You are on page 1of 22

PowerTalk

:
Investing to Keep the Country Strong: A Summary Report

In cooperation with

June 22, 2011 Ottawa, Ontario

PowerTalk Symposium

1

Introduction
On June 22, 2011, Canada 2020 – Canada’s Progressive Centre – in partnership with the Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), hosted a panel discussion called: PowerTalk: Investing to Keep the Country Strong. The intent of the event was for the panel to explore the implications of Canada’s substantial electricity infrastructure investment deficit. Panellists were asked to identify the impediments to investment and advance ideas on how to move forward and how to pay for the needed investments.

The panel (left to right) consisted of: • • • • • Jason Myers, President and CEO, Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters; The Hon. John Manley, President and CEO, Canadian Council of Chief Executives; Don Newman (event moderator), Chair, Canada 2020 Advisory Board, and Senior Strategic Advisor, Bluesky Strategy Group; Derek Burney, Senior Strategic Advisor, Norton Rose LLP; and Craig Alexander, Senior Vice President and Chief Economist, TD Bank Financial Group.

PowerTalk Symposium

2

Setting the Stage
Pierre Guimond, President and CEO, CEA, set the stage for the panel with a short presentation outlining the state of Canada’s electricity infrastructure and its investment needs. Mr. Guimond pointed out that the electricity grid has delivered reliable service to consumers and businesses for decades at highly competitive prices. The current electricity infrastructure, which was built largely in the 1960s and 1970s, has had competitive prices as one of its core features – lower prices than south of the border – in part to attract businesses to Canada for which electricity is an important input cost, notably manufacturing. In that sense, electricity policy in Canada has been a de facto industrial strategy. This has served business, retail consumers and the economy well for decades. Guimond noted that by the 1990s, investment in the electricity grid slowed dramatically, as demand slowly caught up to supply, while governments and the electricity industry concentrated on maintaining relatively low prices for consumers. Due to underinvestment during this period, Canada must now make unprecedented catch-up investments. The existing infrastructure must not only be renewed, but the system itself, according to Guimond, must be

Pierre Guimond, President & CEO, Canadian Electricity Association

transformed from one designed to support a smaller economy and smaller population base to one that supports the energy-intensive information and electronic devices consumers of today demand, as well as the sustainable economy of the future and the mass use of electric vehicles, among other electricity-hungry consumer innovations. As a result of this investment deficit and these new pressures on the system, estimates from the Conference Board of Canada and the International Energy Agency conclude Canada needs to spend approximately $15 billion annually on electricity infrastructure investment for the next twenty years. Guimond remarked that this constitutes “a scale of investment never before seen in this country.” Consequently, investment in electricity infrastructure is an issue of significant national importance that needs a much greater profile in national and provincial debates. For his part, Guimond called on the federal government to redouble its efforts to play a constructive, facilitative role, respectful of provincial jurisdiction in electricity generation and transmission, to help spur the needed investment. Electricity investment must, according to Guimond, be thought of as a major national priority linked directly to

PowerTalk Symposium

3

securing Canada’s economic competitiveness, as well as a means to securing reliable reasonably-priced electricity for consumers.

Challenges to Grid Investment
A number of impediments and challenges to grid investment were identified in the panel discussion. The panellists basically agreed that these impediments needed to be tackled and overcome for any major electricity grid investments to proceed in a timely fashion.

Fiscal Constraints
Panellists agreed that the scale of investment cited by the Conference Board and the International Energy Agency (IEA) was accurate. Craig Alexander was of the view that most costs estimates are actually on the low side, that most estimates under-state the demands, and that Canada needs at a minimum a 50% increase in investment relative to past spending. Jason Myers stated that the relatively flat demand growth for electricity today is going to increase rapidly as some big resource projects come on stream in the next three to four years, at which point rates will “go through the roof” given the current state of the infrastructure and the supply it generates and transmits. Panellists also agreed that the electricity infrastructure deficit presented a major challenge for governments – federal and provincial – all of which are wrestling down fiscal deficits, some of which are very large and unsustainable. Derek Burney said investment in the grid of the magnitude suggested by the Conference Board and IEA “is a tall order when governments don’t have that kind of fiscal wherewithal.”

Hon. John Manley, PC, President & CEO, Canadian Council of Chief Executives

Craig Alexander re-enforced Derek Burney’s point when he said that the fiscallyconstrained environment in which we live presents politicians with some very tough decisions going forward. Alexander expressed that we cannot under-estimate how important electricity infrastructure is to our economy and our way of life, yet he feels it remains largely overlooked and under-appreciated. Jason Myers agreed with the fiscal constraints faced by governments, but suggested the money must be found because “vision without money is a hallucination.” The comments on the fiscal limitations of government led Craig Alexander to argue that governments alone cannot foot the bill to meet the electricity infrastructure deficit. For this reason alone the private sector will have to become more involved in electricity infrastructure investments and governments will need to find ways to “crowd in” private investment.

PowerTalk Symposium

4

Regulatory Inefficiency
Regulatory over-lap, duplication and inefficiencies were raised as a serious impediment – greater even than the fiscal constraints – to any major investment in grid infrastructure. Derek Burney referred to a “regulatory morass of approvals” in the electricity sector, with “too much government, too much regulation, and too much over-sight for a rational policy framework.” This, Burney claimed, results in a time-frame of six to ten years to get approvals for a power project. John Manley re-enforced this view by pointing out that not only are multiple levels of government involved in regulatory approvals, but that multiple departments within each government are involved, all of which adds to regulatory costs, complexities, and inefficiencies and slows approvals. Craig Alexander pointed out the difficulty in putting a dollar value on the regulatory cost but conceded these costs are enormous. He agreed with Derek Burney that the time frame for major projects is a ten year lag. This means if governments and utilities do not act now on grid investments, Canada will find itself behind the curve and will run into even greater problems down the road. Although few specific suggestions for reform were put on the table by panellists, the basic message they delivered was that regulatory reform and streamlining is imperative for grid investment to proceed.

Mixed Messaging on Electricity Pricing
The extent to which electricity prices are subsidized by governments was raised as an impediment to investment. According to Derek Burney, in the province of Ontario, “massive subsidies on renewables and price rebates” have given the public the impression that low prices can be sustained, which he does not believe is possible. On the other hand, politicians in the McGuinty government have been telling Ontarians for the past year that electricity prices will be rising significantly in the coming years. This is a prime example of the mixed messages that consumers are receiving from their governments

Derek Burney, OC, LLD, Senior Strategic Advisor, Norton Rose LLP

on electricity supply and prices, which tends to muddle the public’s mind on the need for grid investment. According to Burney, as a result of this mixed messaging, “not in my back yard” views often prevail locally with respect to specific projects because the public has no appreciation of the poor state of existing infrastructure.

PowerTalk Symposium

5

Subsidized Electricity is Not an Effective Social Policy
Burney argued that governments should no longer deal with pressures on low-income citizens through what he termed “universal electricity price subsidies.” Rather, legitimate affordability issues for Canadians should be dealt with through appropriately designed social policy. He also argued that subsidizing business electricity rates makes no sense in the long-term. John Manley essentially agreed with Burney and pointed out that Canadians have taken some pride in low-cost electricity, especially in Ontario. As a result, politicians have not confronted voters with the fact that our current electricity pricing system is an “extremely poorly-planned social policy to make electricity affordable to everyone, whether or not affordability is an issue” for the individual. Governments decided, according to Manley, to subsidize consumer prices, which he argued is anti-conservation and anti-green. He claimed that everyone in Ontario politics today is competing to make electricity more affordable for Ontarians, rather than telling the public the truth about electricity supply, demand and pricing. Manley argued that we need an “adult conversation” about electricity, as much as we do about health care. Craig Alexander agreed that prices are subsidized, which induces consumption not conservation, and that prices thus need to increase accordingly. Subsidizing electricity for the whole population, in his view, does not make sense, although he stated that there will remain a continuing need to provide some level of subsidy for business to secure their competitiveness and preserve jobs. John Manley disagreed, arguing that you cannot run a policy where business gets a big subsidy and consumers do not because it runs against the conservation principle and is not sustainable politically.

Building a Competitive Business Environment
Jason Myers agreed with Craig Alexander on the need to continue some level of business subsidy. He pointed out that electricity rates in the U.S. today are competitive, and this, plus the high costs of regulation in Canada, a high dollar and low-profit margins, are significant competitive issues for Canadian business. Myers stated that Canadian business recognizes rates will have to increase, “the question is how fast and how that can be offset to some extent to remain competitive.” Myers claimed that, notwithstanding the current electricity subsidy, businesses in Canada are paying a tremendous price for electricity, and, more fundamentally, some companies are dealing with unreliable supply of electricity.

Jayson Myers, President & CEO, Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters

In the final analysis, all panellists agreed that the current approach to subsidies needed reform as they are a roadblock to increased investments. However, there were differences in views on whether subsidy reforms should apply to only consumers or to both consumers and business.

PowerTalk Symposium

6

Intergovernmental Co-operation
Panellists discussed the federal and provincial government roles in getting the needed investment moving. John Manley argued that the federal government should take on its responsibility to promote a national strategy around energy and electricity, in collaboration with the provinces. In his view, the much-discussed East-West power grid is not a sensible solution, but regional grids should be pursued. He also picked up on Jason Myers’ point about the need to ensure the reliability of supply for business, and suggested that reliability is something the federal government could champion. Derek Burney lamented the lack of transmission facilities between Ontario and Quebec to get the hydro produced in Northern Quebec to Southern Ontario where it is needed. In his view, investment in Ontario-Quebec grid infrastructure is practical and needs to be an immediate priority rather than subsidizing solar and wind power (which will only provide a small fraction of electricity needs). He suggested that the federal government’s decision to provide loan guarantees to Newfoundland and Labrador to develop the Lower Churchill project sets a precedent that Ontario and Quebec should exploit, asking for the same treatment from Ottawa to develop an Ontario-Quebec transmission grid. Burney also thought the federal and provincial governments need to work together toward the goal of a more-streamlined regulatory process. Craig Alexander stated that governments need to find ways to crowd in private sector investment given their fiscal constraints. In his view, we need “clarity around the rules of the game,” and confidence that those rules are not going to change overnight due to political pressures or exigencies at either level of government. Alexander claims a panCanadian energy strategy could emerge that would attract a lot of private investment, but the problem would be uncertainty in the rules of the game and in government positioning and thinking on electricity infrastructure investment.

Craig Alexander, Senior VP & Chief Economist, TD Bank Financial Group

Green Energy
There was some discussion and disagreement among the panellists on “green energy.” Derek Burney claimed the Ontario government’s effort to stimulate the development of solar and wind power is impractical. He was of the view that natural gas was a better and more practical bet toward a greener energy mix. Burney pointed out that Canada has an estimated one-hundred-year supply of natural gas, which is under-utilized today, especially as a substitute for coal generation. In Burney’s view “natural gas is the answer in the short-term until renewable technologies have proven they are credible and cost-efficient.”

PowerTalk Symposium

7

Craig Alexander was more positive toward renewables and what he called a “green growth strategy.” Alexander also argued that, contrary to popular belief, Canadians are weak on conservation, partly due to artificially-low prices that induce consumption. A more market-based electricity price will lead, in Alexander’s view, to a more conservationist-minded consumer.

John Manley argued that nuclear power, which he described as “absolutely free of carbon emissions,” is very safe if properly managed and constructed and should not be off the table, notwithstanding recent controversies around nuclear power in other countries, notably Japan and Germany. Echoing Derek Burney, Manley argued that base power cannot be replaced with renewables, especially wind. For Manley, a solid, green base-power source is nuclear, which in his view will also prove cheaper in the end.

The PowerTalk Symposium included an audience question and answer session.

PowerTalk Symposium

8

Conclusion
The panel discussion was lively, wide-ranging and in-depth. Panellists brought a range of perspectives and experience to bear on a vastly complex topic. Overall, panellists were in agreement on the major issues, particularly on four major issues which formed the basic conclusion from the discussion. 1. LARGE SCALE INVESTMENT REQUIRED: The scale of investment required in Canada to both maintain the electricity infrastructure and position it for growth, as well as position it for changes in the economy, is at least as great as the estimates of the Conference Board and the IEA, and thereby constitutes an unprecedented investment requirement over the next number of years. 2. ALLOW PRIVATE SECTOR INVESTMENT: The old model of financing this investment, largely via government funding, is unrealistic given the fiscal constraints virtually all governments are grappling with for the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, there is an urgency to act now – we cannot wait until governments have balanced their budgets. The inescapable conclusion is that we need to find new ways to get greater private sector involvement in financing these projects across the country. 3. REGULATORY REFORM IS URGENT: The big impediments to getting the investment moving – and getting the private sector more involved – are regulatory overlap, inefficiencies and the costs of regulation. These lead to a great degree of uncertainty regarding future projects. Unless and until the regulatory process is streamlined – both federally and provincially – it is unlikely that the private sector will step up to the plate in terms of financing on the scale and time-line required. 4. CLEAR PUBLIC MESSAGES ON ELECTRICITY: The issue of electricity infrastructure investment needs to be at the heart of the national policy conversation. This is essential to develop the necessary political and societal consensus for action. The public has been confused by mixed messages from politicians, inconsistent policies from governments, and conflicting price signals from the markets. This has created the impression that the need to act strategically is neither significant nor urgent when in fact it is both. If there was one take-away from this panel, it was that it is time for the Canadian public to be better informed about the state of Canada’s electricity infrastructure and how vitally important it is to our economy and way of life; Canadians must realize that we can no longer take it for granted. The time to act to preserve and improve this unique asset – which is so central to Canada’s economic competitiveness and quality of life – is now.

PowerTalk Symposium

9

About the Event Hosts
Canada 2020 is a non-partisan, progressive centre working to create an environment of social and economic prosperity for Canada and all Canadians. For more information, visit: www.canada2020.ca. Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) members generate, transmit and distribute electrical energy to industrial, commercial, residential and institutional customers across Canada every day. From vertically integrated electric utilities, to power marketers, to the manufacturers and suppliers of materials, technology and services that keep the industry running smoothly -- all are represented by this national industry association. For more information, visit: www.electricity.ca.

About Canada 2020 – Canada’s Progressive Centre
Canada 2020 is supported by:

and the many individual donors to the Canada 2020 Founders' Circle. For more information, visit www.canada2020.ca

Discussion sur l’énergie
Investir pour préserver la vigueur du pays : rapport sommaire

en coopération avec

22 juin 2011 Ottawa (Ontario)

210, rue Dalhousie, Ottawa (Ontario) K1N 7C8 Tél. : 613-789-000, Téléc. : 613-241-4867 www.canada2020.ca

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

1

Introduction
Le 22 juin 2011, Canada 2020 – Canada’s Progressive Centre – en partenariat avec l’Association canadienne de l’électricité (ACÉ), a tenu une discussion en groupe intitulée Discussion sur l’énergie – Investir pour préserver la vigueur du pays. Le but de cet événement était que le groupe étudie les incidences du considérable déficit des investissements pour l’infrastructure d’électricité du Canada. On a demandé au groupe d’experts d’indiquer ce qui nuit aux investissements et de proposer des idées sur la façon d’aller de l’avant et de payer pour ces investissements dont on a cruellement besoin.

Le comité d’experts comprenait (de gauche à droite) : • • • Jason Myers, président et chef de la direction, Manufacturiers et Exportateurs du Canada; L’honorable John Manley, président et chef de la direction, Conseil canadien des chefs d’entreprise; Don Newman (modérateur de la discussion), président du comité consultatif de Canada 2020, conseiller stratégique principal, Bluesky Strategy Group; Derek Burney, conseiller stratégique principal, Norton Rose LLP; et Craig Alexander, vice-président principal et économiste en chef, Groupe Financier Banque TD.

• •

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

2

Mise en contexte
Pierre Guimond, président-directeur général de l’ACÉ, a fait une mise en contexte pour le groupe par une courte présentation décrivant l’état de l’infrastructure d’électricité du Canada et ses besoins en investissements. M. Guimond a précisé que le réseau électrique offre depuis des décennies un service fiable aux consommateurs et aux entreprises, et ce, à des prix hautement concurrentiels. L’une des caractéristiques de base de l’actuelle infrastructure d’électricité, qui a été construite en grande partie au cours des années 1960 et 1970, consiste en ses prix concurrentiels – des prix moins élevés qu’au sud de la frontière – en partie pour attirer au Canada les entreprises, dont l’électricité constitue un important coût des entrants, notamment pour la fabrication. À cet égard, la politique canadienne en matière d’électricité consiste en une stratégie industrielle de fait. Pendant des décennies, cela a été profitable pour les entreprises, pour les consommateurs du service de détail et pour l’économie. M. Guimond a indiqué que dans les années 1990, les investissements dans le réseau électrique avaient considérablement diminué, alors que la demande rattrapait peu à peu l’offre et que les gouvernements et l’industrie de l’électricité se concentraient à maintenir des prix relativement bas pour les consommateurs. En raison de cette période de sous-investissements, le Canada doit maintenant faire du rattrapage sans précédent en matière d’investissements.

Pierre Guimond, président-directeur général, Association canadienne de l’électricité

L’infrastructure actuelle doit non seulement être renouvelée, mais le système lui-même, selon M. Guimond, doit aussi être transformé, passant d’un système conçu pour répondre aux besoins d’une plus petite base de population et d’une économie de plus petite taille à un système permettant de répondre aux besoins des consommateurs dotés d’appareils électroniques et d’information voraces en énergie, ainsi qu’aux besoins liés à l’économie durable de l’avenir et à l’utilisation massive de véhicules électriques, entre autres innovations énergivores. Par suite de ce déficit en matière d’investissements et des nouvelles pressions exercées sur le système d’électricité, selon les estimations du Conference Board du Canada et de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie, le Canada devra faire des investissements d’environ 15 milliards de dollars par année dans l’infrastructure d’électricité pendant les vingt prochaines années. M. Guimond a précisé que cela constitue “ des investissements d’une ampleur jamais vue auparavant au pays ».

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

3

Par conséquent, les investissements dans l’infrastructure d’électricité constituent un enjeu d’une importance nationale considérable auquel on doit accorder beaucoup plus d’attention dans les débats provinciaux et nationaux. Pour sa part, M. Guimond a demandé au gouvernement fédéral de redoubler d’efforts en vue de jouer un rôle constructif et de décisionnaire, tout en tenant compte des compétences provinciales en matière production et de transport d’électricité, et ce, afin d’aider à stimuler les investissements requis. Les investissements dans le secteur de l’électricité doivent, selon M. Guimond, être considérés comme une priorité nationale majeure directement liée au maintien de la compétitivité économique du Canada, ainsi que comme façon de continuer à offrir aux consommateurs un approvisionnement électrique fiable à prix raisonnable.

Défis liés aux investissements dans le réseau
Un certain nombre d’obstacles et de défis nuisant aux investissements dans le réseau ont été mentionnés lors de la discussion en groupe. Le groupe d’experts était essentiellement d’accord sur le fait qu’il faut d’abord surmonter ces obstacles, puis procéder sans tarder aux importants investissements dans le réseau d’électricité.

Restrictions budgétaires
Le groupe d’experts s’entendait pour affirmer que l’ampleur des investissements indiqués par le Conference Board et l’Agence internationale de l’énergie (AIE) était exacte. Craig Alexander était d’avis que la plupart des estimations de coûts étaient en fait optimistes, qu’elles sous-estiment la plupart les besoins et que le Canada doit avoir une hausse de ses investissements d’au moins 50 % par rapport aux dépenses antérieures. Jason Myers a indiqué que la croissance relativement stagnante de la demande d’électricité qu’on connaît actuellement augmentera rapidement lorsqu’on mettra à exécution les importants projets liés aux ressources, soit dans trois ou quatre ans; à ce moment, les tarifs “ exploseront » étant donné la situation actuelle de l’infrastructure et l’électricité qu’elle produit et transporte. Le groupe d’experts a également convenu que le déficit pour l’infrastructure d’électricité présentait un défi de taille pour les gouvernements – fédéral et provinciaux – lesquels sont tous aux prises avec des déficits financiers, dont certains sont considérables et insoutenables. Derek Burney a dit que des investissements dans le réseau selon le montant indiqué par le Conference Board et l’AIE “ sont

L’honorable John Manley, C.P., président et chef de la direction, Conseil canadien des chefs d’entreprise

titanesques lorsque les gouvernements ne disposent pas de ce type de ressources fiscales ».

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

4

Craig Alexander a appuyé le point de Derek Burney en indiquant que ce contexte de contraintes fiscales dans lequel nous vivons place les politiciens devant des décisions très difficiles à prendre pour l’avenir. M. Alexander a dit que nous ne devons pas sousestimer l’importance de l’infrastructure de l’électricité pour notre économie et pour notre mode de vie, mais il a tout de même l’impression qu’elle passe considérablement inaperçue et qu’elle n’est pas appréciée à sa juste valeur. Jason Myers était d’accord avec les restrictions budgétaires auxquelles sont aux prises les gouvernements, mais il a indiqué qu’il fallait absolument trouver cet argent, car “ une vision sans argent n’est qu’une hallucination ». Suivant les commentaires relatifs aux contraintes fiscales du gouvernement, Craig Alexander a fait valoir que les gouvernements ne peuvent pas payer seuls la note du déficit de l’infrastructure d’électricité. Pour cette seule raison, le secteur privé devra plus participer aux investissements dans l’infrastructure d’électricité et les gouvernements devront trouver de nouvelles façons “ d’attirer » les investissements privés.

Inefficacité de la réglementation
Le chevauchement des compétences, les dédoublements et les inefficacités en matière de réglementation ont été soulevés comme étant des obstacles sérieux – plus importants encore que les contraintes financières – aux investissements majeurs dans l’infrastructure du réseau électrique. Derek Burney a fait référence à une “ montagne d’approbations réglementaires » dans le secteur de l’électricité, avec “ trop de présence du gouvernement, trop de réglementation et trop de supervision pour avoir un cadre politique rationnel ». Cela, a indiqué M. Burney, entraîne des délais de six à dix ans avant d’obtenir les approbations pour un projet de production d’électricité. John Manley a appuyé ce point de vue en soulignant que non seulement il y a plusieurs paliers de gouvernement qui participent aux approbations réglementaires, mais aussi que plusieurs ministères au sein de chaque gouvernement sont concernés, lesquels contribuent tous aux coûts, à la complexité et à l’inefficacité de la réglementation, ainsi qu’à la lenteur pour l’obtention des approbations. Craig Alexander a souligné la difficulté de mettre un montant au coût réglementaire, mais a admis que ces coûts sont énormes. Il était d’accord avec Derek Burney pour affirmer que les importants projets accusent un retard de dix ans. Cela signifie que si les gouvernements et les services publics n’agissent pas dès maintenant pour faire des investissements dans le réseau d’électricité, le Canada se retrouvera en bas de la courbe et sera confronté plus tard à des problèmes encore plus importants. Même si les membres du groupe ont proposé quelques suggestions en particulier relativement à une réforme, leur message de base était qu’il est crucial de procéder à une réforme et à une simplification de la réglementation afin d’aller de l’avant avec les investissements dans le réseau électrique.

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

5

Messages variés sur la tarification de l’électricité
L’étendue des subventions gouvernementales pour l’électricité a été soulevée comme étant l’un des obstacles aux investissements. Selon Derek Burney, dans la province de l’Ontario, les “ subventions massives pour les énergies renouvelables et les remises » donnent à la population l’impression qu’on peut maintenir des tarifs bas, ce qui, selon lui, est impossible à faire. D’un autre côté, les politiciens du gouvernement McGuinty disent depuis un an aux Ontariens que le prix de l’électricité augmentera considérablement au cours des prochaines années.

Derek Burney, OC, LLD, conseiller stratégique principal, Norton Rose LLP

Voilà un exemple parfait de messages mixtes qu’entendent les consommateurs de la part de leurs gouvernements relativement à l’approvisionnement et au prix de l’électricité, ce qui crée de la confusion chez la population quant à la nécessité de faire des investissements dans le réseau électrique. Selon M. Burney, la conséquence de ces messages variés entraîne souvent une attitude du “ pas dans ma cour » dans les collectivités lorsqu’il est question de projets bien précis, car la population n’est pas au courant du piètre état de l’infrastructure actuelle.

Les subventions pour l’électricité ne sont pas une politique sociale efficace
M. Burney a fait valoir que les gouvernements ne devraient plus prendre des mesures relativement aux pressions exercées sur les citoyens à faible revenu en ayant ce qu’il a appelé des “ subventions universelles du tarif d’électricité ». Les questions bien légitimes de capacité financière des Canadiens devraient plutôt faire l’objet d’une politique sociale adéquatement mise au point. Il a aussi fait valoir que les subventions pour les tarifs d’électricité des entreprises sont irrationnelles à long terne. John Manley était essentiellement d’accord avec M. Burney et a souligné que l’électricité à bas prix a été une certaine source de fierté pour les Canadiens, en particulier en Ontario. Le résultat en est que les politiciens n’ont pas le courage de dire à leurs électeurs que notre système actuel de tarification de l’électricité est “ une politique sociale extrêmement mal planifiée afin de rendre l’électricité abordable pour tous, que la capacité financière soit un enjeu ou non ». Les gouvernements ont décidé, selon M. Manley, de subventionner les prix pour les consommateurs, ce qu’il a affirmé être anticonservation et antiécologique. Il a indiqué que chaque personne qui fait de la politique en Ontario aujourd’hui se démène pour rendre l’électricité plus abordable pour

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

6

les Ontariens, plutôt que de dire à la population la vérité sur l’offre, la demande et la tarification de l’électricité. M. Manley a indiqué que nous devons avoir une “ conversation d’adultes » sur l’électricité, tout comme nous le faisons pour le système de santé. Craig Alexander a convenu que les prix sont subventionnés, ce qui favorise la consommation et non la conservation, et que les prix doivent donc augmenter en conséquence. Les subventions pour l’électricité accordées à l’ensemble de la population, selon lui, sont illogiques, même s’il a précisé qu’il y aura un besoin constant d’offrir un certain niveau de subvention pour les entreprises afin d’assurer leur compétitivité et de préserver les emplois. John Manley était en désaccord, avançant qu’on ne peut avoir une politique selon laquelle les entreprises ont droit à une subvention importante, mais pas les consommateurs, car cela est contraire au principe de la conservation et n’est pas durable d’un point de vue politique.

Mise en place d’un environnement commercial concurrentiel
Jason Myers était d’accord avec Craig Alexander sur la nécessité de continuer à accorder un certain niveau de subvention pour les entreprises. Il a souligné que les tarifs d’électricité aux É.-U. aujourd’hui sont concurrentiels et que cela, conjugué au coût élevé de la réglementation au Canada, à un dollar élevé et à une faible marge bénéficiaire, constitue un enjeu important pour les entreprises canadiennes. M. Myers a indiqué que les entreprises canadiennes sont conscientes que les tarifs devront augmenter, “ la question est de savoir à quelle rapidité et comment on peut compenser cela jusqu’à un certain point afin de demeurer concurrentiels ».

Jason Myers, président et chef de la direction, Manufacturiers et Exportateurs du Canada

M. Myers a affirmé qu’indépendamment des subventions actuelles pour l’électricité, les entreprises au Canada paient un prix important pour l’électricité et, plus fondamentalement, que certaines entreprises doivent parvenir à fonctionner avec un approvisionnement d’électricité qui n’est pas fiable.

Coopération intergouvernementale
Les membres du groupe ont discuté du rôle des gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux en vue d’obtenir les investissements nécessaires. John Manley a fait valoir que le gouvernement fédéral devrait assumer sa responsabilité de promotion d’une stratégie nationale en matière d’énergie et d’électricité, en collaboration avec les provinces. Selon lui, le réseau d’électricité est-ouest dont il a été amplement question n’est pas une solution judicieuse, mais on devrait continuer d’examiner la solution des réseaux régionaux. Il a aussi repris le point de Jason Myers sur la nécessité d’assurer la fiabilité

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

7

de l’approvisionnement pour les entreprises et a indiqué que la fiabilité est un aspect pour lequel le gouvernement fédéral pourrait jouer un rôle important. Derek Burney s’est désolé du manque d’installations de transport entre l’Ontario et le Québec afin d’amener l’hydroélectricité produite dans le Nord du Québec aux régions du sud de l’Ontario, où on en a grandement besoin. Selon lui, l’investissement dans l’infrastructure du réseau électrique Ontario-Québec est utile et doit être une priorité immédiate, plutôt que les subventions pour la production d’énergie solaire ou éolienne (qui ne répondra qu’à une petite partie des besoins en électricité). Il a suggéré que la décision du gouvernement fédéral d’accorder des garanties de prêt à Terre-Neuve-etLabrador pour mettre au point le projet de la Lower Churchill établit un précédent dont l’Ontario et le Québec devraient tirer profit et demander à Ottawa le même traitement pour la mise en place d’un réseau de transport d’électricité entre l’Ontario et le Québec. M. Burney était également d’avis que les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux doivent travailler ensemble vers l’objectif d’un processus réglementaire plus simplifié. Craig Alexander a indiqué que les gouvernements doivent trouver des façons d’attirer les investissements du secteur privé, étant donné leurs contraintes financières. Selon lui, il faut des “ précisions sur les règles du jeu » et l’assurance que ces règles ne changeront pas du jour au lendemain en raison de pressions politiques ou d’exigences à un palier ou à un autre du gouvernement. M. Alexander affirme qu’il pourrait en découler une stratégie énergétique pancanadienne qui attirerait beaucoup d’investissements privés, mais le problème serait l’incertitude quant aux règles du jeu et quant à la position et à l’opinion du gouvernement relativement aux investissements dans l’infrastructure d’électricité.

Craig Alexander, vice-président principal et économiste en chef, Groupe Financier Banque TD

Énergie verte
Il y a eu une discussion et des désaccords entre les membres du groupe relativement à “ l’énergie verte ». Derek Burney a affirmé que les efforts du gouvernement ontarien en vue de stimuler la mise en valeur de l’énergie éolienne et solaire sont vains. Il était d’avis que le gaz naturel était une meilleure solution et bien plus utile en vue d’avoir un assortiment d’énergie plus écologique. M. Burney a souligné que l’approvisionnement en gaz naturel du Canada est estimé à cent ans, qu’il est sous-utilisé actuellement, en particulier comme solution de remplacement pour la production d’énergie à partir du charbon. Selon M. Burney, le “ gaz naturel est la solution à court terme d’ici à ce que les technologies d’énergie renouvelable se soient révélées dignes de confiance et économiques ».

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

8

Craig Alexander était plus positif à l’égard des énergies renouvelables et de ce qu’il a appelé une “ stratégie de croissance écologique ». M. Alexander a aussi fait valoir que, contrairement à la croyance populaire, les Canadiens sont peu enclins à la conservation, en partie en raison des prix artificiellement bas qui favorisent la consommation. Des prix de l’électricité qui reposeraient plus sur le marché feraient en sorte, selon M. Alexander, que les consommateurs seraient plus axés sur la conservation de l’énergie.

John Manley a soulevé que l’énergie nucléaire, qu’il décrit comme “ ne produisant absolument pas d’émissions de carbone », est très sûre si sa gestion et sa construction sont adéquatement gérées et qu’il ne faudrait pas l’écarter, malgré les récentes controverses entourant le nucléaire dans d’autres pays, notamment le Japon et l’Allemagne. Faisant écho à Derek Burney, M. Manley a débattu que l’énergie de base ne peut pas être remplacée par les énergies renouvelables, en particulier l’éolien. Pour M. Manley, le nucléaire est une source d’énergie de base écologique et solide, qui se révélera également selon lui plus économique en fin de compte.

Le Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie comprenait une période de questions du public.

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

9

Conclusions
La discussion en groupe a été animée, vaste et approfondie. Les membres du groupe ont présenté un éventail de points de vue et d’expérience pour traiter d’un sujet grandement complexe. Dans l’ensemble, les membres du groupe étaient d’accord sur les principaux enjeux, en particulier sur quatre enjeux principaux qui forment les conclusions de base de la discussion. 1. NÉCESSITÉ DE FAIRE DES INVESTISSEMENTS À GRANDE ÉCHELLE : L’ampleur des investissements nécessaires au Canada, à la fois pour maintenir l’infrastructure d’électricité et pour la positionner en vue de sa croissance, ainsi que pour la positionner en vue des changements dans l’économie, est au moins aussi importante que les estimations faites par le Conference Board et l’AIE et constitue donc un besoin d’investissements sans précédent pour les prochaines années. 2. PERMETTRE LES INVESTISSEMENTS DU SECTEUR PRIVÉ : L’ancien modèle de financement de ces investissements, soit principalement par du financement gouvernemental, est irréaliste compte tenu des contraintes financières auxquelles sont aux prises pratiquement tous les gouvernements pour l’avenir prévisible. Néanmoins, il est urgent d’agir dès maintenant – on ne peut attendre que les gouvernements aient atteint l’équilibre budgétaire. La conclusion inévitable est que nous devons trouver de nouvelles façons d’obtenir une participation accrue du secteur privé pour le financement de ces projets partout au pays. 3. URGENCE D’UNE RÉFORME DE LA RÉGLEMENTATION : Les obstacles majeurs qui empêchent d’obtenir des investissements – et d’obtenir une plus grande participation du secteur privé – sont le chevauchement des compétences, les inefficacités et les coûts liés de la réglementation. Ceci entraîne un niveau considérable d’incertitude pour les projets à venir. À moins d’en arriver à un processus réglementaire simplifié – à la fois au fédéral et au provincial – il est peu probable que le secteur privé s’impliquera en ce qui a trait au financement selon l’ampleur et le calendrier qui s’imposent. 4. CLARTÉ DES MESSAGES À LA POPULATION SUR L’ÉLECTRICITÉ : La question des investissements dans l’infrastructure d’électricité doit être au cœur de la conversation politique nationale. Cela est primordial pour en arriver au consensus politique et de société qui s’impose en vue de passer à l’action. La population est confuse par les messages variés des politiciens, les politiques changeantes des gouvernements et les signaux de prix divergents sur les marchés. Cela donne l’impression que la nécessité d’agir de façon stratégique n’est ni importante ni urgente, alors que c’est tout le contraire. S’il y a un point à retenir de cette discussion en groupe, c’est probablement qu’il est temps pour la population canadienne d’être mieux informée sur l’état de l’infrastructure d’électricité du Canada et sur son importance vitale pour notre économie et pour notre mode de vie; les Canadiens doivent réaliser qu’on ne peut plus la tenir pour acquise. Le moment est venu d’agir afin de préserver et d’améliorer cet actif unique qui est au cœur de la compétitivité économique du Canada et de la qualité de vie au Canada.

Symposium Discussion sur l’énergie

10

Les hôtes de l’événement
Canada 2020 est un centre progressiste non partisan dont les activités visent à créer un environnement de prospérité sociale et économique pour le Canada et pour tous les Canadiens. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez : www.canada2020.ca. Les membres de l’Association canadienne de l’électricité (ACÉ) fournissent des services quotidiens de production, de transport et de distribution d’électricité à des clients industriels, commerciaux, résidentiels et institutionnels dans tout le Canada. Tous les intervenants de l’industrie sont représentés dans cette association industrielle nationale : entreprises de service public à intégration verticale, négociants en énergie, fabricants et fournisseurs de matériel, de technologie et de services devant assurer le bon fonctionnement de l’industrie. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez : www.electricite.ca.

À propos Canada 2020 – Canada’s Progressive Centre
Canada 2020 est commandité par :

et les nombreux donateurs du Founders’ Circle de Canada 2020. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez www.canada2020.ca.