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Annual report

Cover: doctor-specialist in training on the Emergency section

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00 VISION 01 CARE 02 QUALITY 03 RESEARCH 04 TRAINING 05 PARTNERSHIP 06 INVESTMENT 07 SERVICES 08 GOVERNANCE

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beyond caring for patients” Jef Peeters. At the same time patients are rightly becoming more articulate. but with an increasing number of chronic disorders. Our leading status is also thanks to our very close working relationship with the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of Ghent University. On 1 October 2010 I took over the management of Ghent University Hospital from Professor Francis Colardyn. learn and undergo treatment on a modern and accessible campus. our aim is to develop in terms of excellence. It is our mission not just to increase our high quality of care.“Caring about people. Our almost 6000strong workforce is on the campus day in day out to turn this mission into a reality. which is also located on our campus. I have come to know UZ Gent as an institution that excels in the field of patient cure and care. but also to make this visible both on and off campus. Ghent University Hospital Health is paramount. healthy future. visitors. We are doing this by investing in people. Ghent University Hospital is constantly evolving. Every day we receive around 15. in 2020 they will be able to stay. all-encompassing approach. More so in the 21st century than ever before. infrastructure and a focus on our customers. This means that people are living longer and longer. work. It also means: providing care to everybody according to a broad.000 patients. All striving towards a common goal: to provide the very best modern care to every patient. Excellence is also providing care that is accessible in all respects. . Click here to order your copy of the annual report. In this annual report we present UZ Gent as it is today: a dynamic organisation that is preparing in all areas for a highly ambitious. Today we are able to detect diseases at an increasingly early stage and more and more successfully. For us. Together with our partners and almost 6000 employees. As a result we are surviving many diseases and conditions that would have been fatal twenty years ago. Visitors to our campus will not fail to notice that we are investing large sums in modernising our infrastructure. This means caring about people beyond caring for our patients. research. and also more and more on improving comfort and providing a better quality of life. Growing together in excellence is our mission. excellence means an outstanding level of care and comprehensive medical expertise. and therefore a customer focus in all services that we offer. We are also working more and more closely within a growing network of regional hospitals. often before any real symptoms develop. staff and students. As a pioneer in health. The principle underlying all these initiatives is the needs and wishes of our patients. Healthcare still focuses on survival. with a strong awareness of their rights. and the quality of care is growing and becoming more sophisticated. CEO.

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both patient groups are able to attend the Ghent University Hospital Neurophysiological Monitoring Centre (NMC) for diagnosis and treatment. Sleep recording takes around 24 hours per patient. From now on. Neurologist and NMC Coordinator. and around 20% of the Belgian population from sleep disorders. This also takes place in the case of children who are at an increased risk of cot death.” Bundling expertise The NMC has 16 modern and pleasant single rooms and a separate children’s department. . “Just like neurologists.000 Belgians suffer from epilepsy. The nursing team specialises in epilepsy and sleep recording and is supported by technologists who are first to analyse the signals recorded. Pneumology. Epilepsy recording is carried out over four days or longer. This is essential in order to make the correct diagnosis and determine the most appropriate treatment for both groups. hence the decision to combine epilepsy and sleep monitoring in children and in adults. because we need to monitor one or more seizures. We use video cameras to observe the patient and an EEG device records the brain activity using electrodes that are stuck to the skin. brain signals and other biological signals.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. “Sleep and epilepsy patients used to be monitored at four different locations within the hospital.Care Leading expertise Neurophysiological Monitoring Centre More than 100. “We use video cameras to monitor the patient and an EEG device records the brain activity using electrodes that are stuck to the skin. and is one of the largest of its kind in Europe. 27 nurses monitor patients with sleep disorders or epilepsy around the clock using video images. explains Professor Paul Boon. This data is then analysed in greater detail by the treating physicians from the various disciplines. Continuous monitoring In the NMC. The centre offers a multidisciplinary approach to both children and adults. The Neurology. This takes place simultaneously. Now it’s all under one roof”. The data is centralised and then analysed. somnologists or sleep experts combine video images with brain signals and other readings in patients complaining of insomnia or extreme drowsiness during the day. General Internal Diseases and Paediatrics sections work together closely and bundle their expertise and equipment for this purpose.

to Gynaecology and Genetics. usually in the navel region. Circus skills applied in rehabilitation Our younger patients in the Children’s Rehabilitation Centre are learning circus skills such as juggling. this often also marks the end of all medical follow-up. acrobatics and tightrope walking. combined with drama. The techniques help them to regain certain skills and vary from easy to highly complex. The chance to demonstrate their abilities boosts their self-confidence and assists with their social reintegration. All children can take part. The children were proud to show off their circus skills at the Handelsbeurs in Ghent in May 2010. LESS stands for Laparo-Endoscopic Single Site Surgery and is a more sophisticated version of the traditional laparoscopy or keyhole surgery. Women who are not diagnosed with the syndrome until they have reached adulthood often also slip through the net. almost 1 in 2000 newborn baby girls suffer from Turner syndrome. wound infection or rupture of scar tissue. The Ghent University Hospital Turner Clinic now conducts three-monthly specialist consultations that combine the specialities with which women suffering from Turner syndrome come into contact. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. via Psychology and Ear.First successful LESS procedures in Urology January 2010 saw surgeons from the Urology section perform the first successful LESS procedure on a patient. the Turner Clinic aims to encourage women with Turner syndrome to undergo as much follow-up as possible. bleeding. Nose and Throat Medicine. Just one opening is made for the laparoscope. This means that they are missing all or part of an X chromosome and will be susceptible to various medical problems throughout their lives. This means that the patient is only left with one scar. These specialities extend from Endocrinology and Cardiology. Once they have left the children’s clinic. regardless of their limitations or disabilities. recovers quickly and is likely to experience fewer complications such as post-operative pain. More and more complex surgical procedures using this technique will probably be performed in the future. . By coordinating its approach in order to offer a comprehensive care package. Improved follow-up for women with Turner syndrome In Belgium.

” Allergy Network Based on their symptoms. Professor Philippe Gevaert. For instance. Paediatric Pneumology and Paediatric Gastroenterology. We have produced a series of flow charts for this purpose that ensure the care is consistent and set out in concrete terms for all care providers. Nose and Throat Medicine. including the Emergency Section. medication and bee or wasp stings. This is a complex puzzle to which UZ Gent takes a multidisciplinary approach. An EpiPen® is an ‘emergency pen’ that people can use to give themselves a shot of adrenaline if they experience another life-threatening allergic reaction. In the Emergency Section our first concern is of course to stabilise patients who are experiencing a life-threatening reaction by administrating medication. On being discharged from the Emergency Section. Pneumology. the hospital has developed an ‘anaphylaxis care pathway’. explains emergency doctor Professor Peter De Paepe. work together within a unique Allergy Network.” A detailed referral procedure is also in place so that patients know which specialist they need to contact and do not needlessly end up going round and round the hospital. Once the allergic reaction is under control. This takes place according to established procedures for both children and adults.” Central allergy telephone number: +32 (0)9 332 67 08 “We have a central allergy telephone number that both general practitioners and patients can call if they have any questions or are looking for information. patients discharged from the Emergency Section are referred to the appropriate section for further diagnosis and follow-up. the search starts for the cause and an appropriate treatment. The anaphylaxis pathway has been in place since Summer 2010. In such cases it is essential to lose as little time as possible. A specialist allergy nurse is available to offer help and support. To make it easier to identify the cause of an allergy.Multidisciplinary approach to life-threatening allergic reactions Every year. Patients receive clear information about the steps they need to take and find their way around more easily. Patients also report to other sections with serious allergic reactions to food. Aftercare is also provided according to a standardised approach. Peter De Paepe: “All care providers within the Emergency Section now work according to a uniform approach. To streamline this search and ensure that it runs smoothly. Dermatology. Established procedures “The aim of a care pathway is to improve the quality of the care”. Finding the right specialist with the right experience is not straightforward.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. . each patient is given an information leaflet about the Allergy Network and an allergy card stating guidelines to follow in the event of anaphylaxis. “One way that we do this is by coordinating all the steps that the patient goes through as effectively as possible. explains: “A number of sections deal with different types of allergies: Ear. we will use fixed criteria to determine whether the patient needs to be given an EpiPen® to take home on discharge from the Emergency Section. around 50 people present at the Emergency Section with a life-threatening allergic reaction. Coordinator of the Allergy Network. all these sections. The network has a central allergy telephone number that both general practitioners and patients can call if they have any questions or are looking for information.

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To make sure that the patient receives the right care at the right time. home or to another institution outside the hospital.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. states Dr. Neurosurgery or Pneumology.Top quality care for people with paraplegia UZ Gent has started to develop a paraplegia (paralysis of the lower limbs and torso) care pathway. but other disorders that cause symptoms of paralysis. “The patient often goes through a lengthy process and it is important that the care provided in the different departments is coordinated”. . for instance with regard to urine and stool patterns. such as multiple sclerosis. decubitus prevention and psychological support. The main problem areas are bowel movement. can be respected wherever possible. Annick Viaene. Viaene. We are focusing on patients aged 15 or over who present in the Emergency Section with a new injury. Centre for Locomotor and Neurological Rehabilitation explains: “The care pathway is designed for patients with paraplegia.” “A patient often goes through a lengthy process and it is important that the care provided in the different sections is well coordinated. also qualify. The process ends with the patient’s discharge to the Rehabilitation Centre. “Fellow therapists and patients also confirmed the major need for uniform guidelines. It is important for care providers to ask these patients detailed questions so that their habits at home. The purpose of this pathway will be to streamline the route that the patient follows from admission to discharge. catheterisation and pain policy. They later end up in patient admissions. usually in Orthopaedics. however we are also looking at patients with an existing injury who come to the hospital at a specific point in time to undergo a procedure.” A lengthy process Patients who are admitted to the Emergency Section need to be referred to Intensive Care or to a surgery area as quickly as possible. Listening to patients Dr. and to provide all therapists in the workplace with clear guidelines.

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This technique is used in combination with other systems to ensure that surgery is carried out as effectively and safely as possible. They must be physically stable. where needed. it lights up flesh-coloured. They can also carry out dialysis more frequently and/or for longer than allowed for in the traditional hospital schedule. This makes it easy to see the border between tumour and normal tissue. sometimes even before he or she is admitted. When the tumour is then examined under ultraviolet light using the surgical microscope. Experienced nurses teach patients how to carry out haemodialysis and look after themselves fully independently at home. The majority of psychosocial care providers are funded by this Cancer Plan. home care. Clearer pictures of brain tumours The Neurosurgery section is using an innovative method to get an even better picture of certain types of brain tumours during surgery. psychosocial staff and paramedics. Ten psychologists. just like at the hospital. If necessary. . Naturally these patients receive the most appropriate medical care. Both patients from UZ Gent and from other centres can follow the training programme. The tumour tissue converts this product into a fluorescent substance. Their task is to prepare patients as well as possible for their admission to and discharge from the hospital. and starting the preoperative preparations helps to improve the quality of admission. However. saving as much of the healthy brain tissue as possible. where the prescribed preoperative tests can be performed and provides detailed information about the procedure and the period of admission. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. the patient is given a drink containing 5-aminolevulinic acid. Three hours before the procedure. eight nursing consultants and three social workers support patients during their time at the hospital. Home haemodialysis takes some of the weight off the hospital’s dialysis department. Politicians have picked up on this message and have launched the National Cancer Plan. Also within the Paediatric Haematology/Oncology section. which in turn enables the neurosurgeon to remove the tumour even more precisely. the medical team has been supplemented in the context of the National Cancer Plan with additional nurses. patients can still rely on support from their regular care providers later on during the outpatient follow-up period. The advantage is that patients can carry out dialysis at a time that suits them. the Social Service is called in to help to prepare for the patient’s discharge. have the right mental attitude and must not have undergone a transplant.Home haemodialysis for kidney patients The Medical Kidney Diseases section’s home haemodialysis project has been in full swing since 2010. in particular neuronavigation and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Their time in the hospital goes more smoothly. Over the past few years. Well-prepared to the hospital and back home Admission nurses have been introduced in the Orthopaedics outpatient clinic. The nurse assesses the patient’s care needs in order to draw up an appropriate timetable and coordinate effectively with the surgery schedule and set out the range of care options. These can include: a need for medical aids. particularly in the period between admission and surgery. In the last few years. rehabilitation at another care institution and so on. Psychosocial support for cancer patients Around 1400 new cancer patients are admitted to Ghent University Hospital every year. leaving greater capacity to admit patients who cannot carry out dialysis on themselves. Patients have been found to be very satisfied with this additional assistance. the Social Service has sufficient time to support the discharge planning process. after the medical consultation and the admission planning. The admission nurse explains how the patient can prepare for admission. the leading centre in Belgium. Taking a detailed nursing case history in the outpatient clinic. He or she will also identify any care problems and restrictions in the patient’s home situation that could impede a smooth discharge from the hospital. this care has also been accompanied by better and better support services. The patients must meet a number of requirements in order to take part in the project. and they are not dependent on the hospital’s schedules. This additional support for patients means that Belgium ranks amongst the top countries in Europe in the field of cancer treatment. Their expectations are realistic and. UZ Gent has done pioneering work in the organisation of oncological care in Belgium and in doing so has consistently highlighted the importance of psychosocial support.

After all. accessibility. In the long term. UZ Gent focuses on tertiary and quaternary healthcare. .000 on top of the standard investment budget. Jan van Meerbeeck is committed to raising the bar even further. But according to Jan van Meerbeeck. Auxiliary nursing staff and care professionals will take over part of the nursing staff’s workload. Both are currently sometimes performing work for which they are overqualified. Waiting times. the care doesn’t end on leaving the hospital. paramedics and various support staff.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. “We have selected four key research areas in which we already play a leading role and in which we want to improve our performance further still and achieve world-class status: genetics.” “The medical care that we provide must be top quality both now and in the future. immunology/inflammatory diseases and neurosciences.” In addition. We need to play a leading role in the development of these care processes. This can’t continue. He is attached to the Pneumology section as a Pneumologist/ Oncologist. the task of secondary hospital can also take on an academic dimension. secondary and tertiary care. and so on are all elements that have an impact on patient satisfaction. But throughout all this we must never forget that quality is primarily determined by the staff: doctors. Key areas At an academic level.Jan van Meerbeeck: new CMO & Chief Physician Professor Jan van Meerbeeck was installed as the new Chief Physician at UZ Gent on 1 December 2010. and over the past few years has focused on the organisation of thoracic oncology at the hospital. Satisfied patients “The medical care that we as a hospital provide must be of a high quality both now and in the future. I foresee a shift in the tasks of doctors and nursing staff. the cafeteria. due to the future shortage of doctors and nursing staff. enabling them to recruit additional staff and leave their hands free for their research activities. oncology. “But the preconditions also play an important role. the new Chief Physician also wants to further strengthen the links between the hospital and the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences in order to develop new cooperation agreements. Nursing staff will take over the more routine tasks currently carried out by doctors. These research groups receive €250. This type of academic research is just as relevant in social terms as purely medical research. nurses. A much-needed effort is underway to recover lost ground in the field of building infrastructure. an area of keen focus today. “There is currently a need for research into transmural care models in which the patient experiences a smooth transition between primary. that is beyond question”. and we are working hard in this area.” Transmural care models As a university hospital. Jan van Meerbeeck explains his vision. The ambitions and goals of the new Chief Physician integrate seamlessly with the vision of the CEO and the management. but also the preconditions play an important role.

306 in 2009).1% increase compared to 2009.279 procedures and by 0.852 consultations. The development is all down to the massive progress achieved in surgical capability.2% to 33. Transplant activities were similar to 2009. . A total of 135 transplants were carried out: 8 heart transplants. 3 pancreas transplants and 79 kidney transplants (including 11 from a living donor).3% to 427. This figure is remarkable for a university hospital that treats many severely to very severely ill patients.952.534: a 3. To guarantee patient comfort during one-day admissions. The number of bed days fell slightly (294. There was also a rise in the number of surgical procedures and consultations.2010 in numbers: more day-clinic admissions 2010 saw the trend of an increasing number of one-day admissions continue.4% to 35.241 in 2010 compared to 294. the hospital significantly increased its capacity for day surgery and inpatient day care in 2010. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. by 4. 45 liver transplants (including 4 from a living donor). The number of overnight stays lasting at least 1 night rose by 3. The total number of one-day admissions was 48. medical technology and drug treatments.

A doctor making a diagnosis is valuable time. . the busy Dermatology outpatient clinic had to contend with long waiting times to the frustration of both patients and staff. Now it is standard procedure to keep some time free so that we can attend to these people quickly without disrupting the rest of the schedule. This meant that a large group of patients arrived on campus and came to the outpatient clinic at the same time. We held around 23. The argument that every patient is unique is to some extent a false analogy: most consultations follow established lines. We see patients with urgent problems within the space of a week. often very visually. a record number for our department. The aim is to make small changes in order to achieve a process improvement that benefits quality without making large investments.” Urgent consultation Jo Lambert worked with all her staff to closely examine the processes within the department.000 consultations in 2010. but also came up with their own solutions to resolve the situation. And with success: the ‘lean’ way of working has significantly reduced waiting times. Punctuality has also improved: patients spend much less time in the waiting area. By arranging for each doctor to start at five minute intervals. what activities are useful for him during a hospital visit and what is ‘waste’ that can be thrown out?” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. in the Dermatology outpatient clinic Until recently. And yet we didn’t feel as though we were struggling to keep our heads above water. We have also started to work with more standards. like waiting times. Following established procedures means that we don’t waste time looking for materials. These standards work. leading to pressure and queues at the desk. arranging appointments by telephone with the doctors at set times.” Satisfied patients Other small changes have also led to greater efficiency and less time wasting: setting up printers closer to the consultation rooms. We discovered that we see an average of around ten patients every week that require urgent attention. We see patients two weeks after making the appointment in the general surgery hours. improving the laboratory layout to name but a few. Head of Department Professor Jo Lambert introduced the technique of LEAN management in order to tackle the problem areas together with her staff. which will give us more space for things that are useful to the patient. which means they are happier. all doctors started their surgery hours at the same time. Our guiding principle are the patient’s needs: what does he want.Quality LEAN management reduces ‘waste’. They came to the surprising conclusion that they themselves were partly responsible for the waiting times. and the process is clear. Waiting for half an hour before the doctor can see you is wasted time. what activities are useful for him during a hospital visit and what is ‘waste’ that can be thrown out. Quality improvement Jo Lambert: “The principle of LEAN management comes from the world of production. we have succeeded in eliminating this chaos. “All these small changes have a phenomenal impact. where previously this took six weeks. In the long-term we will not need such a large waiting area.” “Our guiding principle are the patient’s needs: what does he want. “In the past. Urgent cases are also not as unpredictable as they seem. improved the quality of care and restored efficiency and calm within the department.

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explains hospital hygienist Pascal De Waegemaeker. rather than out of medical necessity. the duration of urinary catheterisation is also a crucial concern”. a patient runs a 5% risk of developing a urinary tract infection.” The nurses play a major role in the catheterisation process. Reducing infections “As well as the question as to whether or not a catheter is indeed necessary. as they insert and remove the catheters on the doctors’ instructions.” “At UZ Gent we focus on reducing the number of urinary tract and bladder infections by half by significantly reducing the use and duration of urinary catheterisation. “This allows us to check on the success of our awareness-raising campaign and the impact in the longer term. .” New procedure The end of May 2010 saw the launch of a new standard nursing procedure at Ghent University Hospital for the insertion of long-term urinary catheters. An equally common problem is that catheters are not removed quickly enough. “For every day of catheterisation. Pascal De Waegemaeker continues. the materials and the method”. and care providers are not sufficiently practised in inserting and looking after them. emphasises Professor Willem Oosterlinck.‘Curse’ of the catheter It is a global problem that far too many hospital patients undergo unnecessary urinary catheterisation. as well as the indication and the probable removal date”. To remedy these problems. After a month this risk is almost 100%. all hospital infections combined total more than 80 million euro in healthcare insurance costs. Urologist. “The hospital hygiene committee drafted the accompanying ‘guidelines for the use of long-term urinary catheters’.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. This can in turn lead to serious complications and even multiple organ failure. At UZ Gent we focus on reducing the number of urinary tract and bladder infections by half by significantly reducing the use and duration of urinary catheterisation. UZ Gent has launched an awareness-raising campaign: ‘Curse of the catheter’. the contraindications. An updated observation sheet in the EPD is used to record the insertion and removal of long-term catheters. “The procedure specifically focuses on correct practice: the right indications. In an ideal scenario both the doctor and the nurse should ask themselves each day whether urinary catheterisation is still necessary. On an annual basis. The most common incorrect indications for use cited by nurses themselves are urinary incontinence and patient comfort. The electronic patient file or EPD can help when making this decision. Pascal De Waegemaeker: “Nurses often insert a catheter out of habit.

the Ombudsman Service then formulates recommendations to ensure even better services. the patient can submit his or her comments. a strict quality standard for medical laboratories issued by the official Belgian accreditation organisation Belac. compliance. 2010 saw a further rise in the number of laboratory tests that are carried out according to this standard to more than 200.High quality standards for the clinical laboratories The Medical Genetics. suggestions or complaint to the Ombudsman Service. Ghent University Hospital won the award for its professionalisation of purchasing activities. Award-winning purchasing department In October 2010 our purchasing department won the silver Public Tender Award in a competition between institutions whose purchasing activities are governed by the Act on public procurement. If discussions with the relevant care provider or responsible party fail to resolve the problem. Pathological Anatomy and Clinical Biology laboratories operate according to the requirements of the ISO 15189 standard. The jury assessed the project submitted based on the application of legislation and regulations. Nevertheless it can sometimes happen that the care. does not fully meet the expectations of the patient or his or her family. which has led to shorter procedures and savings. This is evidence not only that the laboratories have an excellent quality system and deliver accurate. performance and social relevance. In 2010 the Ombudsman Service handled 828 cases. a broad customer satisfaction survey in 2010 revealed that the requesting doctors are satisfied to very satisfied with the service provided by the medical laboratories at Ghent University Hospital. but in doing so also generates valuable feedback on the hospital’s performance. What’s more. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. risk control. . The Ombudsman Service always strives to find a solution to the individual problem. despite all efforts. The Service will then handle and follow up the complaint professionally and discreetly. with the aim of avoiding similar complaints in future and further improving the care and services provided. In order to obtain and retain accreditation. laboratories must perform internal quality inspections and prove to experts that their quality system meets the standard’s strict requirements. traceable test results. Based on this. Ombudsman beyond complaints Our 6000 employees strive every day to achieve excellence in the services they provide. but also that they are continuously seeking to make further improvements.

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immunology and neurological sciences The philosophy behind UZ Gent’s policy on determining aeras of toplevel research is to set priorities and invest in them. The translational nature and social value of research are also essential factors: rapid application of the results of research to provide better patient treatment. Ghent University Hospital and Ghent University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences share a campus. This extra funding does not mean that research groups in other areas will be disadvantaged. sophisticated treatments. making choices in order to be able to operate at the highest level is essential. Ghent University Hospital has therefore selected four areas of research which will receive extra funding to further develop their position: genetics. The scientific context has shifted from the regional to the global plane. Ghent University Hospital invests in a broad range of research activities and continues to produce highly-trained professionals in all medical disciplines. freeing top scientists for more and better research. After all. These additional funds will allow departments to hire extra staff. Application of the results of research These four research areas were selected in consultation with Ghent University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences on the basis of objective criteria: leading position recognised by peers. Ghent University Hospital already excels in all of these areas. oncology. Researchers are working close to the patients they need for their work. . freeing top scientists for more and better research.000 euros in addition to their normal budget. This is the primary concern of a university hospital. Consequently.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. and patients in turn can count on the most recent insights in medical care.Research Focus areas for our top research: genetics. Ghent University Hospital encourages a climate that promotes translational research. oncology. number of A1 publications. The aim is to reach the top European or even global level within a few years thanks to the additional financial resources which are to be made available. This promotes smooth cooperation. the intention is that the policy of focusing on key areas should in the relatively short term lead to better. “These additional funds will allow departments to hire extra staff. It is merely making additional resources available for those fields in which it wants to reach and retain a leading position. Advanced scientific research is combined with tertiary medical care on a single site. immunology and neurological sciences. Each of the four key areas will receive 250. and involvement in current trends in epidemiology and healthcare needs.

Dr. • Prof. This indicates that the gene plays a crucial role in the development of this type of blood cancer. • Prof.New leukaemia gene discovered Researchers at the Medical Genetics Centre have discovered a gene that plays a crucial role in the development of a form of acute leukaemia. The research also found that 10.7% of them said that they had been injured in the accident. Invisible consequences of traffic accidents Scientific research in the Paediatric Psychiatry section has revealed shortcomings in the way that traffic accidents are recorded in Belgium. • Prof. The results of the research have been published in the authoritative journal Nature Genetics. lymphoid neogenesis and airway remodelling in the pathogenesis of COPD’. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. in which he concentrates on investigating new strategies for the treatment of chronic joint conditions. She was praised by the BMJ for her outstanding and socially important scientific work which has won her an international reputation. for his article ‘House dust mite allergen induces asthma via Toll-like receptor 4 triggering of airway structural cells’. and showed that accidents can have major but invisible psychosocial consequences.5% of the young people suffer mental problems after a traffic accident. Bart Lambrecht of the Pneumology section received the ERS Maurizio Vignola Award on innovation in Pneumology. Dr. Marleen Temmerman. worth 50. head of the Gynaecology section. worth 20. Dirk Elewaut was selected by the jury for his outstanding scientific research in rheumatology and immunology. Scientific awards in 2010 • The British Medical Journal Lifetime Achievement award for 2010 was granted to Prof. Dirk Elewaut of the Rheumatology section won the InbevBaillet Latour Fund prize for clinical research. such as posttraumatic stress disorder. and the finding may offer prospects for new treatments. Martine Cools of the Paediatric Endocrinology section won the Young Investigator Award of the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology for her work on ‘The molecular genetics at the interface between dysgenetic and streak tissue in gonads of patients with gonadal dysgenesis’.000 pupils in secondary education found that 6. published in Nature Medicine. A written survey among more than 3. was awarded for his project on the ‘Interrelationship of systemic inflammation. which goes some way towards explaining why more men are affected than women.000 euros.2% of the young people questioned had already been involved in a traffic accident. The gene lies on the X chromosome. The disease occurs in both children and adults. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. pulmonary inflammation.000 euros. Dr. 2. These figures are four times higher than official statistics. . anxiety or depression. Guy Brusselle won the COPD Research Award given by the European Respiratory Society. The prize. The gene also has a defect in almost half of all patients. • Dr. Dr.

Training Ghent University Hospital as a training centre Training students is one of Ghent University Hospital’s main tasks. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. an average of just over one a week. The number of doctoral theses submitted to the Faculty is increasing year on year. Over 6. physical education and sports sciences. 87 doctors received their specialist qualifications in 2010. medico-social sciences and rehabilitation sciences and physiotherapy. biomedical sciences. . Training is given in various fields: medicine. dentistry. Students at the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences are also trained at the Ghent University Hospital campus. Future medical specialists and dentists receive high-quality training with a strong emphasis on practical work at UZ Gent. More than 60 theses were submitted in 2010.600 students were registered with the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences in the 2009-2010 academic year. speech therapy and audiology.

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We all gain in terms of quality and efficiency by coordinating our activities better. we are able to optimise medical care provision and exchange standards of care and good practices. . “We organise specialist consultations in human genetics and rare diseases at AZ Nikolaas general hospital. Network coordinator Prof.” Ghent University Hospital also concluded around fifty cooperation agreements at section level in 2010 with hospitals in East Flanders. Dr. organ donation and organ transplant. in the context of prenatal advice and care for patients with oncological conditions. and therefore we make academic consultants available to our partner hospitals.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. and that specialists from the partner hospitals can approach each other for advice or specific care. stem cells and bone and tendon grafts. And thanks to the good relations between doctors at partner hospitals. Since 2010 we have also been working with AZ Sint-Elisabeth general hospital in Zottegem. West Flanders. All the cooperation agreements entered into by Ghent University Hospital are open and non-exclusive. nephrology and endocrinology-diabetology. AZ Nikolaas general hospital in Sint-Niklaas and H. and the hospitals also work closely together in scientific research. UZ Gent is the preferred partner for highly specialised care and provides advice where necessary. especially in oncology. human body material.-Hartziekenhuis Roeselare-Menen hospital on the removal and supply of reproductive cells. AZ Sint-Lucas general hospital in Ghent. scientific research. cardiology.Partnership Partnerships with tangible results UZ Gent is involved in far-reaching joint ventures with thirteen hospitals in areas such as care provision. training and logistics. We are also starting joint clinical research projects. the Dutch region of Zeeuws-Vlaanderen. Under these agreements. One feature of the partnerships is that the partner hospital is the first choice for patient referral.” New partners One of the new partners in 2010 is the AZ Nikolaas general hospital in Sint-Niklaas. Trainee medical specialists can undertake part of their training in a partner hospital. “We want to bring care as close to patients as possible. Koen Vandewoude: “We want to bring care as close to patients as possible. Brussels and Antwerp. We also help each other in fields such as cardiology.

UZ Gent took a fresh look at topics such as healthy diet. “Treating patients with severe trauma is a complex undertaking. This is how we analyse the trajectory that patients are following from one minute to the next: how much time elapsed between the accident and their admission to the Emergency section. and their care and treatment require the input of many individuals. Speed is of the essence in emergency medicine. For that reason we have devised a system to make it easier to free up a theatre for trauma patients requiring emergency surgery. In these cases it is useful to find out whether death could have been prevented. genetics. “Patients who have suffered a severe trauma have a good chance of survival in Ghent University Hospital. diabetes. This prevents us losing crucial pre-hospital information. But we can still strive to improve quality by working on communication. “Treating patients with severe trauma is a complex undertaking. Oswald Varin is the coordinator of these MAT (Medical Audit Trauma) consultations. From one minute to the next Prof. etc.” Bimetra promotes translational research Bimetra was set up in 2010. orthopaedic specialists and neurosurgeons meet to discuss patients who have been admitted to the hospital with severe trauma. Translational research always has a social and/or economic objective in improving preventive or curative medical practice. During these multidisciplinary consultations they conduct a detailed analysis of trauma care and the treatment trajectory which these patients are following. intensive care specialists. Ghent University and Living Tomorrow have joined forces to present new medical technologies to the general public at the House of the Future in Vilvoorde.” In 2010 the MAT team has started to discuss patients who did not recover after a serious accident.” The first MAT consultations took place in 2009 and they are starting to bear fruit. allergy. The aim is to detect and eliminate avoidable errors. awareness-raising and preventive health care have a great impact on general health and quality of life. The patient is at the centre of this research.” Rapid transfer to operating theatre “Our analyses had also shown that the process of transfer from the Emergency section to the operating theatre could be improved. blindness. That is why we also use standards that describe procedures step by step and leave no room for doubt. On 22 September 2010 UZ Gent was one of the participants at the Future Health Care Event. Good communication is vital. and their care and treatment requires the input of many individuals. a platform to facilitate research. when was the patient admitted to Intensive Care. remote rehabilitation and ICT. government. Health and well-being have a prominent role in this activity. It is intended that Bimetra will eventually become a central point of contact for translational biomedical research on Ghent University Hospital’s campus and liaise between specific sections and centres of excellence. Bringing these people together at regular intervals enables us to improve the quality of care for these patients. how quickly were they transferred to the operating theatre. “Communication between medical practitioners involved in caring for trauma patients has been improved. A close look at patients suffering from severe trauma Once a month emergency doctors. In the guided tour on ‘My health today and tomorrow’. Translational biomedical research is the process by which new insights or hypotheses (from clinical observations or fundamental or strategic basic research) are translated into new or improved preventive. logistics and the transfer of knowledge. as health information. valorisation and monitoring of clinical studies.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. what diagnosis and treatment was given. surgeons. diagnostic or therapeutic applications. the medical profession and academics came together to discuss the future vision of health care. To this end Bimetra is developing support platforms such as a central biobank. We have a checklist in the Emergency section which medical practitioners have to complete when a patient is brought in. Dr. deafness.Healthcare of the future Ghent University Hospital. epilepsy. . It is a clinical research centre focusing on the translation and valorisation of biomedical research as part of a joint venture between Ghent University Hospital and Ghent University. at which representatives from business. anaesthetists. We try to appoint permanent contacts and specialists from various disciplines who examine patients while they are still in the Emergency section.

U. He also conducts internal and external training courses. UZ Gent had a delightful day out Every two years UZ Gent organises a family day out for its employees and their families. But they can also help each other: both groups can explore new areas of research by having access to each others’ expertise and specialists. intensive care. compared with 5. The trip in September 2010 was to Planckendael zoo in Mechelen. D.Better support for haematology patients A haematology nursing specialist and consultant were appointed to the Haematology section in 2010.U. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. accompanies them when they are having tests or treatments. not only within the hospital but also throughout all the treatments they undergo.R. working conditions. or picks them up afterwards and. This will be an easy-access session that complements the medical consultation. is better aligned to their needs. They are currently working together to develop a nursing consultation session for patients who need to undergo allogenic stem cell transplant. One of the first joint ventures carried out by the two groups is a Ghent-based glaucoma study in which patients from Maastricht are taking part.000 participants.R. Employees have great opportunities for continuous professional development.be The workforce expanded to 5. The hospital is therefore very attractive to young. This status was granted following independent investigation by the CRF (Corporate Research Foundation) Institute. ensures continuity of care and after-care. The nursing specialist is responsible for quality assurance and the development of haematology patient care by bringing scientific research into direct patient care. which recognises employers that stand out in five HR criteria: terms of employment. Prof. who often require prolonged. The sunshine and blue skies helped to make the day a great success for the 4. highly-trained professionals in particular.G. in consultation with the department nurses. Luc Van Bortel is the head of the Ghent D.707 in 2010. The nursing consultant works from the Oncology Centre and supports patients throughout their entire care trajectory: he gives patients more information about their condition and its treatment.R.U.607 in 2009. They work together to ensure that the treatment of patients with conditions such as leukaemia. The hospital offers an innovative working environment with good working conditions. economies of scale help even out the research workload when the centres are under extreme pressure. . Ghent University Hospital is a Top Employer Ghent University Hospital was officially recognised as a Top Employer in 2010. Dr. To find out more about working at Ghent University Hospital.M in Maastricht. and director of the D. training opportunities. go to www. The two centres complement one another. It deals with the early stages of clinical drugs research.uzgent. has sister in the Netherlands The Drug Research Unit Ghent has set up a sister department at Maastricht University Centre in the Netherlands. and is jointly responsible with the head nurse for the organisation of haematology care. corporate culture and opportunities for internal promotion. In addition.G. The consultant is the point of contact and advocate for patients. They are both capable of carrying out sophisticated drug research by cooperating with other specialist sections in their own hospitals.

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The unit has a number of attractive relaxation rooms. and ten single en-suite rooms. The Surgical Day Care Facility is fully equipped for this growth thanks to improved efficiency. A patient who comes to the day surgery unit at eight in the morning is already on the way home at two p.000 patients a year. and this trend is set to continue.000 children. white corridors. This helps them wake up and recover from the anaesthetic more quickly. Then patients get changed into a dressing gown and slippers. The Surgical Day Care Facility also treats children who need an operation and who would formerly have been admitted to the Paediatric Day Clinic. and apply the least invasive surgical techniques possible. The number of day admissions has risen sharply in recent years. non-clinical facility that from a visual point of view has little in common with a hospital. including 2. Patients attending the Surgical Day Care Facility are welcomed as guests to a bright.Investment New Surgical Day Care Facility The hospital’s brand new Surgical Day Care Facility came into use in mid-November 2010. head of department at the Surgical Day Care Facility: “We want to guide patients smoothly through their stay so that they can return home after a short while. “This is a kind of seat that can be gradually raised as the patient regains consciousness. “People who attend the Surgical Day Care Facility are not ill in the strict sense of the word. “We want to guide patients smoothly through their stay so that they can return home after a short while.” The new Surgical Day Care Facility is the result of a merger between two former surgery day clinics. head of the Surgical Nursing and Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit section. As a result. We have our own admissions facility where the paperwork is handled. explains Marc Coppens. The waiting room has picture windows with a fabulous view over the city. they can stay in a relaxation room or single room for a short time. they can be allowed to go home after a short time and in comfort. We keep patients away from a hospital ambience as long as possible. Surgery is followed by optimum pain control which promotes recovery and ensures that patients can leave the recovery room sooner.m. They are coming for a small procedure and so do not want to be treated as if they were ill”. and walk to the theatre under their own steam.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report. This is immediately followed by a pre-operative check by our nurses. . comments Philippe Boucherie. The facility sees around 10. The number of patients that can be handled has risen from 36 to 52. but rather a curved wall with photographs of a birch forest running like an aorta through the department. Minister Jo Vandeurzen was present at the official opening ceremony in March 2011. “We have done everything in our power to eliminate the ‘hospital’ ambience: no cold. We use short-acting anaesthetics for the operation.” Stretcher beds Once patients have been discharged from the recovery room. “We have decided to use stretcher beds here”.” Walking to theatre Dr. which is why they stay in the waiting room until the theatre staff tell us that they are ready for them. Marc Coppens.

It was made possible by one patient’s generosity. But the new day clinic is first and foremost a more comfortable setting where patients can spend time in a friendly atmosphere. an association for cancer patients. These machines are capable of displaying the smallest anatomical details at a speed which has never been possible before and using a fraction of the amount of radiation which older CT scanners needed. liver or lung conditions. The scanners use less than a third of the radiation dose that older devices used. so it is important for patients to feel at home. Economies of scale have led to further improvements in the quality of care. as a way of allowing patients to spend time with visitors and relatives away from the ward.000 radiotherapy sessions a year. Respiration and Digestion day clinic offers a comfortable area with easy chairs. As a result. The 13 nurses offer optimum care to patients with blood disorders or gastrointestinal. Patients due to undergo treatments that do not take a long time to administer have access to beds and comfortable chairs. Much more accurate two. You wouldn’t dream that you were in a hospital. pulmonary infarcts and some liver conditions. A day treatment can take several hours. They will house two new linear accelerators used by the Radiotherapy section. patients and relatives. This combination is unique in Flanders. A computer network allows the images to be viewed immediately and shared with colleagues in all other sections. This is particularly useful when examining elderly patients or children.Day clinics merge The Haematology day clinic and the Gastrointestinal. .and three-dimensional images of organs and their blood supply are available for use in examining patients with strokes. This lounge was created by the OIGO. Hepatic and Pneumology day clinic have been merged and expanded to form a single Blood. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. a library and kitchenette. Bunkers for two new linear accelerators Two new bunkers have been constructed next to the existing bunkers in building K4. Respiration and Digestion day clinic that can treat 27 patients at a time. Super-fast CT scanners work with lower doses of radiation The Radiology and Medical Imaging section has invested in two brand-new CT scanners. and can also be helpful when dealing with patients in the Emergency section and Intensive Care. The OIGO lounge in the new Blood. They can perform around 30. the section now has access to four modern linear accelerators that are used to irradiate tumours in cancer patients. multimedia and flat-screen equipment. The day clinic also has a nice room which is used for discussions between medical practitioners. They are replacements for two older machines. without any loss in image quality.

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is undergoing thorough renovation. will be stored in an underground energy storage system. The building will be able to use this thermal energy to provide either hot or cold air whenever it is needed. The rehabilitation centre will have deep-level underground energy storage facilities that act via boreholes: heat or cold. and will also cut travel time between the buildings. home to the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. • Campus artery: an overground. Building K3. while existing buildings are undergoing thorough renovation and expansion. an enlarged Radiology and Central Sterilisation Section and a link to building K12. The campus artery will come into use in the spring of 2011. Eating Disorders and Psycho-Medical Unit of the University Psychiatric Section on the ground floor of building K12F. The campus artery will make it safer and more pleasant for patients to move from one building to the next. New buildings are being erected. The technical block of this building is also set for expansion: four new surgery areas. which will dramatically change the appearance of the campus in the short and long term. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. The new infrastructure will enable UZ Gent to guarantee even better care and an improved service to patients and visitors. • At the end of 2010 work started on the renovation of the Anxiety and Mood Disorders. depending on the season. The new building will come into use at the end of June 2011. Out-patients and visitors will be able to travel through the campus using the footpath beneath the walkway. covered walkway connecting various buildings on the campus. They have all the comfort needed to make a prolonged stay as pleasant as possible. . • Expansion and renovation of the Rehabilitation centre K7: the first phase of construction work on the new Rehabilitation centre has been completed. and the admissions departments are in use. • Construction of a third floor in the car park to meet the growing demand for parking space on the campus. • Ghent University is also investing on the “Heymans Campus” that it shares with UZ Gent. • New Children’s Clinic (K12D): a brand-new building with an interior designed completely with the comfort of children and parents in mind.Building for ever better care Many major building projects are currently in hand on the Ghent University Hospital campus. The new building is finished.

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400 in 2010. comments Prof. This is the site of Ghent University Hospital’s brand new clean room facility. Patients go straight to see their doctor and do not have to hang about in a vast waiting room. Improvements in service provision The new infrastructure has also led to considerable improvements in service provision. . “The number of treatments given has risen from 67 in 1987 to over 2. glass structure between Outpatient Units 3 and 4 catches the eye. and is also a great advance for staff. Ultra-modern A modern. The high-tech clean room which we now use also allows us to work with ovarian tissue and carry out stem cell research. which has a bright. surgery or assisted reproduction techniques such as IVF. as it is here that the human cells which are reimplanted during IVF treatment are created. such as sperm cells and embryos. the IVF lab transferred to a brand new clean room facility. comforting atmosphere to patients and staff. which means that waiting times are shorter and we can see more patients. The distance between medical professionals and patients is cut shorter. It will from now on be carrying out this work in the renovated Outpatient Unit 4.” “This kind of facility is essential for a Reproductive Medicine department. Prof. Administration work has been separated as far as possible from consultation and treatment areas. so that the work can be done in a largely dust-free and entirely bacteria-free setting. Dr. The architecture radiates calm. Special infrastructure and equipment ensures that the air quality and air circulation are as good as possible. As part of this move. De Sutter: “We now have a lot more space. spacious interior that offers a restful. As a result. so as to free up more space for clinical activities. The Department of Reproductive Medicine (ARG) investigates the causes of infertility and treats them by hormone therapy. The new infrastructure is very popular with patients. as it is here that the human cells which are reimplanted during IVF treatment are created”. we should be able to help even more people in the future. which is home to a number of operations including the IVF laboratory.000 couples a year to conceive.” Click here to order your copy of the annual report.” UZ Gent’s clean room facility is one of the first in Belgium to meet the very strict European and Belgian quality and safety standards for handling human tissue. A clean room is a room in which staff work under controlled conditions with human tissues and cells. and each doctor has a separate working space with two examination rooms and three consultation rooms shared by the doctor and the midwife. head of the ARG department. It is here that UZ Gent hopes to help up to 5. “This kind of facility is vital to a Reproductive Medicine department.IVF lab moves to brand-new clean room facility Ghent University Hospital’s Department of Reproductive Medicine celebrated its 25th anniversary with a move to a new home in the hospital. Patients then go straight to the midwife. among the most sophisticated in Europe. Petra De Sutter.

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The ICRH regards reproductive health as a basic right. has been spending part of his working time assisting the Federal Public Service for Health since the first of July 2010. Renal Dialysis head nurse. and the integration of sexual and reproductive rights in healthcare systems. The ICRH is active all over the world and is recognised as a research centre by the World Health Organisation. Mozambique. Head of Gastrointestinal Surgery. The team also took badly needed medical supplies such as anaesthetic equipment and pain pumps with them. A team of surgeons. Click here to order your copy of the annual report. Stefaan Claus. They performed twenty urgent life-saving operations. Dr. It focuses on topics such as HIV and sexually transmissible infections. The field hospital treated around a thousand patients in the first ten days after the disaster. Paediatric Intensive Care Unit.Services Ghent University Hospital’s Disaster Planning Coordinator assists the Federal Public Service for Health Geert Arno. Patrick Van De Voorde. is a volunteer for B-Fast and also helped the victims by setting up a field hospital as part of the medical team. so that eventually local doctors will be able to run the centre without outside help. a village in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The International Centre for Reproductive Health (ICRH). working with B-Fast. under the direction of Prof. nursing coordinator in charge of disaster planning. mother and child health. took basic equipment to the area affected and gave local practitioners at two hospitals basic training in the treatment of burns. . In his role as ‘emergency planning process manager’. A cardiac surgery team also travelled to Nicaragua in March 2010 to work on a project with the Chaîne de l’Espoir – Keten van de Hoop [Chain of Hope] organisation to treat children with congenital heart abnormalities. identified and treated victims with kidney problems as part of an international group of renal specialists coordinated from Ghent University Hospital and in conjunction with Médecins Sans Frontières. Practitioners have put their medical and nursing skills to use on a number of continents to help the local population. Emergency nurse Mona Clauwaert. he is responsible for creating and monitoring the skills profiles of all medical professionals who would be involved in a disaster scenario. went to Cambodia in December as part of a long-running international aid project in the region. Prof. South Africa and Rwanda. wants to contribute to improving sexual and reproductive health. anaesthetists and nurses. Luc Debaerdemaecker trained 20 anaesthesia nurses from the provinces in a two-day hands-on workshop. Dr. and devises training programmes for them. In a local hospital they also helped construct a cardiac surgery unit for children. He also helps draft national emergency plans and is available at any time to help deal with major disasters. and her team treated children with congenital heart abnormalities in the Palestinian territories. The team performed dialysis on a total of 54 victims. Hundreds of people were killed or severely burned. After the devastating earthquake in Haiti on 12 January 2010. a number of practitioners rushed to the scene to help the people there who were in such great need. sexual and gender-related violence. Dr. Katrien François. and is dedicated to improving the access to and quality of reproductive health care for everyone. On 2 July 2010 a fuel tanker was involved in an accident and exploded in Bukavu. Humanitarian work abroad Many members of Ghent University Hospital’s staff are involved in commitments far beyond the boundaries of the hospital. Head of the Cardiac Surgery department. Piet Pattyn. led by Prof. and more particularly in Kenya. Marleen Temmerman (head of the Gynaecology section). Dr. Most of its work is done in Africa. Dr.

Simon Van Belle Prof. Vice-chancellor of Ghent University deputy chairman: Prof. CNO & Director of Nursing Mrs Chantal Haeck. CEO Members: Prof. Jan van Meerbeeck. Dr. Inspector-General of Finance (not on the picture) Click here to order your copy of the annual report. Dr.GOVERNANCE Management Board Chairman: Mr Jef Peeters. Paul Van Cauwenberge. Government Commissioner Mr Daniël Ketels. Eric Mortier. CMO & Chief Physician Mr Filip Demeyere. Dr. Deputy Vice-chancellor of Ghent University (also chairman of the Audit Committee) Supervision Mr Yannick De Clercq. Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences CEO: Mr Jef Peeters Members chosen by the Board of Governors of Ghent University: Mr Bart Ampe Prof. Dr. Frank Vermassen Secretary: Mrs Sabine De Smyter Attending meetings on invitation: Prof. Geert De Soete Mr Jan Vercamst Members chosen by the physicians of Ghent University Hospital: Prof. Dr. Director Business Support Services Prof. . Dr. Dr. Luc Moens. Rik Achten Dr Nadia Den Blauwen Prof. Director – Representative of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences Secretary: Mrs Sabine De Smyter Supervisory Board Statutory Directors: chairman: Prof. Dr. Marleen Temmerman. Dr.

CEO Ghent University Hospital Editing and coordination Ingrid Nelis. Marie-Laure Solie. Communication & Events Department.Colofon Publisher Jef Peeters. Bregje Goes. . Ghent University Hospital Photography Christophe Vander Eecken Design De Blauwe Peer Printing Stevens Print Click here to order your copy of the annual report.

Universitair Ziekenhuis Gent De Pintelaan 185 9000 GENT +32 (0)9 332 21 11 info@uzgent.uzgent.be www.be .

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