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Biology 202 Human Physiology Instructor: E-mail: Web site: Faith Vruggink 103G Schwarz 269.965.3931 x2345 vrugginkf@kellogg.

edu http://academic.kellogg.edu/vrugginkf/ Chapter Learning Guides: http://web.me.com/sjorges2002/Site/Course_Docs.html

Course Description: Prerequisites: Biology 201 completed with grade of C or better Compass Reading Score: 73 This course is an introduction to the major concepts and homeostatic mechanisms necessary for a fundamental understanding of normal human physiology. General principles covered are cellular membrane function, electrophysiology, feedback mechanisms and metabolism. Included is an analysis of the properties and interrelationships of major organ systems and a brief introduction to selected disease processes. Length of Course: One semester, 4 credits, 48 hours of lecture, 32 hours of lab Core abilities: Demonstrate critical thinking skills in gathering, analyzing, interpreting facts, and problem solving using scientific inquiry. General Education Outcomes A. Determine the degree of validity of inferences drawn from specific evidence. B. Recognize implied assumptions, points of view and biases in given statements and assertions. C. Analyze, evaluate, draw conclusions and make decisions based on quantitative and qualitative data. D. Distinguish between data that are relevant and data that are irrelevant to a particular question. E. Interpret and use formulas to solve problems. F. Represent data graphically and be able to interpret data represented graphically. G. Design methods to gather and analyze evidence. Learning Objectives 1. Examine the general mechanisms that maintain homeostasis among fluid compartments of the body. 2. Contrast mechanisms of passive and active membrane transport.

3. Predict changes in cellular electrical phenomena if specific plasma electrolytes are abnormal 4. Sequence the structures and processes of synaptic communication 5. Distinguish the structural and functional features among branches of the efferent (motor) peripheral nervous system 6. Explain the physiological response to stress 7. Illustrate the molecular basis of muscle contraction 8. Sequence the relationships among the electrical activity of a motor neuron, the electrical activity of a skeletal muscle fiber and the mechanical activity of a muscle fiber 9. Contrast the factors that determine the force generated by a single muscle fiber and a whole muscle. 10. Evaluate skeletal muscle response to various physical conditioning programs 11. Sequence the functional relationships in the heart among the following: electrical pathway of the conducting system, electrical activity of contractile cells, mechanical activity of contractile cells and normal blood flow 12. Explain the variables that control cardiac output 13. Evaluate the determinants of mean arterial pressure 14. Differentiate among the forces that drive capillary exchange 15. Sequence the homeostatic responses that reflexively maintain mean arterial pressure (short term) 16. Evaluate the pressure changes that occur during ventilation 17. Summarize the process of pulmonary and systemic gas exchange 18. Contrast oxygen and carbon dioxide transport in the blood stream 19. Evaluate the sequence of homeostatic responses that reflexively maintain ventilation 20. Summarize the homeostatic mechanisms that control glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 21. Categorize the homeostatic mechanisms that regulate and maintain normal fluid and electrolyte balance. 22. Summarize the homeostatic responses that reflexively maintain mean arterial pressure (long term) 23. Summarize reflexive control of micturition 24. Summarize the homeostatic responses that regulate acid/base balance in body fluids. 25. Evaluate the composition, digestion, and absorption of a meal 26. Summarize reflexive hormonal control of the gut. 27. Summarize reflexive neurological control of the gut 28. Summarize reflexive control of defecation 29. Contrast the absorptive and postabsorptive states 30. Analyze the endocrine and neural control of the absorptive and postabsorptive states 31. Contrast diabetes mellitus and hypoglycemia 32. Explain the determinates of basal metabolic rate (BMR) 33. Explain homeostatic regulation of total-body energy balance. 34. Explain homeostatic regulation of body temperature

35. Summarize homeostatic regulation of the anterior pituitary (adenohypophysis) 36. Characterize the molecular structure and function of the anterior pituitary hormones Required Materials: Fundamentals of Human Physiology 1st edition, by Stuart Ira Fox ISBN: 978-0-07-722635-0. PhILS 3.0 Physiology Interactive Lab Simulations ISBN: 978-0-07-334933-6, bundled with the text ONLY if purchased at the college bookstore. Lab Manual: ISBN: 978-0-07-804299-7 Grading: The course grade is based on the total number of points accumulated during the semester. Final grade for the class is out of 700 points. Lecture Exams, Prelab Quizzes, Exams, PhILS Reports are scheduled (see lecture/ lab schedule) Lecture quizzes and problems are at the discretion of the instructor.

Grading Scale: The final grade is based on total points earned. End of semester percentages will not be rounded up. It is possible to earn 726 points in this class (103+%). There is no extra credit available. Grade

A AB+ B BC+

Percentage Point Range 93 - 100 651 700 90 - 92 630 650 87 - 89 609 629 83 - 86 581 608 80 - 82 560 580 77 - 79 539 559

Grade

C CD+ D DF

Percentage Point Range 73 - 76 511 538 70 - 72 490 510 67 - 69 469 489 63 - 66 441 468 60 - 62 420 440 0 59 0 419

Distribution of Total Points: Assessment 4 Lecture Exams X 45, 50, 55, 60 4 Lecture Quizzes X 25 points each 4 Lecture Problems X 25 points each Lecture Peer Evaluation 2 Lab Exams X 50 points each 10 Lab Prelab and Vocab Quiz X 10 points each 12 PhILS Lab Reports X 9points each Total possible Points 210 100 100 20 100 100 96 726

Lecture Exams: Exam 2, 3 and 4 are each worth progressively more points than Exam 1. Each exam subsequent to exam 1 is cumulative. Each Exam has questions totaling 5 points that are based the problem most recently completed. Exam questions are objective type questions, matching and multiple choice. Exams are individual effort. Lecture Quizzes: Lecture quiz questions are based on check point questions and end of chapter review questions that are assigned in chapter study guides. Lecture quizzes are open notes/closed book. Each lecture quiz has questions that are an individual effort (10 points) and questions that are group effort (15 points). Time limit for individual effort is 10 minutes and the time limit for group effort is 20 minutes. Individual quiz grades are determined by the total points earned in the individual effort and the group effort. Lecture quiz questions are either correct or incorrect. No partial credit will be awarded. Lecture Problems: Lecture problems involve critical thinking to apply knowledge from 2 or more chapters to new situations. Lecture problems are open book, open notes and open resources from other sources. Each lecture problem has an individual effort (10 points) and a group effort (15 points). Individual problem grades are determined by the total points earned in the individual effort and the group effort.

Lecture Peer Evaluation: Each student will be evaluated by their group members and assigned a score based on criteria designed by class consensus. Each student will be assigned a score between 0 and 20, based on their peer evaluations. Lab Exams: Exam questions are objective type questions, matching and multiple choice. Questions are based on vocabulary and analyzing scenarios and data similar to lab activities and PhILS simulations. Exams are individual effort. Lab Quizzes: Lab Quiz questions are based on vocabulary and prelab activities in the required lab manual. Each lab quiz consist of 2 matching questions based on vocabulary and two short answer questions based prelab activities. Each question is worth 2 points. Missed lab quizzes receive a grade of zero. Time limit for each lab quiz is 10 minutes. Each quiz starts at beginning of the scheduled lab time. Quizzes are individual effort. Lab quiz questions are either correct or incorrect. No partial credit will be awarded. PhILS Reports: PhILS 3.0 lab simulator generates a lab report after the lab simulation is completed. Each report consists of a prelab quiz. Graph or table of data, and a post lab quiz. The following grading rubric will be use to evaluated and assign points to PhILS reports o Prelab quiz score 80% or greater: 3 points. Prelab quiz score less that 80% 1 point o Data must be complete data must demonstrate a trend: 3 points. No trend 1 point o Postlab quiz score 80% or greater: 3 points. Prelab quiz score less that 80% 1 point o Missed PhILS report receive a grade of zero. Attendance Requirement: The student is expected to: Attend all lecture and lab sessions Complete all exams in the allotted time. Time limits are listed on the semester lecture and lab schedule. Time limit for exams is 80 minutes. Each exam starts at beginning of the scheduled class time. Complete all assignments including reports, quizzes and exams by the scheduled or announced deadlines. Submit PhILS lab reports during the first 10 minutes of the scheduled lab time. Time limit for each lab quiz is 10 minutes. Each quiz starts at beginning of the scheduled lab time.

Make-up Policy: Any exam may be made up if the student contacts the instructor prior to the scheduled lecture or lab time in which the student is enrolled. Make-up exams must be completed the day the student returns to class. If the student does not contact the instructor prior to the scheduled lecture time in which the student is enrolled the make-up exam will be worth one half of the usual points. Missed quizzes may not be made-up. Lab reports will be worth half credit if a student does not attend the entire lab session. Classroom Etiquette: Cell phones and pagers must be OFF during class time. If you must take or return an emergency call, please sit by an exit door and go out in the hall to do so. No texting during class All Electronic devices MUST be put away during assessments (tests and quizzes). Class participation is encouraged and it is expected that there be an atmosphere of respect in both the lecture and lab. Side Bar" conversations may be important to you during lecture but PLEASE remember they distract and disturb students around you and me, thus PLEASE refrain from chatting during lecture.

Disclaimer: Information contained in this syllabus was, to the best knowledge of the instructor, considered correct and complete when distributed for use at the beginning of the semester. However, this syllabus should not be considered a contract between Kellogg Community College and any student, nor between any student and the instructor. The instructor reserves the right, acting within the policies and procedures of Kellogg Community College, to make changes in course content or instructional techniques without notice or obligation. ADA Statement: Kellogg Community College does not discriminate in the admission or treatment of students on the basis of disability. KCC is committed to compliance with the American Disabilities Act and Section