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Alarm Message Reference Guide

278558 Rev. A1

Use this publication as a source for complete and accurate information that helps you better operate or service Metso Automation equipment. Your comments and suggestions are welcome. Metso Automation, Inc. 1180 Church Road Lansdale, PA 19446 Attention: Manager, Technical Publications

Copyright 2004 by Metso Automation MAX Controls Inc. Printed in the United States of America All rights reserved

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Contents
Preface ...............................................................................................................................................1 Chapter 1 ........................................................................................................................................1-1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................................1-1 maxDNA System Alarm Classes .......................................................................................................... 1-1
Process Alarms......................................................................................................................1-1 System Alarms ......................................................................................................................1-1 Alarm Configuration ..............................................................................................................................1-2 Configuring Alarm Priorities ................................................................................................1-2 Viewing Alarm Messages ......................................................................................................................1-2 Alarm Summary Display........................................................................................................................1-3 Alarm Summary Menu Buttons ............................................................................................1-3 Alarm List Display................................................................................................................1-4 Acknowledging and Silencing Alarms...................................................................................................1-5 Using Keyboard Buttons........................................................................................................................1-5 Acknowledge and Silence.....................................................................................................1-5 Defeat....................................................................................................................................1-5 Restore ..................................................................................................................................1-6 Defeating and Restoring Alarms ............................................................................................................1-6 Using maxVUE Runtime Display Buttons............................................................................................1-6

Chapter 2 ........................................................................................................................................2-1 How to Interpret .............................................................................................................................2-1 Process Alarms..............................................................................................................................2-1


Control Block Alarms ............................................................................................................................2-1 High Level Analog Input Alarms...........................................................................................................2-2 Data Block Alarms.................................................................................................................................2-3 Individual Alarm Cutouts .....................................................................................................2-3 Troubleshooting Process Problems ........................................................................................................2-4 Logged Process Alarm Format: ............................................................................................2-5

Chapter 3 ........................................................................................................................................3-1 How to Interpret .............................................................................................................................3-1 System Alarms ...............................................................................................................................3-1 System and Network Alarms ................................................................................................................ 3-1
Logged System Alarms Format ............................................................................................3-2 Troubleshooting System Problems .......................................................................................3-2

Part II ...............................................................................................................................................II-1 Alarm Message...............................................................................................................................II-1

maxSTATION Installation
Reference Guide ...........................................................................................................................II -1 Process Alarms .................................................................................................................................... II -1
DPU4E/DPU4F Process Alarms ..........................................................................................................II -2 DPU4E/DPU4F System Alarms...........................................................................................................II -3 WorkStation Alarms.............................................................................................................................II -4 Controller/Datapoint Alarms................................................................................................................II -8

Part III .............................................................................................................................................III-1 Alarm Message.............................................................................................................................III -1 Reference Guide ..........................................................................................................................III -1 System Alarms....................................................................................................................................III -1

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Preface
The Alarm Reference Message Guide contains listings of all the process and system related alarm messages you are likely to encounter in the operation of a maxDNA system. Part I of this publication introduces you to all the maxDNA alarm types, alarm-related displays and alarm message formats appearing on displays and on hard copy reports. Part II provides a complete alphabetized listing of all the maxDNA process alarm messages along with text explaining what they mean. Part III provides a similar listing for system alarms. This publication assumes you are familiar with the maxSTATION and the various display environments. For more information about related topics, refer to the following publications: Book Title maxSTATION Operator's Guide 278557 Book Number

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Chapter 1
Introduction
maxDNA System Alarm Classes
maxDNA System lets you view two classes of alarms: Process Alarms System Alarms

Process Alarms
Process alarms consist of alarm messages associated with the process itself. These consist of two types: Process Limit Alarms Process limit alarms are caused by values exceeding their assigned limits. Alarm information consists of time, point tagname and its long description, alarm text associated with the alarm, current value of the point, alarm limit value, and the units of measure for the point in alarm. Process Status Alarms Process status alarms are generated by points and programs at DPUs. Alarm information consists of time, point tagname and its long description, alarm type text and the alarm value.

System Alarms
System Alarms consist of alarm messages associated with the system hardware. These consist of two types: Station Diagnostic Alarms Station diagnostic alarms are caused by maxSTATION or Remote Processing Unit (DPU, I/O boards) faults, such as weak batteries, card failures, etc. Alarm information consists of time,

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tagname of the station reporting the alarm, the device reporting the fault, and the alarm text. DPU Bus Network Diagnostic Alarms This relates to two classes of alarms, DPU Bus related and maxNET network related. DPU Bus network diagnostic alarms are caused by cable breaks, token passing errors, failure of stations to respond, etc. maxNET Network alarms are caused by Frame Switch or hub failures, Ethernet card failures, Ethernet cable breaks, or a failed target maxSTATION. Alarm information consists of time, tagname for the DPU Bus reporting the alarm (e.g. DPUBUS1), name of the maxSTATION involved in the fault, and the alarm text.

Alarm Configuration
You may set up alarms and events to be detected when you create configurations using maxTOOLS. The system then automatically detects the alarms and events, processes them, and identifies them for display and acknowledgment, logging, analysis, and optional archiving.

Configuring Alarm Priorities


At time of configuration, you may give alarms one of six severity levels. (0 is the lowest prioritynot alarmed at alland 5 is the highest priority.) Alarm severities can be used in conjunction with a temporary filtering function that you may configure using maxVUE Runtime to further classify, filter, and sort alarms for a more meaningful presentation of alarm conditions on alarm-related displays. See "Alarm Summary Display" for a listing of other filtering categories.

Viewing Alarm Messages


You may view alarms from the following standard and custom maxSTATION displays: Alarm Summary Alarm List Other Display Types Point Data Pop-up Faceplates Point Detail displays

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Introduction
Custom graphic displays

Alarm Summary Display


The Alarm Summary display shows filtered or unfiltered alarms from all maxDPUs and DBMs in the domain and the local LSS. By default, a single Alarm Summary page displays up to 20 alarms, however, the window may be configured to display from 1 to 40 alarms; display buttons let you page up and down through the full list. There is no limit to the number of pages. Older systems with only DBMs would have a limit of 5000 alarms per DBM. Click the Alarm Summary button on the Vertical Toolbar or on the Operator keyboard to access the display in a single keystroke. Each entry on the display lists the time, date, tagname, long description, value, limit, and acknowledge status of the alarm. Points may be selected in the summary for display swap or control action. When selected, the tagname of the selected point will appear on the Point Select button on the Horizontal Toolbar display. Note: By default, the Alarm Summary display lists all alarms without filtering. Use the Temporary Filter Setting Display to set up and control how alarms are seen on the actual Alarm Summary displays. You may filter alarms by type, the state of acknowledgment, and the severity. See Publication 278599, maxSTATION Operator's Guide, "Filtering Alarms."

Alarm Summary Menu Buttons


The Alarm Summary Display includes six buttons at the bottom of the display that let you view alarms filtered by various categories that you select from the Temporary Filter Setting dialog box. See Publication 278599, maxSTATION Operator's Guide, "Temporary Filter Setting." Table 1-1 relates the available filtering categories to maxDNA alarm classes as described at the beginning of this chapter. You may click the following buttons to display a filtered alarm list: Click This All Process diagnostic\control Process\system diagnostic System diagnostic To View This Display Display all alarm messages. Display only process diagnostic and process control alarms. Display only system diagnostic and process diagnostic alarms. Display only system diagnostic alarms.

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Process diagnostic Process control Display only process diagnostic alarms. Display only process control alarms.

Refer to the following Alarm Filtering Quick Reference Table for a listing of each filtering category that you may select, and the corresponding alarm classes and types that come under this category. These correspond to choices available under the Alarm Type field from the Temporary Filter Settings dialog window in maxVUE Runtime. Table 1-1. Alarm Filtering Quick Reference Table
Filtering Category (from Alarm Type field) Process Diagnostic/Control Process/System Diagnostic System Diagnostic Process Diagnostic Process Control All Alarm Class Alarm Types

Process System, Process System Process Process Process, System

Process Limit, Process Status System Diagnostic, Process Limit Alarm, Process Status Alarm Station Diagnostic, Highway Network Diagnostic Process Limit Alarm, Process Status Alarm Process Limit, Process Status Process Limit, Process Status, Station Diagnostic Highway Network

Alarm List Display


The Alarm List display shows the most recent acknowledged and unacknowledged alarms (with the highest severity). By default, the Alarm List displays up to 20 alarms, however, the window may be configured to display from 1 to 40 alarms; the alarms appear inside a window at the lower part of the Vertical Toolbar. Because the Alarm List remains on the Vertical Toolbar display, you never lose sight of highest priority alarms. Unacknowledged alarms are displayed in their corresponding alarm severity color combination; acknowledged alarms are in white text on a black background.

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Introduction

Acknowledging and Silencing Alarms


With only a single keystroke, you may acknowledge alarms using the operator keyboard, the PC keyboard and from a variety of maxVUE Runtime Displays at the maxSTATION.

Using Keyboard Buttons


The four alarm keys, colored yellow on the maxDNA operator keyboard, control alarms. Two of these keys, <Acknowledge> and <Silence>, also appear on the standard Horizontal and Vertical Toolbar display. Use these keys as follows: to temporarily stop alarms from occurring, <Defeat>, restore their function (remove defeat), <Restore>, acknowledge them, <Ack>, and silence the audible annunciator, <Silence>. The Acknowledge, Silence, Defeat and Restore keys work in maxDNA release versions 3 and 4 but are restricted to the selected point and the selected point must have a Point Control pop-up on the screen.

Acknowledge and Silence


Press the <Acknowledge> key to acknowledge the highest priority unacknowledged alarm; this is the top alarm displayed in the alarm list display on the Vertical Toolbar display. This key has the same effect as the Ack button on the Alarm List display. On the PC keyboard, the equivalent key is <Ctrl-F3>. See the next section. When a new alarm is detected, the maxSTATION can sound an audible alarm in addition to posting the new alarm in the appropriate location in the alarm list. The <Silence> key lets you quiet the alarm with a single keystroke and has the same effect as the Silence button on the Vertical Toolbar display. See "Using maxVUE Runtime Display Buttons". On the PC keyboard, the equivalent key is <Ctrl-F10> The <Silence> key only silences an audible alarm; the <Acknowledge> key both silences and acknowledges the top most alarm on the list.

Defeat
Defeats all alarms on the currently selected block. When implemented, the block will not alarm until it has been restored. Use of this key may be restricted. On the PC keyboard, the equivalent key is <Ctrl-F4>.

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Restore
Restores all alarms on the currently selected block so that it can alarm again. On the PC keyboard, the equivalent key is <Ctrl-F5>. See next section.

Defeating and Restoring Alarms


You may temporarily defeat Control and Data Block alarms without changing their triggering criteria. This permits individual process loops and other control actions to be switched off during operating periods when the alarm would be of no use. An example of this would be nuisance alarms that occur during startup or changes to part of the system. When normal operation resumes, the alarm features of that function can be restored. The Defeat capability eliminates clutter in alarm summaries and operating views, simplifying the operator's view of the process. To be sure operators do not overlook defeated alarms, the word defeated appears in every faceplate, which displays that loop or controls action. Note: You may only defeat process-related points; alarms related to system hardware points cannot be defeated.

Using maxVUE Runtime Display Buttons


From maxVUE Runtime displays, you may acknowledge and silence alarms from the standard Vertical and Horizontal Toolbars, Alarm Summary Display, Alarm List Display, and from Point Control pop-ups and digital Detail Displays. Refer to the following table: Button Ack Ack Page Button *Ack Point Location Point Data Pop-up, Point Detail Display Alarm Summary Location Horizontal Toolbar Description Acknowledge Alarm condition of the current point. Acknowledges all alarms in the currently displayed page. Description Acknowledge any alarm which exists for the point currently selected. Acknowledge the top-most alarm appearing at the top of th Al Li t i d d

*Ack Top

Alarm Summary, Alarm List

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Introduction
the Alarm List window and the Alarm Summary display. **Silence Vertical Toolbar Silence an audible signal originating in a maxSTATION equipped with a sound board and speakers. The audible signal indicates that an alarm has occurred for a point assigned to a predefined hierarchical group.

* If an audible alarm is equipped, this action will silence the audible alarm.
** The Silence key only silences an audible alarm; the Acknowledge key both silences and acknowledges the top most alarm on the list. maxSTATIONs not equipped with sound boards and speakers may be configured to silence alarms occurring at a maxSTATION playing the sound.

Note: Because <Acknowledge> and <Silence> buttons, and the Alarm List window appear on the standard Vertical and Horizontal Toolbars, you may place these elements on every screen view in the system, if desired. You may select individual alarms on the Alarm Summary display by pointing to an alarm and clicking the left mouse button. In response, the system displays the point tag name at the bottom of the display. Once selected, the point can be acknowledged via the Ack point button. Additionally, the Point Data, Control and Detail buttons will apply to the selected point.

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Chapter 2
How to Interpret Process Alarms

A process alarm indicates that some portion of the process has gone beyond its specified limits. When a point goes into alarm, the system adds its tagname to the Alarm List and Alarm Summary displays, and indicates the alarm condition on appropriate point-related pop-up displays. Each of the standard maxDNA functional blocks stored in the DPU database has many alarm states and control conditions built into them, which are set during the configuration process. This permits alarming capability and an interlocking capability with other user-ready and userdefined blocks.

Control Block Alarms


Control Blocks, stored in the DPU (DPU4A and earlier), can contain up to 16 independently adjustable alarms, which permit alarming and interlock capabilities not only within the specific block originating the alarm but also in other computational blocks. The PID Control Block, for example, will alarm and set triggers (Alarm/Mode Word bits) for interlock upon the following six conditions: Process Variable HI Process Variable LO Setpoint HI Setpoint LO Deviation HI Deviation LO

(Refer to online help to reference Alarm/Mode Words associated with each Control Block type.)

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The PID Control Block will display an alarm if any of the input alarm conditions occur. (Refer to the next section.) This control block will also set triggers for individual interlocks upon the following other conditions: Output HI. Output LO. Emergency down state induced by either operator or interlock to other conditions. Receipt of a cascaded forceback signal. Receipt of an external override signal. Placed into manual through a hand station. Placed into manual by operator. Placed into manual by interlock from other control blocks. Placed in automatic by either interlock or operator. Placed into cascade by either interlock or operator. Placed into computer mode by either interlock or operator.

High Level Analog Input Alarms


The DPU can scan up to 60 high level analog inputs every 125 milliseconds. These fast-scan inputs, which are configured using Analog Input Buffer (AIB) blocks, each have the following eight associated alarm conditions: Instrument Out of Range LO Instrument Out of Range HI Instrument Out of Range (HI or LO) Alarm LO Alarm HI Alarm (HI or LO) Any limit exceeded Link Failure (cannot communicate with I/O module)

Note: Since AIBs cannot be independently alarmed, they do not appear on any alarm displays. AIBs may be read by Control and Data Blocks; should an AIB reach an alarm state, the Control and Data Block used to monitor the AIB will actually go into an alarm state. To actually look at the AIB alarm condition, you may have to look at the associated Control and Data Block detail display.

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How to Interpret Process Alarms


Analog input alarms can help discriminate between reaching an operational and safety alarm condition and the failure of an input device, such as a field sensor/transducer or the loss of an I/O module or channel.

Data Block Alarms


The DPU 248 Data Blocks each have the same eight input alarms listed for the High Level Analog Inputs. This allows the same alarms to be applied to other inputs by linking them to a Data Block. In addition, Data Blocks can each be used to perform any of the following alarm options: Open thermocouple detection. HI and LO alarm condition. HI-HI and LO-LO alarms expressed either as an absolute value or as a delta from the HI or LO alarm value. Rate-of-change alarms and rate-of-change clamps placed on inputs or outputs to detect unacceptable slew rates or to limit signal slew rates. Adjustable hysteresis (% value) deadband for value-related alarms (HI, LO, HI-HI etc.) to prevent nuisance alarms as a variable hovers around an alarm trip value. Time Delay settings to suppress transient swings into alarm but not sustained alarm conditions. Alarms built into each Data Block can be set up to trigger: On single threshold crossing or on repetitive deltas. Upon return to normal. If acknowledged, but situation remains uncorrected for too long a time period. Alarms can also automatically acknowledge when they return to normal before being acknowledged by the operator. These options enable the process engineer to alert operators to abnormal conditions while eliminating the nuisance alarms that can obscure more important process information.

Individual Alarm Cutouts


An Alarm Cutout feature makes it possible to dynamically disable only a specific type of alarm in a Data Block. These could be all LO alarms, all

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HI alarms, rising/falling, or all alarms. Cutout can be due to process value changes or system hardware conditions. For example, during known disruptive operations (start up or shut down), selective alarms can be temporarily disabled to avoid masking more important real alarms. Yet you will be kept aware of other conditions of that same bypassed point, such as an open thermocouple. These alarm cutouts are independent of the Alarm Defeat/Restore mechanism, and can be triggered either by operator command, by a discrete signal, or induced by a program. Any event, threshold of analog value, lapse of time, condition, state, sequence step (or completion) or command either within or outside of maxDNA can be used to trigger an alarm cutout. A single event or logic result of several conditions or events (boolean expression) can impact the alarm of a single Data Block, or any combination of Blocks. Each Data Block can have its own independent triggering circumstance.

Troubleshooting Process Problems


Process limit alarms and process status alarms appear together on the Alarm Summary display mixed in with system alarm messages. The format of displayed process alarms is somewhat different from the format for station alarms and DPU Bus network alarms. (Refer to Chapter 3, "How to Interpret System Alarms" for a description of system alarm formats.) Process limit alarms have the following format:
Time Date Tagname Description Alarm Text HH:MM:SS MM:DD:YY Up to 16 characters Up to 32 characters Message Text Alarm Value Limit

Variable Character Lengths

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How to Interpret Process Alarms

Process status alarms have the following format:


Time Date Tagname Description Alarm Text HH:MM:SS MM:DD:YY Up to 16 characters Up to 32 characters Message Text Alarm Value Limit

Variable Character Lengths Note: The Limits field does not apply to status alarms.

Displayed process limit alarms and process status alarms are also somewhat different from each other. Process limit alarms report: Time the alarm occurred. Tagname of associated point. Name of point and alarm message text under the Description field. Alarm type. Current value of the point. Alarm limit value. Units of measure for the point. The process status alarms format is similar to the process limit alarms format as outlined above; however, because status alarms are associated with digital type points, the Summary Display Limits field does not apply and is not used. Process alarm messages also appear in a hardcopy version that uses a format somewhat different from the Alarm Summary Display format. Because the printed format can accommodate 133 characters per line, printed text may contain additional information. Refer to the following figure to learn how to recognize logged process alarms:

Logged Process Alarm Format:


date/ time severity type alm/clr tagname description value limit 38 long title 32

18

16

16

Process limit alarms report: Date/time Time the process alarm occurred.

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Severity Alarm severity ranging from 0 to 5; the severity number appears in a three-character field surrounded by asterisks: *5* Type When a process alarm is logged, the characters pa appear in this twocharacter wide field. Note: The format for process alarms and edit actions is the same. An Edit Action occurs when an operator takes some action involving a point, such as a mode change or a configuration. When a Edit Action is logged, the characters ea appear. Tagname Tagname of associated point; the tagname is created when you configure a point using maxTOOLS.

Alm/clr When an unacknowledged process alarm is logged, the characters alm appear in this three-character wide field. If the alarm is acknowledged or otherwise clears, the characters clr appear. If the line applies to an edit action, the field is blank. Description Process Alarm message text, such as HiHi LoLo; Range High; and so forth. When this field applies to an edit action, the message text describes an attribute that was edited. Value Limit When this field applies to a process alarm, it reports the current value of the point and the alarm limit value. When this field applies to an edit action, it reports that the limit was changed; the new limit value along with the previous value limit appear in this field. Long Title Long name of point. To troubleshoot process alarms, you may access Point Data, Control, and Detail pop-up displays to learn more about points in alarm and to make quick adjustments to your process. When a process alarm occurs, the alarm message will also appear on these displays.

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How to Interpret Process Alarms


You may invoke these displays in maxVUE Runtime by selecting the appropriate button on the main menu Horizontal and Vertical Toolbars. See Publication 278599, maxSTATION Operator's Guide.

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Chapter 3
How to Interpret System Alarms
System and Network Alarms
System diagnostic status alarms inform you of maxDNA system hardware and software problems. Problems detected within a specific module or station are classified as diagnostic failures. Problems with communications are referred to as highway network alarms. DPU Bus network alarms are further divided between DPU Bus network and maxNET network communications problems. maxVUE Runtime System Status displays show both alarm types. System alarms appear along with process alarms on the Alarm Summary Display and on the Alarm List. The format of displayed system alarms is somewhat different from the format for process alarms; refer to the previous chapter for a description of process alarm formats. System alarms have the following format:
Time HH:MM:SS Date MM:DD:YY Tagname Up to 16 characters Text Subsystem Name Message Text

Variable Character Length

On the display, the subsystem reporting the fault and the message text appear together under the Description field. The three fields to the right of this field Type, Value, Limit apply to Process alarms. System alarm messages also appear in a hardcopy version that uses a format somewhat different from the Alarm Summary display format. Because the printed format can accommodate 133 characters per line, printed text may contain additional information. Refer to the following figure to learn how to recognize logged system alarms:

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Logged System Alarms Format
date/time Size of field 18 severity 3 type 2 alm/clr 3 tagname 16 description 54

System alarm fields report: Date/time Time the system alarm occurred. Severity Alarm severity ranging from 0 to 5; the severity number appears in a three-character field surrounded by asterisks: *5* Type When a system alarm is logged, the characters sy appear in this twocharacter wide field. Tagname Tagname of associated point; the tagname is created when you configure a point using maxTOOLS. Alm/clr When an unacknowledged system alarm is logged, the characters alm appear in this three-character wide field. If the alarm is acknowledged or otherwise clears, the characters clr appear. Description Alarm message text.

Troubleshooting System Problems


When a system alarm occurs, read the message text to determine the nature of the problem. For a better understanding of what the message means, refer to Part III of this book which provides an alphabetized list of all the maxDNA system messages and their meanings. The most obvious way to pinpoint the source of a hardware or communications problem is by looking up the tagname associated with the message. When you configure the system hardware using maxTOOLS software, you assign a unique tagname to each DPU Bus and to each station assigned to a DPU Bus. The maxDNA system references DPU Buses and stations by tagname. When you create or update a system, the tagnames used in the logical configuration of the system should also appear on labels attached to the

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How to Interpret System Alarms


actual physical device. This makes it easier to pinpoint the location of the maxSTATION, DPU, I/O module, or DPU Bus reporting the problem. If you have a particularly large configuration consisting of multiple DPU Buses and many stations configured with each DPU Bus, system status displays may also help you to pinpoint the location of a system problem. System status displays are a collection of screens used to diagnose problems in your system. These consist of: System Status Display DPU Bus Map Display DPU Bus Statistics Display DPU Bus Station Status Display Refer to Publication 278599, maxSTATION Operator's Guide, for more information about these displays.

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Part II
Alarm Message Reference Guide
Process Alarms
Part II consists of an alphabetic listing of all maxDNA Process Alarm messages. The following pages contain the actual message text (appearing here in all upper case characters), the point or points which can generate the alarm, and a description of what each process alarm message means. Process alarm message text for any given point appears in three versions: 16-character text used in alarm log 12-character text used in Alarm Summary displays 12-character text used in Detail pop-ups All three versions are listed for each process alarm message entry. Note: Points for which an alarm message is applicable include some Control Blocks, which are no longer supported by maxDNA, but were supported by the Models 582 and 585 Operator Stations. Those points are identified using ** in the table.

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maxSTATION Installation

DPU4E/DPU4F Process Alarms


Process alarms in a maxDPU are generated by three types of atomic blocks: ATAG, DTAG and ALMREP. ATAG and DTAG will generate specific alarm text strings for the alarm summary display and events. These texts are shown below. Names in capital letters below are attributes of ATAG and DTAG.
Alarm Clear Value = (TMSG attribute value)

DTAG

TMSG is set to TRTXT or FLSTXT based on the value of OUT in the DTAG. A clear alarm occurs when the DTAG output value changes to the non-alarm state.
Alarm Digital Value = (TMSG attribute value)

DTAG

TMSG is set to TRTXT or FLSTXT based on the value of OUT in the DTAG.
Return to Normal

DTAG, ATAG

Return to Normal behavior must be selected in the ALMBEHAVE attribute. A return to normal alarm occurs when the alarm condition of an acknowledged alarm clears.
AlarmRising =ACTUALRATE Lim=LIMRATE ATAG

LIMRATE attribute must be non-zero for a rising or falling alarm to occur.


AlarmFalling =ACTUALRATE Lim=LIMRATE LowAlarm Limit =LIMLO Value =OUT HighAlarm Limit =LIMHI Value =OUT LoLoAlarm Limit =LIMLOLO Value =OUT HiHiAlarm Limit =LIMHIHI Value =OUT ATAG ATAG ATAG ATAG ATAG

The DPUTEMP atomic block in a DPU4F can generate a Low, High, LoLo, or HiHi alarm if the DPU temperature exceeds one of the specified limit values.
RangeLoAlarm Lim=LIMRANGELO Value=OUT RangeHiAlarm Lim=LIMRANGEHI Value=OUT ATAG ATAG

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Workstation Alarms

DPU4E/DPU4F System Alarms


The maxDPU produces several system alarms. ATAG can produce an open circuit alarm when referenced to a TC. The base DPU atomic blocks will produce the others. TC input# ADDR nnn Open Circuit ATAG

Input# is the TC input referenced by the ATAG. nnn is the address of the TC card. This alarm is generated by ATAG but actually occurs due to a break in the wiring for a TC input. Standby DPU has Failed BACKUP

This occurs in DPU4E only and is somewhat misleading. This alarm is generated in the active DPU that has just taken over due to a takeover request or failure of the (previously) active DPU. Primary/Secondary DPU Takeover BACKUP

DPU4F only. This alarm is generated when the inactive DPU changes it state to active due to a takeover or a failure of the (previously) active DPU. Normal Queue Overrun QUEOVRN

The normal time class typically executes every 500 ms in a DPU. If it cannot complete execution of all of the normal time class atomic blocks in the configured time period, this alarm is generated. While this alarm should be very rare, it indicates a fairly serious condition. The DPU is overloaded to the point where it cannot perform control and monitoring functions in a timely manner. Prompt attention should be given to the size of the configuration and to the allocation of atomic blocks to the critical, high and normal time classes. For example, too many critical atomic blocks could impact the performance of the normal time class. NetErr: DPU NetA: CommOk || NetB: CommLost NETALARM

Generated when the A or B network is not usable by the DPU. Usually indicates some physical problem with the network. Can also be a configuration problem. A

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DPU4F set to 10 MB operation when connected to a 100 MB port will generate a NetErr alarm. DPU Battery Problem BATALARM

DPU4E only. Generated when the battery voltage is determined to be too low to sustain DPU operation long enough to write the configuration to flash memory. DPU CPU Fan Problem FANALARM

DPU4E only. The CPU fan has stopped or slowed to the point where it is no longer effective. The fan should be replaced.

WorkStation Alarms
A number of programs in the workstation can produce alarms. The name of the originating program is shown on the right. The text on the left will appear in the Text field on the alarm summary display. All workstation alarms are of type System. [IP address] DPU is Not Responding Healthlog

Healthlog cannot establish communication with the DPU. [IP address] Status: SBP_E_TIMEOUT Healthlog

Healthlog has lost communication with a DPU. ALM DLL COULD NOT READ name RealTimeGateway

The RealTimeGateway alarm dll could not establish communication with a DBM (name). Alarms from this DBM will not be displayed. ALM Primary and Secondary Printer Error LSS

The primary and secondary network printers are not available. Some possibilities are that they could be disconnected, powered down or out of paper. ALM Primary Printer Error LSS

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Workstation Alarms
The primary network printer is not available. Data (loggers, reports) should be re-directed to the secondary printer. ALM Secondary Printer Error LSS

The secondary network printer is not available. If the primary printer should fail, the secondary will not be there to takeover. ALM Reports size n MB exceeds limit of m MB LSS

The size of generated report files on the hard disk has exceeded the amount specified in the MCS registry (Max Generated Rpts MB). Generated reports are saved in the c:\Custom\Reports\Generated folder. ALM Archive size n MB exceeds limit of m MB LSS

The size of archived report files on the hard disk has exceeded the amount specified in the MCS registry (Max Archive Megabytes). Archived reports are saved in the c:\Custom\Reports\Archive folder. ALM Event size n MB exceeds limit of m MB LSS

The size of event databases on the hard disk has exceeded the amount specified in the MCS registry (Max Event Megabytes). Event MDBs are saved in the c:\Custom\Database\System\Events folder. ALM Spool size n MB exceeds limit of m MB LSS

The size of the files in the spool folder the hard disk has exceeded the amount specified in the MCS registry (Max Spooling Megabytes). Spool files are saved in the c:\WinNT\System32\Spool\Printers folder. ALM Total size n MB exceeds limit of m MB LSS

The size of the report, event and spool files on the hard disk has exceeded the amount specified in the MCS registry (Max Total Megabytes). COMM: SBP_E_TIMEOUT Operation Timeout The maxMERGEDPUALM program will issue the alarm above if communication is lost with one of its alarm providers (maxDPU). The tagname of this alarm will have the malm suffix.

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maxSTATION Installation
Dead Man Timer Timed Out LSS

Only applies to a program that starts up an LSS dead man timer service. That program is responsible for updating the dead man timer. If it does not do so in a timely fashion, the above alarm is generated. Disable Time Sync To DBM RealTimeGateway

DISK WRITE FAILED: DATA LOST !

maxSTORIAN

This alarm will occur if the disk is full and has not yet been trimmed. Dongle will expire in n days LSS

The parallel port dongle will expire shortly and maxVUE will no longer run. This alarm is associated with test dongles. ILLEGAL ALARM SORT FOR DBM RealTimeGateway

The DBM does not support the Sev/Time sort order. An alarm request for this sort order will cause the RealTimeGateway to issue an alarm. Alarms from the DBM will not be displayed. The maxLINKS program can also generated alarms if it has been configured to do so. It will issue analog and digital alarms as shown below where name is the tagname of a maxLINKS service/point. Name = Val => LimitH = LimVal Name = Val => LimitHH = LimVal Name = Val <= LimitL = LimVal Name = Val <= LimitLL = LimVal Name -> TRUE Name -> FALSE Maximum disk usage level reached ! maxLINKS maxLINKS maxLINKS maxLINKS maxLINKS maxLINKS maxSTORIAN

Old data will be deleted by maxSTORIAN when this alarm is generated. MERGE COULD NOT READ Provider maxMERGEALM

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-6

Workstation Alarms
An alarm provider such as maxMERGEDPUALM, LSS, or RealTimeGateway could not be read. Alarms from this provider will not appear on the alarm summary display. MERGE RCV BAD ALARM FROM provider maxMERGEALM

Indicates that unknown data was received from an alarm provider. This is not a serious problem since the alarm data will be retrieved on the next read. However, repeated occurrences of this alarm indicate some workstation problem (possibly low memory?). Net Err: Station Lost Comm with DBM on Net A/B Realtimegateway Generated by the DBMcomm plugin in the RealTimeGateway when communication is lost with a DBM on the A or B network. NetErr: name NetA status maxTransport

Text for this alarm could also indicate net B. name is the workstation name. Status can display: CommLost, CommRegained, CommOk. If the status sticks at CommLost, no communication is occurring on the failed network. POINTS WITH LOWERED PRIORITY maxSTORIAN

maxSTORIAN cannot keep up with all of the data that it is receiving and will shed load. Station: Log In: [IP] RemoteServe

A user has logged in remotely from the listed IP address. Station: Log Out [IP] A remote user has logged out. UNCONNECTED POINTS maxSTORIAN RemoteServe

MaxSTORIAN cannot access one or more points that it was asked to collect. Warning disk usage level reached ! maxSTORIAN

The amount of disk space used by the maxSTORIAN has reached the warning level.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-7

maxSTATION Installation

Controller/Datapoint Alarms
ALM INT'LOCK ALM INRLOCK ALARM INLK

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Reversing Motor Controller (Cntrl Block) Meaning: One of the Interlock inputs configured as an Alarm Interlock has become true. The motor will be turned off. This alarm may cause the algorithm to go to the 'stopping' state.
ALARM INTERLOC ALM INTERLOC ALM INTERLOC

Point(s) which generate Control (Control Block)

this

alarm:

Binary

Meaning: User-defined in Binary Control Module ExCEL.


BACKED OVER BACKED OVER SEC ACTIVE

Point(s) which generate this alarm: (Control Block)

Backup

Meaning: Control has been transferred to the secondary DPU of a backup pair.
BACKUP BACKUP BACKUP

Point(s) which generate **Receives (Control Blocks)

this

alarm:

Meaning: This block is now receiving data from the backup DPU of a backup pair,because of a transfer of control in that pair.
BOTH LIMITS BOTH LIMITS BOTH LIMIT

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Valve/Breaker Controller (Control Block) Meaning:
CLOSED

Both limit inputs have become true.


CLOSED CLOSED

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL. in Binary

Binary Control

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-8

Workstation Alarms
COMM FAILED COMM FAILED COMM FAIL

Point(s) which generate **Receives (Control Blocks) Meaning:


CONF ERROR

this

alarm:

No data received from other station.


CONF ERROR CONF ERROR

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Blocks Meaning: into one Block.
DEV HIHI

All Data

An illegal value has been entered of the editable fields of a Data


DEV HIHI DV HL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block) Meaning: The deviation configured HIHI limit.
DEV LIMIT DEV LIMIT

**Real the

has
DV

exceeded

Point(s) which (Control Block)

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Meaning: 'Generic' alarm raised if the PID algorithm has raised a deviation limit alarm but the condition cleared before it was logged.
DEV LOLO DEV LOLO DV HL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block) Meaning: The deviation configured LOLO limit.
DEVIATION DEVIATION

**Real the

has

exceeded

DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Acquisition (Control Block)

**Data

Meaning: The L3 limit is exceeded by any pair of inputs.

DEVIATION HI

DEV HIGH

DV

Point(s) which (Control Block)

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-9

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: Deviation between process variable and set point has exceeded the configured high alarm limit.
DEVIATION LO DEV LOW DV

Point(s) which (Control Block)

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Meaning: Deviation between process variable and set point has exceeded the configured low alarm limit.
DEV HIGH DEV HIGH DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Counter (Control Block)

**Event

Meaning: Output minus the specified deviation value has exceeded the configured deviation high alarm limit.
DEV LOW DEV LOW DV

Point(s) which generate Counter (Control Block)

this

alarm:

**Event

Meaning: Output minus the specified deviation value has exceeded the configured deviation low alarm limit.
DIGITAL ALRM DIGITAL ALRM ALARM

Point(s) which generate digital Data Blocks Meaning: alarm.


DIGITAL INP

this

alarm:

All

A digital data block has gone into


DIGITAL INP ALARM

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Status/Alarm (Control Block)

Digital

Meaning: The output bit of the point has become true and the algorithm is configured to alarm.
DISCREPANCY DISCREPANCY DISCREPANCY

Point(s) which generate this Sequencer, Ramp Gen (Control Blocks)

alarm:

Meaning: Either the first control block in a 'chain' of blocks (used to construct sequences with more than 8 steps) is not the same type as the others in the chain; or the control

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-10

Workstation Alarms
block attempted to access a step which is higher than allowed based on the number of slots in the chain; or the control block was trying to find the first 'off' step but either could not find it or its number was greater than 255.
DISCREP+TIM DISCREP+TIME DISC + TIME

Point(s) which generate this Sequencer, Ramp Gen (Control Blocks)

alarm:

Meaning: A discrepancy alarm has occurred, and the time in a particular step has exceeded the allowed time.
DV HL DV HL DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real

Meaning: 'Generic' alarm raised if the Real Alarm algorithm has raised a deviation limit alarm but the condition cleared before it was logged.
DV RATE DV RATE DV R

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real

Meaning: Input 1 rate of change has exceeded the configured limit.


FAIL FAIL FAIL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL. in Binary

Binary Control

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-11

maxSTATION Installation
FAILED FAILED FAILED

Point(s) which generate this alarm: (Control Block)

Backup

Meaning: Control has been transferred to the backup DPU of a backup pair; this control block is no longer in control.
FALLING FALLING FALLING

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks

Analog

Meaning: The output of the Data Block is decreasing at a rate faster than the configured Rate-of-Change limit.
HIGH ALARM HIGH ALARM ALARM HIGH

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

Analog

Meaning: Input value is greater than or equal to the configured high alarm limit.
HIHI ALARM HIHI ALARM HIHI ALARM

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input value is greater than or equal to the configured high alarm limit.
INP 1 INP 1 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 1 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 2 INP 2 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 2 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 3 INP 3 INP

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-12

Workstation Alarms
Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks Analog

Meaning: Input 3 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 4 INP 4 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 4 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 5 INP 5 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 5 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 6 INP 6 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 6 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 7 INP 7 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 7 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INP 8 INP 8 INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Input 8 of this block is in alarm; see the input's Detail Popup to observe the exact alarm condition.
INPUT ALARM INPUT ALARM INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-13

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: 'Generic' alarm raised if the control block has raised an input alarm but the condition cleared before it was logged.
I1 LIMIT I1 LIMIT INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: and 8-Pos Switch Control Blocks

Select

Meaning: 'Generic' alarm indicating that the control block has raised an input alarm for input 1 but the condition cleared before it was logged.
I2 LIMIT I2 LIMIT INP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: and 8-Pos Switch Control Blocks

Select

Meaning: 'Generic' alarm indicating that the control block has raised an input alarm for input 2 but the condition cleared before it was logged.
INSTR HIGH INSTR HIGH INST HIGH

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

Analog

Meaning: Hardware failure alarm indicating that the input is greater than 5.5V on a 1V-5V input.
INSTR LOW INSTR LOW INST LOW

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

Analog

Meaning: Hardware failure alarm indicating that the input is less than 0.5V on a 1V-5V input. LEFT LIMIT LEFT LIMIT LEFT LIMIT this alarm:

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

Meaning: The left limit input has become true while the motor is running in the reverse direction.
LINK FAILED LINK FAILED LINK FAIL

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-14

Workstation Alarms
Point(s) Blocks which generate this alarm: Data

Meaning: The DPU has lost communication with the I/O device; for example, if a Receive Data Block can no longer communicate with the other DPU.
LOLO ALARM LOLO ALARM LOLO ALARM

Point(s) Blocks

which

generate

this

alarm:

Data

Meaning: Input value is less than or equal to the configured low low alarm limit.
LOW ALARM LOW ALARM ALARM LOW

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

Analog

Meaning: Input value is less than or equal to the configured low alarm limit.
NO MINIMUM SPEED NO MIN SPEED NO MIN SPEED

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NO MFWD/MREV NO MF/MR

Binary Control

in

Binary
NO MF/MR

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NON CONGR INPT NON CNG

Binary Control

in

Binary

INPT

NON CNG INPT

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NORMAL NORMAL

Binary Control

in

Binary
NORMAL

Point(s) Blocks Meaning: normal.

which

generate

this

alarm:

Data

An alarmed condition has returned to

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-15

maxSTATION Installation

NOT CLOSED

NOT CLOSED

NOT CLOSED

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Valve/Breaker Controller (Control Block) Meaning: The 'closed' feedback input has not gone true within the specified time limit. Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NOT OPEN NOT OPEN

Binary Control

in

Binary
NOT OPEN

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Valve/Breaker Controller (Control Block) Meaning: The 'open' feedback input has not gone true within the specified time limit.
NOT OFF NOT OFF NOT OFF

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Meaning: Within 2 seconds of the start/stop input going false the motor forward (or motor reverse) input has not gone false; or the run feedback input has not gone false within the configured time limit during the stop sequence. Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NOT OPEN/CLOSED NOT OP/CL

Binary Control

in

Binary
NOT OP/CL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NOT OPN+CLSD NO OP+CLOSED

Binary Control

in

Binary

NOT OP + CL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Valve/Breaker Controller (Control Block)

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-16

Workstation Alarms
Meaning: Both 'open' and 'closed' feedback inputs are false.
NOT READY NOT READY NOT READY

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Meaning: The 'motor ready' input goes false while the motor is running, or during startup. Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
NOT START NOT START

Binary Control

in

Binary
NOT START

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
OPEN T/C OPEN T/C

Binary Control

in

Binary
OPEN TC

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks

Analog

Meaning: Hardware failure alarm indicating an open thermocouple.


OUT <> INPUT OUT <> INPUT DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Limit Regulator (Control Block)

**Demand

Meaning: Generic alarm indicating that the point has generated either an output > input alarm or an output < input alarm, but the condition cleared before it was logged.
OUTPUT<INPUT OUTPUT < INP DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Limit Regulator (Control Block)

**Demand

Meaning: Difference between the input to and the output of the algorithm has exceeded the configured limit value.
OUTPUT>INPUT OUTPUT > INP DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Limit Regulator (Control Block)

**Demand

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-17

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: Difference between the input to and the output of the algorithm has exceeded the configured limit value.
POS'N TIMOUT POS'N TMOUT POS TIME

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

this

alarm:

Meaning: The motor has been started and the maximum positioning time has been exceeded.
POS+BOTH LIM POS+BOTH LMS POS BOTH

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

this has

alarm: been

Meaning: Maximum position time exceeded and both limits are true.
POS+L LIMIT POS+LEFT LM POS LEFT

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

this

alarm: been

Meaning: Maximum position time has exceeded and the left limit is true.

POS+R LIMIT

POS+RIGHT LM

POS RIGHT

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

this

alarm: been

Meaning: Maximum position time has exceeded and the right limit is true.
PV HIGH HIGH PV HIHI PV HL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real

Meaning: The process input value has exceeded the configured HIHI limit.
PV LOW LOW PV LOLO PV HL

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real

Meaning: The process input value has exceeded the configured LOLO limit.
PV HIGH PV HIGH PV

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-18

Workstation Alarms
Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks Analog

Meaning: The process variable input (or input 1) has exceeded the configured PV high limit.
PV HL PV HL PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real

Meaning: Generic alarm indicating that the point has generated a PV high or low alarm, but the condition cleared before it was logged.
PV LOW PV LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Meaning: The process variable input (or input 1) is less than the configured PV lo limit.
PV RATE PV RATE PV R

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Alarm (Control Block)

**Real of

Meaning: The process input value rate change has exceeded the configured limit.
PV I1 HIGH PV I1 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I1 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I1 LOW PV I1 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I1 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I2 HIGH PV I2 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks)

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-19

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: Analog input I2 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I2 LOW PV I2 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I2 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I3 HIGH PV I3 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I3 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I3 LOW PV I3 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I3 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I4 HIGH PV I4 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I4 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I4 LOW PV I4 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I4 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I5 HIGH PV I5 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I5 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I5 LOW PV I5 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks)

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-20

Workstation Alarms
Meaning: Analog input I5 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I6 HIGH PV I6 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I6 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I6 LOW PV I6 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I6 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I7 HIGH PV I7 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I7 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I7 LOW PV I7 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I7 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV I8 HIGH PV I8 HIGH PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I8 is greater than the configured HI alarm value.
PV I8 LOW PV I8 LOW PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Overrides, 8 Pos Switch (Control Blocks) Meaning: Analog input I8 is less than the configured LO alarm value.
PV LIMIT PV LIMIT PV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control Blocks

Analog

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-21

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: 'Generic' alarm indicating that the point has generated a PV limit alarm but the condition cleared before it was logged.
RANGE HIGH RANGE HIGH OVERRANGE

Point(s) which generate this Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

alarm:

Data

Meaning: The input to the data block is greater than the configured range high limit.
RANGE LOW RANGE LOW UNDERRANGE

Point(s) which generate this Blocks, Analog Input Buffers

alarm:

Data

Meaning: The input to the data block is less than the configured range low limit.
RIGHT LIMIT RIGHT LIMIT RIGHT LIMIT

Point(s) which generate Positioner (Control Block)

this

alarm:

Meaning: The right limit input has become true while the motor is running in the reverse direction.
RISING RISING RISING

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Data Blocks

Analog

Meaning: The output of the data block is increasing at a rate faster than the configured Rate-of-Change limit.
RUNBACK RUNBACK DV

Point(s) which generate Runback (Control Block)

this

alarm:

Hard

Meaning: The logic input calling for a runback has become true and the output of the block is being decreased; or the limit associated with the logic input calling for the runback has been exceeded.
RUNDOWN RUNDOWN DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Limit Regulator (Control Block)

Demand

Meaning: The logic input calling for a rundown has become true and the output of the

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-22

Workstation Alarms
block is being decreased to the limit associated with the logic input calling for the rundown.
RUN'G NO F/R RUN NO MF/MR RUN NO FF

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Meaning: Either the motor forward input or the motor reverse input goes false while motor is running.
RUNN'G NO RF RUNN NO RF RUN NO RF

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Meaning: The motor running feedback input goes false while the motor is running.
RUNUP RUNUP DV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Limit Regulator (Control Block)

Demand

Meaning: The logic input calling for a runup has become true and the output of the block is being increased to the limit associated with the logic input calling for the runup.
SEC'Y FAIL SEC FAIL SEC FAIL

Point(s) which generate **Receives (Control Blocks)

this

alarm:

Meaning: No data being received from the other station; the last value that was received came from the secondary DPU of a backup pair.
SEC'Y NO RDY SEC NOT RDY NOT READY

Point(s) which generate this alarm: (Control Block)

Backup

Meaning: There is a problem with the secondary DPU of a backup pair, or the backup link is not working; the secondary will not be able to assume control.
SEQ INT'LOCK SEQ INRLOCK SEQ INLK

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-23

maxSTATION Installation
Meaning: One of the Interlock inputs configured as a Sequence Interlock has become true. The motor will be turned off only if it is not already in the Running Forward or Running Reverse states. This alarm may cause the algorithm to go to the stopping state.

SEQUENC INTERLOC

SEQ INTERLOC

SEQ INTERLOC

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
SETPT CLAMP SETPT CLAMP

Binary Control

in

Binary
SP

Point(s) which Control Block

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Meaning: 'Generic' alarm indicating that the point has generated a setpoint clamp alarm but the condition cleared before it was logged.
SETPT HI SETPT HI SP

Point(s) which Control Block

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Meaning: The setpoint is greater than the value configured in K5.


SETPT LO SETPT LO SP

Point(s) which Control Block

generate

this

alarm:

PID

Meaning: The setpoint is less than the value configured in K4.


START START START

Point(s) which generate Control (Control Block)

this

alarm:

Binary

Meaning: User-defined in Binary Control Module ExCEL.


START NO RF START NO RF START NO RF

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Reversing Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-24

Workstation Alarms
Meaning: The run feedback input has not gone true within the configured time limit during the starting sequence of the motor.

START NO F/R

ST NO MF/MR

START NO FF

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Motor Controller (Cntrl Block)

Reversing

Meaning: The motor forward (or motor reverse) input has not gone true within 2 seconds of the start sequence of the motor.
TIME EXCEED TIME EXCEED TIME XCD

Point(s) which generate this Sequencer, Ramp Gen (Control Block)

alarm:

Meaning: The configured time to move to the next step of the ramp or sequence has been exceeded.
TRIP TRIP TRIP

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL.
UNAVAIL FLD DEV UA FIELD DEV UA

Binary Control

in

Binary
FIELD DEV

Point(s) which generate this alarm: Control (Control Block) Meaning: User-defined Module ExCEL. in Binary

Binary Control

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 II-25

Part III
Alarm Message Reference Guide
System Alarms
Part III consists of an alphabetic listing of all maxDNA System Alarm messages. The following pages contain the actual message text (appearing here in all upper case characters), how the alarm impacts the DPU, the reporting device and a description of what each system alarm message means.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-1

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES Highway Comm

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


43

Reporting Device

Description

24-BIT BUS PATH ERROR IN 1ST DATA BASE A CABLE IS BROKEN A STATION WENT DOWN OR CAME UP

DHW HWYn

A test value written to the common database by background diagnostics was found to have been corrupted. At one or more locations on the named highway, there is a cable break; see the System Status display for that highway to see which stations are reporting the break. One of the highway stations has stopped passing token, or has just started passing token again. (name) is the name of the station which could not pass the token to the station which left the highway. Linearization range calculation error. There are more process alarms present than the database is sized to handle. An attempt at subsequent reconstruction is performed, assuming that this might be a transitory problem. A session was allocated, but now the DBM is not responding with alarm list data. This alarm occurs when trying to allocate an alarm session with a DBM. The Real-Time Processor annunciates that the attached Applications Processor has become active.

HWYn (name)

AI OR API LINEARIZATION ERROR ALARM LIST OVERFLOW

YES

NO

39

IOP RTP

ALM DLL COULD NOT Read DBMName (such vas "DBM1 or "DBM2") ALM DLL COULD NOT START DBMName (such as "DBM1 or "DBM2") SESSION AP BECAME ACTIVE

maxSTATION maxSTATION RTP

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-2

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

AP CANNOT COMMUNICATE ON NETWORK A

APPL

APPLICATIONS PROCESSOR SWITCHED SERVERS

APPL

AP CANNOT COMMUNICATE ON NETWORK B

APPL

An Applications Processor has lost communications with a Real-Time Processor on Network A. Real-Time Processors regularly broadcast their status on both control room networks. All Graphics Processors will receive all Real-Time Processor broadcasts, even if the Graphics Processor and Real-Time Processor are in different domains. When a Graphics Processor ceases to receive a broadcasts from a Real-Time Processor on this network, it generates this alarm. This situation may be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card A in the Applications Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card A in the Real-Time Processor, or a failed Real-Time Processor. The Applications Processor has either lost Control Room Network communications with its current Real-Time Processor or has determined that a different Real-Time Processor in the same domain has a better data highway status. This is a one shot alarm and does not persist. An Applications Processor has lost communications with a Real-Time Processor on Network B. Real-Time Processors regularly broadcast their status on both control room networks. All Graphics Processors will receive all Real-Time Processor broadcasts, even if the Graphics Processor and Real-Time Processor are in different domains. When a Graphics Processor ceases to receive a broadcast from a Real-Time Processor on this network, it generates this alarm. This situation may be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card B in the Applications Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card B in the Real-Time Processor, or a failed Real-Time Processor.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-3

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
NO

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


11

Reporting Device

Description

BACKUP LINK CRC/FRAMEERROR

QUE

BACKUP LINK QUEUE OVERFLOW BACKUP LINK TIMEOUT

NO NO

NO NO

13 04

QUE QUE

BATTERY #1 WEAK

NO

NO

02

IOP

BATTERY #2 WEAK

NO

NO

03

IOP

BUFFER OVERFLOW

DHWn

BUFFER OVERFLOW

YES

NO

37

DHW

There was a communications error (either a cyclic redundancy check failed, or there was a frame error) in the high-speed backup link between a backup pair of DPUs. The inactive DPU of a backup pair is not keeping up with information coming over the backup link. The active DPU of a pair of backup DPUs is reporting that the inactive DPU didnt respond to a query within the timeout period. Battery #1 weak on DPU motherboard (model 555-2) or battery weak for CMOS on the CPU board (models PSF and PDP). Battery #2 weak on DPU motherboard. (model 555-2) or battery pack weak on motherboard (models PSF and PDP). One of the highway processor's communications buffers is not being emptied by the DBRT in the RTP. Will probably require that the Real-Time Processor be reset. The DPUs highway processors communications buffers are not being emptied by the CP. Will require that the DPU be reset.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-4

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

CAN'T COMMUNICATE WITH RTP VIA NETWORK A

GP

CAN'T COMMUNICATE WITH RTP VIA NETWORK B

GP

A Graphics Processor has lost communication with a Real-Time Processor on Network A. Real-Time Processors regularly broadcast their status on both control room networks. All Graphics Processors will receive all Real-Time Processor broadcasts, even if the Graphics Processor and Real-Time Processor are in different domains. When a Graphics Processor ceases to receive a broadcast from a Real-Time Processor on this network, it generates this alarm.This situation may be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card A in the Graphics Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card A in the Real-Time Processor, or a failed Real-Time Processor. This alarm will persist until either the problem is resolved or the network database of the failed RTPs domain is purged. Refer to the Graphics Processor Operators Guide, Using the Real-Time Processor Selection Display, Clear Button. A Graphics Processor has lost communication with a Real-Time Processor on Network B. Real-Time Processors regularly broadcast their status on both control room networks. All Graphics Processors will receive all Real-Time Processor broadcasts, even if the Graphics Processor and Real-Time Processor are in different domains. When a Graphics Processor ceases to receive a broadcast from a Real-Time Processor on this network, it generates this alarm. This situation may be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card B in the Graphics Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card B in the Real-Time Processor, or a failed Real-Time Processor. (continued on next page)

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-5

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

CAN'T COMMUNICATE WITH RTP VIA NETWORK B (continued from prior page)

CANNOT ARBITRATE FOR SCSI BUS

RTP

CANNOT RE-SELECT SCSI INITIATOR

RTP

CMOS CLOCK VALUE IS INVALID

YES

NO

46

DHW

CNTL LOG RESUMED nnn STATUS LOST

RTP

CONFIGURATION ROLLBACK

RTP

CONFIGURED HDI CARD(S) MISSING

RTP

CONTROLLER OR DPU RELOADING CONTROLLER PROCESS ALARM LOG SUSPENDED COULD NOT OPEN THE EVENT DISK

NO

NO

09

IOP,SLOT, PFI RTP

This alarm will persist until either the problem is resolved or the network database of the failed RTPs domain is purged. Refer to the Graphics Processor Operators Guide, Using the Real-Time Processor Selection Display, Clear Button The Real-Time Processor cannot request the use of the SCSI bus in order to communicate with its clients (Applications or Graphics Processors). This is most likely to be a hardware fault such as a lose SCSI connector, a defective cable, etc. One of the Real-Time Processor's clients initiated a SCSI transaction; when the response was ready, the client would not respond. This can be caused by either hardware, software, or a processor which is temporarily 'too busy'. During DPU startup, either the CMOS clock is not running, or the value of the year stored in the clock is before 1995. An overflow occurred in the memory buffer which stores status broadcast messages; thus, some messages have been lost. There was an error during the database installation phase of Install; thus, this Real-Time Processor has rolled back to its previous configuration. The specific problem(s) which caused the rollback are detailed in a log file which is built by the Configuration Builder during Install. During startup, this Real-Time Processor's database called for highway card(s) to be present which are not responding to a startup request. A reload of this DPU is currently underway. Controller process alarm logging has been suspended because of the overflow of the buffer containing the status broadcast messages. There has been a failure of the hard disk partition in

RTP
Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-6

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

PARTITION CPU FAILURE CPU FAILURE CURRENT RTP IS NOT A PREFERRED SELECTION YES NO 48

DHWn DHW APPL GP

CURRENT YEAR IS OUT OF CONFIGURED RANGE

RTP

DAQD OR IOP DEADMAN TIMER TIMED OUT DATA POINT RECEIVES IN LINKFAIL DEADMAN TIMER NOT REFRESHED DH NEVER RECEIVED CP RESPONSE

YES YES

YES NO

18 25

IOP IOP DHWn

YES

NO

F0

DHW

DMA TIMEOUT ON NETWORK SCSI OPERATION

RTP

which the events are stored. The highway processor's periodic diagnostic test of its CPU detected a fault. The highway processors periodic diagnostic test of its CPU detected a fault. A Graphics or Applications Processor is currently using a Real-Time Processor as a data server and that Real-Time Processor is not on its preferred server list. This alarm will persist until the station starts using a preferred Real-Time Processor as its current server. The switch to non-preferred server can happen either as a result of failure of all preferred servers, or manual switch via the RTP Selection Display. The time configuration file which has been produced and installed by the Configuration Builder is not correct; thus, this Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. IOP timed out (periodic tasks not being scheduled). Millisecond interrupts have stopped. Data block receive in Linkfail condition; data is not being received by Data Block. This highway processor is reporting that its own deadman timeout circuitry has not been refreshed. The highway CPU requested data from the CP in order to respond to a highway request; but, after a timeout period, the CP had not responded. There is a fault in the SCSI bus of this WorkStation: a DMA operation was not completed within the required timeout period. The most likely reason for this error is that some Graphics Processors in this WorkStation have the same SCSI ID (look at CONFIG.INI in the \VUE subdirectory to see). There may also be a hardware fault such as a lose SCSI connector, a defective SCSI cable, etc.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-7

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
NO

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


07

Reporting Device

Description

DPU BACKUP PAIR IS RUNNING ON SECONDARY

SLOT

DPU EVENT QUEUE FLUSHED DPU EVENT QUEUE OVERFLOWED

RTP RTP

DPU FAILURE: ILLEGAL RETURN THRU 0 DPU FAILURE: SRAM CHECKSUM ERROR

YES YES

YES YES

FE FF

SLOT SLOT

DPU IS OFFLINE

NO

NO

07

IOP

In a DPU backup pair, the Secondary is currently active. After you determine that the Primary DPU is able to take control, you can transfer control back via the pushbutton on that DPU. The event queue of a DPU has been emptied; this event was received from that DPU. The event queue of a DPU has not been emptied fast enough by one or more Real-Time Processors; thus some older events in the queue have been overwritten by newer events, and the older ones will not be collected by those Real-Time Processors. An internal failure has occurred in the DPU; this is a fatal error. There is a checksum error in the static RAM (the RAM which contains the operating system) of this DPU. This is a fatal error (reported by model 555-2 only). The DPU is presently offline, so it is no longer updating any process/control outputs. Check the state of the DPU keylock and Interaction Page 9 to get the DPU back online.

Alarm Text

Type

Causes DPU Failover


NO

Activates DPU Offline Contact


NO

DPU Alarm Severity


04

Reporting Device

Description

DPU PROCESSOR FAN FAILURE

SLOT

DRAM CODE CHECKSUM ERROR

YES

YES

FD

SLOT

The cooling fan mounted on the CP of the PDP DPU has failed. Replace or repair the fan immediately to avoid overheating. The CP background diagnostics has detected an incorrect checksum in the program logic stored in dynamic RAM (DRAM); the DPU will have to be reset.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-8

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


46

Reporting Device

Description

DUPLICATE HIGHWAY STATION NUMBERS DUPLICATE HIGHWAY STATION NUMBERS ECC CORRECTED A ONE-BIT ERROR EVENT BARREL OVERFLOW

DHW DHWn

NO

NO

11

DHW RTP

EVENT DISK I/O ACCESS ERROR

RTP

EVENT QUEUE DATA LOSS EVENT QUEUE HAS BEEN RESET EVENTS BUFFER NEARLY FULL

YES

NO

E2

QUE QUE APPL

EVENTS DATA LOSS EMINENT

APPL

The highway processor received a message in which the highway address of the sender was the same as its address. The highway processor received a message in which the highway address of the sender was the same as its address. ECC logic detected and corrected a single-bit DRAM error (reported by model 555-2 only). The event barrel of a Real-Time Processor has not been emptied fast enough by its client Applications Processor; thus, some older events which had been stored in the barrel will be lost. This alarm indicates a problem occurred when the events subsystem tried to access the hard drive of the Real-Time Processor. If this alarm persists, then there might be a problem with the hard drive. Event Queue overflow; dequeue rate is insufficient. Event Queue reset. The CURRENT volume is not mounted on the optical drive, or the CURRENT volume is full and needs to be closed out and replaced. The Event History buffer has been storing data and is nearly full. Same as above message, but this is a second-level warning for the Event History buffer.

Alarm Text

Type

Causes DPU Failover

Activates DPU Offline Contact

DPU Alarm Severity

Reporting Device

Description

EVENTS DATA LOST ExCEL STACK CHECK ERROR NO NO 04

APPL PFI

Same as above, but Event History data has now been lost and cannot be recovered. As of the execution of a check command, the ExCEL processor's stack was not empty (the check command tests the state of the stack to permit debug of an ExCEL program which is causing the alarm "User Stack no empty

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-9

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

GENERIC SCSI I/O ERROR

RTP

GLOBAL IGAP COMPLETED GP BECAME ACTIVE GP HAS SWITCHED SERVERS

Highway Comm

HWYn RTP APPL

HDI CARD(S) MISSING AND CARD(S) TIMEOUT

RTP

HIGHWAY STATION # DISCREPANCY HIGHWAY STATION # DISCREPANCY

NO

NO

04

DHW DHWn

at Restart" to be reported by PFI). There is a fault in the SCSI bus of this WorkStation. This can be caused by either hardware, software, or a processor which is temporarily too busy. An IGAP (Initialize Go-Ahead Pointers) was completed on this highway. The Real-Time Processor annunciates that the attached Graphics Processor has become active. The Graphics Processor has either lost Control Room Network communications with its current Real-Time Processor or has determined that a different Real-Time Processor in the same domain has a better data highway status. This is a one shot alarm and does not persist. An HDI card has failed during normal operation. This may be a temporary condition due to this station's being IGAP'd out; if not, then the Real-Time Processor will have to be reset. This highway processor is reporting that the periodic check of its highway address is failing. This highway processor is reporting that the periodic check of its highway address is failing.

Alarm Text

Type

Causes DPU Failover

Activates DPU Offline Contact

DPU Alarm Severity

Reporting Device

Description

HWYn TIMED OUT OR COMMUNICATION CEASED

RTP

This highway processor either stopped refreshing its deadman timer, or it failed to perform the periodic highway query issued by DBRT. Will probably require the Real-Time Processor to be reset.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-10

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES YES YES

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO NO NO

DPU Alarm Severity


B0 40 30

Reporting Device

Description

I/O BUS ACCESS ERROR ILLEGAL ALGORITHM CODE ILLEGAL BUFFER POINTER VALUE

PFI SLOT DHW

ILLEGAL BUFFER POINTER VALUE

DHWn

ILLEGAL OR NO APPLICATION OBJECT

YES

NO

17

PFI

IOM CYCLE EXCEEDED 1 MSEC

YES

YES

E8

QUE

LOSS OF COMM WITH A GRAPHICS PROCESSOR

RTP

The DPUs programmed functions interpreter is unable to communicate with one or more modules on the I/O bus. A control block contains an algorithm code which is not part of the standard algorithm set. The highway processor does a periodic check of the buffer pointers of its communication buffers; this alarm indicates that one or more pointers were outside the allowed range. Will require that the DPU be reset. The highway processor does a periodic check of the buffer pointers of its communication buffers; this alarm indicates that one or more pointers were outside the allowed range. Will require the Real-Time Processor to be reset. The application program area of the DPU is either empty because the DPU needs to be reloaded, or there is illegal object code in that program area. The IOM is unable to complete its scheduled processing each millisecond. This condition occurs if either the IOM stops running or if it is configured with too many digital terminal boards (16 in model PSF SFP, 25 in model PDP). This Real-Time Processor could no longer communicate with one of its client Graphics Processors. The RTP's timesync function generates this alarm if each GP does not periodically issue time sync requests. This can be an Ethernet communications problem, or a failure of a Graphics Processor. This is a one-shot alarm and does not persist.

Alarm Text

Type

Causes DPU Failover

Activates DPU Offline Contact

DPU Alarm Severity

Reporting Device

Description

LOSS OF COMM WITH AN APPLICATIONS PROC

RTP

This Real-Time Processor could no longer communicate with its client Applications Processor. The RTP's time

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-11

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

maxSTATION <stationName> LOST COMM WITH DBM <dbm/name> ON NET A Or maxSTATION <stationName> LOST COMM WITH DBM <dbm/name> ON NET B

maxSTATION

MERGE COULD NOT READ Provider MERGE RCV BAD ALARM FROM Provider (_DBM_ALM) MERGE RCV BAD SBP STAT FROM Provider MODEM JABBERHALT RELAY ACTIVATED

YES

NO

31

maxSTATION maxSTATION maxSTATION DHW

sync function generates this alarm if the AP does not periodically issue time sync requests. This can be an Ethernet communications problem, or a failure of the Applications Processor. This is a one-shot alarm and does not persist. A maxSTATION has lost communications with a DBM on Network A or B. DBMs regularly broadcast their status on maxNET Networks A and B. All maxSTATIONs will receive all DBM broadcasts, even if the maxSTATION and DBM are in different subsystems. When a maxSTATION ceases to receive a broadcast from a DBM on this network, it generates this alarm. This situation may be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card A or B in the maxSTATION, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card A or B in the DBM, a failed DBM, or a failed frame switch or network hub. This alarm occurs when trying to connect to an alarm provides (Alarm Summary or LSS). An error status was received from the provider, instead of alarm data. This alarm occurs when connected to a provider, but unable to read alarm data. The highway modem logic deactivated the relays which connect the modem's receiver/transmitter to the data highway. This action will be taken if the highway processor will not cease transmitting.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-12

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

MODEM JABBERHALT RELAY ACTIVATED

DHWn

NO CLEAR-TO-SEND AFTER REQUEST-TO-SEND NO CLEAR-TO-SEND AFTER REQUEST-TO-SEND NO TIME CONF DATA FOR CURRENT YEAR

NO

NO

12

DHW DHWn RTP

NON-MASTER STN INITIATED A TOKEN PASS OPTICAL DISK MOUNT REQUEST

Highway Comm

HWYn

APPL

OPTICAL DISK REQUIRES ATTENTION OTP FREE LIST EMPTY

APPL RTP

The highway modem logic deactivated the relays which connect the modem's receiver/transmitter to the data highway. This action will be taken if the highway processor will not cease transmitting. The highway processor wanted to transmit, but its modem would not activate CTS to permit transmission to begin. The highway processor wanted to transmit, but its modem would not activate CTS to permit transmission to begin. The time configuration file which has been produced and installed by the Configuration Builder is not correct; thus, this Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. This system monitor detected that another station initiated a token pass which was out of sequence. This may be reported if there is a recovery from stallout. A request for either Process History data or Event History data has resulted in a request to mount an unmounted WORM volume. The optical disk which is currently being written to is either full or there are write errors. There is no space left in the outstanding transaction packet pool of memory. This alarm could be indicative of a software operational problem within the Real-Time Processor, but it could also occur as a side-effect of a SCSI communication problem. The Real-Time Processor will probably need to be rebooted.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-13

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
CONFIG. DEP.

DPU Alarm Severity


B0

Reporting Device

Description

PARALLEL I/O MODULE / DATA PT CONF. ERR

IOP

POINT TRANSFER DATABASE ERROR

RTP

PRINTER 1 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 2 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 3 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 4 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 5 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 6 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 7 NEEDS ATTENTION PRINTER 8 NEEDS ATTENTION PROCESS HISTORY BUFFER NEARLY FULL

APPL

There is a discrepancy between the parallel I/O module assignments called for in this DPU's configuration and the actual modules which are present. The module address is displayed on Interaction Page 10 with a red background. There is a problem with the point transfer database file which has been produced and installed by the Configuration Builder; thus, this Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. A printer fault has been detected on the reported printer.

APPL

PROCESS HISTORY DATA LOSS EMINENT PROCESS HISTORY DATA LOST PROCESSOR BOARD LOCAL RAM ERROR PROCESSOR BOARD PROM CHECKSUM ERROR YES YES NO NO 44 45

APPL APPL DHW DHW

The CURRENT volume is not mounted on the optical drive, or the CURRENT volume is full and needs to be closed out and replaced. The Process History buffer has been storing data and is nearly full. Same as above message, but this is a second-level warning for the Process History buffer. Same as above, but Process History data has now been lost and cannot be recovered. DPU highway CPU local RAM read/write error found by the on-line diagnostics. PROM checksum error found by on-line diagnostics.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-14

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


35

Reporting Device

Description

PROCESSOR EXECUTED ILLEGAL INSTRUCTION PROCESSOR EXECUTED ILLEGAL INSTRUCTION PROCESSOR RESTART - RESET OR RELOAD PROM CHECKSUM FAILURE REAL-TIME CLOCK CHIP ON 1ST DB FAILED RECOVERY FROM STALLOUT ATTEMPTED ON HWY RECOVERY FROM STALLOUT ATTEMPTED ON HWY RESET RTP CANNOT COMMUNICATE ON NETWORK A

DHW DHWn

NO

NO

10

IOP,SLOT, DHW,PFI DHWn IOP

The highway processor executed an instruction reserved for a fault condition. Will require that the DPU be reset. The highway processor executed an instruction reserved for a fault condition. Will probably require the Real-Time Processor be reset. DPU has been reset, or reload has been completed. The highway processor detected an error in its periodic on-line test of the checksum of its software PROM. Either a) the real-time clock hardware has failed; or b) there was an error in the reception of the IRIG-B time sync signal. A highway stallout (no highway activity for 500 microseconds) condition was detected; this station recovered by restarting the token. A highway stallout (no highway activity for 500 microseconds) condition was detected; this station recovered by restarting the token. This station has been reset. The Real-Time Processor failed to successfully initialize the NIC adapter card for Network A on start-up, or it cannot communicate with an Applications Processor on Network A. Communication failures can be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card A in the Real-Time Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card A in the Applications Processors or a failed Applications Processors.

YES

NO

28

YES

NO

27

DHW

DHWn

(any) RTP

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-15

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

RTP CANNOT COMMUNICATE ON NETWORK B

RTP

RTP DATABASE LOAD FAILURE

RTP

RTP TREND DATABASE LOAD FAILURE

RTP

RTP TREND SCAN FAILURE SCAN NOT COMPLETED IN TIME ALLOWED

RTP RTP

SCSI BUS COMMUNICATIONS ERROR

RTP

The Real-Time Processor failed to successfully initialize the NIC adapter card for Network B on start-up, or it cannot communicate with an Applications Processor on Network B. Communication failures can be caused by any number of failures, such as a bad Ethernet card B in the Real-Time Processor, a bad cable, a bad Ethernet card B in the Applications Processors or a failed Applications Processors. One or more configuration database files, which have been produced and installed by the Configuration Builder, are not correct; thus, this Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. The trend database files, which have been produced and installed by the Configuration Builder, are not correct; thus, this Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. Trend scanning was disrupted, usually because of severe highway communication problems. Trend scanning was not completed in its allotted time, usually because the highway token rate is momentarily below the level needed to permit timely completion of all tasks, or because of hardware problems which prevent highway communications. There was an error in the operation of the SCSI bus which runs among the Real-Time Processor and its clients (the Applications and Graphics processors).

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-16

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

SCSI NETWORK CONFIGURATION ERROR

RTP

SERIAL I/O COMMUNICATIONS ERROR SERIAL I/O COMMUNICATIONS ERROR SERIAL I/O DATA POINT ERROR SERIAL PORT 1 COMMUNICATION ERROR SERIAL PORT 2 COMMUNICATION ERROR

NO

NO

08

DHW DHWn

YES NO

NO NO

50 12 13

IOP PFI

SLOT #16 PARALLEL I/O MODULE TROUBLE SLOT #nn PARALLEL I/O MODULE TROUBLE SLOT #nn PARALLEL I/O MODULE TROUBLE SOE AND DIGITAL INPUT DATA LOSS

YES

NO

D1 B1-BF C1-D0

SLOT

The Real-Time Processor's database of hardware devices does not match the names and addresses of the SCSI client(s) which are currently connected to that device. The highway serial I/O chip is generating interrupts which, in the CPU's opinion, are garbage. The highway serial I/O chip is generating interrupts which, in the CPU's opinion, are garbage. Data has not been resent within the timeout period. An ExCEL program is communicating to an external device through a serial port. Either the ExCEL program cannot keep up with the incoming data stream, or the ExCEL program is transmitting too fast for the selected port and baud rate. You should check the RTS/CTS and XON/XOFF interlocks, as well as the ExCEL program running state. Any slot which is driving an Output Driver module will report this alarm if the Output Driver reports an output fault. D1 is used for slot 16; B1 to BF are used for slots 1 to 15; C1 to D0 are used for slots 17 to 32.

YES

NO

E0

IOP

STACK OVERFLOW OR UNDERFLOW

YES

NO

38

DHW

Digital input barrel overflow caused by excessive input state change activity. The SOE barrel has 3000 entries, and is emptied at the rate of 5000 entries per second, so the excessive activity would have to continue for an extended period of time. Stack underflow detected in local RAM.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-17

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

STATION BECAME INACTIVE

Highway Comm Highway Comm

HWYn (name) HWYn (name) APPL GP

STATION DIDN'T RESPOND TO A QUERY STATION HAS SWITCHED RTP SERVER

STATION IS NO LONGER IGAP'D - REIGAP STATION MISSED AN IGAP COMMAND

Highway Comm Highway Comm

HWYn

HWYn (name)

STATION PRESENT BUT NOT CONFIGURED

RTP

STN BECAME ACTIVE FOR THE FIRST TIME STN DIDN'T USE CORRECT LOW LOOP ADDRESS STN IS MASTER WHILE THIS STN IS MASTER STN RCVR PROBLEM / MONITOR MISSED TOKEN

Highway Comm Highway Comm Highway Comm Highway Comm

HWYn

HWYn (name) HWYn (name) HWYn (name)

The named highway station became inactive; normally reported after an IGAP caused the removal of that device from the system map. A data highway query was made of a station, and that station did not respond, perhaps because it failed. A Graphics or Applications Processor has switched to a new Real-Time Processor server either due to automatic failover or manual request via the RTP Selection Display. This is a one-shot alarm and does not persist. A station on this data highway is not IGAP'd, probably because it was reset after the last IGAP command (a station always comes up unIGAP'd). After an IGAP, a station did not correctly perform the IGAP operation (consisting of trying each address after its own until it finds a station, and then always giving the token to that station). The Real-Time Processor has detected the presence of a SCSI device which is not defined in the RTPs hardware database, or the SCSI device is not configured properly to match the database information. A station on HWYn became active for the first time; it will be added to the highway map maintained by each token monitor. The named station did not use the correct low-loop address when passing the token from the high-traffic loop to the low loop. This station has the token, and therefore is the master at the present moment. This station then detects that another station is attempting to transmit (illegally). A station appeared to have missed the token pass, maybe because this station had a receiver problem and did not hear the token being passed.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-18

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

STN SKIPPED A STN ON SRCH FOR NEXT STN TASK OVERRUN

Highway Comm YES NO 27

HWYn

IOP

THIS STATION STALLED OUT THE HIGHWAY

NO

NO

13

DHW

THIS STATION STALLED OUT THE HIGHWAY

DHWn

TIME CONFIGURATION FILE LOAD FAILURE

RTP

TIME CONFIGURATION FILE READ ERROR

RTP

During an IGAP procedure, a station was searching for stations with addresses greater than its own; during that search, that station appeared to have skipped a station. Task overrun counters are non-zero: the CP couldnt keep up with scheduled periodic tasks (control blocks, data blocks, and analog input buffers). When this station had the token, it attempted to pass it on, but it got no response; so, it dropped the token to force a stallout, thus permitting a system monitor to restart token passing. When this station had the token, it attempted to pass it on, but it got no response; so, it dropped the token to force a stallout, thus permitting a system monitor to restart token passing. The time configuration file which describes timezone, standard or daylight savings, etc. was read correctly, but when the file was to be used by this Real-Time Processor, there was an error in the file. This Real-Time Processor will 'roll back' to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder. The time configuration file which describes time zone, standard or daylight savings, etc. was not read correctly by this Real-Time Processor. This Real-Time Processor will roll back to its previous configuration. See the Install log file which is built by the Configuration Builder.

Alarm Text

Type

Causes DPU Failover


YES

Activates DPU Offline Contact


NO

DPU Alarm Severity


29

Reporting Device

Description

TIME DIFF FROM TIME-SYNC-MSG BY 10 SEC

IOP

This station received a time sync message which was more than 10 seconds different from the current time being

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Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover Activates DPU Offline Contact DPU Alarm Severity Reporting Device Description

System Alarms

TIME DIFFERS FROM TIME-SYNC-MSG BY 4 SEC TOKEN LOST ON RETURN FROM A LOW LOOP TOKEN NOT RECEIVED FROM HI LOOP Highway Comm YES NO 49

RTP

HWYn

IOP,DHW

TOKEN PASSING PROBLEMS TREND QUEUE HAS BEEN RESET TRH RAN OUT OF QUERY (INPUT) BUFFERS

Highway Comm YES NO E1

HWYn QUE RTP

TRH RAN OUT OF RESPONSE (OUTPUT) BUFFERS

RTP

TRH'S TRP FREE LIST IS EMPTY

RTP

maintained by this station. This station received a time sync message which was more than 4 seconds different from the current time being maintained by this station. When the token was returned from a low-traffic loop to the high-traffic loop, the low-loop station did not use the correct return address. The DPU did not receive the token from the high-traffic loop for more than 1.5 seconds (a DPU is supposed to get the token every 0.5 seconds). A generic message indicating that, on a particular data highway, token passing is not proceeding as it should. The trend queue (which is not currently used) has been reset. There is no space left in the input buffers of the transaction request handler pool of memory. This alarm could be indicative of a software operational problem within the Real-Time Processor, but it could also occur as a side-effect of a SCSI communication problem. The Real-Time Processor will probably need to be rebooted. There is no space left in the output buffers of the transaction request handler pool of memory. This alarm could be indicative of a software operational problem within the Real-Time Processor, but it could also occur as a side-effect of a SCSI communication problem. The Real-Time Processor will probably need to be rebooted. There is no space left in the transaction request packet pool of memory used by the transaction request handler. This alarm could be indicative of a software operational problem within the Real-Time Processor, but it could also occur as a side-effect of a SCSI communication problem. The Real-Time Processor will probably need to be rebooted.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-20

Alarm Message Reference Guide


Alarm Text Type Causes DPU Failover
YES

System Alarms
Activates DPU Offline Contact
NO

DPU Alarm Severity


32

Reporting Device

Description

UNEXPECTED OR SPURIOUS CTC INTERRUPT UNEXPECTED OR SPURIOUS CTC INTERRUPT UNKNOWN SERIAL I/O FAILURE

DHW DHWn DHWn

USER STACK NOT EMPTY AT RESTART

NO

NO

07

PFI

The highway processor received an unexpected interrupt from its counter-timer circuit. The highway processor received an unexpected interrupt from its counter-timer circuit. The highway processor has detected a fault in its serial I/O interface circuit; the root cause of the fault cannot be identified by the highway processor. At the restart command, the ExCEL processor's stack was not empty. Check the ExCEL program running in that DPU.

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-21

Alarm Message Reference Guide

System Alarms

Metso Automation, Inc. 278558 III-22