You are on page 1of 34

AUSTI N R E S I DENT G LOBAL CITIZE N

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN


Welcome to the 2010 Austin Energy Green Building annual report. This year, through our building ratings and energy code work, we saved 7,468 kilowatts of demand, 16.6 million kilowatt hours of electricity, 42.6 million gallons of water and diverted 13,057 tons of construction waste from the landfill. These accomplishments are the economic justification for our program and the way we measure our progress. But kilowatts, kilowatt hours, gallons and tons are the means to achieving our goal, not the goal itself. The buildings we celebrate in this report are not merely energy, water or material efficient. They are workplaces, schools, homesthe building blocks of the unique, colorful neighborhoods that make up Austin. Our real goal is helping to ensure buildings make a positive, durable, sustainable contribution. We want them to advance, not degrade, Austins culture and its residents quality of life. Our goals go beyond the Austin Energy service territory. For example, it is very important that buildings in Austin reduce water use for the city and electric demand on our power plants. It is equally important that when we choose sustainably-harvested wood for one of our projects, we are making it possible for an Oregon forest to maintain its function in the water cycle. By specifying this type of lumber in Austin, we can influence a regions water quality and biodiversity thousands of miles awaythereby helping Oregonians in their efforts to improve their lives and advance their culture. In 2011, AEGB celebrates 20 years of green building in Austin. That kind of continued success is only possible with the support, participation and engagement of City Council, the mayor, the city manager, Austin Energys leadership team, Austins green building professionals and an entire community of Austin residents who understand the roles they play as global citizens.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
02 04 05 06 08 FIVE-STAR HOMES, 2001PRESENT GREEN BUILDING ACROSS AUSTIN: 2010 RATED PROJECTS SINGLE FAMILY GREEN BUILDING MARKET PARTICIPATION SITE ENERGY

12 16 18 20 22 26 30

WATER MATERIALS INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY EQUITY EDUCATION INNOVATION PROJECTS TO WATCH

Richard Morgan Manager, Austin Energy Green Building

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN 01

Five-Star Homes, 2001Present

Austin Energy Green Building has been rating homes since 1991, when we created the first residential green building rating tool in the country. But it wasnt until 2001, when Becca Aronow and Ben Obregon built their west Austin home, that we awarded our first five-star rating. Their achievement was just the beginning. At the end of 2010, we had rated 360 five-star homes and 9,247 homes overall! As more Austin homeowners aim for five stars, what it means to achieve that high level of sustainability has evolved and expanded. The Obregons straw bale house is characterized by a focus on sustainable materials and natural building. Homes like Angel Bolhouses show that simple, affordable design can produce five-star results. The Aldredges renovation demonstrates that shorter commutes, adaptation of existing buildings and preserving neighborhood culture all contribute to sustainable living, Austin-style. As we celebrate our 20th anniversary in 2011, and look ahead to the next 20 years, we see trends moving in the direction of smaller, more urban houses and condominiums located in mixed-use neighborhoods with shared green space. The future will be ultra-efficient, as well we have already laid out a plan for all new homes in Austin to be net-zero energy capable by 2015.

While a green home built in 2030 may look quite different from the Obregons 2001 straw bale home, the exciting thing about green building is that the five-star homes on these pages will still be standing for years to come. They exemplify the fundamental principles of green building: resource efficiency, sustainable site practices, high indoor environmental quality, comfort and beauty. That all adds up to superb durability and healthy, sustainable homes for Austin residents and global citizens for years to come.

Neighborhood West Austin Architect Ben Obregon Homeowners Becca Aronow & Ben, Kaleb & Maya Obregon Square Footage 1,748 Growing up on a farm helped define local architect Ben Obregons concern for the environment. So when he and his wife Becca bought their land, they set out to build a straw bale home that would become the very first house awarded a five-star AEGB rating. Raising the walls on a straw bale house, in addition to being affordable and energy efficient, appealed to Ben and Becca because of its similarity to old-time barn raisings. Barn raisings brought the community together, Ben said. People would get out there together and sweat for this common goal. The best part of the journey, however, has been watching their kids grow up with a strong sense of environmental responsibility. They ask questions like, What green building rating does that house have? Ben said. Weve built something that has taught our kids about the big picture.

02 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING

Timeline Photography by Alexa Carlson

Neighborhood West Austin Architect Barley & Pfeiffer Homeowners Emily, Greg, Henry & Adi McKaskle Square Footage 2,456 Emily and Greg McKaskle had a few ideas about what they wanted in a new house: It needed to be respectful of the land, well-crafted and unique. Our top priorities were sustainability and energy efficiency, the couple said. At the same time, we didnt want to sacrifice a homey feeling. They didnt. In addition to a light-colored metal roof, high-efficiency cooling equipment and almost 50,000 gallons of rainwater storage, architects Barley & Pfeiffer designed comfortable front and back porches. Its great to just hang outside and let the kids play, Emily said. The connection to the outdoors and the respect for the environment are both big parts of local culture. Daughter Adis front porch playhouse is even made from a discarded shipping crate. Like the playhouse, the familys home was designed with sustainability in mind, but it isnt fussy or pretentious, Emily said. It fits perfectly into our funky little Austin neighborhood.

Neighborhood East MLK Architect Casa Verde Builders Homeowner Angel Bolhouse Square Footage 1,185 When engineering student Angel Bolhouse started looking for a home to buy, affordability and a good neighborhood were her top priorities. Energy efficiency wasnt as important as location and price, she said. I really just got lucky that this house was a five-star home. I didnt realize all the benefits until I moved in and attended a seminar on green building. The home was originally a Casa Verde Builders affordable home, built by participants of an American YouthWorks green jobs service learning program. Angel is the second owner, and she has made the house truly her own, by building a secret bedroom door that masquerades as a bookshelf, a swinging porch bench, a large deck and a stonefloored outdoor shower.

Neighborhood Mueller Architect Streetman Homes Homeowners Dennis & Carole Mick Square Footage 2,521 Dennis and Carole Mick did their homework on energy efficiency prior to their house search. We had talked about reducing our carbon footprint and living lighter, Dennis said. Reduced energy use is one of the main reasons we made the move. High ceilings that direct summer heat away from the living space, low-E windows and daylighting provided by a clerestory are a few of the features that contribute to what the Micks say is a superb quality of life. Theyre striving to cut their energy use even further, as well, having volunteered for the Pecan Street Projects federally-funded, energy-tracking program. Typically, you have no idea how much energy you actually use, but this will let us see it, Dennis said. We drive differently now as a result of our hybrid vehicle feedback, so we know this kind of thing works.

Neighborhood Bouldin Architect Stuart Sampley Homeowners Horatio, Tenley, Phinney & Quin Aldredge Square Footage 2,206 When Horatio and Tenley Aldredge set out to renovate, there was no question that they would choose green design. We lived for so long in an inefficient house; the windows rattled, Tenley said. Were religious about water conservation and recycling and shutting off the lights. It was about putting your money where your mouth is. In the renovated home, the rattling windows were replaced with high-efficiency ones that, along with total-fill insulation, a sealed attic and a metal roof, contribute to a durable, efficient envelope that keeps the Aldredges comfortable and their utility bills low. Renovating rather than buying a new home allowed them to stay in the central Bouldin neighborhood, so Horatio and Tenley, both attorneys, can limit their commutes to about two miles. We like urban living, Tenley said. In 20 or 30 years, I can see us maybe living in one of the downtown high-rises.
AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN 03

Green Building Across Austin: 2010 Rated Projects


78759 78750 78758 78732 78730 78731 78754 78757

Commercial Projects 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

2e Aloft Austin at The Domain 2e Anderson High School AdditionAISD 2e Webb Middle School Fine Arts BuildingAISD 1e Post West Austin 3e EyeMasters 3e Dental Smiles 3e Central Texas Pediatric Dentistry 3e The Childrens Place 3e Famous Footwear 3e Yo So Cool 3e Mosaic at Mueller 3e Austin Childrens Shelter 3e Turner-Roberts Recreation Center 3e Norman Elementary School AdditionAISD 2e Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary Anderson House 1e The Quarters Garage and Retail 3e Austin Community College Rio Grande Campus Parking Garage 4e The Austonian 1e Gables Pressler 3e Palisades West 3e Gorzycki Middle SchoolAISD 3e HelioVolt
Mueller South Regional Retail

78756 78751 78703

78752

78746

78723

78702 78742 78704 78741

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Multifamily Projects 1 2 3 4 5 6

78745

3e Midtown Commons 4e Franklin Gardens 3e East Village Lofts 5e The South 5th 3e Longhorn Village 2e Fox Hill Apartments

78744

Single Family Homes by Zip Code 1 10 11 25 26 50 51 150 151 300

78617

78747
04 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING

SINGLE FAMILY GREEN BUILDING MARKET PARTICIPATION

ONe MeASure OF greeN buildiNg SuCCeSS in Austin is the number of Austin Energy Green Building rated homes completed each year. Despite the decline in the overall number of homes built in Austin in recent years, the percentage of AEGB-rated homes has stayed high. Of the 1,909 single family homes completed in 2010, AEGB rated 722, or 38 percent. This represents broad adoption of green building among Austin home builders. The chart to the right shows the market participation rate of AEGB-rated single family homes from 2004-2010. year AEGB-rated homes participation rate

2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

760 1087 1049 981 1021 712 722

22% 25% 21% 19% 35% 41% 38%

Austin Energy Green Building Rated Projects

2010

market participation rate

025%

2650%

5175%

76-100%

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN 05

standing a buildings place within Austins system of watersheds.* Developing in urban watershed zones, for example, allows us to preserve rural, agricultural and drinking water protected zones the habitats for native and endangered species such as the Goldencheeked Warbler. Urban site selection also plugs new buildings into existing infrastructure and locates building occupants closer to the amenities they need, allowing them to rely less on singleoccupancy vehicles.

SuStainable Site Selection begins with under-

* A watershed is that area of land, a bounded hydrologic system, within which all living things are inextricably linked by their common water course and where, as humans settled, simple logic demanded that they become part of a community. John Wesley Powell Explorer of the Colorado River
But while location is perhaps the single most important factor in determining a buildings environmental impact, designers are faced with a myriad of other critical site choices, such as those concerning light pollution, urban heat island effect and pest management. Site choices affect quality of life, too: Useful outdoor spaces, such as balconies, gardens and trails, create opportunities for exercise, interaction and leisure. The Austin metro area population has doubled over the past two decades and is predicted to double again by 2030. As local residents, we know sustainable site practices will help us provide for new residents, all while allowing us to enjoy the benefits of a growing economy. As global citizens, we want to preserve the natural resources, unique neighborhoods and sense of community that make Austin a place we love to live.

06 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING SITE

2010 Annii Wisocki Designs

Project:

ArbOreTuM PArK
Just a short commute from high tech jobs in northwest Austin, young professionals enjoy combined residential and commercial development on a heavily-treed infill site. Shared parking reduces impervious cover and shielded outdoor lighting mitigates light pollution.

Project:

eAST VillAge lOFTS


Occupants of this condominium and retail development enjoy East 11th Street nightlife, galleries and restaurants on foot, thanks to car share and transit access. Native and adapted landscaping and integrated pest management reduce the need for chemicals to maintain the site.

Project:

THe MOSAiC AT Mueller


Located on a former brownfield, this mixed-use community offers young families and empty nesters access to the outdoors through balconies and shaded seating areas, transit options and connectivity with retail and services. Multi-level structured parking and cool roofs mitigate urban heat island effect.

Team: Architect Kipp Flores Architects builder Ash Creek Homes engineer Garrett-Ihnen Civil Engineers landscape Architect Lee & Associates AEGB Rating:

Team: developer Esperanza Development Architect Bercy Chen Studio engineers Martinez Wright & Mendez (civil); MGB & Associates (MEP); Structures (structural) AEGB Rating:

Team: Owner Simmons Vedder Partners Architect Steinberg Design Collaborative general Contractor Rampart Construction engineer Bury + Partners (civil) landscape Architect MESA Design Group Commissioning EEA Consulting Engineers AEGB Rating:

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN SITE 07

2010 Andy Heatwole

our ability to uSe energy in buildingS


whether in the form of electricity or natural gasaffords better health, longer lives, comfort, dignity and the leisure to create, innovate and evolve. But unsustainable consumption of energy is associated with serious regional, national and global problems, such as unhealthy outdoor air, climate-changing greenhouse gas emissions, energy scarcity and national security threats. There are two major approaches to making energy consumption in buildings more sustainable: energy efficiency and the use of cleaner, renewable energy sources. Energy-efficiency strategies range from smart building orientation and passive design to more involved approaches, such as sophisticated energy management systems. Renewable energy, such as rooftop solar, is often a cost-effective option for well-designed, energy-efficient buildings. Signing up for GreenChoice, Austin Energys renewable energy subscription program, is another great way to support the growth of renewables.

Austin Energy Green Building participants make important contributions to their community by using less and cleaner energy. They help delay the construction and financing of costly new power plants, which keeps electric rates lower for all of Austin Energys customers. When they support renewables, AEGB participants also help the community meet Austin Energys goal of generating 35 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2020. In addition, one of the most important and least knowncontributions of building green in Austin is the advancement of the energy code. When buildings earn an AEGB rating, they essentially pilot advanced energyefficiency and renewable energy standards for potential integration into the City of Austin energy code. Thanks to this system, Austins energy code is widely recognized as one of the most progressive in the country.

08 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING ENERGY

2010 Alexa Carlson

Project:

FrANKliN gArdeNS
Franklin Gardens offers green, affordable housing to the Chestnut neighborhood and east Austin seniors, allowing them to stay in their neighborhoods after transitioning out of single family homes. The project scored high for energy efficiency and the project team planned for the future with solar-ready design. While there was not enough money in the budget for solar panels, the team designed and installed conduit for a 17 kW photovoltaic system. Another great energy-conserving decision was to purchase submetering software that will make it possible for the property managers to provide residents with detailed information about their individual electric usage, down to the hour. This feedback will give residents the tools they need to understand and reduce their energy consumption.

AEGB Rating:

Project:

THe SOuTH 5TH


Residents of this high-performing condominium complex enjoy homey-and-hip south Austin with its quirky shops, a serious food trailer scene and safe pedestrian and bicycle routes. The building features insulated concrete walls, a cool roof and 3 kW solar arrays for each unit.

Team: Architect Acero Construction engineers EN, Incorporated (MEP); Texas Design Interests (structural) AEGB Rating:

Team: Owner Chestnut Neighborhood Revitalization Corporation Architect hatch + ulland owen architects general Contractor Bailey Elliott Construction engineer Jose I. Guerra (MEP) landscape Architect Winterowd Associates Solar-ready design Meridian Solar

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN ENERGY 09

2010 Patrick Wong

auStin energyS diStributed energy ServiceS Staff works hard


every day building what we refer to as Austins negawatt or conservation power plantthat is, the sum total of all the electric generation capacity weve been able to avoid building through our energy-efficiency programs. There are a number of approaches to utility-scale conservation: We shift load, coax efficiencies out of existing buildings, implement a strict energy code and encourage conservation in new construction beyond the requirements of the energy code through AEGB ratings. We completed our first 700 MW negawatt plant in 2007, and were working to achieve an additional 800 MW of energy efficiency by 2020. In 2010, AEGB helped Austin buildings avoid 7.5 MW of electric demand, bringing AEGBs lifetime contribution to the negawatt plan to 137 MW. The chart to the right puts energy efficiency in the context of Austin Energys natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable generation capacity. You can see how much additional capacity AE would have had to build or buy without our efficiency programs. The chart also shows the progress weve made on the goals of our Resource, Generation and Climate Protection Plan to 2020. Under the plan, Austin Energy aims to meet the electric demand of Austins growing population by increasing generation from renewable power resources and natural gas and achieving even more energy efficiency in buildingswithout increasing nuclear and coal resources.

Project:

HeliOVOlT
Once this solar manufacturing facility begins production, HelioVolt will play a key role in Austins alternative energy market, producing thin-film solar photovoltaic modules for a wide range of uses, from utility-scale installations to building-integrated applications. The HelioVolt facility was a finish-out of an existing building with prefabricated tilt-up walls, so opportunities for envelope insulation were limited. Despite this, the project achieved energy savings 39 percent above the City of Austin energy code. To reach this level of efficiency, the team chose a chilled water HVAC system, allowing more versatile temperature control in different spaces. The facility features high-efficiency lamps and compact fluorescent down lamps, resulting in lighting energy savings of 59 percent above the energy code. The facility also features roof space for up to 10 kW of PV capacity, used to test different systems and installations.

AEGB Rating:

Team: Architect TAG International engineers Bury + Partners (civil); EEA Consulting Engineers (MEP); Texas Design Interests (structural) general Contractor Harvey-Cleary Builders Sustainability Consultant Lee Gros Architect and Artisan Commissioning EEA Consulting Engineers

10 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING ENERGY

2010 Thomas McConnell

AUSTIN ENERGYS 2010 GENERATION RESOURCES AND 2020 GOALS


2020 Gas Goal = 1,744 MW

gAS = 1,544 MW

2020 Efficiency Goal = 1,500 MW 2020 Wind Goal = 1,001 MW

2020 Biomass Goal = 162 MW


greeN buildiNg = 137 MW NuCleAr = 420 MW

2020 Solar Goal = 201 MW

COMMerCiAl eNergY eFFiCieNCY ANd MANAgeMeNT = 321 MW

COAl = 610 MW

biOMASS = 12 MW WiNd = 439 MW

SOlAr = 6.4 MW

reSideNTiAl eNergY eFFiCieNCY ANd MANAgeMeNT = 471 MW

traditional generation fuels

renewables

efficiency
AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN ENERGY 11

the water conServation Strategy

with the highest potential for water savings in most buildings is minimizing the use of potable water for landscape irrigation. Choosing native and adapted drought-resistant plants for landscaping and avoiding lawns is a good start. Rainwater, stormwater and condensate collection systems coupled with high-efficiency irrigation can result in additional reductions. Indoors, water conservation begins with high-efficiency fixtures and appliances, such as low-flow and dual-flush toilets, waterless urinals, low-flow faucets, efficient dishwashers and laundry machines. Rainwater and air conditioning condensate can be used for flushing toilets in lieu of potable water, which is energy-intensive and becoming more expensive to treat and distribute.

When rainfall is adequate, Austin is a Texas oasis, with its proximity to the Edwards Aquifer, the Lower Colorado River Basin and the lakes and swimming holes that provide refuge on hot summer days. But with its burgeoning population, the likely changes to the water supply due to climate change and the uncertain politics of water rights,* it is critical for Austin to reduce consumption. At present, the current five-year rolling average for water consumption in Austin is 163 gallons per capita, per day. The Water Conservation Task Force plan, adopted by City Council in 2007, should pare average consumption to 150 gallons per capita, per day by 2020. In 2010, Austin Water Utility proposed an action plan to further reduce consumption to 140 gallons per capita, per day. The plan is under consideration by City Council.

* The City of Austin is not the only major consumer along the Colorado River: Indeed, the biggest water users are downstream rice farmers who regularly use more than three times as much water annually as does the city (including water used by Austin Energy to generate power), making conservation efforts ever more important.
12 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING WATER

Project:

1613 NOrTHuMberlANd rOAd


This 3,240-square-foot renovation features a 7,900-gallon rainwater collection system. A natural swimming pond lets homeowners cool off in hot weather and provides rainwater storage for irrigation of a yard with minimal turf area and native plants. Low-flow fixtures reduce indoor water use. Theres more: Energy-efficient design, solar thermal water heating, a 6 kW solar array with battery backup and an energy management system make this home nearly net-zero energy.

AEGB Rating:

2010 Patrick Wong

Project:

PAliSAdeS WeST
The Palisades West office complex team reduced indoor water consumption by 45 percent by installing dual-flush toilets, pint urinals and low-flow fixtures. Outdoors, the team reduced potable water use for irrigation by 81 percent by landscaping with native and adapted plants and distributing collected rainwater using a drip irrigation system. The projects most impressive design element is the green roof covering the parking garage, featuring a garden, seating, paths and space for group exercise.

AEGB Rating:

Team: Owners Craig & Patsy Overmiller Architect Craig M. Overmiller Architects builder Patsy Overmiller Mechanical Contractor Epic Mechanical Contractors

Team: Owner Cousins Properties Incorporated Architect Kendall/Heaton Associates engineer Michael E. James & Associates (MEP) general Contractor Austin Commercial landscape Architect SWA Group Commissioning The Delphi Groupe

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN WATER 13

2009 Patrick Wong

auStin energy green building rated projectS saved an estimated


total of 42.6 million gallons of irrigation and indoor water this year. While this is an important achievement on its own, the chart on the following page tells the other half of the sustainability story: When you save water, you also save energy and avoid direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions associated with water treatment, distribution and return. The City of Austin draws up to 250,000 acrefeet of water annually from the Colorado River. Its treatment works like this: Water from the river is drawn and passed through screens to remove large debris. From there, it is treated with chemicals and minerals, then pumped to flocculation basins to be stirred by large paddles, sedimentation basins for detention and then filtered again before going to underground storage tanks to be distributed via underground pipes. After we flush or drain water, treating it for return to the river is even more energy-intensive than the first process. Whats more, wastewater treatment emits greenhouse gases directly in the form of unflared methane from digesters and nitrous oxide generated by effluent. With all these processes, its easy to see how Austin Water Utility uses half of all electricity consumed by Austins municipal governmentand how water, energy conservation and greenhouse gas emissions are inextricably linked.

Project:

lAS CASAS VerdeS: 8306 lONgVieW rOAd


This home is the first in a new community of water-conserving homes in south Austin. A 2,000-gallon rainwater storage tank provides water for irrigation and efficient dual-flush toilets. Landscape design uses exclusively native and adapted plants from the City of Austin Grow Green list. Rock excavated from the site and a raingarden (under construction) contribute to effective storm water management. In the future, residents will enjoy a shared vegetable garden with three additional rainwater storage tanks for irrigation. The project also scored high in energy efficiency with walls and roofs using structural insulated panels, solar thermal water heating and a 3 kW photovoltaic system.

AEGB Rating:

Team: Owner David Martin Architect Martin Associates Architects landscape & rainwater Consulting Dick Peterson Mechanical Contractor Stans Heating and Air Conditioning

14 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING WATER

2010 Greg Coleman

WATER SAVINGS = ENERGY SAVINGS + AVOIDED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

WATER SAVED FROM 2010 AEGB-RATED PROJECTS (1,000s of Gallons)


50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000

0 10

*Direct and indirect associated emissions avoided from water and wastewater treatment, in metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent 20 3O 40 50

GREENHOUSE GASES (MTCO2 e)*

Indoor Water

Irrigation Water

20

40

60

80

100

ENERGY (MWh)*
*Energy saved from avoided water and wastewater treatment

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN WATER 15

material efficiency beginS during the design phase. Smaller buildings with well-designed, multi-purpose spaces, built using material-efficient construction techniques, require less material overall. The materials themselves matter, too: When designers specify salvaged materials and materials with recycled and locally-sourced content, they reduce impacts from resource extraction and transport and extend the life of the landfill. More importantly, choosing these materials creates market demand for more sustainable products.
During the construction phase, managing waste is critical. In Texas, a quarter of all waste going to the landfill is construction and demolition waste. Throughout the operations phase, facilities managers and occupants can pare down waste by reducing the use of disposables, recycling and composting food waste. An important principle to keep in mind: Well-designed buildings made of natural, beautiful materials have long lives. People value and care for them, adapt them to changing needs, develop them into cultural landmarksand, in the end, are less likely to trade them for new buildings.

16 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING MATERIALS

2009 Thomas McConnell

Project:

AuSTiNS CHildreNS SHelTer CAMPuS AT rATHgeber VillAge


Safe materials and practices were top priority for this eight-building campus, since it will be housing up to 78 neglected and abused children. All paints, coatings, sealants, adhesives, carpets, composite wood and insulation are low-emitting materials. A green housekeeping plan will minimize indoor air pollution. The team also reduced impacts through sustainable materials choices: 81 percent (by cost) of the materials used for the childrens cottages are sourced in Texas and 43 percent (by cost) of the materials used in the Educational and Program Services Buildings is recycled content. Of all the project construction waste, 77 percent (188 tons) was diverted from the landfill. Visitors and staff of the shelter will enjoy ample open space and pedestrian pathways connecting buildings to each other and the campus to the nearby Mueller development.

AEGB Rating:

Project:

702-b WeST CreSTlANd driVe


This 803-square-foot second dwelling unit, just a mile from the original Threadgills, makes excellent use of durable, reclaimed, renewable and recycled materials. Efficient framing practices reduced waste and interior wood walls were reclaimed from Janis Joplins old house.

Team: Owner Valerie Kanak Architect Craig Nasso Architecture builder Eli Mosley Mechanical Acme Air Conditioning & Heating AEGB Rating:

Team: Architects Kipp Flores Architects, LZT Architects engineers Alpaca Energy Solutions (MEP); ATS Engineers (MEP); Hanrahan-Pritchard Engineering (civil); Koenig Consulting Engineers (structural) general Contractor Flynn Construction landscape Architect TBG Partners Commissioning The Delphi Groupe

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN MATERIALS 17

2010 Patrick Wong

deSigning for good indoor environmental quality means ensuring our habitats
are safe, comfortable and promote good physical and psychological well-being. Indoor air quality is a major component of the indoor environment. Improving indoor air quality begins with carefully considering what items to introduce to your well-sealed building envelope. Sources of pollutants, such as copy rooms and laboratories, should be identified, isolated and ventilated. Designers should specify low- or zeroemitting paints, coatings, adhesives, insulation, composite wood and finishing materials to reduce emissions of toxic chemicals in the indoor environment. Exposure to indoor pollutants, such as radon, mold, volatile organic compounds and ozone, can cause, at the very least, short-term discomfort for occupants. Long-term exposure has been linked to heart and respiratory illnesses, which are of particular concern for certain vulnerable populations, such as the young, elderly or ill.

High indoor environmental quality has to do not only with indoor air quality concerns, but also with occupant comfort. Individual thermal controls, daylighting systems, views to the outdoors and high acoustical quality make building occupants more comfortable and productive, which results in a myriad of cascading benefits. Healthy indoor air combined with a comfortable, beautiful indoor environment promotes better occupant health and wellness, leading to lower health care expenditures, fewer sick days, better productivity and employee retention. These benefits help increase the value of the building and encourage companies to sign longer leases. In schools with good indoor environmental quality, students earn better grades and have fewer health problems. In a residential context, good indoor environmental quality helps ensure a comfortable, dignified, non-toxic environment in which to sleep, eat, relax and raise a family.

18 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING IEQ

2009 Thomas McConnell

Project:

gOrZYCKi Middle SCHOOl


By prioritizing indoor environmental quality, the Gorzycki Middle School project team created a healthy, productive learning environment for southwest Austin students and teachers. A construction phase indoor air quality plan kept workers safer and prevented damage and contamination of building materials that could have long-term impacts on building air quality. Non-emitting materials were important, as well: The project team selected composite wood products without added urea formaldehyde. Rooms such as science laboratories and janitorial closets have hard-lid ceilings, fully constructed partitions and dedicated exhaust systems. The AISD-wide integrated pest management policy protects building occupants, school buildings and grounds from damage caused by pests and pesticides. Now that the school is open, building occupants can count on CO 2 and thermal comfort monitors to keep them safe and comfortable.

AEGB Rating:

Project:

607 deeP eddY AVeNue


For this renovation of a 1917 house near the iconic Deep Eddy Pool, the project team aimed to minimize off-gassing of harmful chemicals. They sealed wood surfaces with water-based products and tung oil and used zero-VOC interior paints. An open floor plan allows cross-and-stack ventilation, improving the indoor environment with passive cooling and plenty of fresh air.

Team: Owner Joseph and Amber Bennett Architect Joseph M. Bennett Architects Mechanical Phillips Maintenance Service Solar Photovoltaic Meridian Solar AEGB Rating:

Team: Owner Austin Independent School District Architect GSC Architects engineer HMG & Associates (MEP) general Contractor Bartlett Cocke General Contractors landscape Architect Coleman & Associates Sustainability Consultant AISD Energy, Water and Sustainability Team

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN IEQ 19

2010 Patrick Wong

2010 Jody Horton

green building iS more


than saving water, conserving energy, reducing material waste and doing it all affordably. Environmental preservation and economic viability are just two parts of the sustainability story. The last critical piece has to do with working toward greater social equity. In practical terms, social equity should be considered at every phase of the building life cycle. It begins with site selection: Will residents and workers have access to safe, affordable transit choices? Is the building located in a desired development corridor, to protect drinking water and rural lands for future generations? Will it provide services or employment to neighborhood residents, contribute diversity and preserve local character? In the design phase, its important to minimize negative impacts to neighbors. Does the building increase light or noise pollution, storm water runoff, urban heat island effects or traffic? Choice of materials is important too: They may seem to be just the stuff buildings are made of, but the story behind them should be one of fair working conditions and sustainably-managed resources. During the construction phase, its important to consider how

equitably workers are being treated. Are they safe and fairly-paid with adequate breaks and water? Poorlymanaged construction pollutionfor example, dust and exhaustcan cause health problems for local residents. During the occupancy phase, every facet of a building impacts social equity. Durable, water- and energy-efficient buildings reduce maintenance costs and help keep utilities affordable for everyone in the community. This is particularly important for low-income residents. Improved indoor air quality protects people from being exposed to pollutants that can cause chronic illnesses. A pleasant indoor environment, one with daylight and well-organized space, contributes to a sense of community well-being and pride. These considerations are all ways of getting at the greater goal: to advance human culture. After all, as local residents and global citizens, we want to make the world a place where 7 or 9 billion present and future human beings can eat, breathe, sleep, dance, raise families, make art and coexist harmoniously alongside the countless other organisms we share the planet with.

20 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING EQUITY

BEYOND LOW UTILITY BILLS: EqUITY IN AUSTINS MULTIFAMILY BUILDINGS

2010 Patrick Wong

Austin Energy Green Buildings mission is to lead the transformation of the building industry to a sustainable futureand that means an equitable future. While equity has always been a part of our vision, AEGB introduced equity as a formal category of its multifamily rating system in 2010. The new rating tool awards points for providing affordable housing in order to encourage green housing development for families at 80 percent of, or below, Austins median family income. The tool also highlights the role that transportation plays in housing affordability: Housing and transportation together account for 40-70 percent of the average low-income familys household expenses. Locating housing in dense, transit-accessible neighborhoods reduces dependency on expensive-to-own-and-maintain vehicles. Finally, the rating encourages projects to provide a computer lab to residents, for whom personal computers and Internet service might be a substantial expense. With free, reliable Internet access, residents can apply for jobs, pay bills and, in the future, manage their home energy use.

COLLABORATING FOR BETTER WORKING CONDITIONS


Project:

918 eAST 53rd STreeT


This 1,368-square-foot home in north central Austin features universal design that accommodates the homeowners changing mobility. The home is barrier-free in accordance with standards defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act and features roll-in showers, installed grab bars and an ADAcompliant toilet. The home, a second dwelling on a large lot, locates homeowners within a quarter mile of public transit. Two installed rain barrels provide water for landscape irrigation and solar-ready design allows the future option of a PV array.

AEGB Rating: AEGB is partnering with the local non-profit Workers Defense Project to increase equity in Austins construction industry. The organization has helped raise community awareness of local industry injustices, such as wage theft, unsafe working conditions and inadequate medical insurance and workers compensation. Building Austin, Building Injustice, a report produced in collaboration with the University of Texas, has been an especially effective tool in bringing attention to poor working conditions in Austins construction industry. AEGB participants can earn a point toward a green building rating by adhering to the Workers Defense Project Premier Community Builder Agreement, a legal contract that provides a framework for making fast-growing Austin a better place of employment for construction workers, one contractor at a time.

Team: Owner Richard Kallus and Pamela Romero Architect Richard Hughes Design builder ILCOR

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN EQUITY 21

one of the moSt powerful benefitS of a green building is its potential to transform the building industry. The Austin Energy Green Building rating is a distinguishing label designed to help consumers make educated choices about the kinds of buildings they want to live in, work at, rent or own. We promote outstanding green building projects in town through our numerous education and outreach activities and by publishing case studies like those featured in this report and on our website.
Its even more effective when AEGB participants speak from firsthand experience, getting the word out about the benefits of owning, operating, living in and working at green buildings. There are a number of ways to reach out. In commercial buildings, project teams can create permanent education installations in their buildings using signs and displays, inviting visitors to check out efficient mechanical systems, view real-time energy consumption or learn to use dual-flush toilets. On the residential side, instructional manuals, brochures and web features can teach residents about green living. As tech-savvy Austinites rely more and more on the Internet and social media marketing, pertinent online content and smart phone applications are indispensable tools. Our message is this: Using your building to educate building professionals and the public about sustainability* has a multiplier effect. Save a gallon of water in your buildingand tell other building owners exactly how you did itand you have the potential to save that gallon in dozens of other buildings, in Austin and around the world.

* Sustainability means finding a balance among three sets of goals: 1) prosperity and jobs 2) conservation and the environment and 3) community health, equity and cultural vitality. It means taking positive, proactive steps to protect quality of life now and for future generations. City of Austin, Office of Sustainability
22 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING EDUCATION

Project:

AuSTONiAN
At 683 feet, 56 stories tall, the Austonian is the most prominent building in Austinand its four-star AEGB rating makes it a veritable green building landmark. Low-flow fixtures, ENERGY STAR washers and dishwashers and 1.8 gallon-per-minute showerheads contribute to indoor water savings of 28 percent and a connection to the Austin Energy District Cooling Downtown Plant helps with energy savings. On the materials side, the team diverted 83 percent (2,170 tons) of its construction waste from the landfill, used materials with recycled content and chose low-emitting finishing materials to minimize the release of pollutants into the indoor environment. The tenth-floor urban garden, irrigated by air conditioning condensate, creates an outdoor refuge for downtown-dwelling residents. But what demonstrated true leadership was the owners enthusiasm for educating residents, staff, occupants and the community about sustainable design and cultural preservation. The team went to great lengths to preserve the historic Dumas Blacksmith Shop brick faade in the very public 2nd Street District, demonstrating their commitment to material reuse and Austins cultural heritage. By providing information about green features and recommendations for green living on their website, in the lobby and in homeowners guides, the Austonian is encouraging market transformation in Austin and beyond.

Team: Owners Benchmark Development, Grupo Villar Mir, Momark Development Architect Ziegler Cooper Architects engineers CBM Engineers (structural); CHP and Associates Consulting Engineers (MEP) general Contractor Balfour Beatty Construction Historic Preservation Emily Little AEGB Rating:

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN EDUCATION 23

2010 Thomas McConnell

auStin energy green buildingS education programS calendar of


reach out to the entire Austin green building communityfrom the casually interested to top-notch designers and engineers. Our monthly professional development seminars let building professionals keep up with the latest in the field while earning continuing education credits. Green Boots is our education series for residential builders and trade contractors. And for homeowners and other novices, we offer a quarterly day-long workshop known as Green By Design. In addition to these regular activities, AEGB staff support, organize, are invited to speak at Central Texas sustainability events, and participate in fairs, trade shows and conferences throughout the year.

EVENTS + SEMINARS

FEBRUARY 01 e
local, National and international energy Policy Doug Lewin, Good Company Associates Karl R. Rbago, Austin Energy

MARCH 05 e
indoor Air Quality Kerry A. Kinney, The University of Texas at Austin Brent Stephens, The University of Texas at Austin

APRIL 19 24
ACi Home Performance Conference AEGB hosted this national conference which, thanks to a booming home performance and energy efficiency industry, attracted a record 1,800 attendees.

MAY 22
green by design

JUNE 06
Cool House Tour At the 14th annual tour, co-hosted by the Texas Solar Energy Society, Austinites toured a net-zero energy affordable housing development, a house that generates enough solar energy to power an electric car, a quirky remodeled 1917 cottage and a sleek live/work rural loft.

JUNE 25 e
building Control Systems David Dixon, Hill Country Ecopower Albert Elbaz, Johnson Controls Kathy Gossett, GreenSwitch Team

FEBRUARY 27
green by design For more than a decade, AEGB has offered quarterly sustainable design workshops on single family residential green building in the hot, humid central Texas climate.

MARCH 26 e
efficient HVAC Systems Dick Grant, Trane San Antonio John Umphress, Austin Energy Green Building
24 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING EDUCATION

APRIL 30 e
greening existing buildings Tim Kisner, Austin Energy Stuart Sampley, Architect David Thomas, Austin Convention Center

MAY 28 e
Aegbs New Online rating Tool Jeff Wacker, Austin Energy Green Building

e SEMINAR SERIES

JULY 23 e
Social equity Sarah Dooling, The University of Texas at Austin Karl R. Rbago, Austin Energy

AUGUST 27 e
The Hows and Whys of Smart Water use Drema Gross, Austin Water Utility Danny Lytle, Austin Water Utility Joel Klumpp, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality

SEPTEMBER 17 e
energy Modeling Michael Gatto, Austin Community Design and Development Center Kapil Upadhyaya, Kirksey EcoServices

OCTOBER 21
Networking event At our annual Zilker Clubhouse event, the green building community networked and celebrated green building successes.

NOVEMBER 06
green by design

DECEMBER 10 e
Sustainable behavior Amanda Berens, Foundation Communities Grcan Glen, The University of Texas at Austin

SEPTEMBER 24 26
renewable energy roundup and green living Fair Central Texans headed to Fredericksburg for this annual sustainability event to catch up with the latest in renewables and technology, as well as learn from and network with local green celebrities.

AUGUST 28
green by design

JULY 27
green boots graduation Thirty building professionals earned their Green Boots by completing our 12-course residential construction series, which includes modules on all facets of green design, from smart site selection to interior finishes.

NOVEMBER 12 e
green building Case Studies Stuart Hersh, The Willows Wayne Jeansonne, Solluna Builders Dylan Siegler, Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN EDUCATION 25

auStin energy green building has been leading the way since we first collaborated with the Center for Maximum Potential Building Systems to develop the first residential rating tool in 1991. Over the years, we have introduced the commercial and multifamily rating tools, created dependable education and networking opportunities for the building community, won awards, hosted conferences and shepherded outstanding projectssuch as the Ben White branch of the University Federal Credit Unionto five-star ratings.
As we look to the future, we see an Austin with net-zero energy buildings, high-density mixed-use communities, green infrastructure and low-carbon transportation optionswhere healthy indoor environments are the standard, not a novelty. To move us along this path, we partner with other city departments, local organizations and building professionals to develop new services that encourage higher levels of performance in the construction industry. Some of these initiatives are described in the pages to come, but first, we offer a bit of insight from Karl R. Rbago, vice president of Austin Energy Distributed Energy Services, about how all these advances fit into a vision for the electric utility of the future. In the end, we provide services and support that aim to reward industry innovation. Our project teams are the true innovators. When they find a new, better way to improve site or resource efficiency or indoor environmental quality, they are charting a course to more sustainable development for all of Central Texas.

26 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING INNOVATION

utility of the future

Were living in the future. Ill tell you how I know. I read it in the paper. Fifteen years ago.
John Prine, Living in the Future

The electric utility industry, at least for the 20 years that I have been working in it, has been poised for a fundamental transition to what many call the utility of the future. Traditionally, the business modelsometimes called the spin the meter modelhas been about volume of sales. More sales pay for more investments, more investments pay for more profits, and, once upon a time, more investments meant lower costs per unit of electricity. But in the face of technological, market and policy development, as well as environmental impacts from electric consumption, this model simply must change. Utilities have recognized that demand for electric service is different from demand for kilowatt hoursand that customers ultimately want the former. Regulators and markets constantly put pressure on utilities to find better, less costly ways of delivering that service. As the business shifts, utilities are increasingly looking to the distributed end of the system for opportunities to increase value to customers. Smart grid, distributed generation, electric vehicles, advanced energy efficiency, demand response, direct load control and, of course, green building are all high on the list of strategies that utilities are carefully examining and, at Austin Energy, aggressively deploying.

Austin Energy Green Building already models some of the major trends that signal the emergence of the utility of the future. For years, their approach to energy, water and material efficiency has shown that integration yields multiple, often serendipitous benefits. Right-sizing mechanical equipment, for example, reduces electric demand, consumption, initial costs and operational costsand can also improve equipment durability and reduce indoor humidity, resulting in increased occupant comfort. As the program responsible for updating the City of Austin energy code, AEGB is also leading the shift in our building codes from prescriptive to performance-based. They have as a 2015 goal a Zero Energy Capable Homes standard, under which every new home will be capable of being a zero energy home over the course of a year with the addition of a small solar photovoltaic system. We are also envisioning performancebased standardssuch as kWh per square foot, per yearthat could implicitly recognize the differences among building types, age and usage. Standards like these help create the market and regulatory conditions for private sector innovation. In collaboration with many other groups at Austin Energy, AEGB will also play a key role in guiding the transformation of the built environment toward

higher and higher levels of interactivity. The smart grida term used to describe a wide range of technological transformation afoot in the distribution end of the electric utility system todaycould ultimately place every system and subsystem of a building under the control of an intelligent, flexible, highly-automated building management system. This is much more than setting the thermostat from a smart phone, though that will be fun. It is about a constant flux of system conditions and transactions that result in buildings having conversations like this: I ordered some electricity that I dont need. What can you offer me? Yes, I can offer some ramp control for your micro-turbine. Now? On a regular basis? I can curtail. What duration and magnitude? Can you send a service professional? These trendsintegration, performance standards and automated building management systems are just a few of the road signs that point toward the utility of the future. All this change will not happen overnight, nor will it necessarily be dramatic. Much of it will appear as more

controllable, more efficiently priced-and-delivered electric service. Smart meters look a lot like old meters; electric vehicles get charged with plugs that look a lot like gas pump nozzles; interruptible thermostats look like regular thermostats. But dramatic or not, we are talking about a transformative change to one of the most important service sectors in our societywith buildings taking center stage. Buildings are where our electric service happens. Whether as homes, the sites for our economic activities or, increasingly, as the sites for our power generation and energy management systems, our buildings are where the utility of the future will emerge. And when building professionals participate in charrettes, perform parametric analysis on an energy model, install windows or blow insulation, they are a parta major partof this transformation.

Karl R. Rbago Vice President, Distributed Energy Services

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN INNOVATION 27

NEW CODES, NEW RATINGS, NEW WEB APPLICATION

While Austins new construction market has been quieter than in pre-recession years, Austin Energy Green Building has been busy updating the energy code, our rating tools and launching a new online rating system. The new residential and commercial energy codes, which AEGB is responsible for developing, raise efficiency standards for every new building in Austin. The residential code helps Austin progress toward the goals of the Zero Energy Capable Homes Plan. Under the plan, all new homes will be capable of being net-zero energy over the course of a year, with the addition of a cost-effective solar array. The new code brings Austin homes about halfway to meeting this ambitious objective.

The new commercial code features major advances for the building envelope, complemented by an Austin-specific requirement for basic mechanical commissioning, which can result in up to 15 percent more energy efficiency. These measures prepare Austins commercial construction industry to meet the progressive IECC 2012 standards, expected to be adopted in 2013, which are anticipated to improve the way we design mechanical systems. The new AEGB rating tools, whose release coincided with the roll-out of the new energy code on Oct. 1, 2010, continue to encourage a shift toward performance-based energy standards. Historically, energy standards have been prescriptivethat is, they specify levels of efficiency for individual building components, such as

HVAC systems or windows. Performance-based standards set an energy use goal rather than specifying components, allowing project teams to choose the best way to achieve the goal. AEGB also introduced a new web application that allows the green building rating process to be tracked and viewed in real time and streamlines communication between staff members and project teams. The new system is a single online platform for all project documentation, including construction drawings, specifications, other submittals and the rating calculations. With this tool, team members can correspond, get status updates and receive reference materials in real time.

New in the 2010 AEGB Ratings


Single Family Improved HVAC efficiency (minimum 550 square feet per ton of cooling) Builders must provide a Texas Climate Vision score (code compliance calculator developed by Texas A&M) to demonstrate energy savings above energy code Two-star homes (and higher) must divert at least 50 percent of construction waste from the landfill or submit an approved waste management plan multiFamily Social equity category with points for housing affordability, Internet and computer accessibility and transportation options Points available for electric vehicle charging stations and PVC- and phthalate-free building materials CommerCial Integrated design point requires two of these analyses: a) energy use b) daylight availability c) water balancing d) water quality and conservation, wildlife habitat or building massing Points available for green housekeeping, electric vehicle charging stations, PVC- and phthalate-free building materials and access to local and regional food production Light pollution reduction standards include new Backlight, Uplight and Glare (BUG) ratings for luminaires developed by IESNA

28 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING INNOVATION

GREEN ROOF ADVISORY GROUP

ENERGY MODELING INCENTIVES

PLUG-IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Use of green infrastructure to help mitigate the environmental impacts of the built environment has become increasingly important as our world continues to urbanize. Rooftops are one of the few available areas in the concrete jungle to reintroduce vegetation, providing oases and recreation space for urban residents, gardens for local food production and habitats for wildlife. The benefits dont stop there: Green roofs clean and cool the air, play a role in stormwater management and reduce energy demand by keeping buildings cool. Since they frequently last longer than conventional roofs, less waste is sent to the landfill. AEGB staff have been key players in the City of Austins effort to create policies and programs to facilitate the installation of green roofs in Austin as part of the Green Roof Advisory Group. The group, made up of city employees from several departments and green roof and sustainability technical experts, developed a five-year plan to systematically support uptake of green roofs in Austin. With their hard work, the support of Council and Austins citizens, green roofs like the one at the Austonian (p. 23) and City Hall (below) are becoming a part of Austins urban landscape.

As Austins codes and standards advance, and project teams build better buildings, it gets harder to achieve additional energy efficiency using a systems-and-components approach. To move new construction toward whole-building design and help building professionals continue to improve energy performance, Austin Energys Energy Efficiency Services and AEGB have partnered to offer an incentive for energy modeling to the Austin community. Under the program, expected to be available in late 2011, Austin Energy will provide a rebate for qualified energy modeling services based on building size, cost of services and calculated energy demand savings.

Since the 2007 launch of Austin Energys Plug-In Partners campaign, led by former General Manager Roger Duncan, plug-in electric vehicles have been identified as an important opportunity to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from vehicles, expand its revenue base and begin to test new energy management strategies and a service-based business model. As part of the electric vehicle ramp-up effort, AEGB staff have been working with electricians, electrical inspectors, car dealers and manufacturers to make recommendations for building code changes to accommodate charging stations and propose an expedited process for charging station installations and inspections. AEGB is also working to expand the scope of green building to better encompass transportation. With the addition of a point for charging stations in our 2010 ratings, electric vehicles join the portfolio of recognized green transportation options, including public transit, bicycle routes, pedestrian access and car share programs. Making charging accessible at home and at work will make it easier for Austinites to make the switch from gas-powered vehicles and help alleviate electric vehicle range anxiety. Switching to electric vehicles wont solve all of Austins transportation problems. An electric car still contributes to traffic jams, for example, and all cars require a lot of resources to manufacture. But electric vehicles will help Austin make important environmental gains, including reductions in smog and greenhouse gas emissions.

INTERNATIONAL GREEN CONSTRUCTION CODE

For years, AEGB has been using its green building rating system as a testing ground for the City of Austin energy code. This experience as a leader in code development and compliance is now serving a global audience: Since 2009, AEGB staff has been collaborating to write the first International Green Construction Code in the role of energy committee chair. The IGCC aims to change policymakers view of sustainability by introducing green standards into the same family as life/safety building codes. A public draft was finalized during meetings in Austin in January 2010. Final action will take place in November 2011 in Phoenix. If approved, the code will be available for widespread adoption in early 2012.
2011 Patrick Wong

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN INNOVATION 29

Projects to Watch: 2011 and Beyond


LA MA
KOE N
RT

RB
IG L

LVD
NO

45

35TH

MO-P AC

ST

ST
GU AD AL UP ES T

BE R

KM

C
A TORO C

AN

AM

DR

TH

ST

51S T

ST

HL OO

O ER

RD

NO RT HE AS TD R

Architect: Nelsen Partners 1. WHOle FOOdS MArKeT // Solar-tracking skylights and lighting sensors improve indoor light. Customers can enjoy eating outdoors under trees preserved on site.

RED

R UD T

AM HE RS TD

DU

VA L

RD

DU

VA L

RESEARCH

IC

CA VE

BLV D

TR

ME

IVE

L OF CAPITA

DR

LTO N

ELD

BURNE

ME

D SA

R
TA R

T ROA

LN

WA L

AV E

SH

PE

PA R

STE

KFI

NORTH AUSTIN
MA R

RD

NC HA CA

NE

MA

SR

DS TR

EE

EE

ST ST R

H1

CO NG R

SO

UT

ES

SA VE

GR

PL

JO

DW AR

EA

WO O

SA N

OV E

DR

LA

TV AL

LE

YD

30 AUSTIN ENERGY GREEN BUILDING

JO

BE

I YV LL

D NYON R

LL

RD

RD

TL ES

KE

DR

38

TH

E 51ST ST

24TH ST

26TH ST

ST
R RD
MLK J R BLV D

K LA

TIN US EA

BR

AK

EN

TEXAS

ER

FIE

LA

LD

MANO

RD

15TH

ST
D WOO

6TH
1ST

12 ROSE
7TH ST

TH ST
AIRP

WE

IL RV BE

LE

RD

VD BL

ST
ST

5TH

ST

AVE
GOV ALL

ORT BLVD

CK

YT ON

GIN

RD

E 1S T ST
E DR

BO

LM

RD

Architect: SHW group 2. AiSd MCCAlluM HigH SCHOOl eXPANSiON // The expansion boasts an excellent indoor environment (thanks to a daylighting study), very high water savings and an outdoor art patio classroom.

RI VE RS ID

R TO OL T FS

TE

RI

BU

RD

RL

Architect: Forsite Studio


ES ON RD

3. bell STudiO // This combination carport-studio located near the University of Texas uses a structurally-insulated panel roof for excellent thermal performance.

Architect: Nelsen Partners 4. WildFlOWer TerrACe // This senior housing development offers a vanpool, art studio, library and activity centers, providing community living in a resource-efficient package.

builder: Standard Pacific 7. Mueller HOuSe CONdOMiNiuMS // This new housing product increases density by disguising four units as one large house, located near transit and greenways at Mueller.

Architect: barnes gromatzky, Kosarek Architects 10. SPAWglASS OFFiCe // A site characteristic study informed the choice of stormwater management strategies (including raingardens) to reduce impacts to nearby Carson Creek.

Architect: Allan Nutt Architecture 5. greeNWAY lOFTS // This condominium complex features shared parking, efficient unit planning, shaded hardscapes and irrigation with non-potable water.

developer: Foundation Communities 8. M STATiON // Located in the MLK Transit-Oriented Development, M Station offers affordable housing and family-oriented amenities to low-income residents.

Architect: barnes gromatzky, Kosarek Architects 11. AiSd eArlY CHildHOOd CeNTer // The center achieves excellent indoor environmental quality with pollutant isolation, limited VOCs and individual controls for thermal comfort.

Architect: looney ricks Kiss 6. Mueller SiMMONS Vedder 2 // Educational outreach efforts are planned to help residents of this 301-unit condominium complex live green in their Mueller homes.

Project Manager: ACddC 9. guAdAluPe-SAldAA NeT-ZerO SubdiViSiON // All 60 units of affordable housing at this brownfield redevelopment are net-zero energy, relying on solar thermal and photovoltaic generation.

Architect: The Sage Partners 12. reTreAT AT NOrTH bluFF // This apartment building is located on a rehabilitated brownfield, offering proximity to transit and communal gathering areas.

AUSTIN RESIDENT, GLOBAL CITIZEN 31

AEGB STAFF
1. Katherine Murray 2. Heidi Kasper 3. Patricia House 4. Sophie Roark 5. Sarah Talkington 6. Mary McLeod 7. Jeff Wacker 8. John Umphress 9. Teresa Dixon 10. Maureen Scanlon 11. Bryan Bomer 12. Tina Woodings 13. Jessica Galloway 14. Susan Peterson 15. Shelly Comer-Murray 16. Michael Husted 17. Richard Morgan 18. Lisa Nutt 19. Miki Cook 20. Liana Kallivoka

12

16

6 7 11 9 13 15 17 19

18 5 10

20

14

2011 Jody Horton

CONTACT US In Person 811 Barton Springs Road, Suite 300 // Austin, TX 78704 Mail 721 Barton Springs Road // Austin, TX 78704 Phone 512.482.5300 E-mail greenbuilding@austinenergy.com Web greenbuilding.austinenergy.com Facebook facebook.com/aegreenbuilding Twitter twitter.com/aegreenbuilding For an electronic version of this publication, write to aegbannualreport@austinenergy.com

JA_1050