunity to examine the instruments to determine how sound is produced with each instrument. d.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT TONE COLOR ACTIVITIES CLASSIFYING INSTRUMENTS A. b. Listen to the story again. clarinet. (bird. This could be done in cooperative groups. Warn students about the proper care of the instruments and not blowing into any of the instruments. Teacher removes all cards from the board and mixes them. b. finding the most complimentary combinations of tone colors. wolf. c. flute. g. and French horn are shown.. brass trio. e. bassoon." "air starter. string quartet. 3. oboe. Have small groups of students create with their own ensembles. and hunters. self starters. Students listen to Peter and the Wolf raising their hands when they hear "air starters" and listening to the unique tone quality/timbre of each instrument. Students will cut and paste the instrument pictures onto the template. f. Duplicate these pages for students. bassoon. oboe. Peter and the Wolf a. Students identify the character that goes with each instrument.Prince George’s County Public Schools 76 . GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. They should be able to tell how sound is produced and classify the instrument into the appropriate sound production family. Students raise their hands when they hear the "air starters. etc." and "skin starter" as each of the instruments is played. c. duck. Discuss how the sound is produced and the classification for each instrument. string starters. grandfather. French horn. Prepare six to eight boxes of four or five instruments with at least one from each of the classification families in each box. i. 4. Discuss the vocabulary associated with various musical ensembles. and skin starters. Alternative activity: Students listen to Peter and the Wolf and hold up flash cards labeled "string starter. woodwind quintet. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . cat.e. Students identify "air starters" by raising their hand when cards with the flute. Each member of the group should select one of the instruments to share with their group. Teacher points to the musical instrument pictures and introduces the characters they represent in Peter and the Wolf." Students identify the "skin starter" (timpani) and "string starter" (violin) in Peter and the Wolf and the characters represented by them with two other signals. Create a collage of various instruments from every sound source category. Small Group Classification Activity – Intermediate students a. b. Groups should then share their ensemble combinations with the class and justify their selection with information about the instruments. Instrument Collage a. clarinet. Each group should be given one of the boxes of instruments. c. b. classifying them into the appropriate section of the template. Introduce the instruments from the story. air starters. timpani) c. Peter. Divide students into groups of no more than five (preferably four). violins. 2. Ensemble Creation a.

woodwind. Have students consider size and playing techniques. and the sound produced. b. The Orchestra a. Inventing an instrument a. d. Have students draw a sketch and describe their instrument. Using the information from their instrument creation. B. materials. b. Be sure your writing includes: • a catchy name for your instrument • a complete description of the materials it is made from and the size using language that will make it sound interesting to the potential buyer • an explanation of what part of the instrument makes the sound and how to play your instrument in a way that will attract your buyer • the type of musical sound it can produce Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Group the "orchestral instruments" by this new system. Share a variety of music equipment catalogs with the class. Have students consider tone qualities and what materials would produce the desired quality. how it is played. have students respond to the following writing prompt: Pretend that a music equipment company has agreed to advertise your instrument in their catalog. string. Examine the sample catalog entries for musical instruments. Use the Sound Production Family labels in conjunction with the orchestra section labels. Refer to the traditional labels: brass. and percussion as sections of the orchestra. c. Read Orchestranimals or another book about orchestra instruments and classify the instruments by orchestra section and sound production family while reading the book. CREATING: 1. Include a color drawing of your instrument showing somebody playing the instrument. Make note of the language used for the description including size.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT TONE COLOR ACTIVITIES 5. Have students determine what type of musical sound they would like to have an instrument make. Write a persuasive entry using factual information about your instrument as you would like it to appear in the catalog.Prince George’s County Public Schools 77 .

MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT Instrument Collage Template CHORDOPHONES (STRING STARTERS) AEROPHONES (AIR STARTERS) IDIOPHONES (SELF STARTERS) MEMBRANOPHONES (SKIN STARTERS) Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 78 .

The fifth category entitled "electronophones" was added later with the advance of technology. and percussion instruments. Note: includes some of traditional Percussion. Electronophones: Instruments in which sound is produced by purely electronic means. The four main categories are as follows: 1. 4. cannot be heard until its sound is channeled through an amplification system even though it must be produced first from the vibration of strings as in the acoustic guitar. the action itself (percussion). Note: includes traditional String instruments. Aerophones: Instruments in which sound is produced by the vibration of air. This classification system was developed by Eric von Hornbostel and Curt Sachs in 1914. woodwind. An electric instrument is an instrument in which a device to increase/amplify the volume of a sound or change its timbre forms an essential part of the instrument. According to Sachs. the principle of division in a classification system should remain consistent throughout all categories. An amplified instrument is a sound producing instrument whose volume is increased by changing the sound into an electric signal using a separate device such as a pick-up or microphone then playing it back through a loudspeaker. The electric guitar. This music may be produced through the natural medium of a human voice or through the more artificial medium of a human-made instrument. Chordophones: Instruments in which sound is produced by the vibration of strings. it is based on three different principles: the sonorous material acted upon (strings). the most accessible. consistent system of instrument classification than the traditional scheme which includes stringed. brass. 2. all cultures have some kind of music.amplified and electric instruments. The human voice remains the most common medium of musical sound not only because it is the most natural. The list which follows helps to understand the classification system and where instruments from around the world might be placed along with traditional orchestral instruments. and the most effective carrier of melody and words. Membranophones: Instruments in which sound is produced by the vibration of stretched membrane/skin.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT TONE COLOR ACTIVITIES REFERENCE PAGE: SOUND PRODUCTION FAMILIES INTRODUCTION: With few exceptions. The criterion they used is the way in which the sound is produced in the instrument. Idiophones: Instruments in which the substance of the instrument itself produces the vibration. 5. Note: includes some of traditional Percussion. The traditional scheme frequently used by music educators has significant drawbacks. and the activating force (winds) which is further subdivided by the material of the instrument (woodwind and brass). First. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . HORNBOSTEL-SACHS CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM: The classification system adopts a more logical.Prince George’s County Public Schools 79 . for example. Note: includes traditional Woodwinds and Brass. A classification system to include this multitude of instruments was developed in the early 1900’s and is still in use today. it does not include many of the instruments outside our modern orchestra. but also because it is flexible and expressive. In addition. Hornbostel and Sachs devised a more consistent classification system which uses a single criterion to determine the instrument’s classification. This group includes two categories of music instruments . 3. Human-made instruments include an ever expanding number of musical instruments throughout the world.

Kawai K samplers: Roland S – 50 hybrids: Casio FZ .1 computer 80 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Elepian Electronic Piano.3 Organ.Prince George’s County Public Schools . mini moog digital synthesizers: Yamaha DX 7.MUSICAL CONCEPTS AND SKILL DEVELOPMENT TONE COLOR ACTIVITIES AEROPHONES/AIR STARTERS accordion horn saxophone bassoon kayne siku cornet ocarina trombone double recorder English horn pipe organ quena whistle IDIOPHONES/SELFSTARTERS agogo bell finger cymbals wood block rattles flexitone resonator bells rhythm sticks balafon bells gong guiro castanets celeste hosho Chinese bell tree jingle bells claves kalimba contrabass bars maracas shaker shekere xylophone tempo blocks cymbals metallophone MEMBRANOPHONES/SKIN STARTERS adodo bongos changgo snare drum sogo donno hand drum tambourine with head CHORDOPHONES/STRING STARTERS autoharp fiddle guitar mandolin piano bass bouzouki harp harpsichord ukulele vihuela double bass dulcimer koto recorder sheng oboe dizi piccolo tuba French horn rainmaker angklung axatse glockenspiel sansa guiro chimes/chime tree clappers cloud chamber bowls cowbell slapstick vibraslap wind chimes petia ashiko drum taiko-dojo bass drum lute banjo haegum shamisen ch'in kora violin harmonica clarinet sousaphone panpipes trumpet flute cricket tone block gankogui sand blocks cabasa triangle jaltarang jingles kseng kseng mbira steel drums triangle tambourine without head apentemma conga atumpan timpani balalaika guitarron p'i p'a cello kayagum viola ELECTRONOPHONES analog synthesizers: Hammond B .

Frequent communication with the building Reading Specialist and the classroom teacher will be helpful in the planning and pacing of instruction to optimize the natural link that occurs between reading. An understanding of the music lyrics to fully appreciate the role of music in people’s lives is an integral part of these activities. Writing activities to communicate students’ understanding of these perspectives are also included. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . This section also provides students with the opportunity to develop a broader view of the Fine Arts and the connections between the various art forms. the other Fine Arts. and social perspectives. writing.Prince George’s County Public Schools 81 . There are suggested activities for Drama. Music teachers are encouraged to coordinate with classroom teachers when planning a unit from this section for more meaningful instruction.Music in Relation to People And Other Arts This section examines the music of people from a variety of cultural. Reference pages with the Reading Themes and a glossary of literacy terms are included in this section. historical. and music. Suggested activities are included for each of these areas. Music Styles and Genres. Visual Art. and Writing.

Foreign Language – The music which our ensembles perform has its inception from western European civilization. Geography – Music is common. Language Arts – When analyzing a music composition.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Music in Relation to Other Arts Has your audience ever contemplated the direct relationship that music education has with the school’s total curriculum? Many critics fail to realize and consider the influence which music has on the entire educational program. • Science – Music is a specialized science which deals with the qualities of sound. Although a simple framework. multiplication. and timbre. we develop and reinforce the concepts of addition. students study the great composers of the past. four. Middle Ages. performers gain significant knowledge in the Italian language. counting in groups of two. the performer will note the relationship of the concerto/symphonic form with that of the basic essay format emphasized in writing classes. and will inevitably improve the students’ all important standardized test scores. History – Through an appreciation of music. musicians understand similarities between the English and the Romantic/Germanic languages. we raise the awareness of the world around us.Prince George’s County Public Schools 82 . three. Baroque. Mathematics – Although it is a simplified form of arithmetic. testimonial. and higher are used consistently in all music repertoire. but unique to every culture on Earth. and Contemporary Eras. we are able to experience a piece of history through a performance of a musical selection. subtraction. Music acts as a blueprint. Romantic. This goes a long way in building a strong vocabulary base. and division. Classical. With an awareness of the terminology printed throughout the sheet music. Utilize the following when making your case to the masses. Depending on the selection’s difficulty and composer. When performing these. The root words. and archive to the people and the events of the Antiquity. French and Spanish terms may be introduced. The phrasing of the musical line in a performance has a direct relationship with the vocal inflections emphasizing portions of the basic sentence. German. prefixes. Both have their origins from other regions and countries on the globe. As musicians. Extensive training is given to the aural discrimination between like pitches and those that are different. the standard exposition-developmental-recapitulation construction of music has a direct correlation with the author’s thesis statement-development-conclusion. When musicians understand the intentions of the composer’s masterpiece. Renaissance. acoustics. Each music selection that our students present utilizes rhythmic patterns and a specified tonality. and suffixes located in the foreign language find their way directly into the English derivative. As a result of the terminology. When teaching the values of rhythmic notation. • • • • • Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . they gain insight to all historical eras.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 83 . a significant amount of time is spent on developing proper breath support and appropriate respiratory habits. Rehearsals. Instead. It evokes passionate emotions in the heart and rekindles vibrant memories of the mind. Music is the universal language which establishes a common bond among all subjects and people. In addition. woodwind. As with all sports organizations. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . the concepts of teamwork and cooperation are exploited in the band. Emphasizing and enhancing music education will expand the student’s knowledge in a variety of subjects. brass and string instruments. excuses are made and methods are devised to remove an essential portion of the human soul. it would make sense to fervently develop and advance our music programs. motor skills are advanced substantially when playing percussion. are as intensive and exhaustive as jogging and swimming laps. and release the human spirit. improve their test scores.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS • Physical Education – When starting and developing the wind and vocal musician. With the enormous impact that music has on every aspect of our lives. if properly orchestrated. orchestra and chorus setting.

d. Have groups perform the song in class. school. Share different traditions and customs for celebrating birthdays that students in the class follow. Assess using the following criteria: singing together as a group. having a clear beginning and end for the song. LISTENING: 1. Provide students with a copy of the words of the musical selection. 2. 2_________________________________ . PERFORMANCE: 1.Prince George’s County Public Schools 84 .MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS INDIVIDUAL EXPRESSION A. Have them follow along singing with the recording. c. Listen to a musical selection of any type or style a. Sing several songs referring to birthdays including Happy Birthday (America) and Las Mananitas (Mexico) Spotlight on Music . b. Birthday songs a. Song Summary a.e. and singing an original song about a birthday.4. what is the music telling you that you should do). neighborhood. This message says to me that I should (in your own words. Students may use a familiar tune from a song and make up new words or make up a completely new song. While listening to the music have students complete the following sentence: This music reminds me of (a person) because ______________________________ . Have students in cooperative groups make up a birthday song for children in the future. Discuss the birthday customs from different cultures. Discuss how customs vary from family to family even within a culture. “Old McDonald” or other similar songs a. b. Ask students to complete the following song summary: I believe the musician is singing about the issue of ____________________ and their message is (in your own words) which is supported by phrases from the lyrics like: 1_________________________________ . and 3__________________________. As a whole class write new words to this song with a different setting. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . B. etc. 2. i.

Have students create their own verse for a spiritual with a hidden meaning appropriate for the time period and historical context. and “Draw a Bucket of Water” (African American) . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters or similar folktale text from various countries. Scenes could be dramatized by small groups as other groups are working on the rhythmic speech.4. 3. b. e. Code songs of the Underground Railroad a. c. Use this as a starting point for telling the whole story in the form of a rap. The exact words need not be used but the body of the story should remain the same. “One. Two. Read the story again looking for repetitive or rhythmically phrases that could be said by the whole group.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS CULTURAL EXPRESSION A. “Zum Gali Gali (Israel) . b.Share the Music – 3 and Spotlight on Music 3. Three” (Barbados) . Sing “Follow De Drinkin’ Gourd” and discuss the routes of the Underground Railroad using a map. Students should then try to sing the song whenever they are doing the work over a given period of time. Discuss which types of work would be done by girls versus the work done by boys in each culture. Have students create their own work song for a job they have to perform on a regular basis. Put the whole story together as a class. Read the book together as a class. d. “Wang U Ger” (China) . d. Discuss the hidden meanings in the song and the ways that the lyrics helped the slaves to communicate and subsequently escape.3.4.Prince George’s County Public Schools 85 . c. Sound effects by culturally authentic instruments could be added to the story’s retelling. Discuss the constellations referred to in the song.Share the Music – 5 and Spotlight on Music . a. Perform using a culturally authentic singing style.Share the Music . PERFORMANCE: 1. Do this with as much cultural authenticity as possible in the music class environment. 2. Sing and play the following work songs of children: “Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush” (European). Sing the songs again and pantomime performing the work while singing the song. Students should then evaluate the song’s effectiveness in having the work go faster or easier. The story should be divided into scenes. Small groups work on different parts and then the whole group joins in at some point with the repetitive/rhythmic phrase being said by the class. Discuss the cultural background of the children who sing these songs. Chart the information and look for similarities and differences between the cultures and the kinds of children’s work. “Stone Pounding” (Jamaica) . Discuss the story using a story map graphic organizer. Point out on a map the location of these countries.Share the Music .Step It Down and Spotlight on Music – 3. Evaluate the practices as a class and incorporate the suggestions for improvement into additional rehearsals as time allows until students are satisfied with their creation. b. Work songs a.

GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. 2. Beat games a. 3. “Irish Jig” (Ireland). b. “Bob-a-Needle” (African American needle case passing game) Shake It to the One That You Love the Best. Have students state the criteria for their selection. where the passing occurs. “El Acitron” (Latin American stick passing game) Spotlight on Music . Show pictures of the instruments used in the recording. Hold On” (Jamaican ring passing game) Share the Music . “La Raspa” (Mexico). and African dance experience b. “Obwisana” (African stone passing game) Share the Music . “Electric Slide” (America).3. b. “Hora” (Israel). Have students compare the games as they are introduced using a Venn Diagram with consideration for such items as the passing object. c. language. and “Biddy. tempo. Native American dances. Classify those instruments.K. Spotlight on Music . As a culminating activity students may be asked to select their two favorite games and compare them. Have students listen to a recording of a mariachi band. As a class discuss the classification of instruments using the pictures. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .3.) B. and the position of the players. how the game is played. c. Latin American Instrument Classification a.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS CULTURAL EXPRESSION (cont. Compare the different dance styles and formations. Have students research any of the dances to share information with the class about the dance as a cultural expression. Have students perform a selection of traditional dances such as the following: “Seven Jumps” (Denmark). Listen to other Latin American music for the use of instruments.6. Traditional dances a. Sing and play the following beat games: “Engine #9” (Traditional American block passing game). Discuss cultural information regarding Hispanic music as well.Prince George’s County Public Schools 86 .

Where. Each group should then prepare a presentation of the information using one of the following presentation possibilities. The words should remain the same.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS HISTORICAL CONTEXT A. The class should follow each group’s presentation by singing the song that refers to that particular event. etc. Perform the work that would be done with each type of shantey as it is being sung. 3. a. c. Each group may develop their own style for singing the refrain of Yankee Doodle. Have students respond to the following writing prompt: Pretend you are looking for sailors to go to sea during the 1700’s. Have students in small groups research several of these events. Sea Shanteys – Music and You. Evaluate each group’s performance using pre-determined criteria based on the completion of the task of creating a variation on the singing style of Yankee Doodle. Use the writing process for the completion of this writing assignment. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . The graphing activity at the bottom may be done as a whole class. Discuss the historical events referred to in the lyrics. Revolutionary War songs a. Groups should complete a Who. b. b. rhythmic alternatives. 2. PERFORMANCE: 1. Sing a variety of the freedom songs. b. Divide into small groups. c. • eyewitness news report • talk show interview • dramatize the event • debate the two sides • oral history presentation – take the position of someone who was there • analysis – “we think they should have …” • what if – change one thing about the event and predict what might have happened if… • application – How can you use what happened from the event to change or work on one of today’s issues? • abstraction – If something like this happened today.Prince George’s County Public Schools 87 . Tell what you may have a chance to do in your leisure time. Sing one of the versions of Yankee Doodle. The singing style should change for each group. Sing a variety of sea shanteys. These will be the variations. Book 5 a. c. Have students become familiar with the refrain. Discuss theme and variations form. Discuss some of the possibilities including dynamic changes. tempo changes. Write an advertisement for a newspaper to persuade more sailors to come work on your ship. how would things be different? • presentation ideas of your own – please get teacher approval before you continue d. In small groups have students complete the “Sea Shantey Glyph” which is included here. What. graphic organizer as they do their research. etc. Freedom Songs from the Civil Rights Movement. Give each group an opportunity to perform for the class. Tell about a favorite sea shantey you enjoy singing and when you generally sing it. Include information about the life on the ship or jobs you have to perform as a member of the crew. Discuss the historical context of these work songs of the sea.

Write a speech to a group of today’s freedom fighters telling them how you feel about this issue. name a freedom song that you could use for the issue you have selected and write down new words you might sing in the song to speak about your issue. Describe how you might use something you learned about from the Civil Rights Movement to help make changes.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS HISTORICAL CONTEXT e. Use the writing process for the completion of this writing assignment. Have students individually respond to the following prompt: Pretend you are a freedom fighter in today’s world.Prince George’s County Public Schools 88 . In your speech. Select an issue you feel people need to work on (for example: drugs. Include information about what you feel needs to be changed. education). weapons. violence. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

The red sails are for males and blue sails are for females.Prince George’s County Public Schools 89 . Cook Shanteyman Capstan Halyard 3. Switch glyphs with another group.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS SEA SHANTEY GLYPH You’ve recently been hired to work on board a ship. Graph the results using a bar graph. and number and gender of sailors on the ship. Interpret the data and write an informative entry in the captain’s journal using the data from their glyph. Create a glyph detailing your job. cargo. How many sailors are on your ship? Draw a sail on the mast for each crew member. Fabrics & Furnishings agricultural products work ship (fishing/whaling) 4. Questions: 1. To which hemisphere would you travel? Select a tan ship from the table if you would be traveling to the southern hemisphere and a gray ship if you would be traveling to the northern hemisphere. 2. destination. For which job were you hired? Draw the appropriate stick figure aboard the ship where you would work. What kind of cargo do you haul? Draw the following patterns on the hull of your ship to represent the corresponding cargo. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

LISTENING: 1. Allow time for preparation before returning to the music. MUSIC STYLES AND GENRES A. Through the year while listening to and/or performing a variety of musical selections of any type or style. Assign each group one of the scenes from the story to pantomime while the music is played.e. or Cinderella. Discuss appropriate behavior for participation as the audience as well as the performers in this activity. c. Explore the twelve bar blues pattern. “Under the Big Top” – Donaldson (Bowmar Listening Library-Animals and the Circus) Alternative: “Carnival of the Animals” – Saint-Saens a. c. Evaluate the performance using pre-established criteria. Assign each group a specific act. Divide the class into eleven groups. Hansel and Gretel. Supply props. Sing the “Joe Turner Blues” while the chord progression is played on the xylophones. d. Listen to the entire work b. GAMES AND MOVEMENT: 1. c. b. Make an audio recording of the final performance. B. classify the musical works by genre on a chart. Have students listen to a selection of blues pieces.Prince George’s County Public Schools 90 . PERFORMANCE: 1. A common setting or topic (i. Allow time for groups to prepare.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS DRAMA A. Students may work in cooperative groups to write their own twelve bar blues verses. b. Practice together as a class. The Blues a. d. B. Count the beats played in each phrase. costumes. Play a twelve bar blues chord progression on the xylophones. Each group will dramatize the acts within the piece of work. and tumbling mats. e. Choose a selection such as the Nutcracker. Encourage students to silently pantomime as the music should be the only thing heard. PERFORMANCE: 1. Sorcerer’s Apprentice. Divide the class into small groups. a. Listen to the music and draw scenes from the story using a sequence chain. d. Genre Classification a. “Back to School Blues”) may be chosen but this is not required. f. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Prior to the performance agree on a signal for letting each know when to start. Discuss the story that accompanies the music.

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Alternate activity during the holiday season: have students draw a night scene with a pattern in the holiday lights. have students draw quilt patterns. and social context of the music as well. Responses could be assessed using the rubric provided. change or add one thing to the drawing of a fish. Students may draw Kente cloth patterns while listening to the music. African choral music selection a. b. Have students respond to the listening selection providing the requested feedback on the form.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS MUSIC AND ART A. Provide students with a copy of the music journal form. Distribute dark sheets of construction paper. LISTENING: 1. While listening to the music use stars to create their own shapes on the paper provided. Music Journals (could be done over several class periods) a. c. Discuss how stars sometimes create shapes and symbols called constellations. (Several possibilities are provided with this activity. b. Encourage them to comment on the type of music as well as the instrumentation preferences. Demonstrate the theme and variations idea using a drawing of a fish. 3. Have students respond to a music BCR (samples are provided) to determine student comprehension of the song text. For each variation. Choose a familiar song. cultural. 2. “The Planets” by Holst a. LISTENING: 1. b. Discuss the historical. 4. 2. b. Ask students to make some generalizations about their musical tastes and observations following several listening experiences.6 a. Have students listen to the “Trout Quintet” and draw their own versions of fish variations. 5. “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik” by Mozart Spotlight on Music . Music Brief Constructed Responses a. c.Prince George’s County Public Schools 91 . Discuss the song lyrics. While listening. b.3 a. c. Listen to a musical selection of any type or style a. MUSIC AND WRITING A. “Trout Quintet” by Schubert Spotlight on Music . d. Discuss theme and variations form prior to listening to the piece. While listening to the music have students complete the following sentence: This music reminds me of the color because _________________________________ .) Make sure students are comfortable singing it. c. Have students use yellow or white crayons or chalk for this activity. Choose several listening selections.

However word walls need to be active so when addressing various music skills and concepts in instruction. There are different levels of involvement on the part of the teacher in order to bring students to the point of independence with the area of music. Music Word Wall Word walls in the music room should contain music vocabulary words. comprehension of music text. music journals. and creating new lyrics to songs. access the word wall and draw students’ attention to the music vocabulary that is associated with the specific skill or concept.Prince George’s County Public Schools 92 . fluency development through rhythmic speech and singing. Among these strategies are word walls with music vocabulary. so the words could stay up all the time. Music Text Writing Experiences Writing is a process and music text writing (creating new lyrics) is no exception. The next level of writing is Guided Writing where the teacher assists the students but the students do the actual writing. which the students then copy. These levels include Shared Writing where the teacher and students create the song lyrics together and the teacher is doing the actual writing. Brief Constructed Responses to address comprehension skills. Writing. Independent Writing is the level where students can independently construct and write their own lyrics. Interactive Writing follows this where the teacher and students create the song lyrics together with the teacher writing the text. Students of all grade levels use the word wall in the music classroom and the vocabulary crosses those grade levels. in addition to writing about personal musical preferences. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . and Music There are a number of reading and writing instructional strategies and activities that can be incorporated into music instruction. This could be applied to other areas of music responses as well. Additional ideas for incorporating some of these strategies in music are given below.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Suggestions for Linking Reading. evaluation of performances. or with the teacher writing part and the students writing part.

monitor changes over time.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Glossary of Literacy Terms for the Music Teacher Analogies Antonyms Assessment Baseline Data BCR Benchmark Blends Character Traits Chunking Clusters Compound words Comprehension Conclusions Content area words Content specific Context clues Conventions Decoding Digraphs Diphthongs Directionality Dolch words DRA Comparison of certain similarities between things which are otherwise unlike Opposites Tests Information gathered before instruction begins Brief constructed response: a brief response to a posed question generally not more than one or two paragraphs in length. Gliding monosyllabic speech sound The direction that the text flows.reflective process. also known as Running Records. “figures of speech” Smooth oral reading skills Assessments in which teachers feed information back to students in ways that enable the student to learn better. Explain what each example means and how each one answers the question. Use the key words in a topic sentence that answers the question. left to right High Frequency Words Developmental Reading Assessment. Acronym used in the writing process to help develop BCR's. Find and underline key words in a question. can also be used in a reading passage for better comprehension Two consonants that go together to make one sound Two independent words that can go together to create a new word Primary goal of reading. match students with appropriate reading material and. punctuation. a reading assessment tool which allows teachers to target instruction to specific student needs. Support your answer with at least two specific examples from the text. Understanding of the text The solution to a problem in a story Vocabulary about a specific subject Vocabulary or language about a specific subject Using the words in the sentence or paragraph to create meaning for an unknown word Standard spelling. document reading proficiency and students' use of strategies. The MSA contains numerous BCR's in both the reading and mathematics portions. grammar. ECR Emergent Readers Figurative language Fluency Formative Assessment FUSE Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Extended constructed response Students who are just beginning to learn basic reading skills Language that has meaning beyond the literal meaning. Minimum acceptable criteria that measures student progress at any given point Forming a word by combining parts of the words Elements of personality Breaking an unfamiliar word into familiar groups of letters to be able to read it. and capitalization rules Figuring out letter sound relationships in words Group of two successive letters whose phonetic value is a single sound. or when students can engage in a similar.Prince George’s County Public Schools 93 . self .

The multiple meaning word and context clue examples are in the SRI format. these help the reader locate information in the text What students knew about a topic before instruction Words with the same ending sound Scoring tool with specific information for how skills and concepts should be assessed by degree or level of achievement Changes in the meaning of speech forms Putting the events of a passage or story in order Scholastic Reading Inventory: a reading comprehension test for grades 2-12 that assesses students' reading levels and helps teachers adjust instruction according to students' needs. In reading education.) Generalizations Genre HFW Homographs Homophones Idioms Inference Literal meaning Mechanics Mind Picture/Mind Map MSA Multiple meanings Multiple usage Phonemic awareness Phonics Picture clues Predictions Prefix Primer Print features Prior knowledge Rhyming words Rubric Semantics Sequencing SRI Common elements Forms of text materials High Frequency Words also known as Dolch words. Using the pictures to create meaning for an unknown word Expressing what the reader thinks will happen next in the text based on what they know or have read Added beginnings of words Introductory reading level Also known as text features. such as the end of a unit or an end of year assessment. This assessment is almost entirely vocabulary related. Stance Suffix Summative Assessment Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . track students' reading growth over time. This assessment is given quarterly to monitor a students reading progress. Most standardized tests are summative. Purpose for reading or writing Word endings Assessments which attempt to summarize student learning at some point in time. and match readers to text. children are taught the sounds of letters and how those letters combine to form words. and capitalization rules Creating a visual image in your mind of a story Maryland State Assessment: administered each year near the end of the 3rd quarter. Determines if a school is meeting AYP (adequate yearly progress). punctuation. The same word used in different contexts and means different things The same word used in different contexts and means the same thing The speech sounds for each letter or letter group as they create word structures The study of the sounds that make up words. grammar.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Glossary of Literacy Terms for the Music Teacher (cont.Prince George’s County Public Schools 94 . but have different meanings Words that sound the same but are spelled differently and have different meanings A phrase or expression that is understood in a given language but differs from the literal meaning of its parts taken together Drawing conclusions from what is in the text and one’s own knowledge and thinking Facts stated directly in the text Standard spelling. commonly used words Words that sound and look the same.

Strategies for reading unfamiliar words Words used in writing to strengthen and clarify meaning Rhyming words Substitution of a known word with the same meaning Reading Stances Word attack Word choice Word families Word substitution Reading for Literary Experience Reading to Perform a Task Reading to be Informed Writing Stances Writing to persuade Writing to share personal ideas Writing to inform Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . but rather experienced as a whole language system of communication. first person. is the belief that language should not be separated into component skills.Prince George’s County Public Schools 95 .) Synonyms Syntax Vocabulary Voice Whole Language Different words with the same meaning Structure of language in phrases and sentences Words The perspective the text is written from. second person.MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Glossary of Literacy Terms for the Music Teacher (cont. etc. Whole language has been characterized as encouraging children to guess at the pronunciation of words rather than focusing on phonics.

Shoulders. Sea Miss Lucy Had A Baby Little Drops of Water Where. Toes If You're Happy and You Know It Itsy. Bitsy Spider Yankee Doodle (Sammy Seal's song) This Old Man (Mimi Mouse's song) Hush Little Baby (Reggie Rooster's song) Mary Wore a Red Dress (all) Tortillas and Lullabies K 2 Colors All Around K K K K K K K K 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 We're a Family Friends Together Let's Count Sunshine and Raindrops Wheels Go Around Down on the Farm Spring is Here A World of Animals All Together Now Chicken Soup with Rice The Wheels on the Bus Cows in the Kitchen 1 2 Surprise 1 3 Let's Look Around 1 4 Family and Friends 1 5 Home Sweet Home 1 6 Animal Adventures How Much is That Doggie in the Window? Bingo The More We Get Together Take Me Out to the Ball Game Old MacDonald Had a Farm Mary Had A Little Lamb Polly Put the Kettle On The Giants 5 Little Pumpkins Barnyard Song Mi Chacra/My Farm A Sailor Went to Sea. Sea. Knees.Prince George’s County Public Schools 96 . Grade Theme K 1 Theme Title Look At Us Music Links in the Reading Text The Alphabet Song Head. Oh Where Has My Little Dog Gone? Five Little Frogs Little Shell The Sidewalks of New York Animal Song Little Pig Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Reading Themes The Elementary Reading Themes are listed below along with the music links given in the Reading Textbook. References to books are in italics.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 97 .writing lyrics Haiku lesson link to music lesson "Singing Man" story Cowboy songs-reading and analyzing lyrics "This Land is Your Land" words Duke Ellington book. Mell Goes to Camp story Listen to and write about world music Grandma's Records. salsa music information Writing lyrics for a theme song for cartoon opening "Dogzilla" story Ballad of Dinosaur Bob song (Auld Lang Syne tune) The Lazy Man and the Busy Man The Ants Go Marching The Caterpillar This Land is your Land Five Little Ducks The Bear Went Over the Mountain The Ants Go Marching .writing new verses.) 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 We Can Work It Out Our Earth Special Friends We Can Do It! Silly Stories Nature Walk Around Town Amazing Animals Family Time Talent Show Go To a Concert unit Moses Goes to a Concert story Jade's Drumming story Will Holly Sing? Story Making instruments Ben's Trumpet Bremen Town Musicians Zin Zin Zin a Violin The Perfect Instrument Mr. Marian Anderson Ballroom dancing with Cinderella story "John Henry" story Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . How To Read Lyrics Animal Songs 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 Off To Adventure Celebrating Traditions Incredible Stories Animal Habitats Voyagers Smart Solutions Journeys American Stories 4 3 That's Amazing Problem Solving song .MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Reading Themes (cont.

Chinese Americans. Conversations with the classroom teacher and building reading specialist would also be helpful in linking music instruction to reading. Many Trails 5 6 Animal Encounters The Sixth Grade Reading Curriculum is organized differently than the rest of the elementary reading curriculum. Mexican Americans 4 5 Heroes 4 5 5 6 1 2 Nature: Friend and Foe Nature's Fury Give It All You've Got 5 5 5 3 4 5 Voices of the American Revolution Person to Person One Land.Gloria Estevan and Duke Ellington Listening to music with a purpose.) 4 4 Problem Solvers Blues research project Musicians' Work unit with Bach and Louis Armstrong "Sing to the Stars" story with musical game in the lesson Elements of Poetry unit with writing a rap included Benefits of music unit Success in the Music Business .MUSIC IN RELATION TO PEOPLE AND OTHER ARTS Reference Page: Reading Themes (cont.Prince George’s County Public Schools 98 . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . These frameworks would also be helpful in determining the pacing of the Themes for grades K-5 as well as the reading skill instruction at any given point in the year.equipment and technology Tall Tales La Bamba story History of Recorded Sound Unit Mozart Season Meet Yo Yo Ma Yankee Doodle-reading and analyzing text Cowboy stories Native American stories Pioneer stories American Immigrants . The Curriculum Framework for Reading in the sixth grade would be most helpful in determining what themes/stories are being discussed as well as the skills being addressed in Reading instruction. discussing a song by Estevan Recording sounds .

Music Journal Date Title and Type Title: Type: + _ Interesting: Title: Type: + _ Interesting: Title: Type: + _ Interesting: Title: Type: + _ Interesting: Title: Type: + _ Interesting: Title: Type: + _ Interesting: What I Thought About It Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 99 .

The response demonstrates a minimal understanding of the text. Gr. would he still come back? Support your opinion with information from the song lyrics (text). Willy or Liza? Support your opinion with specific details from the text (song lyrics). (Page numbers refer to the Share the Music textbook series. The response is completely incorrect or irrelevant to the question. Uses text-based and/or text-relevant information to show understanding.) Which song was your favorite song to sing? Use information from the song to support your preference. Which animal represents a man and which animal represents a woman? Use information from the text (song lyrics) to support your answer. Addresses the demands of the question.28): Is the person singing the song happy with his decision to come to this land? Use specific details from the text (song lyrics) to support your opinion. The Cat Came Back (p. Minimally addresses the demands of the question. gr. gr.2.Rubric 3 Music BCR’s The response demonstrates an understanding of the complexities of the text. 2 1 0 Grade 3 There’s a Hole In My Bucket (p. Sweet Betsy from Pike (p. 224): If another tragedy happened to the cat.) Which performance did you like the best. 134. The response demonstrates a general understanding of the text. 4. Partially addresses the demands of the question. Page numbers in italics refer to the Spotlight on Music series. p. (Use after a selection of 4 -5 songs sung in class. 3. 323. p. (Use after watching a videotape and an audiotape performance in class. the one that you could watch and listen to or the one that you could just listen to? Support your selection with specific information from the performance. Grade 4 When I First Came to This Land (p. Frog Went a’Courting (p. 180. p. 350): Do you think Betsy and Ike were ready for their journey? Support your position with information from the song lyrics (text). Effectively uses text-based and/or text-relevant information to clarify or extend understanding.) 100 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools . 132): Who does a better job of solving problems in the song.46): The frog and the mouse are animals that represent people in the song. Uses minimal information to show some understanding of the text in relation to the question.

Which presents a more appealing picture of life on a boat? Use the song lyrics (text) to support your position. p. p.5. 74): Is Old Joe Clark an honorable person? Give evidence from the text (song lyrics) to support your position. 363): Is the job of being a tarrier an easy or difficult job? Support your position with information from the text (song lyrics). (Page numbers refer to the Share the Music textbook series. 132): Is the job of working on the Erie Canal easier or harder with a mule? Use information from the song lyrics (text) to support your answer. 4. Sails (p. p. 32/347): Compare the two songs about boats. What was the best part of the performance? Give a specific example and explain why you feel it was the best. Grade 6 Day-O/John B.Prince George’s County Public Schools . 154. 396.) 101 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Tarriers (p. 191. What part of the performance needs improvement? Give specific ideas for how it might be improved. p. Old Joe Clark (p. 5. Simple Gifts (p.Grade 5 Erie Canal (p. What are some of the ways that the performance could be improved? Use specific examples from what you observed to support your answer. gr. gr. What was the best part of the performance? Give a specific example and explain why you feel it was the best. Which performance was of the highest quality? Support your selection with specific information from the performance. 120. Page numbers in italics refer to the Spotlight on Music series. Yankee Doodle (p. gr. Which performance was of the highest quality? Support your selection with specific information from the performance. 136): What does the song suggest about the people that it represents? Use specific details from the song lyrics (text) to support your answer. 154): Does the song present a realistic picture of the Revolutionary War? Support your position with information from your background knowledge and the song lyrics (text). 4. What part of the performance needs improvement? Give specific ideas for how it might be improved. gr. Drill Ye. What are some of the ways that the performance could be improved? Use specific examples from what you observed to support your answer.

Music Careers. Activities addressing the impact of technology on the music business are also included in this section.Music Careers This section addresses an additional outcome. 102 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . from the Prince George’s County Scope and Sequence.Prince George’s County Public Schools . This section has activities for the direct instruction to address the objectives and indicators for this outcome.

b. List a variety of music related careers. Training a. Include the person’s background. Portfolios a. successes.MUSIC CAREERS PERFORMANCE A. B. Select a music-related career from previous class discussions.Prince George’s County Public Schools 103 . Tour Itinerary a. Discuss economical routes of travel and location selection. ticket price considerations. Discuss touring as a musician and list all the jobs associated with the tour in addition to the performers. Have students research the type of training and/or qualifications needed to be hired for that job. Have small groups select another music related career and complete a sequence chain with information about steps to take to get the job in their respective music career. and written work from the year’s music instruction. professional training. Discuss what information prospective employers may need to have when considering an applicant for a music related job. Develop a class portfolio of whole class and individual performances. Select one to research. determine what steps a person might need to take to find a position in that particular field. Determine what items an applicant might include in a portfolio. etc. reason for being a musician. b. performance experience. Write an article for a newspaper or magazine introducing the musician to readers. 2. concert date and time choices. This may be done in small groups after being modeled by the teacher. As a class. recommendations. 2. description of musical style. b. Examine the items in their portfolio. family information. Have students draw the route on a map to submit with their itinerary. Interviews a. create a tour for a group of students’ choice. How to get the job a. b. goals for the future. b. EMPLOYMENT 1. List questions students might have about the life of a professional musician. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . PERFORMER’S LIFE 1. Invite a professional musician to speak to the class and discuss their portfolio of their work. etc. Using a sequence chain graphic organizer. QUALIFICATIONS 1. Interview a professional musician. c. C.

Include at least three of these areas in your critique. Write an article for your newspaper about the performance you have attended. Encourage students to take paper and pencil to the event to be able to make notes for later review. where and when they performed. Write at least two compliments (positive statements) as well as two suggestions for improvement. Following the concert respond to the following prompt: Imagine you are a newspaper reporter. Allow students to perform a musical selection of their choice for the class. b. with students. including what was performed. Use the writing process for the completion of this writing assignment. MUSIC PUBLIC RELATIONS/PROMOTERS 1.MUSIC CAREERS MUSIC RELATED JOBS A. Responsibilities a. Media resources a. choice of music. a number of places where a person encounters music in their daily life. MANAGER’S JOB 1. Keep in mind as you make your word choices that this person is your employer and you want to offer them assistance in improving their performance and at the same time keep your job. what they performed. cooperation with other members of the performing group. conduct a search of the Yellow Pages to find the names of someone to fit the job description on the worksheet. Posters a. Be sure to write at least one compliment (positive statement) about the performance as well as one suggestion for improvement. organization and if applicable. performance.Prince George’s County Public Schools 104 . B. b. Alternative assignment: Have students write a recommendation for the performer. This may be done in small groups after being modeled by the teacher. MUSIC EMPLOYMENT 1. C. “Hire a Musician” a. Have students respond to the following prompt: Pretend you are the manager of one of today’s performers. Newspaper review a. Determine the job title for a person involved in each type of these music related careers. d. Reference the media on-line catalog for filmstrips pertaining to various music careers. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . e. bravery. Use the writing process for the completion of this writing assignment. Include information about the performers. Write a critique of their performance commenting on the following: their talent. stage presence. Have the rest of the class make notes about the performance. (This would be a good performance opportunity for those piano students and instrumental music students. 2. List. discuss information that a newspaper reporter might need to gather to report on a musical event and write a review of that event. Prior to a school music assembly or music concert experience students might have on their own. Using the “Hire a Musician” worksheet. compliments and suggestions for improvement for the performer. b.) c. 2. Design a poster advertising an upcoming concert for a school performing group or an imaginary performing group/concert. Discuss the responsibilities of the performer’s manager.

What headings could you look under? Which one seems to fit best? How many listings are there under that heading? Which ones are closest to your location? What is their location? Do any have an ad listed in the phone book? What information does the ad give that makes the person or company worth considering? Who would you call first and what would you ask them? Who would you hire at this point and why? Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .MUSIC CAREERS Hire a Musician 1. Job Description: Possible job titles: 2. Use a Yellow Pages phone book and find someone to fill the job.Prince George’s County Public Schools 105 . Think of a job for which you might hire someone in the music field.

In small groups have students create a commercial jingle and the commercial to accompany the jingle for one of the products on the list. Video a. credits. BROADCASTING 1. Discuss the importance of using persuasive language. b. Discuss how call letters and frequency are determined as well as the difference between AM and FM. 2. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . c. etc. b. record company’s name and logo. SHOPPING 1. In small groups. Allow students to make up their own frequency and call letters that are not currently in use. wants or needs. Discuss the recording process from the recording studio to the distribution of the final product. Have students create their own one hour radio show including the items listed above. b.e. Tape a selection of contemporary music videos appropriate for school use and view in class.COMMERCIALS 1. 2. c. or combination). commercials. time and temperature. if possible. Have students listen to an hour of radio broadcasting and write down what was heard including: how many songs. including recording title. background music. Have students list different marketable items and determine whether they are goods or services. song titles and duration. B. ADVERTISING . c. Have students watch their choice of videos at home and determine the format of each. 2. List jobs for each step of the process. Discuss the format of each (i. Tour a recording studio. Invite a member of a local shopping mall management staff to visit and discuss the use of music in shopping centers and its impact on shoppers. psychologically. Program music for use in the school cafeteria to evaluate the impact of music in this setting. B. either drawing pictures or writing the action for several scenes of a video for a musical selection of their choice. station identification. Videotape commercials as they are presented to the class. storytelling. music for the jingle. CD’S a.MUSIC CAREERS MUSIC AS A MARKETING TECHNIQUE A. collage surrounding a topic. games and promotions. Radio a. THE RECORDING INDUSTRY 1. Using a sequence chain have students develop their own music video. performance video. TECHNOLOGY A. have students create a CD cover for an imaginary group. Tour a local radio station if possible. group’s name. Examine the cover of a current recording and list information contained on that cover.Prince George’s County Public Schools 106 . Discuss ways to incorporate music as a marketing technique – theme music. news and traffic reports.

They can be used as a model for lesson plan development for music teachers.Prince George’s County Public Schools . 107 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .SECTION IV Sample Lessons for Elementary Vocal and General Music Instruction These lessons are suggestions and not intended to be the complete curriculum for any grade level nor are they intended to be required lessons.

A typical lesson might include: song and chant material. Some of these needs may not have been identified or diagnosed at this early age. These students will need gentle but firm assistance to make the adjustment to the school setting. Songs or chants that help students to remember these routines will be beneficial in these efforts. In addition. consider the short attention span of a child this age. in place). instrument activities. and their developmental age. Guidelines for Teaching Pre-Kindergarten Music Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 108 . a new focus song. tonal patterns for echoing. music in varied tonalities and meters. When planning lessons for this age group. non-performance-oriented learning environment that is musically rich but is immediately accessible to the child’s participation.SAMPLE LESSONS The focus of the pre-kindergarten curriculum is to support the primary music development stage of a child’s life. Children this age may not have had any previous school experience. The two goals of this stage are for each child to develop a positive disposition towards active participation in music activities and the achievement of basic music competencies including the ability to sing in tune and physically keep a steady beat. The teacher should. There is also a natural flow or progression to the activities from small motor activities to free movement and then back to small motor and calming activities by the conclusion of the lesson. developmentally appropriate. A 20 minute time span is recommended. large movement. inexperience. The main point in this lesson plan format is to provide a number of activities and experiences with some teacher direction of activities but very little focus on directed teaching of music concepts. Suggested lesson plan format would include any or all of the following: a greeting song. Programs such as “Music Together” and “Kindermusik” offer repertoire. a lap song (large movement. There may also be language barriers. Many of the same suggestions given for primary students may be applied to the pre-Kindergarten students. Some children may have special needs: emotional or physical. The emphasis must be on actual musical experiences rather than concepts about music. Frequent repetition of previously learned material is often enjoyed by this age. These familiar songs for routines will be comforting to this age as they make the adjustment to the school experience. instrument play along. For this reason. a focus song or finger play (small motor movement). These activities are interspersed with brief music skill development activities. a free movement / dancing piece with props. and goodbye song. songs without words. quiet song. movement activities and instrument play. a few rhythm patterns for echoing. there may need to be several instructions for routine school tasks. consider their young age. children mature at different rates so maturity may mask learning disabilities at this early stage of educational development. The teacher should create a playful. finger play. instruments. however. and curriculum appropriate for this age group.

SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Pre-K – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: Drama and Music Overview: Students will act out the words to the music in order to connect drama and music. Make note of those students who are not singing with the group and those who are not on task.Prince George’s County Public Schools . “Jack and Jill Went up the Hill. Discuss the facial expressions that the characters should have. Discuss how they would feel if they saw that the nut was rotten. Closure Activities: Discuss other songs known to the students that could be dramatized in a similar fashion. I picked them up and cracked them open. you could describe the word as meaning “spoiled.C. Divide students into groups of five.” Introduce the song “Found a Peanut. They were dirty and “rotten.” (words are included here for teacher use) while also doing the hand motions and facial expressions which describe the meaning of the song. Next. As a class. and help the students remember the words to the song. let them try to sing and follow along with all of the hand motions and facial expressions. evaluate how well the group showed the facial expressions to fit the words of the song. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Share the song “Humpty Dumpty. 109 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Give additional students an opportunity to dramatize the same song while the class sings along. What else could they do if they got a tummy ache? Adapt the same activity to the song.” Discuss who the characters would be.” Have students act out the Jack and Jill parts. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Dramatize stories of familiar songs. Have students discuss in their group how they would dramatize this song. Assessment: Groups should share their performance of “Humpty Dumpty” while the class sings the song. If they don’t come up with a synonym. Sing it again.” Ask what the word “rotten” means. (II. Students should demonstrate the ability to dramatize the song correctly with appropriate facial expressions. and they can follow all of the hand motions and facial expressions with you.1) Talk about how I walked through the woods and found some nuts that had fallen from a tree onto the ground.

I feel all better just now. I got a tummy ache. Just now he gave me medicine. I feel all better. I called the Doctor. I feel all better just now. it was rotten. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 110 . I cracked it open just now. I called the Doctor just now. It was rotten. I cracked it open just now. I ate it anyway just now. I got a tummy ache just now Just now I got a tummy ache. Just now it was rotten. he gave me medicine. I called the Doctor. found a peanut. Just now I ate it anyway. he gave me medicine just now. I cracked it open. Just now I called the Doctor. I ate it anyway. it was rotten just now. Just now I found a peanut. he gave me medicine just now.SAMPLE LESSONS Found a Peanut Found a peanut. I called the Doctor just now. He gave me medicine. found a peanut just now. Just now I cracked it open. I got a tummy ache. I got a tummy ache just now. found a peanut just now I cracked it open. Just now I feel all better. it was rotten just now. I ate it anyway. I feel all better. I ate it anyway just now.

1) Accompany songs and stories using student selected instruments and sounds.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Pre-K .1) Sing “Rain. and draw a story map on the blackboard or chart paper while discussing what happened.” Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Review the story map again with students.Prince George’s County Public Schools 111 . In the middle of the storm have everyone sing “Rain Rain Go Away. (III. Review the story. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .A. Make note of those students who are performing at the appropriate time and those who are not looking at the board. (III. Ask students to name a classroom percussion instrument that is being shown to the class. If they don’t know the name.Lesson 2 Lesson Title: Instruments with a Rainstorm Overview: Students will add classroom instruments in order to enhance the meaning behind the story. Have selected students try out the instrument. Draw a picture of the instrument on the story map right where it will be played in the story. Students should be able to play the instruments at the correct time.B. Guided Practice Activities: Students should decide which instruments to add to the story to enhance the meaning. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Investigate sound production using classroom instruments. pointing to the pictures and having students play the corresponding instrument. Do the same thing with other instruments. Briefly discuss possibilities for instruments for sound effects. without minimal teacher’s prompts. Rain Go Away” or another familiar rain song. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Make up a story about a rainstorm. with the student’s help. Describe how to hold the instrument and how to play it correctly. Also observe whether they are able to follow the story line and add the instruments and singing at the correct time. Discuss sounds that a person might hear when it rains. Assessment: Closure Activities: Discuss how the story map might be adapted to a different story about going down the street and seeing a fire engine. then tell them the name of the classroom rhythm instrument.

1 and discuss what movement would go with the song. Do the same with “Skip to My Lou. Then.” Discuss “What is a gallop?” Ask different children to demonstrate a gallop. she was so excited that she started galloping along with her down the street. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have students act out all of the animal motions using their large body movements. but when she saw her friend. and then let the last few students gallop to the door when that part of the music comes. Introduce the song “Skip to My Lou” from Spotlight on Music .1 by singing it and using your fingers on your lap to act out the words. Have the students use their fingers on their laps to act out the words. skipping.” Make note of those students who are performing the appropriate movements correctly. and sing and walk for part A and gallop around the room for part B. Closure Activities: Review the A part of “Rig a Jig Jig” very slowly and see who can walk to the music while exiting the room. (I.1) Tell this story “A little girl was walking down the street. Then have students sing along as they use their fingers to act out the words to the song. Tell them that a horse likes to gallop. running. Give all students an opportunity to try the skipping while the class sings the song.C. turning.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Pre-K – Lesson 3 Lesson Title: Large Body Movement with Songs Overview: Students will use large body movement in order to indicate a relationship between movement and the lyrics of a song. bending to music. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Relate movements such as walking. Extensions: Use “Sammy” from Hap Palmer’s Teaching Basic Skills through Music.Prince George’s County Public Schools 112 . Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: A few students at a time demonstrate walking and galloping as everyone else is singing and using their fingers on their laps. while going in a line around the classroom. (Part A is walking and Part B is galloping) while teacher sings song a second time. all students get in a line. Assessment: Students should demonstrate that they are listening to the music and that they know when to walk and when to gallop around the room. Again have a few students demonstrate skipping to accompany the song. Review keeping personal space for the galloping part. Introduce the song “Rig a Jig Jig” from Spotlight on Music .

” The warm-up should introduce the objective without much discussion. The statement of the objective needs to be in terms that students this age will understand. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . It is best to limit directions to two or three at a time. Primary students need to be actively involved. Sol would be the top line and mi on the bottom. students can recognize melodic direction with limited note songs. With the two line staff. New song material is best taught by rote singing. whispering. This age student is just learning how to follow directions and therefore benefits from having a demonstration of what is expected by the teacher. The important thing is that this age needs to have frequent opportunities to move during a music lesson. Teach beginning note reading skills at an early age. recognizing the difference between fast and slow or quiet and loud will certainly be manageable. Some classes will need to try movement activities in place before moving freely about the room. Improvisation experiences are enjoyable for this age. individual student.e. or small group. i. Some students learn melodic notation using a two line staff for sol-mi and later la. They will often be able to master a skill before the conceptual understanding is achieved. speaking. The teacher directed activities should include brief directions/teacher talk and move swiftly to active involvement for the students. Using familiar songs or activities for warm-ups will help with transitions. Primary students should be given the opportunity to play simple percussion instruments with guidance and instruction on how to play musically. short melodic phrases and limited notes are most suitable for this age. As primary students get older they can read more advanced melody and rhythm. Some teachers have the same opening song for every class period for this age. Activities should change frequently to maintain interest. Dramatization activities can be very successful with this age. “dynamics” will not mean as much as “quiet” and “loud. re. Songs with repeated phrases or predictable forms are also appropriate. Asking students to repeat directions before starting an activity is wise especially if the directions are complicated.” However. Songs with simple. Closure activities need to be brief and prepare students for the transition from the music lesson to the classroom teacher. Students this age sometimes think of instruments as toys and need instruction on how to take care of them as well as how to play them musically. Isolate rhythm from melody in the early years. By third grade. “Today we’re going to learn about fast and slow and then use our fast and slow voices to sing some train songs. and do. students should be reading notes on the five line staff. rhythmic chant. This age can explore different ways to use the voice from singing. However. Assessment of primary students can be through observation of whole group activities for student mastery of skills and concepts. even though some may have difficulty doing both. Primary students enjoy movement activities but often need guidance in using the space appropriately. Most primary students will need repeated experiences before they reach mastery of most music skills. Encourage students to sing while doing the movement. The distinction between musical instruments to play music and playing with toys for fun should be made. However songs can be repeated over several lessons because students this age need repetition to become comfortable with song material.Prince George’s County Public Schools Guidelines for Recommended Music Activities in Primary Grades 113 . for example.SAMPLE LESSONS The pacing of the Primary lesson is critical to keeping the students engaged in the music learning. etc. Additional melody notes can be added one or two at a time without becoming too confusion for this age. exposing students to the appropriate music terminology is a good idea when linked with language students would be familiar with so that they can become familiar with the appropriate music vocabulary. They will have difficulty distinguishing more complex concepts like identifying brass from woodwind instruments in a listening selection. even if it is to add actions to a song while seated. Labels for musical skills need to be in language that the students can easily understand. Listening experiences for primary students should be brief and focused. but keep early experiences brief and simple. The accepted music terminology can be added as students get older.

SAMPLE LESSONS LESSON PLANNER – PRIMARY DIRECTED TEACHING ACTIVITY PLANNER – 20 MINUTE LESSON Focusing Student Attention Statement of Objective: What should students know and do as a result of the lesson? Times approximate: 2-3 minutes Introductory and/or Developmental Activities Warm-Up: How will you engage students in learning? How will you connect the lesson to their prior knowledge? Teacher Directed Activities: How will you aid students in constructing meaning of new concepts? How will you introduce/model new skills or procedures? 3-4 minutes Guided Practice Teacher-Monitored Activities: What will students do together to use new concepts or skills? How will you assist students in this process? 5 minutes 2-3 different activities Independent Activities and/or Meaningful-Use Tasks Extension. and Practice Activities: What opportunities will students have to use the new skills and concepts in a meaningful way? How will students expand and solidify their understanding of the concept and apply it to a real-world situation? How will students demonstrate their mastery of the essential learning outcomes? 3-4 minutes Assessment Formative Assessment: How will you monitor student progress throughout the lesson? Summative Assessment: How will you ensure that all students have mastered the identified learning indicators? How will you assess their learning? Daily and end of unit. Closure Activities: How will you assist students in reflecting upon what they learned today and are preparing for tomorrow’s lesson? 2-3 minutes 2-3 minutes Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Refinement.Prince George’s County Public Schools 114 .

toes. (I.” These two songs are included as music selections to accompany the reading theme. (I.A. mouth.1) Play Simon Says and have students point to various body parts like head. Then have them join in singing that part. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Make up new verses for the song with new actions.A. Guided Practice Activities: Have students listen to “If You’re Happy and You Know It” from Spotlight on Music . Sing that part together.2) Sing and interpret several songs representative of different activities. etc.C. Closure Activities: Have students sing the song in their head and show the actions for review of same and different. Discuss whole and part. Sing the whole thing with actions. ears.K and raise their hand when they hear a part that is the same as a part that they have already heard. (II.C. and Toes” from Spotlight on Music . shoulders.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Identify simple formal characteristics in music such as same/different and whole/part. knees.Prince George’s County Public Schools . Go over the part that is different. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the song “Head. knees. Discuss with students where they sing the same thing and where they need to sing something different.’ several times. Have students stand and sing the whole thing and perform the actions that go with the song.1) Relate movements such as bending and stretching to musical sounds.K by singing it and having students raise their hand every time they hear the body parts from the title. Shoulders. and toes. shoulders. Go over the different part (eyes. and nose). Discuss same and different.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: R W Same/Different – Body Parts Overview: Students will recognize the parts of the song that are the same in order to sing the song with the appropriate actions. 115 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Assessment: Students should demonstrate the ability to recognize the parts that are the same and different and respond with the appropriate actions while singing the song correctly. (Kindergarten Reading Theme 1 is called “Look At Us. Repeat the pattern of ‘head. (I. Make note of those students who are not singing with the group and those who are not on task.1) Perform singing games. Knees.

Table Top Press. The big book comes with a black-line master for multiple copies of a little book that students can color and make for their own version of the big book. O. P. distributes these materials. BOX 640296.Prince George’s County Public Schools 116 . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . EL PASO. TX 79904. There is a big book published for the song to accompany the recording.SAMPLE LESSONS Note: The song “If You’re Happy and You Know It” is included on a CD called Sing to Read by Wilma Salzman.

(II.D. Have students join in speaking the numbers while teacher does other parts. (I. Have students listen for the parts that are the same while teacher sings up to number five. Discuss singing voice.2) Interpret sounds in music using shapes and pictures. Draw pictures to go with the words after each group of numbers. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the rhyme “1. 2 Buckle My Shoe” with beat while speaking. Have them count and pat the beat together.B. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have them sing the numbers on sol-mi together (Teacher may need to demonstrate this first).A. 2 Buckle My Shoe” by speaking it and having students hold up fingers for the number they hear in the rhyme. Practice those parts together.1) Demonstrate the steady beat playing classroom instruments. (Kindergarten Reading Theme 5 is called “Let’s Count.C.D. (I. Then students should add the beat while singing the song.4) Perform singing games. Have students review “1.3) Investigate various vocal timbres through speaking and singing. Review speaking voice. Have students perform the whole thing. Teacher should add the part that’s new.” This lesson would be a good link to the Reading Theme for the students as well as reinforcement of Math skills.1) Sing and interpret several songs representative of different activities.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • Identify simple formal characteristics in music such as same/different and whole/part. (I.A.Prince George’s County Public Schools 117 . Introduce the song “This Old Man” from Spotlight on Music – 1 by singing it and having students hold up fingers for the number they hear in the song. Discuss speaking voice. (I. Review the part that was different for each number and draw a simple picture to illustrate it. Continue in this way through ten. Ask students to predict by singing the parts that they think will be the same for six. (I. Have students add beat while saying the rhyme. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students perform the whole thing. Have students sing the numbers and pat the beat together.1) Have students count to eight together. Write the numbers in groups of two.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 2 R W Lesson Title: Counting Song and Rhyme Overview: Students will be able to compare singing and speaking while demonstrating the beat and performing two counting selections.

2 Tie My Shoe” is included on a CD called Sing to Read by Wilma Salzman. The book. Closure Activities: Note: The song “1. BOX 640296. EL PASO. Sing or speak short musical phrases from each counting selection.Prince George’s County Public Schools 118 . Make note of those students who are not performing with the group and those who are not on task. The big book comes with a blackline master for multiple copies of a little book that students can color and make for their own version of the big book. TX 79904. P. There is a big book published for the song to accompany the recording. Table Top Press. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Students should demonstrate the ability to perform the musical selections using the appropriate voice with the class. Have students identify whether they heard singing or speaking by holding their thumbs up for singing and thumbs down for speaking. illustrated by Carol Jones could be shared with students for comparison to the version of the song done in class. This Old Man. O. puts out these materials.

(Kindergarten Reading Theme 6 is called “Sunshine and Raindrops.1) Investigate sound production using voices. which increase as the storm continues.4) Interpret sounds in music using shapes and pictures. Assign students to instruments.” Have students join in if they know it. Say the words of the song.”) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • Identify musical contrasts such as loud/soft. housetop.A.1) Accompany songs and stories using student selected instruments and sounds. Add lightning bolts for thunder and lightning. Draw simple pictures for grass. Start with a few raindrops. Whisper the song. Guided Practice Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Rain Go Away. and singing.Prince George’s County Public Schools 119 .1) Sing and interpret several songs representative of different activities. Discuss which voice was the quiet voice and which was a louder voice. As a class. Then speak the words a phrase at a time and have students repeat each phrase. tree.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 3 R W Lesson Title: Dynamics – Rain Songs Overview: Students will recognize dynamics in order to sing and play instruments using the appropriate dynamics. Discuss whether they would play loud or quiet.2) Investigate various vocal timbres through whispering. discuss which instruments could play the different parts of the rainstorm.B.1) Sing “Rain. Review speaking voice. Discuss the sequence of events for a rainstorm.D. (II. and an umbrella for the last phrase. (I.A. Make up a symbol for hail. Add some swirlly symbol for the wind. (I. Then have the students whisper the whole song together using the pictures as cues. (I.A. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the song “Rain on the Green Grass” by singing it. (III. Make a graphic drawing of a rainstorm on a large piece of poster paper. Discuss different voices. speaking. (III.B. classroom instruments and other objects that make sound. Finally the whole class sings the whole song. Discuss which parts are loud and quiet. Use the singing voice and do the same thing.

” At the beginning.Prince George’s County Public Schools 120 . sing it quietly and change the words to “Rain. BOX 640296. distributes these materials. There is a big book published for the song to accompany the recording. Sing “Rain on the Green Grass” loudly. Begin and end the storm by singing “Rain. Table Top Press. P. Rain Go Away. by Kin Eagle is a picture book connected to the theme and includes the music for the song at the back of the book. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . EL PASO. Closure Activities: Note: The book It’s Raining. The big book comes with a black-line master for multiple copies of a little book that students can color and make for their own version of the big book. Make note of those students who are not singing with the group and those who are not on task. The song “Rain on the Green Grass” is included on a CD called Sing to Read by Wilma Salzman. sing the song loudly. O. Have students quietly whisper sing the song as they are leaving.” Assessment: Students should demonstrate the dynamics by singing the song correctly. TX 79904. At the end. Rain. It’s Pouring. stay away.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students follow along and play the instrument sound that goes with each part of the storm as the teacher points to the different symbols on the chart. Teacher may need to point to more than one thing at a time.

and stretching to musical sounds. Show the tempo of leaving the station (increasing speed). Other transportation songs could be used as well and the Reading Theme includes “The Wheels on the Bus.1) Dramatize stories of familiar songs.1) Play the “Metronome Game. Ask students to identify the tempo set on the metronome.A. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Share other train stories like I’ve Been Working on the Railroad by Nadine Bernard Westcott and Down By the Station by Will Hillenbrand with the class.Prince George’s County Public Schools .C.2) Relate movements such as walking.” Explain that the beat can be fast or slow. high/low and loud/soft. Introduce the song “Engine #9.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 4 R W Lesson Title: Tempo Trains Overview: Students will recognize tempo in order to show changes in tempo while singing and moving to a song. As students become familiar with songs. running. (II. short/long. (I.”) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Identify musical contrasts such as fast/slow. walking or running. (Kindergarten Reading Theme 7 is called “Wheels Go Around” and could be linked to music with this lesson on tempo. bending. traveling to the next station (steady fast speed) and arriving at this station while passengers get off and on (slowing speed). (I. turning.C. vary the tempo according to predetermined signals for fast and slow. Closure Activities: Review the concept of fast and slow tempo discussed in the lesson and review how the students moved during the songs. and show the class how the “tempo” can be varied on the metronome. Vary the tempo as story is read.” Make up a story of a train’s travels. Have students act out the story of the train while singing the song. 121 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Assessment: Make note of those students who are showing the correct tempo in each section of the story and those who are not on task. skipping. Have students move fast and slow with the ‘drum’ metronome. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Discuss how trains move.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 122 .B. Discuss some of the animals that might be on the farm and the sounds they make. (I. and O on the board. (II.D. Do the same for “there.” Put up two of the pictures of that animal.4) Interpret sounds in music using shapes and pictures. (Tell students “Old MacDonald” if they do not know. Have students see if the same pattern for sounds and the same animals are used.1) Explain briefly the historical context of selected songs. Do the same with some of the other animals that are suggested by students.” Group each set of animals. a songbook.” “there a ?” and “everywhere a ? ?” Sing the song again pointing to the animal pictures as the class sings. Ask students to name the letters. Review the song to determine how many times we make a given animal sound before the word “here. Ask if anyone knows a farm song with those letters in it.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W Farm Animals – Old MacDonald Overview: Students will interpret pictures and letters in order to sing the song and add animal sounds at the appropriate time. Repeat for “here a ?. Show pictures of the animals they name. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .A.1) Sing and interpret several songs representative of different activities. (I.” Cows in the Kitchen.) Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the song “Old MacDonald” by singing it and having students raise their hand with they hear the letters on the board. (II. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students listen to other versions of Old MacDonald and follow the pictures and letters on the board. is included with this Reading theme. Have students hold up fingers to show how many times they make the animal sound each time. Then have them join in singing that part. Guided Practice Activities: Make eight copies of small farm animal pictures.B.1) Write the letters E.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Investigate various vocal timbres. I. Create a Venn diagram showing which animals are used in both songs and which animals are used in one or the other. (Kindergarten Reading Theme 8 is called “Down on the Farm.

The charts show the words by themselves or the words with pictures.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Students should demonstrate the ability to interpret the pictures and letters that are shown in order to sing the song correctly.Prince George’s County Public Schools 123 . The book. Closure Activities: Have students sing the song in their head and hold up the number of fingers for each animal sound. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Make note of those students who are not singing with the group and those who are not on task. Note: The Singlish series of charts and CDs has a version of Old MacDonald. Old MacDonald. illustrated by Carol Jones could be shared with students for comparison to the version of the song done in class.

Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Listen to the music.A. running.Prince George’s County Public Schools 124 . Closure Activities: Review the two speeds or tempo changes that the elephants showed with the music. i. and stretching to musical sounds. bending. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . (I.e. (Kindergarten Reading Theme 10 is called “A World of Animals. (I.” This song and other animal songs could be used in conjunction with this theme to teach tempo and movement. Make note of students who are not on task or who need more time for mastery of this skill. Guided Practice Activities: Listen to the music again and show slow tempo by holding up one finger and fast tempo by holding up two fingers.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Identify musical contrasts such as fast/slow. someone chasing the elephant. Have students identify the slow tempo by holding up one finger. Discuss how elephants move. Discuss how the music indicates the action with the tempo change. skipping. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Introduce the movement activity by discussing how to move like an elephant (swing trunk) and move to the speed or tempo of the music.1) Introduce “The Elephant” from Learning Basic Skills Through Music. Perform with the music.2) Relate movements such as walking. Discuss what happened in the music with the tempo. Assessment: Each student moves to match the tempo in each section of the music.C. Discuss reasons for the tempo change in the middle. turning.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade Kindergarten – Lesson 6 Lesson Title: R W Moving Like an Elephant Overview: Students will identify and move to match tempo changes in the music. Practice both slow and fast tempo.

Students will sing a familiar song from memory. The following software can be used to create a graphic organizer: Kidspiration. correct pitch.1) Sing from memory fifteen songs. Use a web graphic organizer poster or one of the digital resources to display the feedback you receive from the students. Inspiration. Discuss some of the things she does in the story.peterpaulandmary. Microsoft Word.eril.htm • Index of Rhymes (lyrics): http://www. Remind them to use the “Checklist for Healthy Singers” to guide their performance.niehs.com Warm-up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Explain that songs can tell a story.net/stfly.htm • Angie Palmer’s (MIDI): http://www.timmyabell.org/music. and Microsoft PowerPoint. (I. website projected on a screen.gov/kids/musicchild. ensemble “singing together.Prince George’s County Public Schools . Have students listen to this song about a lady who does some strange things. Sample Sing-a-Long Websites: • National Institute of Health Kid’s Page: http://www.B. or through the television.htm • Timmy Abell’s Home Page (Real Audio/Wav): http://www. (II. Perform “I Know an Old Lady” by playing a recording from a website or CD.html • Llerrah Music (MIDI only): http://www.com/music/lyrics/ol/oldlady. Paul and Mary (lyrics): http://www.htm Discuss who the main character of this song might be.snaithprimary.nih.” Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Dramatize stories of familiar songs. 125 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .htm • Peter. correct rhythm. The “Checklist for Healthy Singers” includes the following: energy and projection.enchbyench.com/jukekids. Use teacher selected technology tools that enhance learning. “I Know an Old Lady” Websites • Timmy Abell: http://www. pleasant tone.” diction and expression. textbooks.2) Student Standards for Technology Addressed in this Lesson: • • • Explain connectivity.C. monitor.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade K – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: I Know an Old Lady – Digital Product Overview: Students will dramatize a story song in order to create a multimedia production depicting “I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. such as CDs.htm • PBS Kids: http://pbskids.com/angie/lady_who_swallow.llerrah.com/music/f-17-07. concentration and focus. Recognize that various media formats are used to communicate ideas.timmyabell.

PowerPoint slides can be formatted with photos and text. or leaps. creeps. Use recorded accompaniment so that videotaping is possible.educationworld. flies. Discuss how the illustrator shows the personalities of the characters in the story. Reinforce the idea that all of these creatures help tell the story by singing.com/tools_templates/sm_nov2002. Discuss the following: How does a fly move? Is its flight pattern regular or irregular? Will it move fast or slow? Will it move high and low? Or will it stay on the same level? Have one student demonstrate how a fly moves. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students work in groups to dramatize a character from the song. Guided Practice Activities: Have students begin with the fly. Explain that dramatize means to use movements. • Classroom Performance – Students perform the song portraying their assigned characters. Use the following rubric to assess student’s dramatization of the story. • Sing-a-Long Book – Students record a CD of the song to include in a picture book they have created using photos of the creatures with the text. Give students time to create a dramatization that the whole group can perform. Assessment: Students will select from the following final products to dramatize the song: • Music Video of the Song – Videotape a performance of the song in an ensemble with “dancers” representing the characters. each person can demonstrate their idea by using eight beats for movement and eight beats to return to a neutral position.org/view_interactive.mped. Give students time to discuss the creature with their teammates. Allow time for several volunteers. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . printed. Remind students to use their knowledge of the animal or insect as well as “context clues” or clues from the song lyrics to help decide how to move.aspx?id=127&title • Education World (Downloadable Word Template): http://www. Students should show how they would move. or animal is. and assembled in book form for this product.doc Use one of the children’s books listed at the end of the lesson to show how the illustrator tells the story. They may combine movements from the members of their team to make their creature exciting and believable. Give students a count of eight beats to move and eight beats to return to their seat. In order to decide how the group movement should look. • Visual Aid for Ensemble Performance of the Song – Students perform the song while PowerPoint slides are projected of the characters on the screen for each verse. and sounds to express who another person. object.Prince George’s County Public Schools 126 . wobbles. Discuss whether it crawls. They should demonstrate their dramatization when their creature is introduced. facial expressions. Assemble the class and have the students sing the song again. Remind them to think about how the creature moves in its normal habitat. They will work with a partner to dramatize one of the characters in the song.SAMPLE LESSONS Graphic Organizer Websites and Resources • RWT Webbings Tool: http://interactives. Explain to students that they will be making a living book.

virginia.SAMPLE LESSONS 3 – Student uses a wide range of appropriate movements to express the identity of their creature. Claudia Rueda. Santee Schools. The performance is credible.santee.htm Tools for Differentiated Instruction: Activity Card (Visual Aid). http://www. Bilingual Library Programs for Children.htm Bi-Lingual Instruction: Spanish Language Version.k12. Judy Schachner • I Have A Weird Brother Who Digested A Fly by Joan Holub • Oh My a Fly! by Jan Pienkowski Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Additional Lesson Materials: Felt Board Stories and Cut-Outs.tx. Illustrator • There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Simms Taback • I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (Sing-Along Stories) by Mary Ann Hoberman • Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (Paperback Pop-up/Lift-the-flap) by Colin Hawkins • There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Glen Hay • I Know an Old Lady by G.santee. 1 – Student does not demonstrate appropriate choices in portraying his/her creature and lacks physical presence or appropriate body language.tsl.teach.ca. However. http://www. Teach Virginia Website.preschoolprintables. http://www. The performance is credible.us/Carl/mother_goose. 2 – Student uses a wide range of movements to express the identity of their creature.us/ld/pubs/bilingual/preschoolers/ququiri.edu/go/wil/I_Know_an_Old_Lady_Activity_Card. Preschool Pintables. 0 – Student does not perform. student does not move within the number of beats available within their creature’s introduction. Santee Schools.Prince George’s County Public Schools 127 . Closure Activities: Discuss with students other songs that they could dramatize in a similar way. http://teachers.ca.htm Print/Audio Materials (Reading level: Ages 4-8): • I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Mary Ann Hoberman • I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Nadine Bernard Westcott • I Know an Old Lady by Public Domain. Brian Karas • I Know an Old Lady by Rose Bonne • I Know An Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (Pop-Up Book) by E-learning Books Variations on the Text • I Know An Old Woman by Bari Weissman • I Know an old Lady who Swallowed a Bat by Lucille Colandro • There was an old Lady who Once Saw a Ghost and Other Funny Rhymes by Shirley Pettigrew • I Know an old Lady who Swallowed a Trout! By Teri Sloat • I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed A Pie by Alison Jackson.us/Carl/mother_goose. http://teachers.pdf Word Search.com/felt/oldlady/feltoldlady.k12.state.shtml Pictures for an Accordion Book.

SAMPLE LESSONS
Videos: • I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly (1964) Directed by Derek Lamb (6 min) • “Mammals on The Move” Video Segment , Mammals #1, United Streaming: http://www.unitedstreaming.com/ (2:28) Additional Internet Resources: • The Free Dictionary, http://www.thefreedictionary.com • PowerPoint in the Classroom, http://www.actden.com/pp/ • Windows Movie Maker: Adding Credits to a Film, http://presentationsoft.about.com/od/moviemaker/ss/titles.htm

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SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title:
R W

Melody – Dog Songs

Overview:
Students will read melodic notation and recognize solo and ensemble in order to read melodic notation on a two line staff and sing at the correct point in the song. (The First Grade Reading Book, Theme 1 is “All Together Now” and Theme 4 is “Family and Friends.” This lesson would be a good link to either Reading Theme for the students. The songs, “BINGO,” “Where Oh Where Has My Little Dog Gone?” and “How Much is That Doggie?” are included with this theme in the Reading series. This lesson may take 2 – 3 class periods.)

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • • • • Sing simple “Sol-Mi” patterns using hand signs. (I.B.1) Read and perform simple melodic notation. (I.D.1) Read and sing “Sol-Mi” patterns as notated on the music staff. (II.D.2) Dramatize and pantomime songs using movement. (II.C.1) Investigate the difference between solo and ensemble performances. (II.D.1) Sing “Bingo” from Spotlight on Music – K. Write the letters on the board. Assign each of the five letters to five individual students to sing at the appropriate time in the song to build fluency. Write the words for “Oh Where, Oh Where Has My Little Dog Gone?” on a chart. Write each phrase in a different color. Read the chart as a class. Echo sing each phrase. (The melody for this song is included in the First Grade Reading Book, Theme 4 “Family and Friends.”) Assign each phrase to a small group of students. Have the small groups sing their phrases in order. Work for fluency as they each sing their part.

Warm-Up:

Introductory and Developmental Activities:

Guided Practice Activities:

Review the hand signs for Sol and Mi. Echo sing simple four beat Sol-Mi patterns with hand signs. Have students read each phrase from “Doggie” using the hand signs and their names. (See attached song sheet.) Add words. Assign the dog part to one student and the bear part to another student. Have each person sing their part. If puppets are available, use a dog and bear puppet for the soloists. Allow each student in the class to sing one of the solo parts.

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SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:
Read the notes on the board and sing with hand signs for the “ruff, ruff” part included below. Have the class sing together with words. Read the story How Much Is That Doggie in the Window? Have students sing the ruff, ruff part at the end of each phrase in the story.

Ruff Assessment:

Ruff

Make note of those students who are not singing at the appropriate time. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Those students who are singing and consistently using the correct hand signs should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Read the notes for two to three melodic patterns from the board with the hand signs.

Closure Activities:

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SAMPLE LESSONS

Doggie Song sheet
Bear Sings:

Dog - gie

Dog – gie, where’s your bone?

Dog Sings:

Some - one

stole it from my

home.

Dog Sings:

Who

stole my

bo

-

ne?

Bear Sings:

I

stole your

bo

-

ne.

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SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title:
R W

Different Voices – Nursery Rhymes

Overview:

Students will perform different Mother Goose rhymes in order to demonstrate solos, male and female ensembles after a discussion of the words and characters in the rhymes. (This lesson may take more than one class period.)

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • • • • • Recognize musical contrasts such as unaccompanied melody/melody with accompaniment. (I.A.2) Identify the different voices of males and females as well as children. (I.A.3) Sing and interpret several songs representative of different countries and cultures. (II.A.1) Explain briefly the historical context of selected song from various cultures. (II.B.1) Dramatize and pantomime songs using movement. (II.C.1) Investigate differences between solo and ensemble performances. (II.D.1) Following the First Grade Reading Theme 2 “Surprise,” have students review the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb.”

Warm-Up:

Introductory and Developmental Activities:
Discuss whether Mary is a girl or boy. Have just the girls say the rhyme. Change the name to Marty. Go over the words to see if any other words need to change, i.e. pronouns. Have only boys say the rhyme.

Guided Practice Activities:
Do the same with other nursery rhymes like Jack Be Nimble (change to Jill), Old Mother Hubbard (Father), Little Miss Muffet (Mister), and Old Woman in the Shoe. Discuss any background information needed to better understand each rhyme.

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:
Divide the class into small groups. Give each group a copy of the words to one of the rhymes. Have the students in the group figure out how to act out the rhyme and whether they want the main character to be a boy or a girl. Have students perform their rhymes for the class.

Assessment:

Make note of those students who are not contributing to the group work. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Those students who are participating with their group should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.

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Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Extensions: Give each student a copy of each of the rhymes printed one to a page with space left on the paper for a picture.Prince George’s County Public Schools 133 .SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Go over Jack and Jill and divide the rhyme up between boys and girls with the boys saying the part about Jack falling down and the girls saying the part about Jill tumbling after. Do the same with Peter. Have students illustrate each rhyme and make their own nursery rhyme book. Peter Pumpkin Eater.

students have an opportunity to compare and contrast. they should hold up their index card with the cuckoo clock on it. Discuss a cuckoo clock. (First Grade Reading Theme 4 is “Family and Friends.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Sing simple “sol-mi” patterns using hand signs. After each dock or clock. Compare it to the other clocks discussed earlier in the lesson. Divide students into small groups. Play the music and have students be the cuckoo clock. Select a group that can find the Sol-Mi consistently in the music. Compare the cuckoo clock to other kinds of clocks including clocks today. This lesson could be a good reinforcement of those skills.Prince George’s County Public Schools 134 . The cuckoo sound from the cuckoo clock is the same as Sol-Mi. Practice having the cuckoo come out of the “clock” when they hear the pattern. Hickory Dickory Dock. Have students make a cuckoo clock by having three or four of the students make the walls and arch of the clock and one student to be the cuckoo. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . have the selected group do their ‘cuckoo’ action and sing on Sol-Mi while the rest of the class does the rhyme. List these on the board: dock-clock.B.1) Write new verses to familiar songs. Working together as a class. one-down (?). Students should recognize and move to the Sol-Mi pattern when it occurs in the music. Have students raise their hands when they hear a rhyming word. Distribute copies of the cuckoo clock included with this lesson.C. (These could be mounted on index cards. Guided Practice Activities: Introduce the nursery rhyme ‘Hickory Dickory Dock.1) Dramatize and pantomime songs using movement. (I. Play a two-minute sample of the music.B. the cat jumped up on the clock. the cat went meow. The clock struck two.) Explain to students that when they hear the cuckoo or the sol-mi pattern. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Play a brief sample of “The Cuckoo in the Deep Woods” from Carnival of the Animals (Bowmar Listening Library). Example: Hickory Dickory Dock. Play the pattern on bells.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 3 R W Lesson Title: Sol-Mi in Clock Songs Overview: Students will identify the Sol-Mi pattern in order to respond with movement to the pattern in “The Cuckoo in the Deep Woods” by Saint-Saens. (II.” During this theme. Repeat the rhyme so that the students can say it without assistance.’ Discuss a grandfather clock. (II.1) Review Sol-Mi with hand signs. create a new verse for 2 o’clock.

Those students who are consistently contributing should receive a 1 for their assessment grade for making up new verses. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Cuckoo Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Those students who recognize Sol-Mi consistently should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Divide the class into ten groups for the other times on the clock. Assessment: Make note of students who are not on task or who need more time for mastery of the skill of recognizing Sol-Mi. Closure Activities: Review the hand signs that match the cuckoo sound from the music heard in the lesson.Prince George’s County Public Schools 135 . Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Make note of students who are not on task while the group is creating a new verse. Each group should create a new verse for their hour on the clock.

) Draw the two line staff on the board as it is shown on the song sheet. Guided Practice Activities: Introduce the teddy bear manipulatives. (I. one for Sol.1) Play the “Follow the Ball” game. Class sings sol and mi as the ball is passed from child to child. (See example in attached song sheet. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . choose eight children to form a line in front of the classroom. Substitute a teddy bear for the ball. Sing the next phrase of the song while following the bears on the board. Have the students sing the whole song with hand signs while pointing to the bears on the board. (See attached song sheet. Put a repeat sign at the end of the line. Give the first child a teddy bear. Discuss with students how to put the bears on the two lines to show the melody for the song. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the hand signs for Sol and Mi. This lesson would be a good link for the students.D.C. Discuss whether a teddy bear is real or make believe as well as whether a teddy bear could really do the things in the song.B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 136 . ) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Sing simple “Sol-Mi” patterns using hand signs.1) Read and sing “Sol-Mi” patterns as notated on the music staff. Echo the first phrase from “Teddy Bear” using the hand signs and their names. To play.) Sing with hand signs from the bears on the board.1) Dramatize and pantomime songs using movement. Echo sing simple four beat Sol-Mi patterns with hand signs. All phrases are the same. (I. (First Grade Reading Theme 6 is “Animal Adventures. (II. Children pass the bear either over their heads (Sol) or between their legs (mi) to the person behind. and the other for Mi with the note names on the manipulatives.) Add the words for the song. (Instructions for constructing these are included. Do the same for the last two phrases of the song.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 4 Lesson Title: R W Melodic Notation using “Teddy Bear” Overview: Students will use melodic notation manipulatives in order to read melodic notation on a two line staff and then dramatize/pantomime the song while singing. Point out to the students that the phrase uses the same melody.” Students will work on real and fantasy in this theme. The teddy bears should be in two colors.

” birds for “Bluebird. Sing the song without the hand signs. Have students dramatize the song by following those directions while singing.Prince George’s County Public Schools 137 . grade 3 and Kindergarten for and Spotlight on Music – 3 a multicultural connection. Closure Activities: Review the hand signs. Extensions: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Make note of the directions the song has in it. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade.” hearts for “Georgy Porgy. Other ideas for manipulatives with limited tone songs – trains for “Engine #9.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Make note of those students who are not looking at the board or are not doing the hand signs. Play the Chinese children’s song “Kuma San” from Share the Music.” etc. Those students who are visually following the notes on the board and consistently using the correct hand signs should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.” pennies for “Who Has the Penny?.

Label the brown bears with Sol. turn around. mi Teddy Bear.Prince George’s County Public Schools 138 . tie your shoe. Teddy Bear that will do. Teddy Bear. mi. Teddy Bear. Teddy Bear. sol. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Put magnets or tacky on the back to stick to the board. Teddy Bear. mi sol.SAMPLE LESSONS Teddy Bear sol. mi. Label the white bears with Mi. sol. Teddy Bear. sol. MANIPULATIVE CONSTRUCTION: Make five brown bears and four white bears using the pattern below. Laminate the bears. touch the ground. Teddy Bear.

Discuss which patterns in the song sound like Sol-Mi. Place fish on the floor with magnetic strip side up. Distribute the enclosed song sheet. Teach the song “Two. grade 1 and from Spotlight on Music .1) Read and sing “Sol-Mi” patterns as notated on the music staff. (I.B) Play “Going Fishing. 6. 8 Overview: Students will identify Sol-Mi in order to perform. Six.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W Melody in 2. ) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Sing simple “Sol-Mi” patterns using hand signs.B. (I. Have students make up their own melodic pattern on the third line of their worksheet.D. (III. Sing the song and use the movement pattern each time the Sol-Mi patterns occur. make a fishing pole using a yardstick. On one side write four beat melodic patterns. he/she goes to the board and writes the pattern on a staff while the next student goes fishing. read and compose using Sol-Mi in a song. Four.” Before the lesson. Choose a student to fish with pole and magnet. Discuss possible reasons why someone might be late and what the other person could do in those situations. When the student has caught a fish. Have students review the song using the song sheet.2) Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. they will now make up their own melody for part of the song.1. Eight” from Share the Music. Students will sing the pattern that is caught and notated on the board. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Discuss the words of the song and when the song might have been sung (a long time ago). 4. Laminate the fish and glue magnetic strips on backs. string. Practice writing possible melodic patterns for the third line of the song on the board. (First Grade Reading Theme 7 is “We Can Work It Out. and a magnet in place of a hook. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Explain to students that just as they made up solutions to the problem in the song. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Have the students use their hands (on shoulders for Sol and on their knees for Mi) to show the melodic pattern in the song.” This lesson could be used to reinforce the comprehension skills of problem solving from the Reading Theme for the students. Have students share their new third line with the class.Prince George’s County Public Schools 139 . Cut out several construction paper fish.

Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: As students sing their melody patterns. make note of those students who did not write a melody pattern or could not sing what they had written. Closure Activities: Review the concept of Sol-Mi by having students stand when the teacher sings the pattern. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Those students who did write a melody pattern and could sing what they had written should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.Prince George’s County Public Schools 140 .

Two. Two.SAMPLE LESSONS Two. six. six. don’t wait.Prince George’s County Public Schools 141 . Six. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . four. Meet me at the gar . Four. eight. Eight Compose a melody for “If I’m late. four. If I’m late. eight. don’t wait” by writing combinations of sol and mi on the blank lines above the words using the rhythm notes given.den gate. Be prepared to sing what you have written.

have each student sing the whole song in their head.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 6 Lesson Title: R W New Spider Verses Overview: Students will create new verses for “Eensy Weensy Spider” in order to add actions to dramatize the new verses. Make minor adjustments as needed. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: When the new version is completed. again.” This lesson could also be used in conjunction with this theme. This lesson may take two-three class periods.” which could be used for this same lesson. Guided Practice Activities: Have the students brainstorm several possibilities for what kind of spider their version of the song could be about. (II. Check each new part to make sure it fits with the melodic rhythm. Have students divide into cooperative groups with students sitting close by them to discuss possible ideas for actions to go with the new version.1) Warm-Up: Sing “Eensy Weensy Spider” from Spotlight on Music . Discuss where their spider could be going for the next part of the song and how it could be moving there. Go over those ideas together as a class.K with actions. etc. Eensy Weensy Spider by Mary Ann Hoberman. Roly Poly Spider by Jill Sardegna. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Read other versions of this song from picture books like: Itsy Bitsy Spider by Iza Trapani.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Dramatize and pantomime songs using movement. Itsy Bitsy Spider by Lorianne Siomades. Use chart paper to keep track of the new version as it develops so students can see their progress and review as new parts are added. Explain that the class will be making up their own version of the song and then add actions to go along with it. Reading Theme 8 is “Our Earth. Ask them to think about any editing changes that need to be made. vote on one. List those on the board. Get several ideas and then. Observe the groups as they are working.Prince George’s County Public Schools 142 . (III.C. Continue to add new parts a section at a time. (The First Grade Reading Theme 7 includes the song “The Ants Go Marching.B. Work together as a class to develop actions to dramatize the song.1) Write new verses to familiar songs. Vote on one. Share ideas from the group work with the whole class. Sing the whole song as a class. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

Prince George’s County Public Schools 143 . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Throughout the class. Extension: “La Pequenita Arana” Eency Weency Spider sung in Spanish can be found in Spotlight on Music. grade Kindergarten. Closure Activities: Have the students sing the whole song with the new actions. Those students who are participating should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. make note of those students who are not participating as the class is developing the new verse and actions.

Make note of those students who did not write a four beat pattern or could not clap what they had written.Prince George’s County Public Schools 144 . Have students clap their patterns with a partner and then ask individuals to clap their pattern for the class.1) Give students craft sticks and have them create four patterns.Grade 1 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity Rhythmic Building Blocks Overview: Following instruction on reading rhythms using quarter notes and quarter rests. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Read and perform simple rhythmic notation using quarter notes and rests. (I. using quarter notes and rests in groups of four beats. students will be able to read rhythm notes in order to compose four rhythm patterns. Those students who did write a four beat pattern and could clap what they had written should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . one at a time.D. Activity: Assessment: Assess the students as they clap their patterns. Review with students that both the note and the rest get a beat.

If they are not ready to do this. Write down several of their answers. Listen to “Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me” from Spotlight on Music – 2. Guide them by giving several examples such as butterfly.3) Write new verses to familiar songs. balloon.” on the board or on a chart. Ask the students to think of a noun to fill in the blank. Those students who recognize the different sections of music in the song consistently should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.1) Warm-Up: Sing and move to any AB or ABA song already taught and review the form. identify the A section for them and ask them to signal each time they hear the B section.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 1 – Lesson 8 Lesson Title: R W Music and Writing Overview: Students will learn to sing “Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me” and create a class book by writing and illustrating their own answers to a phrase from the song in order to identify ABA form. Echo sing the song and have them perform a different movement with each section. lion. or race car. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment.” Pass out the writing page included with this lesson and have the students write their answers in the blank with a pencil.B. 145 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . The movements may match the steady beat or be more like a circle dance. Ask them to listen again and identify how many different sections they hear. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Write the phrase “I feel like a _________. Have them ask how to spell any words they are unsure of because they are writing a book and all of the words in a book must be spelled correctly. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Assessment: Make note of the students who are not on task or who need more time for mastery of the skill of recognizing the different sections of music in the song. Then ask them think of an adjective (a describing word) for their noun or a verb (an action word). Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Sing familiar songs in an ensemble. Many children will already know it. Create movements or ask the students to create them. they may begin to draw a picture of their answer in the box provided with their pencil.Prince George’s County Public Schools . They will be able to read and sing their book in ABA form. (III. If there is time. (I. Chart several examples such as a “pretty butterfly” or “floating balloon. tower.B. Ask which section is sung last? Identify the form as ABA.

month and year. If time permits. and draw a picture in the box to illustrate their answer. Check over the papers for spelling errors and completion of work before the next class. Assessment: Make note of students who are not on task and do not complete their song sheet page. class name.SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Collect papers and pencils and sing a closing or line-up song to end class. They may sing their answers in class when they are done or try to read and sing someone else’s answer. Present their book to them at the next class and sing through it. Review the song as a class. They will be reading and singing their own class book.. they may add color to their picture with crayons or markers. Day 2: Warm-up: Completing the Class Song Book Sing and move to “Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me.” Identify the form again as ABA. It may be a good idea to use the black fine-point permanent marker to trace over all pencil markings in their pictures if time permits. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have the students finish their answers and pictures in pencil. Guided Practice: Share a page that has already been created as a model or show several good examples from the class or another class. Put all completed pages into a plastic sheet cover and place in a binder with a cover page stating the song title. trace over their answers with a permanent fine-point black marker. Label the A and B sections for reinforcement. When they are done. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the song sheet tasks.Prince George’s County Public Schools 146 . Those students who stay on task and complete their song sheet page should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. They are to fill in the blank with their noun and an adjective or a verb. This makes the pictures look better. Include the original lyrics to the song as the first page of the book. Closure Activities: Extension: Select several of the student pages to sing in the song.

SAMPLE LESSONS Writing Page I feel.Prince George’s County Public Schools 147 . I feel like a ____________________________ Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . I feel. I feel.

(This lesson ties in with Second Grade Reading Theme 1 called “Silly Stories. Demonstrate how they might add the changes like fins. If they finish their fish drawing. Then have students say it using a happy voice. 2 – Students were not listening to the music or attempting any pictures. etc. Signal to the students when each new variation begins so that they can start the next box. Demonstrate how students should draw a plain fish in the top box.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: R W Trout Quintet and Art Overview: Students will recognize theme and variations in order to create an original drawing of a fish and six variations. mad voice. stripes and even silly ones like baseball hats and beards. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Have students repeat it the same way. As each variation in the “Trout Quintet” is played. (II. they should draw the same fish as the previous box but add something new each time. Seuss’ One Fish. sad voice.Prince George’s County Public Schools 148 .C. Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 1 – Students drew pictures. Two Fish. Guided Practice Activities: Distribute the drawing sheet included with this lesson. tired voice. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Play the “Trout Quintet” from Spotlight on Music – 6 and have students draw. Blue Fish. they could add details in each box to create a fish tank picture. Explain that the music they will hear will take a theme and repeat it but with different sounds each time.”) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Relate musical sounds to visual art identifying repetition and contrast. which demonstrate an understanding of contrast in theme and variations while listening to the music without talking. Assessment: Closure Activities: Have students examine their papers to find if their pictures are all the same (showing repetition) or different (showing contrast).1) Have students read the title for Dr. Red Fish.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 149 .SAMPLE LESSONS Name _________________________ Homeroom _________________________ Trout Quintet Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

(I.) Introduce the concept of drawing from “imagination. as in “Whither wilt thou wander. such as CR. such as “Sally Sells Seashells. Then have them write a tongue twister about the critter they have created utilizing alliteration to describe their critter’s home. food. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Present teacher example of a cluster critter to the class.C. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Ask students to create a critter drawing using only the letters in their blend. environment and/or form of movement etc. rhythmic patterns. Do. Re. By the Seashore” or “How Much Wood Would a Woodchuck Chuck.1) Relate musical sounds to visual art identifying repetition and contrast.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Perform simple ostinato patterns to accompany songs using classroom rhythm instruments.Prince George’s County Public Schools 150 .SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title: R W Crazy Critter Songs Overview: Students will create “Crazy Critters” in order to compose song stories about them demonstrating knowledge of beginning consonant blends. wayfarer?” Guided Practice Activities: Model the process for creating cluster critters. Re. Mi. The assigned blend will serve as the repeating consonant sound.C. (The Second Grade Reading Theme 1 called “Silly Stories” would be a nice link for this lesson. Assign a consonant blend to each student by writing the blends on slips of paper and have each student select one. (See attached worksheet.” Their critters do not have to look like real animals. They should be prepared to share it with the class as they show their drawing. Mi. Perform tongue twister for the class.B. Students should practice saying their tongue twister maintaining the tempo while they are saying it.” Alliteration is the use of similar consonants for the poetic or literary effect achieved by using several words that begin with the same or similar consonants. Introduce the concept of “alliteration. “Chewy chocolate cherries are Charlie’s choice” is also good. (II. (I. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .1) Develop the ability to compose and arrange music.” The choral warm-up.B) Teach the children a tongue twister. The pitches are Do.1) Relate body movements to tempo. (III. repetition and contrast. Fa. using one pitch on each word.

Review information the students may have made up about their critter’s home. food. Then. show them how to play a rhythm pattern while they chant their tongue twister in rhythm. Explain that students will now be making up a story about their critter. Closure Activities: Perform the opening tongue twister(s) again. environment and/or form of movement. At points in the story that they decide on. They may work alone or in small groups if preferred. Assessment: Have students again display their “Crazy Critter” drawings and have them perform their song stories for the class. etc. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review how to speak their tongue twisters rhythmically in tempo. Those students who were able to perform the tongue twister that goes with their cluster critter drawing should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Allow the students to work on their own story songs. steady beat that they are required to follow. from the previous lesson. Make sure to establish a strong. the group may choose one member’s critter to use for the story.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Those students who did not create a tongue twister or cluster critter should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Those who present their song story following the directions will receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Day 2: Setting the Stories to Music Warm-Up: Start with a tongue twister from the previous class. If working in a group. Have students make up their own rhythm pattern to go with their tongue twister. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . they should say their tongue twister and add their rhythm pattern.Prince George’s County Public Schools 151 . Those who have not created a song story or make no attempt to perform their song story will receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Closure Activities: Review several of the tongue twisters created by class members.

SAMPLE LESSONS Crazy Critter Drawings Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 152 .

Going note by note and using the lyrics of the song as well as the hand signs.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Sing simple “sol-mi-la” patterns using hand signs.2) Begin with the “Can You Sing Sol-Mi-La?” activity.B. Mi and La. At the end of the second phrase. one for Sol. sing what is already notated.1) Read and sing “sol-mi-la” patterns as notated on the music staff.) Sing the first phrase with hand signs and song lyrics from the stars on the board.D.) Draw the two line staff on the board as it is shown on the song sheet. Draw a two line staff on the board and choose a student to place magnets on board to create a sol-mi-la pattern. Substitute the star manipulatives in the attached worksheet for the magnets. Continue with the whole song. one for La. melodic direction. from written notation. (I.C. Child who sings pattern correctly changes the pattern and chooses another child to sing. The stars should be in three colors. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the hand signs for Sol. Echo sing simple four beat sol-mi-la patterns with hand signs with the whole class.2) Relate body movements to melodic direction. Then sing using note names. (See example in attached song sheet. and the other for Mi with the note names on the manipulatives.Prince George’s County Public Schools 153 . (Instructions for constructing these are included.1) Identify and sing. (The Second Grade Reading Theme 2 is called “Nature Walk. Then add the words. (I.” This lesson would be a good link to the Reading Theme for the students.) Guided Practice Activities: Introduce the star manipulatives. discuss with students how to put the stars on the two lines to show the melody for the first phrase of the song.D. (See attached song sheet. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . note by note and have students come up to put the notes on the board. using hand signs and lyrics then hand signs and note names.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 3 Lesson Title: R W Melodic Notation using “Star Light” Overview: Students will use melodic manipulatives in order to read melodic notation on a two line staff. Sing the next phrase of the song. (I. Student chooses another student to sing the pattern. Echo the first phrase from “Star Light” using hand signs and their names. (I.

” pennies for “Who Has the Penny?.” etc. Practice singing the whole song with note names and hand signs. Closure Activities: Review the hand signs used for the song. Those students who are visually following the notes on the board and consistently using the correct hand signs should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. Extensions: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Other ideas for manipulatives with limited note songs – trains for “Engine #9.SAMPLE LESSONS Do the same for the last two phrases of the song.Prince George’s County Public Schools 154 . Have students stand to sing the song. and squat (mi). Give students thinking time and then have them read and sing the pattern using hand signs and note names. Put a four beat pattern on the board with stars from the song. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade.” birds for “Bluebird.” hearts for “Georgy Porgy. Do a couple more if time permits. tiptoes (la). Assessment: Have the students sing the whole song with hand signs and note names while the teacher points to the stars on the board. Using the following positions have them move to show the melodic direction while doing the hand signs and singing: stand (sol). Make note of those students who are not looking at the board or are not doing the hand signs.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 155 . Label the blue stars with Sol. sol mi sol. sol mi Star light. Label the yellow stars with La. First star I see tonight. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Label the white stars with Mi. and eight white stars using the pattern below. Wish I may.SAMPLE LESSONS Star Light. star bright. wish I might. sol mi. Have the wish I wish tonight. la sol. two yellow stars. Put magnets or tacky on the back to stick to the board. sol mi Sol. MANIPULATIVE CONSTRUCTION: Make thirteen blue stars. la sol. Star Bright Sol mi sol mi Sol mi. sol mi Sol. Laminate the stars.

from written notation. Continue with the second phrase.2) Relate body movements to rhythmic patterns. Sing the whole song. Echo sing simple four beat sol-mi-la patterns with hand signs with the whole class.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 4 Lesson Title: R W Rhythmic Improvisation – Dog Named Nickel Overview: Students will create a rhythm pattern in order to accompany a song with new verses created by the class. Put the verses in order from the lowest coin to the highest coin.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • Sing simple “sol-mi-la” patterns using hand signs. (I.1) Review the hand signs for Sol. Have students stand to sing the song. Those students who are singing and did help with new verses should receive a 1 for their assessment grade.1) Read and sing “sol-mi-la” patterns as notated on the music staff. Mi and La. Decide whether the verse should be silly or real and use that as a guide for the new verse. have them move to show the melodic direction while doing the hand signs and singing: stand (sol). Make up new verses for other coins.A.2) Improvise simple rhythmic phrases.C.” This lesson would be a good link to the Reading Theme for the students. (I.D. tiptoes (la). (I. Using the following positions. (I. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the first phrase of “Dog Named Nickel” using hand signs and their names. (Second Grade Reading Theme 4 is called “Amazing Animals. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Then add the words. and squat (mi). Guided Practice Activities: Change the word ‘nickel’ in the song to “penny’ and make up a new verse with something that rhymes with penny.Prince George’s County Public Schools . melodic direction.B.) Discuss whether this could really happen or not.1) Identify and sing. 156 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .D. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students name other coins. Notate the song on the board on a two line staff as indicated on the attached song sheet. (See attached song sheet. Assessment: Make note of those students who do not add anything or who do not sing the complete song. (III.

A Dog Named Nickel Sol la la sol sol mi mi sol la sol mi Sol sol la la sol sol mi mi Sol sol la la sol mi I had a little dog.SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Review the hand signs used for the song. his name was Nickel Every time I turned around.Prince George’s County Public Schools 157 . he turned into a pickle. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Encourage the students to make up their own verses for the song at home.

(I.D.C. and squat (mi). Assessment: As the students sing the song with solo parts.2) Improvise simple melodic phrases. Continue with the second phrase. (Second Grade Reading Theme 5 is called “Family Time.Mabel Overview: Students will improvise a melodic response in order to add an ending to a song. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .D. (I. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Sing the song as a group. melodic direction. Using the following positions.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • Sing simple “sol-mi-la” patterns using hand signs. (See attached song sheet. Make note of students who do not add anything or who do not sing the complete phrase. They could add food items as well as utensils. The group repeats their phrase after them. Then add the words.) Have students stand to sing the song. from written notation. (III.2) Relate body movements to melodic patterns. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the first phrase of “Mabel” using hand signs and their names. List a few of the possible items that are needed to set a table. Mi and La.A.1) Identify and sing. tiptoes (la). Guided Practice Activities: Introduce the solo phrase.1) Review the hand signs for Sol. have them move to show the melodic direction while doing the hand signs and singing: stand (sol). They sing at the appropriate time in the song. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Pass a plastic fork or spoon to the first person who will add the solo phrase. Those students who are singing their new phrase at the appropriate time should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. (I.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W Melodic Improvisation . teacher should monitor who is singing at the appropriate time. Continue until everyone has had a turn passing the fork to the next person each time.1) Read and sing “sol-mi-la” patterns as notated on the music staff. Give students an opportunity to think of at least three ideas that they can add to the song. Echo sing simple four beat sol-mi-la patterns with hand signs with the whole class. Notate the song on the board on a two line staff as indicated on the attached song sheet. (I.B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 158 .” This lesson could be a good link to the Reading Theme for the students.

sol.SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Review the hand signs used for the song. sol mi Mabel. mi. Mabel Sol mi sol mi Sol la sol mi Sol. set the table. Don’t forget the _____?_____ (solo) Don’t forget the _____?_____ (group) Sol.Prince George’s County Public Schools 159 . Just as fast as you are able. sol. mi. Mabel. mi. sol mi Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . mi.

Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Discuss how to write these patterns with standard musical notation using quarter notes and rests. Discuss how many times the section repeats.A. Have students play “Make Your Move” making up movements that show which phrases are the same and different. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Assessment: Have students read and perform the patterns with their paper plates. Observe the students and make note of those who are not on task or have difficulty performing the patterns. (Second Grade Reading Theme 6 is called “Talent Show.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Find the strong and weak beat patterns in duple and triple meter. Have students use the tapping sheet while listening to “The Toreadors” from Carmen by Bizet. Distribute two paper plates to each student.1) Identify and sing.C.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 6 R W Lesson Title: Rhythm reading with “The Toreadors” Overview: Students will identify rhythm patterns in order to play them for the A section of “The Toreadors” noting which ones are the same/different and finding the strong/weak beat pattern. (I. like/unlike phrases of songs from various cultures. Decide which are the same and different. Those students who are able to play the patterns with the music should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. from written notation. (I. Have students share their movements with the class. Add additional cultural information. have students suggest what toreadors are. Closure Activities: Review the concept of same and different phrases by clapping the same pattern and having the students identify the different pattern by standing up when it is heard. first without music and then with music.1) Use the song “Matarile” from Share the Music – Songs to Sing and Read.) Using the picture at the top of the Tapping Sheet.” This lesson could be linked to that reading theme.Prince George’s County Public Schools 160 . Look at the dot patterns. (I. Have students read patterns while playing paper plate cymbals.D.1) Relate body movements to rhythmic patterns. repetition and contrast. Distribute copies of the Tapping Sheet for “The Toreadors” that shows dots with starburst/no starburst. Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. (See attached sheet. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

SAMPLE LESSONS Tapping Sheet – “The Toreadors” The Special Ending Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 161 .

Have students sing and perform their movements at the appropriate time.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: Form and The Nutcracker Overview: Students will compare two parts of The Nutcracker in order to describe what makes one AB form and the other ABA form. Listen to the “March from the Nutcracker” using the map on Resource 2.10 from Share the Music. grade 2 and from Spotlight on Music . Divide students into groups of three to four.” Decide on movements to go with the first and second parts of the music to show AB form.” have the students decide how to make an AB form and an ABA form.C.B. Discuss The Nutcracker ballet.1) Arrange given musical ideas (excerpts) to create musical forms such as AB and ABA.A.9 from Share the Music. grade 2. grade 2.” Play the rhythm sticks while marching during the A section. Compare the form of the “March” to “Jingle Bells. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Listen to the “Overture from the Nutcracker” using the map on Resource 2. play the jingle bells and scurry during the B section to show ABA form. (I.1) Relate musical sounds to visual art identifying repetition and contrast. Discuss what makes the two musical selections from The Nutcracker different. Have students create simple movements to accompany their section. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Perform the AB form and the ABA form. (I.Prince George’s County Public Schools 162 .C. Compare the form of the “Overture” to “Jingle Bells. Discuss the form of this song (verse-refrain or AB).1) Sing “Jingle Bells” from Share the Music. (III. Pass out color squares of two colors with the letter A on one color and the letter B on another to each student. (II.3) Relate body movements to repetition and contrast. Assign each group the letter A or B.1. Play the song again and have students hold up color squares to show which section of music is being sung. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Using “Jingle Bells” and “We Wish You a Merry Christmas. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Identify sound patterns in simple forms such as AB and ABA.

Those students should receive a 2 for their assessment grade. Closure Activities: Review these concepts by clapping an AB or an ABA set of patterns and have the students identify them correctly.Prince George’s County Public Schools 163 . Those students who demonstrate an understanding of AB and ABA form by moving and singing in the correct manner should receive a 1 for their assessment grade. make note of those students who are not on task or who need more time for mastery of this skill.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: As students perform the AB and ABA forms. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 2 – Lesson 8 Lesson Title:

Exploring Musical Form with Digital Resources

Overview:

Students will arrange given musical ideas in order to create musical forms such as AB, ABA, and Rondo forms. Their compositions will be saved. Students will use digital resources including websites and/or computer software to do their creations.

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • • • • Arrange given musical ideas to create musical forms such as AB, ABA, and rondo. (III.B.1) Listen to and express opinions about recorded musical performances, both audio and video. (V.A.1) Identify sound patterns in simple forms such as AB, ABA, and rondo. (I.A.3) Relate body movements to repetition and contrast. (I.C.1) Examine ways in which music is a part of each student’s life and the lives of children around the world. (II.A.1)

Student Standards for Technology Literacy Addressed in this Lesson
• • • • • • • Use computer and multimedia technology with some teacher support. Use the mouse/touch pad correctly. Select and insert images and text. Select text by highlighting to perform functions such as deleting, changing fonts, and moving text. Use technology tools including software and hardware, from a range of teacher selected options to learn new content or reinforce skills. Describe ways the selected technology tools are being used to support learning goals and accomplish tasks. Communicate with various audiences independently or with assistance using different media formats.

Day 1: Experiencing ABA
Warm-up:
Students will play a matching game or sing a song in ABA form. Online Resources • Melody Memory Game, http://www.melodymemorygame.com/ • Match the Musical Phrase Game, http://creatingmusic.com/puzzles/puzzles.html • Sing a Song in ABA form (Start with slide 3), http://civic.acadiau.ca/links/Composition%20Lessons/ABA_Composition.ppt

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music - Prince George’s County Public Schools

164

SAMPLE LESSONS
(No-Tech Option: Place several melody cards and their matches facing the blackboard. Ask a student to turn a card. Play or sing the melodic phrase on the selected card and the child will guess which hidden card has a matching melody. When the children find a match, show both cards and play or sing them as an AA phrase.)

Introductory and Developmental Activities:
Remind the students they were asked to find matching phrases in the warm-up. Explain that when music is organized using these phrases, they are called musical themes. Communicate that composers use musical themes so that the mood of the music can be understood. When all the parts are put together, a composition’s musical form can be identified. Musical form is how the music is organized.

Guided Practice Activities:
Let students listen to Robert Schumann’s composition “Folk Song” from Album for the Young. Three-Part (A B A) Form Website 1 (QuickTime Plug-in Required), http://raider.muc.edu/~miskeljp/intro/kamien/t/aba/aba.htm Outline the phrases kinesthetically as the students listen to the music. Although it is not necessary for the students to see the notation and analysis at this point, they should be encouraged to mirror the movements. (Kinesthetic representation of the phrase could include drawing the phrase in the air or pointing to sound motifs in the air or on a chart. More examples of kinesthetic movement have been included in the extension section of this lesson. In any case, emphasize the use of shorter notes in the B section by changing the type of movement for this section. A diagram has been included below to organize your movement.) Sections Measures A 1–8 B 9 - 16 (faster) A 17 – end

Use questioning to help students identify each section. Examples: Are all of the phrases alike? Did you move the same way for the entire composition? How did your movement change? Did any sections repeat?

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:
The instructor identifies the first theme as section A. The students should be able to distinguish the form of the selection by identifying the middle theme as different (B) and the last section as similar to the first theme (A). Review the selection again using the automated movie version of this sound clip so that the students can see the music and the form as they listen. Three-Part (A B A) Form Website 2: http://raider.muc.edu/~miskeljp/intro/kamien/t/aba/aba.mov

Closure Activities:
Show the motions for each section of the ABA piece again and have students identify which section is being shown by calling out A or B depending on the movement they see.

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Day 2: Composing ABA
Warm-up:
Review the concept of composing in ABA form by using the following websites: Making Tracks Composer: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio3/makingtracks/makeatune.shtml (This site offers a point and click method for sound selection in any form.)

Introductory and Developmental Activities:
Explain that the class will be composing a piece in ABA form. Play a student composition from the following website. Student Composition in ABA Form (A prompt to download Scorch should be expected.) http://www.vtmidi.org/examples_scores/FinalDavidOpus9.htm

Guided Practice Activities:
Guide students, using Finale NotePad, to create like and unlike phrases that can be combined to create various musical forms such as ABA. Students should have hands-on training in a lab or a one-computer classroom with the aid of an online tutorial. “Document Setup Wizard”, http://www.atomiclearning.com/finale_notepad

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:

Students should identify types of melodic movement using website for melodic contour and decide the type of contour their musical theme will have. “Melodic Contour”, http://www.creatingmusic.com/contours/index.html

Closure Activities:
Have selected students share what they have developed for their ABA form. Let students know that they will continue to work on their ABA composition in the next lesson.

Day 3: Partner ABA’s
Warm-up:
Review the concept of composing in ABA form by using the following websites: Music First! Form Activity: http://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0072287683/student_view0/chapter11/activities.html# (This site offers a point and click method for examining musical form.)

Introductory and Developmental Activities:

Have students share what they need to do to create an ABA form. Have students work with a partner to create their composition in ABA form. Each student will create a melodic phrase (A) consisting of eight beats of music. Students should be encouraged to use the playback feature to make changes to their compositions. They should also try to use familiar rhythms such as: quarter notes and rests, eighth notes, half notes and rests, etc. in their compositions. After saving their performance of their eight beat phrases for their partner, they will
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Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:

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create a contrasting eight beat phrase for theme B. Students can restate the A section or use the cut and paste feature of the software to add the final section to their ABA composition.

Assessment:
Use the following rubric to assess student compositions: 1 – The composition has three eight beat phrases/themes that follow ABA form and the B section is in contrast musically to the A section through melodic contour, rhythm, or other distinctive musical elements. 2 – The composition does not explore the use of eight beat phrases/themes to reflect the form ABA.

Closure Activities:
Students will be asked to reflect on the process by responding to the following prompt in their student journals: Is revising or making changes to the music composition during the writing process a good idea? How did revising affect the final composition?

Additional Lesson Materials:

Additional Tutorials: Band in a Box: Use this to add accompaniment/harmony to student compositions. http://www.pgmusic.com/bbdemovideos.htm

Kinesthetic Approach: Hoedown Visual Listening Map Video (Chart) http://faculty.weber.edu/tpriest/VisualListeningMaps/Hoedown2.mov Hoedown Kinesthetic Listening Map Video (Movement): http://faculty.weber.edu/tpriest/Kinesthetic%20Listening%20Maps/Hoedown.mov Interactive Music Composition Sites: San Francisco Symphony’s Composerizer, http://www.sfskids.org/templates/musicLabF.asp?pageid=15 (This sight has short phrases which can be organized and replayed to create a theme.) Morton Subotnick’s Creating Music Website, http://creatingmusic.com/mmm/index.html Article: It’s Elementary: Integrating Music Technology, http://metmagazine.com/mag/elementary/index.html Optional Software and Usage: Basic: Use Music Ace “Doodle Pad” to organize pictorial representations. Proficient: Use Finale Notepad to create like and unlike phrases. Advanced: Sibelius can be used to create short compositions in ABA form. Exemplary: Use Garage Band to combine recorded voices/instruments with digital medium.

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SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 - 6 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title:
R W

Multiple Meanings in Music

Overview:

Students will explore music vocabulary words in order to identify the correct music definition from the context of the sentence for those with multiple meanings.

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • Define tempo, dynamics, and meter using musical terms. (I.A.1) Describe characteristics of music such as crescendo, decrescendo and accent using appropriate musical terms. (I.A.2) Have students make a list of music words, one for each letter of the alphabet, if possible. Encourage students to use the word walls, displays, and bulletin board information.

Warm-Up:

Introductory and Developmental Activities:

Discuss which ones on the list have multiple meanings. Examples: pitch, note, piano, rests, instrument. Discuss how the sentence context helps to determine the meaning. Divide students into pairs. Assign each pair of students one of the music words with multiple meanings. Each pair should think of two sentences using each of the words but in a different context.

Guided Practice Activities:

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:

Student pairs should share their sentences with the class. The class should give the meaning for each word. Have students complete the worksheet given here (or something similar) and assess using the following rubric: 4 – Students select the correct definition for each word with 90% accuracy. 3 – Students select the correct definition with 80% accuracy. 2 – Students select the correct definition with 70% accuracy. 1 – Students select the correct definition with 60% accuracy. 0 – Students select the correct definition with less than 60% accuracy.

Assessment:

Closure Activities:
Ask students to think of other music words that have multiple meanings.

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MULTIPLE MEANING WORDS In the following example, each word has more than one meaning. Select the word, which has the same meaning as the underlined word. _____ A. B. C. D. _____ A. B. C. D. _____ A. B. C. D. _____ A. B. C. D. _____ A. B. C. D. notation sounds music strings sound throw melody angle 2. beat rhythm speed dynamics 3. instrument softly keyboard fast 4. pieces of paper music pitches letters reading parts 5. In order to read guitar tablature you must understand what chords are. When Mrs. Johnson sings the notes she sings very beautifully. When the orchestra played piano, the audience struggled to hear. The tempo of the march made it very exciting. 1. The pitch of the violin was very high.

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2. _____ C. While walking to the park with my grandmother we heard music playing. two or more parts with the band one part as a solo 3. In this passage the word crescendo means to _____ A. _____ D. _____ B. _____ D. 1. The last song was supposed to be sung in harmony but I could only hear the melody. It has a very strong bass part and the beat is easy to hear. _____ B. _____ D. When we arrived at the park we realized that a concert was taking place. which has the same meaning as the underlined word. fish high loud low Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .SAMPLE LESSONS USING CONTEXT CLUES Use clues from the following passages to find the meaning of the underlined words. _____ B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 170 . _____ C. Select the phrase. In this passage the word harmony means _____ A. As we walked closer. One of our favorite dances is the Cha Cha Slide. _____ C. the music began to crescendo. In this passage the word bass means _____ A. get louder walk slowly run quickly stop playing Yesterday my mother and I went to my sister’s concert at school.

1) Sing a variety of western and non-western folk and composed songs including those in other languages.A. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Sing the song at a faster tempo.1) Review the song “Engine #9. (I. (I. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .B.C.1) Interpret music in free and patterned forms in various meters using body movements. This position is the ‘pass it’ position. (II. Passing object will move around the circle in a counter clockwise direction. Pieces of the unit could be done if materials are not available for all the songs. Students should cross their right hand on the floor in front of their left knee. This position is the ‘pick it up’ position. music for listening and related activities. ) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • Define tempo using musical terms.A. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Add the song when the passing action is smooth. Guided Practice Activities: Introduce the passing action for “Engine #9. (II. Have students move their right hand in front of their neighbor’s left knee.” Class should be sitting in a circle. instruments to play.1) Construct support for individual interests in different styles and kinds of music.A. For a more challenging game. Discuss what happens with the beat.1) Compare the music for various groups of people as a part of everyday life. Also the Third Grade Reading Theme 1 called “Off to Adventure” has a section on listening to and writing about world music. Discuss tempo. give each student a block so everyone passes at the same time. This would be a great link between music and reading. (IV. They will use only their right hand for the games. Explain to students that they will be playing passing games from different countries to practice tempo.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title: R W Tempo – Beat games Overview: Students will play a variety of beat games from different cultures in order to compare two of the games as well as telling which they prefer.2) Explain preferences for songs to sing.A. Have students practice the action first without a block and then with a block. (II. (This unit may take several lessons.Prince George’s County Public Schools 171 .” Have students tap the beat with their right hand only on the floor while singing. Do the same while singing at a slower tempo.

Then have students put both hands behind their back. Day 3: African American Children’s Game Warm-Up: Review the song “Obwisana” and have students show the passing action while singing. Remind students which hand is active. Review the action from “Engine #9” with the “Obwisana” recording. The students’ left hand should be behind their left hip while seated so that their neighbor can reach it to place the object in the left hand. (Shells) Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: As children become more proficient. pass it. 172 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . The right hand is still active and passes the object from their left hand to their neighbor’s left hand. hand out a stone to each child. there will be another game from America with a slightly different passing action. Have students sing along as they become familiar with the song. Have students pat the beat while listening. There is a version of this game in Share the Music where the pattern is: pick it up. grade 3 and Spotlight on Music . Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Closure Activities: Have students compare and contrast the two games played so far.K. Have students pat the beat with just their right hand. pass around a rock or stone. Play a recording of “Obwisana” from Share the Music. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Play “Bob-a-Needle” from Shake It To the One That You Love the Best. Have students tap the beat with their right hand only on the floor while singing. Ask what resources the children who live near the coast in Ghana may use. thumb (right).SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Review the passing action for the game and what happens to the passing action when the tempo gets faster. thumb (left). Next class. Day 2: African Children’s Game Warm-Up: Review the song “Engine #9” with the passing action. there will be a game from Africa with something different being passed. Once the passing action is mastered. Discuss with students where the song originates and the use of natural resources by children playing the game.Prince George’s County Public Schools . Next class. Review the passing action for the two games and what happens to the passing action when the tempo gets faster. using a Venn diagram.

After practice passing one stick. have students listen again to the recording for the words ”triqui. A brief discussion of the history of the game would be appropriate here. Next class. a small sewing needle case would be most authentic.” Review what happened with the tempo in “Obwisana. there will be another game in a different language where a stone is passed but from America instead of Africa.SAMPLE LESSONS Guided Practice Activities: Students should be able to maintain the passing action while singing the song. have students compare and contrast all of the games played so far. triqui. Closure Activities: Review which games had songs sung in a different language and where they were from. the person holding the stick taps it twice in front of them before passing it on. there will be another game from Latin America with something different being passed.) The same thing happens with “Acitron.” but this time passing another item from the natural environment . grade 3 and Spotlight on Music . For this reason.6. The game is played with someone in the middle trying to guess who has the needle case by the end of the song. Next class. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: When students are proficient at the game with one stick. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Closure Activities: Review the passing action for “Bob-a-Needle” and what happens to the tempo for this game. using a Venn diagram with additional circles. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Have students pat the beat while listening.a stick. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the action from “Engine #9” and “Obwisana. tron. Review which game had a stone being passed. After playing.” On these words. Day 4: Latin American Children’s Game Warm-Up: Have students listen to the recording of “Acitron” from Share the Music. sharing with students the idea that slave children did not have many toys and often had to make do with whatever was handy. Practice passing around a small object that can be hidden in their hands while being passed. have students compare and contrast all the games played so far.” (It. After playing.Prince George’s County Public Schools 173 . distribute sticks to the entire circle. using a Venn diagram with three circles. got faster. if available.

cross. Have students pat the beat with both hands while singing. Guided Practice Activities: Have students try this standing in a circle. using a Venn diagram. When this action is mastered. Guided Practice Activities: Demonstrate the actions using the two pats on each of the following verbal cues: straight. Have students compare and contrast all the games played so far. demonstrate how the stone is hidden in the left hand on the first two pats.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 5: Native American Children’s Game Warm-Up: Sing “Engine #9” at a slow tempo.” Practice this with the “Sara Watashi” song. Pat the beat with both hands to match the tempo. out. straight. Review the passing action for “Bob-a-Needle” and where the hands were for the passing action. Closure Activities: Day 6: Japanese Children’s Game Warm-Up: Have students listen to the recording of “Sara Watashi” from Spotlight on Music – 1 and pat the beat. and then hand to the right side neighbor on the “out” part of the pattern. Students will need to be standing shoulder to shoulder to hide the plate from the person in the center. switched to the right hand on the cross. Sing Up the Corn using the Cheyenne language. hidden in the right hand during the next two pats. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Teach the “Cheyenne Hand Game” from Dance Down the Rain. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . there will be another game from Japan with something different being passed behind the back. using a Venn diagram with additional circles.Prince George’s County Public Schools 174 . Practice with a paper plate. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Play the game with a standing circle and with the recording. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the action for “Bob-a-Needle. Next class. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Play this game as a hiding game with a person in the center trying to guess who has the stone. Have students compare and contrast the three games played so far.

” The left hand is holding the string ready to receive the ring from the neighbor. 1 – Students are attempting to follow the directions for playing the game but are not able to maintain the pattern in tempo with the music. Day 7: Jamaican Children’s Game Warm-Up: Play the song “Biddy Hold On” from Share the Music.SAMPLE LESSONS Closure Activities: Review the passing action for the “Cheyenne Hand Game” and what happens to the tempo for this game. Teacher should walk around the circle with a long length of string. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: This is a hiding game also with someone in the center trying to guess who has the ring by the end of the song. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Have students stand as in the plate passing game. Next class.Prince George’s County Public Schools 175 . Tie a ring onto the string. They should also write down which game was their favorite and give specific details about the game to support their answer. 2 – Students are attempting to follow the directions for playing the game and are somewhat able to maintain the pattern in tempo with the music.): 4 – Students are consistently following the directions for playing the game and are able to maintain the pattern in tempo with the music. using a Venn diagram on paper. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Assessment: Observe students as they are playing any or all of the games and assess using the following rubric. (This could be done as a final test at the conclusion or as an on-going assessment through the unit. Have students keep the beat using the action from “Bob-a-Needle” and the plate passing game from Japan. 3 – Students are generally following the directions for playing the game and are somewhat able to maintain the pattern in tempo with the music. there will be another game from Latin America with something different being passed. Each person should grasp the string with their knuckles up and fingers curled over the string. grade 3. Their right hand is active moving from their own left hand picking up the ring and moving it to the right side neighbor’s left hand. Guided Practice Activities: The ring will be passed along the string using a motion similar to “Bob-a-Needle. 0 – Students are not following the directions and not able to maintain the tempo. have students compare and contrast any two games played. As a final review of the games.

0 – Students did not respond. 2 – Students clearly stated their preference but did not support with details about the game.SAMPLE LESSONS Scoring tool for the final comparison of two games: 4 – Students were able to correctly identify two things the same and two things different about the games they selected and something about tempo was included in the comparison. 2 – Students were able to correctly identify only one thing the same or one thing different about the games they selected and nothing about tempo was included in the comparison. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 3 – Students were able to correctly identify two things the same or two things different about the games they selected and something about tempo was included in the comparison. 0 – Students did not respond. 1 – Students attempted to respond but answer was inappropriate or incomplete. 1 – Students attempted to respond but answer was unclear or incomplete. Closure Activities: Ask students to define tempo and give examples of how the tempo could be shown from the music done in this unit. Rubric for their response to the writing prompt about which game was their favorite: 4 – Students clearly stated and fully supported their preference using specific details about the game. 3 – Students clearly stated and somewhat supported their preference using general details about the game.Prince George’s County Public Schools 176 .

1) Construct support for individual interests in different styles and kinds of music. (Third Grade Reading Theme 2 is called “Celebrating Traditions. Distribute copies of the song or the textbook. “Twinkle. Have the groups pick a familiar tune to use to create a new birthday song.” This would be a nice link for students.2) Explain preferences for songs to sing. and be prepared to perform it for the class. (II. Twinkle. Point out the customs that are most common. Discuss whether people in other countries celebrate birthdays. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Discuss birthday customs that students have in their own families.” “Old MacDonald.4. Ask students to identify the country that is our neighbor to the south. Give students an opportunity to sing the song with the recording. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Divide students into cooperative groups. Inform students that they are going to hear a song sung as a birthday song by people in Mexico. Go over the Spanish words in the song. Play “Las Mananitas” from Share the Music.A.e. (IV.” “If You’re Happy and You Know It.B. Review meter by conducting triple meter while singing. The groups should then make up new words for the song. In addition this theme has a section on salsa music. i. instruments to play. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . (IV.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 – Lesson 3 Lesson Title: R W Birthday Songs Overview: Students will sing birthday songs from two cultures in order to create a new birthday song by writing new words to a familiar tune.” etc. practice it together as a group.” substituting ‘anybody’ for a person’s name.Prince George’s County Public Schools 177 . which would provide another link for this lesson. music for listening and related activities.A.A. Point out that the Mexican people sing in the same language that they speak.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Sing a variety of western and non-western folk and composed songs including those in other languages.1) Sing “Happy Birthday. grade 4 or 6 and Spotlight on Music .1) Compare the music for various groups of people as a part of everyday life. (II. Guided Practice Activities: Discuss what language is spoken in Mexico.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 178 . 2 – Students create part of the birthday song but are not able to perform it with their group. Encourage students to find out how people in other countries celebrate as well as how other members of their extended family celebrate birthdays Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 3 – Students create and perform part of a birthday song with a group.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Observe students as they are working and assess using the following rubric: 4 – Students create and perform a new birthday song with a group. 1 – Students attempted to create part of the birthday song but did not finish. Closure Activities: Review birthday customs and compare to Mexico. 0 – Students made no attempt to complete the task.

A. Discuss how dynamics could make the story more interesting. B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 179 .1) Sequence the events in a musical drama. The crocodile has a big smile. D.C. sequencing the events in the following manner: A. (I. Guided Practice Activities: Have students make a cartoon of this story. grade 3 by rote. E. (Third grade Reading Theme 3 called “Incredible Stories” could be linked to this lesson. Have students take home the cartoon and perform it for a family member. (I. The crocodile is shown winking his eye as the lady waves to the crowd. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Perform the song with movements and dynamics. The crocodile and lady sail past the pyramids on the Nile River.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 – Lesson 4 Lesson Title: R W Dynamics and Drama in “Crocodile Song” Overview: Students will use dynamics and movements in order to dramatize the story of this song and then create a sequence chain in cartoon form. Draw a picture of the lady sailing on the back of the crocodile on a bright and sunny day. Try out some of the students’ ideas. (II. F.” Show the dynamics of the music by opening and closing hands (alligator jaws). Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Teach “The Crocodile Song” from Music and You. and accent using appropriate musical terms. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . decrescendo.C.1) Play “Alligator Jaws” game using the “Dance of the Comedians. The lady is shown petting the crocodile. The crocodile is shown moving the opposite way and the lady is seen inside the crocodile.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Describe characteristics of music such as crescendo. C. Add the movement directions suggested in the Teachers Manual.2) Interpret music in free and patterned forms in various meters using body movements.

0 – Students made no attempt to complete the task. movements and draw cartoon using the directions given. movements and draw one of the pictures suing the directions given. movements and draw three of the pictures using the directions given 1 – Students use very few of the dynamics.Prince George’s County Public Schools 180 .SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students use proper dynamics. 3 – Students use most of the dynamics. movements and draw four of the pictures using the directions given 2 – Students use some of the dynamics. Closure Activities: Review how the dynamics and the movements added expression to the story and review the sequence of events from the cartoon. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • Sing simple melodic patterns containing “do” and “re” using hand signs.D. Re.A.” (Part of the lesson for reading is to write lyrics for an opening song to go with the cartoon. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Introduce the song “Hot Cross Buns” using hand signs and their names.3) Read and perform simple melodic notation including half notes. Perform the story with the song and sound effects.B. Add song effects to other parts of the story. (III.1) Improvise simple pentatonic ostinati to accompany familiar songs. Then add the words.1) Read and sing “mi-re-do” patterns as notated on the music staff.1) Review the “Dogzilla” cartoon story that is part of the Reading instruction for Theme 3 “Incredible Stories.) Review the hand sins for Sol. (II. Echo sing simple four beat melody patterns with hand signs.1) Select and play instruments to match the mood of extra musical ideas.B. Have students make up melody patterns that could be played on tone bar instruments with the new song. The reading lesson suggests using Old MacDonald however the same thing could be done in music class with the addition of writing down the melody notes with the song “Hot Cross Buns”. (I. and Do.D.2) Sequence the events in a musical drama. (I. Evaluate the performance.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W Cartoon Tunes Overview: Students will create song lyrics in order to have an opening song for a cartoon using a familiar melody. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Discuss the story and how the tune of “Hot Cross Buns” might be rewritten to fit the story.C.Prince George’s County Public Schools 181 . Notate the song using a two line staff on the board. (III. Discuss what needs to be improved. Mi. La. Have students work together to write new words for an opening song for the cartoon. (I. Practice singing the new words.

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 2 – Students contributed to the group composition but did not perform it or performed it but did not help with the composition.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Observe students as they create and perform their new words and music using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students contributed consistently to the group composition and performed it. 3 – Students contributed occasionally to the group composition and performed it. 1 – Students made a minimal attempt to be part of the group work in either composition or performance.Prince George’s County Public Schools 182 . 0 – Students made no attempt to contribute to group work. Closure Activities: Think about other television shows or commercials that have music.

first as the teacher plays it on the piano and then as it is heard in the musical listening.” students show how many fingers they were hiding. (This lesson may need to be done in two – three class periods.B.3) Read and perform simple rhythmic and melodic notation including half notes. Ha.1) Play “Magic Number. divide the class into one additional group and add the melodic ostinato.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 – Lesson 6 Lesson Title: Melodic ostinato with “Laugh. Then switch parts. write five rhythmic patterns on the board. Have the students follow the half note melodic ostinato.2) Sing simple melodic patterns. Practice singing this pattern alone.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Maintain tempo and pitch while singing familiar rounds. Isolate the pattern for the first phrase of the song. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Listen to “Pachelbel Canon” from Silver Burdett Music. grade 5.” Before class. Then sing this pattern while the teacher sings the song melody. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the song “Laugh. (I. Guided Practice Activities: Divide the class into two groups having one half sing the pattern while the other half sings the song melody. Ha. The patterns will contain half notes as well as other rhythmic notation already studied. When teacher says “Show me your magic number.Prince George’s County Public Schools 183 . For additional challenge. Repeat at least four times. Students identify one of the five patterns clapped by the teacher by hiding the correct number of fingers behind their backs. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Relate this ostinato to the one that the students have just performed with the song “Laugh. (I. Sing the song as a round.” Divide the class in half and review the song with the melodic ostinato.D. Ha” Overview: Students will recognize a half note in order to sing and play a melodic ostinato pattern that contains a half note. Ha.B. Ha. Give everyone a chance to sing the melodic ostinato part. (I. Ha” from Share the Music. the teacher sings the pattern while the class sings the song melody. Songs to Sing and Read.

1 – Students sang the melody rather than the ostinato.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess while observing the students as they perform the melodic ostinato. 3 – Students generally maintained the ostinato while others sang the melody 2 – Students attempted the ostinato but could not maintain it while others sang the melody. Closure Activities: Review the concept of ostinato by clapping patterns that are and are not an ostinato and have the students stand when they hear an ostinato.Prince George’s County Public Schools 184 . 0 – Students did not respond. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 4 – Students consistently maintained the ostinato while others sang the melody.

Cinderella. 3 – Students drew pictures. 2 – Students listened to the music but their pictures did not demonstrate an understanding of the sequence of the story. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . which demonstrated an understanding of the sequence of the story while listening to the music without talking. Sorcerer’s Apprentice. 1 – Students listened to the music but did not attempt any pictures.Grade 3 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity R W Musical Drama Overview: Students will draw scenes from a musical drama while listening in order to recognize the sequence. which may be used to familiarize students with the stories. Have students draw pictures to demonstrate an understanding of the sequence of the story while listening to excerpts from the musical dramas. as well. (Third Grade Reading Theme 5 called “Voyagers” has comprehension instruction for predicting outcomes. (There are picture books and/or videos with these stories. Any of the stories could be used for reinforcement of these skills.C. (II. Hansel and Gretel. which demonstrated an understanding of the sequence of the story while listening to the music with some talking.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Sequence the events in a musical drama. etc.) Distribute a sequence chain.Prince George’s County Public Schools 185 .1) Discuss the story in a drama like The Nutcracker. 0 – Students were not listening to the music or attempting any pictures. Activity: Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students drew pictures.

(I. 3 – Students created a melody with no more than two errors in melodic notation and performed it with no more than two errors for the class.Grade 3 – Lesson 8 Lesson Title: SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity Melody in “Bonefish.Prince George’s County Public Schools 186 . 1 – Students attempted to create a melody but could not perform it for the class. (I.D. have the students review the pattern for “mi-re-do” at the top of the sheet. and mi. students will learn to write melodies in order to compose a melody for the words of a song using these melody notes. 2 – Students created a melody with numerous melodic notation errors and could not perform it for the class. re.D. 0 – Students did not respond. Have students compose a melody for the first three lines of this song and write it on their own paper. Activity: Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students created a melody using the correct melody notes and performed it correctly for the class. Students should be prepared to perform their melody for the class by singing their new melody.2) Using the worksheet included with this lesson. Bluebird” Overview: Following instruction on reading melodies using do. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Read and perform simple rhythmic and melodic notation. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .1) Read and sing “mi-re-do” patterns in various keys as notated on the music staff.

Prince George’s County Public Schools 187 . Frog in the pool. ro . Bluebird Compose a melody for the first three lines using mi. Fly in the cream jar. Sheep and flea. and do by writing the melody notes on the blank lines above the words using the rhythm notes given. Mi Re Do Bone - fish. doo – dle bug. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Blue .SAMPLE LESSONS Bonefish. Clap for all the child - ren here at school.bird. Be prepared to sing what you have written. re.bins in a tree. Chick a - dee.

and children) as well as instrumental pieces and singing with instruments.Grade 3 – Lesson 9 Lesson Title: SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity Personal Preferences Overview: Students will write about their favorite song using musical terms in order to give support for their preference. meter.1) Construct support for individual interests in different styles and kinds of music.1) Explain preferences for songs to sing. 3 – Students clearly stated and supported their preference using at least one of the musical terms correctly and indicating the type of voices or instruments.B.Prince George’s County Public Schools 188 .A. (Be sure to use four of the musical terms in your supporting statement as well as some information on what type of singing or instruments or both you hear. rhythm. Have students complete the following writing activity.A. female. dynamics and meter using musical terms.) Activity: Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students clearly stated and fully supported their preference using at least three of the musical terms correctly and indicating the type of voices or instruments. tempo. (I. 1 – Students clearly stated but did not support their preference or used the musical terms incorrectly. and form. My favorite song is _________________ because ______________________________ ___________________________________________________________________ .1) Discuss/review the definitions for musical terms like melody. Discuss/review different singing and speaking voices (male. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . 2 – Students clearly stated and somewhat supported their preference using at least one of the musical terms correctly or indicating the type of voices or instruments. music for listening and related activities. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Define tempo. 0 – Students did not respond. (IV. (IV. dynamics.

Discuss what the producers of the music (the performers) would prefer and why. 2 – Students clearly stated but did not support their preference. Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students clearly stated and fully supported their preference. 3 – Students clearly stated and somewhat supported their preference. 0 – Students did not respond. have students listen to a taped recording of a performance as well as watch a video of a performance. a video of a performance. or a tape recording or CD of the performance. Briefly discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each type of performance from the position of a consumer of music. Have students complete the following statement: If I had a choice of spending money on a concert ticket. I would spend my money on _________________ because ______________________________________________ . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .SAMPLE LESSONS Alternative Activity: This addresses the following indicator as well: Experience a live performance outside the school setting and compare to recorded performances. 1 – Students attempted to answer but did not respond appropriately. Following a performance of the school chorus or band. both audio and video.Prince George’s County Public Schools 189 .

rollins. String Theme (Peter) http://library. Explain the purpose for a chosen media format.) Indicators from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Sequence events in a musical drama.1) Explain preferences for songs to sing. or as a home to school project. instruments to play. Students will respond in writing to the following question: Which picture represents the music you are listening to? They should be prepared to explain your answer. Identify use text features to facilitate understanding of informational text.B. 1) Construct perspectives from listening to western instrumental music from various historical periods. Sidebars. (II. (II. (II.C.” (This lesson can be implemented in a whole class setting.D.Prince George’s County Public Schools 190 .html Play the excerpt on the following site: • Musical Selection: “Peter and the Wolf”. music for listening and related activities. and Homepages. Identify examples of how technology has affected the environment past and present. Recognize and use online text features including URLs.edu/Foreign_Lang/Russian/frame4. (IV. in a classroom center.html • Above Eternal Peace (Russian artist Isaac II’ich Levitan) http://www. Display the images located on the following websites: • Two Figures (Russian artist Liubov' Sergeevna Popova) http://www.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 3 .1) Student Standards for Technology Literacy Addressed in this Lesson: • • • • • • Understand that some programs require connection to the Internet.Lesson 10 Lesson Title: “Peter and the Wolf” Listening Map Overview: Student will listen to and classify string and woodwind instrument in order to understand the choices Prokofiev made in selecting instruments when he composed “Peter and The Wolf.A.1) Listen to orchestral music which features string and woodwind instruments to introduce classification terms: chordophones and aerophones. Use of removable storage including floppy disk.rollins.org/17321/data/pwmusic. Drop down menus. Hypertext links.edu/Foreign_Lang/Russian/frame3.thinkquest.html Warm-up: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

org/17321/data/quiz.org/17321/data/pandw. The students should find a picture of the instrument and listen to its sound as a solo instrument and in an ensemble to determine their response.co. Explain the factors influencing a composer’s decision to use an instrument such as.html Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .html Narrated story with orchestral sounds (PowerPoint) http://www.thinkquest. Microsoft Word.net/technology/instruct/lessons/elementary/animals/wolf/aspeter.asp?id=4 Guided Practice Activities: Tell the story of “Peter and the Wolf” and explore the characters and their instruments using any of the following resources: Online text of “Peter and the Wolf“(Print Material is also noted in this plan).ppt Matching Instruments to Characters (PowerPoint) http://www.ppt “Peter and the Wolf” instruments no sound (PowerPoint) www.org/view_interactive.com/shows/showdesc.educationworld.htm The students will use group response to classify instruments using the Hornbostel-Sachs system for classification. idiophones. tone quality and range and identify means of sound production of the instruments by using the following website: DSOKids. http://library. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Students can begin their independent work by taking an online quiz.) Classics for Kids. (Download Flash: 6:01min. Inspiration.html Web Investigation of “Peter and the Wolf” http://library.classicsforkids.aspx?id=127&title • Education World (Downloadable Word Template): http://www.lexington1.com/downloads/Peter and the Wolfppp.SAMPLE LESSONS Introductory and Developmental Activities: Explain that composers can use music to tell a story or communicate their ideas. Introduce Sergei Prokofiev.com/2001/instrumentchart.dsokids.thinkquest. “Peter and the Wolf” Quiz.sover.doc • The following software can also be used to create a graphic organizer: Kidspiration. or membranophones in creating the instructor led web graphic organizer.uk/music/powerpoint/peter_and_the_wolf_2.org/17321/data/estext. http://library.com/tools_templates/sm_nov2002. and Microsoft PowerPoint. http://www.thinkquest. http://www.Prince George’s County Public Schools 191 .ppt Instruments in “Peter and The Wolf“(PowerPoint) http://www. In this lesson include the following: aerophones. Listen to an online radio broadcast highlighting the life and music of the composer. chordophones.net/~fcsu/gceit/ajarvis%20grade%203%20music%20powerpoint%20appendix .ppt Help the students identify the characters and the instruments Prokofiev uses to portray them recording their answers on a graphic organizer. Graphic Organizer Websites and Resources • RWT Webbings Tool: http://interactives.primaryresources.mped.musiceducationmadness.

However. Listening Map Example: Sound and Stories (PDF doc. How would a modern composer like Quincy Jones set the story to music? What instruments would he use? • If you were a musician in the National Symphony Orchestra. 4 – Reflections in the journal response are expressed using complete sentences. 2 – Reflections in the journal are loosely expressed and are not detailed or clear in expressing the opinions of the writer. Allow the students to independently review the websites used in class to support their work.cincinnatisymphony. 1 – The listening map shows a loose connection to the musical themes presented in the selection. which instrument would you play and why? Assessment: Assess student’s listening map using the following rubric: 4 – The listening map shows the relationship between characters and instruments in the correct order. p. contain clear and detailed explanations to questions using three or more sentences.pdf The students will respond to the following writing prompts in their journals: • What are your feelings about Prokofiev’s instrument choices in “Peter and the Wolf”? • Prokofiev was born in 1891.20) http://www.SAMPLE LESSONS Students will create a sequential listening map of “Peter and the Wolf” which identifies the characters and predominant instruments as they appear in the story. 2 – There is not an apparent relationship between the characters portrayed in the music and the instruments and one or more items is out of sequence. 3 – Reflections in the journal response are expressed using complete sentences and exhibit a degree of reflection on the part of the writer. Paint. 0 – No response to assigned task Closure Activities: Allow student time to share their responses in their journal entries. 1 – Reflections are incomplete or have insufficient detail for the reader to understand the opinion of the writer.Prince George’s County Public Schools 192 .17 . 0 – No response to assigned task Assess student responses to journal prompts using the following rubric.org/PDF/SoundsandStories05. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . The students can use Microsoft Word. the explanations or opinions expressed are not clear. PowerPoint or scan a painting or drawing of their map to create a digital file. 3 – The listening map shows the sequence of events but does not accurately depict the relationship of characters to their instruments. and demonstrate a high level of reflection on the part of the writer.

htm For more information on Hornbostel-Sachs classifications go to: MSN Encarta. http://encarta. Maria. • Peter and the Wolf Vagin.org/Peter%20and%20the%20Wolf2.net/videos/peterandthewolf2. United Streaming (3:34/9:20) http://www. • Peter and the Wolf Gukova. • Peter and the Wolf Wiencirz.toonzone. Vladimir.Prince George’s County Public Schools 193 . Patricia.pdf Journal Sheet. Selina. • Peter and the Wolf Prado. Julia. http://www. • Peter and the Wolf Cooney. • Peter and the Wolf Chappell.com The Hunter’s Theme (32 seconds) http://disneyshorts. Michèle.mov Printable Materials Not Just for Kids. • Peter and the Wolf Crampton. Ian. Gerlinde.msn. http://readwritethink.html Listening Map. http://www.com/year98/kids6_10.electricteacher.cincinnatisymphony.org/lesson_images/lesson313/journal-sheet. • Peter and the Wolf Lemieux. http://www. Erna. • Peter and the Wolf Carlson. Miguelanxo. • Peter and the Wolf Voigt. • Peter and the Wolf Hastings. Max and All His Instruments.org/PDF/SoundsandStories05.genevacsd.bayweekly.” Musical Max. Barbara. Warren.com Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .pdf Tutorials PowerPoint Tutorial.SAMPLE LESSONS Additional Lesson Materials: Print/Audio Materials: • Sergei Prokofiev’s “Peter and the Wolf” and the Cincinnati Symphony (includes CD) • Peter and the Wolf(mechanical book) Viking Kestrel • Peter and the Wolf Beck.com/tutorial3. Retold(PowerPoint Presentation) http://www.unitedstreaming.htm Videos “Part I.

Students can evaluate both their individual performance as well as that of the ensemble given specific criteria and then make necessary improvements to the performance. or music reading activities for warm-ups will help with transitions. Asking students to repeat directions before starting an activity is wise especially if the directions are complicated. A variety of assessment strategies for this age is important.SAMPLE LESSONS The lesson plan for Intermediate students can involve the integration of musical concepts or skills. listening to a new song with a specific purpose. for example. then finding them in a new song. It is again best to limit directions to two or three at a time. Guidelines for Recommended Music Activities in Intermediate Grades Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . The performance experience should focus on mastery of individual skills as well as a quality ensemble sound. Students in the Intermediate grades can handle cooperative group activities as well as whole group experiences. more focused listening experiences. students need instruction in how to play instruments correctly and with care. The same can be applied to evaluating musical performances. The rhythm and melody can be taught in isolation but should eventually be integrated as part of the musical experience. Cooperative group activities need to be monitored closely for on task behavior. The statement of the objective should introduce students to music terminology but link the musical terms to language that students will understand. the integration of the instruction of the musical elements contained in a song and an analysis of the lyrics of the music would be appropriate for this age. Again. They should have the opportunity to follow the musical score with guidance to increase their musical literacy. Students on this level need to be able to interpret the lyrics of the music and analyze what they lyrics say about the people who sing the song both culturally and historically. Criteria for determining the grade should be shared with students so that they know how they will be assessed. Closure should summarize the focus of that day’s lesson as well as prepare for the following lesson. Games to assist with music notation skills can be beneficial but the skills need to be extended to include an authentic performance experience. Again. The teacher directed activities could include more teacher talk than in the primary lesson but still needs to be interactive so that students are engaged. Intermediate students can sing longer songs with more complicated melodies. However. Careful assessment of students’ skills and knowledge prior to the introduction of new music learning is critical. Encouraging students to then perform the music reflecting the culture of the people who performed the music in the past or in another culture helps to develop musical sensitivity. individual assessment. Students should be encouraged to be specific in using the music vocabulary when doing this type of activity. one activity can lead into the next. Composition and improvisation within structured guidelines is appropriate at this age. echo experiences. This age student will need assistance to develop the appropriate music vocabulary to discuss the listening experience and this may need to be modeled by the teacher. and written assessment activities is important. Students this age are ready to experience longer. clapping rhythm patterns. If students are weak in prerequisite skills. Where it is available. There can be more development of a musical concept in an intermediate lesson but this should still be done through a variety of activities. Students should be able to sing and play at the same time. The warm-up should introduce the objective without much discussion. it is important that those skills be part of the instruction for new learning. Instrument skills can be more complex with a higher level of mastery.Prince George’s County Public Schools 194 . and then playing them on instruments during the performance of the song. Singing familiar songs. Integration of whole group assessment. Having students complete writing activities to demonstrate an understanding of the lyrics is appropriate and can be handled in a variety of ways as suggested by many of the sample lessons included here. Communication about these criteria should be stated frequently so that students have a goal to work towards through the musical experience. technology can be integrated into music lessons at this level.

or elaborate on a concept or skill taught? Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .Prince George’s County Public Schools 195 . Refinement. prepare. and Practice Activities: What opportunities will students have to use the new skills and concepts in a meaningful way? How will students expand and solidify their understanding of the concept and apply it to a real-world situation? How will students demonstrate their mastery of the essential learning outcomes? 5 minutes Assessment Formative Assessment: How will you monitor student progress throughout the lesson? Summative Assessment: How will you ensure that all students have mastered the identified learning indicators? How will you assess their learning? Daily and end of unit. 5 minutes Closure Activities: How will you assist students in reflecting upon what they learned today and are preparing for tomorrow’s lesson? What homework will be assigned to help students practice.SAMPLE LESSONS LESSON PLANNER – INTERMEDIATE DIRECTED TEACHING ACTIVITY PLANNER – 30 MINUTE LESSON Focusing Student Attention Statement of Objective: What should students know and do as a result of the lesson? Times approximate: 5 minutes Introductory and/or Developmental Activities Warm-Up: How will you engage students in learning? How will you connect the lesson to their prior knowledge? Teacher Directed Activities: How will you aid students in constructing meaning of new concepts? How will you introduce/model new skills or procedures? 5 minutes Guided Practice Teacher-Monitored Activities: What will students do together to use new concepts or skills? How will you assist students in this process? 10 minutes Independent Activities and/or Meaningful-Use Tasks Extension.

Add the words.B. The Reading Theme includes a section on reading and analyzing song lyrics with cowboy songs. (III.B. Guided Practice Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 196 . Have students read the notes on the sheet with hand signs.1) Evaluate individual performances for the reflection of cultural authenticity.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: R W Colonial games Overview: Students will sing Colonial work and game songs for children in order to discuss the historical context.D. (I. (I.D.1) Examine the use of musical elements and perform music using the style reflective of that culture.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • • • • • • • • Perform simple melodic ostinati to accompany songs.3) Describe how music reflects traditions in various cultures.A.A.B. (I. Discuss octaves. Have students read the notes for the melodic ostinati.A. (I. responding to conducting cues.B.2) Sing and play classroom instruments in an ensemble. (I. (II. (IV. That type of comprehension development could be reinforced in these lessons.2) Perform music with appropriate expression as indicated by the written score.D. (II.B.B.1) Summarize ways in which people from diverse cultures enjoy performing and creating music. Find the pattern that has the octave.2) Sing and summarize the historical context of early American music such as folk songs.2) Improvise pentatonic melodies on keyboard instruments. (I.1) Day 1: Pentatonic Song Review Warm-Up: Echo sing with hand signs several patterns using notes in pentatonic.1) Identify and sing octaves as notated on the treble staff. (IV.1) Sing simple melodic patterns containing high “do” using hand signs. (II.A. (II. (The Fourth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “American Stories” would be a nice link to this unit. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Pass out the song sheet included with this lesson.1) Perform children’s game songs from various historical periods and cultures.3) Read and perform simple melodic notation. This unit may take several lessons.

3. 3 – Students generally maintain the melodic ostinato while singing the song. Stay with pentatonic notes for this activity. grade 4 and Spotlight on Music . What job was the song about? Ask how many kids have to help do laundry for their chores. Sing the song while playing the instruments. Complete a Venn diagram with information discussed in class. It may be easier with the F and B bars removed from the instruments. Give the students two or three notes to use for their ostinato. 3 – Students generally maintain their own melodic ostinato using the assigned notes while singing the song. 2 – Students can generally maintain the melodic ostinato but not while singing the song. 1 – Students are attempting to play their own melodic ostinato but are not attempting to sing. the song will be reviewed and information about the people who sing and the jobs they do will be shared. Let them know that that is something that they have in common with kids in Colonial times. Assess students as they are composing a new melodic ostinato using the following rubric: 4 – Students consistently maintain their own melodic ostinato using the assigned notes while singing the song.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Play the melodic ostinati on classroom melody instruments. 0 – Students are not attempting the melodic ostinato or singing. Review the song “Pity My Case” from the last class. Assessment: Assess students as they are playing the melodic ostinato using the following rubric: 4 – Students consistently maintain the melodic ostinato while singing the song. Ask students to think about what the job was for the song from this lesson. Discuss how doing laundry is different today from Colonial times. This song is also included in the Reading Theme 2. Closure Activities: During the next class. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 197 . Switch groups who compose a new ostinati and give them new notes to use so that all students have an opportunity. 0 – Students are not attempting the melodic ostinato or singing the song. Have small groups make up their own ostinato to add to the song. 1 – Students are attempting to play the melodic ostinato or attempting to sing. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Briefly introduce how life was different for the early colonists from what it is today. Day 2: Colonial Work Songs Warm-Up: Play “When I First Came to This Land” from Share the Music. Ask students how many of them have to do chores today. Discuss who would sing this song. This lesson will look at what kids did in Colonial times compared to today. 2 – Students generally maintain their own melodic ostinato but did not use the assigned notes while singing the song.

Guided Practice Activities: Discuss what type of work was in today’s song. review “Pity My Case. grade 3 and Spotlight on Music . Compare to work of today.” Introductory and Developmental Activities: Share information with the class about different social classes during Colonial times (i. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 198 .1. Demonstrate with a group of four then let the whole class try it in groups of four. Talk about how the lyrics would change to sing about the different steps to getting the laundry done. wealthy landowners – gentry. Share with students that singing together with their family was another form of recreation for kids during Colonial times. Listen to “Draw a Bucket of Water” from Share the Music. Discuss which classes were singing while they were working (all but gentry and poor). middle class – middling sort. Closure Activities: Play the song “The Green Grass Grew All Around” from Spotlight on Music .e. Day 3: Colonial Games Warm-Up: Listen to “The Distressed Damsel” from Voices of American History . Share the game that goes with “Draw a Bucket of Water” from Step It Down. poor and unemployed). Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Discuss the steps to getting the laundry done in Colonial times. servants – indentured servants.Colonial America. Ask students to think of work that is done by kids today that Colonial kids did not have to do.3. If that is not available. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Discuss what kids get to do after their chores are done today. slaves. Closure Activities: Discuss what other chores Colonial kids might have to do and compare to today’s kids. Share with students that the same song was sung by indentured servants and slaves although with different singing styles. (play) Same was true in Colonial times.SAMPLE LESSONS Guided Practice Activities: Review the song and add actions to show the work the song lyrics tell about.

” and “Green Grass Grew All Around. 3 – Prompt is generally well written with the proper form and somewhat accurate historical/cultural information.’ let them ‘play’ one more time the games that go with “Draw a Bucket of Water” or “London Bridge.” “Draw a Bucket of Water. Assessment: Scoring tool for the Colonial writing prompt: 4 – Prompt is completely written with the proper form and accurate historical/cultural information.” Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the Venn diagram from the earlier lesson. Compare today’s jobs to what you know about the jobs that Colonial children had to do. 2 – Attempt is made to answer the prompt but information was generally inaccurate or incomplete. Select one of the Colonial work songs sung in music class and write down new words you might use in the song telling about one of jobs you have to do around your house. Grade drops one letter grade for missing music information. Distribute copies of a Venn diagram for students to complete for their selected chore. Pretend you are writing a report for a Colonial child telling them about the kinds of jobs or chores children have to do in today’s world. 0 – Students did not respond. Discuss in class how students should complete the prompt. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students respond to the following prompt.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 4: Comparing Colonial Times to Today Warm-Up: Review “Pity My Case. Closure Activities: After students turn in their ‘work.” “When I First Came to this Land.” Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 199 . Guided Practice Activities: Have students select a chore that they do today and compare it to something that Colonial kids had to do. Give students time to complete their response at home as homework or provide time in class for students to work on this. 1 – Limited attempt is made to answer the prompt.

In some la - dy’s gar - den. Clothes to wash when I get home. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 200 .SAMPLE LESSONS Pity My Case Do Do Pi .ty my case. In some la - dy’s gar - den.

(II. Read the book and show the Reading Rainbow video to go along with the song. Groups should each perform their new version of the verse of the song for the class. The class should join in singing the response and refrain.) Discuss the use of these songs as code songs for the Underground Railroad. Guided Practice Activities: Play “Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd” from Share the Music . (IV. Sweet Chariot. Review call and response. Possible songs include: “Get On Board.” Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Review “This Little Light of Mine” from the beginning of class. Sing other spirituals and examine the lyrics for possible codes.” and “When the Saints Go Marching In. (II.6 and Spotlight on Music .A.2) Sing and summarize the historical context of early American music such as spirituals.5. (Spirituals sung by African Americans. (II. Discuss Underground Railroad history. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Discuss what kind of song this is and who would sing this song.B.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • Describe how music reflects traditions in various cultures. Have students learn the song.” “All Night.A. (Fourth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “American Stories” or Theme 4 called “Problem Solvers” would be a nice link to this unit. (IV. Discuss the specific codes in the song.1) Evaluate individual performances for the reflection of cultural authenticity.1) Examine the use of musical elements and perform music using the style reflective of that culture. All Day.1) Sing “This Little Light of Mine” from Spotlight on Music – 2. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 201 . Each group should make up new words for the calls that would be codes for the Underground Railroad.A.” “Swing Low.B. Students may join in if they know it.1) Summarize ways in which people from diverse cultures enjoy performing and creating music. Have students form cooperative groups.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title: R W Music of the Underground Railroad Overview: Students will sing African American spirituals in order to discuss the historical context and their use as code songs.

0 – Students did not attempt a new verse. Closure Activities: Think of other spirituals that students may know and discuss the codes in those songs.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess students as they are singing their new verse using the following rubric: 4 – Students created and sang a new verse for the song that showed an understanding of the codes used for the Underground Railroad. 3 – Students created and sang part of a new verse for the song that showed an understanding of the codes used for the Underground Railroad. Extension: The resource Music of the Underground Railroad by Kim and Reggie Harris provides excellent information on this topic as well as a recording of many of the spirituals used on the Underground Railroad. 2 – Students created a new verse for the song that showed an understanding of the codes used for the Underground Railroad but were not able to sing it. 1 – Students attempted to create a new verse for the song but did not finish and were not able to sing it. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 202 .

) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Perform music with appropriate expression as indicated by the written score.1) Practice several choral warm-ups relating to the use of head voice. Closure Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 203 .B.2) Sing and summarize the historical context of early American music such as patriotic songs. Let students know that they will learn the history of “The National Anthem” next time. (The Fourth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “American Stories” or Theme 5 called “Heroes” would be nice links for this series of lessons.” Use choral techniques to address its unique vocal challenges.D.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4 – Lesson 3 R W Lesson Title: Overview: “The Star-Spangled Banner” Students will learn to sing “The National Anthem” in order to present it in historical context with a short dramatic presentation of the history of the song. After some study time. Grade 4. such as its wide range. Work extensively on getting proper use of head voice to achieve success with this song. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students study the lyrics. have students complete a fill-in-the-blank test on the words to “The National Anthem. (II. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Read the historical background on “The Star-Spangled Banner” provided in the Music and You.” A possible incentive for getting all the words right would be to have a competition between classes to see which class gets the highest percentage of correct answers. A challenge could also be issued to the staff to see if they can better the students’ score. Demonstrate the difference between chest voice and head voice. Have students sing the song to determine whether they are able to properly employ the use of their head voice and whether they know the words completely and correctly. (II. (I.A.3) Examine the use of musical elements and perform music using the style reflective of that culture. Teach the students to sing “The Star-Spangled Banner.

Closure Activities: Review “The Star Spangled Banner.” Discuss what parts are needed for a dramatization of the story. Have students audition for the speaking parts or assign them. Review the history or read through the play if available. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 204 .” Review head voice.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 2: Preparing the Play/Polishing the Song Warm-up: Review “The National Anthem. Review assigned roles. Closure Activities: Review the basic history of the song. Assign some to be British soldiers and some could be American soldiers. Share with the students the other two choices for our national song: “America. read through the script of “O’er the Ramparts. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Review what each group will need to do and when. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Discuss the history behind “The Star Spangled Banner. Speak through the song and then sing the song to aid in memorization. Discuss why we stand when we sing our national anthem and the importance of this act.” Discuss what choice they would have made and why. the Beautiful” and “Yankee Doodle. A few students could provide the sound effects of the battle re-enactment. Day 3: Warm-up: Rehearsing the Play Sing “The National Anthem. Every student should have a part in the play. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Divide up into groups to plan staging and acting plan.” Review head voice.” If available. Ask students to bring items they think might be useful.” Remind students to memorize their lines and practice their parts at home as well as bringing costumes and props. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Discuss costumes needed and props.

Set the blocking for the play and sing “The National Anthem” at the end. 2 – Students did not demonstrate an understanding of the history of the patriotic song but did participate in the performance of the play and sang the song. Assessment: Assess students using the following rubric: 4 – Students demonstrated a complete understanding of the history of the patriotic song during their performance of the play and singing the song.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 4: Rehearsing the Play Warm-up: Sing “The National Anthem” with and without the words. Take care of any last minute performance needs. including parents. 0 – Students did not attempt to be part of the play or sing the song. Day 5: Perform the Play Warm-up: Sing “The National Anthem” with and without the words. as needed. 3 – Students demonstrated a limited understanding of the history of the patriotic song during their performance of the play and singing the song. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Closure Activities: Discuss inviting some people. to be the audience for the presentation of the history of the National Anthem. Closure Activities: Review the events in the history of the National Anthem. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Perform the play with the singing of “The National Anthem” at the end. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review parts. 1 – Students made a minimal effort to be part of the play or sing the song. Practice the play and song several times. Review parts. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 205 .

SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4 – Lesson 4 Lesson Title:
R W

Rhythm Review for Percussion

Overview:
Following instruction on reading rhythm patterns using quarter notes, quarter rests and eighth notes, students will write rhythms in order to create a percussion rap using these rhythm notes. Students will select which instruments will perform the different patterns in their rap as well as the order of the patterns. (Fourth Grade Reading Theme 4 called “Problem Solvers” includes a poetry unit where students are asked to write a rap. This could be done in conjunction with that unit.)

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • • Sing and play classroom instruments in an ensemble, responding to conducting cues. (I.B.3) Read and perform simple rhythmic notation. (I.D.1) Compose and perform music using simple rhythmic notation for classroom percussion instruments. (III.B.1) Play “Find the Rhythm.” Prior to class prepare several flash cards with four beat rhythm groupings. Students will identify the rhythm that the teacher claps. Teacher chooses a child to find the card. When the child finds it, they clap it back for the teacher. Extend to eight beats when they are ready.

Warm-Up:

Introductory and Developmental Activities

Have the class create a rhythmic phrase of four measures in 4’s. Use the names of cities, states, cars, animals, flowers, etc. as text material. Compile a list of words in the chosen category on the board. Arrange the words in groups so that they fit the chosen category.

Guided Practice Activities

Clap the words in each measure and write the notation. Have the class perform their creation.

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task:

Divide students into cooperative groups. Using the worksheet included with this lesson, have the students complete the patterns by writing in the rhythm note that goes with the word. Students should then arrange the four phrases into a rap. When they have determined the order the phrases will go in, they should select a different percussion instrument to perform each rhythm.

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SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment:
Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students created a four pattern rhythm rap and performed it correctly using percussion instruments for the class. 3 – Students created a four pattern rhythm rap with no more than two errors in notation and performed it using percussion instruments with no more than two errors for the class. 2 – Students created a four pattern rhythm rap with numerous notation errors but were able to perform it for the class using percussion instruments. 1 – Students created part of a four pattern rhythm rap with numerous notation errors and were unable to perform it for the class. 0 – Students did not complete the task.

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SAMPLE LESSONS

Rhythm Review
Say and clap the words in the patterns below. Fill in the blank spaces with the rhythm of the words. Then decide which order the patterns should go in. Select different percussion instruments to play each pattern. Practice together as a group. Be prepared to perform for the class.

Reading, writing,

math, and art

Diving, swimming, rowing, polo

Chicken, eggs,

fish, and pork

Kickball,

softball, soccer,

tag

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Grade 4 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title:

SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity

R

W

Timbre in Music/Color in Art

Overview:
Students will write about the color that comes to mind when different pieces of music are played in order to compare timbre to color. (Fourth Grade Reading Theme 5 called “Heroes” has a section on listening to music with a purpose. This could be done in conjunction with the Reading instruction.)

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• Compare timbre in music to color in visual art. (I.C.1) Play a few minutes of four diverse pieces of music. (Suggested list: “Stars and Stripes Forever,” “Brahms’ Lullaby,” “Sabre Dance,” and the “Pastoral Symphony”) Have students complete the following sentence for each musical sample: This music reminds of the color _______________ because _______________________ ______________________________________________________________________ .

Activity:

Assessment:
Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students supported all of their color ideas with specific information connecting the color to the music. 3 – Students supported some of their color ideas with specific information connecting the color to the music. 2 – Students stated their color ideas but gave only general information connecting the color to the music. 1 – Students stated but did not support their color ideas. 0 – Students did not attempt the activity.

Extension:

Another possible writing activity:

This music reminds me of (a fictional character from a list provided by the teacher) because ___________________________________________________________ . (Possible characters: Cinderella, the Wicked Witch of the West, Scooby Doo, King Kong, etc.)

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SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4, 5 – Lesson 6 Lesson Title:
R W

Instrument Classification

Overview:
Students will investigate how instruments produce sound in order to classify instruments according to sound production families and compare these groups to the sections of the orchestra/band. Classification will be extended to include other sounds and student created instruments. (The Fourth Grade Reading Theme 4 called “Problem Solvers” has a story called “Sing to the Stars” which includes a game with instruments. The Fifth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “Give It All You’ve Got” has a section on Yo Yo Ma and refers to the book Mozart Season. These might be nice links to this unit. This unit may take several lessons.)

Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence:
• • • Describe tone color and methods of sound production of orchestral, band and related folk instruments using sound classification terms (i.e. aerophones…). (Grade 5 – I.A.2) Listen to orchestral compositions which emphasize brass and percussion instruments and classify using the terms: aerophones, membranophones, and idiophones. (Grade 4 – II.D.1) Listen to musical compositions and identify selections, which emphasize various instrumental ensembles. (Grade 5 – II.D.1)

Day 1: Classification Introduction
Warm-Up:
Play a selection of orchestral music. Have students name some of the instruments they hear and what family they think the instrument is in.

Introductory and Developmental Activities:

Share information with students about sound production families. Show how the sections of the orchestra are included in these families, i.e. Chordophones (string starters) – string section, Aerophones (air starters) – woodwind and brass sections, Membranophones (skin starters) – percussion section, and Idiophones (self starters) – percussion section. Share with students a story, which includes orchestra instruments. Possibilities include Orchestranimals by Irene Eugen and Vlasta van Kampen and the classic Peter and the Wolf. As the story is read discuss the instruments named in the story. Classify the instrument into the correct sound production family as well as identifying the section of the orchestra.

Guided Practice Activities:

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two for air starters. Students should be able to classify both. they should think about what type of instrument they would like to create and how it would be classified.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Listen to the story of Tubby the Tuba from Spotlight on Music .5. Have students identify the sound production family and the section of the orchestra by using an all pupil response such as holding up one finger for string starters.1. Guided Practice Activities: Show students the instruments they will need to classify from some of the boxes and the information they need to share with their group. Day 3: Instrument Creation Warm-Up: Play the “Orchestra Song” from Share the Music. Day 2: Classification Experience Warm-Up: Play a different selection of orchestral music than what was heard during the precious lesson. and four for self starters. The boxes can include real instruments and pictures of instruments. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Students should complete the Classifying Instruments activity. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the sound production families. Discuss whether the class agrees with the student’s classification information or not. Have random students share their classification information with the class.” Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 211 . Have students name some of the instruments they hear and what family they think the instrument is in. three for skin starters. Have students use the other hand to identify the section of the orchestra with a similar system. Closure Activities: Now that students have had experience classifying instruments. grade 4 and Spotlight on Music . Divide students into cooperative groups for the Classifying Instruments activity from the Tone Color section of the Instructional Activities part of this guide. Closure Activities: Review the sound production families and compare to sections of the orchestra. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Go over the directions in the worksheet included with this lesson called “Create an Instrument. Classify the instruments used in the song.

SAMPLE LESSONS Guided Practice Activities: Give students time to work on the worksheet in class. any explanation about how the instrument is played. Share ads where people are used in the picture compared to those.” Again. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students take the work sheet home to finish and bring back to the next class. Make note of the description for information regarding size as well as the materials used to make the instrument. 0 – Students did not attempt to create an instrument or their creation was incomplete. Make note of the persuasive language that is used to advertise the factual information. described a few of the instrument’s characteristics but did not create an instrument that would match the desired tone quality. Encourage them to add color to the picture. Assessment: Assess students’ instrument creation using the following rubric: 4 – Students correctly classified the instrument according to information given. completely described the instrument including the material it is made of as well as size and shape and created an instrument that matches the desired tone quality in all ways. described some of the instrument’s characteristics and created an instrument that matches the desired tone quality in most ways. 1 – Students attempted to create an instrument but did not classify it correctly. which do not. and descriptions of the sound the instrument makes. classify the instruments used in the song. Discuss the persuasive value of having people in the picture. 2 – Students correctly classified the instrument according to information given. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Share a variety of music equipment catalogs with the class. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 212 . Day 4: Instrument Advertisement Warm-Up: Review the “Orchestra Song. 3 – Students correctly classified the instrument according to information given. Compare the appearance of color photos of instruments to black and white. Students should examine sample catalog entries for musical instruments. Closure Activities: Inform students that they will use their instrument creation to write an advertisement during the next class. Guided Practice Activities: Share with students how they might use persuasive language to sell their instrument.

Closure Activities: Encourage students to think about how they might classify instruments that they hear in the future. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 213 . 3 – The description is generally complete and organized.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students complete the Advertising worksheet for the instrument they created during the previous class. but the language choices are persuasive and appropriate for the intended audience. 2 – The description is incomplete and poorly organized. 0 – Students did not attempt to write an advertisement. with persuasive language choices. which are appropriate for the intended audience. with persuasive language choices. 1 – Students attempted to write an advertisement for their instrument but the information was poorly organized and incomplete. Assessment: Assess students’ instrument advertisement using the following rubric: 4 – The description is complete and well organized. which are appropriate for the intended audience.

Musical sound you would like your instrument to produce________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________. Give your instrument a name. Use information from what was discussed in class to classify your instrument. What size is it? _______________________________________________________________________ What is it made of? _____________________________________________________________________ How do you play it? _____________________________________________________________________ What part of the instrument makes the sound? ________________________________________________ What Sound Production Family would it be in? ________________________________________________ Sketch of your instrument (Be sure to show somebody playing it.) Name of your instrument _________________________________________ Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 214 . (You cannot “create” a flute or piano. Then create the instrument that would produce that sound. long or short sounds. These are not your own original ideas. including the ability to play high or low sounds. loud or quiet sounds.) First you should decide on a particular musical sound you would like your instrument to make. Draw a sketch of your instrument showing somebody playing it. Consider tone qualities you would like your instrument to have.SAMPLE LESSONS Create an Instrument You now need to create your own original instrument.

• an explanation of what part of the instrument makes the sound and how to play your instrument in a way that will attract your buyer. You should include a color drawing of your instrument showing somebody playing your instrument that would catch the eye of a potential buyer. • the type of musical sound it can produce. • a complete description of the materials it is made from and the size using language that will make it sound interesting to the potential buyer. Be sure your writing includes: • a catchy name for your instrument. Write a persuasive catalog entry using factual information about your instrument as you would like it to appear in the catalog.SAMPLE LESSONS Advertising Your Instrument Use your Create an Instrument worksheet to complete the following writing activity: Pretend that a music equipment company has agreed to advertise your instrument in their catalog. Name of your instrument Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 215 .

1) Examine the use of musical elements and perform music using the style reflective of that culture. (Grade 4 – II.B. This could be done in conjunction with these stories. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce Native Americans including information about the many different tribes here in our country and that their customs are different depending on the region they are in. The Fifth Grade Reading Theme 5 called “One Land.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • • • Describe how music reflects traditions in various cultures.1) Evaluate individual performances for cultural authenticity.A. One of the traditions that many tribes share is dance. Show an excerpt of a video with Native American dancing.K.A.1) Play “Grand Entry” from Share the Music. singing with the dance. However some musical characteristics are the same for all the tribes. The dances and reasons for the dance vary but all Native American tribes dance. One of those characteristics is a clear beat in their music. which is most often played on the drum. grade 6 and Spotlight on Music . (Grade 4 – IV. (Grade 5 – IV. (Ideas: serious. (Grade 5 – I. and appropriate expression. proper tempo.1) Perform appropriate dances to accompany traditional folk music. (Grade 4 – II.B. Ask students to identify some of the characteristics that they notice for what they see.A. special costumes.A. This unit may take several lessons. (Grade 4 – II.2) Compare the uses of music in western and non-western cultures.2) Sing and summarize the historical context of early American music such as Native American music. Native American dance is different for many other forms of dance and the focus of the unit will be to identify the characteristics of Native American dance and make sure that the way that the class performs the dances reflects the culture of the people. Have students pat the beat and listen for which instrument plays the beat in the musical selection.C. feet moving often more than hands.1) Summarize ways in which people from diverse cultures enjoy performing and creating music. (Grade 5 – II. 5 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: R W Native American Dances Overview: Students will experience Native American dances in order to evaluate their personal performances for cultural authenticity. Many Trails” has stories about Native Americans. (The Fourth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “American Stories” would be a nice link to this unit.1) Determine the characteristics of a good performance such as sing or playing in tune. (Grade 4 – IV.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 4.A. drum beat) Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 216 .

Discuss the purpose behind the different dances as well as giving students an opportunity to experience the dance. 2 – Students are occasionally performing Native American dance in a way that shows a respect for the culture. share the legend of the bear. Often dances are done before a hunt to pay respect for what they are about to hunt. drum beat. Assess the students’ dance performances during the entire unit using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students are consistently performing Native American dance in a way that shows a respect for the culture. Discuss why that is important. 3 – Students are generally performing Native American dance in a way that shows a respect for the culture. Assessment: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 217 . demonstrate and then have students dance the Bear Dance with the recording. feet moving. add the singing if possible) Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Other recommended dances from the same resource include: Canoe Song. Continue to encourage them to use the characteristics they identified earlier from the video to perform the dance with cultural authenticity (serious. Following the directions given in the book. (serious. Encourage them to use some of the characteristics they identified earlier following the video. 0 – Students did not attempt the Native American dances and did not show respect for the culture. 1 – Students attempted the Native American dances but did not show respect for the culture. and Indian Two-Step. drum beat. feet moving. Basket Dance. add the singing if possible).SAMPLE LESSONS Share with students that Native Americans often dance to pay respect or show honor for some living being. Using the resource Moving Within the Circle by Bryan Burton (includes recording and book with excellent instructions).

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 218 . Show pictures of quilts or a real quilt. Show ways to draw different quilt designs. Have students draw a quilt pattern of their own design while listening to the music. (II.A Little Night Music.1) Discuss going to bed practices like brushing teeth. (Fifth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “Give It All You’ve Got” makes reference to the book Mozart Season. teddy bears. Discuss lullabies and introduce the musical piece “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik” by Mozart from Spotlight on Music . 2 – Students are listening to the music but did not complete a quilt pattern. 0 – Students were not listening to the music or attempting a quilt pattern. Closure Activities: Review the name of the music and the English translation for the name. putting on pajamas.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Identify patterns in music and relate them to patterns in visual arts. Discuss what objects young children sometimes sleep with like blankets. stuffed animals. 3 – Students are following the directions for creating a quilt pattern while listening to the music with some talking. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Distribute square pieces of drawing paper.C. Discuss the title and its English translation . etc.3.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: R W Patterns in Music and Art Overview: Students will draw quilt patterns while listening to “Eine Kleine Nachtmusik” by Mozart in order to identify patterns in music. Discuss information about Mozart being a child prodigy and what that means. Assessment: Observe students as they are working and assess using the following rubric: 4 – Students are following the directions for creating a quilt pattern while listening to the music without talking. This lesson could be done in conjunction with that book. 1 – Students listened to the music but did not attempt a quilt pattern. Ask students how the music relates to the artwork they have created. Make note of the patterns in the quilt.

Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Teach the song for those who do not know it or know only part of it. Assign each group one of the events mentioned above.” Have students join in if they know it.e.A.A. (Fifth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “Give It All You’ve Got” or Theme 4 “Person to Person” would be nice links to this unit.1) Determine how lyrics of songs reflect the culture and history of various people. Guided Practice Activities: Using the text book The African American Experience as a resource.A. Bus Boycott. Little Rock. An excellent resource for this is I’m Gonna Let It Shine. and Bloody Sunday. Sit-Ins. Freedom Summer.1) Sing “This Little Light of Mine. Birmingham.A. (II. (II. i. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 219 . which demonstrate how the lyrics reflect the history. Have students listen to Freedom Songs from the Civil Rights Movement and listen for information about the events in the lyrics. (IV. Introduce call and response form and show how it is used in this song.2) Determine the characteristics of a good performance such as appropriate expression. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Divide students into cooperative groups. (III. (II.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title: R W Freedom Songs Overview: Students will sing freedom songs in order to learn the history shared in the lyrics of the Freedom Songs of the Civil Rights Movement. a CD and book with selections of Freedom Songs. Explain how a song leader to change the lyrics of a song to share information can use call and response form. Freedom Rides. This unit may take several lessons. create a timeline of the following events from the Civil Rights Movement. Have the groups read about the event from the textbook mentioned above and complete the graphic organizer included with this lesson.1) Improvise vocally using various forms such as call and response and question and answer.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • Compare the uses of music in western and non-western cultures.B.2) Interpret in writing an understanding of the relationship between music and events in United States history.

After each group presents information. (Possibilities: If You Miss Me From the Back of the Bus – Bus Boycott.) Have students individually respond to the following prompt: Pretend you are a freedom fighter in today’s world. play and have students sing one of the freedom songs that fit with the event so students hear the connection between the music and the history. and made a connection to the Civil Rights Movement. 0 – Students did not respond. I’m Gonna Sit at the Welcome Table – Sit-ins. 3 – Prompt is generally well written with the proper form. Closure Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 220 . 2 – Attempt is made to answer the prompt but position was unclear or there was no connection to the Civil Rights Movement. and made a connection to the Civil Rights Movement. 1 – Limited attempt is made to answer the prompt. Hold On – Birmingham. name a freedom song that you could use for the issue you have selected and write down new words you might sing in the song to speak about your issue. Assessment: Scoring tool for the writing prompt: 4 – Prompt is completely written with the proper form. somewhat clear position.SAMPLE LESSONS Each group should prepare a presentation to the class using one of the following formats: • Eyewitness news report • Talk show interview • Dramatize the event • Debate the two sides • Oral history presentation – take the position of someone who was there • Analysis – “we think they should have…” • What if – change one thing and predict what might have happened if … • Application – Haw can someone use what happened from the event to change or work on one of today’s issues? • Abstraction – If an event like this happened today. education). In your speech. Select an issue that you feel needs people’s attention (for example: drugs. clearly stated position. etc. Grade drops one letter grade for missing music information. Write a speech to a group of today’s freedom fighters telling them how you feel about this issue. Encourage students to find songs today where people share their feelings about what needs to be changed in their music. weapons. Include information about what you feel needs to be changed. Describe how you might use something you learned from the Civil Rights Movement to help make changes. how would things be different? • Presentation ideas of their own with teacher approval before they continue. about their event. Calypso Freedom – Freedom Rides. violence.

SAMPLE LESSONS Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 221 .

This lesson could be done in conjunction with the Reading instruction. (II.1) Sing “Yankee Doodle” from Spotlight on Music – 2. create a timeline of the events leading up to and after the Revolutionary War. (II. Declaration of Independence. etc. Have each group select a side. Surrender at Yorktown. patriot or loyalist.e. Review information about the historical time period that the song comes from. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Divide students into cooperative groups. patriot or loyalist. Continental Congress.2) Interpret in writing an understanding of the relationship between music and events in United States history.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5 – Lesson 3 Lesson Title: R W Yankee Doodle Overview: Students will learn Yankee Doodle in order to know the history behind the song and make up their own version. The Revolutionary War.A. Boston Massacre. Writing of the Constitution.B. Have them create a new verse for “Yankee Doodle. Have students join in if they know it. Some may remember it from their reading instruction. patriots and loyalists. There are some excellent books with information about the history of the song as well as the time period. French and Indian Wars. Guided Practice Activities: Using the students’ Social Studies text book as a resource. (Fifth Grade Reading Theme 3 called “Voices of the American Revolution” uses this song to teach how to read and understand song lyrics. First President. Boston Tea Party. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 222 . i. Have students review rhythm by clapping while they are singing. Discuss the two sides in the war. One of these is by Steven Kellogg. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Teach the song for those who do not know it or know only part of it.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Determine how lyrics of songs reflect the culture and history of various people. from the new lyrics. 4. Discuss the conditions for soldiers during the war. Discuss vocabulary that may be unfamiliar to the students.” Groups should sing the new verse for the class and the class should try to determine which side they are on.

0 – Students did not attempt to create or perform a new verse. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 223 .SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess the students’ new verse for “Yankee Doodle” using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students created and performed a verse that showed an understanding of the historical time period. 2 – Students created and performed part of a verse but it did not show an understanding of the historical time period. Closure Activities: Encourage students to find other songs that share political feelings about historical events. 1 – Students created part of a verse that showed an understanding of the historical time period but were not able to perform it. 3 – Students created and performed part of a verse that showed an understanding of the historical time period.

As the story is read. The call-and-response pattern of singing. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Chart the sequence of events in the story on the board. The call-and-response pattern has flourished everywhere the people of Western and Central African countries have gone.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Determine how lyrics of songs reflect the culture and history of various people.1) Using the call and response method. (Teacher selects signal and the places in the text where the phrase goes. the folk spiritual and the arranged spiritual. Guided Practice Activities: Read A Band of Angels with the students performing the listening task stated above.A. discuss the events in the story and the significance of the Jubilee Singers.” every time they are given a signal. The story should build to a climax when the Jubilee singers begin to sing their own music for the first time. which emphasize chorus. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 224 . Their task will be to say. teach the students to sing “Go Down. Inform the students that there are two types of spirituals. Moses” and/or “Wade in the Water. (II. “Jubilee. Tell students that this story is fiction but it is based on real people and events. was the basis for the folk spirituals and their teaching. at page turns or important events in the story. The Jubilee Singers were the ones who developed the arranged spirituals for presentation in concerts all over the United States and Europe. for example. (II.B. from the beginning of the class.1) Listen to musical compositions and identify selections.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5 – Lesson 4 R W Lesson Title: African-American Spirituals Overview: Students will utilize a literary text and a dramatic presentation in order to bring to life the historical context of the African-American spirituals in this series of lessons. let students know that they will be participating in the story by performing a listening task. a time of hope and freedom. Spirituals are a form of music that originated out of the experiences of African American people. (The Fifth Grade Reading Theme 4 called “Person to Person” would be a nice link for these lessons.” Identify the song(s) as African-American spirituals.) Have students say it a little louder each time if necessary to get the desired dramatic effect.2) Interpret an understanding of the relationship between music and events in United States history. Afterwards. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the text A Band of Angels by Deborah Hopkinson.D. jubilee. (II.

Introduce a new spiritual from the following: “All God’s Children Got Shoes. which she sings along the way.” “Every Time I Feel the Spirit. Day 2: Perform and Discuss Warm-Up: As students enter the room with lights off. Review several songs listed above. Sweet Chariot.” “Follow the Drinking Gourd. review the spiritual from day 1. Identify it as one of the Fisk Jubilee Singers pieces. If access to this CD is not available. and have CD of “Gwen Briley Strand as Harriet Tubman” playing. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Discuss the different purposes of the spirituals: songs of encouragement.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess students using the following rubric: 4 – Students accurately charted the events from the story and participated in the telling of the song. Play as much as time allows.” “Steal Away. Bible songs. and freedom songs. if possible. coded songs. Enjoy the dramatic effects of a nighttime ride on the Underground Railroad and the spirituals. Assess students using the following rubric: 4 – Students demonstrated a complete understanding of the history shared in the book with the support for the selection of the spiritual to match the event. Closure Activities: Sing the opening song again. 225 Assessment: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . sorrow songs. Students should give a reason for their choices. 0 – Students did not chart the events from the story and did not participate in the telling of the song.” “Swing Low.” “Deep River. 2 – Students accurately charted the events from the story or participated in the telling of the song but did not do both. 3 – Students demonstrated a limited understanding of the history shared in the book with the support for the selection of the spiritual to match the event. 1 – Students did not chart the events from the story but did participate in the telling of the song. Review the events from the text of A Band of Angels on the board. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have the students select a spiritual from the list to go with the main events listed on the board from the text A Band of Angels.” Rehearse the selected spiritual.” and “Oh Freedom.” “Let Us Break Bread Together. 3 – Students charted the events from the story with some mistakes and participated in the telling of the song.” “Nobody Knows the Trouble I’ve Seen.

Closure Activities: Have each student share a piece of information about African Americans that they did not know before.SAMPLE LESSONS 2 – Students did not demonstrate an understanding of the history shared in the book but did make a selection of the spiritual to match the event. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 226 . 0 – Students did not attempt to make a selection. Extensions: Prepare a dramatic presentation of the main events in the text A Band of Angels and insert the spirituals learned where appropriate. 1 – Students made a selection but did not give a reason for their choice.

SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W Sea Chanteys Overview: Students will sing a variety of sea chanteys in order to pantomime the work done by sailors as they were singing the chanteys.1) Interpret in writing an understanding of the relationship between music and events in United States history.A. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the sailors of the 1700’s-1800’s. (II.B. (II. which give personal satisfaction. (II. including winding up ropes.1) Day 1: Sea Chantey Introduction Warm-Up: Play a version of “Cape Cod Chantey” Spotlight on Music – 6. Discuss what would help the sailors work together at the same pace. Many Trails” would be nice links to this unit. Short haul chanteys for pulling ropes and other short jobs Halyard (haillard) chanteys for setting the sails and longer jobs Capstan chanteys for turning the capstan. setting the sails. (Both hands together like they are holding a rope in front of the body waist high. Students will respond to a writing prompt at the end of the unit in order to share their knowledge of the work of sailors based on what they know from the sea chanteys sung during the unit. (music) Discuss the role of the chantey man. Show the action of pulling the ropes. and turning the anchor. (to set the pace of the singing to help the sailors get the work done and not get too tired) Share terminology for the chanteys and the connection to the work being done. This unit may take several lessons.C.) Guided Practice Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 227 . Ask students what group of people they think may sing this type of song. Discuss the work they might have to do on the ship. which raises and lowers the anchor Forecastle chanteys for off duty hours in the sleeping quarters or forecastle Review “Cape Cod Chantey. (Curriculum guide page 351) (The Fifth Grade Reading Theme 4 called “Person to Person” or Theme 5 called “One Land.” This is an example of a short haul chantey. Discuss where they would sleep on the ship (below deck). Tug with one hand and then the other on the accented beat of each measure.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Determine how lyrics of songs reflect the culture and history of various people.1) Identify musical abilities.

Review with students what group of people would sing this type of song. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 228 . (Both hands together like they are holding a rope in front of the body but hands raised overhead. Review with students what group of people would sing this type of song. which were for setting the sails and longer jobs. halyard chanteys will be sung.. capstan chanteys will be sung. Discuss the role of the chantey man. Show the action of pulling the ropes to set the sails. Ask for new volunteers to be the chantey man and sing the call while the class sings the response and everyone does the work. Book 5 and Spotlight on Music – 2. Joe” from Music and You. Closure Activities: Day 3: Capstan Chanteys Warm-Up: Listen to “Away for Rio” from Music and You. (to set the pace of the singing to help the sailors get the work done and not get too tired) Review what type of chantey was introduced during the previous class. Review the halyard (haillard) chanteys. Discuss what would help the sailors work together at the same pace (music). Book 5. Next time. Day 2: Halyard Chanteys Warm-Up: Listen to “Haul Away. Ask students to volunteer to be the chantey man and sing the call while the class sings the response and everyone does the work. Review with students that the sailors sing to set the pace of the work. Joe” again and learn the response of the song. Closure Activities: Review with students that the sailors sing to set the pace of the work. Tug with one hand and then the other on the accented beat of each phrase.) Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have the class sing the response as they are showing the work. This is an example of a halyard chantey. Next time. Guided Practice Activities: Have students listen to “Haul Away.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have the class sing the response as they are showing the work. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the work the sailors might have to do on the ship.

SAMPLE LESSONS Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the work the sailors might have to do on the ship. So the songs were forecastle chanteys. have ten students line up next to each other. Discuss what they were singing about and what it says about what the sailors thought about during their off duty times. Introduce the capstan chanteys. There would be about ten men on both sides of the pole or 20 men per pole. Talk about what sailors might be able to do during off duty hours. Guided Practice Activities: Have students listen to “Away for Rio” again and learn the response of the song.) Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: To demonstrate the action of turning the capstan. and have them turn as a line around one other student who stands still as the capstan. Book 5 and Spotlight on Music . These were sung in the sleeping quarters. Next time. chanteys that were sung in off duty hours will be the focus of the lesson. Have the class sing the response as the demonstration group is showing the work of turning the capstan. Ask for new volunteers to be the chantey man and sing the call while the class sings the response and the demonstration group moves.4. Have students respond to the following prompt: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 229 . This is an example of a capstan chantey. shoulder to shoulder. Show the action of turning the capstan. Closure Activities: Day 4: Forecastle Chanteys Warm-Up: Listen to “Shenandoah” from Music and You. Have students listen to “Shenandoah” again and learn the song. Review with students what group of people would sing this type of song. There would be about 14 poles per capstan. Stories that are put to music or “ballads” were also sung during off duty hours. Review with students that the sailors sing to set the pace of the work. which were sung to turn the capstan. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Review all the types of chanteys that have been sung during the unit and the work for each. Review what types of work and chanteys were introduced during the previous classes. which was a turnstile on the main deck with ropes or chains attached to the anchor under the ship. Share with students that telling stories was one form of recreation. below deck in what is called the forecastle. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the work the sailors might have to do on the ship. (A line of sailors would grip a pole that was inserted through the turnstile.

1 – Limited attempt is made to answer the prompt. 2 – Students are occasionally performing the chanteys in a way that shows an understanding of the sailors and their work. 0 – Students did not respond. Grade drops one letter grade for missing music information. Closure Activities: Have students think of how music could help make their own work get done easier. 3 – Students are generally performing the chanteys in a way that shows an understanding of the sailors and their work. 3 – Prompt is generally well written with the proper form and somewhat accurate historical/cultural information. Scoring tool for the writing prompt: 4 – Prompt is completely written with the proper form and accurate historical/cultural information. Assessment: Assess the students’ performance of the chanteys and the work during the entire unit using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students are consistently performing the chanteys in a way that shows an understanding of the sailors and their work. 1 – Students attempted to perform some of the chanteys but did not show an understanding of the sailors and their work. 0 – Students did not attempt to perform the chanteys. Tell what you may have a chance to do in your leisure time.SAMPLE LESSONS Pretend you are looking for a sailor to go to sea during the 1700’s. 2 – Attempt is made to answer the prompt but information was generally inaccurate or incomplete. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 230 . Write an advertisement for a newspaper to persuade more sailors to come work on your ship. Include information about the life on the ship or jobs you have to perform as a member of the crew. Tell about a favorite sea chantey you enjoy singing and what you are generally doing when you sing it.

the students will read music in both meters in order to perform patterns in both meters on classroom percussion instruments. Activity: Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students perform both patterns with no errors. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Read. 3 – Students perform both patterns with fewer than four errors.Grade 5 – Lesson 6 Lesson Title: SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment Activity Reading in Two Meters Overview: Following instruction on reading music in duple and triple meters. 2 – Students perform both patterns with fewer than six errors. and perform simple music in duple and triple meter including dotted half notes. Have the students practice playing the rhythmic patterns with a partner.1) Copy the worksheet included with this lesson. (I.D. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 231 . Each student will choose a rhythm instrument on which to play one pattern in duple meter and one pattern in triple meter. write. 0 – Students did not respond to the prompt. Each student will demonstrate proficiency in a small group and individually. 1 – Students perform both patterns with fewer than ten errors.

2 4 2 4 3 4 3 4 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 232 . Then play them on percussion instruments.SAMPLE LESSONS Reading in Two Meters Read these rhythms.

Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 233 .SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5. 6 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: Kente Cloth patterns Overview: Students will design Kente cloth patterns while listening to West African percussion ensemble music in order to identify patterns.1) Compare folk music to other forms of artistic expression in western and non-western cultures. (Grade 5 – II.C. Relate the patterns in the Kente cloth to patterns in the West African music.C. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • Compare the uses of music in western and non-western cultures. (Grade 5 – II. Show a sample if available. Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students are following the directions for creating a Kente cloth pattern while listening to the music without talking. 2 – Students are listening to the music and attempted a Kente cloth pattern but did not create a pattern. Play the West African drum music as students are working on their designs.1) Identify patterns in music and relate them to patterns in visual art. 1 – Students listened to the music but did not attempt a Kente cloth pattern. Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Make note on a map what region of Africa the music is from. Explain that this is one of the characteristics of African music. 0 – Students were not listening to the music or attempting a Kente clothe pattern.C. (Grade 6 – II. Share the book Kente Colors by Debbi Chocolate. 3 – Students are following the directions for creating a Kente cloth pattern while listening to the music with some talking. Ask students to find patterns in the cloth.A. (Grade 6 – II.2) Play West African drum music. Ask students if they have seen Kente cloth before. Explain that there is another art form that uses patterns that comes from the same area of Africa. Have students indicate when they hear a rhythm pattern.1) Relate styles in music to style in visual art. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Distribute a large sheet of plain drawing paper. Have students draw a Kente cloth design using the entire sheet as if it were a piece of cloth.

SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 5.1) Construct and apply criteria of good musical performances to individual achievements. bravery. (Fifth Grade Reading Theme 2 called “Give It All You’ve Got” would be a nice link for this lesson. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 234 . Use the writing process for the completion of this writing assignment. organization. Write a critique of their performance commenting on the following: their talent. cooperation with other members of the performing group. choice of music. (This would be a good performance opportunity for those piano students and instrumental music students. Write at least two compliments (positive statements) as well as two suggestions for improvement. Allow students to perform a musical selection of their choice for the class.1) Discuss the characteristics of a good performance. performance. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students respond to the following prompt: Pretend you are the manager of one of today’s performers. Discuss responsibilities of a performer’s manager. (Grade 6 – IV. compliments and suggestions for improvement for the performer.) Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Have the rest of the class make notes about the performance. and appropriate expression. Include at least three of these areas in your critique. Keep in mind as you make your word choices that this person is your employer and you want to offer them assistance in improving their performance and at the same time. and if applicable.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Determine the characteristics of a good performance such as singing or playing in tune. 6 – Lesson 8 R W Lesson Title: Manager’s Critique Overview: Following a performance by the school chorus or band or a performance by an outside group. stage presence. (Grade 5 – IV. students will observe a performance in order to write a critique of the performers. proper tempo.A. including what was performed. keep your job.A.

Alternative Activity: Have students write a recommendation for the performer. 2 – Students answered the prompt commenting on one or two of the suggested areas with only one compliment and/or only one suggestion for improvement. 0 – Students did not respond to the prompt.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students answered the prompt completely commenting on three of the suggested areas with two compliments and two suggestions for improvement. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 235 . or suggestion for improvement. 3 – Students answered the prompt commenting on one or two of the suggested areas with two compliments and/or two suggestions for improvement. 1 – Students attempted to answer the prompt but left out the suggested areas. compliment. Closure Activities: Review the characteristics of a good performance.

” Chorus students should be able to sing songs with multiple verses.. chorus and band groups. Literature and techniques are selected according to the developmental needs of the students. A 6th grade student should audition for the elementary Honors Chorus. on an A/B day schedule. Class periods will be 45 minutes in length. exploring careers in music. students will • Require more time for guided practice and independent work after direct instruction. composition. music technology.e. and two-parts.. unless it is determined by their teacher that the voice has sufficient maturity to participate at the Middle School level. perform and respond to music. • Improve skills on recorder and classroom instruments (guitar and keyboard if available) through individual and ensemble performance. The students will develop their vocal and general music skills by singing. writing to persuade and writing to inform. The course description in the Middle School Courses Catalog. writing and performing music.e. various languages. and more willing to work toward greater skill development. The music concepts will be taught in units. as well as school performances should be provided. either verbally or written • students are beginning to discover strengths and talents. which is essential to begin career focus and development Because of these factors. playing classroom instruments. Students will begin to explore music technology and careers in music. With this movement toward independence: • the peer group takes on greater importance in personal decision making • there is a greater capacity to work • students can participate in organized group activities with rules and expectations (i. Opportunities to participate in outside performances. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 236 . expressing opinions. students in 6th grade are to be instructed using the Middle School model. • Work on individual and group projects – i. identifying and classifying styles and music genres.” To accomplish this.SAMPLE LESSONS Guidelines for Teaching Sixth Grade Using the Middle School Model The sixth grade student is in the middle – socially and developmentally – between the need for specific directions and guidance of elementary and the beginnings of independence and responsibility of early adolescence. Students should be able to sing and play accompaniment parts on various classroom instruments. with approximately 20 lessons in each unit. states that students in 6th Grade General Music will: “demonstrate the ability to perceive. The Middle School courses catalog states that students participating in 6th Grade chorus will: “continue the development of their vocal/choral skills begun in elementary school. • Incorporate writing activities to develop note-taking skills. Repertoire is representative of various styles and cultures. identifying and understanding the elements of music. sports) • there is a greater capacity to express opinions. audition for Honors Chorus.

eighth notes. (II.D.B. (II.1) Examine music. Call out switch and the students should switch to the other rhythm.2) Compare the use of music and the roles of musicians in our culture and those in selected nonwestern cultures. (II. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Assign the new names given below to the notes: Jazz Ragtime Have students read the following rhythms using the names given above.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 1 Lesson Title: Multicultural Rhythms Overview: Students will experience rhythm ensemble music from three cultural regions of the world in order to classify and compare the instruments used from the three regions. Divide the class and have half the class read and clap the top rhythm while the other half does the same with the bottom rhythm. influenced the development of musical styles in the United States. (I. (I.A.4) Read and perform simple rhythmic notation including sixteenth notes. (This unit is divided into five lessons.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • • Describe the tone color and methods of sound production for instruments using sound classification terms.A.1) Relate the ways in which music of various cultures.2) Day 1: Basic rhythm review Warm-Up: Read and clap rhythm patterns from the board using quarter notes and rests. which is unique to students’ cultural heritage.1) Select and play classroom instruments that are appropriate to the non-western music being studied. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 237 . such as African and Latin American.A. (II. half notes.B. and whole notes.

Closure Activities: Review the new note names for familiar notes. why not? If yes. Distribute Lunar New Year information sheet included with this lesson. Day 2: Asian rhythm ensemble Warm-Up: Students should think about the following questions which have been written on the board: “In our last class. Answers should be in selected response format or brief constructed response format. Have the students start out like before but part way through. prepare questions for the students to answer. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 238 . 3 – Students were generally accurate with some errors but maintained the assigned rhythm. Discuss other customs associated with Lunar New Year. we learned about the Lunar New Year. is it a celebration you look forward to?” Review “Lion Dance #1” from the previous lesson using the ragtime note names. What celebrations can you think of that involve large groups of people in an organized activity? Does your family participate in this celebration? If no. When they hear “split.” (See song sheet included with this lesson. Assessment: Observe students as they perform the “Lion Dance” to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students can maintain their assigned rhythm with minimal errors in performance. Have students clap. Explain that this is a sample of one of the rhythms that might be played during a Lunar New Year parade.” half the class claps one rhythm while the other half claps the other.SAMPLE LESSONS Guided Practice Activities: Play “The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin. than the other rhythm while the music plays. Play all four parts at the same time. Explain to students that they will hear the music again and they will now need to listen for when to split. Play the music again. call out “split” and later call out “switch” so that students have an opportunity to do both rhythms in unison as well as harmony.) Have students signal the rest rather than saying it. Assign students to play the rhythms on the designated instruments. first one rhythm. Call out when to switch as the music plays. Students will be learning a new rhythm note in the next lesson. 2 – Students were generally accurate but not able to maintain their assigned rhythm. 0 – Students made no attempt to play assigned rhythm. This could be used for an assessment activity as well. 1 – Students made a recognizable attempt at playing their assigned rhythm but were not able to maintain it and made several errors. Using this sheet as a guide. This is when people dress in a lion costume and move through the streets as they celebrate Lunar New Year. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students use the ragtime note names to read “Lion Dance #1.

one at a time while the music plays. Play the music again. Have students read the following rhythms using the names given above. Use all four and divide the class into four groups. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 239 . Assessment: Observe students as they perform the “Lion Dance #2” and “Dragon Dance” to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students can maintain their assigned rhythm with minimal errors. 3 – Students were generally accurate with some errors but maintained the assigned rhythm. call out “split” and later call out “switch” so that students have an opportunity to do all four rhythms in unison as well as harmony.” each group needs to clap their assigned rhythm. 0 – Students made no attempt to play assigned rhythm. Review their real names as well.” Have students signal the rest rather than saying it. Again assign students to instruments to perform the Dragon Dance rhythms. Closure Activities: Review the new names for reading all the notes used in this lesson. Explain that some years the parade uses a dragon rather than a lion. 1 – Students made a recognizable attempt at playing their assigned rhythm but were not able to maintain it and made several errors. Call out when to switch as the music plays. Do the same with the Dragon Dance. Have the students start out like before but part way through. Play all four parts at the same time. Explain to students that they will hear the music again and will now need to listen for when to split. 2 – Students were generally accurate but unable to maintain their assigned rhythm. play “The Entertainer” by Scott Joplin. Show students how sixteenth notes and eighth notes can be combined and performed using combinations of the new “ragtime” note names as in the example below: Rag – tainer Enter .time Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students use the ragtime note names to read “Lion Dance #2. Review Lunar New Year customs. Explain that this is another sample of one of the rhythms that might be played during a Lunar New Year parade. Assign students to play the rhythms on the designated instruments.SAMPLE LESSONS Introductory and Developmental Activities: Introduce the sixteenth note using the word “entertainer” for reading these notes. Divide the class and have half the class read and clap the top rhythm while the other half does the same with the bottom rhythm. Review the two rhythms from the previous class. Guided Practice Activities: Again. When they hear “split. Students will be learning rhythms from other cultures in the next lessons. Call out ‘switch’ and the students should switch to the other rhythm. Have students clap each rhythm.

Have students tap the steady beat. The taiko is a drum. One of the traditional folksongs is Sakura. However. Music traditions here are very old. These drums were used for many purposes. Share with students the following information about the koto: The koto is a stringed instrument that originated in China. 3 – Students can start the ostinato but not maintain it. Have students listen to a recording of “Sakura” from Spotlight on Music. like the piano in the United States. Does this sound familiar? Is it something you would expect to hear on the radio? What element of the music (instruments. Share information about the taiko. and many of the old practices are still followed. where it obtained many more strings. The koto now has 13 strings. 2 – Students can start the ostinato but it does not fit the music. It is a popular household instrument. 0 – Students made no attempt to create or perform an ostinato. Play the ostinato on drums during the A section on the recording (when the voices are chanting). Guided Practice Activities: Have students listen to “Lion” from Spotlight on Music. 1 – Students made a minimal effort to perform the ostinato. Big cities and quiet countryside are what will be found there. Japanese music is also full of contrasts. Observe students as they create the ostinato to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students can maintain their ostinato and it fits the music. overall sound) do you like? What element does not sound like anything you have heard before?” Introductory Activities: Share the following information with students: Japan is an island country. Book 6. such as in ceremonies and in wartime to frighten the enemy and to command the troops. Book 6. This song is known and sung by both young and old people. All groups play their ostinato on the final A section. and there is also a heavy emphasis on tradition while pursuing new technology. Have students listen to “Sakura” played on the koto. rhythms. Form four groups and have students create and practice an ostinato for the A section. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music Assessment: 240 . The word “taiko” means fat drum in Japanese. Sing along with the recording.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 3: Rhythms of Japan Warm-up: Play a selection of Japanese instrumental music and have students respond to the following which is written on board: “Use your listening journal to record observations of the piece of music to which you are listening. Independent Activity: Have students record which piece of Japanese music most appealed to them in their listening journals. Students should give one reason for their preference and must choose one of the pieces heard in class today. it was brought to Japan.

Be ready to perform today! Introductory and Developmental Activities: Play West African drumming music for the students and have students listen to the rhythms. Show students the “Akua” rhythm pattern. Explain to students that the West African music will be played again and they should improvise their own rhythm pattern to go with the music. Missing numbers should be said in their head and not left out. this music is passed from teacher to student or from person to person by ear. Follow the same procedure to perform this rhythm. Have students transfer their rhythms to designated instruments. Play the music and allow students to improvise while it is playing. Explain that the name Anansi is also used in African folktales or trickster tales. the study of music is done differently. numbers will be used rather than notation. They will also try to determine who the master was and who the apprentice was. Layer the entrance of each rhythm.SAMPLE LESSONS Closure: Compare the three cultures explored thus far in the unit. The teacher should be keeping a steady beat and counting to help the students master their patterns. Guided Practice Activities: Divide students into six groups and assign each group one of the rhythms. Have them count out the lines one at a time. Think about expressing the pattern (tempo. Review with students the African tradition of improvisation in music. What instruments are the same? What role does music play in Japanese society? How about in Chinese? Students will explore rhythms from Africa next.” To introduce students to African rhythms. dynamics) as well as actually teaching the rhythm itself. Each group should play both patterns together. and the characteristic sound of a West African ensemble. Have the rhythms stop in reverse order when given the signal to stop. Have students perform the patterns they taught in the beginning of class. Because it is difficult to learn expression from traditional notation. you are going to be a music teacher. Explain that in West Africa. The class will determine if the pattern sounded the same or different. Show students the “Anansi” rhythm patterns. Day 4: African rhythm ensemble Warm-Up: Have students follow these directions written on the board: Today. Musicians serve an apprenticeship. They should repeat the rhythm until given the signal to stop. Choose a partner and take turns teaching a pattern of four to eight beats long. working with a master to learn rhythms and expression. This is referred to as “oral tradition. one after the other. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Assessment: Observe students as they improvise to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: 241 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

” Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Assessment: Observe students as they perform the Latin rhythms to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 242 .html This site brings you to the opening of the Latin Afro-Cuban Jazz lesson. perform their rhythm with the refrain of “La Bamba. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Share with students that this style is called salsa. Review the definition of oral tradition.e. locate pictures to show students. ’ i. Discuss whether it seems to be a separate entity or serve to provide an underlying beat. which has an instrument sound library. Assign each group a rhythm.org/jazzED/j4yp_curr/modules/latinAfroCubanJazz/module. Students will be learning rhythms from another culture in the next lesson. Divide the students into six groups. Have them clap their assigned rhythm when the refrain of “La Bamba” is playing. 1 – Students made a minimal attempt to improvise and it did not fit with the music.SAMPLE LESSONS 4 – Students can maintain their improvised rhythm and it fits with the West African music. 2 – Students can improvise a rhythm but it does not fit with the West African music. Show students the instruments typically used in Latin American music. 3 – Students can improvise but not maintain their rhythm. A great resource for supplemental instruments is: http://www. Discuss the instruments heard in the music. Discuss other uses of the word ‘salsa.3. Day 5: Latin America rhythm ensemble Warm-Up: Have students listen to an example of salsa music like “La Bamba” from Share the Music.jazzatlincolncenter. Discuss and compare the instruments used in the two rhythm ensembles. If instruments are not available. Closure Activities: Review the difference between learning rhythms in the African culture compared to the Asian culture. Again. Compare the advantages and disadvantages to this tradition with learning by standard notation. Have students transfer their assigned rhythm to the designated instrument. Demonstrate the correct way to hold and perform on the instruments. Explain that the new rhythm ensemble that the students will be performing will use instruments from Latin America. Mexican food. 0 – Students made no attempt to perform an improvised rhythm. Share where the music comes from. Guided Practice Activities: Have students read the rhythms that are on the sheet included with this lesson one at a time. grade 5 and Spotlight on Music . Discuss the importance of the percussion section.

Have students draw comparisons between the ensembles discussed in this unit using the visual organizer included with this lesson. African – natural materials. Closure Activities: Discuss and compare the instruments used in the rhythm ensembles from the four cultures. 0 – Students made no attempt to play assigned rhythm.” 1 – Students made a recognizable attempt at playing their assigned rhythm but were not able to maintain it and made several errors.SAMPLE LESSONS 4 – Students can maintain their assigned rhythm with minimal errors in performance with “La Bamba. Point out which instrument all the ensembles have in common (drums of some type) and the instruments that are unique to each culture.” 3 – Students were generally accurate with some errors but maintained the assigned rhythm with “La Bamba.” 2 – Students were generally accurate but not able to maintain their assigned rhythm with “La Bamba. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 243 . Discuss which instruments are also used in American music. Discuss what the instruments in the ensembles from different cultures are made of (Asian – metal. Latin American – variety).

this is not strictly adhered to. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 244 . the belief is that having one will lead to the other. will pay a visit to their oldest and most senior member of their family. Usually family members gather on the morning of New Year's Day. The first week is the most important and most often celebrated with visits to friends and family as well as greetings of good luck. and Vietnam. Homes are decorated with paper cutouts of Chinese auspicious phrases and couplets (short phrases) that speak of "happiness. On the days before the New Year celebration. This has been in practice for many centuries. The same calendar is used by countries and cultures that are influenced by the Chinese. Red packets traditionally consisted of amounts which were considered multiples.” the day when everyone grows one year older. Japan." "longevity." A reunion dinner is held on New Year's Eve where members of the family. usually their parents or grandparents. However. It is interesting to note that in the Chinese tradition. at the eldest and most respected family member's residence. The New Year's Eve dinner is very large and traditionally includes foods with names that mean good things. Because certain things and/or food sound alike to certain Chinese well-wishes. The seventh day traditionally is known as the “Common Man's Birthday. Tibet. Chinese families give their home a thorough cleaning. It is at this gathering that red envelopes are given by senior members of the family. It is believed the cleaning sweeps away bad luck and makes their homes ready for good luck to arrive. the name of an object can influence people to believe that it is either good or bad luck. Family members. The fifteenth and last day of the New Year is the time when an old woman will greet you with a basket of celery. to unmarried junior members of the family. get together for celebration. Similarly "multiples of 2" such as $1. also called the Chinese New Year. Depending on locality. it is best not to visit family members. usually married. The date of the New Year changes each year depending on the Chinese calendar." "wealth.SAMPLE LESSONS The Lunar New Year The Lunar New Year. lasts for fifteen days. Employers may also give red envelopes to their employees on the first working day after the festival. such as Korea. the same day may also be celebrated as the Lantern Festival. Some people give their homes. The venue of the aforementioned Reunion Dinner is usually. The gift was originally a token amount but these days it is not uncommon to receive large sums in affluent families. near and far.10 and $2. Some specific traditions of the Lunar New Year are that on the third day. if not always. Amounts like $2 or $20 were acceptable.20 were also acceptable. doors and windowpanes a new coat of red paint. Words that sound alike but mean different things are called homophones. in order of their seniority. Chinese red firecrackers will also be on display where the deafening explosion of each firecracker is believed to scare evil spirits away. or even great grandparents. Some families will invite a Lion Dance troupe to their home as a symbolic ritual to usher in the Lunar New Year as well as to force-evict bad spirits out of the premises. All brooms and dust pans are put away on New Year's Eve so that good luck cannot be swept away. or as the Chinese Valentine’s Day.

) A hair-cut is considered bad luck. Candy is eaten to ensure the eater a "sweet" year.wikipedia.SAMPLE LESSONS Firecrackers Firecrackers are either by themselves or strung in a long string. as red symbolizes good things. Superstitions during the New Year period • • • • Buying a pair of shoes is considered bad luck. There are also several flowers and plants which are popular for the New Year. Thus "cutting hair" could be perceived as "cutting your prosperity" in Cantonese. chrysanthemums. The word "shoes" is a homonym to the word for "rough" in Cantonese. narcissus. Information taken from www. They are cased in red paper. Clothing Red clothing is worn throughout the Chinese New Year. as red will scare away evil spirits and bad fortune. The word "pants" is a homonym to the word for "bitter" in Cantonese. such as peach blossoms. Buying a pair of pants is also considered bad luck.org/ . Decorations Red banners with "Luck" (福) written on them are hung around the house and on the fronts of doors. Talking about death is inappropriate for the first few days of Chinese New Year. as it is considered inauspicious as well. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 245 . The loud popping noise created by the explosion is thought to scare away evil spirits. The word "hair" is a homonym to the word for "prosperity". kumquat plants. and bamboo. (Although some perceive it to be positive as the word 'pants' in Cantonese could be a homonym to the word for "wealth".

line 2 = triangle. line 2 = triangle. line 4 = drum Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 246 .SAMPLE LESSONS Lion Dance # 1 line 1 = finger cymbals. line 3 = gong and suspended cymbal. line 3 = gong and suspended cymbal. line 4 = drum Dragon Dance line 1 = finger cymbals. line 4 = drum Lion Dance # 2 line 1 = finger cymbals. line 3 = gong and suspended cymbal. line 2 = triangle.

SAMPLE LESSONS Akua Rhythm Pattern Split Log Drum Large Drum Shakers Sticks Hand Drum Blocks 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 5 5 6 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 247 .

SAMPLE LESSONS Anansi Rhythm Pattern Split Log Drum Hand Drum Shakers Bongo Drum Large Drum Sticks 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 4 6 7 2 2 5 5 6 7 8 3 5 7 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 248 .

SAMPLE LESSONS Latin American Rhythms cowbell maracas bongos cabasa guiro claves Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 249 .

SAMPLE LESSONS Graphic Organizer for Rhythm Ensembles West Africa Latin America Japan China 250 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music .

“Take Me Out to the Ball Game” will be on their list but if not.” Have students join in with the singing or teach the song if they do not know it.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 2 Lesson Title: R W Parody Songs Overview: Students will compare two performances of the same song with different words in order to create new lyrics for a song of their choice. record your impressions of this piece of music. Ask students to name songs they might hear at a baseball game. What is the message that is being delivered by the lyrics? What is the mood of the piece?” Play a piece of music by the Bob Rivers Band or Weird Al Yankovich. (“Eat it!” by Weird Al is a great example. (Hopefully.A. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 251 .A. i. (IV.) Introduce the song “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.1) Develop the ability to compose and arrange music. Ask them to also use the word in a sentence to fit each definition.) Compare dissimilar performances of the same work discussing differences in interpretation and preferences. Go over the words until they are comfortable singing it. Take me out of the grade school… List ideas of things they might include in their song. one of the definitions must be musical. (II. Try to pick a song that you think your students will recognize from the opening measures. Guided Practice Activities: Students will write their own with the topic of school. two musicians who have made a career from parody music. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Examine music that is unique to students’ cultural heritage. Show how the tune of the song should be maintained as they write new lyrics as well as a rhyme scheme if possible. Share the versions of the song in either of the books Take Me Out of the Bathtub and I’m Still Here in the Bathtub by Alan Katz. Let students know that these are parody songs. Ask students to think of two definitions of the word.B. share this one. Make note of the patterns in the original song that are maintained in the new versions.e.1) Have students respond to the following: “In your listening journal.) Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Write the word “pitch” on the board. (III.

0 – Students made no attempt to contribute to group work. 1 – Students made a minimal attempt to be part of the group work in either composition or performance.’ the whole class could join in on that part of the song as each group sings the verse. Each group needs to work on a version of their own. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 252 . 3 – Students contributed occasionally to the group composition and performed it. Observe students as they create and perform their new verse to assess their skills using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students contributed consistently to the group composition and performed it. Closure Activities: Have students think of other familiar songs that could have new words added. Provide chart paper and markers for students to write down their final version as well as scratch paper for them to write rough drafts and ideas.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students divide into cooperative groups. 2 – Students contributed to the group composition but did not perform it or performed it but did not help with the composition. If each group starts their new verse with the words ‘Take me out of the grade school. Assessment: Have the students sing the whole song with each group singing their new verse.

Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: The teacher will clap ten rhythmic patterns containing the same note values as mentioned above. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Write simple rhythmic and melodic patterns from dictation. students will arrange the patterns to reflect what the teacher is clapping. the students will recognize rhythmic notes in order to write four-beat patterns that the teacher plays on a hand drum. 0 – Students did not respond. (I. and sixteenth notes. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Have students work with a partner for cooperative learning. half notes. Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students write down all patterns with fewer than two mistakes.2) The teacher will clap eight beat patterns. have students work alone. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 253 . whole notes.D. Using manipulatives for quarter notes. 1 – Students write down all patterns with fewer than eight mistakes. Students will write the patterns down as they hear them. Closure Activities: Have individual students clap patterns that the teacher must notate. After three patterns.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 3 Lesson Title: Rhythmic Dictation Overview: Following instruction on reading rhythmic notation including sixteenth notes. 3 – Students write down all patterns with fewer than four mistakes. eighth notes. 2 – Students write down all patterns with fewer than six mistakes. quarter rests.

1) Review syncopation patterns by using the “Rise and Shine” echo clap activity. Experiment with suggestions until comfortable with one.” Emphasize that if working with a partner.e. performers. tempo. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • Compare dissimilar performances of the same work discussing differences in interpretation and preferences. (IV. choose a familiar song (i. Discuss the different musical elements of this recording such as: instruments.5. When they hear a syncopated pattern. and form. Use a Venn diagram to list the students’ answer. Compare these two recordings. where they are performing. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 254 . Warm-Up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Listen to the recording of the song “Guantanamera” from Music and You. just on the song itself. Grade 6 and Spotlight on Music . “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. dynamics. the song selected must be known to both people in the group. they sit back down when they echo the pattern. Guided Practice Activities: Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Working alone or with a partner. When they hear an non-syncopated pattern. melody. Students echo clap several patterns. they “rise” when they echo the pattern.A.” Students may not comment on the student performance.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 4 Lesson Title: R W Compare and Contrast Overview: Students will listen to two versions of the song “Guantanamera” in order to discover similarities and differences in the performances of each.) List ways that the piece of music could be changed. Complete a supporting statement which shows which version is preferred using the following prompt: “I liked _________________ version best because ______________________________. Then. combine with another group and perform the different versions. listing the answers on the Venn diagram. Listen to another recording of the song made at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival (Smithsonian Folkways World Music Collection).

0 – Students did not respond to the prompt.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students completed the diagram and wrote a supporting statement including all the elements discussed. 3 – Students completed the diagram and wrote a supporting statement including four of the elements discussed. 2 – Students completed the diagram and wrote a supporting statement including at least two of the elements discussed. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 255 . Closure Activities: Review the activities completed in these lessons and review the different musical elements that can be changed in different versions of the same music. 1 – Students completed part of the diagram and wrote a supporting statement including at least one of the elements discussed.

C. After students have responded. there were a lot of rules that had to be followed by composers.) Display it on an overhead as students come in to class. (II. Explain to students that art and music history are divided into time periods based on prevailing opinions at the time. In the Classical Period. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 256 . Ask students to identify elements in the work that fit with the title of the piece. musicians. a German painter who lived from 1774-1840. He painted this in 1818. and artists.A. composers and artists used events from their daily lives as source material and inspiration for their creativity.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 5 Lesson Title: R W The Romantic Period Overview: Students will examine the influence of daily experiences of musicians and artists in the Romantic Period in order to describe the connection to musical works and artistic creations of the Romantic Period. The piece of art work from the beginning of class was painted by Casper David Friedrich. Share with students the following information about the Romantic Period: The Romantic Period was a reaction to the music of the Classical Period.D.3) Relate styles in music to styles in visual arts. In the Romantic Period. polyphonic and homophonic texture. (The painting is provided at the end of this lesson.1) Identify aurally a repertoire of diverse vocal and instrumental compositions written by exemplary composers. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • Perform and compare examples of monophonic. Do NOT reproduce the title. tell students the title of the work. (II. (I. The Romantic Period covered the years from 1825-1900 and there is a parallel Romantic period in literature and art. Ask students to brainstorm what this artist might have been trying to convey through his work.1) Day 1: The Romantic Period Warm-up: Prepare a transparency of the painting “The Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog” by Casper David Friedrich.

tell students to listen to the scenarios that are read in class. Closure Activities: Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 257 . 2 – Students completed half of the scenarios or their answers are incomplete.Schubert Symphonie Fantastique . Remind students that there are no wrong answers in this exercise. slow.classicalarchives. Students are to write a sentence which reflects the mood of the piece. Again. “Pastoral” . They may use existing pieces or create their own. instrumentation.SAMPLE LESSONS Guided Practice Activities: Using the template #1 (included with this lesson). Have students list things in everyday life that could inspire a piece of music or art.).Berlioz Symphony Number 6. They are to record how each piece makes them feel while they are listening to it.Bizet Firebird .com website. Depending on the character of the class. etc.Students completed most of the scenarios but one or two are missing. but a more personal one. Model appropriate responses for the students using a recording of “Moonlight Sonata” by Ludwig von Beethoven. Have each student in the class contribute one idea. 3 . 1 – Students show an attempt to complete the work but most of their answers are missing or incomplete. However. they must describe what it would sound like (fast. using template #2 (included with this lesson). if they create their own piece. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Assessment: Assess student understanding of the music and art connection using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students completed all of the scenarios with complete sentences. Other selections that may be used in this lesson are: Erlkonig .Beethoven Carmen .Schubert Gretchen am Spinrrade . Students will possibly be uncomfortable with this task as it involves not only a different listening style. 0 – Students did not make an effort to try the assignment. and also what they think the composer was thinking or feeling when he wrote the piece. loud. They are to then write one or two sentences describing the music that they feel would best accompany each scenario. students may need to be separated to keep them engaged in the task. tell students that they are going to be listening to four excerpts of music. which is a free website.Stravinsky All of these can be located on the www.

SAMPLE LESSONS Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 258 .

I think the composer was feeling __________________________________. I think the composer was feeling __________________________________. This piece made me feel _____________.SAMPLE LESSONS Listening Template # 1 Use this chart to record your impressions of the four listening selections. I think the composer was feeling __________________________________. I think the composer was feeling __________________________________. This piece made me feel _____________. Selection 3- Selection 4- This piece made me feel _____________. You are specifically focusing on mood…how does the piece make you feel? How do you think the composer was feeling when writing this piece? Selection 1Selection 2- This piece made me feel _____________. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 259 .

Scenario 1 Scenario 2 Scenario 3 Scenario 4 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 260 .SAMPLE LESSONS Scenarios Template # 2 In this template. however. dynamics. Consider tempo. you will write what you think would be a theme song for the scenario your teacher reads. You may use an existing piece of music. you need to make sure that you are using school appropriate music. and instruments.

because I hit Carol with a meter stick. the new student at school with the cute accent from Hungary. Have students finish the worksheet by underlining the musical terms. Melody entered the Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 261 . and writing it down next to each musical term.) Select one or two musical words. The weather was perfect and the stadium was packed. was going to be there. Write the definition next to the word on the word wall and on the student’s paper. such as pitch or rest. (I. have students look up the musical definition of the term using a musical dictionary or music textbook. (II.C) Discuss musical terms that have multiple meanings. Discuss the answers as a class and have students correct any errors. Then. Carol had another motive for coming to the game.A) Develop a comprehension of the relationships of music to the other fine arts. looking up the musical definition. Ben had another reason for coming. • I was sent to see the Principal. Go over the first sentence with the students and underline the words that are musical terms. “I am not going to repeat myself. and have the students identify and discuss the multiple meanings of these words. (A list of possible terms is provided at the end of the lesson. • Pitch your tent in the flat area with grass. (See Appendix for the Music Glossary from the Voluntary State Curriculum. Put the rubber band down!” • It is only natural to want modern computer equipment. Whitney Houston was singing “The National Anthem” and this was a perfect opportunity to hear her live and in person. (This lesson and musical vocabulary list can be used throughout the year to introduce new musical terms and their multiple meanings in preparation for the MSA assessments.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Describe the characteristics of musical sound. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Share the following story with the students: Ben and Carol were so excited.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 6 Lesson Title: R W Multiple Meanings and Musical Terms Overview: Students will study multiple meanings of words in order to define the musical use of the term.) Introductory and Developmental Activities: Guided Practice Activities: Distribute the following text on a worksheet or a similar text which uses the musical term or terms: • The teacher said. They were going to see the Orioles play the Red Sox – the first major league game of the season. Have students define the meaning of the words using the context clues from the text. His ma told him that Melody.

0 – No attempt made to complete the story or write the definitions.SAMPLE LESSONS stadium right on cue. Then have them finish the story using more musical terminology. “the program is starting. 3 – Students completed the story with additional musical terms and included somewhat appropriate definitions for the musical terms. Assessment: Assess the students’ work using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students completed the story with additional musical terms and included appropriate definitions for the musical terms. “Oh. Have the class identify and define the musical terms. 2 – Students attempted to complete the story with a few additional musical terms and included some of the definitions for the musical terms. “I’m going to go talk to her.” he said. 1 – Students attempted to complete the story but did not include the definitions. Closure Activities: List of Possible Terms: Accent Alteration Band Carol Cue Major Meter Natural Pitch Range Rest Rhythm Album Arrangement Bar line Chord Cut time Medieval Modern Perfect Program Repeat Rhapsody Root Al fine Balance Ben – as in “ben marcato” Con Ma .” said his sister.as in “lento ma non troppo” Melody Motive Petite Principal Resonance Roll Round Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 262 . give it a rest Ben.” Have students independently underline the musical terms and give their musical definitions on a separate sheet of paper. Have students share their stories with the class.

1) Using personal knowledge of the students. Emphasize that the pattern should be easy to recognize and remember. for example. Savvy directors can use the music to foreshadow coming events. It can be traced back to Richard Wagner. themes are used for each of the main characters. is The Lord of The Rings. Leitmotifs are a compositional tool that allows the composer to tell a story.” We all knew when the shark was coming!) Guided Practice Activities: Have students brainstorm what they would want their personal theme to be. The listener is quickly able to recognize the sound of each of these themes.” “I do not recognize this piece of music. In Star Wars.” Warm-up: Introductory and Developmental Activities: Share with students the following information about leitmotif: The leitmotif is a concept that is widely used by composers today. tempo.1) Write compositions in complex forms such as fugue and theme and variations. the ring. dynamics. Some examples: Harry Potter Fresh Prince of Bel Air Star Wars Have students complete one of the following statements: “I recognize this piece of music. A definition of the leitmotif is a musical theme that is directly tied to a specific person. and probably the most developed of those mentioned.B. and the main characters.A. All three movies in the series use themes for death. Luke Skywalker. who used it heavily in his operas. Specifying note values will make this activity easier for students to conquer. Record personal choices from the discussion on chart paper or the board. thing. Model how to compose an eight note pattern that will be a personal theme. In the Harry Potter movies. or event. and the theme itself becomes a powerful part of the story. (III. It is from _____________.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 7 Lesson Title: Leitmotif Overview: Students will examine the concept of leitmotif in order to compose a personal theme song. and Princess Leia. composer John Williams wrote easily recognizable themes for Darth Vadar. place. (III. Discuss instruments. to create suspense (think about “Jaws. Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • Investigate the use of electronic instruments and equipment in the making of music. choose a theme that the students will recognize. A third example. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 263 . and note values.

or MIDI if access is available. Some students should be able to correctly notate their melody on staff paper. pianos. such as recorders. 0 – Students made no attempt at composition. They should record their brainstorming in case they get stuck in the process. record the class theme created during the Guided Practice on any technology available. 2 – Students wrote a partial melody. 3 – Students wrote a melody for their theme. or hum themes from television or movies for other students to guess. Discuss what that theme says about the movie or TV show.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students follow the same thought process to create their own lietmotif. guitars. whistle. Assess student compositions using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students wrote a melody that fit with ideas that they wrote for their personal theme. but it is awkward. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 264 . less than the specified eight beats. Assessment: Closure: Have students sing. While students are working. if possible. 1 – Students attempted to write the melody but were not able to complete the assignment. Students should be able to perform their themes. Their decisions should be a map to completing this activity. Provide students with several choices for instruments to use for their theme.

265 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . guitarists. Identify the blues form used for this piece.2) Write compositions in complex forms. Listen to a blues piece such as “Joe Turner Blues” from Music and You. The first blues music was performed by singers. (I. (III.D. (I. The blues is primarily a vocal solo or narrative with instrumental accompaniment and a fixed harmonic progression. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Share the following information about the blues with students: The blues is a style of music that began in America in the early twentieth century and its roots can be found in spirituals and work songs.SAMPLE LESSONS Grade 6 – Lesson 8 Lesson Title: R W The Blues Overview: Students will analyze the blues and their relationship to the African-American Spiritual in order to compose their own blues piece. Explain that a chord is three or more tones produced at the same time.A. and banjo players. The 12-bar blues is the most commonly used form. The chord symbols on the chart will represent the root note of each chord. influenced the development of musical styles in the United States. Grade 6. and 16-bar blues. first playing the full chord and then playing the root note for each chord only. A blues note is a pitch that is lowered by one half step. In order to learn the 12-bar blues chord progression.4) Relate the ways in which music of various cultures such as African. the students will be playing the root notes only today. Identify call and response as a common musical technique used in African-American spirituals and jazz music. and Latin American.B. (I.1) Day 1: What is the blues? Warm-Up: Echo sing several simple phrases or a familiar call and response song. European. (This unit may take several lessons.1) Read and play a harmonic classroom instrument using standard chord symbols. 12-bar blues.A. (II. Play the progression on an instrument of choice. There are three distinct blues forms: 8-bar blues. Guided Practice Activities: Display the chord progression for “Joe Turner Blues” or the selection played earlier.) Indicator(s) from Scope and Sequence: • • • • • Analyze musical selections for the use of syncopation and blues notes.2) Sing and play melodies and descants to accompany songs.B.

Closure Activities: Review the 12-bar blues form and directions for the assignment. Review the 12-bar chord progression using movement. and V chord pat head. and the third phrase answers or completes the statement. Students should begin to work in class and then complete the assignment as homework. the second phrase repeats this statement. 2 – Students were generally accurate but were not able to maintain the chord progression. Have students take turns playing the 12-bar chord progression while the rest of the class sings the song and demonstrate the movement. Have students analyze “Joe Turner Blues” lyrics to see if they follow this format. Review the information about chords and chord roots. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students create their own blues lyrics in the style and form of “Joe Turner Blues. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the chord progression from previous lesson. 3 – Students were generally accurate in maintaining the assigned chord progression.SAMPLE LESSONS Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Closure Activities: Review the three distinct blues forms. Explain how to add the fifth of each chord to the progression and display the pattern with these two notes. explain how all of the notes in each chord are already being played. Guided Practice Activities: Explain that the 12-bar blues lyrics often are written in a standard form. If using autoharps or guitars. The first phrase makes a statement.” (AAB text form) They should be able to sing their lyrics to the same tune or a composed melody while playing the 12-bar blues accompaniment on an instrument. if using tonebar instruments. Assessment: Assess students as they perform the chords while singing: 4 – Students were able to maintain the chord progression with minimal errors. On the I chord pat knees. 0 – Students made no attempt to play the chord progression. IV chord pat shoulders. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 266 . Day 2: The 12-bar blues chord progression Warm-Up: Sing “Joe Turner Blues” or the blues song introduced in the previous lesson. 1 – Students made a recognizable attempt at playing the chord progression but were not able to maintain it and made several errors. Have students play the “Joe Turner Blues” chord progression on classroom instruments.

Guided Practice Activities: Review the 12-bar blues lyrics form from the “Joe Turner Blues. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 267 . Other students should complete their BCR forms following each performance. Decide which form it is: 8-bar. Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Allow students to share instruments and practice their compositions. Closure Activities: Remind students that all blues pieces will be performed for the class during the next lesson and students should bring a copy of their lyrics. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Distribute and review the BCR forms to each student. Review the “Joe Turner Blues.” Review the 12-bar chord progression using movement while singing.” Remind students that their compositions have to follow that form. Songs should be given a title. Day 4: Warm-up: Performance Day! *Performing the compositions may take more than one day. _______________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Independent Activities/Meaningful-Use Task: Have students perform their blues compositions for the class. 12-bar or 16-bar. Introductory and Developmental Activities: Review the 12-bar chord progression using movement while singing. They need to be prepared to perform them for a grade. Form should include the following: Performer(s) ____________________________ Title of Song ____________________________ What was the best part of the performance? ____________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ What part of the performance needs improvement? Give specific ideas for how it might be improved.SAMPLE LESSONS Day 3: Rehearsing our blues compositions Warm-up: Listen to a new blues song.

2 – Students evaluated the performance with few details from the performance or ideas from their own experiences. 0 – Students made no attempt to evaluate the performance or writing did not answer the BCR. 3 – Students evaluated the performance given limited details from the performance or limited ideas from their own experiences. Their lyrics were somewhat interesting. Their lyrics were creative and interesting.SAMPLE LESSONS Assessment: Assess the student performances using the following scoring tool: 4 – Students performed their piece with minimal errors and with correct phrasing and format. 1 – Students made many errors and did not follow the correct format. 3 – Students performed their piece with minimal errors but the phrasing or format contained some errors. 0 – Students made no attempt to write or perform a blues piece. Assess the BCR responses using the following rubric: 4 – Students evaluated the performance completely given details from the performance and ideas from their own experiences. 1 – Students attempted to evaluate the performance but the evaluation was incomplete. 2 – Students made several errors in their performance but the correct format was used. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 268 . Closure Activities: Discuss with students other topics for blues creations.

Appendix Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 269 .

followed by a contrasting section.) Classroom Instruments Any of a number of musical instruments typically found in a general music classroom. woodwind. guitar. or percussion instruments and instruments from various cultures. verbal description. customs. and experiences of a given people at a given time. Acoustic Sound Sources All instruments that do not require electronics to produce sound.) Articulation Clarity and distinct rendition in musical performance. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 270 . dynamics. and other developing technology. Aesthetic Criteria Standards used for assessing the effectiveness of music. Call-and-Response A song style that follows a simple question-and-answer pattern in which a soloist leads and a group responds. and form are left wholly or partly to the discretion and creativity of the performer. basic midi devices such as keyboards. (Aspects such as melody. Orff instruments (melody and rhythm). Accuracy The ability to be precise and avoid errors. followed by a repetition of the beginning.) Blend The process of producing tones that pass imperceptibly into each other. Bass Clef F clef that indicates the placement of F below Middle C on the staff. and movement. and the context in which a particular work is being experienced. (It is used for low-pitched instruments and voices and for left-hand keyboard parts. emotional makeup of the listener. other visual representation. Compose Process of creating a musical work Culture(s) The shared ideas. Chance Music Music in which composers deliberately leave parts of the composition and performance undetermined. and small auxiliary instruments. rhythm. Dynamics The volume of sound. inclusive of. (These may include the quality of the aural perception. beliefs. Electronic Sound Sources Personal computers. timbre. Descant A freely written or improvised soprano part added to a melody. but not limited to: keyboard. drum machines. synthesizers. including brass. the loudness or softness of a musical passage. string. sequencers.Maryland State Department of Education MUSIC GLOSSARY from the Voluntary State Curricula ABA Often referenced as “song form.” musical structure with a beginning section. It is also known as aleatory music. Describe Demonstrate understanding of music through reading and writing music notation.

Fugue A polyphonic composition consisting of a series of successive melody imitations. Skip. Electrophones – Instruments using electronic circuits. Meter A rhythmic measure of a certain number of beats. dynamics. slide. which have an organized and recognizable shape. Locomotor Movement Movement through space involving a change in location. Genre Category of music marked by a distinctive style. devised in 1914. and percussion. Folk Music The indigenous music of the world evoking the life and culture from which it comes. Homophonic A style of musical texture in which a single melody is supported by chords. (Music often handed down by the aural/oral tradition. a moving base involving a progressive relocation of the body in space. Intonation The act of singing or playing in tune. and one half step. (The five major categories are: Idiophones – Self sounding instruments. including pitch. or content. Melody A succession of notes. (Examples of basic steps are walk. duration. and jump. hop. form. one half step. three whole steps. or families: string. for classification of musical instruments based on the sound produced by the vibrating material. woodwind.Elements of Music Components of musical activity. texture. and tone color. Chordophones – String instruments. brass. Membranophones – Instruments producing sound by means of a stretched skin or membrane. Free Form Musical structure that relies less on repetition and contrast and more on motivic development. Interval The distance in pitch between two tones. Aerophones – Wind instruments with the sound caused by vibrating air. leap. Listen To make a conscious effort to hear. Hornbostel-Sachs Classification System A system. like instruments are often categorized in four groups.) Major Key (Major Mode) Tonality of a composition based on a scale formula of two whole steps. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 271 . Families of Instruments In Western music. Melodic Pattern A representative example of a short melody or combined melodies. run. being intent upon the various aspects of musical composition and performance.) Form The way a musical composition is organized. often referring to repetition and contrast within the work. form. and gallop are examples of irregular rhythmic combinations. varying in pitch.) Improvisation Spontaneous musical invention commonly associated with jazz.

bouncing. (A frequent pattern is ABACADA. or presented in retrograde Solfeggio A method of sight reading using the syllables. often used by composers as a building block. usually instrumental. Polyphonic A texture which is characterized by the simultaneous combination of different melodies and rhythms. Pentatonic Any five-tone scale.Minor Key (Minor Mode) Tonality of a composition based on a scale formula of one whole step. pulling. MI. movement of the body around its own axis.TI. which are then transposed. also called canon. swinging. hands or arms only. in which one section intermittently recurs. two whole steps. one half step. unvarying melody repeated continually throughout a composition. FA. Music Structure Synonymous with form. stretching. “DO.) Serialism Use of a set sequence of pitches as the basis for a musical composition. SOL. Rhythmic Pattern A representative example of a short rhythm or set of rhythms. the official lists are available from the Maryland Music Educators Association. it includes bending. or the entire body. and twisting. (In Maryland. (Also called axial movement. DO” Staff A set of five lines and four spaces on which music is notated. distinctive musical pattern or figure. 272 Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music . Non-Locomotor Movement Movement that occurs above a stationary base. Style Musical characteristics shared by a “school” or group of composers. such as the ordering of the twelve chromatic tones. one half step. two whole steps. It may include fingers only.) Round A composition in which the same melody is started at different times and sounded together. shaking. Movement Patterns Any type of bodily response to music. pushing. RE. often referring to repetition and contrast within the work. process by which a composer or performer uses musical material in a unique manner. Rhythm Combinations of long and short sounds that convey a sense of movement – pertaining to everything having to do with the time aspect of music. the way a musical composition is organized. Scale of 1 – 6.) Ostinato A brief. feet only. Pitch The highness or lowness of sound determined by its frequency of vibration. inverted. LA. Motive (Motivic) A short. Rondo A form of composition. Graded Music Publishers and music education organizations grade music according to level of difficulty.

) Transposition Changing a whole piece or a section of a piece from one pitch level (key or tone row) to another. beliefs. Treble Clef The sign. customs.g. Theme and Variations A musical form in which a theme is stated. World Culture(s) The shared ideas. musical instruments are classified by family: string. Verse and Refrain Song form in which each stanza. Romantic.. Tempo (Tempi) The speed at which a piece of music is performed. which indicates that the line on the staff on which it is placed. woodwind. Western Traditional Instrument Classification System In this system. variations may be sectional or continuous. Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 273 . and percussion. (See timbre. Baroque.Stylistic Eras Approximate time periods in music history during which composers used similar compositional techniques. Two Staff System Two connected sets of five lines and four spaces used to notate two part vocal or instrumental music. Timbre The distinctive tone quality of a sound. and experiences of a given people at a given time. is the G a fifth above middle C (It is used for high-pitched instruments and voices and for right-hand keyboard parts). e. (See tone color. then varied in a succession of statements. Classic. Renaissance. and Impressionist.) Tone color Specific quality of a sound. brass. or line of metrical writing. is followed by a chorus that is repeated after each verse.

to hear and understand. university. The Kodály Envoy is the quarterly publication of the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. and to serve as an advocate for music education in schools. It includes guides on technology. NATS: National Association of Teachers of Singing www. Teaching Music focuses on practical articles in specific areas. O.org The American Orff-Schulwerk Association is a professional organization of music and movement educators dedicated to the creative teaching approach developed by Carl Orff and Gunild Keetman. composition. The Orff Echo is the official publication of the American Orff-Schulwerk Association. medicine. and teaching. The Music Educators Journal offers timely articles on teaching approaches and philosophies.MENC: Music Educators National Conference www. private teachers.mmea-maryland. senior high. P. middle school. research. publication.org/ The Organization of American Kodaly Educators was founded in 1973.php is the largest association of teachers of singing in the world. Members of NATS find themselves in a community of friends and colleagues who are all seeking the same goal: excellence in teaching and singing. Published quarterly. college. private school. which reaches all areas of music education: choral. voice science.nats. MMEA is a not-for-profit association incorporated in the State of Maryland whose mission is to provide professional development for music teachers. orchestra. The two local chapters are the Middle Atlantic Chapter and the Greater Baltimore Chapter. Articles and columns cover a variety of topics. to move and create . Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music Professional Organizations 274 . and especially voice pedagogy. both for themselves and their students. Its purpose is to promote Kodaly's concept of "Music for Everyone" through the improvement of music education in schools and to enrich the quality of life of the people of the U. and music supervisors.A.org/ is the professional association for the school music teachers of Maryland. general music.learning to sing and play.S. Box 391089 Cleveland. AOSA: AMERICAN ORFF-SCHULWERK ASSOCIATION www.should be an active and joyful experience.org/ is the national association for music education. A reference journal. Its mission is to advance music education by encouraging the study and making of music by all. through music education. Members of MMEA receive its official publication. OH 44139 (216) 543-5366.acdaonline. Membership in MENC includes two of its publications. with members in more than 25 countries. it serves as an historical record and is a venue for teachers of singing and other scholars to share the results of their work in areas such as history. band. MMEA and MENC have joint memberships. Its official publication is the Choral Journal. They are joined by their belief that learning about music . The official publication of NATS is the Journal of Singing. advocacy resources and how-to articles in all specialty areas. OAKE: ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN KODALY EDUCATORS www. diction. ACDA strives through arts advocacy to elevate choral music's position in American society.oake. ACDA: American Choral Directors Association www.org/index. it provides vital research information and the dissemination of teaching ideas pertaining to Orff Schulwerk. elementary.menc. MMEA: The Maryland Music Educators Association www. the Maryland Music Educator. current trends and issues in music education and the latest in products and services. The local chapter is the MUSIK: MARYLAND UNITED SPECIALISTS IN KODALY.org/ is a nonprofit music education organization whose central purpose is to promote excellence in choral music through performance. research. junior high.aosa. In addition. which provides current information regarding the teaching of singing as well as results of recent research in the field. The editorial purpose of the Choral Journal is to provide ACDA members with practical and scholarly information about choral music and its performance. opportunities for excellence for music students and teachers.

Information needs to be revised on the __________________________________________________________________ ___________________ ______ following: are: 7. __________________________________________________________________ Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 275 . Thank you for helping to review and revise your curriculum so that it is meaningful to your teaching.CURRICULUM GUIDE EVALUATION FORM This form is to be used by individual teachers to provide a reaction to the curriculum guide currently being used. please complete the form and send it to the Coordinating Supervisor of Special Area Programs. In-service was received on this publication. 3.) should be added to the document. Teachers could use further in-service on the following topics/chapters/units: __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ 4. PGIN: 7690-_______ __________________________________________ Name of Document __________________________________________ Name of Unit/Chapter Evaluated ______________________ Instructional/Grade Level 1. The attached material (outline. The in-service was (adequate. Yes ______ __________________ Publication Date No ________ 2. The errors/omissions noted in the document are on page(s)___________________ __________________________________________________________________ 5. inadequate) for using this document. lesson plan. ISSC Building. etc. The best written and most helpful sections or pages of this document __________________________________________________________________ ____ 6. Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Your input is necessary in order to assess what revisions must be made in the document. At the end of each unit taught or after teaching from the entire document.

Do the lessons contain realistic teaching time frames? Yes _____ No ______ 11. Did the format of the guide make it easy to use? Yes _____ No _____ 9. Was the content appropriate for the level of teaching? Yes ____ No _____ 14. Does the content adequately provide for Title IX (sex equality) guidelines? Yes ____ No ____ 15. Does the content adequately provide for inclusion of information about multi-cultural and multiracial relationships? Yes ____ No ____ 16. Are there a sufficient number of teaching lessons/activities? Yes ____ No ____ 12.8. Are there a sufficient number of available resources listed? Yes ____ No ____ 13. The following suggestions would improve this document: __________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ Name (if desired) ______________________________________________ School ______________________________________________________ Curriculum Framework – Elementary Vocal and General Music 276 . What changes would you like to see included? ____________________________ __________________________________________________________________ 10.