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Quick Contents

Table of Figures....................................................................................................... viii Preface About This Manual................................................................................... 1 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000.............................................................. 5 Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running ................................... 41 Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface ............................................................. 55 Chapter 4 Status Displays .................................................................................. 63 Chapter 5 Programming Menus ......................................................................... 89 Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation .................................................................... 181 Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation.......................................................................... 229 Chapter 8 Preemption........................................................................................ 261 Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority...................................................................... 267 Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance ................................................... 289 Chapter 11 Controller Specifications............................................................... 317 Chapter 12 Serial and Data Connectors .......................................................... 321 Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details ....................................................... 329 Chapter 14 D Modules ....................................................................................... 353 Glossary .................................................................................................................. 357 Index ........................................................................................................................ 367

Operating Manual

ATC-1000

Advanced Traffic Signal Controller

7/27/2010 p/n: 99-537 Rev 2

Copyright 2010 Peek Traffic Corporation. All rights reserved. Information furnished by Peek is believed to be accurate and reliable, however Peek does not warranty the accuracy, completeness, or fitness for use of any of the information furnished. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any intellectual property. Peek Traffic reserves the right to alter any of the Company's products or published technical data relating thereto at any time without notice. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or via any electronic or mechanical means for any purpose other than the purchasers personal use without the expressed, written permission of Peek Traffic Corporation. Peek Traffic Corporation 2906 Corporate Way Palmetto, FL 34221 U.S.A. Trademarks The ATC-1000 controller and the IQ Link and IQ Central software packages are trademarks or registered trademarks of Peek Traffic Corporation in the United States and other countries. TransCore and TransSuite are registered trademarks of Roper Industries, Inc. Microsoft and Windows are trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Other brands and their products are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective holders and should be noted as such.

manual assembly: 81-1285 manual content: 99-537 Rev 2 manual cover art: 99-538

Contents

Table of Figures....................................................................................................... viii


Table of Tables...................................................................................................................................... xiv

Preface About This Manual................................................................................... 1


Purpose and Scope................................................................................................................................. 1 Assumptions............................................................................................................................................ 1 Related Documents................................................................................................................................. 2 Technical Assistance............................................................................................................................... 3 Conventions Used in this Manual............................................................................................................ 3 Typographic Conventions ................................................................................................................. 3 Keyboard and Menu Conventions .................................................................................................... 4 Symbol Conventions......................................................................................................................... 4

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000.............................................................. 5


Traffic Engine.................................................................................................................................... 8 Controller Hardware .............................................................................................................................. 10 Enclosure........................................................................................................................................ 10 Operating System, Firmware and Memory ..................................................................................... 11 Display ............................................................................................................................................ 11 Keypad............................................................................................................................................ 12 Comms and Utility Connectors ....................................................................................................... 14 I/O Module Connectors................................................................................................................... 19 Heartbeat LED ................................................................................................................................ 20 Data Key Port ................................................................................................................................. 20 Power System................................................................................................................................. 21 Basic Operations ................................................................................................................................... 22 Setting the Date and Time .............................................................................................................. 22 Setting Up Daylight Savings Time .................................................................................................. 25 Adjusting Screen Contrast .............................................................................................................. 28 Turning the Backlight On and Off ................................................................................................... 29 Entering Edit Mode ......................................................................................................................... 30 Entering the Menu System ............................................................................................................. 30 Entering the Utilities Menus ............................................................................................................ 31 Viewing Help Screens..................................................................................................................... 31

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ATC-1000 Firmware .............................................................................................................................. 32 Checking the Current Version of Firmware ..................................................................................... 32 Updating Firmware Using a USB Thumbdrive ................................................................................ 34 Using the IQ Link Utility with the ATC-1000........................................................................................... 38 Using an ATC-1000 With IQ Central...................................................................................................... 39

Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running................................... 41


Hardware Setup Checklist ..................................................................................................................... 42 Software Setup Checklist....................................................................................................................... 43 Recording the MAC Address........................................................................................................... 44 Setting the Cabinet Address ........................................................................................................... 44 Configuring the SNMP Manager on the PC .................................................................................... 45 Setting the IP Address and Ethernet Settings................................................................................. 50 Loading a Default Database Into the Controller .............................................................................. 52 Field Deployment................................................................................................................................... 53 Programming a Basic Intersection......................................................................................................... 54

Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface ............................................................. 55


Navigating in the Environment............................................................................................................... 56 Using the Help System .......................................................................................................................... 57 Firmware Flow Chart ............................................................................................................................. 58 Top-Down View of the Menu System.............................................................................................. 59 Entering the Menu System .................................................................................................................... 62

Chapter 4 Status Displays .................................................................................. 63


Overview of the Status Screens ............................................................................................................ 64 Status Menu .................................................................................................................................... 64 Navigating the Status Screens ........................................................................................................ 64 Controller Status Screen........................................................................................................................ 65 Inputs Status Screen ............................................................................................................................. 68 Outputs Status Screen........................................................................................................................... 70 Coordination Status Screen................................................................................................................... 71 Time of Day Status Screen.................................................................................................................... 73 Preemption Status Screens ................................................................................................................... 74 Detectors Status Screens ...................................................................................................................... 76 SDLC & FIO Status Screens ................................................................................................................. 77 Alarms Status Screens .......................................................................................................................... 78 Overlaps Status Screen......................................................................................................................... 80 MMU Status Screens............................................................................................................................. 80 TSP Status Screens .............................................................................................................................. 82 ABS ZERO Status Screen ..................................................................................................................... 86 Revisions Screen................................................................................................................................... 87

Chapter 5 Programming Menus ......................................................................... 89


Overview of the Programming Screens ................................................................................................. 90 Unit Configuration Menu ........................................................................................................................ 90 Start-Up Configuration Screen ........................................................................................................ 91 Program Flash Screen .................................................................................................................... 93 Phase Compatibility Screens .......................................................................................................... 95 Channels Screens ........................................................................................................................... 96 Comm Ports & IP/Cab Setup Menu ................................................................................................ 97 Ring Sequencing Screens............................................................................................................. 111 USTC Miscellaneous Screen ........................................................................................................ 112 Controller Menu ................................................................................................................................... 113 Phase Enables Screen.................................................................................................................. 114 Green Timing Screens .................................................................................................................. 115 Clearance Timing Screens ............................................................................................................ 117 Pedestrian Timing Screens ........................................................................................................... 118

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Added Initial Timing Screens ........................................................................................................ 119 Gap Reduction Timing Screens.................................................................................................... 121 Dynamic Max Timing Screens ...................................................................................................... 124 Phase Options Screens ................................................................................................................ 126 Recall Screens.............................................................................................................................. 130 Overlap Menu ............................................................................................................................... 133 Coordination Menu .............................................................................................................................. 139 Coordination Variables Screen ..................................................................................................... 140 Pattern Table Screens .................................................................................................................. 143 Split Table Screens....................................................................................................................... 143 Toronto Offset Correction Ext/Reduce.......................................................................................... 144 Toronto Offset Correction Percent................................................................................................ 145 Time of Day Menu ............................................................................................................................... 146 Time of Day Actions Menu............................................................................................................ 146 Day Plan Screens ......................................................................................................................... 150 Schedule Screens......................................................................................................................... 151 Override Commands Screen ........................................................................................................ 152 Set Local Time Screen ................................................................................................................. 154 Advanced Time Setup Screen ...................................................................................................... 155 Daylight Saving Settings Menu..................................................................................................... 156 Detectors Menu ................................................................................................................................... 163 Vehicle Detector Options Screens................................................................................................ 163 Vehicle Detector Timing Screens ................................................................................................. 165 Detector Call Phases Screen........................................................................................................ 166 Switch-to Phases Screen.............................................................................................................. 167 Pedestrian Detectors Screen........................................................................................................ 168 Preemption Screens............................................................................................................................ 169 Using the PreTimed Menu .................................................................................................................. 170 Transit Signal Priority Menu ................................................................................................................ 171 System Maintenance Menu................................................................................................................. 172 Database Utilities Screen ............................................................................................................. 173 Copy Database Functions ............................................................................................................ 175 Diagnostics Mode ......................................................................................................................... 179 Logs Menu........................................................................................................................................... 180

Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation .................................................................... 181


General Overview of Coordination ...................................................................................................... 182 Signal Timing in a Coordinated Environment...................................................................................... 183 Cycle Length................................................................................................................................. 183 Local Cycle ................................................................................................................................... 183 Split (Phase Allocation)................................................................................................................. 183 Local Cycle Reference Point ........................................................................................................ 184 Master Cycle................................................................................................................................. 184 Offset ............................................................................................................................................ 185 Synchronization Methods .................................................................................................................... 186 Historical Sources of Sync Pulses ................................................................................................ 186 Offset Seeking .............................................................................................................................. 186 Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit........................................................................................ 187 Functions Used to Coordinate an Actuated Controller ................................................................. 187 Example of Force Off And Permissive Placement........................................................................ 188 Programming a Peek ATC Controller for Coordination ....................................................................... 190 Coordination Parameters Explanation .......................................................................................... 190 Parameter Value Organization ..................................................................................................... 191 Parameter Entry into the ATC Series Controller........................................................................... 192 Time of Day (TOD) Programming to Run Coordination................................................................ 194 Example: Programming of Coordination ............................................................................................. 198 Pedestrian Override Mode (POM) ................................................................................................ 215

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Programming the Pattern Table for Coordinated Operation ......................................................... 218 Verifying Proper Coordinated Operation ....................................................................................... 225 Traffic Responsive Operation .............................................................................................................. 227

Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation.......................................................................... 229


Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 230 Calling the Plans ........................................................................................................................... 230 Using the PreTimed Programming Screens ........................................................................................ 232 Timing Plans Screens ................................................................................................................... 233 Signal Plans Menu ........................................................................................................................ 237 Pretimed Preemption Screens ...................................................................................................... 244 Pre-Timed Preemption .................................................................................................................. 246 Pretimed Preempt and Interval Skipping Screens ........................................................................ 248 Details About Pre-timed Preemption ................................................................................................... 251 Operation ...................................................................................................................................... 251 Input Priority .................................................................................................................................. 252 Setting up an Actuated Leading or Lagging Left Turn ......................................................................... 254 Wrong Way to Program a Leading Left Turn ................................................................................ 254 Correct Way to Program a Leading Left Turn ............................................................................... 256 Correct Way to Program a Lagging Left Turn ............................................................................... 258

Chapter 8 Preemption ....................................................................................... 261


Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 262 Preemption Linking ....................................................................................................................... 264 Preemption Parameters ................................................................................................................ 265

Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority ..................................................................... 267


What is TSP?....................................................................................................................................... 268 How TSP Functions in the Peek ATC Controller ................................................................................. 269 Prioritization Methods.................................................................................................................... 272 Getting TSP Set Up ............................................................................................................................. 273 TSP Screens and Parameters ............................................................................................................. 275 Unit Parameters ............................................................................................................................ 276 Run Parameters ............................................................................................................................ 277 TSP Action Plans .......................................................................................................................... 279 Run Configuration ......................................................................................................................... 281 Queue Jumping ............................................................................................................................. 285 Split Table ..................................................................................................................................... 286 TSP Status Monitoring......................................................................................................................... 287 TSP Troubleshooting ........................................................................................................................... 287

Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance ................................................... 289


Overview.............................................................................................................................................. 290 Utilities Menus ..................................................................................................................................... 290 Utilities Menu for the Keyboard and Display ................................................................................. 290 Diagnostics Mode.......................................................................................................................... 291 USB Operations................................................................................................................................... 301 USB Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 301 Moving Databases Using a USB Drive ......................................................................................... 302 Moving Logs Using a USB Drive................................................................................................... 303 USB File System ........................................................................................................................... 304 Data Logging ....................................................................................................................................... 305 Controller Message Log ................................................................................................................ 305 NTCIP Event Log .......................................................................................................................... 306 Advanced Controller Logging Menu.............................................................................................. 307 Setup Logging Options.................................................................................................................. 307 View Logs Screen ......................................................................................................................... 309

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System Maintenance........................................................................................................................... 310 Preventive Maintenance and Calibration ...................................................................................... 310 Diagnosing Controller Operation .................................................................................................. 310 Troubleshooting................................................................................................................................... 311 Troubleshooting Transit Signal Priority Operation ........................................................................ 313

Chapter 11 Controller Specifications............................................................... 317


Overview of Controller Specifications ................................................................................................. 318 Physical/Environmental Specifications ......................................................................................... 319 NTCIP Compliance ....................................................................................................................... 320

Chapter 12 Serial and Data Connectors .......................................................... 321


Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 322 Port 1 - SDLC Connector .................................................................................................................... 322 Port 2 RS-232C Connector .............................................................................................................. 323 Port 3 2070 Port ............................................................................................................................... 324 Port 4 - Local Connector ..................................................................................................................... 325 Port 5 Spare/UPS Connector ........................................................................................................... 326 Ethernet Connectors ........................................................................................................................... 327 USB Connectors.................................................................................................................................. 328

Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details ....................................................... 329


Connector Details................................................................................................................................ 330 NEMA TS2 Type 1 I/O Module............................................................................................................ 330 Port A Connector .......................................................................................................................... 330 NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module............................................................................................................ 332 Port A Connector .......................................................................................................................... 332 Port B Connector .......................................................................................................................... 337 Port C Connector .......................................................................................................................... 339 HMC-1000 I/O Module ........................................................................................................................ 342 HMC Input / Output Connector ..................................................................................................... 342 Stop Time Switch.......................................................................................................................... 344 LMD40 I/O Module .............................................................................................................................. 345 LMD40 Port A Connector.............................................................................................................. 345 LMD40 Port B Connector.............................................................................................................. 347 LMD40 Communication Inputs Connector.................................................................................... 348 LMD Port D Connector ................................................................................................................. 349

Chapter 14 D Modules ....................................................................................... 353


Overview ............................................................................................................................................. 354 ATC D Module..................................................................................................................................... 354 Additional D Modules .......................................................................................................................... 356

Glossary .................................................................................................................. 357 Index ........................................................................................................................ 367

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Table of Figures

Figure 1 The ATC-1000 traffic controller.................................................................................... 6 Figure 2 Module locations .......................................................................................................... 6 Figure 3 Front view of the ATC-1000 controller Main Module.................................................. 10 Figure 4 ATC-1000 keypad ...................................................................................................... 12 Figure 5 Comms and Utility Ports ............................................................................................ 15 Figure 6 USB Command menu................................................................................................. 15 Figure 7 Example I/O Modules................................................................................................. 19 Figure 8 Datakey type data receptacle .................................................................................... 20 Figure 9 Set Local Time screen, in Edit mode ......................................................................... 22 Figure 10 Example Advanced Time Set screen, showing EST values .................................... 23 Figure 11 Set Local Time screen ............................................................................................. 25 Figure 12 Daylight Saving Setup Menu.................................................................................... 26 Figure 13 Current DST Settings............................................................................................... 26 Figure 14 Setting DST by Exact Date screen .......................................................................... 27 Figure 15 Contrast Adjust screen............................................................................................. 28 Figure 16 Utilities > Miscellaneous status menu, showing Backlight Timeout ......................... 29 Figure 17 Utilities Menu ........................................................................................................... 31 Figure 18 Revisions Screen ..................................................................................................... 32 Figure 19 Status help screen showing revision info................................................................. 33 Figure 20 Write USB Files/Folders in IQ Link .......................................................................... 34 Figure 21 IQ Link creates the drives and files on the thumbdrive ............................................ 34 Figure 22 Directory on the USB thumbdrive ............................................................................ 35 Figure 23 ATC FW Loader screen ........................................................................................... 36 Figure 24 Select firmware file and press Enter key.................................................................. 36 Figure 25 Verify the correct firmware version .......................................................................... 37 Figure 26 IQ Link software interface ........................................................................................ 38 Figure 27 IQ Central software interface ................................................................................... 39 Figure 28 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen............................................................................ 44 Figure 29 The My Computer management dialog box............................................................. 46 Figure 30 Services and Applications window........................................................................... 46 Figure 31 Windows Services list .............................................................................................. 47 Figure 32 Open Add/Remove Programs (or the Vista equivalent)........................................... 47 Figure 33 Choose Add/Remove Windows component ............................................................ 48 Figure 34 Management and Monitoring Tools ......................................................................... 48

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Figure 35 Select the Simple Network Management Protocol .................................................. 49 Figure 36 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen ........................................................................... 50 Figure 37 Firmware flowchart .................................................................................................. 58 Figure 38 Utilities Menus ......................................................................................................... 59 Figure 39 USB Menu ............................................................................................................... 59 Figure 40 Top-down view of the ATC-1000 Menu System ...................................................... 61 Figure 41 Navigating between the Main Menu and Controller Status screen ......................... 62 Figure 42 Status Options available on the ATC-1000 Controller............................................. 64 Figure 43 Sample Controller Status screen Phase Pattern .................................................. 65 Figure 44 Sample Controller Status screen Pretimed Pattern.............................................. 67 Figure 45 Sample Controller Status screen Pretimed Pattern - Details ............................... 67 Figure 46 Sample Inputs Status Screen .................................................................................. 68 Figure 47 Sections of the Inputs Status screen ....................................................................... 68 Figure 48 Outputs Status Screen ............................................................................................ 70 Figure 49 Page 2 of the Outputs Status screens..................................................................... 70 Figure 50 Sample Coordination Status Screen ....................................................................... 71 Figure 51 Sample Time of Day Status Screen ........................................................................ 73 Figure 52 Sample Preemption Status Screen ......................................................................... 74 Figure 53 Sample Detector Status Screen .............................................................................. 76 Figure 54 SDLC Status Screens.............................................................................................. 77 Figure 55 Alarms/Event Status Menu ...................................................................................... 78 Figure 56 Alarm Status display................................................................................................ 78 Figure 57 Short Alarm Status screen....................................................................................... 79 Figure 58 Overlaps Status Screen........................................................................................... 80 Figure 59 MMU Status screen ................................................................................................. 80 Figure 60 TSP Status Screens ................................................................................................ 82 Figure 61 TSP Input Status screen.......................................................................................... 82 Figure 62 TSP Output Status screen....................................................................................... 85 Figure 63 Absolute Zero Status Screen................................................................................... 86 Figure 64 Revision Details Screen .......................................................................................... 87 Figure 65 Programming Menu ................................................................................................. 90 Figure 66 Configuration menu ................................................................................................. 90 Figure 67 Start-Up Screen....................................................................................................... 91 Figure 68 MUTCD Flash Screen ............................................................................................. 93 Figure 69 Phase Compatibility Screen (Page 1)...................................................................... 95 Figure 70 Phase Compatibility Screen (Page 2)...................................................................... 95 Figure 71 Channels Screen (Page 1) ...................................................................................... 96 Figure 72 Channels Screen (Page 2) ...................................................................................... 96 Figure 73 Misc. Setup Menu.................................................................................................... 97 Figure 74 Port 1 Setup Screen ................................................................................................ 98 Figure 75 Ports 2 through 5 Setup Screen .............................................................................. 99 Figure 76 IP/CAB Address setup screen ............................................................................... 100 Figure 77 I/O Mapping menu ................................................................................................. 101 Figure 78 I/O Cabinet setup screen....................................................................................... 102 Figure 79 I/O Function Map Setup screen 1.......................................................................... 103 Figure 80 Example remapping............................................................................................... 104 Figure 81 Editing mode on the I/O Function Map Setup screen............................................ 104 Figure 82 Available I/O Functions list .................................................................................... 105 Figure 83 Available I/O Functions list page 24 ................................................................... 105 Figure 84 Function Assignment Warning............................................................................... 105 Figure 85 Warning about previous pin assignment ............................................................... 106 Figure 86 New pin assignments after the change ................................................................. 106 Figure 87 I/O Cabinet Setup Screen...................................................................................... 107 Figure 88 I/O Mapping screen ............................................................................................... 107 Figure 89 I/O Function Map Screen for TS2 Type 1 I/O module ........................................... 107 Figure 90 TF BIU MAP Setup screen for TS2 Type 1 module .............................................. 108

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Figure 91 TF BIU MAP Setup screen ACTIVE I/O.............................................................. 109 Figure 92 Detector BIU Mapping View screens ..................................................................... 110 Figure 93 Ring Sequencing Screen (Page 1) ........................................................................ 111 Figure 94 Ring Sequencing Screen (Page 16) ...................................................................... 111 Figure 95 USTC Miscellaneous Screen ................................................................................. 112 Figure 96 Controller Menu ..................................................................................................... 113 Figure 97 Phase Enables Screen .......................................................................................... 114 Figure 98 Green Timing Screen (page 1) .............................................................................. 115 Figure 99 Green Timing Screen (page 2) .............................................................................. 116 Figure 100 Clearance Timing Screen (Page 1)...................................................................... 117 Figure 101 Ped Timing Screen (Page 1)................................................................................ 118 Figure 102 Added Initial Timing Screen (Page 1) .................................................................. 119 Figure 103 Added Initial Timings (Page 2)............................................................................. 119 Figure 104 Gap Reduction Timing Screen (Page 1) .............................................................. 121 Figure 105 Classic Case of Gap Reduction ........................................................................... 123 Figure 106 Dynamic Max Timing Screen (Page 1) ................................................................ 124 Figure 107 Dynamic Max Timing Screen (Page 2) ................................................................ 124 Figure 108 Phase Options Screen (Page 1) .......................................................................... 126 Figure 109 Phase Options (Page 2)....................................................................................... 126 Figure 110 Recalls Screen (Page 1) ...................................................................................... 130 Figure 111 Phase Recalls (Page 2) ....................................................................................... 130 Figure 112 Overlaps Menu..................................................................................................... 133 Figure 113 Overlap Screen (Page 1) ..................................................................................... 133 Figure 114 Overlap Screen (Page 4) ..................................................................................... 134 Figure 115 Typical Load Switch assignments........................................................................ 135 Figure 116 Pedestrian Overlap Screen (Page 1) ................................................................... 137 Figure 117 Pedestrian Overlap Screen (Page 8) ................................................................... 137 Figure 118 Coordination Menu............................................................................................... 139 Figure 119 Coordination Variables Screen ............................................................................ 140 Figure 120 Pattern Table Screen (Page 1) ............................................................................ 143 Figure 121 Split Table Screen (Page 1)................................................................................. 143 Figure 122 Offset Correction Extend/Reduce Split Table ...................................................... 144 Figure 123 Offset Correction Extend/Reduce Splits as Percentages .................................... 145 Figure 124 Time of Day menu................................................................................................ 146 Figure 125 Time of Day Actions menu................................................................................... 146 Figure 126 Time of Day Actions screen (Page 1) .................................................................. 147 Figure 127 Time of Day Action COMMAND - Example ......................................................... 148 Figure 128 Time of Day Actions screen (Page 6) .................................................................. 148 Figure 129 Auxiliary/Special Function Assignment (Screen 1) .............................................. 149 Figure 130 Auxiliary/Special Function Assignment (Screen 6) .............................................. 149 Figure 131 Time of Day - Day Plan Screen (Page 1)............................................................ 150 Figure 132 Time of Day Schedules Screen (Page 1)............................................................. 151 Figure 133 Override Commands Screen ............................................................................... 152 Figure 134 Time Set Screen .................................................................................................. 154 Figure 135 Advanced Time Setup screen.............................................................................. 155 Figure 136 Daylight Saving Time Settings screen ................................................................. 156 Figure 137 Status message showing default DST settings were loaded ............................... 157 Figure 138 Status message showing DST is disabled........................................................... 158 Figure 139 Display Current DST Settings screen .................................................................. 159 Figure 140 Disabled DST on the Display Current DST Settings screen ................................ 159 Figure 141 Set DST by Exact Date ........................................................................................ 160 Figure 142 Display Current DST Settings screen .................................................................. 161 Figure 143 Detector Menu ..................................................................................................... 163 Figure 144 Vehicle Detector Options Screen (Page 1) .......................................................... 163 Figure 145 Vehicle Detector Timing Screen (Page 1)............................................................ 165 Figure 146 Detector Call Phases Screen............................................................................... 166

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Figure 147 Switch-to Phases Screen .................................................................................... 167 Figure 148 Ped Detectors Screen ......................................................................................... 168 Figure 149 Preemption #1 Screen......................................................................................... 169 Figure 150 Pretimed menu .................................................................................................... 170 Figure 151 Transit Signal Priority Menu ................................................................................ 171 Figure 152 System Maintenance Menu ................................................................................. 172 Figure 153 Default Database Load screen ............................................................................ 173 Figure 154 Database Load Decompressing files................................................................ 173 Figure 155 Completion of File Decompression...................................................................... 174 Figure 156 Completion of USB Database download ............................................................. 174 Figure 157 Copy Database Functions screen ....................................................................... 175 Figure 158 Copying Actuated Data menu.............................................................................. 176 Figure 159 Copying Phase Data screen................................................................................ 176 Figure 160 Copying Coord Data menu .................................................................................. 177 Figure 161 Copying Coord Pattern Plan data screen ............................................................ 178 Figure 162 Diagnostics Warning screen................................................................................ 179 Figure 163 Diagnostics Menu screen .................................................................................... 179 Figure 164 Three types of coordinated progression .............................................................. 182 Figure 165 Two intersections with the same Local Cycle length........................................... 183 Figure 166 Local Cycle Reference Point ............................................................................... 184 Figure 167 Example of Coordinated Intersection Offsets ...................................................... 185 Figure 168 Typical placements of fixed force offs and permissives ...................................... 188 Figure 169 Coordination Menu Screen.................................................................................. 192 Figure 170 Coordination Variables Screen............................................................................ 192 Figure 171 Coordination Variables Screen 1 of 3.................................................................. 193 Figure 172 Coordination Variables Screen 2 of 3.................................................................. 193 Figure 173 Coordination Variables Screen 3 of 3.................................................................. 193 Figure 174 Coordination Split Table Screen 1 of 16.............................................................. 194 Figure 175 Coordination Split Table Screen 16 of 16............................................................ 194 Figure 176 TOD Action Table Screen 1 of 6.......................................................................... 195 Figure 177 TOD Action Table Screen 2 of 6.......................................................................... 195 Figure 178 TOD Action Table Screen 3 of 6.......................................................................... 195 Figure 179 TOD Action Table Screen 4 of 6.......................................................................... 196 Figure 180 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 1 of 32 .................................................................. 196 Figure 181 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 2 of 32 .................................................................. 196 Figure 182 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 3 of 32 .................................................................. 197 Figure 183 IQ Link window .................................................................................................... 198 Figure 184 Database Edit command on the IQ Link Intersection menu ................................ 198 Figure 185 Intersection List window ...................................................................................... 199 Figure 186 Controller Configuration dialog box ..................................................................... 199 Figure 187 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen on the ATC-1000 ........................................... 200 Figure 188 Sample Controller Status screen......................................................................... 200 Figure 189 Intersection List ................................................................................................... 201 Figure 190 Select Intersection window in IQ Link.................................................................. 201 Figure 191 Controller Programming Toolbar in IQ Link ......................................................... 202 Figure 192 Coordination Window in IQ Link .......................................................................... 202 Figure 193 Programming Menu Screen................................................................................. 203 Figure 194 Coordination Menu .............................................................................................. 203 Figure 195 Coordination Variables Screen............................................................................ 203 Figure 196 Setting Coord Operational Mode in IQ Link......................................................... 204 Figure 197 Coordination Variables Screen............................................................................ 206 Figure 198 Setting the Coord Correction Mode in IQ Link..................................................... 206 Figure 199 Setting USTC Correction Mode ........................................................................... 207 Figure 200 Setting Coord Correction Mode ........................................................................... 207 Figure 201 Setting the Maximum Inhibit value....................................................................... 208 Figure 202 Setting the Maximum Mode in IQ Link................................................................. 209

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Figure 203 Setting the Force Mode........................................................................................ 210 Figure 204 Setting Coord Force Mode in IQ Link................................................................... 210 Figure 205 Setting System Pattern on the ATC-1000 screen ................................................ 211 Figure 206 Setting System Pattern 001 ................................................................................ 212 Figure 207 Setting System Pattern in IQ Link ........................................................................ 212 Figure 208 Pattern table in the Coordination window of IQ Link ............................................ 218 Figure 209 Setting Max Patterns in IQ Link ........................................................................... 219 Figure 210 Pattern Table overview in IQ Link ........................................................................ 220 Figure 211 Pattern Cycle Time limits ..................................................................................... 222 Figure 212 Pattern Offset Time limits..................................................................................... 222 Figure 213 Split Number details............................................................................................. 222 Figure 214 Sequence Number details.................................................................................... 222 Figure 215 Ring Window in IQ Link........................................................................................ 223 Figure 216 DB to Controller button in IQ Link ........................................................................ 223 Figure 217 Controller to DB button in IQ Link ........................................................................ 224 Figure 218 Database Download warning message ............................................................... 224 Figure 219 Checking the Coordination Status screen for coordination.................................. 225 Figure 220 Key operating coordination parameters in IQ Link............................................... 226 Figure 221 Pretimed menu..................................................................................................... 232 Figure 222 Timing Plans Menu .............................................................................................. 233 Figure 223 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 1)........................................................... 234 Figure 224 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 1)........................................................... 235 Figure 225 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 16)......................................................... 236 Figure 226 Signal Plan screen ............................................................................................... 237 Figure 227 Signal Plan Per Interval Modifiers (Screen 1 for Plan 1)...................................... 238 Figure 228 Signal Plan Per Interval Modifiers (Screen 2 for Plan 4)...................................... 240 Figure 229 Pretimed Channels-to-Intervals Map Page 1 for Signal Plan 1 ........................ 241 Figure 230 Outputs-to-Intervals Map screen.......................................................................... 242 Figure 231 Outputs-to-Intervals Map screen (Outputs 61-64, Signal Plan 4) ........................ 243 Figure 232 Pretimed Preemption screen ............................................................................... 244 Figure 233 Wig-wag signals during pre-timed preemption using Cycle Dwell ....................... 247 Figure 234 Pretimed Preempt & Interval Skipping screen ..................................................... 248 Figure 235 Actuated intervals in the IQ Link Pre-timed table................................................. 250 Figure 236 Wrong way to program a leading left turn in pre-timed mode (IQ Link) ............... 254 Figure 237 Correct Programming for a Leading left turn in IQ Link ....................................... 256 Figure 238 Programming a lagging left turn........................................................................... 258 Figure 239 Inserting pedestrian clearance intervals to support a lagging left ........................ 259 Figure 240 Preemption #1 Screen ......................................................................................... 262 Figure 241 Preemption #6 Screen ......................................................................................... 262 Figure 242 Phases in a Peek ATC Preemption Run.............................................................. 263 Figure 243 Preemption run linking ......................................................................................... 264 Figure 244 TSP Timing Adjustment in an Intersection........................................................... 268 Figure 245 Transit Priority Menu............................................................................................ 269 Figure 246 TSP Action Plans, Run Configs and Runs........................................................... 270 Figure 247 Transit Priority Menu............................................................................................ 275 Figure 248 Unit Parameters screen ....................................................................................... 276 Figure 249 Run Parameters screen ....................................................................................... 277 Figure 250 TSP Action Plan screen ....................................................................................... 279 Figure 251 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 1, Config 1)................................................ 281 Figure 252 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 2, Config 1)................................................ 281 Figure 253 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 2, Config 3)................................................ 282 Figure 254 Navigating Run Configuration screens ................................................................ 282 Figure 255 TSP Queue Jumping screen................................................................................ 285 Figure 256 Split Table screen ................................................................................................ 286 Figure 257 Keyboard/Display Utilities menu .......................................................................... 290 Figure 258 Diagnostics Menu screen..................................................................................... 291

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Figure 259 I/O Diagnostic Menu ............................................................................................ 291 Figure 260 Standard Input Test screen ................................................................................. 292 Figure 261 Outputs Diagnostics Test screen......................................................................... 293 Figure 262 Communication Diagnostics screen .................................................................... 295 Figure 263 Memory Diagnostics screen Before Testing Starts .......................................... 296 Figure 264 Diagnostic Memory Test screen .......................................................................... 296 Figure 265 Testing Real Time Clock test in progress......................................................... 297 Figure 266 Testing Real Time Clock screen Status result ................................................. 297 Figure 267 Testing USB Device screen................................................................................. 298 Figure 268 Testing USB Device screen when USB device is detected................................. 298 Figure 269 Launching the FW Loader screens...................................................................... 299 Figure 270 Waiting for firmware file on USB or Ethernet....................................................... 299 Figure 271 Update Firmware file list ...................................................................................... 300 Figure 272 Hardware/Software mismatch message.............................................................. 300 Figure 273 USB Menu ........................................................................................................... 301 Figure 274 ATC USB thumbdrive file system ........................................................................ 304 Figure 275 Log Data menu .................................................................................................... 305 Figure 276 Controller Message Log ...................................................................................... 305 Figure 277 Controller Message Log (Page 2) ....................................................................... 306 Figure 278 Sample log entry.................................................................................................. 306 Figure 279 NTCIP Event Log screen..................................................................................... 306 Figure 280 Advanced Controller Log menu ........................................................................... 307 Figure 281 Setup Logging Options screen ............................................................................ 307 Figure 282 View Advanced Log Screen ................................................................................ 309 Figure 283 Choose Log Data to view .................................................................................... 309 Figure 284 Pin assignment looking into the Port 1 connector ............................................... 322 Figure 285 Pin assignment looking into the Port 2 connector ............................................... 323 Figure 286 Pin assignment, looking into the male Port 4 connector ..................................... 325 Figure 287 Pin assignment looking into the Port 5 connector ............................................... 326 Figure 288 Pin assignment looking into the Ethernet ports ................................................... 327 Figure 289 Pin assignments looking into the USB port ......................................................... 328 Figure 290 TS2 Type 1 MS-A Connector .............................................................................. 330 Figure 291 Pin assignment, looking INTO the male Port A connector .................................. 332 Figure 292 Pin assignment, looking INTO the female Port B connector ............................... 337 Figure 293 Pin assignment, looking INTO the female Port C connector ............................... 339 Figure 294 HMC-1000 Input/Output Connector..................................................................... 342 Figure 295 LMD40 I/O Module - Port A ................................................................................. 345 Figure 296 LMD40 I/O Module - Port B ................................................................................. 347 Figure 297 LMD40 I/O Module Communication Inputs Connector ..................................... 348 Figure 298 LMD I/O Module - Port D ..................................................................................... 349 Figure 299 Pin assignment, looking INTO the male Port D connector .................................. 354

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TABLE OF TABLES
Table 1 Related Documentation ................................................................................................. 2 Table 2 Typographic conventions used in this manual ............................................................. 3 Table 3 Keyboard conventions used in this manual ................................................................. 4 Table 4 Symbol conventions used in this manual..................................................................... 4 Table 5 Time Conversions Seconds to Hours ....................................................................... 24 Table 6 Command code modifiers on the Status screen.......................................................... 67 Table 7 Ring Status messages on the Preempt Status screen ................................................ 75 Table 8 TSP Inputs................................................................................................................... 83 Table 9 TSP Status messages on the TSP Input Status screen .............................................. 84 Table 10 Module Type options ............................................................................................... 102 Table 11 Map Commands ...................................................................................................... 102 Table 12 Available Interface Languages ................................................................................ 112 Table 13 Available Types of Overlap...................................................................................... 135 Table 14 Operational Mode values......................................................................................... 140 Table 15 Coordination Correction modes............................................................................... 141 Table 16 USTC Coordination Correction modes .................................................................... 141 Table 17 Coordination Maximum modes................................................................................ 141 Table 18 Coordination Force Mode options ........................................................................... 142 Table 19 System Pattern modes ............................................................................................ 142 Table 20 Available TOD Override Commands ....................................................................... 152 Table 21 System Pattern Available Values ......................................................................... 211 Table 22 Pattern to Pretimed Signal Plan and Timing Plan assignments .............................. 231 Table 23 Input Priority ............................................................................................................ 252 Table 24 Split Balance recovery method - example ............................................................... 280 Table 25 Troubleshooting the ATC-1000 Controller............................................................... 311 Table 26 TSP Troubleshooting Checklist ............................................................................... 314 Table 27 Physical and Environmental Specifications ............................................................. 319 Table 28 Pin Assignments for Port 1 SDLC ........................................................................... 322 Table 29 Pin Assignments for Port 2 RS-232C ...................................................................... 324 Table 30 Pin Assignments for Port 4 ...................................................................................... 325 Table 31 Pin Assignments for Port 5 ...................................................................................... 326 Table 32 Pin Assignments for the Ethernet ports ................................................................... 327 Table 33 Pin Assignments for the ATC-1000 USB port.......................................................... 328 Table 34 Pin Assignments for the ATC-1000 TS2 Type 1 MS-A connector........................... 330 Table 35 Port A Pin Functions................................................................................................ 332 Table 36 To set the TS2/2 Input/Output Mode, set these inputs to these values:.................. 334 Table 37 Cabinet Port Input Changes, by Mode .................................................................... 335 Table 38 Cabinet Port Output Changes, by Mode.................................................................. 336 Table 39 Port B Pin Functions................................................................................................ 337 Table 40 Port C Pin Functions................................................................................................ 340 Table 41 HMC-1000 Input/Output Connector Pin Functions .................................................. 342 Table 42 LMD40 Port A Pin Functions ................................................................................... 345 Table 43 LMD40 Port B Pin Functions ................................................................................... 347 Table 44 LMD40 Communication Inputs Connector............................................................... 348 Table 45 LMD Port D Pin Functions ....................................................................................... 349 Table 46 Port D Pin Functions................................................................................................ 355

xiv

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Preface About This Manual

PURPOSE AND SCOPE


This manual describes the installation and day-to-day operation of the ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller. It discusses the options available for I/O and D modules for the controller. It does not cover the modem and communications card options that are available for the optional 2070 modem slot or other external devices, as too many options exist. For such items, please refer to the documentation that is supplied.

ASSUMPTIONS
It is assumed that the reader and user of this manual, the hardware, and the software tools described herein are authorized to work in and around traffic cabinets by the local traffic governing body. The reader should be familiar with the operation and wiring of traffic control cabinets in their area, and must be aware of, and follow, all safety and security protocols of the traffic agency. Its also assumed that the operator of the ATC-1000 traffic controller is aware of what signal standards are being used inside the cabinet (NEMA TS 1, TS 2, NTCIP, Simple output, etc.) and follow those standards. The Peek ATC-1000 uses the following standards: National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) TS1 NEMA is a North American trade organization that first defined the TS1 standard in 1978. This standard was formally declared obsolete in 1992. NEMA TS2. This standard replaced the TS1 standard in the United States and Canada. The current published standard is TS2-2003. It specifies operational features and interchangeability requirements for manufacturers.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Preface About This Manual Advanced Transportation Controller (ATC). The ATC standard, currently at Version 5.2b, published on September 25, 2006 was defined as a new standard integrating some features of TS2. ATC is primarily a North American standard. It was defined by a joint committee that included the U.S. Department of Transportation, AASHTO (the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials), the ITE (Institute of Transportation Engineers), and NEMA. Wherever standards do not define the operation of the controller or the cabinet system, Peek went into the design process for the ATC line of controllers with the strategy to create a proprietary system that uses the best practices and reliable, leading-edge technologies available for each application. This is particularly true of the Peek ATC Controllers Preemption, Transit Signal Priority, and Interval-based traffic engines.

Controller Firmware
This manual was written to describe the Peek ATC-1000 Controller using firmware version:

3.5 Build 304


If your controller is running firmware other than the version listed above, there may be some differences between the screens and functions described here and the screens and capabilities of your controller.

RELATED DOCUMENTS
These documents provide additional or related information which may be useful during the installation and configuration of this ATC-1000 controller: Table 1 Related Documentation Document
IQ Central Firmware Release Notes IQ Link Operating Manual IQ Link Release Notes IQ Central Operating Manual IQ Central Release Notes

Part Number
99-545 81-1202 99-490 81-1105 99-427

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Technical Assistance

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
If you need assistance or have questions related to the use of this product, contact Peek Traffic Corporations Customer Service Group for support. Contact Information
Toll free in the U.S.: (800) 245-7660 phone: (941) 845-1200 fax: (941) 845-1504 email: tech.support@peektraffic.com

Hours of Operation
M-F, 8am-5pm, Eastern Time

www.peektraffic.com CONVENTIONS USED IN THIS MANUAL


When referring to any of the product manuals from Peek Traffic, the following typographical conventions will aid in understanding the intent of the various topics and procedures.

Typographic Conventions
As shown in the following table, whenever text appears in the following fonts and styles, it indicates a special situation or meaning for the user. Table 2 Typographic conventions used in this manual Description
Commands or controls that must be selected by the user appear in bold. Switches or keyboard keys appear in SMALL CAPS. Things that the user needs to type at a prompt or entry window, exactly as shown, appear in this font. Items italicized inside slanted brackets < > are variables that need to be replaced while typing a command. The slanted brackets should not be typed.

Example
In the Print dialog box, select Options. When finished selecting parameters, press the PAGEDOWN key. Type a:\setup.exe at the prompt.

Type c:\<install directory>\product and press ENTER.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Preface About This Manual

Keyboard and Menu Conventions


Some commands are accomplished with a pair or sequence of keystrokes or command entries. The way these should be done is indicated by the way they are shown in the instructions, as listed here. Table 3 Keyboard conventions used in this manual Description
A series of commands that need to be completed in sequence will be separated by a right slant bracket (>) A dash, or hyphen, ( - ) indicates keys or controls that need to be pressed at the same time to activate the command A comma ( , ) indicates keystrokes that need to be pressed one-after-the-other.

Example
Go to Start > Programs > IQCentral and select IQCentral. Press CTRL- p to print the file.

To print the file, press ALT-f, p.

Symbol Conventions
The following symbols are used in this manual to indicate special messages for the user. Each indicates the level of importance that should be assigned to the associated text. Table 4 Symbol conventions used in this manual Symbol Description
Note This icon accompanies a general note or tip about the current topic. Caution This icon represents a general hazard. If the operator is not paying attention, some action that is undesired may occur. Important This is a detail about the product that may not be a hazard, but is critical to the operators proper understanding and use of the product. Warning This icon represents a situation where some real risk exists, whether of electrical shock or some other form of personal or property damage. Be very careful when dealing with Warning situations.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

This chapter introduces the components, firmware and utility software of the ATC-1000 Traffic Controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: An overview of the controller, starting on page 6. Details about the parts and controls of the ATC-1000, page 10. An introduction to the controllers firmware, on page 22. An introduction to the IQ Link software utility, on page 38. Introduction to IQ Central, on page 39.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

OVERVIEW
This is a picture of the ATC-1000 controller, with a TS2 Type 1 Input/Output module installed.

Figure 1 The ATC-1000 traffic controller


The ATC-1000 is a multi-standard traffic controller. It will fit into a variety of traffic control cabinets, based on the hardware installed and the software settings used. It can function as either a phase-based (NEMA) or interval-based (pre-timed) controller. With the various I/O modules, D modules and Communications modules that can be installed into the unit, it can be mated to a variety of cabinet wiring harnesses. Main Module (Display, Keypad, Engine Board, Serial Connectors) Power Module (Behind)

Input/Output Module

D Module Slot

Figure 2 Module locations

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Comms/Modem/2070 Module Slot

Conventions Used in this Manual Following the ATC standard, the ATC-1000 uses the Linux operating system internally. It has an engine board attached to the rear of the display and keypad modules. The engine board runs Linux and the traffic engines that determine what outputs will be sent to which connectors, and which inputs will be read at what time. A somewhat unique feature for the ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 controllers is that they have dual traffic software engines, which allows them to be easily switched between NEMA phasebased and pre-timed, interval-based operation. This is accomplished by a simple pattern change. The ATC-1000 can be set to operate in any one of the 255 available intersection traffic patterns. If any pattern between 1 and 48 is chosen, the controller operates in NEMA phase-based mode. If a pattern between 101 and 228 is chosen, the controller operates in pre-timed interval mode. Pattern 255 is Flash. Pattern 254 is Free. Selecting any pattern other than those listed here puts the controller into Backup Free operation. Power is supplied to the controller via the I/O module. The exact pins to use for power depends on which I/O module is installed.

Power Input on TS2 Type 1 I/O Module


This I/O module only has a single, small A connector, which is primarily used to supply power to the controller. Most of the other communications between the controller and cabinet occur on the controllers serial connectors. For this type of I/O module, AC Neutral is on pin A. AC Line voltage (120VAC) is on pin C. Chassis/Earth Ground is on pin H.

Power Input on TS2 Type 2 I/O Module


There are three connectors on the TS2 Type 2 I/O module, but power is still supplied through the left-most one, labeled A. For this type of A connector, AC Neutral is on pin U. AC Line voltage (120VAC) is on pin p. Chassis/Earth Ground is on pin V.

Power Input on LMD I/O Module


The LMD I/O module has two connectors, A and B, but power is yet again supplied on the A connector. For the LMD A connector, AC Line voltage (120VAC) is supplied on pin p. AC Neutral is on pin U, and Chassis/Earth Ground is on pin V

Power Input on HMC-1000 I/O Module


The HMC controllers were a line of devices manufactured by Honeywell Corporation in the 1970s and 1980s. They were among the earliest traffic controllers that implemented the NEMA TS1 standard. The HMC-1000 I/O module has 1 connector and a switch. The main connector is labeled connector INPUT/OUTPUT and it has AC Line voltage (120VAC) supplied on pin 61. AC Neutral is on pin 62, and Chassis/Earth Ground is on pin 63.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Traffic Engine
Peek ATC controllers are unique in that they have two distinct traffic engines, or software applications that cycle an intersection through the desired signal sequences, available at all times. The controller determines which engine to use by which intersection Pattern has been requested. Peek ATC controllers can use only one of the available 255 Patterns at any given time. Patterns 1 through 48, along with patterns 254 and 255 are NEMA engine patterns. Patterns 101 through 228 are Interval-based patterns.

NEMA Operation
The ATC-1000 will run as a NEMA, phase-based controller as long as a pattern between 1 and 48 has been selected. (Or the special patterns defined by NEMA as Pattern 254: Free operation, and Pattern 255: Flash.) As a NEMA controller, the ATC-1000 configures movements within an intersection based on phases rather than intervals. A phase, by the NEMA standard, is a traffic movement that includes a standard vehicular signal transition cycle defined for every movement in a U.S. or Canadian intersection as: Red --> Green --> Amber --> Red. Within this environment, the ATC-1000 has the following capabilities: Up to 16 phases of vehicle and pedestrian movement Up to 16 phases in 4 rings Up to 48 coordination patterns Up to 16 split configurations Up to 4 overlap movements Up to 6 preemption plans Up to 64 vehicle detector inputs Up to 8 pedestrian detector inputs Up to 48 Time of Day action plans Up to 32 Time of Day day plans Up to 32 Time of Day schedules The ability to communicate with a Central System via the NTCIP protocol The ATC-1000 controller uses the US Department of Transportation sponsored and ITE (Institute of Transportation Engineers) written Advanced Transportation Controller standard. The physical connections that are made to the cabinet depend on which I/O and D Modules have been installed in the unit. The controller can be configured to use TS2 Type 1, TS2 Type 2, HMC-1000, or LMD connections. D modules are available in a number of configurations that allow for special customer requirements, including ATC standard, Peek 3000E, LMD, Idaho D, Traconex and Multisonics D modules.

Interval-based Operation
The ATC-1000 will run as a pre-timed, interval-based controller as long as a pattern between 101 and 228 is selected. Interval-based operation is used by most of the world

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Conventions Used in this Manual other than the United States and Canada, and even in those two countries, some cities, states, and provinces use the interval-based programming rather than NEMA programming. An interval is defined as a period of time during which all of the signal outputs output by the controller are in a fixed state. Whenever any signal output needs to change, that marks the beginning of a new interval. Interval-based operation can include preemption, TSP operation, and detector actuation to adjust timing.

Transitions Between NEMA and Interval-Based Operation


Any time that the controller will be asked to switch between NEMA and Interval-based operation, or vice versa, the controller will manage the interface between the two, very different modes of operation by transitioning into and out of the Red Rest state. Both NEMA and Interval-based operation recognize the Red Rest state, and both have set transition sequences to access and leave Red Rest. Peek ATC controllers utilize this area of commonality to enable a traffic engine transition without the need to send the intersection into a Flash state.

Cabinet Environment
The ATC-1000, as long as it is fitted with the proper type of I/O module and firmware, can function as a controller replacement in any cabinet that currently hosts a TS1, TS2 Type 1, TS2 Type 2, HMC-1000, LMD 40, LMD 9200, Traconex, or Multisonics traffic controller.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

CONTROLLER HARDWARE
The primary human input and output interface, the digital and serial data ports, as well as the fuses and power indicators, are all part of the ATC-1000 controllers Main Module. This is housed in the top left corner of the controller enclosure and is typically never removed from the housing by the traffic technician.
LCD Display - 40 Character 16 Row Alphanumeric Keypad Function Keypad

Heartbeat LED

Transmit/Receive LEDs for each port

Fuses

Power Status LEDs

USB port Serial Ports Ethernet Ports

Figure 3 Front view of the ATC-1000 controller Main Module

Enclosure
The ATC-1000 controller uses a modular design; all fuses, connectors, and controls are accessible from the front of the unit, as defined in the Advanced Transportation Controller standard. The top of the ATC-1000 housing is closed and free of any openings, to prevent dirt, dust, water or other debris from entering the top of the unit. Ventilation holes are provided on the rear of the unit. The resulting ventilation is more than enough to cool the electronics. The design is such that foreign debris and water cannot easily enter the case in a typical installation. The controller is constructed so that it can be shipped easily via common carrier without the need to disassemble the unit.

10

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware

Operating System, Firmware and Memory


When the ATC-1000 controller is powered on, it loads a copy of the Linux operating system from BIOS into flash memory and runs it. The operating system then loads the programming and data the unit needs to operate. The controllers basic functionality is defined by its programming. This programming is maintained as data in non-volatile flash memory. Firmware can be stored or updated in the unit in a couple of ways. It can be stored to internal flash memory either from a USB memory chip via the USB port at the front of the unit, or through the PC Ethernet port via an attached Microsoft Windows PC that is running the IQ Link software utility. The controllers database is its set of operating parameters that tell the software exactly what type of intersection is being controlled. This database can be loaded in three possible ways: via the USB port, via an Ethernet connection to a PC running IQ Link, or via a comms link to a central system software package such as IQ Central. The ATC-1000 controllers Linux operating system continuously checks the integrity of the units internal memory, the loaded firmware, and the local database of configured parameters. If the controller detects a fault, it will immediately terminate its watchdog output (i.e. CVM or Fault Monitor) to the CMU or MMU, which will place the cabinet (and the intersection) into FLASH mode. When this situation occurs, the controllers display shows a message indicating the cause of the failure.

Display
The front panel display of the controller is a 40 character wide by 16 row tall LCD screen. The display shows the ATC-1000s menu system, its currently configured parameters, and status screens that display the current situation within the controller and in the intersection. The display is fully operable over the temperature range of 4 to +158F (20 to +70 C). Below 32F (0C) a heater comes on to warm up the display, but only when the cabinet door is open. The display will not be damaged by lower temperatures when the heater is not on, it just wont display properly.

Contrast Control
The liquid crystal display has a user configurable contrast setting. To modify the contrast of the screen, the power to the unit must be on and it must be beyond its initial startup routine. Press and hold the blue function key on the controllers keypad (located at the bottom right corner of the keypad), then use the contrast up and contrast down keys to change the screen display.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

11

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Keypad
The ATC-1000 controller includes a two section keypad to the right of the display window. The left part includes 16 keys for alphanumeric entry and selection. The rightside 16 keys provide the functional keys, including the blue Function key, the green navigation arrow keys, the Yes, No, and ENT(Enter) buttons, and several other special function keys.

Figure 4 ATC-1000 keypad


1 to 0 The numbered keys on the keypad are used to enter values into parameter screens, as well as to choose numbered items in menus. When you are in a set of related screens, such as the six Preemption screens or the eight TSP Run Configuration screens, as long as you are not in Edit mode, you can also press the number of the screen to go there directly. So pressing the 4 button while in the Preemption screens would take you to fourth preemption screen (M AIN M ENU > 6 > 1 > 4.) These are used to enter values into hexadecimal fields. The E key on the keypad has a second, important function. With the Blue function key ( ), it toggles the controller into and out of database edit mode. When in Edit mode, pressing the -E again saves any changed values on the screen and returns the controller screens to read-only mode. HME Everywhere in the ATC-1000 interface, the HME, or Home button, returns the user to the main status screen, 1.1 Controller Status. This screen can also be accessed by choosing the first option (Controller Status) on the Status menu. (M AIN M ENU > 1 > 1) When the controller is in Edit mode, the arrow buttons are used to navigate between parameter fields on controller database screens.

A to F E

Arrow Keys

12

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware UP (+) When in sections of the database with multiple screens, such as the six screens of Preemption (Main Menu > 6), or the two pages of Vehicle Detector Options (Main Menu > 5 > 1), the Up and Down keys are used to switch between screens. The Up (+) button moves you to the screen closer to the begging of the list (e.g. 2 -> 1, 6->5). If the Blue function key ( ) is pressed first, the Up button can be used to increase the contrast of the ATC-1000 display. The Up and Down buttons are also used to switch between the various Status screens. The Controller status screen is at the top of this list, and it follows the order on the Status menu. HLP Toggles the help information for the current screen on and off. When in Edit mode, it displays the help information for the currently selected field. The CLR/ESC button can also be used to exit out of a help screen. And when in the Home status screen (aka the Timing Status, or Controller Status screen) the HLP button displays revision and copyright information about the ATC-1000 firmware. ENT, or the Enter button, is used in a variety of places in the interface to proceed past warning or error messages, such as when youve entered invalid data into a parameter field. It is also used to select a file, value, or test in the Diagnostics screens. MNU, or the Menu button, takes you to the Main Menu of the controller, no matter where you are in the interface. Note that this doesnt work when you are in the Diagnostics menus, or in the Help screens. You must first exit from those environments to use the MNU button to display the Main Menu. If you press the Blue function button ( ) before pressing MNU, it will open the ATC-1000 Utilities menus. PRV In the menus, the PRV or Previous button, will move you one step up the menu tree. For instance, if you are in the Time Set screen and you press PRV, it will move you to the Time of Day Menu. The UP and Down buttons are used to move between parameter screens for those parameters that have multiple screens of settings, such as Preemptions, Pattern Tables, and many others. The Down button moves you to the screen lower on the list, so 1 -> 2, 5 -> 6, etc. If the Blue function key ( ) is pressed first, the DWN button can be used to decrease the contrast of the ATC-1000 display. The Up and Down buttons are also used to switch between the various Status screens. The Controller status screen is at the top of this list, and it follows the order on the Status menu.

ENT

MNU

DWN ()

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

13

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000 NXT NXT or the Next button. Used when entering the Diagnostics mode of the controller, under the Maintenance menu. The NXT button is also used to cycle through preset, non-numeric values for controller settings. Primarily used to turn parameter settings on and off in the parameter screens of the interface (after entering Edit mode with the -E key combination.) A Yes is indicated in the interface by an X next to a setting. These keys are also used for some settings that have a direct ON/OFF screen value, such as DAYLIGHT SAVINGS on the 2.4.7 Time Settings parameter screen. CLR/ESC The Clear/Escape key is used to return a field to its default value (usually all zeros for numerical values, or OFF for binary parameters.) This button is also used to exit out of the Utilities menus, and out of the Help screens. This is the special function key for the controller. Pressing this button before pressing one of the other keys showing a blue label above or around it will command that buttons secondary function. These include opening the Utilities menu (MNU button), changing the controller display contrast (UP+ and DOWN- buttons), and forcing on and off the display backlight (YES button).

YES/NO

Comms and Utility Connectors


Just below the keypad on the front panel of the ATC-1000, the controller has four D-sub type serial ports and a USB port. These ports have a variety of uses. local file transfers as a connection point to a central system as a local connection point for the IQ Link utility software as a connection to the cabinet (for TS2 Type 1 operations) as a connection point to an external backup power supply monitoring circuit as a connection point to a conflict monitor a place to upload controller firmware or a traffic database (via the USB port)

14

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware

Figure 5 Comms and Utility Ports


The details about each port are described in the next sections, describing the ports from left to right.

USB Port
The ATC-1000 controller includes a single USB ports on the front panel. It functions the same way a USB port does on a PC. The port is designed to allow easy transfer of files to and from the controller using small portable memory devices such as USB memory sticks or thumb drives. At present, only passive RAM devices have been tested to work with the controller, so other types of USB devices such as external USB hard drives, mice, keyboards, and cameras will not be recognized by the controller. The USB port is "hot-swappable" the controller does not need to be shut down and restarted to attach or remove a USB memory device; simply plug the device into the USB port and the controller automatically detects it and displays a menu of options from which you can select a desired action. USB device detected remove to exit >1.USB->DATABASE 4.CMU_LOG->USB 2.DATABASE->USB 5.UPS_LOG->USB 3.LOG->USB

Figure 6 USB Command menu


Use the Up and Down arrow buttons to navigate between the menu Options. Press the ENT key to make a selection.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

15

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Port 1 - SDLC
Port 1 is an RS-485 port (now known as an EIA-485 differential serial communications interface.) This port is used in a TS2 cabinet to communicate with other devices within the cabinet. Typically, TS2 Type 2 controllers use the SDLC port to connect to the intersection MMU. The 15 pin female port uses the SDLC (synchronous data link) communication protocol with a bit rate of 153.6 Kbps, as required by the NEMA TS2-2008 Standard. This ports TX LED is on whenever the controller is transmitting data. The RX LED is on whenever the controller receives data on this port. The ports high speed full duplex data channels utilize four twisted pairs: two transmit and receive data pairs, and two transmit and receive clock pairs. The pin assignments for Port 1 are detailed on page 322.

Port 2 - Central
Port 2, also known as the Central Port, is often used to connect the controller to a central software system such as IQ Central, either via a direct serial connection, or via a modem (e.g. TELCO, fiber optic, or radio modems). This is the standard port used to connect to a central system software package when connecting via direct serial or a modem. The port can be configured in firmware and will support transmission speeds up to 115.2K bps. Port 2, Port 5, and the Ethernet ports are the only ports that fully support the NTCIP protocol. Standard serial communications are supported with speeds from 1200 bps to 115.2 Kbps, as well as Parity (Odd, Even, None), Stop Bit (1 or 2), and Handshake (None, Xon/Xoff, Hardware) settings. Port 2s TX LED goes on whenever the controller is transmitting data and the RX LED goes on whenever the controller is receiving data on the port. The pin assignments for Port 2 are detailed on page 323.

Port 4 - Local
The Local port, or Port 4 on the ATC-1000 Controller is a male 9-pin serial port that is often used to connect a Conflict Monitor (CMU) or Malfunction Monitor (MMU) to the controller. The data rates for this port are firmware-selectable from 1200 bps to 115.2 Kbps. Parity (Odd, Even, None), Stop Bit (1 or 2), and Handshake (None, Xon/Xoff, Hardware) can also be set for this port in the controller firmware. This port is also often used as the connection point to directly attach a PC that is running IQ Link, thus allowing firmware updates and interactive configuration modifications on site. Just as with Port 1, this ports TX LED lights whenever the controller is transmitting data, and the RX LED lights whenever the ATC-1000 is receiving data on this port. The pin assignments for Port 4 are detailed on page 325.

16

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware

Port 5 UPS/Spare
Port 5, or the Spare port, is a 9 pin male RS-232 port that is typically used to connect a data cable from a cabinet UPS system to the controller, or it can be used to connect a PC directly to the controller via a standard serial cable (for example, to use it with IQ Link.) Port 5 can also be used as a connection point to the central software system. The TX LED indicates when the controller is transmitting data and the RX LED indicates when its receiving data on the port. The pin assignments for Port 5 are detailed on page 326.

Ethernet Ports
The ATC-1000 has two RJ-45 Ethernet ports as a standard configuration. However, the ATC-2000 controller can also be ordered with the full complement of four Ethernet ports, as specified in the FHWA ATC standard. The Ethernet ports all use the standard 10Base-T network interface, and conform to the IEEE 802.3 standard for twisted pair communications. The network interface supports transmission at the full 10Mbps rate. Each ATC-1000 controller has a unique MAC network address, which can be viewed in the firmware interface by choosing the Revision screen under the Status menu (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > D. R EVISIONS ). The port supports communications using either TCP/IP, SNMP, or NTCIP networking protocols. The Ethernet connectors and Ports 2 and 5 are the only ports that can be used to connect the ATC-1000 controller to a central server software system such as IQCentral. Unlike the other ports on the front of the ATC-1000, which indicate Transmit (TX) and Receive (RX) status via their LEDs, the Ethernet ports have built in LEDs that indicate status in a slightly different way. The yellow LINK LED indicates that the Ethernet port is connected to an active Ethernet hub/switch or computer (i.e. something outside of the controller has acknowledged that the port is on the network,) and that the controller is ready to transmit and receive data on that network. The green ACT LED shows when the Ethernet port is being used to actually transmit and receive data.

Optional Expansion Slot Ports


Along the right edge of the unit, the ATC-1000 Controller has a vacant slot available behind a removable front panel. This slot can accommodate either a Peek 20706A Asynchronous FSK Modem card or a Peek 2070-7A Asynchronous Serial Communication Module. The connector in the slot is the 96 socket contact DIN 41612 as specified in the CalTrans TEES 1999 to support a 2X wide board. The serial ports that result from installing either of these cards can be configured in the firmware to support transmission speeds of from 1200 bps up to 115.2 Kbps. The firmware can also be used to set the Parity (Odd, Even, None), Stop Bit (1 or 2), and Handshake (None, Xon/Xoff, Hardware) settings for these ports. The pin assignments for these cards are available in the documentation provided with those optional add-on cards.

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

17

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Note

The 2070 slot in the ATC-1000 can host the above Peek 2070 modules, but it can also host any CalTrans TEES compliant 2070 comms module, no matter the manufacturer. Again, the pin assignments and exact functionality of these third-party modules is defined in their documentation.

18

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware

I/O Module Connectors


In the space just below the main display, keypad, and comms connector panel is the location of the ATC-1000 Input/Output (I/O) module. There are four I/O module variants available for the ATC-1000: TS2 Type I TS2 Type 2 LMD 40 HMC-1000 The number and type of connectors that you see near the bottom front face of your ATC-1000 controller is determined by which of these four I/O modules are installed in the controller. The type of I/O module installed in the controller determines what type of cabinet the unit can be installed into.

Figure 7 Example I/O Modules


No matter which type of I/O module is being used, the ATC-1000 will automatically detect the type installed in your controller as soon as it is powered up. A single cable

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

19

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000 connects the I/O module to the ATC-1000 motherboard. If a D module is installed in your controller, either one or two connectors may be attached to the back of the I/O module from that unit as well. (D modules are always connected to the ATC-1000 through the I/O module.) The pin assignments and voltage and current requirements of the various I/O module connectors are defined in Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details, starting on page 329.

Heartbeat LED
The front panel also includes a Heartbeat LED, which flashes at a rate of four times per second as long as the controllers internal fault monitor signal is being generated and the traffic engine is running. If the controller is powered ON, but has a serious problem, the blinking of this LED will halt completely, meaning that the LED will stay on in an unblinking state.

Data Key Port


A Data Key port is part of the FHWA ATC standard and is known as a keyceptical. This port is available as an option on the ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 controllers. The actual key that is used in these ports is a non-volatile computer memory device that can be used to store controller database (i.e. traffic programming) and conflict monitor programming card settings. It functions in much the same way that a USB thumbdrive does when one is inserted into the ATC-1000 USB port, with one additional feature. If the data key has CMU or MMU programming information stored on it, the controller and conflict monitor will interact to verify that the conflict matrix defined therein is valid and compatible.

Figure 8 Datakey type data receptacle


Compatible data keys are available from DataKey Electronics, Inc. of Minneapolis, Minnesota. (www.datakeyelectronics.com). The ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 can accept SFK series SPI 5V Flash & EEPROM type serial memory keys.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Hardware

Power System
The ATC-1000 controller is powered through the I/O Module. The exact port and pins used to provide power to the controller depends on which I/O module is being used, but it is typically the left most port on the module, which is called the A connector on the TS2 I/O modules. For instance, on a TS2 Type 2 I/O module, power comes in by accepting 120VAC on pin p and AC neutral on pin U. There is no internal battery backup for memory storage or the real time clock in the ATC-1000 controller. During power down or power outages, all static memory (SRAM) and the real-time clock are powered by two super capacitors. In the event of an AC power outage, these capacitors provide sufficient power to maintain the SRAM contents and the functioning of the real time clock for up to seven days. AC power goes to a power module, located behind the front face of the main controller module, along the left side of the controller. The power LEDs and fuses on the front panel of the controller are actually part of the ATC power module.

Fuses
The controller is fitted with a pair of easily replaced front panel power fuses. These are located in the lower left corner of the main display/keyboard module. The bottom fuse is a 1 Amp fuse that protects the internal circuitry of the controller from excess current coming into the unit via main AC power. The top fuse protects the controller from over-current situations occurring on the Fault Monitor output pin of the I/O module connectors. For example, on the TS2 Type 2 I/O module, this output is located on pin A of the MS-A connector. No matter which I/O module is connected, this fuse is designed to blow if the 24VDC output exceeds 1 Amp of current.

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

BASIC OPERATIONS Setting the Date and Time


Although you can see the current date and time on the main status screen of the ATC1000, you cannot edit those settings there. There are more details about the time and date settings on the ATC controller in the Time of Day Menu topic, starting on page 146. Here are the steps required to change the date and time on your controller: 1. 2. 3. 4. Press MENU to enter the menu system Select option 2. P ROGRAMMING . Choose option 4. T IME
OF

D AY .

Select option 5. S ET L OCAL T IME


2.4.5 YEAR: 2009 HOUR: 10 SET LOCAL TIME MONTH: 08 MINUTE: 04 PG1OF1 DAY: 17 SECOND: 06 *

Current Timezone: EASTERN DST Status: Enabled Timzone and DST cannot be edited from this page. Use the Advanced Time Setup and Daylight Saving Settings pages, accessible from the previous menu.

Figure 9 Set Local Time screen, in Edit mode


5. Press the blue function key ( ). You will see an asterisk ( ) appear in the top

right corner of the screen. Press the E key to enter Edit mode. The asterisk will disappear and one of the fields will begin flashing. This indicates the cursor location on the screen, i.e. where you can begin editing data. 6. 7. Enter the numbers for the current year, month, and date. User the right arrow button to switch to the next field between entries. Type in the numbers for the current local time: hour, minutes and seconds. Use the right arrow buttons to navigate between the fields. If the DST and zone settings are correct, you can save these values now by pressing -E and skipping the rest of this procedure.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Basic Operations 8. Although the time zone and Daylight Savings Time (DST) values are shown on this screen, they cannot be edited here. To set the time zone and DST values, go back up to the Time of Day menu by pressing the PRV button. Select option 6. A DV ANCED T IME S ETUP . Notice that you are still in Edit mode on the new screen, as indicated by the blinking field entry showing where the cursor is currently located.

9.

10. Press the down arrow to go to the L OCAL T IME D IFFERENTIAL line. At first, it will highlight the plus or minus symbol that sits to the left of the number. If the location where the controller will live is in a time zone to the West of the City of London, then this value should be a negative. If your time zone is East of the City of London, it should be a positive value. Use the Y ES and N O keys to select either the + or symbol, then press the right arrow button to move to the number portion of the Local Time Differential.
2.4.6 ADVANCED TIME SET PG1OF1

GLOBAL TIME HOUR...............12 GLOBAL TIME MINUTE.............07 GLOBAL TIME SECOND.............06 GLOBAL YEAR....................2010 GLOBAL MONTH...................01 GLOBAL DAY.....................22 LOCAL TIME DIFFERENTIAL........-18000 DAYLIGHT SAVINGS (ON/OFF)...... ON PATTERN SYNC...................00030 (MINUTES AFTER MIDNIGHT)

Figure 10 Example Advanced Time Set screen, showing EST values

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23

Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000 11. Enter the number of seconds that your local time differs from Global (or UTC) time. Since this is not an easy thing to calculate in your head, here is a handy table showing the most common time differentials: Table 5 Time Conversions Seconds to Hours Difference in Hours
1 hour 2 hours 3 hours 4 hours 5 hours 6 hours 7 hours 8 hours 9 hours 10 hours 11 hours 12 hours

Difference in Seconds
3600 7200 10800 14400 18000 21600 25200 28800 32400 36000 39600 43200

As an example, the Eastern time zone in the United States would have a time differential of 18000. 12. Press the blue function key again ( ) and press the letter E on the keypad. This will exit from Edit mode, and store the new time and date values. This completes setting the Day and Time values in the controller.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Basic Operations

Setting Up Daylight Savings Time


The ATC-1000 can use daylight savings time (DST) based on fixed dates, certain days of a month, or it can be turned off entirely. By default, DST is deactivated in ATC controllers shipped from the factory. To enable DST, you just need to load the default DST plan, which uses the standard dates for DST that are typical in the United States. Then, it is easy to modify the plan, if so desired, using the Exact Date and Day of Week Occurrances options. There are more details about the DST settings and the other time and date settings on the ATC controller in the Time of Day Menu topic, starting on page 146. 1. Before adjusting your DST settings, please verify that the date and time values for the controller are correct. (Press the HME button to see the standard Status screen, which shows the current date and time.) If these values are not correct, use the steps in the Setting the Date and Time procedure on page 22, to set the values correctly. Press MNU to go into the menu system. Select Programming by pressing the 2 button. Choose option 4. T IME
OF

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

D AY

Go into the Set Local Time screen by pressing 5. Verify that the DST Status setting is set to Enabled. (See below)
2.4.5 YEAR: 2010 HOUR: 14 SET LOCAL TIME MONTH: 04 MINUTE: 17 PG1OF1 DAY: 09 SECOND: 06

Current Timezone: GMT/UTC DST Status: Enabled Timzone and DST cannot be edited from this page. Use the Advanced Time Setup and Daylight Saving Settings pages, accessible from the previous menu.

Figure 11 Set Local Time screen


If DST Status is not set to Enabled, press PRV to return to the previous menu and then choose option 7. D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP .

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000 7. The Daylight Saving Setup menu is used to view the current settings, load a default DST setup, or to configure custom DST setups using either exact dates or day of week of the month occurrances. Well start by loading some default settings, which is required to enable DST.
2.4.7 DAYLIGHT SAVING SETUP MENU

1. Load Default US DST Settings 2. Disable DST 3. Display Current DST Settings 4. Set DST by exact date 5. Set DST by day of week occurrances

Figure 12 Daylight Saving Setup Menu


Press option 1. L OAD D EFAULT US DST Settings. The screen will indicate that the defaults have been loaded by showing a status message at the bottom of the screen: Loaded Default DST Settings! 8. Select 3. D ISPLAY C URRENT DST S ETTINGS . You will see a screen that looks like this: (The times shown are on a 24 hour clock.)
2.4.7.1 DST Params (Occontrollerrrances of DOW) DST Begins in the month of <March> on the <Second> <Sunday> at 02:00:00 oclock. that occurs on or after the <1st> DST Ends in the month of <November> on the <First> <Sunday> at 01:00:00 oclock. that occurs on or after the <1st> Minutes to Adjust time: 60

Figure 13 Current DST Settings.


If the values are the way you want them, you are done with this procedure. If not, continue on to the next steps. 9. If you want to change the days or dates that Daylight Saving Time starts and stops, choose either 4.Set DST by Exact Date or 5. Set DST by Day of Week Occontrollerrances.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Basic Operations 10. In either the DST by Exact Date screen or the DST by Day of Week Occurances screen, press -E to enter Edit mode.
2.4.7.2 Set DST by Exact Date Begin Date: 01/01/2000 Begin Time: 00:00:00 End Date: 01/01/2000 End Time: 01/01/2000 Minutes to Adjust time: 60

Figure 14 Setting DST by Exact Date screen


Note that the values shown on these screens do not reflect the current DST settings. These are just the baseline values for these screens. However, if you were to exit Edit mode now and return to the previous menu, you will have changed the DST values to these baseline dates and times. 11. Define the Begin Date and Time. (or Begin Month, Day, Time) 12. Define the End Date and Time. (or End Month, Day, Time) 13. Set the M INUTES TO A DJUST T IME , which is the number of minutes over which you would like the controller to slowly switch to the new time. (This is for the sake of coordinated intersections.) A typical value would be between 5 and 10 minutes. 14. Once youve set all the values on the Set DST screen, press +E to exit Edit

mode. The values shown here will go back to their default values, but the values you entered will be stored to the DST engine. 15. Press PRV to go to the Daylight Saving Setup Menu and choose option 3.D ISPLAY C URRENT DST S ETTINGS . Verify that the settings you entered are displayed. This completes the setup of Daylight Saving time.

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Adjusting Screen Contrast


Follow these steps to adjust the contrast of the ATC-1000 display: 1. From anywhere in the interface, press the blue function button ( will appear in the upper right corner of the display. 2. Press either the UP+ or DWN buttons. You will see the Contrast Adjust screen. ). An asterisk

CONTRAST ADJUST 109

<+> <-> Adjusts <any other key> Exits

Figure 15 Contrast Adjust screen


3. Use the UP+ and DWN buttons to change the value of the contrast. It can be any value between 0 and 255, but typically a value between 80 and 150 is the normal range for display contrast. (This normal range can shift with the ambient temperature of the LCD screen.) Set the value for comfortable viewing. Press any other key on the keypad to exit from the Contrast Adjust screen.

4.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Basic Operations

Turning the Backlight On and Off


The backlight for the ATC-1000s display will automatically turn on and stay on for a preset period of time. The length of time the backlight stays on can be programmed from the Utilities menu. ( + MNU, 5, B ACKLIGHT T IMOUT ). Use the green up and down arrow keys to adjust this value, the only value on this screen that can be modified by the operator. The timeout can be any value between 10 and 630 seconds (10 seconds to 10 minutes). Press MNU again to return to the main menu system. ** Miscellaneous Status ** <B>Check Buzzer: ESW1 Init Status: EEPROM Init Status: Backlight Mode: Backlight Timeout: Temp Sensor: Contrast Value: --GOOD GOOD ON 600 [SEC] 25C [77F] 109

<MENU> Return to Main

Figure 16 Utilities > Miscellaneous status menu, showing Backlight Timeout


But if you wish to manually force the backlight on or off, this can also be done using the Blue function key ( ) and the Y ES button. This toggles the display backlight on and off. If you toggle it on, the light will stay on until you physically turn it off by pressing -Y ES again. There is no timeout when you use this control to turn the backlight on or off.

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Entering Edit Mode


All of the screens in the ATC-1000 menu environment are displayed in a read-only format when first shown. You have the option, however, to change the settings on the controller database screens by entering Edit mode. This is done by navigating to the screen where the desired parameter is stored and then pressing the Blue function button and the E (Edit) button together. An asterisk (*) will appear at the top right corner of the screen after the button has been pressed. The asterisk disappears when a function option, such as E for Edit is pressed. Once in the Edit mode, one of the data fields will flash, indicating which field is the cursor location..

Note

Status screens do not have any editable fields. The only exception to this is the Backlight Timeout value on the Miscellaneous Status screen of the Utilities Menu, (See Entering the Utilities Menus on page 31.)

At this point, you can use the arrow buttons to move around on the screen. The currently selected field is indicated by blinking. Typing in a number or other value will replace the value in the currently highlighted field. The Y ES and N O buttons are used to toggle binary values, such as Phase Enabled. After you have changed a value, it will continue blinking until you save the changed values by pressing the -E key combination again. This also takes the ATC-1000 out of Edit mode.

Entering the Menu System


By default, when the controller starts up, it will display the 1.1 Timing Status screen. To enter the Main Menu system of the ATC-1000, press the MNU button.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Basic Operations

Entering the Utilities Menus


The utility menus are separate from the Main Menu system of the controller. These menus are directly linked to the hardware and are accessed in a different way. To open the Utilities menus, press the Blue function button ( ) and the MNU button (i.e. the Utilities button).
** ATC TS2 Utilities Main Menu ** < < < < < < 1 2 3 4 5 6 > > > > > > Keypad Test Display Test Voltage Status Operational Status Miscellaneous Status Revision Info

<ESC> Quit

Figure 17 Utilities Menu


Press a keypad button to enter the various status screens. To exit out of the Utilities Menus, press the ESC button.

Viewing Help Screens


Interactive help screens are available for most of the parameter screens of the controller. To open the help description for a given screen, navigate to that screen in the menus, and then press the HLP button. To see the help information for a particular +E, use the arrows to field on a database screen, switch into Edit mode by pressing move to the desired field, and press the HLP button to see the help screen for that particular parameter. Press either the HLP or CLR/ESC button to exit out of the help screen.

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

ATC-1000 FIRMWARE
The firmware in the ATC-1000 Controller is a program running in the controllers Linux operating system environment. It defines the menus and available parameters displayed from the controllers database. The firmware is the program that applies the controller database values to the operation of the intersection. Because of its importance, and the fact that the ATC-1000 firmware can be updated by customers, were providing details on how to check your controller firmware, and instructions on how to update the firmware stored in the controller.

Checking the Current Version of Firmware


The operating system and firmware that are currently loaded in the ATC-1000 controller are details on the Revisions screen. To view the data, follow these steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Power up the unit Press the MNU button to enter the menu system. Selection option 1 for the Status menu. Press the letter D on the keypad to open the Revisions screen. (See Figure 18.)
1.D MODEL REVISION INFORMATION : Peek Model ATC

SOFTWARE: 03.005.0148 DB ver : 5

BOOT LOADER VERSION: U-Boot 1.1.4 (Jun 2 2009 - 17:17:04) Linux 2.6.20.14 Version: #13 PREEMPT Tue Jun 30 18:57:57 EDT 2009 MAC ADDR : 1A-B6-1F-B2-3C-C6

Figure 18 Revisions Screen


Make note of the third line of text on this screen, showing the software version information, as well as the version of the database structure (DB ver). Both of these pieces of information will be important, especially when talking with Peek Traffic personnel about any issues you may be attempting to address with the ATC-1000 controller.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

ATC-1000 Firmware

Note

Another quick way to check the firmware revision information is to press the HLP button from the Timing Status screen. (i.e. the Home screen).

ATC Controller Copyright(c), Peek Traffic Software: 03.005.148

Figure 19 Status help screen showing revision info

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

Updating Firmware Using a USB Thumbdrive


Follow these steps to update the firmware within an ATC-1000 controller:

Note

The controllers operating system and boot loader will only accept an update to a firmware version that has a higher version number than that currently stored in the unit. If you wish to return to a previous version of firmware, you will need to contact Peek Traffic Customer Service for assistance.

1.

If this is the first time the USB drive will be used for ATC firmware transport, you will need to prepare the drive so that the ATC unit recognizes it. If the drive is not yet formatted, begin by formatting it as a FAT drive using your Windows PC. (Locate the drive in Windows Explorer, right-click on it, and choose Format.) Note the name and location of the thumbdrive on your system for the next step. Open IQ Link on the Windows system where the thumbdrive is attached. Select the Utils menu and choose Phase 2 > Write USB Files/Folders, as shown in Figure 20.

2.

Figure 20 Write USB Files/Folders in IQ Link


3. Navigate to the drive letter where the USB drive is connected and click on S AVE . A dialog box will open to acknowledge completion of the task creating the necessary signature file and folders.

Figure 21 IQ Link creates the drives and files on the thumbdrive


4. 5. Click OK. Open Windows Explorer and navigate to the thumbdrive. You will see the directory structure illustrated in Figure 26.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

ATC-1000 Firmware

Figure 22 Directory on the USB thumbdrive


The Signature File that identifies the drive to the ATC controller is called ASTC_DATA_DISK, as shown above. 6. Store the ATC-1000 firmware update file on the USB thumbdrive. Place the file in the \ATC_LINUX\USTC_firmware folder. The file is available from Peek Traffics customer support team. The firmware must be newer than the version that is currently stored on the controller, or the controller will not accept it during the update process. A firmware file is named natc_v00#R###.bin where the #s indicate the version and build of the firmware. For instance, the file for version 3.5, build 304 of the firmware is called natc_v005R304.bin. Now go to the ATC-1000 controller. Go into the System Maintenance area of the controllers menus and choose the Diagnostics Mode. (M AIN M ENU > 3. S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3. E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE )

7.

Caution
8. 9.

The next step will put the controller into Flash mode.

Press the NXT button to proceed into Diagnostics Mode. Choose option 7.Update Firmware.

10. The FWLoader utility will start. When you see the following screen, plug the USB thumbdrive containing the new firmware into the controllers USB port. (The Ethernet addresses that appear on this screen depend on the Ethernet port settings for your particular controller.)

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

ATC FW Loader v2.3 Waiting for USB Listening on ETH eth0: 119.2.59.12 eth1: 192.168.60.199

Figure 23 ATC FW Loader screen


11. You should see one or more listed firmware files that are available on the USB thumbdrive displayed on the screen. Use the up and down arrow buttons to move the cursor (>) next to the firmware file you wish to load. If you select a file that is a lower version than the one currently installed in your controller, the update attempt will fail, at which point you will be returned to the firmware list display.
Select FW File: natc_v002R106.bin natc_v003R148.bin > natc_v005R304.bin

Figure 24 Select firmware file and press Enter key


12. When you have the correct firmware file selected, press the ENT button to start the install. 13. The controller will report that it is Updating the Traffic Application. After no more than a few seconds, you should see a Firmware Update Complete message. 14. When the installation completes, go ahead and remove the USB thumbdrive from the USB port on the controller. The ATC-1000 must be completely powered down and restarted at this time. 15. A Firmware/Hardware sync screen will appear. As the screen states, press the following buttons in the exact order to proceed: E C YES and E. If the

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

ATC-1000 Firmware upgrade was successful, the controller will start up and return to the Timing Status screen. 16. When the status screen appears again, check the firmware version that is running by going to the Revision menu screen. (M AIN M ENU > 1.S TATUS > D.R EVISIONS )
1.D MODEL REVISION INFORMATION : Peek Model ATC

SOFTWARE: 03.005.0304 DB ver : 5

BOOT LOADER VERSION: U-Boot 1.1.4 (Jun 2 2009 - 17:17:04) Linux 2.6.20.14 Version: #13 PREEMPT Tue Jun 30 18:57:57 EDT 2009 MAC ADDR : 1A-B6-1F-B2-3C-C6

Figure 25 Verify the correct firmware version

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000

USING THE IQ LINK UTILITY WITH THE ATC-1000


The IQ Link software utility operates under Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows Vista. This software allows a PC to create a simple connection to the ATC-1000 controllers firmware using either an Ethernet port or a serial port. Once connected, IQ Link can be used to: Load updated firmware to a connected controller Change parameters in a connected controllers database Create a firmware update on a USB thumb drive Create a controller database on a USB thumb drive that can then be loaded to an ATC-1000 in the field

Figure 26 IQ Link software interface


For details on how to install the utility and how to use it with the ATC-1000 controller, refer to the IQ Link Operating Manual which can be retrieved from the Peektraffic.com website (http://www.peektraffic.com/ptmanuals.htm), or it can be ordered as a printed copy by contacting the Sales Department at (941) 845-1253 or via email at sales@peektraffic.com. Request part number 81-1202.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Using an ATC-1000 With IQ Central

USING AN ATC-1000 WITH IQ CENTRAL


IQ Central is Peek Traffic Corporations own central traffic management software system. It allows a central PC computer (or network of computers) to connect with, monitor, reprogram, override, and preempt a variety of traffic equipment types. Primarily, IQ Central is used to monitor and access traffic controllers in the field remotely from a central location. IQ Central uses NTCIP as its communications protocol, which is also the standard protocol used by the Peek ATC controllers.

Figure 27 IQ Central software interface


There is a great deal more information provided on using IQ Central, setting up devices and communications connections, and programming devices using its interfaces, within the IQ Central Operating Manual. However, the basic steps to get your ATC-1000 connected to IQ Central are these: 1. 2. Pick a connection method between the central location and the device: modem, direct serial, Ethernet, radio modem, etc. Configure the ATC-1000 communications to central using the parameters on Comm Ports and IP/Cab setup menu. (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5).

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Chapter 1 Introduction to the ATC-1000 3. Once there, select option number 2. P ORT 2-5 setup parameters. Base your communications parameters on the type of connection being used, and the port through which you plan to communicate with the Central system. In IQ Central, add a new Connection based on the channel type and details (i.e. phone number, IP address). In IQ Central, define a device of the type PEEK ATC. From the selected new device instance in IQ Central, select the Connection you created previously. Test the connection to IQ Central by attempting to retrieve a portion of the devices database into the Upload/Download module.

4. 5. 6. 7.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

This chapter discusses how to get a new ATC-1000 controller operating and describes the basics of installing the unit in an intersection cabinet. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Component checklist, on page 42. Setting the IP address, on page 50. Loading a default database, on page 52. Field deployment, on page 53. Programming a basic intersection, on page 54.

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

OVERVIEW
When the ATC-1000 controller is first sent to customers, it will have firmware, a MAC address, an IP address, and a cabinet address installed. These instructions explain how to configure a brand new unit for use in a traffic cabinet

HARDWARE SETUP CHECKLIST


To operate properly, an ATC-1000 controller must be installed in a traffic cabinet environment that matches the type of hardware and firmware that is installed in the unit. However, before it can be inserted into a cabinet, you should verify that you have the following hardware elements for the controller: ATC-1000 unit Proper I/O module (TS2 Type 1, TS2 Type 2, HMC-1000, or LMD 40) A set of cabinet connectors that match the I/O module connectors. In particular, the power supplied on the pins of the A connector must be valid for the I/O module. Communications hardware to connect the controller to a central system, if one will be connected. This could include serial cables, Ethernet cabling to the cabinet, or an external modem and cables. A USB data thumb drive for transporting controller firmware and databases to the controller in the field.* Cabling to connect a conflict monitor or malfunction management unit (MMU)* Cabling for the data connection of an uninterruptable power supply (UPS) system* Data key for transferring controller databases or conflict monitor compatibility matrices.* Serial cable to connect an IQ Link PC to the controller via Port 5, or CAT5 cable to connect to the Ethernet port. Properly jumpered programming card for the conflict monitor or MMU.

Optional items. Not strictly required for operation


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Software Setup Checklist

SOFTWARE SETUP CHECKLIST


The ATC-1000 also needs several data objects to be installed properly within the controller. Without these elements, the controller will not function in a cabinet, even when properly wired and cabled. These are the data objects: A unique MAC address (needed for Ethernet communications). The current MAC address for the internal network card is displayed on the Revisions screen (M AIN M ENU > 1 > D). A unique cabinet address. (Used by IQ Link as a controller identifier.) IQ Link installed on a PC. This PC must have the Windows SNMP Manager service installed in order for IQ Link to function correctly. This service can be installed from your Windows installation disk or CAB files. An IP address for the controller (needed for Ethernet communications). This can be viewed and edited on the IP/Cabinet Address screen (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3). It is labeled as IP Address LOCAL. If an IP gateway address is needed, this is also available on the IP/Cabinet Address screen (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3). It is labeled as IP Address SYSTEM. A default database installed within the controller. A default database can be loaded into active memory from a stored copy using the System Maintenance menu. (M AIN M ENU > 3 > 1). Or, alternatively, you can use the Copy Database commands on the System Maintenance menu to load a database from a memory location, such as a USB key or DataKey, or you can modify the database using a PC connected using IQ Link. Finally, the proper modifications to the controllers database to make it work with your intersections hardware and to logically service your particular intersections phases, ped phases, overlaps, preemption calls, etc. The topics in this chapter describe how to make sure all of the above components are in place before you take the controller out to install it into its cabinet.

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

Recording the MAC Address


The MAC address is a globally unique identifier assigned to each Ethernet network adapter card. The MAC address has been assigned and set at the Peek factory. The current address is displayed as the bottom line of text on the Revisions screen (M AIN M ENU > 1.S TATUS > D.R EVISIONS .)

Important

If the MAC address is not present (or set to all zeros 00-00-0000-00-00), you will need to return the unit to Peek Traffic, so that a valid MAC address can be installed.

Write down the MAC address for the controller and associate it with the location and IP address you will be assigning to this unit.

Setting the Cabinet Address


The firmware of the ATC-1000 controller had its start in the Peek IQ ASTC Central Business District controller, also known as the CBD controller. The CBD controller has a very specific requirement for a cabinet address. At power on, or controller reset, the CBD controller automatically reads the cabinet address. If the controllers internal cabinet address does not match the address provided by the address circuit in the cabinet itself, the controller and the MMU will place the intersection into Flash. This check of the cabinet address is not a NEMA function, so it is not done as part of the ATC-1000 controllers startup. However, the cabinet address is used by the IQ Link software to identify each controller to which it is communicating. The current value of the cabinet address stored in the ATC-1000 controller is displayed as the last four characters on the second row of the standard Controller Timing Status screen. The cabinet address can also be seen, and edited, on the IP/Cabinet Address setup screen (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3). 1. 2. Power on the controller. Navigate to the IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen. (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3)
2.1.5.3 IP/CAB ADDR SETUP

Cabinet Address: 3CC6 IP Address SYSTEM: 128.002.060.198 IP Address LOCAL : 010.247.001.002

Figure 28 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Software Setup Checklist 3. Press the function key and then the E button (Edit). This places the

controller into Edit mode. You can see when you are in Edit mode by the * that appears in the top right corner of the screen, and the fact that one of the data fields on the screen begins flashing between its current value and a set of asterisks. For instance, the Cabinet address field will start flashing between - - - - and * * * * to show that this is the currently selected field. 4. Press the green down arrow to go to the IP Address SYSTEM field. Use the number and arrow keys on the controller to enter the new SYSTEM IP address. The last two octets of the SYSTEM IP address, converted to hexadecimal representation, will automatically update the cabinet address field. While still on this screen, write down this value next to the MAC address for this controller that you noted earlier.

5.

Note

For ATC CBD controllers in the ASTC cabinet setting, the cabinet address is used to indicate the first two octets of the IP address. For instance, a value of FFFF would indicate that the first two numbers of the IP address are 255.255. This is not the case for ATC-1000 controllers.

6.

Once youve set the SYSTEM IP address, press the the value and exit Edit mode.

-E combination to save

This completes the change of the controllers System IP and cabinet addresses.

Configuring the SNMP Manager on the PC


The next step in getting the ATC-1000 controller running is to make sure that the PC where IQ Link will be running has the SNMP Management service activated. To accomplish these steps, you will need to have Administrative access to the computer, and either the Windows installation CDs or the .cab files of the Windows installation.

Note

IQ Link is not strictly required in order to set up and operate the ATC-1000 controller. Unlike the ATC-1000, the ATC CBD controllers are not programmable from the front interface, so IQ Link is required for their setup. In contrast, the ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 can be programmed entirely from the front panel. However, programming and maintaining a network of ATC-1000 controllers can be done more easily and conveniently when used with the IQ Link and IQ Central software tools.

1.

Check to see whether the PC already has the SNMP service configured. The easiest way is by a right click on M Y C OMPUTER and choose M ANAGE .

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

Figure 29 The My Computer management dialog box


2. Double-click on Services and Applications

Figure 30 Services and Applications window


3. Double-click on Services

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Software Setup Checklist

Figure 31 Windows Services list


4. 5. Check to see if the SNMP Service is shown in the list. If it is, proceed to step 7. Otherwise, install it using the following procedure: Open the C ONTROL P ANEL and choose A DD
OR

R EMOVE P ROGRAMS .

Figure 32 Open Add/Remove Programs (or the Vista equivalent)

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running 6. Choose A DD /R EMOVE W INDOWS C OMPONENTS

Figure 33 Choose Add/Remove Windows component


7. Choose M ANAGEMENT
AND

M ONITORING T OOLS and click the D ETAILS button

Figure 34 Management and Monitoring Tools


8. Select the S IMPLE N ETWORK M ANAGEMENT P ROTOCOL and choose OK.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Software Setup Checklist

Figure 35 Select the Simple Network Management Protocol


9. At this point, the PC will request the Windows installation disk required for the SNMP files. Insert the disk, or point the installer at the local copies of your Windows installation .cab files.

10. Complete the installation following the onscreen instructions. 11. Go to the S TART M ENU and open the S ETTINGS list. Then choose the C ONTROL P ANEL . 12. Under A DMINISTRATIVE T OOLS , choose S ERVICES 13. Scroll down and right mouse click on SNMP S ERVICE . 14. Select P ROPERTIES . 15. Select the S ECURITY tab. 16. Make sure public is in the Community field with READ CREATE in the corresponding rights field. If not, then edit the existing field or add a new one. The Community name is case sensitive, be sure to use the lower-case public and not PUBLIC or Public. This completes the installation and configuration of the SNMP service. IQ Link will not function properly when the PC is connected to the controller without this service.

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

Setting the IP Address and Ethernet Settings


This procedure is intended to guide the user through the process of setting the ATC1000 controller IP address, which will then allow the user to connect IQ Link to the controller over the controllers Ethernet ports. This is also an important step if you plan to attach the controller to the central system via the Ethernet ports. 1. 2. Power on the controller. Navigate to the IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen. (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3)
2.1.5.3 IP/CAB ADDR SETUP

Cabinet Address: 3CC6 IP Address SYSTEM: 128.002.060.198 IP Address LOCAL : 010.247.001.002

Figure 36 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen


3. Press the function key and then the E button (Edit). This places the controller into Edit mode. You can see when you are in Edit mode by the E that appears in the top right corner of the screen, and the fact that one of the data fields on the screen begins flashing between its current value and a set of asterisks. For instance, the Cabinet address field will start flashing between - - - - and * * * * to show that this is the currently selected field. 4. 5. Use the down arrow key to move the flashing indicator to the first group of numbers in the IP Address Local field. Use the controllers number keypad to enter the first group. This is a decimal number representing a two digit hex value, so any value between 000 and 255 is acceptable. Use the number keys on the controller to enter the IP system address. This can be any value between 000 and 255, per octet. It needs to be a unique value as far as your copy of IQ Link is concerned. Write down this value next to the MAC address for this controller that you noted earlier.

6.

Note

For ATC CBD controllers in the ASTC cabinet setting, the cabinet address is used to indicate the first two octets of the IP address. For instance, a value of FFFF would indicate that the first two numbers of the IP address are 255.255. This is not the case for ATC-1000 controllers.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Software Setup Checklist 7. 8. If your network environment requires it, set the Default Gateway IP address, Subnet Mask, and DHCP Server address on this screen as well. When you are finished editing values on this screen, press the -E key

combination to save the changes. If you inadvertently entered an invalid value, such as an IP address octet that is outside the range 000 to 255, then the ATC1000 will warn you that the value is incorrect and prompt you to return to the screen to enter a correct value number. That completes the programming of Ethernet/IP settings on the ATC-1000.

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

Loading a Default Database Into the Controller


The process of loading a default database into the ATC-1000 controller couldnt be simpler. The controller stores default databases internally as a backup system. To load one of the two available default databases into the controllers active memory, follow these steps. 1. 2. 3. Power up the ATC-1000. Navigate to the System Maintenance menu, and then select Default Database Load (M AIN M ENU > 3 > 1) Select whether you would like to install a simple 8 phase, dual ring configuration (option 1), or an 8 phase, dual ring with coordination and preemption settings configuration. (option 2). The controller will load the database from memory and transition over to the new operation automatically.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Field Deployment

FIELD DEPLOYMENT
Because of the large number of I/O options, central comms options, and operating parameters of the ATC-1000, the exact method to install the controller into one of your field cabinets is highly dependent on your local procedures and technical requirements. The basic process to install the controller in the field follows these steps: 1. (Optional) Power up the unit in the office, connecting it to a PC running IQ Link and program the controller with the intersection-specific database settings it needs. Or, alternatively, you could load the programming onto the controller by plugging in a USB thumbdrive containing the database and powering up the unit. Load the database using the USB menu, which will appear automatically. Ensure that all circuit breakers in the cabinet power distribution panel are off. Ensure that the input power is connected to the cabinet power panel and the appropriate buss bar. The cabinet must be wired properly for the intersection. Ensure that all Signal light connections and detector input connections are properly made in the cabinet, including any necessary pedestrian inputs. Place the controller onto a shelf in the cabinet. Plug in the cabinet connectors to the I/O module of the ATC-1000. This could be from one to four cables, depending on the type of I/O module and cabinet you are using. If you are using a TS2 Type 1 I/O module, Connect the SDLC communication cable from the cabinets MMU panel to the controllers Port 1 connector. Ensure that the connector clips on the communication cable properly latches on to the locking blocks. If the MMU has not already been set up for this installation, program or jumper the appropriate co-phases on the MMUs programming card. Reinsert the programming card into the MMU. Turn on all circuit breakers in the cabinet. For normal three-color operation, check that the SIGNAL AUTO/FLASH switch of the cabinet is in the AUTO position and that the SIGNAL ON/OFF switch is in the ON position. Verify that the ATC-1000 powers on and shows all six front panel power LEDs glowing green. Verify that the power up sequence clears successfully and the unit immediately shows the 1.1 Timing Status screen. Verify that the Heartbeat LED is flashing steadily at approximately 4 flashes per second.

2.

3.

4. 5. 6.

7.

8.

9.

10. Observe the operation of the intersection signals and detection inputs to verify that the intersection is operating as expected. This completes the general field deployment process.

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Chapter 2 Quick Start: Getting a Unit Up and Running

PROGRAMMING A BASIC INTERSECTION


Because of the numerous operating modes and options on a modern ATC controller, the programming of the controller can be a complex process. These are the basic steps for setting up the parameters to run a normal intersection. These parameters can be programmed into IQ Link or IQ Central without having the controller connected, then once the parameters are double checked and verified, these can be loaded to the controller either over a Central-Local connection (for IQ Central), or via a USB thumb drive transfer or serial connection from IQ Link. Or you can bypass all that and simply program the controller from the front panel using the keypad. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Load a Default Database that is similar to yours. (M AIN M ENU > 3 > 1) Define which phases are enabled. (Main Menu > 2 > 2 > 1) Define how the controller should start up operating the intersection from a power off situation. (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 1) Setup the Flash mode youd like to use for the intersection (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 1 > 2) Set the Green times for each phase (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 2 > 2) Set the Clearance times (Yellow and Red) for each phase (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 2 > 3) Set the Pedestrian times (Walk and Ped Clearance) for each Ped phase (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 2 > 4) Set up the vehicle detectors and link them to phases (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 5 > 1) Set up pedestrian detectors and link them to Ped phases (M AIN M ENU > 2 > 5 > 5)

These are the basic settings for the intersection. There are featured capabilities that can be configured using the rest of the ATC-1000 programming screens (or alternately, using IQ Link or IQ Central as a programming interface.)

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface

This chapter describes, the keypad and front panel display interface of the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed: An overview of the menu and status screen environment, on page 56. Navigating in the Menus, on page 56. Using the Help System, on page 57. Firmware flowchart, on page 58. Entering the Menu system, on page 62.

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Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface

OVERVIEW
When the ATC-1000 Controller is powered on, it will go through a startup sequence. After it displays its splash screen, showing the Peek Traffic logo and some information about the firmware, the screen then shows the standard Controller Status screen. The controllers menu system can be accessed using the Main Menu button (MNU). Status screens cannot be edited. For more details about how to navigate around in the menu system, see the next topic.

NAVIGATING IN THE ENVIRONMENT


To navigate around in the ATC-1000 Controllers menu system requires a few, consistent set of keys. These are the rules: To switch from the Controller Status screen to the Main Menu, just press the M AIN M ENU button. To switch to the Main Menu from anywhere in the menu system, press the M AIN M ENU button. To switch from any menu back to the Controller status screen, just press HME (Home). To select an item on a menu, press the number corresponding to that item in the menu. To move upward in the menus structure, press the P REV M ENU button. When in parameter screens with multiple pages, using the P AGE U P and P AGE D OWN screens to change between the pages. Use the P REV M ENU button to exit from the parameter screens. Some parameter screens have two dimensions of screens (e.g. TSP Run Configuration Screens: Configurations 1 through 8, and Runs 1 through 8.) The first dimension is selected using Page Up and Page Down, the second dimension is selected using the numbered keys on the keypad. Help Topics - To see help on a given topic, go to the screen or menu concerning that issue and press the H ELP button. If any help exists for the topic, a special help screen will appear. To exit the help screen, press either the ESC button or the HLP button again.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Using the Help System

USING THE HELP SYSTEM


The Help system within the ATC-1000 Controller consists of a set of context-sensitive screens that appear on the display when you press the HLP (Help) button. The system shows you whatever help is available for the parameters that are currently shown on screen. When in viewing mode, you will see the help screen for the entire menu or topic, if one is available. In addition, when in Edit mode and displaying a screen of settings, the help system will display the information related to the currently selected parameter. To exit out of any of the help screens, press either the HLP or CLR/ESC buttons.

Note

Pressing HLP from the Controller status screen displays the software copyright and version information.

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Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface

FIRMWARE FLOW CHART


The following chart provides an overview of the basic theory on how the ATC controller selects the traffic pattern to use in the intersection.

Figure 37 Firmware flowchart

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Firmware Flow Chart After going though its startup tests and startup flash routine, it enters a loop in which it checks to see if there is an external or override pattern set, if not, then it looks for a valid pattern for the current date and time, and if there is no valid pattern, it falls back on its default settings for use in Free run mode. If there is at this point not a valid free run pattern defined, it will run the soft flash pattern, or absent even that last fallback position, go to a hard flash mode.

Top-Down View of the Menu System


There are several on screen menu systems available from the front panel of the ATC-1000 controller. Pressing the button and the MNU (Utilities) buttons together will open the ATC TS2 Utilities Menu system, as shown in Figure 38.

Figure 38 Utilities Menus


Another menu system that can be used on the ATC-1000 is the USB Menu, which appears whenever a USB thumbdrive is inserted into the controllers USB port. The menu functions as shown in

Figure 39 USB Menu


The diagram on the next page (Figure 40) shows the locations of all of the screens in the Main Menu system, including menus, status screens, and parameter screens. Commands that open one or more parameter screens indicate the number of parameter ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 59

Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface screens next to the box. Commands that perform a function as soon as you press the button are shown in blue. Commands in light gray are not yet implemented. This menu diagram is also displayed on the inside of the back cover of this manual.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Firmware Flow Chart

Figure 40 Top-down view of the ATC-1000 Menu System

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Chapter 3 Introduction to the Interface

ENTERING THE MENU SYSTEM


There are three kinds of screens in the ATC-1000 Controllers menu system: menu screens, status screens, and parameter screens. Menu screens are used to navigate between screens. Status screens show information about the controller and the program running within the controller that cannot be edited directly. Parameter screens show the settings that are stored in the controller and used to run the intersection. The values on parameter screens can be changed using the keyboard and LCD display interface, if one first switches to Edit Mode. The top screens of the whole system, however, are the Main Menu screen and the Timing status screen.
MAIN MENU 1. STATUS 2. PROGRAMMING 3. SYSTEM MAINTENANCE 4. LOGS

HOME button

MENU button

1.1 TS22 Tue 21-Mar-2006. P1:OK TIMING STATUS 08:47:11 3CC6 R1 02 EXT 00.0 M1 024 FDW 005 PRE INP R2 06 GRN REST PRE KBD FDW 005 R3 RED REST DW R4 RED REST DW CALL STATUS 1111111 1234567890123456 CRD CMD:254 VEH SYS CMD: 0 PED C C C C TOD CMD: 1 PHS

Figure 41 Navigating between the Main Menu and Controller Status screen
(The Controller Status screen is detailed on page 65.)

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 4 Status Displays

This chapter describes the Status Displays of the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Overview of the Status menus, on page 64. The Controller status screen, on page 65. The Inputs status screen, on page 67. The Outputs status screen, on page 70. The Coordination status screen, on page 71. The Time of Day status screen, on page 73. The Preemption status screen, on page 74. The Detectors status screen, on page 76. The SDLC & FIO status screen, on page 77. The Alarms status screens, on page 78. The Overlaps status screen, on page 80. The MMU status screen, on page 80. The Transit Signal Priority status screens, on page 82. The Abs Zero status screen, on page 86. The Revisions screen, on page 87.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

OVERVIEW OF THE STATUS SCREENS


The ATC-1000 controller has fourteen status screens in twelve areas, each of which shows a particular set of critical data on a single screen of information.

Status Menu
The contents of the Status menu are slightly different than the other commands and screens described in this menu system: they are the results of the controllers operation rather than inputs into the controller. The status screens are described in more detail in the next section. (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS )
1 1. controller 2. INPUTS 3. OUTPUTS 4. COORDINATION 5. TIME OF DAY 6. PREEMPTION 7. DETECTORS STATUS MENU 8. SDLC & FIO STATUS 9. ALARMS 0. OVERLAPS A. MMU B. T.S.P C. ABS ZERO D. REVISIONS

Figure 42 Status Options available on the ATC-1000 Controller

Navigating the Status Screens


After one has accessed any of the individual Status screens, these are the navigation options: U P + button Go to the next higher status screen. Think of the status screens as a vertical stack of displays, with the 1.1 Controller Status screen at the top of the stack, and the 1.D Revision Information screen at the bottom. DWN button Go to the next lower status screen. MNU Return to the Main Menu of the menu system HME Return to the top of the Status display stack, to the 1.1 Controller Status screen PRV Go back to the previous screen you just visited.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Status Screen

CONTROLLER STATUS SCREEN


The Controller Status screen (or the Runtime Status Screen) is the default display whenever the controller is running. (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > 1.C ONTROLLER ) or, you can always call up this status screen by pressing the HME button. Unlike the other Status screens, which will return to the Status menu when you select PRV, the Controller Status screen does not respond to PRV. Instead, you need to press the MNU button to return to the Menu system. This is a result of this screen being the default status screen for the controller. Below is a sample of the main run time Status. Beginning on the top left of the display we see the number 1.1. All of the screens in the ATC-1000 show the screen number from the Menu Structure. From the Main Menu, 1 is Status, and the first Status screen is #1 or Screen 1.1 After the screen number, we see the I/O type is shown as TS21 which represents TS2 type 1. Next is the Day of the Week, Thu short for Thursday, next is the Day of the Month, Month, and Year and a . to indicate that DST (Daylight Savings Time) is active. 10-Sep-2009. Following the date, is the Port 1 status indicator P1:OK (or Err if there is a problem). P1:OK is the Port 1 SDLC Communications status for a TS2/Type 1 ATC, but in a TS2/Type 2 ATC, the P1:OK message indicates the communications status between the front panel/engine board module and whatever I/O board is installed in the ATC. See page 77, SDLC & FIO Status Screens for more details.
1.1 TS22 Tue 27-Jan-2010. P1:OK TIMING STATUS 08:53:22 00F7 R1 02 EXT 00.0 M1 005 DW PRE INP R2 06 GRN REST PRE KBD DW R3 RED REST DW R4 RED REST DW CALL STATUS 1111111 1234567890123456 CRD CMD:254 VEH C C C SYS CMD: 0 PED C C C C TOD CMD: 1 PHS

Figure 43 Sample Controller Status screen Phase Pattern


The second line from the top is the static text TIMING STATUS and the clock in HH:MM:SS (24 hour time) 16:51:20. The four letter string at the end of line 2 (00F7 in this case) is the cabinet address for this controller. The cabinet address is the 2 lower octets of the controllers IP address, displayed in HEX. In this example, the controllers IP address is 192.168.0.247 so the lower 2 octets are shown as 00F7.

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65

Chapter 4 Status Displays The center of the screen shows the timing status of all 4 rings. Both vehicle and pedestrian timers are shown. On the right side of the screen, to the right of the R1 and R2 indicators, the two PRE lines indicate the current activity on the 6 NEMA Preempt runs. If a Preempt input is active (grounded), the run number will appear to the right. PRE KBD indicates that a manual call has been placed for preemption from the front panel of this controller. This is done from the Preemption Status screen (M AIN M ENU > 1.S TATUS > 6.P REEMPTION ) That is also the only place where this kind of preemption call can be cleared. Call Status for all 16 vehicle and pedestrian phases as well as the N next decision phases complete the left side of the display. In this example there are vehicle calls on phases 1, 3 and 7 as well as ped demand on phases 2, 4, 6 and 8. Pattern selection/hierarchy is shown as follows: CRD CMD:254 (Coord Operational Mode 0-255) SYS CMD: 6 (System Pattern Control 0-255) TOD CMD: 11 (TOD scheduler pattern) NTCIP supports 255 patterns. In the Peek ATC-1000, patterns 1-48 are the NEMA actuated patterns. Each pattern consists of a cycle (between 30-255 seconds), an offset (between 0-254 seconds) and a split table number. There are 16 split tables supported by the ATC-1000. Pattern numbers 101-228 are used to call an Interval based timing/signal plan. The ATC-1000 supports 24 Interval based timing plans and each timing plan supports 4 signal plans. There are 2 patterns that are dedicated to specific functionality. Pattern 254 = FREE operation and Pattern 255 = AUTO FLASH operation. The pattern selection using NTCIP has 3 layers. The bottom of the plan selection hierarchy layer is the NTCIP TOD scheduler. The scheduler calls Action items at HH:MM change points and the action item points to a pattern from 1-255. The TOD scheduler can be overridden by the next layer up in the hierarchy, the System Pattern Control. This object can call any of the 1-255 patterns. When a set of the System Pattern Control object is performed by the central management station, the controller loads the unit backup timer from the database. The unit backup timer can hold a value between 0 and 65, 535 seconds. The System Pattern Control can then be overridden by the Coord Operational Mode object. Unlike the System Pattern Control, the Coord Operational Mode is not loading the unit backup timer. In the example above we see that the TOD scheduler is calling for pattern #11, the System Pattern Control is calling for 6 and the Coord Operational Mode is picking pattern 254 (FREE). So regardless of the NTCIP TOD scheduler or the System Pattern Control values, the controller will run the Coord Operational Mode pattern 254. The coordination command (CRD CMD:), system command (SYS CMD:), and TOD command (TOD CMD:) messages can be followed by lower-case letter codes. The following table indicates their meaning:

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Status Screen Table 6 Command code modifiers on the Status screen Code Meaning
Coordination has an error, causing it to run FREE Coordination is in transition, or offset seeking Coordination is in synchronization (i.e. is running correctly)

f t s

Pretimed Version of Controller Status Screen


If you are running a pretimed pattern (pattern numbers 101 to 228) then the controller status screen shows a different set of information.
1.1 TS22 P1:OK PRETIMED PLAN OFLNE CALL STATUS 1111111 TP:01 SP:01 OFS:016 1234567890123456 M000 PL002 025.0 DET INT:06 00.0 03.2 VEH PED CHN DATE Tue 27-Apr-2010. TIME 16:11:21 CRD CMD:101t SYS CMD: 0 ACTIVE 1 2 3 4 5 6 TOD CMD : 0 PREEMPT

FFFF

Figure 44 Sample Controller Status screen Pretimed Pattern


The status screen is divided into sections with different functions, as shown in Figure 45.
Plan and interval timing information: TP = Timing plan, SP = Signal plan, OFS = Offset time (M and L/PL items are internal stats). Time in bottom right corner (025.0 in this example) is the accumulated split time for the cycle. Interval #, Minimum time counter, interval counter Signal Plan modifiers Current pattern as defined by coordination (CRD), System command (SYS), or Time-of-Day schedule (TOD) 1.1 TS22 P1:OK PRETIMED PLAN OFLNE CALL STATUS 1111111 TP:01 SP:01 OFS:016 1234567890123456 M000 PL002 025.0 DET INT:06 02.6 07.1 VEH X PED X SEMI-ACTUATED SKIPOK CHN DATE Tue 27-Apr-2010. TIME 16:11:21 CRD CMD:101t SYS CMD: 0 ACTIVE 1 2 3 4 5 6 TOD CMD : 0 PREEMPT Call status for vehicular and pedestrian detectors

Signal outputs Controllers current internal date & time

FFFF

Cabinet address

Preemption call status

Figure 45 Sample Controller Status screen Pretimed Pattern - Details


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Chapter 4 Status Displays

INPUTS STATUS SCREEN


The Input Status screen shows the state of all of the important input signals coming into the controller. These include the vehicle and pedestrian calls, force-offs, overrides, ring inputs and global controller input parameters. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 2.I NPUTS )

1.2 INPUTS TS2 PG1of1 PHASE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 VEH O X X X X X X X X X X PED O X X X X X X X X X X VEH H X X F/O VEH C PED C RING INPUTS 1 2 3 4 MACHINE INPUTS STOP TIME...... MIN RCL.X FORCE OFF...... WRM..... MAX 2.......... CNA 1... MAX INHIBIT....X X X X CNA 2... PED RECYCLE....X X MCE..... RED REST....... INT ADV. OMIT RED CLEAR. EXT ST..

Figure 46 Sample Inputs Status Screen


The screen is divided into 3 layers of Input: Phase (effecting only that phase) , Ring (effects any phase active in a ring) and Machine (effecting all phases) 1.2 INPUTS TS2 PG1of1 PHASE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 VEH O X X X X X X X X X X PED O X X X X X X X X X X VEH H X X F/O VEH C PED C RING INPUTS 1 2 3 4 MACHINE INPUTS STOP TIME...... MIN RCL.X FORCE OFF...... WRM..... MAX 2.......... CNA 1... MAX INHIBIT....X X X X CNA 2... PED RECYCLE....X X MCE..... RED REST....... INT ADV. OMIT RED CLEAR. EXT ST..

phase data

ring data

machine inputs

Figure 47 Sections of the Inputs Status screen

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Inputs Status Screen The Input screen is used to troubleshoot and validate the state of the controller inputs. The Ring inputs are fairly self-explanatory, but some of the other abbreviations may cause confusion. VEH O Vehicle Omit input for this phase PED O Pedestrian Omit input for this phase VEH H Vehicle Hold input for this phase F/O Force-Off input for this phase VEH C Vehicle Call on this phase. Could be the result of a recall placed on the phase PED C Pedestrian Call on this phase, may be a result of a recall placed on the phase MIN RCL Minimum recall input WRM Walk Rest Modifier input CNA 1 & 2 Call to Non-Actuated 1 and 2 inputs MCE Manual Control Enabled. INT ADV Interval Advance input EXT ST External Start input

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

OUTPUTS STATUS SCREEN


The Outputs Status screen shows the output signal states of the ATC-1000 controller. These include the red, yellow, green, walk, dont walk, pedestrian clear, phase next and phase on outputs for each of the 16 possible phases being run by this controller. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 3.O UTPUTS )


OUTPUTS

1.3.1 PHASE RED YELLOW GREEN PED DW PED CLR WALK P NEXT P ON

PG1of2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

Figure 48 Outputs Status Screen


Use the UP+ and DWN buttons to move between the two Output Status screens.
1.3.2 VEH OVL 1 2 3 4 RED X X X X YELLOW GREEN PED OVL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 DONT W X X X X X X X X CLEAR WALK 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CHANNEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 RED X X X X X X X X X YELLOW GREEN X X X OUTPUTS PG2of2

Figure 49 Page 2 of the Outputs Status screens

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Coordination Status Screen

COORDINATION STATUS SCREEN


The Coordination status screen shows the states of all of the phases, permissives, and holds and force-offs, as well as global coordination parameters such as the local cycle time, the offset from the coordination signal, the current pattern being run, and the coordination status. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 4.C OORDINATION )

1.4 COORDINATION STATUS PG1OF1 Local :000 Master:000 Ptn:254 Spl: 00 Offset:000 Status:Free Deltas R 0 0 0 0 C 0 Sums R 0 0 0 0 C 0 Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Color :r Y r r r Y r r r r r r r r r r Perm : Hold-FO: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Patn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Curr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Cmnd 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 POZ1 00 POZ2 00 Tsp Phases 0 0 0 0 Run 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Status R1W 0 R2W 0

Figure 50 Sample Coordination Status Screen


Local Local Cycle time. The three digits to the right of Local: is the Local Cycle time in seconds. Master Master Cycle time, in seconds. If Master and Local times count up to the currently commanded cycle length, reset to zero and start counting again, the ATC-1000 is in Coordination. Ptn The currently commanded pattern being run. Spl The current split being run. Offset Offset is the currently selected Offset being run. In the example above, 000 for the Offset usually indicates the first intersection on the coordinated corridor. Status The Status label in the top middle of the screen shows the current status of phase based operation from a coordination perspective. This field can display any of these values: Free No coordination Transfer Waiting for Green termination 1 Cycle Less than 1 cycle since the controller got in sync In sync In sync for more than 1 cycle Seeking Not in sync but attempting to achieve sync Fault A phase with a call didnt serve for two cycles Retry Returning to coordination after a Fault Bad Plan Invalid coordination pattern detected Failure Coordination has failed due to two consecutive Faults TSP Active Controller is cycling to TSP phases as soon as possible via green reduction and green extension ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 71

Chapter 4 Status Displays TSP Recovery Correcting the offset error resulting from a TSP Active event, by adding or reducing splits. TSP Balance Correcting the offset error resulting from a TSP Active event by extending non-TSP phases and reducing TSP phases. TSP L0 Pending Idle TSP has completed and the controller is now awaiting the next Local Zero to return to in sync operation. Deltas R The split deltas (time differences, in seconds) for Rings 1 through 4, projected for the current cycle, after the most recent split adjustment. Deltas C The cycle deltas (time differences, in seconds) for the current cycle, after the most recent split adjustment. Sums R, C These are the accumulated delta times for Rings 1 through 4 and the current cycle. At the local Zero, the current Deltas are added to the sums and the delta is reset to zero. Color Current color shown by the phase. (G=Green/Dont Walk, W=Green/Walk, Y=Yellow, r=Red (Off), R=Timing red clearance, P=Flashing Dont Walk (Ped clearance)) Perm Shows the current permissive status for the phase (V=Vehicle permitted/Peds not permitted, C=Coordinated phase , B=Both vehicles and peds permitted ) Hold-FO Shows whether a Hold or a Force-Off are currently active for this phase (H=Hold, F=Force-Off) Patn Shows the split times, in tenths of seconds, for the current TOD pattern Curr Shows the split times, in tenths of seconds, for the currently running pattern Cmnd Shows the split times, in tenths of seconds, for a centrally commanded pattern P0Z1, P0Z2 These are two-digit Hex representations of the TSP inputs. P0Z1 represents inputs 1 through 8. P0Z2 represents inputs 17 through 24. TSP Phases Phases receiving TSP activity Run Status Shows the status of the TSP runs, if any are enabled. Uses the following letter codes: R Request r Reservice inhibit S Success M Removed C Clearance failure F Detector failure inhibit D Delay timing inhibit E Extend timing O Override inhibit A Actively extending TSP phase green I Invalid with call R1W, R2W Ring 1 and Ring 2 walk timers

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Time of Day Status Screen

TIME OF DAY STATUS SCREEN


The TOD Status screen shows critical details about the controllers operation when it is controlled by a TOD schedule. (M AIN
1.5
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 5.T IME

OF

D AY )

Time of Day Status

Time : 09:03:10 Date : Tue 21-Mar-2006. Local Cycle Zero : Current command : MANUAL FREE Day Plan Status : 1 Action Number : 1 Control Plan : 254 Backup Timer : 0 TSP Action Plan : 0 Auxillary Outputs: ---Special Function : -------Commanded Action Mask : --X-----

Figure 51 Sample Time of Day Status Screen


This screen is helpful in determining if the ATC-1000 is tracking the TOD schedule correctly. In addition to the Time functions, this display shows each time the coordinator passes over the Local Cycle Zero point in the cycle. Day Plan Status The number of the Day Plan currently in effect. Action Number The TOD Action within the current Day Plan that is currently in effect. Current Control Plan The pattern number currently running in the controller. Note that this pattern could be the result of the Time of Day schedule, coordinated operational mode, a central override, or central system control. If any of the objects under the backup timer have been set, the NTCIP Backup Timer will shown the current value as it is decremented (in tenths of a second). The current TSP Action plan is displayed in the bottom four rows, along with the current status of the Auxiliary and Special Function outputs that are under TOD control. Commanded Action Mask The Time of Day programming screens allow the operator to set up eight commanded actions, which are all TOD Override commands assigned to that command action number. An X in these slots on the Time of Day Status screen indicates if any of the eight TOD commanded actions are being requested at the current time.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

PREEMPTION STATUS SCREENS


This screen shows the status of any preemption activity currently occurring. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 6.P REEMPTION )

1.6 PREEMPT STATUS Active Preempt: 00 Inputs: Key Inputs: 2 Ring Status: R1: .. R2: .. R3: .. R4: .. Min Dur: 00000 Max Pres: 00000 Min Dwl: 00000 Inp Del : 00000 Dwl Red: 00000 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CHANNEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 RED X X X X X X X X X X YELLOW GREEN X X

Figure 52 Sample Preemption Status Screen


Active Preempt If no preemption is active, it displays 00. If a preemption is currently running, this shows the number of the preemption run being serviced Key Inputs This array of six characters shows if any manual preemption keypad inputs have been placed on this screen. This screen can be used to place a manual preemption call into the controller. Press a number between 1 and 6 on the front panel keypad to place the call. The correponding number will appear next to Key Inputs. (It will also show up as a number next to PRE KBD on the Controller Status screen (Either HME or M AIN M ENU > 1.S TATUS > 1.C ONTROLLER ) But be aware that this is placing an active preemption call into the controller. On this Preemption Status screen, the number keys toggle these calls on and off. So press the number again to clear the preemption call. Or, if youve place multiple preemption calls here, press the CLR button to clear all of them.

Caution

Keypad preemption calls will remain active until they are cleared on this screen, or until the power is cycled on the controller.

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Preemption Status Screens Ring Status Shows the current status of the four rings during the preemption run. Each ring can show one of these eight status messages: Table 7 Ring Status messages on the Preempt Status screen Code
IG IY IR TG TY TR DL EX

Meaning
Initial Clearance Green. (Clearing non-preemption phases) Initial Clearance Yellow (Clearing non-preemption phases) Initial Clearance Red (Clearing non-preemption phases) Track Clearance Green Track Clearance Yellow Track Clearance Red Dwell Clearing to Exit phases

Minimum Duration Shows the current value, in seconds, for the preemption runs Min Duration timer Maximum Presence Shows the current value, in seconds, for the preemption runs Max Presence timer Minimum Dwell Shows the current value, in seconds, for the preemption runs Min Dwell timer Input Delay Shows the current value, in seconds, for the preemption runs Input Delay timer. Channel color intervals are displayed for convenient observation of the preemption run.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

DETECTORS STATUS SCREENS


The Detectors Status screen shows the current state of all 64 detector inputs, as well as if any of the detectors have been placed into a failed state by the detection input diagnostics. An X under each detector number indicates that that detector is either active or has been judged to have failed. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 7.D ETECTORS )

1.7 DETECTOR STATUS ACTIVE FAILED

PG1OF2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 X X X X X X X X 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2

ACTIVE FAILED

Figure 53 Sample Detector Status Screen


For details on the detection input diagnostics, refer to page 165. Use the D WN button to see the status for detector inputs 33 through 64.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

SDLC & FIO Status Screens

SDLC & FIO STATUS SCREENS


This screen is helpful in determining if the ATC-1000 has any errors on the SDLC (Synchronous Data Link Control) communication port NEMA Port 1, meaning communications during NEMA TS/2 Type 1 operation through cabinet Bus Interface Units (BIUs). (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 8.SDLC S TATUS )

Terminal & Facilities BIUs Detector BIUs

MMU Front panel to I/O Module communications

1.8 SDLC & Field I/O STATUS SDLC OVR:00000 CRC:00000 T1T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 T2T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 T3T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 T4T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 D1T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 D2T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 D3T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 D4T00000000 R00000000 n00000000 MUT00000000 R00000000 n00000000 F000550179 R00183393 n00366784

t00 t00 t00 t00 t00 t00 t00 t00 t00

r00 r00 r00 r00 r00 r00 r00 r00 r00

Error counts on each BIU communications line: T = Transmit R = Received N = Not Acknowledged (NAK)

t00 r00

Figure 54 SDLC Status Screens


At any failure of the ATC controller, this screen should be viewed and the result documented for analysis. SDLC OVR Number of SDLC overruns, or in other words, number of times the data flow into the controller has exceeded its capability to handle the flow. CRC Number of Cyclical Redundancy Check errors. CRC is a method to check that the data sent is the same as the data received by encoding a piece of data within a packet that is dependent on the contents of the rest of the packet. A CRC error tells the device to request a retransmission of the data packet until it is received without such an error. A high count in this field indicates that the transmission line is noisy, which could indicate interference or a mechanical problem with the wire or connectors. The rows show communications statistics for the four Terminal and Facility BIUs, the four Detector rack BIUs, and one row for communications with the MMU data. This data is cleared on power up. The columns show the numbers of transmissions (T), packets received (R), NO responses (N), and then errors on transmitted(t) or received(r) packets.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

ALARMS STATUS SCREENS


There are two Alarm Status screens, available from the Alarm Status menu. (M AIN
1.9
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 9.A LARMS )


ALARM STATUS MENU

1. UNIT ALARM STATUS 1 & 2 2. SHORT ALARM STATUS

Figure 55 Alarms/Event Status Menu


Option 1 will display the first of the Alarm Status displays.
1.9.1 ALARM STATUS 1 & 2

STOP TIME...... EXT START...... RESPONSE FAULT. POWER RESTART..X COORD ACTIVE... LOCAL FREE.....X LOCAL FLASH.... COORD FAIL..... CYCLE FAULT.... COORD FAULT....

Figure 56 Alarm Status display


This screen shows the status of NTCIP Status data objects (These are called unit Alarm Status 1 and unit Alarm Status 2 in the controller database and in standard NTCIP data structures.) An X next to one of these binary data objects indicates that that alarm has been triggered at some point. Most are cleared as soon as the alarm condition ends, however some items latch, or remain on until some event clears them. The Power Restart bit will stay active until a read from the central system takes place. The Response Fault bit is triggered by a NEMA TS2 Port 1 fault. Option 2 will display the Short Alarm Status display, as shown in Figure 57.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Alarms Status Screens


1.9.2 SHORT ALARM STATUS CRITICAL ALARM..... NON CRITICAL ALARM. DETECTOR FAULT..... LOCAL OVERRIDE..... LOCAL CYCLE ZERO... T AND F FLASH...... PREEMPT............

Figure 57 Short Alarm Status screen


This screen represents the data stored in the NTCIP database object called short Alarm Status. Often, central system software polls the controller for this data on a second-bysecond basis. Critical Alarm This is raised as a result of the Stop Time input going HIGH NON-Critical Alarm This is the Cabinet Door switch Detector Fault One or more detectors have been found to be faulty by the detector input diagnostics. (Refer to page 165 for details.) Local Override MCE (Manual Control Enabled) active Local Cycle Zero This bit is set each time the controller passes the top of a new cycle T and F Flash Terminals and Facilities flash mode Preempt The controller has received a preemption input and is currently serving a preemption run

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

OVERLAPS STATUS SCREEN


The Overlaps Status screen provides a simple status display of the four vehicle overlap phases and eight pedestrian overlap phases of the controller. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > 0.O VERLAPS ) OVERLAP STATUS PG1of1

1.0 VEH: 1 OFF 2 OFF 3 OFF 4 OFF PED: 1 DONT 2 DONT 3 DONT 4 DONT 5 DONT 6 DONT 7 DONT 8 DONT

WALK WALK WALK WALK WALK WALK WALK WALK

Figure 58 Overlaps Status Screen

MMU STATUS SCREENS


The MMU Status screen shows the current basic phase information along with data provided by the cabinets conflict monitor (CMU) or Malfunction Management Unit (MMU), whichever is installed in your setup. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > A.MMU)


MMU INPUTS

1.A.1

PG1of2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 CHANNEL 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 RED : YELLOW: GREEN : CVM : X 24V1: X 24V2: X 24V_INHIB: RESET: R-EN: CONF: RED FAIL : DIAGF: MINC: P1TO: O RELAY : RESP TO FAIL: STARTUP CALL: LOCAL FLASH :

Figure 59 MMU Status screen

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

MMU Status Screens This screen shows the current data from the MMUs frame 129 response. During any fault troubleshooting of the ATC-1000, this screen should be viewed and the content recorded for future analysis. CVM Controller Voltage Monitor or Fault Monitor 24V1 +24V DC Monitor 1 24V2 +24V DC Monitor 2 24V_INHIB +24V DC Inhibit Input Reset Reset button or input R-EN Red Enabled input CONF Conflict fault detected, indicating some combination of incompatible greens or yellows occurred at the same time for a period longer than the allowable recognition time. Red Fail Red Fail flag. No red signal visible in preset amount of time. One or more channels has no indications at all above the required signal thresholds. DIAGF Diagnostic failure. A software diag failure indicates the unit has failed its program-based diagnostics. A hardware diag failure indicates that the controller is not toggling the watchdog circuit. MINC Multiple indications failure. This is a result of more than one signal being ON within the same channel, e.g. both yellow and red are being displayed on channel 2. P1TO Port 1 Type 0 failure. In certain modes, the MMU must be in constant communications with the controller. If the MMU does not receive a Type 0 command frame from the controller within 300 milliseconds, a Port 1 failure will be declared O RELAY Output relay fault indicates that this relay is de-energized, which could indicate that the MMU has lost power, or the MMU has placed the cabinet in flash mode. RESP TO FAIL An X next to this message indicates that the CMU/MMU responded immediately to a detected fault. STARTUP CALL The MMU has commanded the controller to restart, by sending the Startup Call bit for two or more consecutive messages. LOCAL FLASH The monitors local flash switch has been turned ON. This is usually the input used for a Police Flash button or keyswitch n the intersection cabinet. The second screen of MMU status information is currently blank.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

TSP STATUS SCREENS


The Input and Output TSP Status screens can be used to monitor the operation of the ATC-1000s Transit Signal Priority function. The setup and functioning of TSP is described in detail in Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority, starting on page 267. (M AIN
MENU

> 1. S TATUS > B. T.S.P)

1.B Transit Signal Priority Status 1. Inputs 2. Outputs

Figure 60 TSP Status Screens TSP Input Status Screen


Selecting option 1 will open the TSP Input Status screen. (M AIN
MENU

> 1.S TATUS > B. T.S.P > 1.I NPUTS )

1.B.1 Inputs Runs

TSP Input Status 111111111122222 123456789012345678901234 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

R=Request A=SplitExtn T=Truncate F=Fail S=Success M=Removed D=Delay E=Extend C=ClearFail r=Reservice O=Override 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ph r G r r r G r r r r r r r r r r TSP Phases: 0 0 Status: Idle 0 0

Figure 61 TSP Input Status screen


Inputs 1-24 represent the status of the raw TSP inputs, as follows:

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

TSP Status Screens Table 8 TSP Inputs Input


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Function
Run 1 check-in/constant call Run 2 check-in/constant call Run 3 check-in/constant call Run 4 check-in/constant call Run 5 check-in/constant call Run 6 check-in/constant call Run 7 check-in/constant call Run 8 check-in/constant call Run 1 check-out Run 2 check-out Run 3 check-out Run 4 check-out Run 5 check-out Run 6 check-out Run 7 check-out Run 8 check-out Run 1 advance cancel Run 2 advance cancel Run 3 advance cancel Run 4 advance cancel Run 5 advance cancel Run 6 advance cancel Run 7 advance cancel Run 8 advance cancel

An 'X' means that the input is active. A space ( ') means that the input is inactive. R UNS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 This represent the status of each TSP run, with a single character code showing its current state: (space) = input inactive or disabled. Disabling could be caused by any of these three situations: No TSP Action Plan, TSP Enabled is OFF, or TSP Run Enabled is OFF. R = valid request A = active extending beyond normal point T = truncating non-tsp phases F = failed due to fail timer expiration S = success, request removed during extension M = removed before extension D = delay timing E = extend timing C = clearance fail, tsp call present when tsp phase turns off r = reservice inhibit O = preempt override ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 83

Chapter 4 Status Displays P H This row of values indicates the current phase color: G = green/steady dont walk Y = yellow R = red clearance W = green/walk P = green/ped clearance R = phase off TSP P HASES : 0 0 0 from all contributing Runs. 0 These represent the current compatible TSP phases

Status The TSP input screen shows a general TSP status message on the bottom line. It will always show one of these five messages: Table 9 TSP Status messages on the TSP Input Status screen Message
Active Balance

Description
TSP Active - Currently reducing intermediate phases splits and/or extending TSP phases split TSP is currently working to correct a timing offset by performing Split Balancing. (See the Mode 2 topic under TSP Action Plans, starting on page 279.) TSP is not currently active TSP action has been completed and is waiting for Local Zero TSP is currently correcting the offset error by extending or reducing splits. (See Recovery Strategy, on page 279.)

Idle Idle Pending Recovery

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

TSP Status Screens

TSP Output Status Screen


Choosing option 2 on the TSP Status menu displays the TSP Output Status screen. (M AIN MENU > 1.S TATUS > B.T.S.P > 2.O UTPUTS )
1.B.2 TSP Output Status 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Outputs: Q Jumps:

Programmed Splits(1-16): 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 TSP Splits(1-16): 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Figure 62 TSP Output Status screen


Outputs 1-8 represent 'confirmation' outputs for each run. Outputs 9 and 10 are currently not used. Q Jumps These represent the six queue jump outputs Programmed Splits These represent the 'normally' running Time of Day pattern splits TSP Splits These represent the TSP-calculated splits times.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

ABS ZERO STATUS SCREEN


The ABS Zero Status screens provides an interface to view and set 32 absolute zero times for the controller. This feature is a test feature and is likely to change in future builds of the software. (M AIN
MENU

> 1. S TATUS > C. ABS ZERO S TATUS )

1.C ABSOLUTE ZERO MENU Current controller Time: 21:49:35 Current Timing Plan: 00 Absolute Zero Times 1..00:00:00 2..00:00:00 3..00:00:00 4..00:00:00 5..00:00:00 6..00:00:00 7..00:00:00 8..00:00:00 9..00:00:00 10.00:00:00 11.00:00:00 12.00:00:00 12.00:00:00 14.00:00:00 15.00:00:00 16.00:00:00 17.00:00:00 18.00:00:00 19.00:00:00 20.00:00:00 21.00:00:00 22.00:00:00 23.00:00:00 24.00:00:00 25.00:00:00 26.00:00:00 27.00:00:00 28.00:00:00 29.00:00:00 30.00:00:00 31.00:00:00 32.00:00:00 A = Individual 1=Set All 2=Set Current 3=Def All(12am)

Figure 63 Absolute Zero Status Screen

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Revisions Screen

REVISIONS SCREEN
This screen provides details about the versions of the operating system (Linux), the firmware and the hardware that make up your ATC-1000 controller. (M AIN M ENU > 1. C ONFIGURATION > D. R EVISIONS )
1.D MODEL REVISION INFORMATION : Peek Model ATC

SOFTWARE: 03.005.0304 DB ver : 5

BOOT LOADER VERSION: U-Boot 1.1.4 (Jun 2 2009 - 17:17:04) Linux 2.6.20.14 Version: #13 PREEMPT Tue Jun 30 18:57:57 EDT 2009 MAC ADDR : 1A-B6-1F-B2-3C-C6

Figure 64 Revision Details Screen


Model This describes the hardware platform that is running this version of the firmware. For ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 devices, it will indicate Peek Model ATC. Software This is the release version of ATC Firmware that is currently installed in your controller. This number should change whenever you use a USB thumbdrive, or IQ Link, to update the firmware on your controller. This piece of information may be useful when attempting to troubleshoot the controller, or whenever communicating with Peek Traffic customer support. This number is the unique software build version for the firmware that is installed inside your controller. DB ver The internal database used to store the controllers parameters is also tagged with a version number. This is also useful for troubleshooting the controller and verifying a firmware update. Boot Loader Version The boot loader and utilities screen are hosted on the video/keyboard PCB and are managed separately from the controller firmware. Again, this information may help diagnose problems with those systems of your controller. Linux Version Indicates the current version of the controllers operating system. MAC ADDR This screen also shows the unique identifier of the controllers Ethernet network port, the MAC address. The MAC address is set at the Peek factory and is unique to this device.

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Chapter 4 Status Displays

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 5 Programming Menus

This chapter describes the programming portion of the controller menu system. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Overview of the Programming screens, on page 90. Unit Configuration screens, on page 90. Controller configuration screens, on page 113. Coordination configuration screens, on page 139. Time of Day configuration screens, on page 146. Detectors configuration screens, on page 163. Preemption configuration screens, on page 169. Pretimed configuration, on page 170. Transit Signal Priority configuration, on page 172.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAMMING SCREENS


Option 2 on the ATC-1000 Main Menu is the Programming menu, where all of the intersection and traffic-specific settings of the controller can be viewed and modified. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING )
2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. PROGRAMMING MENU UNIT CONFIGURATION controller COORDINATION TIME OF DAY DETECTORS PREEMPTION PRETIMED TRANSIT SIGNAL PRIORITY

Figure 65 Programming Menu

UNIT CONFIGURATION MENU


The Configuration Menu hosts parameter screens that allow the operator to define the general operation of the controller, i.e. meaning items that define the communications, general flash, and other global operating settings for the unit. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION )
2.1 1. STARTUP 2. PROGRAM FLASH 3. PHASE COMPATIBILITY 4. CHANNELS 5. COMMS AND I/O SETUP MENU 6. RING SEQUENCING 7. USTC MISCELLANEOUS CONFIGURATION MENU

Figure 66 Configuration menu

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Unit Configuration Menu

Start-Up Configuration Screen


The parameters on this screen determine how the ATC-1000 Controller will operate whenever power is restored to the unit after a long outage (meaning, longer than a few seconds in duration.) (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 1. S TART -U P )
2.1.1 START-UP MENU PG1OF1

MIN FLASH...............000 AUTO PEDCLEAR(ON/OFF)...ON BACK-UP TIME..........00000 RED REVERT.............00.0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 START-UP 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 GREEN X X WALK X X YELLOW RED

Figure 67 Start-Up Screen


Min Flash The number of seconds after power-up that the unit should stay in Flash mode before initiating normal phased service operations. This can be any integer value from 0 to 255 seconds. The default value is 10 seconds. Auto PedClear (ON/OFF) This parameter determines how pedestrian movement signals (e.g. Walk/Flashing Walk/Dont Walk) operate after a local override by an official at the cabinet, such as a police officer, occurs. Such an action taken by an official is known as an MCE, or a Manual Control Enable event. When this parameter is OFF, then the override takes immediate effect, even if the pedestrian WALK signal is not finished timing. If this parameter is ON, then these pedestrian movements are cleared as normally defined and the override is temporarily delayed. The default value is ON. Back-Up Time This is the value of the backup timer, in seconds. If the controller is operating in an environment where it is being told to use a particular traffic pattern by a central computer or a central coordinating controller (i.e. Traffic Responsive operation,) it will expect to receive an NTCIP Set command across its communications ports at regular intervals. If the controller fails to hear a Set command for one of these system control parameters within the backup time period, the controller will revert to its backup plan, i.e. it will start running whatever is its default pattern. Red Revert This global setting determines how short a red signal can be under any circumstances in this controller. So, say that an override or a preemption comes in that tells a particular traffic movement to go green. But that movement has just turned yellow. The Red Revert time, which is a value in tenths of seconds between 0.0 and 25.5 seconds, tells the controller to show a red signal of at least that long before switching to the new pattern. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 91

Chapter 5 Programming Menus Start-Up (Green/Walk/Yellow/Red) Settings This table of settings allows the user to define what signals will be displayed for each phase when the controller exits the startup Min Flash period. After the controller remains in Flash for the required amount of time, these settings serve as the initial state of all of the intersections phases. Once these phase signal states are in place, normal operation of the intersection can begin. It is important to remember to follow safety rules when setting these phase states. The controller will not allow an unsafe initial condition to be entered, but it does not monitor these inputs as you enter them. It merely checks to see if the whole table is valid when you use the -E key combination to commit the changes to the controllers database. If any invalid phase settings exist, for example if youve set more than one color for a phase, you will see an error screen and be required to make changes. The error message does not indicate ALL of the problems with the table, merely the first one that was discovered.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Unit Configuration Menu

Program Flash Screen


This screen is used to define how Flash mode functions within the intersection when used as a pattern in Time of Day (TOD) programming. This is also known as MUTCD Flash. (The MUTCD is the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, written by and maintained by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration. The MUTCD is the oldest baseline source for the definition of how in-road flashing beacons should function in the United States.) MUTCD Flash, unlike the police-activated flash mode, is created by flash signals created within the controller itself. The other flash modes used by NEMA controllers are merely triggered by the controller; in those other cases, the flash signals themselves are actually generated by the cabinets flash transfer relays. By generating its own flash signals during MUTCD Flash mode, the controller maintains direct control of the intersection, and can therefore switch back to normal operation on a time-of-day basis. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 2.P ROGRAM F LASH )
2.1.2 MUTCD FLASH MENU PG1OF1 1111111 1234567890123456

PHASE CHANNEL

ENTER MUTCD FLASH...... X X EXIT MUTCD FLASH...... X X YELLOW FLASH CHANNEL... X X RED FLASH CHANNEL...X XXX XXXXXXXXXX ALT. HALF HZ. CHANNEL... X X MINIMUM FLASH TIME(SEC)..........000 FLASH EXIT YELLOW TIME(SEC)......000 FLASH EXIT RED TIME(SEC).........000

Figure 68 MUTCD Flash Screen

Note

MUTCD Flash is Pattern 255 when used in the TOD screens.

Enter MUTCD Flash This array of on/off values define which phases will first be served with a green, before switching the intersection to all red and then into MUTCD Flash mode. (Note: The values shown in Figure 68 is not a valid setting for an intersection.) Exit MUTCD Flash Similar to the Enter MUTCD Flash settings, this array of on/off values determines which phases will be served with green first upon leaving MUTCD Flash mode, before the controller switches to the next programmed TOD pattern. (Note: The values shown in Figure 68 is not a valid setting for an intersection.) Yellow Flash Channel This array of 16 on/off values defines which phases will flash yellow during MUTCD Flash operation. The same phase cannot be flashed in both red and yellow. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 93

Chapter 5 Programming Menus Red Flash Channel This array of 16 on/off values defines which phases will flash red during MUTCD Flash operation. The same phase cannot be flashed in both red and yellow. Alt Half Hz Channel This array of 16 on/off values defines which phases will flash on an alternating time cycle. A normal MUTCD flash signal is a 1 second cycle with a 50% duty cycle, meaning the signal will be on for a half second, and then off for a half second. Normally, the controller flashes all phases set to yellow and red flash on the same cycle. This option tells the selected phases to flash in the opposite schedule. Sometimes known as Wig-Wag flash operation, this tells the controller to flash the phases that are set to Alternate Half Herz ON, when the other flash signals are OFF. Minimum Flash Time(Sec) This is the minimum amount of time, in seconds, that the controller must stay in the MUTCD flash pattern before it can be switched away to another pattern. The range of values is from 0 to 255 seconds. Flash Exit Yellow Time (Sec) This is the amount of time, in seconds, that all Exit phases are placed into a steady yellow state, before the controller switches to the next programmed TOD pattern. The range of values is from 0 to 255 seconds. Flash Exit Red Time (Sec) This is the amount of time, in seconds, that all phases are placed into a steady red state, before the controller switches to the next programmed TOD pattern. The range of values is from 0 to 255 seconds.

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Phase Compatibility Screens


The top part of this screen allows the operator to define which phases belong to which ring of operation. The bottom part is used to define which phases can be green at the same time as other phases. The first of these two screens covers compatible phases 1 through 8, and the second screen covers compatible phases 9 through 16. (The phase to ring settings are identical on both pages.) (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 3. P HASE C OMPATIBILITY )
2.1.3.1 PHASE RING PHASE COMPATIBILITY PG1OF2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

COMPATIBLE WITH PHASE 1 X X PHASE 2 X X PHASE 3 X X PHASE 4 X X PHASE 5 X X PHASE 6 X X PHASE 7 X X PHASE 8 X X

Figure 69 Phase Compatibility Screen (Page 1)


Use the DWN button to switch to the second screen of settings.
2.1.3.2 PHASE RING PHASE COMPATIBILITY PG2OF2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

COMPATIBLE WITH PHASE 9 PHASE 10 PHASE 11 PHASE 12 PHASE 13 PHASE 14 PHASE 15 PHASE 16

Figure 70 Phase Compatibility Screen (Page 2)


Ring This number can be set to a value between 0 and 4, which indicates to what ring the phase number shown just above the Ring row belongs. Choosing 0 indicates that the phase is not part of any ring. Compatible With An X in this grid indicates that the phase indicated by the row number and the phase indicated by the column are compatible phases.

Caution

NTCIP does not follow the Co-Phase rules that were used in the Peek 3000E controller.

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Channels Screens
In a TS2 Type 2 cabinet, channels are used only to communicate with the MMU unit. The top 2/3rds of this screen are used to define what phases and/or overlaps are assigned to which output channels. There are 16 channels available, eight on the first page and eight more on the second. The numbers on the fifth row of this screen indicate which vehicle phase (1 through 16), pedestrian phase (1 through 16), or overlap (A through D) are assigned to each channel. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 4. C HANNELS )
2.1.4.1 CONTROL VEH PED VEH OVL PED OVL CHANNEL SET-UP MENU PG 1of 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 X X X X X X X X

SOURCE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PHASE(1..16)/VEH OVL(1..4)/PED OVL(1..8) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 DIMMING: GREEN YELLOW RED ALT1/2

Figure 71 Channels Screen (Page 1)


The four rows below the CONTROL row are used to indicate which type of connection is set on that channel. A channel can either be a vehicle phase (VEH), a pedestrian phase (PED), a vehicle overlap, (VEH OVL) or a pedestrian overlap (PED OVL). The bottom four rows of this screen are used to define how signal dimming works on this controller. These settings can be used to tell the controller whether to dim the green, yellow, and/or red signals for a particular phase, and whether or not to use the ALT power balancing feature when using dimming on a particular phase.
2.1.4.2 CONTROL VEH PED VEH OVL PED OVL CHANNEL SET-UP MENU PG 2of 2 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 X X X X

SOURCE 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 PHASE(1..16)/VEH OVL(1..4)/PED OVL(1..8) 1 4 6 8 0 0 0 0 DIMMING: GREEN YELLOW RED ALT1/2

Figure 72 Channels Screen (Page 2)

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Unit Configuration Menu

Comm Ports & IP/Cab Setup Menu


The Comm Ports & IP/Cab Setup menu is used to configure the communications ports of the ATC-1000 Controller, including the serial ports and the Ethernet ports. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS AND I/O S ETUP M ENU )
2.1.5 COMMS AND I/O SETUP MENU

1. PORT 1 2. PORT 2-5 3. IP/CABINET ADDRESS 4. I/O MAPPING

Figure 73 Misc. Setup Menu


The Port 1 option gives you the controls to the port normally used for TS2 Type 1 connections, namely for connecting to the cabinet BIUs and MMU. The ports 2 through 5 settings are more for general serial connections. The settings on these screens are for general serial connection settings, such as baud rate, parity, flow control, etc. These ports are often used for conflict monitors, UPS or power management data lines, or external modems. Finally, the IP/Cabinet settings are used to set the cabinet address, for New York style setups, and also to set the IP addresses for your controller Ethernet ports.

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Port 1 Settings
Option 1 opens a screen to edit the settings for communications Port 1. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS S ETUP M ENU > 1. P ORT 1)
2.1.5.1 PORT 1 2 PG1OF1 BIU NUMBER 3 4 5 6 7 8
AND

I/O

1 TERM & FACILS.....

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 DETECTOR RACK..... FRAME 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 40 ............. 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ENABLE............ MMU ENABLE........

Figure 74 Port 1 Setup Screen


In a TS2/2 cabinet, there are usually no BIUs used, so Port 1 is typically used to connect the controller to the MMU. So, the MMU ENABLE option is normally OFF for the ATC1000 controller. But if BIUs will be used with the controller, one should enable the MMU on this port and define which BIUs will be used for which Terminals and Facilities connection, and which BIU will be used by each detector rack. Frame 40 Enable (1 through 16) NEMA defines several pages of data that should be transmitted to and from BIUs for the Poll for Service function, . These blocks of data are known as frames. This function is also known as Secondary-to-Secondary Enable. Frames that are sent from the controller to the BIU are known as Command Frames. Command Frame 40 is used to poll secondary stations (what the NEMA standard calls the BIUs in this context) for BIU to BIU communications. These settings tell the ATC1000 that the Frame 40 message should be sent to the designated BIU (BIUs #1 through #16.) If the BIU has a message to respond to this Frame 40 message, it sends a type 169 frame. If the BIU has no message to send, it responds with a type 168 frame. (Refer to NEMA TS2-2003 Standard document, Section 3.3.1.4.1.15.)

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Ports 2 Through 5 Screen


Option 2 on the Misc Setup menu takes one to the screen where the communications settings for Ports 2 through 7 can be viewed or modified. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS AND I/O S ETUP M ENU > 2. P ORT 2-5)
2.1.5.2 PORT ENABLED PARITY PORT 2-5 2 3 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PG1OF1

[SP3,SP1,SP4,SP2] 0=DISABLED 1=ENABLED 0=NONE,1=ODD,2=EVEN

STOP BITS 2 2 1 2 BAUD RATE 5 5 7 5 1= 1200,2= 4800 3= 9600,4= 19200 5=38400,6=57600,7=115200 HW FLOW 0 0 0 0 0=NONE,1=HW FLOW HDLC Group Address: 0

Figure 75 Ports 2 through 5 Setup Screen


The Parity, Stop Bits, Handshaking mode, and Baud Rate settings for each of the ports are defined in the columns below the port numbers. Baud rate is set by entering a onedigit number in the Baud Rate row of the ports column, using the values shown to the right in the Baud Rate key. HDLC Group Address The HDLC address is the physical network address for an NTCIP device on a network. This is similar to the Intersection ID number for TS 1 and non-NTCIP TS 2 units. The HDLC Group Address is used if Central needs to send a broadcast message to more than one controller at a time. Group addresses range from 1 to 8191, although address 63 is reserved as an all stations address. A group address 63 message will always be transmitted as a single byte with all bits set. A message received with a Group Address of 63 will force the controller to respond, regardless of its actual Group Address setting. If the controllers Physical Address is set to 63, then the controller will accept any incoming message regardless of how it is addressed. However, this is typically used for testing purposes and should not be implemented in an active intersection as communication collisions are likely to occur.

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IP/CAB Address Setup Screen


This screen is used to set the cabinet address and Ethernet port IP addresses within the ATC controller. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS S ETUP M ENU > 3. IP/C ABINET A DDRESS )
2.1.5.3 IP/CAB ADDR SETUP
AND

I/O

Cabinet Address: 3CC6 IP Address SYSTEM: 128.002.060.198 IP Address LOCAL : 010.247.001.002

Figure 76 IP/CAB Address setup screen


Cabinet Address The cabinet address is typically used only in systems where there is a unique cabinet address module in the traffic cabinet. The controller and this module must talk back and forth to manage the controller cabinet. This is the New York style of cabinet/controller logistics. Otherwise, the Cabinet Address is not used within the controller, or for any other types of cabinet setup. This is a four digit hexadecimal number that can be typed in using the hex keypad on the front of the controller. IP Address SYSTEM This is where you can set the IP Address for the System Ethernet port. This port is typically used to connect the controller to your central system, such as IQ Central or TranSuite. This is the port on which to connect if you wish to send and receive NTCIP communications. IP Address LOCAL This is where you can set the IP address for the Local Ethernet port on the controller. This port is often used to connect a laptop while next to the cabinet, for use with IQ Link, or for a telnet or SSH connection to the device.

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I/O Mapping Menu


Each of the four available I/O modules for the ATC-1000 controller has a defined set of pin assignments for how the outputs of the controller will be routed to individual pins on the various connectors of the I/O modules. For each of the modules, TS/2 Type 1, TS/2 Type 2, HMC-1000, and LMD, there is a default set of pin assignments. (For the TS/2 Type 1, this is actually a default set of pin assignments for the cabinet Bus Interface Units (BIUs), as fed to the cabinet through the controllers Port 1, SDLC connector. i.e. The TS/2 Type 1 standard calls for digital output of the controller outputs through Port 1, to physical pins located on external devices (the BIUs).) I/O Mapping is the feature that allows the controller to change these default pin assignments, so the user can decide to send the alarm outputs or preemption inputs, (or any of the controller inputs or outputs) to a completely different physical pin on the I/O module (or physical pin on the BIU, for TS/2 Type 1 controllers.) To access the I/O Mapping features of the ATC-1000 navigate to: (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS S ETUP M ENU > 4. I/O M APPING )
2.1.5.4 1. CABINET SETUP 2. TS2 TYPE 2 MAP 3. TF BIU MAP 4. DET BIU MAP VIEW I/O MAPPING
AND

I/O

Figure 77 I/O Mapping menu


The I/O Mapping menu allows you to access the two I/O mapping screens: Cabinet setup and Function Map. Cabinet setup is for selecting the type of I/O module and the overall mapping setup. Option 2 on the above menu will change, depending on what I/O module type is selected on the Cabinet Setup Screen. The above example shows what the I/O Mapping menu will look like if the Module Type is set to TS2 Type 2.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus I/O Function Map Setup The I/O Mapping Cabinet Setup screen is used to select the type of I/O module and an I/O mapping profile. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS AND I/O S ETUP M ENU > 4. I/O M APPING > 1. C ABINET S ETUP )
2.1.5.4.1 I/O CABINET SETUP PG1OF1

Module Type..TS2 Type2(2) Map Command..default(0)

Figure 78 I/O Cabinet setup screen


To edit these settings, enter edit mode ( -E), use the up and down arrow buttons to choose which field you wish to modify, then press the number key for the option you want. The available options for these two parameters are shown below in Table 10 and Table 11. Table 10 Module Type options Number
1 2 3 4

Module Type
TS2 Type 1 TS2 Type 2 HMC LMD 40

The selection you make for Module Type will determine what screens appear under command 2 on the I/O Mapping menu. This value will be set automatically to the correct value if you install a different type of I/O module into the controller, but you can also go in and change this setting manually. For the TS2 Type 2, HMC and LMD 40 I/O modules, multiple mappings can be stored on the controller at once. You can select which of the I/O mappings to use by setting the Map Command value on this screen. The standard options for Map Command are shown in Table 11. Additional mappings can be defined in IQ Link or in IQ Central. Table 11 Map Commands Number
0 1 Others

Mapping Set
Default Map I/O Alternate Map 1 User Defined (via IQ Link)

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Select 2. TS2 TYPE 2 MAP to reveal the following screen:


(M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS S ETUP M ENU > 4. I/O M APPING > 2. TS2 TYPE 2 MAP)
2.1.5.4.2 I/O FUNCTION MAP SETUP TS2 TYPE 2 TS2 MSA CONN NV MSA-A MSA-B MSA-C MSA-D MSA-E MSA-F MSA-G MSA-H MSA-J MSA-K MSA-L : : : : : : : : : : : Fault Monitor Not Used Voltage Monitor Phase 1 Red Driver Phase 1 DWLK Driver Phase 2 Red Driver Phase 2 DWLK Driver Phase 2 Ped Clr Drvr Phase 2 Walk Driver Det Channel 2 Call Pedestrian Det 2 [O] [X] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [I] [I] PG1:5
AND

I/O

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 79 I/O Function Map Setup screen 1


The screens that show up here depend on the value that was chosen for Module Type on the I/O Cabinet Setup screen (Main Menu > 2. Programming > 1. Unit Configuration > 5. Comms and I/O Setup Menu > 4. I/O Mapping > 1. Cabinet Setup) The NEMA TS2 Type 2 MS Connector Pin Assignments are listed in the left column. MSA-A is Pin A on the MS Connector A. To view the remaining pins of the 55 pins assigned to MSA, press the DWN button. PG1:5 will change through all five screens down to PG5:5. To change to another TS2, Type 2 Connector follow the [A-F] Select Device command on the lower left corner of the screen. In the case of the TS2, Type 2 I/O Module, since MSA is the opening default, select the B Button to display the MSB Pins and the C Button to display the MSC Pins. In the TS2, Type 2 I/O Module selections D, E and F are not used. The [*C] Loads Defaults command on the lower right corner of the screen, allows the user to change between the Non-Volatile (NV) screen shown at the end of the second line. The NV screen should be selected prior to programming. In the TS2, Type 2 Mode I/O Mapping is only available amongst the three MS Connectors (A, B & C). A common use for I/O Mapping is often found within Cabinets that have limited Load Switches. The example used will be to map Overlap A to the unused Load Switch for Phase 3, which is usually Load Switch #3. To accomplish this task, select MAIN MENU (MNU) > 2. PROGRAMMING > 1. UNIT CONFIGURATION > 5. COMMS AND I/O SETUP MENU > 4. I/O MAPPING > 2. TS2 TYPE 2 MAP. Press the B Button to select those functions on the MS B Connector to reveal the following screen:

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2.1.5.4.2 I/O FUNCTION MAP SETUP TS2 TYPE 2 TS2 MSB CONN NV MSB-A MSB-B MSB-C MSB-D MSB-E MSB-F MSB-G MSB-H MSB-J MSB-K MSB-L : : : : : : : : : : : Phase next_1 Not Assigned Phase Next_2 Phase 3 Grn Driver Phase 3 Yel Driver Phase 3 Red Driver Phase 4 Red Driver Phase 3 Ped Clr Drvr Phase 3 DWLK Driver Phase Check 4 Det Channel 4 Call [0] [X] [0] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] PG1:5

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 80 Example remapping


Place this screen in the Edit Mode by pressing the -E key combination. A capital E will appear in the upper right side of the screen to confirm the Edit Mode. An asterisk (*) will appear as the cursor to the right of the top line of displayed pins, as shown below:
2.1.5.4.2 I/O FUNCTION MAP SETUP PG1:5 TS2 TYPE 2 TS2 MSB CONN NV MSB-A MSB-B MSB-C MSB-D MSB-E MSB-F MSB-G MSB-H MSB-J MSB-K MSB-L : : : : : : : : : : : Phase next_1 Not Assigned Phase Next_2 Phase 3 Grn Driver Phase 3 Yel Driver Phase 3 Red Driver Phase 4 Red Driver Phase 3 Ped Clr Drvr Phase 3 DWLK Driver Phase Check 4 Det Channel 4 Call [0]* [X] [0] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] E

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 81 Editing mode on the I/O Function Map Setup screen


Use the Green Downward Arrow to move the cursor (*) down to the MSB-D : Phase 3 Grn Driver Output line and press the ENT (Enter) Button. By pressing the ENT (Enter) Button, the End-User is accepting the edited values into the I/O map, which will automatically set the Cabinet Map Command to alternate I/O mapping [IOAltMap(1)].

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Unit Configuration Menu The screen will change to all available I/O Functions, as shown below:
I/O FUNCTION SELECT SCREEN Not Assigned Address Select Address Select Address Select Address Select Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot Det Reset Slot 0 1 2 3 1&2 3&4 5&6 7&8 9&10 11&12 13&14 PG1:30 [X]* [0] [0] [0] [0] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] E

(~) ARE Assigned

[HLP] HELP SCREEN

Figure 82 Available I/O Functions list


Page down (DWN) twenty-four times to the following screen:
I/O FUNCTION SELECT SCREEN Overlap b Overlap c Overlap d Overlap a Overlap b Overlap c Overlap d Overlap a Overlap b Overlap c Overlap d Sys Coord Red Red Red Yel Yel Yel Yel Grn Grn Grn Grn Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver Driver PG24:30 [O]~ [0]~ [O]~ [0]~ [O]~ [0]~ [O]~ [0]~* [O]~ [0]~ [O]~ [0]~ E

(~) ARE Assigned

[HLP] HELP SCREEN

Figure 83 Available I/O Functions list page 24


Press the Green Downward Arrow seven times to move the cursor to the right of Overlap a Grn Driver and press the ENT (Enter) Button. A warning, as follows, will display:

*************************************** * * * FUNCTION ASSIGNMENT WARNING * * * * Overlap a Grn Driver [O] * * is already assigned to * * TS2 MSB CONN : MSB-AA * * * * [YES] assign to new pin * * [NO] select other function * ***************************************

Figure 84 Function Assignment Warning


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Chapter 5 Programming Menus As directed by the warning, press the YES Button if the warning statement is desired. A second warning, as follows will display:

*************************************** * * * FUNCTION ASSIGNMENT WARNING * * * * Previously assigned pin * * will be set to NOT ASSIGNED * * & its history will be lost! * * * * [YES] assign to new pin * * [NO] select other function * ***************************************

Figure 85 Warning about previous pin assignment


Press the YES Button a second time and the selection will be made and the screen will revert to the previous MSB Conn screen, as displayed below:
2.1.5.4.2 I/O FUNCTION MAP SETUP PG1:5 TS2 TYPE 2 TS2 MSB CONN NV MSB-A MSB-B MSB-C MSB-D MSB-E MSB-F MSB-G MSB-H MSB-J MSB-K MSB-L : : : : : : : : : : : Phase next_1 Not Assigned Phase Next_2 Overlap a Grn Driver Phase 3 Yel Driver Phase 3 Red Driver Phase 4 Red Driver Phase 3 Ped Clr Drvr Phase 3 DWLK Driver Phase Check 4 Det Channel 4 Call [0] [X] [0] [O]* [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] E

[ENT] Edit [*C] Cancel [*E] Saves

Figure 86 New pin assignments after the change


Select the -E key combination to save and leave Edit Mode. Overlap A Green Outputs will now come out Pin D, on MS B Connector going to the Load Switch 3 (Phase 3) Green Output Field Terminals. Repeat the same process for the Yellow and Red Outputs and Overlap A will display on the previously unused Phase 3 Load Switch. Conduct a complete power down of the ATC-1000 to reset the I/O functions. Reapply power to the ATC-1000 Controller. Check for correct outputs. I/O Mapping will not take place until the controller power is turned off (wait at least half of one second) and then turned back on. The ATC-1000 will recognize the installed I/O Module and change Screen 2.1.5.4 to match the correct I/O Module type. For TS2, Type 1 I/O Mapping select Cabinet Setup, the Map Command must also be selected to default(0).

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2.1.5.4.1 I/O CABINET SETUP PG 1 OF 1

Module Type .. TS2 Type 1 (1) Command Map .. default (0)

Figure 87 I/O Cabinet Setup Screen


Press the PRV Button to return to MAIN MENU (MNU) > 2. PROGRAMMING > 1. UNIT CONFIGURATION > 5. COMMS AND I/O SETUP MENU > 4. I/O MAPPING.
2.1.5.4 1. 2. 3. 4. I/O Mapping

CABINET SETUP TS2 TYPE 1 MAP TF BIU MAP DET BIU MAP View

Figure 88 I/O Mapping screen


Select 2. TS2 TYPE 1 MAP to reveal the following screen:
2.1.5.4.2 I/O FUNCTION MAP SETUP TS2 TYPE 1 TS2 MSA CONN NV PG1:1

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 89 I/O Function Map Screen for TS2 Type 1 I/O module
Note that the MSA Connector of the TS2 Type 1 I/O Module is blank. The Inputs and Outputs on this connector are not available for I/O Mapping, as they are all mandatory for controller operation. The other two I/O module types, HMC and LMD 40, on the other hand, will present screens similar to the TS2 Type 2 I/O Function Map Screens, providing the ability to remap pin outputs on those types of I/O connectors. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 107

Chapter 5 Programming Menus TF BIU Map Screens Press the PRV Button to return to MAIN MENU (MNU) > 2. PROGRAMMING > 1. UNIT CONFIGURATION > 5. COMMS AND I/O SETUP MENU > 4. I/O MAPPING > 3. TF BIU MAP. The NEMA TS2, Type 1 NEMA Terminal and Facilities (TF) assignments are listed in the left column. T o view the remaining assignments of the 51 Inputs and/or Outputs assigned to TF BIU #1, press the DWN button. PG1:5 will change through all five screens down to PG5:5. To change to another TS2, Type 1 TF BIU follow the [A-F] Select Device command on the lower left corner of the screen. In the case of the TS2, Type 1 TF BIUs, since TF BIU_1 is the opening default, select the B Button to display TF BIU_2, the C Button to display TF BIU_3, and select the D Button to display TF BIU_4. In the TS2, Type 1 TF BIU selections E and F are not used. The [*C] Loads Defaults command on the lower right corner of the screen allows the user to change between the Non-Volatile (NV) screen shown at the end of the second line. The NV screen should be selected prior to programming. If the TS2 Type 1 ATC1000 is not operating in a completely, communicating cabinet, then Screen 2.1.5.4.3, will display the second line, as INACTIVE. See the screen displayed below.
2.1.5.4.3 TF BIU MAP SETUP PG5:5 TS2 TYPE 1 TF BIU_1 INACTIVE - NV 01-OUTPUT 02-OUTPUT 03-OUTPUT 04-OUTPUT 05-OUTPUT 06-OUTPUT 07-OUTPUT 08-OUTPUT 09-OUTPUT 10-OUTPUT 11-OUTPUT 1 : Load SW 1 Red Driver 2 : Load SW 1 Yel Driver 3 : Load SW 1 Grn Driver 4 : Load SW 2 Red Driver 5 : Load SW 2 Yel Driver 6 : Load SW 2 Grn Driver 7 : Load SW 3 Red Driver 8 : Load SW 3 Yel Driver 9 : Load SW 3 Grn Driver 10 : Load SW 4 Red Driver 11 : Load SW 4 Yel Driver [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O]

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 90 TF BIU MAP Setup screen for TS2 Type 1 module


If the TS2 Type 1 ATC-1000 is operating in a completely, communicating cabinet, then Screen 2.1.5.4.3, will display the second line, as ACTIVE. See the screen displayed below.

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2.1.5.4.3 TF BIU MAP SETUP PG5:5 TS2 TYPE 1 TF BIU_1 ACTIVE - NV 01-OUTPUT 02-OUTPUT 03-OUTPUT 04-OUTPUT 05-OUTPUT 06-OUTPUT 07-OUTPUT 08-OUTPUT 09-OUTPUT 10-OUTPUT 11-OUTPUT 1 : Load SW 1 Red Driver 2 : Load SW 1 Yel Driver 3 : Load SW 1 Grn Driver 4 : Load SW 2 Red Driver 5 : Load SW 2 Yel Driver 6 : Load SW 2 Grn Driver 7 : Load SW 3 Red Driver 8 : Load SW 3 Yel Driver 9 : Load SW 3 Grn Driver 10 : Load SW 4 Red Driver 11 : Load SW 4 Yel Driver [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O] [O]

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 91 TF BIU MAP Setup screen ACTIVE I/O


Programming I/O Mapping for TF BIUs is conducted in the same manner listed above for TS2 Type 2 Connectors. Accepting the edit values in I/O Mapping for TF BIUs will automatically set that TF BIU to be ACTIVE after cycling power. TF BIUs selected to I/O Mapping functions supersede all other device functions during initial power up. Selecting a TF BIU to set duplicate function(s) on another BIU will result in the function that was duplicated to be set to Not Assigned. If a TF BIU is already active and a function is selected on another BIU that is a duplicate on the active BIU, then the last programmed BIU will take precedence and set the previously active BIU function to Not Assigned.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus DET BIU MAP VIEW Screens On the I/O Mapping menu, selecting option 4. DET BIU MAP View will reveal the screen shown in Figure 92. For NEMA TS2 Type 1 controllers, these screens show the BIU-toDetector mapping assignments. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 5. C OMMS S ETUP M ENU > 4. I/O M APPING > 4. DET BIU MAP VIEW)
2.1.5.4.4 DET BIU MAP VIEW PG1:5 TS2 TYPE 1 DET BIU_1 ACTIVE - NV RESET 1 RESET 2 RESET 3 RESET 4 RESERVED RESERVED RESERVED RESERVED RESERVED RESERVED RESERVED : : : : : : : : : : : Det Det Det Det Not Not Not Not Not Not Not Reset Slot Reset Slot Reset Slot Reset Slot Assigned Assigned Assigned Assigned Assigned Assigned Assigned 1&2 3&4 5&6 7&8 [O] [O] [O] [O] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X]
AND

I/O

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

[A-F] Select Device [*C] Loads Defaults

Figure 92 Detector BIU Mapping View screens


The five page Detector BIU screens can be viewed, but their I/O settings cannot be mapped at this time due to the essential operation of Detectors. The assignments shown here depend on which Module Type and Map Command have been selected on the I/O Mapping > Cabinet Setup screen.

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Unit Configuration Menu

Ring Sequencing Screens


This screen is used to set the order of phases within each ring. There are 16 screens of ring sequencing available, meaning that the four rings can be programmed to sequence through their phases in 16 possible sequences. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 6. R ING S EQUENCING )
2.1.6.1 RING SEQUENCING PG 1of16

SEQUENCE NUM 1 RING 1 1 2 3 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 6 7 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Figure 93 Ring Sequencing Screen (Page 1)


The above ring sequence settings will produce the following sequence: 1/5 2/6 3/7 4/8

Use the D WN button to advance to the next screen of Ring Sequence settings.
2.1.6.16 RING SEQUENCING PG16of16

SEQUENCE NUM 16 RING 1 1 2 3 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 6 5 7 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Figure 94 Ring Sequencing Screen (Page 16)


The sequence defined above is an example of a Lead/Lag sequence: 1/6 2/6 2/5 3/7 4/8

Note

These settings can be used with the Phase Compatibility programming of the controller (Screen 2.1.3) to develop any sequence desired.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

USTC Miscellaneous Screen


USTC stands for U.S. Traffic Corporation. These are proprietary parameters created for the ATC-1000 that are not part of the NTCIP data structures. They support certain advanced features of the controller. They are, however, passed back and forth between IQ Link and the controller, and IQ Central and the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 1. U NIT C ONFIGURATION > 7. USTC M ISCELLANEOUS )
2.1.7 USTC MISC MENU PG1OF1 (0)

LANGUAGE...........English STEADY RED DURING FLASH.......000 REQUEST TIME SYNC..OFF

Figure 95 USTC Miscellaneous Screen


Language The controller supports multiple languages on its display interface. In general, the menus are shown in the available language, however some of the displayed parameters may remain in English. Once a change is made to this selection, you will need to exit out of this screen for the new language to be visible. Table 12 Available Interface Languages Language Value
0 1 2 3

Displayed Language
English (North American) Afrikaans Spanish (Espaol) French (Franais Canadien)

Steady Red During Flash When the controller is in flash mode, this value determines the number of seconds (a value between 0 and 255 seconds) that all channels flashing red are held at a steady red before the flash state can be exited. While the steady red is held, the yellow flashing channels will continue to flash yellow. Request Time Sync This feature is in support of the NTCIP AASHTO 1210 standard, also known as Signal System Master (SSM) support. SSM has not yet been fully implemented in the ATC-1000.

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Controller Menu

CONTROLLER MENU
The screens on the Controller Menu are used to define the operation of phased signaling in the intersection. (M AIN M ENU > 2. P ROGRAMMING > 2. C ONTROLLER )
2.2 controller PHASE FUNCTIONS MENU 8. PHASE OPTIONS 9. RECALLS 0. OVERLAPS

1. PHASE ENABLES 2. GREEN TIMING 3. CLEARANCE TIMING 4. PEDESTRIAN TIMING

5. ADDED INITIAL TIMING 6. GAP REDUCTION TIMING 7. DYNAMIC MAX TIMING

Figure 96 Controller Menu


Phase enables are the on/off switches for phases. The next three options on the Controller Menu, the Green Timing Screens, the Clearance Timing Screens, and the Ped Timing Screens, function as the primary timing definition screens for all of the phases. Each of these screens have two pages, the first for the first eight phases and the second for phases 9 through 16. The rest of the options on this menu function as modifiers to standard phase operations.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Phase Enables Screen


This screen turns phases on and off in the other screens. If a phase is not enabled, it will not be serviced, even if it is assigned as a start-up phase or as part of a ring. These are the master on/off switches for phase movements. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 1.P HASE E NABLES )
2.2.1 PHASE ENABLE PHASE ENABLE MENU PG1 of 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 X X X X X X X X

Figure 97 Phase Enables Screen

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Controller Menu

Green Timing Screens


The next three options on the Controller Menu, the Green Timing Screens, the Clearance Timing Screens, and the Ped Timing Screens, function as the primary timing definition screens for the intersection. Each of these screens have two pages, the first for the first eight phases and the second for phases 9 through 16. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 2.G REEN T IMING )
2.2.2.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 1 PG 1 of 2

PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------MINIMUM GREEN 1-255 Seconds 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 PASSAGE 0.0 0.0 MAXIMUM 1 30 30 0.0 30 0.0 30 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 30 0-255 Seconds 30 30 30

MAXIMUM 2 0-255 Seconds 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ----------------------------------------

Figure 98 Green Timing Screen (page 1)


These are the standard NEMA timing parameters for the green portion of all of the phase movements. Minimum Green The least amount of time, in seconds, to be allowed for the green movement of this phase. The minimum green can be any value from 1 to 255 seconds. Passage For detector actuated and modified operation, the passage timer is influenced by vehicle detector inputs. When a phase is red, the vehicle detector input calls for the phase to be serviced, but when the phase is already being serviced, a vehicle detector input instead serves to extend the phases green period. Passage is the increment of time by which the phase green is extended. The passage timer counts down when no detector input is present, but it gets reset to its full value whenever a detector input is present. The phase is extended until either a gap occurs in vehicle flow, a force-off is applied, or if either of the maximum timers time out. Typical settings for Passage are from 0.5 to 5 seconds, depending on how sensitive or large the detector zones are. The possible range of values for Passage is 0.0 to 25.5 seconds.

Note

Throughout this book, the time when the passage timer doesnt get extended because a gap between vehicles of sufficient length has occurred is called the Gap-Out.

Maximum 1 Maximum 1 timing is the default value used to set the maximum amount of time allowed for the green in this phase. For an actuated phase, this is the upper limit of the amount of green time allowed, as long as the phase is not in Maximum Recall mode. When Maximum Recall is not set to be ON for this phase, the Maximum 1 timer ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 115

Chapter 5 Programming Menus times down only when a serviceable, conflicting call is present. The phase remains green until the Passage timer fails to be reset by a vehicle detection, or until the Maximum 1 timer reaches zero, whichever comes first. This timer will cease timing and reset if all serviceable calls go away. The timer will re-start, if a new call arrives and the active conflicting phases are in the Passage interval. However, when Maximum Recall is set to be ON for this phase, the phase is always served and the Maximum 1 timer always counts down to, whether or not there is a call on the detectors of any other phase. The value of Maximum 1 can vary widely, but to give a feel for the range, its value is typically between 8 and 17 seconds for left turns, between 12 and 25 seconds for side streets, and between 22 and 40 seconds for main streets.

Note

If the Maximum 1 value is set to a very low number (such as zero) then minimum timing requirements for the phase, such as Min Green, will override it.

Maximum 2 Maximum 2 is an alternate value for the maximum allowed amount of time allowed for this phase to be green. Max 2 is activated, on a ring by ring basis, by either an external input or by a TOD pattern change. When Max 2 is active the Maximum countdown timer will be loaded with the Maximum 2 value instead of the usual Maximum 1 time. When setting a value for the Maximum 2 field, the same concepts apply as with Maximum 1, except an alternate value is used. Maximum 2 is sometimes used during peak traffic periods (i.e. to generate longer main street flow times.) It is also sometimes used during coordination, so that phases wont time out before being forced off. Again, if the Maximum 2 time value is set to a very low number (such as zero) then minimum timing requirements for the phase, in other words, the Minimum Green value, will override it.
2.2.2.2 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 1 PG 2 of 2

PHS 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 ---------------------------------------MINIMUM GREEN 1-255 Seconds 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 PASSAGE 0.0 0.0 MAXIMUM 1 1 1 0.0 1 0.0 1 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 0-255 Seconds 1 1 1

MAXIMUM 2 0-255 Seconds 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ----------------------------------------

Figure 99 Green Timing Screen (page 2)

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Controller Menu

Clearance Timing Screens


Collectively, the Green Timing Screens, the Clearance Timing Screens, and the Ped Timing Screens, function as the primary timing definition screens for the intersection. Each of these screens have two pages, the first for the first eight phases and the second for phases 9 through 16. The Clearance Timing Screens allow the user to set timing values for the yellow and red portions of each phase. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 3.C LEARANCE T IMING )
2.2.3.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 2 PG 1 of 2

PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------YELLOW CLEARANCE 3.0-25.5 Seconds 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 RED CLEARANCE 2.0 2.0 2.0 RED REVERT 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0-25.5 Seconds 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

----------------------------------------

Figure 100 Clearance Timing Screen (Page 1)


Yellow Clearance Quite simply, this is the amount of time the phase will spend showing the yellow signal. Yellow clearance can be set to any value between 3.0 and 25.5 seconds. Typical settings are from 3.5 to 5 seconds, based on the travel speed of traffic and the width of the intersection. Red Clearance Obviously, phases sit in red whenever other phases are being served, but there is a short period in the interval when switching from the service of one phase to the next when the intersection must sit in all red. Red Clearance defines how long this rest period is. Values from 0.0 to 25.5 seconds can be entered, but typically this value is between 0 and 2.5 seconds. It is recommended that you use a time of at least 1 second for the Red Clearance value. Red Revert Red Revert time deals with special occasions when a phase may complete its service, and the timing circuit or the coordinator of the controller decides to service the exact same phase again. When this occurs, the red revert time serves as the minimum red time before the phase is switched to green again. It is usually set to a value that is higher than Red Clearance. Typically, Red Revert comes up when the controller is asked to switch into a preemption sequence, or when switching patterns during TOD operation. Values from 0.0 to 25.5 seconds can be entered.

Note

The Red Revert time shown here varies from the Red Revert parameter visible on the Start-up Menu. The Red Revert is a unit global value, which is the value set on the Start-up menu. The parameter shown here, on the other hand, allows the user to set a red revert value per phase that is longer than the global value. The greater of the two values will be used.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Pedestrian Timing Screens


This screen is used to set the timing for Walk/Dont Walk signals. Pedestrian phases are linked to the Vehicle phases of the same number. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 4.P EDESTRIAN T IMING )
2.2.4.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 3 PG 1 of 2

PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------PED WALK 0-255 Seconds 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 PED CLEARANCE 0 4 0 4 0 0-255 Seconds 4 0 4

----------------------------------------

Figure 101 Ped Timing Screen (Page 1)


Ped Walk The amount of time, in seconds, that the Walk signal is displayed, starting at the beginning of the phases vehicle green period. Valid values range from 0 to 255 seconds. Ped Clearance The amount of time, in seconds, after the end of the Ped Walk period, when the flashing Dont Walk signal will be displayed. Valid times range from 0 to 255 seconds.

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Controller Menu

Added Initial Timing Screens


The next two screens concern a modification of basic actuated phase operation called Volume Density operation. Volume density is a way for an intersection to adapt to changes in traffic volume based on inputs from detectors. Volume density is composed of two parts: Initial time adjustments and gap reduction. Initial timing is set on this screen; gap reduction parameters are set on the next screen. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 5.A DDED I NITIAL T IMING ) This screen allows the operator to program the optional Added Initial parameter for each phase, as well as associated parameters. There are two pages for these parameters, the first one for phases 1 through 8 and the second page for phases 9 through 16.
2.2.5.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 4 PG 1 of 2 PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------SEC/ACTUATION 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 MAX INITIAL 0 0 0 0 0 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0

----------------------------------------

Figure 102 Added Initial Timing Screen (Page 1)


2.2.5.2 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 4 PG 2 of 2 PHS 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 ---------------------------------------SEC/ACTUATION 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 MAX INITIAL 0 0 0 0 0 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0

----------------------------------------

Figure 103 Added Initial Timings (Page 2)


Sec/Actuation Also known as Added Initial timing, this parameter is used to calculate an Added Initial timing period, based on detections during the non-Green intervals of a phase. The Sec/Actuation value for a phase is multiplied times the number of vehicles (detections) that are received while the phase is in the Yellow and Red states. This modified initial timing for a phase will be used only if the calculated Added Initial value is greater than the Min Green time and less than the Maximum time. (This is

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus normally Maximum1, but Maximum 2 will be used instead, if it has been invoked.) Typical settings: 2 - 3 seconds. About enough to move each vehicle. Max Initial Maximum Initial sets a limit on the amount of Added Initial. Added Initial can never exceed the maximum initial value. Also known as Max In, or Max Variable Initial. Typical settings: The Max Initial setting is normally set equal to the Initial interval that would be used if Volume Density were not used.

Important

Since both Added Initial and Gap Reduction use vehicle detections for red phases, both methods are based on the assumption that set-back detectors are installed. If the vehicle actuators are installed back (at least) several car length from the stop bar, this allows multiple vehicle detections to occur on phases where traffic is facing a red light.

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Controller Menu

Gap Reduction Timing Screens


Gap Reduction, along with the previous screens initial Timing parameters, are modifications of the basic actuated phase operation called Volume Density operation. Volume density is a way for an intersection to adapt to changes in traffic volume based on inputs from detectors. Gap reduction is a method to dynamically reduce the time allowed between cars needed to keep the green passage timer going, based on how long the green has continued and how many cars have been detected on other phases within the intersection. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 6.G AP R EDUCTION T IMING ) This screen allows an operator to set up Gap Reduction on the ATC-1000 controller. There are two pages of parameters, the first covers the parameters for phases 1 through 8 and the second for phases 9 through 16.
2.2.6.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 5 PG 1 of 2 PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------TIME B4 GAP REDUCTION 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 CARS B4 GAP REDUCTION 0 0 0 0 TIME TO REDUCE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0-255 Vehicles 0 0 0 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0

MINIMUM GAP 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 ----------------------------------------

Figure 104 Gap Reduction Timing Screen (Page 1)


Time B4 Gap Reduction Also known as TBR, this NEMA parameter sets the Time Before Reduction value for Gap Reduction operations for this phase. The value can be between 0 and 255 seconds. This is the amount of time the controller will wait before it begins reducing the passage gap test to the Minimum Gap value. Time Before Reduction (TBR) starts timing when a conflicting call is received (i.e. when someone is waiting at another stop bar in the intersection,) which is often the beginning of green. If the TBR period counts down completely, or the Cars B4 Gap Reduction parameter is satisfied (whichever comes first), the controller will begin reducing the allowed gap in the Passage time for this phase. (Passage time is described on page 115.) If all conflicting calls are removed before TBR has completed timing, the TBR timer will reset. Typical settings: 8 to 20 seconds. You need to allow enough time for queued vehicles to begin moving, since their initial speed will be slow, meaning their gap values will take too long, and gap reduction will begin too quickly. The value of Time B4 Gap Reduction (TBR) should be at least the value of Minimum Green plus 1 second. Cars B4 Gap Reduction This is an NTCIP object that is a slight addition to the normal NEMA Gap Reduction process. This parameter gives another way for gap reduction to ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 121

Chapter 5 Programming Menus begin. This value, which can be any setting between 0 and 255 detected vehicles, tells the controller to begin reducing the passage timer test whenever more than this number of vehicles are waiting at other stop bars in the intersection. Gap reduction will begin whenever either the TBR or the Cars B4 Gap Reduction thresholds are crossed. Time to Reduce Time to Reduce (TTR) is a NEMA parameter that establishes the time reduction step that the controller will use to begin a linear reduction of the phase gap (passage time) down to the minimum gap time. This value can be anything between 0 and 255 seconds, but typical settings are between 4 and 12 seconds. The size of TTR depends on how quickly the operator wishes to close the timing gap. A larger TTR closes the gap more quickly. If one wishes to close the gap immediately in one reduction step, the value of TTR should be the entire difference between the Passage time and the Minimum Gap value. Minimum Gap Minimum Gap is another standard NEMA parameter of the gap reduction process. The minimum gap value establishes the lowest acceptable gap (passage time) in traffic. The gap test will not be reduced below this amount. So if cars continue to cross the vehicle detectors at a rate that leaves no gaps larger than this Minimum Gap value, the Passage timer for the green portion of this phase will be extended right up until the Maximum timer times out. The acceptable range for minimum gap is from 0.0 to 25.5 seconds. Typical settings for Minimum Gap are from 1 to 3 seconds.

Note

In the presence of a continuous vehicle actuation, the phase will not gap out even if Minimum Gap is set at zero.

Notes About the Usage of Gap Reduction Gap reduction allows the normal passage time for a phase to be reduced linearly during the green portion of the phase. The parameters associated with this operation are called Time Before Reduction (TBR), Cars Before Reduction, Time To Reduce (TTR) and Min Gap. Thus, the longer demand holds a phase green even though a conflicting call is present, the closer the vehicles must be spaced to retain the existing green interval. The following are the two typical uses of gap reduction:

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Controller Menu Classic Case Gap Reduction In this case, set back loops, perhaps as far as several hundred feet back from the stop bar, are used to extend the phase. There may or may not be stop bar detectors, as well. (It is recommended that there are.)

Figure 105 Classic Case of Gap Reduction


The Passage timer value is set based on the travel time for a vehicle to get from the setback detector to the intersection. This value could be fairly long; if left alone, this would tend to cause the intersection to run sluggishly, since the phase would constantly extend, even with widely gapped traffic. By using gap reduction, the passage value can be reduced down enough to provide good gap control. Gap Reduction as an Efficiency Tool Even with normal stop bar detectors, Gap Reduction can be an effective way to increase efficiency without getting the green is too short complaints. The idea is to begin the phase with a fairly long passage time when vehicles are moving slowly, then move to a shorter time later, when they are moving at the flow rate. Gap reduction is thus a good way to obtain snappy operation, so that phases cycle crisply without long waits, but also without complaints. which are often the case when Passage times are simply set to low values.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Dynamic Max Timing Screens


This screen allows the operator to program the values to configure Dynamic Maximum operation. This is a system to dynamically modify the maximum value allowable for a phases green period. There are two pages of Dynamic Max parameters, the first covers phases 1 through 8; the second covers phases 9 through 16. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 7.D YNAMIC M AX T IMING )
2.2.7.1 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 6 PG 1 of 2 PHS 1 -- 2 -- 3 -- 4 -- 5 -- 6 -- 7 -- 8 ---------------------------------------DYNAMIC MAX LIMIT 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DYNAMIC MAX STEP 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

----------------------------------------

Figure 106 Dynamic Max Timing Screen (Page 1)


Press the D WN button to see the Dynamic Max Timings for phases 9 through 16.
2.2.7.2 PHASE TIMINGS MENU 6 PG 2 of 2 PHS 9 - 10 - 11 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 ---------------------------------------DYNAMIC MAX LIMIT 0-255 Seconds 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 DYNAMIC MAX STEP 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0-25.5 Seconds 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

----------------------------------------

Figure 107 Dynamic Max Timing Screen (Page 2)


Dynamic Maximum operation can be activated for a particular phase by setting non-zero values to the following parameters. Dynamic Maximum operation functions in NEMA phase-based patterns only. It functions on top of the normal Max1 and Max 2 parameters for a given phase. It functions like this: if a phase Maxes Out twice in a row, the maximum value of the phase begins stepping upward. Each time after that the phase maxes out again, the maximum steps upward again, until an ultimate maximum is reached. If this upward stepping is active and the phase gaps out rather than maxing out, the dynamic maximum steps downward instead. 124 ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Menu Dynamic Max Limit This is the upper limit on the duration of the green, in seconds, that the phase can be granted as a result of Dynamic Max adjustments. Note that if this value is lower than the Max1 and Max 2 limits, then the downward stepping mode of Dynamic Max operation can actually shorten the maximum green time for this phase all the way down to this lower value. This can be any value between 0 and 255 seconds. Dynamic Max Step This is the number of seconds that are added to the phases maximum green value after the phase has maxed out twice in a row. This stepping upward continues until the Dynamic Max Limit is reached or the phase fails to max out once. Dynamic Max stepping will also be deactivated if one of these conditions exist for this phase: A failed detector on the phase Maximum recall is triggered Dynamic Max Step can be set to any value between 0.0 and 25.5 seconds, in tenths of a second. The size of this step depends on how quickly you would like the intersection to respond to a sudden flux of traffic. Larger step values can be used to make the intersection respond more quickly.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Phase Options Screens


The Phase Options screens allow the user to activate or deactivate special per-phase functions, including CNA operation, Dual entry, Simultaneous gap-out, and others. There are two pages of settings. The first allows the setting of these eight parameters for phases 1 through 8. The second page sets the same eight parameters for phases 9 through 16. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 8.P HASE O PTIONS )
2.2.8.1 PHASE: CALL TO NON-ACT 1....... CALL TO NON-ACT 2....... DUAL ENTRY.............. SIMULTANEOUS GAP OUT.... GUARANTEED PASSAGE...... ACTUATED REST IN WALK... CONDITIONAL SERVICE..... ADDED INITIAL CALC...... PHASE OPTIONS PG 1 of 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Figure 108 Phase Options Screen (Page 1) Press the D WN button to see the Phase Options for phases 9 through 16.
2.2.8.2 PHASE: CALL TO NON-ACT 1....... CALL TO NON-ACT 2....... DUAL ENTRY.............. SIMULTANEOUS GAP OUT.... GUARANTEED PASSAGE...... ACTUATED REST IN WALK... CONDITIONAL SERVICE..... ADDED INITIAL CALC...... PHASE OPTIONS PG 2 of 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Figure 109 Phase Options (Page 2)


Call to Non-Act 1 Call to Non-Actuated, or CNA operation, is a method of phase timing (in NEMA phase-based patterns only) in which vehicles and pedestrian detectors are not required in order to serve the phase. CNA is often used when it is desired to hold the coordinated phase in Walk during coordination. Min-Recall and Ped Recall are automatically activated, and phase detectors are disabled for phases set to CNA. The most significant aspect of the CNA mode is that during the hold period while in coordination, the CNA phase will hold at the end of walk instead of the end of green. Ped Clear then follows just before phase termination. The advantage of using CNA for coordinated phases is that the length of walk is determined by the coordinated phase 126 ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Menu split time. In this way, the walk duration varies depending on the cycle and split selection, i.e. Walk time = split time (PedClearance + Yellow + Red). Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a CNA1 phase. A CNA phase contains four Green states, defined by NEMA as States A, B, C and D. State A is Walk Timing, State B is Walk Rest or Walk Hold, State C is Ped Clearance, and State D is Green Dwell/Select. State A: Walk Timing Upon initial entry into phase, Walk times provided Ped Omit is not on. State B: Walk Hold Upon completion of Walk Timing, the phase holds in walk if Hold is applied. State B: Walk Rest The phase rests in Walk if Hold is not applied, the Walk Rest Modifier (WRM) is applied, and no serviceable conflicting calls exist. The phase leaves the Walk Rest/Hold state and advances to Ped Clearance when: a.) The phase is in Walk Rest and a serviceable conflicting call is registered, or b.) The phase is in Walk Hold, a serviceable conflicting call exists and Force Off is applied, or c.) Hold is released and the WRM is not active, regardless of the presence of a serviceable conflicting call. State C: Ped Clearance The phase times the Ped Clearance setting, and then advances to the Green Dwell/Select state. State D: Green Dwell/Select This is the state in which the controller does one of the following things, based on the current conditions: a.) Immediately selects the next phase to be serviced and proceeds to yellow clearance, or b.) it rests in Green/Dont Walk if a call exists and concurrent timing constraints exist, or if WRM and Ped Recycle are not active, or c.) it returns to Walk if no serviceable conflicting call exists and either WRM or Ped Recycle are active, and Ped Omit is not active. Once a CNA phase has left the Walk state, Hold and Force Off do not have an effect on the termination of the phase. That is, Force Off does not have to be maintained throughout Ped Clearance in order to terminate the green, nor will Hold maintain the phase in Green/Dont Walk. Call to Non-Act 2 Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a CNA2 phase. CNA2 operates the same as CNA1, but it provides an alternative phase selection method for Call to Non-Actuated operation, usually for cross-arterial coordination.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus Dual Entry Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a Dual Entry phase. Dual Entry works in conjunction with the compatibility matrix of phases. (See page 95) Dual Entry is a flag on a phase that tells the controller that if a phase in the other ring comes on by itself, the controller can look across the barrier for a compatible phase that is marked as Dual Entry, and it will select one to turn on. This ensures that there will always be a phase on in each ring whenever the compatibility matrix permits it. Dual Entry is typically used during multi ring operation, to prevent a single phase from being served at a time. For example, suppose phase 8 gets called. The controller might serve it alone, except it notices that across the ring barrier, phase 4 is listed as both compatible with 8, AND it is a Dual Entry phase, so the controller goes ahead and turns phase 4 on at the same time. Simultaneous Gap Out Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a Simultaneous Gap Out phase. Simultaneous Gap Out, sometimes known as SGO, allows a phases passage timer to re-start if it has timed out and the phase is waiting to cross a barrier. With SGO enabled and calls on Phases 2 and 6, the Phase 4 passage timer can start again if a new vehicle arrives. If Phase 4 then extends and Phase 8 gaps out, Phase 8 can start its passage timer again. This operation can continue back and forth until both phases Max Out or they both Simultaneously Gap Out, hence the name. When Simultaneous Gap Out is disabled, the phase passage timer cannot restart once it times out for the selected phases and is waiting to cross the barrier. If phase 4 goes to rest while 8 is extending, then 4 cannot start its passage timer again. Both phases will then gap out as soon as phase 8 does. So phases will tend to gap out sooner with SGO disabled than when it is enabled. Guaranteed Passage Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a Guaranteed Passage phase. When this is enabled for a phase that is operating in volume density mode, meaning it is using gap reduction, it allows the phase to retain the right-of-way for the unexpired portion of its Passage timer, following the decision to terminate the Green due to a reduced gap. Actuated Rest in Walk Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be an Actuated Rest-in-Walk phase. This was called Walk Rest or WR in the 3000E controller. Allows the selected phase to rest in Green-Walk instead of Green-Dont Walk, as long as there is no serviceable conflicting call at the end of the Walk timing. Conditional Service Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be a Conditional Service phase. This is typically used to allow a left turn phase to be served twice in the same cycle; once as a leading phase and once as a lagging phase. This is only possible in a non-coordinated intersection. The following conditions are required to allow a conditional service phase to function in this way: there is a call for service on a leading left-turn phase the intersection is not working in coordination with any other intersection

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Controller Menu There is a conflicting call on the opposite side of the barrier. Otherwise, the leftturn phase would be serviced automatically by standard actuated controller behavior, and conditional service isnt required. The through phase of the phase pair that includes this left turn has Gapped out. The time remaining on the through phases maximum timer is larger than the leftturns minimum conditional service time. Note that although conditional service is usually used to allow a second left turn during a cycle, it can in fact be used for any phase that meets the above criteria; just replace the left-turn phase term in the requirement with the conditional phase. Added Initial Calc Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to be an Added Initial phase. Added Initial is a form of Variable Initial timing, which increases the initial green interval of a phase based on the demand for that phase that is measured during the preceding yellow and red periods. The extra time allows a platoon of vehicles to proceed through the intersection before the passage time becomes active. The addedinitial option is generally used when long minimum green times are specified. This method counts the number of detector counts during the non-green portion of the phase and uses that to add a multiple of the added initial time to the minimum green time. The total initial time will not exceed the defined Max initial time. The controller will compare all of the detectors associated with this phase and use the one that collected the largest number of vehicle counts. The values used in these calculations are entered on the Added Initial Timing Screens; see page 119.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Recall Screens
The Recall screen is used to define phase-by-phase recall options for the controller. A recall is a way to create recurring calls for service by phases, even when no real call exists. This is a way to ensure that phases are serviced in the case that detectors are faulty, vehicles miss the detector hot zone, or the pedestrian fails to push the button properly. Recalls can be set for the vehicle and the pedestrian portions of a phase separately. There are two pages of recall screens; the first allows the operator to set the five recall options for phases 1 through 8, the second page allows them to set the same options for phases 9 through 16. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 9.R ECALLS )
2.2.9.1 PHASE/ FUNCTION: VEHICLE MINIMUM......... VEHICLE MAXIMUM......... PEDESTRIAN RECALL....... DETECTOR NON LOCK....... SOFT RECALL............. PHASE RECALLS PG 1 of 2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Figure 110 Recalls Screen (Page 1) Press the D WN button to see the Recall settings for phases 9 through 16.
2.2.9.2 PHASE/ FUNCTION: VEHICLE MINIMUM......... VEHICLE MAXIMUM......... PEDESTRIAN RECALL....... DETECTOR NON LOCK....... SOFT RECALL............. PHASE RECALLS PG 2 of 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

Figure 111 Phase Recalls (Page 2)


Use the Yes and No buttons toggle the Checks for each type of recall for each phase. An X indicates that that type of recall will be applied to the phase. Vehicle Minimum Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to have a Vehicle Minimum Recall, also sometimes known as just a Min Recall. A minimum recall assures that the phase will always be serviced and will time the Initial green, but any further 130 ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Controller Menu green is dependent on detector extensions. (If detections are present, the phase can time up to the Max time.) If there is no demand on the phase, the controller will time the Initial interval only, then it will either rest (if there is no other demand) or advance to the next phase that has demand. A phase can operate in either Min Recall or Max Recall, but not both. If both are selected, then Max Recall will be used. Vehicle Maximum Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to have a Vehicle Maximum Recall, also sometimes known as just a Max Recall. This is similar to Min Recall, except that the phase will time the entire max time regardless of demand. Upon termination of the Max timer, the phase will either rest or advance to a phase that has demand. Maximum 1 is the default maximum used. Maximum 2 can be selected via an external input or via a Time of Day Action. Max Recall is typically used for any phase that is to be pre-timed i.e. it has no detection but must be served. Often used on a main street with no peds (or actuated peds) in a semi-actuated application where the side is actuated but the main street is not. Note that Max Recall should not be applied to phases with functional detection. It is sometimes applied to an actuated phase temporarily when detection fails. A phase can operate in either Min Recall or Max Recall, but not both. If both are selected, then Max Recall will be used. Pedestrian Recall Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to have a Pedestrian Recall, also sometimes known as just a Ped Recall. The pedestrian movement on this phase will be serviced once per cycle. Detector Non Lock Non-Lock disables vehicle call memory on selected phases. The phase only recognizes vehicle presence so that the detector must be continuously occupied in order to maintain a call for service. Note that the default mode is non-lock disabled (no X), which means that memory is on. Program an X for phases to operate in Non-Lock mode (i.e. memory off, presence mode). When Non-Lock is not enabled (locking mode), if the phase terminates with time remaining in the Passage Timer (i.e. Max, Force Off, Interval Advance), a call will be left on the phase and the unit will cycle back to it until the call is serviced. Non lock enabled (X) should be used for phases where the detection zone is sufficient for presence type detection and vehicles must occupy the detector zone to be served. If these vehicles leave before phase service, the call is forgotten, (i.e. Right Turn on Red or Permissive Left Turn completed). Non-Lock disabled (no X) should be used when the detector call must be retained until phase service, such as when the detection zone is set back from the stop bar, or when it is easy for a vehicle to overrun the stop bar detector. Soft Recall Place a check (X) in this row to set this phase to have a Soft Recall. Soft Recall will only place a call on the selected phases if no real calls exist and the controller is not already resting in one of these phases. It allows the unit to cycle between all phases, and when demand ceases, rest in the programmed phase(s).

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Note

If Soft, Min and Max recalls are all set for the same phase, Max Recall will take precedence.

It should be noted that there is a distinct difference between Soft and Min Recall, even when used in a 2-Phase operation. The difference is apparent if, for example, Phases 1 and 2 both have Max Times of 20 seconds, there is no real call on Phase 2, and Soft Recall is applied to Phase 2. In this case, Phase 1 can extend in Passage indefinitely. (Phase 1s Max timer does not count down.) If Min Recall were applied to Phase 2 in this situation, Phase 1 would max out after 20 seconds and then serve demand lacking Phase 2, despite there still being demand on Phase 1. Soft Recall is typically used on a fully actuated intersection. Soft Recall allows the unit to always go back to and rest in main street Green when there is no demand (or recalls) but without interfering with other phase service. For example, at a 3 phase intersection, say that phase 2 is the main street with Soft Recall mode set. If there is demand on Phases 1 and 3 only, the controller will cycle between Phases 1 and 3 only, without servicing Phase 2*. It is only when there is no demand at all that Soft Recall will be applied to Phase 2. If Min Recall had been applied to Phase 2, the unit will always cycle through Phase 2 when going from Phase 1 to 3.

Note

In order for Soft Recall to work properly, the Soft Recall programmed phase(s) must have detection.

Phase 2 will be served normally if there is real demand. (i.e. Cars are actually on the detector.)

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Controller Menu

Overlap Menu
This menu is used to access the two overlap setup screens, one for vehicle overlap phases and the other for pedestrian overlap phases. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 0.O VERLAPS )
2.2.0 OVERLAPS MENU

1. VEHICLE OVERLAPS VARIABLES 2. PEDESTRIAN OVERLAPS

Figure 112 Overlaps Menu Vehicle Overlap Variables


This screen allows for the configuration of up to four overlap phases. Overlaps are phases that are separate from the normal 16 available phases. They are conditional, meaning that their states are linked to one or more of the main 16 phases. To differentiate them from ordinary phases, overlap phases are typically labeled with letters rather than numbers (i.e. Overlap A through D.) (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 0.O VERLAPS > 1.V EHICLE O VERLAPS V ARIABLES )
2.2.0.1.1 VEH OVL CONFIG PG 1of 4

OVERLAP 1 ---------------------------------------1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 PARENTS MODIFIER TYPE .......... TRAIL GREEN ... TRAIL YELLOW .. TRAIL RED ..... 1 0 3.0 0.0

Figure 113 Overlap Screen (Page 1)

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus Press the D WN button to see the Overlap settings for Overlaps B through D.
2.2.0.1.4 VEH OVL CONFIG PG 4of 4

OVERLAP 4 ---------------------------------------1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 PARENTS MODIFIER TYPE .......... TRAIL GREEN ... TRAIL YELLOW .. TRAIL RED ..... 1 0 3.0 0.0

Figure 114 Overlap Screen (Page 4)


An Overlap is a set of G-Y-R outputs that are associated with one or more phases. The overlap forms a separate movement that derives its operation from its assigned phases, commonly called parent phases. A typical overlap will be active during two or more parent phases such that if any parent is green, the overlap is green as well. If the controller makes a phase next decision to clear from one parent phase to another, the overlap will remain green throughout. If the controller decides to clear from a parent to a non-parent, the overlap will clear with the parent using the parents yellow and red duration. Furthermore, in multiple ring configurations, more than one parent phase may be active at a given time. If a phase next decision is made to clear from a parent to a non-parent, and a parent phase is green in another ring, the Overlap remains green. Parents Phases during which the overlap is allowed to be green (see Overlap general description previous). For standard overlaps, only the parent phases need to be programmed. Per the NTCIP 1202 standard, section 2.10.2.3, the overlap will be green whenever a parent phases output is green, and whenever the controller is changing between parent phases. Trailing values These numbers represent the time, in seconds, that the overlap termination is delayed (i.e. a double-clearing overlap) relative to the parent phase. Type The type of overlap determines the logic that will be used by the overlap. Overlap Types are defined by the NTCIP 1202 standard, section 2.10.2.2 (i.e. the overlapType object section.) The available type options are shown in Table 13. This is a read-only value. The ATC self-selects the type based on the user programming of the overlap parameters.

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Controller Menu Table 13 Available Types of Overlap Type


1 2 3

Overlap Type
Other, not NTCIP (Advanced Overlap) Normal (Standard) Minus Green - Yellow

By the NTCIP 1202 standard, a Type 2 (Normal) overlap is controlled by the Parent phases. The overlap output is green in the following situations: (1) when a Parent phase is green, or (2) when a Parent phase is yellow (or in red clearance) and another Parent phase is next. The overlap output is yellow when a Parent phase is yellow and no Parent phase is next. Otherwise, the overlap output is always red. By the same standard, a Type 3 (Minus Green-Yellow) overlap is controlled by the Parent phases and the Modifier phases. For a Type 3 overlap, the overlap output is green in the following situations: (1) when a Parent phase is green and all Modifier phases are also green, or (2) when a Parent phase is yellow (or in red clearance), another Parent phase is next, and all Modifier phases are also green. The overlap output is yellow whenever a Parent phase is yellow and a Modifier phase is NOT yellow and no Parent phase is next. Otherwise, the overlap output is always red. Overlap Channels and Compatibility Overlap operation is sometimes a source of confusion for users, especially when it comes to overlap compatibility. To help clear this confusion, the figure below shows a typical mapping of phases and overlaps to monitor (MMU) channels for an example phasing. Load switches 1 through 5 are shown in Figure 115, with their typical assignments.

Figure 115 Typical Load Switch assignments


Note that the overlap is on a separate load switch which is driven by OVERLAP A, which in turn has been assigned phases 1+2 as parents. CH1-CH5 indicates the Conflict Monitor (or MMU) channel assignments.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus Note also that the appropriate channel compatibilities are: 1-5 2-5 The channel compatibilities are definitely not 1+2 as is sometimes thought. It is important to be able to make the distinction between the overlap and its compatibilities vs. its parents and their compatibilities. The overlap is a separate movement and its parents are not necessarily compatible with each other (and are usually not.)

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Controller Menu

Pedestrian Overlaps
This screen allows for the configuration of up to eight pedestrian overlap phases. Ped overlaps are ped phases that are separate from the normal 16 available pedestrian phases. They are conditional, meaning that their states are linked to one or more of the main 16 vehicular phases. To differentiate them from ordinary phases, ped overlap phases are typically labeled with letters rather than numbers (i.e. Overlap A through H.) (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 2.C ONTROLLER > 0.O VERLAPS > 2.P EDESTRIAN O VERLAPS )
2.2.0.2.1 PED OVL CONFIG PG 1of 8

OVERLAP 1 ---------------------------------------1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 INCLUDED X X MODIFIER X WALK TIME ... CLEAR TIME .. 5 8

Figure 116 Pedestrian Overlap Screen (Page 1)


Use the D WN button to navigate to the other seven pedestrian overlap parameter screens.
2.2.0.2.8 PED OVL CONFIG PG 8of 8

OVERLAP 8 ---------------------------------------1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 INCLUDED MODIFIER WALK TIME ... CLEAR TIME .. 0 0

Figure 117 Pedestrian Overlap Screen (Page 8)


Included Vehicle phase or phases with which the Ped/Ped Clear overlap will be displayed. (The parent phase) Modifier An included phase during which the pedestrian overlap output will transition from Dont Walk to Walk. Walk Time The duration (from 1 to 255 seconds) of the Walk output. The time starts at the beginning of the Modifier phase. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 137

Chapter 5 Programming Menus Clear Time The duration (from 1 to 255 seconds) of the Flashing Dont Walk (FDW) that will be displayed at the end of the programmed Walk time.

Note

The last vehicle phase will remain in All Red until the Walk+Clear time has completed.

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Coordination Menu

COORDINATION MENU
Coordination is the process of keeping multiple intersections working together in a group timing pattern. This allows for green wave movements along main streets, and similar types of coordinated intersection actions. The screens under the Coordination menu allow you to configure the ATC-1000 controller to function in a coordinated environment. This section of the manual describes the screen-by-screen, and parameter-byparameter values used to program coordination. For a discussion of the actual process of programming the ATC-1000 to achieve coordinated operation, refer to Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation, starting on page 181. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION )
2.3 COORDINATION MENU

1. COORDINATION VARIABLES 2. PATTERN TABLE 3. SPLIT TABLE 4. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION EXT/REDUCE 5. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION PERCENT

Figure 118 Coordination Menu

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Coordination Variables Screen


This screen is where global coordination parameters are set, including default patterns, methods of correction, and overall coordination operating modes. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION > 1.C OORDINATION V ARI ABLES )
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......dwell(2) USTC CORRECTION MODE..toronto(0) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 119 Coordination Variables Screen


Operational Mode This number (a value between 000 and 255)sets the overall operational mode for coordination on the ATC-1000. Table 14 Operational Mode values Operational Mode
0

Definition
Automatic mode This mode provides for coordinated operation, Free and Flash to be determined automatically by all possible sources: Interconnect, Time Based events, or System Commands. This is the normal default mode for most systems. Manual Pattern mode Coordinated operation running the specified number pattern (Pattern 001 to Pattern 253). This selection of pattern overrides all other pattern commands, including System Commands. Manual Free mode This mode provides for Free operation without coordination, or Automatic Flash from any source. Manual Flash mode This mode causes the controller to run in the Automatic Flash state, without coordination or Free operation.

001 - 253

254 255

Correction Mode Defines which coordination correction method will be used when establishing a new or different offset from the coordinated time. Setting this value to anything other than other(1) will automatically set the USTC Correction Mode parameter to be other(1). DO NOT SET both Correction Mode and USTC Correction Mode to be other(1) at the same time!

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Coordination Menu Table 15 Coordination Correction modes Correction Mode


other (1)

Description
The coordinator establishes a new offset by a mechanism not defined in the NTCIP standard. This tells the coordinator to use the USTC Correction Mode. When changing the offset time, the coordinator will dwell in the coordinated phases until the desired offset is reached. When changing the offset time, the coordinator adds or subtracts time to/from phase timings with the aim to limit the amount of time the cycle length changes. When changing the offset time, the coordinator adds time to phase timings with the aim to limit the amount of time the cycle length changes.

dwell (2) shortway/Smooth (3)

addonly (4)

USTC Correction Mode These are the proprietary USTC (U.S. Traffic Corporation) coordination correction methods. To access these options, the main Correction Mode value (above) must be set to option 1: other. Setting this value to anything other than other(1) will automatically set the Correction Mode parameter to be other(1). DO NOT SET both Correction Mode and USTC Correction Mode to be other(1) at the same time. The possible values for USTC Correction are: Table 16 USTC Coordination Correction modes USTC Correction Mode
Toronto (0)

Description
The coordinator establishes a new offset by using the City of Toronto offset correction strategy. Refer to Toronto Offset Correction Ext/Reduce on page 144. This value should be used whenever the Correction Mode parameter is set to anything other than other(1). This value means, use the Correction Mode method.

Other (1)

Maximum Mode This parameter determines which maximum time, if any, is used during coordinated operation. The possible values are: Table 17 Coordination Maximum modes Maximum mode value
other (1)

Description
The maximum time to use during coordination is not defined in the NTCIP standard. In practical terms for the ATC-1000, this means that there is no maximum time used during coordination. While coordination is running a pattern, the coordinator will use Max 1 as the maximum phase time. While coordination is running a pattern, the coordinator will use Max 2 as the maximum phase time. Internal maximum timing is inhibited while coordination is running a pattern.

maximum1 (2) maximum2 (3) maxInhibit (4)

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus Force Mode This parameter determines which pattern force mode the ATC-1000 coordinator will use. The possible values are: Table 18 Coordination Force Mode options Mode
other (1) floating (2) fixed (3)

Description
No force off mode is used. Each phase will be forced to the new split time after the phase becomes active. This allows unused split time to be passed to the coordinated phase. Each phase will be forced to the new split time at a fixed position in the cycle. This allows unused split time to pass to the following phase.

System Pattern This parameter defines how the controller will react when it receives a called System Pattern. This is the value that is set by the central system to control the devices pattern from central. The possible values are: Table 19 System Pattern modes System Pattern mode
0 1 - 253 254 255

Description
Standby mode The system relinquishes control of the device. The controller runs the pattern specified by TOD. Pattern # The system commanded pattern (Pattern 1 to Pattern 253.) Free mode The controller runs in Free mode. Flash mode A call for the device to enter Automatic Flash.

If an unsupported or invalid pattern is called by the central system, the ATC-1000 will run in Free mode. The value of System Pattern is ignored if the controller is in Backup mode. Any changes sent to this value will reset the Backup timer to zero (0).

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Coordination Menu

Pattern Table Screens


Coordinated intersections dont work with a single cycle time. Rather, they work with a cycle, offset, and split goal that is then coordinated with the other intersections on a roadway artery. This screen provide three pages of places to define different CycleOffset-Split patterns. Each cycle-offset-split combination is known as a pattern. The ATC-1000 Controller can be programmed with up to 48 different patterns. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION > 2.P ATTERN T ABLE )
2.3.2.1 PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO COORD PATTERN TABLE PG1OF3 1 90 0 1 1 9 30 0 1 1 2 30 0 1 1 10 30 0 1 1 3 30 0 1 1 11 30 0 1 1 4 30 0 1 1 12 30 0 1 1 5 30 0 1 1 13 30 0 1 1 6 30 0 1 1 14 30 0 1 1 7 30 0 1 1 15 30 0 1 1 8 30 0 1 1 16 30 0 1 1

Figure 120 Pattern Table Screen (Page 1)

Split Table Screens


The split table is used to define what split of the overall cycle time each phase will take up. The ATC-1000 controller will accept up to 16 different defined splits for the intersection. A split table number is referenced in each column of the Pattern table screens, so each defined pattern calls one of these defined split tables, which is a large part of what defines each pattern. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION > 3.S PLIT T ABLE )
2.3.3. 1 TABLE # PHASE SPLIT MODE CRDPH PHASE SPLIT MODE CRDPH COORD SPLIT TABLE PG 1of16 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 :015 035 015 025 015 035 015 025 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 : X X 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 :000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 : 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 :

Figure 121 Split Table Screen (Page 1)

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Toronto Offset Correction Ext/Reduce


The values on these screens are used only when the values for Correction Mode = other(1) and USTC Correction Mode=toronto(0) on the Coord Variables screen. This mode was added at the request of the City of Toronto. This method of coordination offset correction allows the operator to set a specific number of seconds to be extended or reduced for each phase, in each of the 16 available split tables. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION > 4.T ORONTO O FFSET C ORRECTION E XT /R EDUCE )
2.3.4 TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION EXT/RED SPLIT 1 of 16 PHASE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 EXTEND :000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 REDUCE :000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 PHASE 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 EXTEND :000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 REDUCE :000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 ALL VALUES 0-255 SECS PAGE DOWN FOR MORE SPLITS

Figure 122 Offset Correction Extend/Reduce Split Table


Extend The number of seconds to add to a phase if offset correction is required and split table N is in effect as the current pattern for the intersection. Reduce The number of seconds to reduce a phase length if offset correction is required and split table N is in effect as the current pattern for this intersection.

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Coordination Menu

Toronto Offset Correction Percent


Again, on this screen, the values set here are only used if Correction Mode = other(1) and USTC Correction Mode=toronto(0) on the Coord Variables screen. This screen is used to set a percentage value for each of the 48 available NEMA patterns in the controller. The percentage is used to determine whether phase extension or phase reduction should be used when the controller needs to offset in an attempt to get back to coordination. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 3.C OORDINATION > 5.T ORONTO O FFSET C ORRECTION P ERCENT )
2.3.5 TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION PERCENT PAT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

PAT 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 PAT 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 PAT 37 38 38 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ALL VALUES 0-99 PERCENT

Figure 123 Offset Correction Extend/Reduce Splits as Percentages


The available values are between 0 and 99 percent, which indicates how far out of sync the start of this controllers cycle is from the coordination point. This is the percent of the full cycle duration and it indicates the threshold between reduction actions and extension. So if the percentage set on this screen for pattern 1 is 20%, and the controller is currently running pattern 1, and its currently lagging the coordination point by 15% of its cycle length, the controller will start reducing phase split times (using the values set on the Toronto Offset Correction Ext/Reduce screen, see page 144). On the other hand in this scenario, if the controller is lagging the coordination point by 25%, then the controller will start extending phases (again, by the Extend values defined on the Toronto Offset Correction Ext/Reduce screen) in order to get back into coordination.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

TIME OF DAY MENU


The Time of Day functions allow the controller to switch between coordinated patterns at preset times throughout a day, and throughout the year. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4 1. ACTIONS 2. DAY PLANS 3. SCHEDULES 4. OVERRIDE COMMANDS 5. SET LOCAL TIME 6. ADVANCED TIME SETUP 7. DAYLIGHT SAVING SETUP TIME OF DAY MENU
OF

D AY )

Figure 124 Time of Day menu


Actions, or events, define a switch to a pattern or some other TOD event. A Day Plan specifies what actions happen during the course of a day. Up to 16 actions can be called in a single day plan. A Schedule is a Year Plan, which specifies what days of the year a given Day Plan will be used.

Time of Day Actions Menu


This menu provides access to the two kinds of Time of Day actions: Event Plans and Auxiliary/Special Functions. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4.1 1. PLANS 2. AUXILIARY & SPECIAL FUNCTIONS TIME OF DAY ACTIONS
OF

D AY > 1.A CTIONS )

Figure 125 Time of Day Actions menu


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Time of Day Menu

Action Plans Screens


The Actions screens provide slots for the definitions of up to 48 Time of Day events, which the ATC-1000 controller calls actions. Actions are calls upon a specific Cycleoffset-split pattern (as defined on the Pattern tables of the Coordination menu), or a special-case pattern such as pattern 255 which puts the intersection into FLASH. (M AIN M ENU > 4.T IME
2.4.1.1 PAT = 0..255 EVENT: PATT : TSP : C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 1 1 0 2 0 0 3 0 0
OF

D AY > 1.A CTIONS > 1.P LANS )

TOD ACTION 1 of 6 TSP = 0..48 4 0 0 5 0 0 6 0 0 7 0 0 8 0 0

Figure 126 Time of Day Actions screen (Page 1)


Event This is the Action number that can be called by a Time of Day plan. PAT This is the pattern that is initiated when this TOD Action is called. TSP This is the Transit Signal Priority Plan that is initiated whenever this TOD Action is called. (Refer to Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority starting on page 267.) COMMAND The eight numbered COMMAND rows that align under the forty-eight (48) TOD Action screens (6 pages for each of 8 events), correspond to the eight Commanded TOD Action Numbers on Screen 2.4.4 (i.e. Override Commands). When a set of Override Commands are programmed and saved under a given Commanded TOD Action Number, that numbered set of commands can be called from within the TOD schedule. This is done by placing an X to the right of the COMMAND row and under the desired TOD ACTION event column.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus The example shown in Figure 142, will turn on all of the Override Commands that are linked to COMMANDED TOD ACTION Number 1, during the Days and Times that TOD ACTION event 1 is programmed to be on.
2.4.1.1 PAT = 0..255 EVENT: 1 2 3 PATT : TSP : C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 1 1 X 2 1 3 1 TOD ACTION 1 of 6 TSP = 0..48 4 5 6 7 8 4 1 5 1 6 1 7 1 8 1

Figure 127 Time of Day Action COMMAND - Example


Use the D WN button to access the other TOD Action Plan screens.
2.4.1.1 PAT = 0..255 EVENT: PATT : TSP : C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 41 0 0 42 0 0 43 0 0 TOD ACTION 6 of 6 TSP = 0..48 44 0 0 45 0 0 46 0 0 47 0 0 48 0 0

Figure 128 Time of Day Actions screen (Page 6)

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Time of Day Menu

Auxiliary and Special Functions Screens


These screens are used to attach auxiliary and special function outputs to any of the available TOD Actions. (M AIN M ENU > 4.T IME
2.4.1.2 EVENT: AUX 1: 2: 3: SPC 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 1 2 3
OF

D AY > 1.A CTIONS > 2.A UXILIARY & S PECIAL F UNCTIONS )


1 of 6 7 8

TOD ACTION 4 5 6

Figure 129 Auxiliary/Special Function Assignment (Screen 1)


AUX When a check (X) is placed in one of these slots, the TOD Action Event will activate this Auxiliary output on the controller. There are three available Auxiliary Function outputs. SPC When a check (X) is placed in one of these slots, the TOD Action Event will activate this Auxiliary output on the controller. There are eight available Special Function outputs. Use the D WN to see the auxiliary/special function assignments for any of the 48 available TOD Events:
2.4.1.2 EVENT: AUX 1: 2: 3: SPC 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8: 41 42 43 TOD ACTION 44 45 46 6 of 6 47 48

Figure 130 Auxiliary/Special Function Assignment (Screen 6)

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Day Plan Screens


Up to 32 day plans can be configured using these screens. Each day plan calls out some of the action plans configured on the Action Plans screens of the TOD menu. Each event during the day plan is composed of an action, and an hour (military time) and minute for the action to occur. Day plans are called out in Schedules. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4.2.1 DAY PLAN EVENT # HOUR MIN ACTION EVENT # HOUR MIN ACTION 1 0 0 1 9 0 0 0 TOD DAYPLANS 1 2 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 16 0 0 0
OF

D AY > 2.D AY P LANS )

PG 1 of32

Figure 131 Time of Day - Day Plan Screen (Page 1)


Event # Each Day Plan can have up to 16 events, each defined by the time of day that the event occurs, and the Action to call at that time. This is non-editable piece of text that labels each event box in the day plan. If the action associated with the event is 0 (zero), then that particular event is ignored. Hour This is a two digit number that indicates the hour in which the action should occur. This is a military representation of the time, so the hour after midnight would be represented by 0, and 2:00 in the afternoon would be represented by 14. Min This is the minute in the hour when the action will be called. Valid values for Min are any number between 0 and 59. Action This is the number of the Action that will be called at this events time. If the value is 0 (zero), then the event is ignored by the controller. Paging down (D WN ) will take you to all 32 of the available day plan screens.

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Schedule Screens
A Schedule is also known as a Year Plan. It defines what months, weekdays, and days of the month of a generic year will call each of the controllers Day Plans. There are 32 schedules that can be configured. All schedules are followed by the controller, but if the same day is assigned to multiple day plans, the highest numbered Schedule will take precedence. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME OF D AY > 3.S CHEDULES )
2.4.3.1 ENTRY 01 SCHEDULE J F M A M J J A S O N D MONTH X X X X X X X X X X X X SCHEDULE S M T W T F S DAY X X X X X X X 1111111111222222222233 SCHEDULE 1234567890123456789012345678901 DATE XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX SCHEDULE DAY PLAN 1 TOD SCHEDULES PG 1 of32

Figure 132 Time of Day Schedules Screen (Page 1)


Use the D WN button to switch to other screens that define the rest of the TOD Schedules. Entry This is the number of the currently visible Schedule. This indicates the priority of the Schedule. Schedule 1 has the highest priority, and Schedule 32 has the lowest. If a day is not defined in the higher priority schedule, the controller looks in the next lower priority Schedule to see if a Day Plan for it is defined there, and so on. Month Selects which month or months of the year to apply this schedules Day Plan. Day Selects which days of the week in the above month to apply this schedules Day Plan. The Day and Date selections are mandatory. Both day and date values must be entered. Date Selects which dates of the month to apply this schedules Day Plan. The Day and Date selections are mandatory. Both day and date values must be entered. Schedule Day Plan This is the Day Plan that is called by this Schedule on the months and days selected above.

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Override Commands Screen


This is an array of screens (Actions 1 through 8, Events 0 through 99) that is 8 screens wide by 10 screens up and down. Use the number keys on the keypad to jump between Actions 1 through 8. Use the Up+ and Dwn buttons to scroll up and down between the 10 event screens. These are commands that can be called by the TOD plan, or by a central override to change the intersection operation of the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4.4 COMMANDED TOD ACTION Number 1 0.not 1.not 2.not 3.not 4.not 5.not 6.not 7.not 8.not 9.not assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) assigned(0) : : : : : : : : : :
OF

D AY > 4.O VERRIDE C OMMANDS )

PG 1of10

Page Up or Down To scroll Events Press 1 to 8 to select Action Number

Figure 133 Override Commands Screen


To change an event setting, use the number and Up/Dwn keys to navigate to the correct screen, press the -E key combination to enter Edit mode, use the up and down buttons to scroll the blinking cursor to the event you wish to change, then press the NXT button to select one of the following event calls: Table 20 Available TOD Override Commands Parameter value
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Override Command
No Assigned Unit Min Recall Unit W.R.M. (Walk Rest Modifier) Phase CNA1 (Call-to-Non-Actuated) Phase CNA2 Phase Min Recall Phase Max Recall Phase Ped Recall Phase Soft Recall Phase Dual Entry Phase SimGap Dis (Simultaneous Gap-Out Disable) Phase Actd Riw (Actuated Rest-in-Walk) Phase Omit Peds Omit

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Time of Day Menu Parameter value


14 15 16 17 18

Override Command
Ring Max 2 Ring Max Inhibit Ring Red Rest Ring Omit Rclr Ring Ped Recle

In general, these commands all follow a pattern: command scope (Unit-wide, Phase, Ring) and the command to be enacted (for example, minimum recall, red rest, etc.)

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Set Local Time Screen


This screen is used to set the basic date and time values for the internal real-time clock of the ATC-1000 controller. This screen is used to set Local Time. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4.5 YEAR: 2006 HOUR: 08 SET LOCAL TIME MONTH: 03 MINUTE: 06
OF

D AY > 5.S ET L OCAL T IME )

PG1OF1 DAY: 24 SECOND: 52

Current Timezone: EASTERN DST Status: Enabled Timzone and DST cannot be edited from this page. Use the Advanced Time Setup and Daylight Saving Settings pages, accessible from the previous menu.

Figure 134 Time Set Screen


As the screen states, the Current Timezone and DST Status values cannot be edited on this screen. The values shown there reflect the settings that have been entered elsewhere in these Time of Day screens. To edit times in Global time rather than local time and to edit your time zone setting (Local Time Differential), youll need to use the Advanced Time Setup Screen. Daylight Saving Times values are edited on the Daylight Saving Setup Menu.

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Time of Day Menu

Advanced Time Setup Screen


This screen provides another, more advanced way to edit your controllers time and date values. On this screen, date and time are set in Greenwich Mean Time (also known as GMT, Universal Time, or for military types, Zulu.) You also need to specify how far off the local Standard time is from GMT. This Local Time Differential is entered in seconds. So to set the local clock to a time zone that is GMT minus 5 hours, which is Eastern Standard Time, you would enter a Local Time Differential of -18000 seconds. (5 hours 60 minutes per hour 60 seconds per minute) Refer to the Setting the Date and Time topic on page 22 for details on setting the time differential. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME
2.4.6 ADVANCED TIME SET
OF

D AY > 6.A DVANCE T IME S ETUP )

PG1OF1

GLOBAL TIME HOUR...............12 GLOBAL TIME MINUTE.............07 GLOBAL TIME SECOND.............06 GLOBAL YEAR....................2006 GLOBAL MONTH...................03 GLOBAL DAY.....................24 LOCAL TIME DIFFERENTIAL........-18000 PATTERN SYNC...................00000 (MINUTES AFTER MIDNIGHT)

Figure 135 Advanced Time Setup screen


Use the + E keypad combination to enter and exit Edit mode. An * will show up in the upper right corner when you are in Edit mode. Use the up and down arrow buttons to switch between the fields. The Global Time and Date values are the numerical values of the current date and time at Greenwich, England. The Differential is the offset, in seconds, from Greenwich time. There are 3600 seconds for each hour your time zone is offset from GMT. You will need to edit the plus and minus symbol first, and then press the right arrow button to switch to the numeric part of the time differential value. Time zones to the West of the Meridian are a negative differential (i.e. the time is earlier), and zones to the East of the Meridian have a positive differential (the time is later.) Pattern Sync For coordinated operation, all of the controllers need to have a common zero point to use to calculate their offset timers. Typically, the default is midnight of every day as the time when the cycle offset is set back to zero. Of course, if all of your controllers suddenly generate a large offset at midnight due to this syncing action, they will all suddenly start large offset seeking timing actions, which could cause sudden changes in split times right after midnight. Many municipalities have opted to set the time to occur later, when traffic is lighter for these actions. This value is the number of minutes after midnight when this pattern sync should occur. Example: So if you would like the pattern sync to occur at 2:00 am, all of the controllers in your system should be set to have the same Pattern Sync value: 120. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 155

Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Daylight Saving Settings Menu


This menu provides a host of options to view, modify, or disable the daylight saving parameters for the ATC controller. Daylight saving time, or Summer Time in some countries, is the adjustment of local time to allow for a longer daylight period in the afternoon and a shorter amount of daylight in the morning. This is typically started in early Spring as the days begin to get longer, and ended in late Fall as the days shorten. (This is, of course, true in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, although Spring starts in March in the North and in September in the South, so the dates will be different.) (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME OF D AY > 7.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETTINGS )
2.4.7 DAYLIGHT SAVING SETUP MENU

1. Load Default DST Settings 2. Disable DST 3. Display Current DST Settings 4. Set DST by exact date 5. Set DST by day of week occurances

Figure 136 Daylight Saving Time Settings screen


Options 1, 2, 4, and 5 are used to modify the current DST settings. In particular, Option 1 loads a default DST set of parameters which correspond to the normal Daylight Saving time values in the United States, namely: The Default DST begins on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 AM local time. Local time is set forward one hour, so it becomes 3:00 AM local time. The Default DST ends on the first Sunday in November, at 1:00 AM local time. Local time is set backward one hour, so it becomes 12:00 midnight.

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Time of Day Menu

Load Default DST Settings


Option 4 on the Daylight Saving Setup Menu loads a default DST set of parameters that correspond to the normal Daylight Saving time values in the United States. It is also the only way to Enable DST after it has been disabled. This command also turns the DST ON/OFF switch on the Advanced Time Setup screen to ON. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME 1.L OAD D EFAULT DST S ETTINGS )
2.4.7
OF

D AY > 7.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP >

DAYLIGHT SAVING SETUP MENU

1. Load Default DST Settings 2. Disable DST 3. Display Current DST Settings 4. Set DST by exact date 5. Set DST by day of week occurrances

Loaded default DST Settings!

Figure 137 Status message showing default DST settings were loaded
The default values are: DST begins on the second Sunday in March, at 2:00 AM local time. Local time is set forward one hour, so it becomes 3:00 AM local time. DST ends on the first Sunday in November, at 1:00 AM local time. Local time is set backward one hour, so it becomes 12:00 midnight.

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Disable DST
Use this command to turn off Daylight Saving Time. This erases your current DST settings, including dates and times. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME 2.D ISABLE DST)
2.4.7
OF

D AY > 7.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP >

DAYLIGHT SAVING SETUP MENU

1. Load Default DST Settings 2. Disable DST 3. Display Current DST Settings 4. Set DST by exact date 5. Set DST by day of week occurrances

DST has been disabled!

Figure 138 Status message showing DST is disabled


This command also changes the DST (ON/OFF) parameter displayed on the Advanced Time Setup screen to OFF. The ON/OFF switch cannot be modified until DST has been Enabled using one of the methods mentioned below.

Note

One ENABLES Daylight Saving Time merely by defining when it starts and ends. This can be done by loading the default values, or by defining Begin and End dates and times on the other screens in the Daylight Saving Setup Menu.

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Time of Day Menu

Display Current DST Settings


Select this option to see what the current values are for daylight saving time on this controller. If DST is disabled, the screen will show just one line, DST is Disabled. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME 3.D ISPLAY C URRENT DST S ETTINGS )
OF

D AY > 6.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP >

2.4.7.1 DST Params (Occurrences of DOW) DST Begins in the month of <March> on the <Second> <Sunday> at 02:00:00 o'clock. that occurs on or after the <1st> DST Ends in the month of <November> on the <First> <Sunday> at 01:00:00 o'clock. that occurs on or after the <1st> Minutes to Adjust time: 60

Figure 139 Display Current DST Settings screen


DST values cannot be modified on this screen. If DST has been disabled using the 2.Disable DST command on the Daylight Saving Setup Menu, then this screen will show that fact:
2.4.7.1 DST is Disabled

Figure 140 Disabled DST on the Display Current DST Settings screen

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Set DST by Exact Date


Use this screen if Daylight Saving time begins and ends on the same date every year. To use this screen, the Daylight Savings (ON/OFF) switch on the Advanced Time Set screen must be set to ON. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME 4.S ET DST BY E XACT D ATE )
2.4.7.2 Set DST by Exact Date Begin Date: 01/01/2000 Begin Time: 00:00:00 End Date: 01/01/2000 End Time: 00:00:00 Minutes to Adjust time: 60
OF

D AY > 7.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP >

Figure 141 Set DST by Exact Date


Use the + E keypad combination to enter and exit Edit mode. The Begin Date and time is the exact date and time that the Real Time Clock in the controller will be set one hour forward. The End Date and Time are the date and time that the Real Time Clock will be set backward by one hour. There is one modifier to these values: M INUTES TO A DJUST T IME This option allows the real time clock to be modified slowly over this number of minutes, so that a sudden shift in the current time will not cause large offset seeking activity in coordinated operation. When a non-zero number of minutes are specified, the change in time will be equally divided over the duration of the period. A typical value might be 10 to 20 minutes.

Important

You must exit Edit mode to save these settings, otherwise the values will be lost when you leave the screen. When you do exit Edit mode, the values shown on this screen will return to their default values, but the new settings will be visible on the Display Current DST Settings screen.

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Time of Day Menu

Set DST by Day of Week Occurrences


Use this screen to define the operation of the Daylight Saving function if the day and time to begin and end is defined as a the Nth day of a certain month (i.e. the First Monday in October). This is the method used to define Daylight Saving Time Begin and End dates in the United States. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME OF D AY > 7.D AYLIGHT S AVING S ETUP > 5.S ET DST BY DAY OF WEEK OCCURRENCES)
2.4.7.3 Set DST by Occurrences of DOW Begin Begin Begin Begin Begin End End End End End Month:....... 01 Occur:....... 1 Day of Week: 1 Day of Month: 01 Mins from Midnight: 0060

Month:..........01 Occur:..........1 Day of Week:....1 Day of Month:...01 Mins from Midnight: 0060

Minutes to Adjust Time: 0060

Figure 142 Display Current DST Settings screen


To modify any of these values, enter edit mode. ( + E)

Important

After youve made edits to one or more of these settings, you must exit Edit mode to save the new values, otherwise the values will be lost when you leave the screen. When you do exit Edit mode, the values shown on this screen will return to their default values, but the new settings will be visible on the Display Current DST Settings screen.

Begin Month The month of the year expressed as a number between 1 and 12 when daylight saving should begin by setting the clock ahead one hour. Begin Occur If you specify a Day of the Week, below, on which occurrence in the month should DST begin. Begin Day of Week Which day of the week, expressed as a number between 1 (Sunday) and 7 (Saturday) should DST begin. Combined with the above value to specify which day of the month. (e.g. if Begin Occur = 3, and Begin Day of Weed = 4, then DST will begin on the 3rd Wednesday of the month.) Begin Day of Month If you specify a Begin Occur and Begin Day of Month, skip this parameter. This is the date of the month on this screen. Begin Mins from Midnight The time for the Beginning DST clock adjustment to occur, in minutes after midnight on the above day. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 161

Chapter 5 Programming Menus End Month The month of the year expressed as a number between 1 and 12 when daylight saving should end, End Occur If you specify a Day of the Week, below, on which occurrence in the month should DST end. End Day of Week Which day of the week, expressed as a number between 1 (Sunday) and 7 (Saturday) should DST end. End Day of Month If you specify a End Occur and End Day of Month, skip this parameter. This is the date of the month on this screen. End Mins from Midnight The time for the Ending DST clock adjustment to occur, in minutes after midnight on the above day. Minutes to Adjust Time This option allows the real time clock to be modified slowly over this number of minutes, so that a sudden shift in the current time will not cause large offset seeking activity in coordinated operation. When a non-zero number of minutes are specified, the change in time will be equally divided over the duration of the period. A typical value might be 10 to 20 minutes.

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Detectors Menu

DETECTORS MENU
The screens on this menu allow the operator to configure the detectors that are attached to the controller, define how they operate, and map them to phases. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5. D ETECTORS )
2.5 DETECTORS MENU

1. VEHICLE DETECTORS OPTIONS 2. VEHICLE DETECTORS TIMING 3. DETECTORS CALL PHASE 4. DETECTORS SWITCH PHASE 5. PEDESTRIAN DETECTORS

Figure 143 Detector Menu

Vehicle Detector Options Screens


This screen is used to work with detector channels after they have been configured. This is where one can place a call on a detector, for example. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5. D ETECTORS > 1.V EHICLE D ETECTOR O PTIONS )
2.5.1.1 VEH DETECTOR OPTIONS PG 1of 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 DET NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 OPTION: CALL..... QUEUE.... ADD INIT. PASSAGE..X X X X X X X X RED LOCK. YEL LOCK. OCC DET.. VOL DET.. RESET....

Figure 144 Vehicle Detector Options Screen (Page 1)

Note

For all of these per-detector functions, its important to remember that the detectors are not associated with individual phases on this screen. Rather, detector-to-phase association is defined on the Detector Call Phases Screen, which is described on page 166.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus Call Place a check (X) in this row under a detector indicates that a detection will place a call for service on the phase associated with this detector, whenever that phase is not timing a Green interval. Queue Place a check (X) on this row under a detector to indicate that this detector is used for gap detection. A queue detector will extend the Green interval of the assigned phase until a gap occurs, or until the Green phase times longer than the optional queue limit. Add Init An X placed in this row beneath a detector indicates that that detector will be used to generate detection inputs for the Added Init function of Initial Green extension. The method used is to count the vehicle detections from all detectors associated with the phase, take the detector with the highest count total, and multiply that count total by the Added Init time step. This extra time is then compared to the minimum and maximum time in effect and utilized, but only if it is greater than the minimum and less than the maximum. Passage When this row is checked (X) the controller will maintain a reset of the associated phases Passage Timer for the duration of the detector actuation, while the phase is green. Red Lock When this row is checked (X) the controller will lock a call to the assigned phase if an actuation occurs while the phase is not showing green or yellow. Yel Lock When this row is checked (X) the controller will lock a call to the assigned phase if an actuation occurs while the phase is not showing green. Occ Det When this row is checked (X) then this detector is marked as an occupancy detector. An occupancy detector collects data for the associated phases occupancy calculations. Vol Det When this row is checked (X) then this detector is marked as a volume detector. A volume detector collects data for the associated phases volume calculations. Reset This sends a reset command to the detector, forcing it to return to FALSE (0) after the reset command. A reset command is an interactive control that is not stored in the controller database. The reset command is sent as soon as you press Yes on the keypad.

Note

A reset command may reset more than one detector, if other detectors are attached to a common reset channel, as is often the case.

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Detectors Menu

Vehicle Detector Timing Screens


This screen is used to enter timing modifications to the operation of each of the 32 detection channels. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5.D ETECTORS > 2.V EHICLE D ETECTOR T IMING )
2.5.2.1 DET NO. DELAY EXTEND QUEUE NO ACT MAX PRS ERR CTS FAIL T VEH DETECTOR TIMING PG 1 of 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Figure 145 Vehicle Detector Timing Screen (Page 1)


Delay A number between 0.0 and 255.0 that indicates the number of seconds that are added as a delay on the input whenever the detectors output goes ON. (True). This delay is added whenever the detectors assigned phase is not green. Extend A number between 0.0 and 25.5 that indicates the number of seconds that a detection ON signal is read beyond the point where the actual detectors output goes OFF. Queue A number between 0 and 255 that indicates the number of seconds that the actuation from a queue detector will continue into the associated phases green. This time begins when the phase becomes green and when this count expires, associated detection inputs will be ignored. (This time may be shortened by other overriding parameters assigned to this phase, including Max times, Force-Offs, etc.) No Act A number between 0 and 255 that indicates the number of minutes used by the detectors No Activity diagnostic. If an active detector does not exhibit an actuation for the specified period of time, it is considered a fault and the detector is classified as failed. A value of 0 disables the No Activity diagnostic for this detector. A failed detector can disable the Add-Init, passage, and extension timers on the associated phase, among other side effects, so use this feature with care. Max PRS This is the length of time in minutes, from 0 to 255 minutes used by the detectors Maximum Presence diagnostic. If an active detector exhibits continuous detection for too long a period, it is considered a fault and the detector is classified as failed. A value of 0 disables the Maximum Presence diagnostic for this detector. A failed detector can disable the Add-Init, passage, and extension timers on the associated phase, among other side effects, so use this feature with care. ERR CTS Used by the Detector Erratic Counts diagnostic, this is the number of counts per minute, over which, the detector will be considered faulty. This can be any value ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 165

Chapter 5 Programming Menus between 0 and 255 counts per minute. If an active detector exhibits excessive actuations, it could be a sign of an intermittent connection in the wiring or some other chattering problem. A failed detector can disable the Add-Init, passage, and extension timers on the associated phase, among other side effects, so use this feature with care. A value of 0 (zero) disables the Erratic Counts diagnostic for this detector. Fail T The amount of time, from 0 to 255 seconds, used as the Detector Fail Time. If a detector diagnostic (one of the above three functions) has tagged a detector input as failed, this function tells the controller to place an artificial call on the associated phase for this many seconds during all non-green intervals. The call remains ON for this many seconds into the green section of the phase.

Detector Call Phases Screen


This screen is used to map the 64 detector channels to individual phases within the intersection. Multiple detectors can be attached to a single phase. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5.D ETECTORS > 3.D ETECTOR C ALL P HASE )
2.5.3 DETECTOR CALL PHASES PG 1 OF 2 1 1 9 0 2 2 10 0 18 0 26 0 3 3 11 0 19 0 27 0 4 4 12 0 20 0 28 0 5 5 13 0 21 0 29 0 6 6 14 0 22 0 30 0 7 7 15 0 23 0 31 0 8 8 16 0 24 0 32 0

DET NO. PHASE NO. DET NO. PHASE NO.

DET NO. 17 PHASE NO. 0 DET NO. 25 PHASE NO. 0

Figure 146 Detector Call Phases Screen


When a detector is mapped to a phase, all of the detector functions and timings defined on the previous two screens will be applied to that phase. If the phase number is defined as 0, the detector will not call any phase when it detects a vehicle. Press the DWN button to get to page 2 of the Detector Call Phases screens, which hosts the phase assignments for Detectors 33 through 64.

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Switch-to Phases Screen


This option allows a detectors output to be switched to another phase when its primary phase is yellow or red. This switch of detector output only occurs when the new phase is Green AND its normal phase is either yellow or red. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5.D ETECTORS > 4.D ETECTORS S WITCH P HASE )
2.5.4 DETECTOR SWITCH PHASES PG 1 OF 2 1 0 9 0 2 0 10 0 18 0 26 0 3 0 11 0 19 0 27 0 4 0 12 0 20 0 28 0 5 0 13 0 21 0 29 0 6 0 14 0 22 0 30 0 7 0 15 0 23 0 31 0 8 0 16 0 24 0 32 0

DET NO. PHASE NO. DET NO. PHASE NO.

DET NO. 17 PHASE NO. 0 DET NO. 25 PHASE NO. 0

Figure 147 Switch-to Phases Screen


Press the DWN button to get to page 2 of the Detector Switch Phases screens, which hosts the switch assignments for Detectors 33 through 64.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

Pedestrian Detectors Screen


This screen is used to configure the eight pedestrian detector inputs. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 5.D ETECTORS > 5.P EDESTRIAN D ETECTORS )
2.5.5 PED DET# PEDESTRIAN DETECTORS PG 1 OF 1 1 2 04 3 06 4 08 5 00 6 00 7 00 8 00

CALL PH...02

NO ACTIV.000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 MAX PRES.000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 ERR CNT..000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000

Figure 148 Ped Detectors Screen


Call Ph This is the phase number associated with this detector input. When this detectors input goes ON, the associated phase will receive a Ped Call. A 0 (zero) indicates that there is no phase associated with this ped detector input. No Activ A number between 0 and 255 that indicates the number of minutes used by this pedestrian detectors No Activity diagnostic. If an active detector does not exhibit an actuation for the specified period of time, it is considered a fault and the detector is classified as failed. A value of 0 disables the No Activity diagnostic for this detector. Max Pres This is the length of time in minutes, from 0 to 255 minutes used by the ped detectors Maximum Presence diagnostic. If an active pedestrian detector exhibits continuous detection for too long a period, it is considered a fault and the detector is classified as failed. A value of 0 disables the Maximum Presence diagnostic for this ped detector. ERR CNT Used by the Ped Detector Erratic Counts diagnostic, this is the number of counts per minute, if exceeded, which will cause the ped detector to be considered faulty. This can be any value between 0 and 255 counts per minute. If an active detector exhibits excessive actuations, it could be a sign of an intermittent connection in the wiring or some other chattering problem. A value of 0 (zero) disables the Erratic Counts diagnostic for this pedestrian detector input.

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Preemption Screens

PREEMPTION SCREENS
Preemption is the process of interrupting the normal operation of the intersection in order to run a special preemption run, as triggered by some external signal, such as a police, fire, train crossing, or emergency vehicle preemption call.
2.6.1 PREEMPT 1 PG 1 of 6 OVERRIDE FL... PRTY OVERRIDE. 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 X

NON-LOCK CALL.. FLASH DWELL....X 1 2 3 4 5 6 TRACK Ph. X DWELL Ph. X X DWELL Pd. EXIT Ph. EXIT Pd. DELAY......... MIN GREEN..... MIN WALK...... ENT PED CLEAR. RED DWL TIME.. 0 1 1 1 0

TRACK GREEN... 5 DWELL GREEN... 1 MIN DURATION..00040 MAX PRESENCE..00060 LINK.......... 0

Figure 149 Preemption #1 Screen


The Preemption portion of the ATC-1000/2000 front panel interface is described in Chapter 8 Preemption, starting on page 261.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

USING THE PRETIMED MENU


Most of the interface and controls for the ATC-1000 have an implicit assumption that most users of the controller will be working with a NEMA style, actuated, phase-based operation in their traffic cabinets. This includes the preemption, TSP and most other parts of the interface. The Pre-timed menu is where most of the settings are located to operate the other type of traffic pattern control in the ATC-1000: pre-timed interval based, rather than NEMA phase-based. Whereas phases assume signals respond to provide traffic movements, pre-timed operation is more concerned with signal outputs. (M AIN
2.7
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED )


FIXED TIMING MENU

1. TIMING PLANS 2. SIGNAL PLANS 3. PREEMPTION 4. PREEMPTION AND INTERVAL SKIPPING

Figure 150 Pretimed menu Pretimed operation is described in detail in Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation, starting on page 229.

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Transit Signal Priority Menu

TRANSIT SIGNAL PRIORITY MENU


(M AIN
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T.S.P)

2.8 TRANSIT PRIORITY MENU 1. UNIT PARAMETERS 2. RUN PARAMETERS 3. ACTIONS PLANS 4. RUN CONFIGURATION 5. QUEUE JUMPING 6. SPLIT TABLE

Figure 151 Transit Signal Priority Menu


The screens, parameters and functions of Transit Signal Priority are described in detail in Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority, starting on page 267.

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Chapter 5 Programming Menus

SYSTEM MAINTENANCE MENU


The System Maintenance menu on the ATC controllers is used to load and copy controller databases and to access the diagnostics system. It is also the menu to use to update the firmware of the controller. Be aware that entering the diagnostics mode on the Utilities menu will take the intersection into Flash operation. The controller will need to be powered down and restarted to exit the System Maintenance Diagnostics screens. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE )

Note

The Diagnostics available here is different from those available when pressing + Voltage (MNU) on the keypad. Those diagnostics are a lower level hardware based set of diagnostics, particularly aimed at the interface circuit board and the operation of the keyboard and display. (Refer to Utilities Menu on page 290.)

SYSTEM MAINTENANCE MENU

1. DATABASE UTILITIES 2. COPY DATABASE DATA 3. ENTER DIAGNOSTICS MODE

Figure 152 System Maintenance Menu

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Database Utilities Screen


The ATC-1000 maintains a couple of pre-configured intersection databases in memory that can be loaded into your primary database. This is a quick way to get a new controller set up with a basic set of parameters that you can then modify. It also provides a way to zero out the controllers internal memory. (M AIN M ENU > 7.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 1.D ATABASE U TILITIES )
3.1 DATABASE UTILITIES

0. Remove ALL Flash Data. 1. Load simple 8ph 2r. 2. Load 8ph 2r with Coord/Preempt

Figure 153 Default Database Load screen

Caution

Loading either of these default databases will over-write all of your current settings.

Remove ALL Flash Data This will remove all of the configuration values stored in the controller. This will not affect the firmware itself, but it will remove all programming that you have done to the controller. This function sets all values in the ATC-1000 internal database to zero (0). Load Databases From the Default Database Load screen, you can opt to load a simple 8 phase, dual ring configuration into active memory on the controller, or an 8 phase, dual ring configuration that is also set up to use coordination and preemption. When you choose one of the above options, a data file will be decompressed and installed into your active memory on the controller.

DECOMPRESSING DATA FILE

Figure 154 Database Load Decompressing files


When the decompression is complete, the controller will report that this function is Done. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 173

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DONE

DECOMPRESSING DATA FILE

Figure 155 Completion of File Decompression


Finally, the controller will process this data file into your active controller database, overwriting the current values.

Processing... USB DATABASE DOWNLOAD SUCCESSFUL

Figure 156 Completion of USB Database download


When you see the Successful message, the default database has now been loaded and is being used by the controller to operate.

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System Maintenance Menu

Copy Database Functions


The Copy Database Data screens provide a method to copy the contents of one area of database memory into other similar areas. There are many places in the controller database where multiple instances of the same type of data exist: 16 NEMA phases 48 TSP Action Plans 64 Detectors 4 Overlaps These are just a few examples. In any location where multiple instances of a particular data type exist, the Copy Database Data menus provide a screen to copy data from one instance to another, to several others, or to all of the others. This is a quick way to set up one phase, detector, or overlap in the manner you wish, and then copy that data over to the others as a template that can be modified for each. There are separate sets of copy screens for the Actuated and Pretimed portions of the database. First, choose which type of data you wish to copy. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 2.C OPY D ATABASE D ATA )
3.2 1. Actuated 2. Pretimed COPY DATA

Figure 157 Copy Database Functions screen


Next, when you get into the Actuated or Pretimed Copy Data menu (Well show the Actuated Copy menu here, just as an example) you need to pick which type of data you would like to copy.

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ACTUATED DATA 1.Phase 2.Coordination 3.Ring 4.Overlaps 5.T.S.P 6.Detector 7.Preempt 8.Channel 9.Schedule

Figure 158 Copying Actuated Data menu


In this example, well choose the first option, Phase data. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 2.C OPY D ATABASE D ATA > 1.A CTUATED > 1.P HASE ) 7.2.1.1 PHASE DATA COPY FROM: 001 COPY TO 0000 A C# 16 :

= ALL = all data up to # element = allowed max

Figure 159 Copying Phase Data screen


Once youve chosen the type of data you would like to copy, you will be presented with the same type of screen no matter what the exact data is. On it, you only need to specify a source (COPY FROM) and destination (COPY TO) for the copy function. COPY FROM The Copy From field is the simpler one to fill in. It must be a single instance of the data type. Usually one edits the first instance, and copies Phase 1 into all of the other phases you wish to use, say phases 2 through 8. In this case, we just enter the number 1 in this field. COPY TO The Copy To field has a few options, as shown in the hints just below the Copy To field.

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System Maintenance Menu You can specify a single instance of the data, say 2, so you would copy phase 1 data into the phase 2 instance. The bottom row of hints shows you what the highest acceptable number instance is for this type of data. You can specify the letter A, using the A key on the controllers keypad, to indicate that you want to copy the source instance into all of the other instance of this type of data in the controller. Or you can copy into all instances up to the instance you specify. You do this by entering the letter C in the Copy To field, followed immediately by the number of the instance. So if I wish to copy the data from Phase 1 into Phases 2 through 12, I would enter C12 in the Copy To field. To provide another concrete example of the Copy Data function, lets go back up to the Coordination option on the Actuated Data menu. This presents a Coord Data menu, where we can choose to copy either pattern data or split data. Lets choose P ATTERN . (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 2.C OPY D ATABASE D ATA > 1.A CTUATED > 2.C OORD )
COORD DATA 1.Pattern 2.Split

Figure 160 Copying Coord Data menu


This results in a display that is very similar to the one we saw before for Phase data. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 2.C OPY D ATABASE D ATA > 1.A CTUATED > 2.C OORD > 1.P ATTERN )

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COORD PATTERN PLAN DATA COPY FROM: 001 COPY TO 0000 A C# 48 :

= ALL = all data up to # element = allowed max

Figure 161 Copying Coord Pattern Plan data screen


As you can see from the hint text on the screen, we can copy any single defined Pattern instance into one or all 48 of the other Pattern instances, or into all patterns up to the instance we specify. All of the copy data screens function in this same way, across all types of data, including Actuated Detector and TOD Schedule instances, to Pretimed Timing Plans, Signal Plans, and Preemption definitions.

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System Maintenance Menu

Diagnostics Mode
The Enter Diagnostics Mode option on the System Maintenance menu is used to enter a special mode of the ATC controller that allows you to troubleshooting the operation of the hardware and firmware, as well as load new firmware and restart the controller.

Caution

Entering Diagnostics mode will automatically place the intersection into Flashing operation, and will require a controller power down and restart to exit.

When you select the option, you will be given the option to cancel out of the operation in order to avoid placing the intersection into Flash. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE )
ENTERING DIAGNOSTICS MODE! WARNING!!!! controller IS GOING TO RED REST FOLLOWED BY FLASHING OPERATION. >>HIT 'NEXT' IF YOU WISH TO DO SO<< >>'PREV' TO CANCEL<<

Figure 162 Diagnostics Warning screen


If you truly wish to enter the Diagnostics screens, you can do so by pressing the NXT button at this point. Or you can press the PRV button to exit out of the Diagnostics mode warning screen, in which case the operation of the intersection will not be interrupted. If you proceed into the Diagnostics screen, you will be presented with a menu of options on the Diagnostics Menu, as shown in Figure 163. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT)
DIAGNOSTICS MENU 1.INPUTS/OUTPUTS TEST 2.COMMS 3.MEMORY TEST (RAM, SRAM, FLASH) 4.TIME TEST (RTC) 5.USB (WRITE/READ) 6.UPDATE FIRMWARE

Figure 163 Diagnostics Menu screen


The details about using the Diagnostics screens are described in Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance, in the topic beginning on page 291. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 179

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LOGS MENU
The commands and log viewing screens are described in the Data Logging topic, starting on page 305.

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This chapter describes how to set up coordinated operation with the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: General overview of coordination, on page 182. Signal timing in a coordinated environment, on page 183. Synchronization methods, on page 186. Coordination of an actuated controller, on page 187. Example of coordination programming, on page 190. Traffic Responsive operation, on page 227.

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GENERAL OVERVIEW OF COORDINATION


Coordination of traffic signals is a term used to describe a process in which two or more intersections are synchronized so that vehicles can pass through each intersection without stopping. Coordinated Operation is then a system mode of traffic management. Each controller within the system will operate with a cycle length, offset and split (set of phase allocations). The cycle length will typically be at any one time common to all intersections in the coordinated system, but each intersection will use its own offset and split. Intersections set up this way will establish what is called progression of signals. There are three basic types of coordinated progressions. For example, consider the following 4 intersections with the indicated progressions.

Figure 164 Three types of coordinated progression


Differences in the offset values of each intersection determine the type of progression. In order for synchronization and therefore the progression to be a continuous process, the return to the main street green of each intersection must be on a cyclical basis. This cycle, or time to serve all phases, must be the same as, or a multiple of, the common cycle for all intersections within the system. A technique called double cycling is sometimes used such that multiphase intersections might use a 90 second cycle while

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Signal Timing in a Coordinated Environment the 2 phase intersections use 45. Each 2 phase intersection then cycles twice for each one multi-phase cycle.

SIGNAL TIMING IN A COORDINATED ENVIRONMENT


The terms defined in the following section explain how coordination is achieved across multiple intersections, each being timed by its own controller unit.

Cycle Length
The cycle length is the total time to serve all phases, i.e. the time from the start of phase n green until the next start of phase n green. All intersections coordinated at any one time must use the same cycle length or a multiple thereof.

Local Cycle
This term refers to the cycle timer active in each unit that actually controls phase timing. This differs from the Master Cycle, which is used as a common reference, but does not control phase timing. The zero point of the local cycle is then referenced to the master cycle by an offset value. The offsets at each intersection may differ, but the master cycle zero point should be the same for all. The first two intersections in the system for the inbound progression are shown below. Both intersections have the same local cycle length (90 seconds).

Figure 165 Two intersections with the same Local Cycle length

Split (Phase Allocation)


A split plan is the allocation of times within the cycle for each phase. The sum of all of these split times, including the green, pedestrian, yellow, and red intervals, creates the full cycle time. Note that the splits of the various intersections that make up a coordinated corridor do not need to be the same. In the above example, the number of phases and the split times of intersection #2 are not the same as intersection #1. But since both have the same full cycle length, synchronization can still be accomplished.

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Local Cycle Reference Point


Each intersection has a reference point within its local cycle that has to remain synchronized with a master reference. This master reference is transmitted throughout the entire coordinated corridor, keeping all of the intersections in sync. Usually the local reference point for each intersection is the start or end of the Main Green phase. That is the point that is used to reference to the master reference signal. Reference point... End of Main Street Green (A).

Figure 166 Local Cycle Reference Point

Master Cycle
This cycle issues the common reference signal and therefore establishes synchronization between all of the intersections in the coordinated corridor.

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Offset
An offset determines where the local reference at each intersection (beginning or end of coord phase green) should occur relative to the common master cycle. For example, for the inbound offset, intersections 1 and 2 would be set up as follows:

Figure 167 Example of Coordinated Intersection Offsets


Intersection #1 has zero offset. It is the intersection from which all others are referenced. The end of its phase A (main street) occurs at the same time as the master cycle zero point. Intersection #2 is offset 7 seconds to allow for travel time. The end of its phase A (main street) occurs 7 seconds after the master cycle zero point. Each successive intersection has a unique offset value as determined by the travel speed and distance.

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SYNCHRONIZATION METHODS Historical Sources of Sync Pulses


The traditional master cycle used for referencing in years past was a 3-second pulse of zero volts from a 115VAC signal via a hardwire interconnect. All intersections would reference and synchronize themselves to these "Sync Pulses as generated by a master dial unit. Over the years, however, other methods of providing referencing sync pulses have been incorporated and have for the most part replaced the 115VAC hardwire interconnect. One of the more popular methods today is Time Based Coordination in which there is no interconnect at all, but each controller internally generates its own master cycle based on its internal clock and the time of day. This is a very popular technique because no interconnect system has to be installed. Another method is through a communications link such as 2 twisted pair wire, radio, or fiber optics. Under such communications links, far more sophisticated information can be passed to and from each intersection, not just simple sync pulse commands.

Offset Seeking
The local cycle timer is not always at the proper offset relative to the master cycle. It can be out of step upon system start-up, if cycle or offset changes are made, or after preemption. Offset seeking describes the process of getting the local cycle back into step with the master cycle. The local cycle can either time a percentage faster, slower, or stop until the proper reference is achieved. Each method avoids abruptness, so as not to disrupt traffic. Offset seeking can sometimes take five cycles to get back in step. This seeking process is necessary to ensure a smooth transition from one pattern to another without skipping, over-timing or short-timing phases.

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Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit

COORDINATION OF AN ACTUATED CONTROLLER UNIT


In this discussion of Coordination thus far, no mention has been made of the various types of controllers, specifically pre-timed controllers versus actuated controllers. In a pre-timed controller the cycle length is fixed and does not vary from cycle to cycle. Thus, if any point within the cycle is synchronized, the entire cycle must be synchronized as well. Therefore, to synchronize a pre-timed controller, one need only to worry about the synchronization process (offset seeking) and the cycle length selection of each controller. When an actuated controller is considered, however, just the establishment of a cycle length is a considerable process in itself. This is because the cycle length of an actuated controller will normally vary from cycle to cycle depending on vehicle demand. A cycle length must then be artificially imposed on an actuated controller to achieve coordinated operation. To accomplish this, there are certain functions that the controller uses, such as permissive periods, holds, and force offs. These functions force the controller to operate within the constraints of a background cycle while still allowing the controller to operate in the actuated mode and allowing basic intervals such as initial (minimum) greens, walk, ped clear, yellow, red, etc., to time normally.

Functions Used to Coordinate an Actuated Controller


HOLD - Holds the coordinated phase (main street) during a specific period of the cycle (when no permissive periods are active.) PERMISSIVES - Allow a "window of time" in which the phase can be serviced. Permissives have a start and end time, and prevent a phase from being serviced too late to be properly forced off. A phase cannot be forced off during its initial (minimum) green or ped timing, thus the permissive must take this into account, i.e. a given phase permissive will end sufficiently before the force off so that if the phase is serviced, it will be able to time at least its initial green and/or ped before force off occurs. FORCE OFF - Terminates a phase at the designated point in the background cycle. Note that Force Off is a rather mild command and can only terminate an actuated green that has timed past the Initial or ped times. It cannot force out of initial, walk or ped clear. It has no effect on yellows or reds. It is important to note that the coordinator only uses the above commands to constrain the controller phasing and phase next decisions. It does not interfere with or modify intervals such as minimum greens, walk, ped clear, yellow, red, etc. This is a common misconception.

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Example of Force Off And Permissive Placement


This example shows how an actuated controller may be set up using the Force Off and Permissive functions in an 8 phase dual ring. Shown is a 90 second background cycle with the typical placement of fixed force offs and permissives. Each force off establishes the point at which the phases will be terminated and move on. Phases can gap-out before they force off. If a phase does gap out, the next phase can get more time. Notice that each permissive ends somewhat before the force off for the indicated phase pair. Under full demand on all phases, permissives generally dont do much. However, under light demand, particularly if the coordinated phase is likely to rest or if other phases are likely to be skipped (no demand), permissives make sure that phases are only allowed service at such a point that they can be forced off at their designated time.

Figure 168 Typical placements of fixed force offs and permissives


Coordination of actuated controllers can be tricky business. Two seemingly contradictory concepts are employed at once. On the one hand, because the controller is actuated, the benefits associated with an actuated controller are desired, i.e. a controller that is responsive to traffic, skips phases with no demand, varies the green appropriately for phases with demand, and finally, one that rests in the main street in absence of any demand. On the other hand, to accomplish coordination, one must constrain the timing so that the controller operates within the confines of the background cycle. Coordination of actuated signals is often a complex matter, and requires a great deal of effort on the part of the responsible agency to provide the analysis (traffic studies, etc.) required for proper programming and subsequent operation. Coordination of actuated signals can often be controversial as well. This is primarily due to the nature of their operation. In the case of pre-timed controllers, signal progression tends be well behaved and each signal nicely displays its green in just the proper order. Actuated signals, however, do not always seem to behave so nicely. For example, if at a given intersection, all the side street phases do not use all their green time (they "gap-out" before they "force off"), then there will be an "early return" to the main street.

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Coordination of an Actuated Controller Unit The "platoon" of vehicles at that intersection will then be released and may arrive at the next intersection too early, before the green appears. These vehicles will have to stop, which, of course, defeats the purpose of coordination. There are, however, a couple of things to consider relative to this issue. Firstly, despite the lack of appearance of coordination under such circumstances, the system may actually be more efficient. Even though the pre-timed system may be well coordinated, it often does so by arbitrarily holding the main street red as the side streets are provided with a fixed duration green time, whether needed or not. Conversely, the actuated machine returns to the main street as soon as it can. Since some main street vehicles may turn off before they reach the next intersection, an early return is certainly beneficial to them. For those that proceed through the next intersection, although they may be hampered by arriving too early, they may also have the luck that the next intersection returns to main street early as well, and can proceed unimpeded. This type of operation provides maximum efficiency although it can occasionally appears sporadic and unpredictable. This leads to the second point: proper coordination using actuated controllers requires that the responsible agency provides the proper cycle and split settings for the level and distribution of traffic at any given time of day. If the cycle length and split times are appropriate for the conditions at all times of the day, non-beneficial early returns to the main street can be minimized.

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PROGRAMMING A PEEK ATC CONTROLLER FOR COORDINATION Coordination Parameters Explanation


All Peek ATC Series Controllers are compliant with NTCIP 1202, v02.18, therefore the programming parameters must follow the NTCIP Object designs. The NTCIP design structure is very conducive to interoperability with NTCIP Central Systems. However, NTCIP cannot be described as user-friendly when programming a complex function such as Coordination. This document will assist the end-user in the organization of parameters to make programming Coordination an easier task. This document should be utilized in conjunction with the ATC-1000 Manual that can be downloaded off the Peek website at the following link: http://www.peektraffic.com/ptmanuals.htm. The recommendations provided in this guide will be given in a format conducive with the organization needed to operate the ATC Series Controller in Coordination and possibly in conjunction with Traffic Responsive or even Adaptive Control. The recommended format organization is not mandatory for Coordination, but could be required for Traffic Responsive or Adaptive control. Coordination control has been historically programmed in sets of Cycle(s), Offset(s) and Split(s), or COS. NTCIP controls Coordination in Patterns, as defined in NTCIP Object 2.5.7, cited below.

Pattern Table
patternTable OBJECT-TYPE, SYNTAX SEQUENCE OF PatternEntry, ACCESS not-accessible, STATUS optional, DESCRIPTION "<Definition> A table containing Actuated Controller Unit Coordination Pattern parameters. The number of rows in this table is equal to the maxPatterns object. <TableType> static <DescriptiveName> NTCIP-1202::ASC.patternTable <DataConceptType> Entity Type" ::= { coord 7 }, patternEntry OBJECT-TYPE, SYNTAX PatternEntry, ACCESS not-accessible, STATUS optional. DESCRIPTION "<Definition> Parameters for a specific Actuated Controller Unit pattern. <DescriptiveName> NTCIP1202::ASC.patternEntry, <DataConceptType> Entity Type",INDEX { patternNumber } ::= { patternTable 1 } PatternEntry ::= SEQUENCE { patternNumber INTEGER, patternCycleTime INTEGER, patternOffsetTime INTEGER, patternSplitNumber INTEGER, patternSequenceNumber INTEGER }

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Programming a Peek ATC Controller for Coordination An NTCIP Pattern consists of the Pattern Number, Cycle Time, Offset Time, Split Number and Sequence Number. The NTCIP Pattern Number permits Pattern Numbers from 1 to 255. Pattern Number 254 is reserved to call Free Operation. Pattern Number 255 is reserved to call programmed Flashing Operation. The ATC Series Controller currently supports Pattern Numbers 1 through 48, for NEMA Coordination. Pattern Numbers 49 through 253, are either reserved or dedicated to pretimed or interval control Coordination. The ATC Series Controller complies with the NTCIP limitation on Cycle Lengths in whole seconds from 30 to 255 Seconds. Offset values are in whole seconds from 0 to 254. Split Numbers are derived from NTCIP specified Split Table. The ATC Series Controller supports 16 Splits within the NTCIP Split Table. Sequence Numbers are derived from the NTCIP specified Sequence Table. The ATC Series Controller supports 16 Sequences.

Parameter Value Organization


The end-user should now start the organization of parameters to assist in parameter entry into the ATC Series Controller. Since the Pattern Number quantity is currently limited to 48. A decision needs to be made on the use of Cycles, Offsets and Splits. Historically most traffic personnel have utilized three or five Offsets which support the Inbound Flow, Outbound Flow and a Balanced Flow to varying degrees. In this example three Offsets will be utilized. Splits are most commonly programmed as Balanced between the Main Street and Side Street, Slightly Favoring the Main Street, Moderately Favoring the Main Street and Heavily Favoring the Main Street. This example will use four Splits per Cycle. This permits the use of four different Cycle Lengths within the constraint of 48 Patterns. 4 Cycle Lengths x 3 Offsets x 4 Splits = 48 Pattern Numbers On the attached Excel Spread sheet, record the four Cycle Lengths in whole seconds between 30 and 255 seconds. Using a Modeling Program calculate Offsets for each Cycle Length for Inbound, Balanced and Outbound. Enter these values on the attached Excel Spreadsheet. Calculate splits by Phase to the whole second. The sum of each Rings assigned Phases Split Times must equal the cycle length. Calculate the four Splits (Balanced between the Main Street and Side Street, Slightly Favoring the Main, Moderately Favoring the Main Street and Heavily Favoring the Main Street) for each cycle length and enter them on the attached Spreadsheet. If more than one sequence is used at this intersection, then enter the Sequence Number and a quick representation of the sequence on the attached Excel Spreadsheet. A change in sequence over the course of the day is rare. One example would be a Lead/Lag Intersection that changes the Lead Phase by Time of Day (TOD).

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Parameter Entry into the ATC Series Controller


Use the ATC-1000 Controller Manual to navigate to the below listed Coordination Menu Screen.
2.3 COORDINATION MENU

1. COORDINATION VARIABLES 2. PATTERN TABLE 3. SPLIT TABLE 4. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION EXT/REDUCE 5. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION PERCENT

Figure 169 Coordination Menu Screen


Follow the instructions in the ATC-1000 Controller Manual to complete the below listed Coordination Variables Screen parameters based on local guidelines or preferences.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 170 Coordination Variables Screen


Go to the Coordination Pattern Table. Transfer the parameters collected on the attached Excel Spreadsheet to this table in the organization of parameters listed below.

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2.3.2.1 PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO COORD PATTERN TABLE 1 90 14 1 1 9 90 17 3 1 2 90 47 1 1 10 90 14 4 1 3 90 17 1 1 11 90 47 4 1 4 90 14 2 1 12 90 17 4 1 5 90 47 2 1 13 110 21 5 1 PG1OF3 6 90 17 2 1 14 110 54 5 1 7 90 14 3 1 15 110 29 5 1 8 90 47 3 1 16 110 21 6 1

Figure 171 Coordination Variables Screen 1 of 3


2.3.2.2 PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO 17 110 54 6 1 25 130 27 9 1 COORD PATTERN TABLE 18 110 29 6 1 26 130 61 9 1 19 110 21 7 1 27 130 31 9 1 20 110 54 7 1 28 130 27 10 1 21 110 29 7 1 29 130 61 10 1 22 110 21 8 1 30 130 31 10 1 PG2OF3 23 110 54 8 1 31 130 27 11 1 24 110 29 8 1 32 130 61 11 1

Figure 172 Coordination Variables Screen 2 of 3


2.3.2.3 PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO PATTERN CYCLE OFFSET SPLT NO SEQ NO COORD PATTERN TABLE 33 130 31 11 1 41 150 69 14 1 34 130 27 12 1 42 150 39 14 1 35 130 61 12 1 43 150 33 15 1 36 130 31 12 1 44 150 69 15 1 37 150 33 13 1 45 150 39 15 1 38 150 69 13 1 46 150 33 16 1 PG3OF3 39 150 39 13 1 47 150 61 16 1 40 150 33 14 1 48 150 39 16 1

Figure 173 Coordination Variables Screen 3 of 3


Go to the Coordination Split Table. Transfer the parameters collected on the attached Excel Spreadsheet to screen listed below in the organization of parameters as follows.

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2.3.3.1 TABLE PHASE SPLIT MODE CRDPH # 1 : : : 1 022 1 9 000 2 2 023 1 X 10 000 2 3 022 1 11 000 2 4 023 1 12 000 2 5 022 1 13 000 2 6 023 1 X 14 000 2 7 022 1 15 000 2 8 023 1 16 000 2 COORD SPLIT TABLE PG1OF16

PHASE SPLIT : MODE : CRDPH :

Figure 174 Coordination Split Table Screen 1 of 16


Continue transferring the parameters collected on the attached Excel Spreadsheet to the series of Coordination Split Table screens until all Splits (48) are completed as follows.
2.3.3.16 TABLE PHASE SPLIT MODE CRDPH # 1 : : : 1 029 1 9 000 2 2 060 1 X 10 000 2 3 029 1 11 000 2 4 032 1 12 000 2 5 029 1 13 000 2 6 060 1 X 14 000 2 7 029 1 15 000 2 8 032 1 16 000 2 COORD SPLIT TABLE PG16OF16

PHASE SPLIT : MODE : CRDPH :

Figure 175 Coordination Split Table Screen 16 of 16

Time of Day (TOD) Programming to Run Coordination


The ATC Series Controller has the Coordination Parameters programmed, however it will not enter Coordination until the Coordination Patterns are specified within TOD Actions, those Actions are time listed within Day Plans and scheduled. Fill out a TOD Day Plan for each different Day Plan on the attached Excel Spread Sheet. In the example, there are three Day Plans utilized. Day Plan 1 is the Weekday Plan. Day Plan 2 is the Saturday Plan. Day Plan 3 is the Sunday Plan. Go to the TOD Action screens. Transfer the parameters collected on the attached Excel Spreadsheet to screens listed below. Associate an EVENT to each PATTern utilized in each Day Plan in the order of parameters as follows.

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2.4.1.1 TOD ACTION 1 OF 6

EVENT: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 PATT :255 254 016 031 016 008 014 002 TSP : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8:

Figure 176 TOD Action Table Screen 1 of 6


2.4.1.1 TOD ACTION 2 OF 6

EVENT: 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 PATT :033 048 021 005 254 255 254 008 TSP : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8:

Figure 177 TOD Action Table Screen 2 of 6


2.4.1.1 TOD ACTION 3 OF 6

EVENT: 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 PATT :020 008 254 255 254 016 008 020 TSP : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8:

Figure 178 TOD Action Table Screen 3 of 6

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2.4.1.1 TOD ACTION 4 OF 6

EVENT: 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 PATT :006 021 254 000 000 000 000 000 TSP : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C O M M A N D 1: 2: 3: 4: 5: 6: 7: 8:

Figure 179 TOD Action Table Screen 4 of 6


With the patterns (PATT) for each Day Plan associated with a numbered event, enter each day plan with events corresponding to the start time listed on the Day Plan on the ATC-1000/2000 Programming Charts, as the example shows below. (The charts can be downloaded as a PDF file from the Peek Traffic website, at http://www.peektraffic.com/ptmanuals.htm )
2.4.2.1 DAY PLAN 1 EVENT # HOUR MIN ACTION 1 0 0 1 2 4 0 2 10 16 30 10 3 6 0 3 11 18 0 11 4 7 30 4 12 19 0 12 5 9 0 5 13 21 0 13 6 10 0 6 14 0 0 0 7 11 30 7 15 0 0 0 8 13 30 8 16 0 0 0 TOD DAYPLANS PG 1 of32

EVENT # 9 HOUR 15 MIN 30 ACTION 9

Figure 180 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 1 of 32


2.4.2.2 DAY PLAN 2 EVENT # 1 HOUR 0 MIN 0 ACTION 14 EVENT # HOUR MIN ACTION 9 0 0 0 2 6 0 15 10 0 0 0 3 7 0 16 11 0 0 0 4 9 0 17 12 0 0 0 5 11 30 18 13 0 0 0 6 13 30 19 14 0 0 0 7 15 30 20 15 0 0 0 8 19 30 21 16 0 0 0 TOD DAYPLANS PG 2 of32

Figure 181 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 2 of 32

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2.4.2.3 TOD DAYPLANS PG 3 of32

DAY PLAN 3 EVENT # 1 HOUR 0 MIN 0 ACTION 22 EVENT # HOUR MIN ACTION 9 0 0 0 2 6 0 23 10 0 0 0 3 8 0 24 11 0 0 0 4 11 30 25 12 0 0 0 5 14 0 26 13 0 0 0 6 18 0 27 14 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 16 0 0 0

Figure 182 TOD DayPlans Table Screen 3 of 32


Complete the TOD Schedules for each Day Plan and check that coordination is operating properly and in accordance with your traffic plan.

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EXAMPLE: PROGRAMMING OF COORDINATION


This section describes how to program the Coordination portion of the ATC-1000 database using both IQ Link and the front panel keypad and screen. 1. To start the process, well begin in IQ Link. Open IQ Link, by inserting the correct User Name and Password, then click the OK button. (The default user name and password are USTC_ADMINISTRATOR for both.) The main IQ Link screen will open, as shown below:

Figure 183 IQ Link window


2. Quickly click on the third button from the left., which is the Stop/Start Automatic Polling button (It has concentric circles and is red and green. shown at right) Pressing this button will stop communications attempts until the user has selected an Intersection and is ready to communicate with that Intersection. An ATC-1000 intersection will need to be added to the IQ Link database first. Select Database Edit from the Intersection menu.

3.

Figure 184 Database Edit command on the IQ Link Intersection menu


This will bring up the Intersection List window, as shown in Figure 185.

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Figure 185 Intersection List window


4. Select the New Intersection button from the Intersection List window toolbar (shown at right). The following dialog box will appear, for the entry of a new intersection controller:

Figure 186 Controller Configuration dialog box


5. Enter an Intersection Name in the space provided. (The Default listing of Name0 can be used if you dont have a more specific name in mind.) The name can be up to 50 characters in length and can include spaces and punctuation. For ease of use, its better to keep the name under 30 characters. Well name our controller Test throughout the rest of this tutorial. Enter the Cabinet Address, which is a four digit hexadecimal number. It must be a unique number within the IQ Link database. For networks similar to the one used in New York City municipal traffic controller cabinets, the cabinet address is supplied by hardware located within each cabinet and must be set here to match the intended cabinet location. In other network setups, IQ Link just uses the Cabinet Address value that is stored within the ATC-1000. It uses this address as a unique device identifier for communications purposes. Weve entered the number 019D as our cabinet address. a.) The Cabinet Address that is stored in the ATC-1000 can be viewed (or edited) by pressing the MNU (Menu) button on the front panel of the controller to bring up the controllers menu system. Then press 2 to enter the Programming menus. Then press 1 to enter Unit Configuration, then 5 to see the COMMS AND I/O SET-UP menu, and finally 3 to open the IP/CABINET ADDRESS screen. (See Figure 187)

6.

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Note

Throughout this manual, when referring to a particular ATC-1000 screen, the keys to press in order to find the screen will be listed using this format:

MM > 2 > 1 > 5 > 3


(This example matches the above set of navigation instructions.) Please also note the screen numbers at the top left corner of each ATC-1000 screen, which also indicate the key combination required to access that screen (when starting from the ATC-1000 Main Menu.)

2.1.5.3

IP/CAB ADDR SETUP

Cabinet Address: 019D IP Address SYSTEM: 128.002.060.198 IP Address LOCAL : 010.247.001.002

Figure 187 IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen on the ATC-1000


The cabinet address is also visible on the second row from the top, on the righthand side of the Controller Status screen. To view this screen, press the HME (Home) button on the front panel of the ATC-1000. The Controller Status screen is displayed in Figure 188. The Cabinet Address is has been circled.
1.1 TS22 Tue 21-Jan-2010. P1:OK TIMING STATUS 08:47:11 019D R1 02 EXT 00.0 M1 024 FDW 005 PRE INP R2 06 GRN REST PRE KBD FDW 005 R3 RED REST DW R4 RED REST DW CALL STATUS 1111111 1234567890123456 CRD CMD:254 VEH SYS CMD: 0 PED C C C C TOD CMD: 1 PHS

Figure 188 Sample Controller Status screen


7. Back in the IQ Link Controller Configuration dialog box, you should check the Pretimed Intersection box only if this ATC-1000 will be programmed as a Pretimed controller (rather than as a NEMA phase-based controller.)

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Note

The ATC-1000 is currently the only controller in the world that can be programmed as either a NEMA or a pretimed controller.

8.

Click the OK button to accept the Controller Configuration in IQ Link. Now that this controller information has been entered into IQ Link, the Intersection Name will appear in the Intersection List window, as shown below:

Figure 189 Intersection List


9. Make sure the new controller is highlighted in the Intersection List window, and click the Intersection Button. This will load this Intersection for database programming, as displayed below.

10. After clicking the Intersection Button, the Select Intersection screen will appear within the Intersection List SubMenu. Highlight the desired Intersection, check the Connect to Controller box, enter the correct System IP Address, check the method of communication of Ethernet or Serial and click the OK Button. 11. Refer back to the ATC-1000 screen and the IP/Cabinet Address Setup screen. The four sets of three digits shown next to IP Address SYSTEM is the ATC-1000s Ethernet (or IP) Address. An example would appear as IP Address System: 010.120.001.157.

Figure 190 Select Intersection window in IQ Link

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation The Intersection List SubMenu will disappear, progress for establishing communications with the Controller displays and a new row of programming buttons will appear on the IQ Link Main Menu.

Figure 191 Controller Programming Toolbar in IQ Link


12. The fourth button on the row of large icon buttons that looks like a red, yellow and green vertical pie chart is the Coordination portion of the ATC-1000 database. Place the cursor of this button and the label Coordination Object will display. Click this button and the Coordination Window Menu will open as follows.

Figure 192 Coordination Window in IQ Link


13. On the ATC-1000, press the MNU (Menu) Button to get to the MAIN MENU, then press 2 to open the Programming menu.

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2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. PROGRAMMING MENU UNIT CONFIGURATION controller COORDINATION TIME OF DAY DETECTORS PREEMPTION PRETIMED TRANSIT SIGNAL PRIORITY

Figure 193 Programming Menu Screen


14. Select 3. COORDINATION to reveal the Coordination menu.
2.3 COORDINATION MENU

1. COORDINATION VARIABLES 2. PATTERN TABLE 3. SPLIT TABLE 4. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION EXT/REDUCE 5. TORONTO OFFSET CORRECTION PERCENT

Figure 194 Coordination Menu


15. Select option 3 to open the Coordination Variables screen
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......dwell(2) USTC CORRECTION MODE..toronto(0) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 195 Coordination Variables Screen


NTCIP Object 2.5.1 states that the Coord Operational Mode Parameter as: This object defines the operational mode for coordination. The NTCIP possible modes are:

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0

Description
Automatic - this mode provides for coord operation, free and flash to be determined automatically by the possible sources (i.e. Interconnect, Time Base, or System Commands). Manual Pattern - these modes provides for Coord operation running this pattern. This selection of pattern overrides all other pattern commands. Manual Free - this mode provides for Free operation without coordination or Automatic Flash from any source. Manual Flash - this mode provides for Automatic Flash without coordination or Free from any source.

1-253

254 255

These definitions are also listed on the bottom of the IQ Link Coordination submenu for each subsequent parameter. 16. Back in IQ Link, to run the ATC-1000 in Coordination, select 0 for Automatic in IQ Link as shown below or keypad, in Edit Mode, the value 000 and ENT Buttons, as shown above.

Figure 196 Setting Coord Operational Mode in IQ Link


NTCIP Object 2.5.2 for Coord Correction Mode Parameter has the definition This object defines the Coord Correction Mode. The possible modes are: other: the coordinator establishes a new offset by a mechanism not defined in this standard. dwell: when changing offset, the coordinator shall establish a new offset by dwelling in the coord phase(s) until the desired offset is reached. shortway (Smooth): when changing offset, the coordinator shall establish a new offset by adding or subtracting to/from the timings in a manner that limits the cycle change. This operation is performed in a device specific manner.

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Example: Programming of Coordination addOnly: when changing offset, the coordinator shall establish a new offset by adding to the timings in a manner that limits the cycle change. This operation is performed in a device specific manner. The Coord Correction Mode Parameter was previously known in legacy Peek family of Controllers as Offset Seeking. The method in which each of these modes work is describes as follows: Dwell Coord Correction Mode (Offset Seeking) allows the Controller to rest in the coordinated phase(s) continuously until the new offset point is reached. Dwell mode is similar to the technique electro-mechanical Controllers used to get in step and is not widely used anymore. Shortway Coord Correction Mode (Offset Seeking) moves Local Zero to the offset by a process that either shortens or lengthens the cycle time by 17 and 20 percent, respectively whichever achieves sync fastest. The +20% long or 17% short is evenly distributed among all phases in the cycle. Because it can seek in either direction, the most out-of-sync the unit can be is 50% of the cycle. The unit accomplishes this by actually timing either 0.83 or 1.2 seconds for each real time second in the cycle that elapses until the new offset is reached. Although similar in operation to Add Only, the ability to shorten the cycle can considerably speed up the seeking process. For example, the Local Zero point arrives a few seconds late relative to where it should be. With dwell or addOnly, since the cycle can only be increased, the unit has to essentially seek all the way around the cycle to get in step. With short route, it can simply speed up the cycle for a brief period and get in step quickly. Add Only Correction Mode (Offset Seeking) moves Local Zero to the offset by lengthening the cycle only. This is accomplished by actually timing 1.2 seconds for each second in the cycle that elapses until the new offset is reached (local times slow). This represents a 20% increase in cycle time and is evenly distributed among all phases in the cycle. Because the seeking is in one direction only, it may take up to five cycles to get in sync. Phases can only time longer and never shorter than their allocation time. Short route is generally preferred in most cases, but addOnly may be preferred when phase timing is critical, as with long pedestrian times.

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation 17. To select the Coord Correction Mode in the ATC-1000, set Correction Mode to be option 3. shortway.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..toronto(0) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 197 Coordination Variables Screen


18. To set the Coord Correction Mode value using IQ Link, again set the value to 3. shortway, as shown in Figure 198.

Figure 198 Setting the Coord Correction Mode in IQ Link


If the Coord Correction Mode Parameter is set to other(1), a proprietary Coord Correction Mode developed for the City of Toronto, Canada is available by programming the USTC Coord Correction Mode. The possible modes are: Toronto defines a percentage of the current cycle length that determines if time should be added or subtracted to splits when establishing a new offset based on how late or early the coordinated phase begins. Other option selected when Coord Correction Mode Parameter is set to dwell(2), shortway(3) or addOnly(4).

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Example: Programming of Coordination 19. Set the USTC Coord Correction Mode, set the value to be 1. other as shown below.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 199 Setting USTC Correction Mode


20. To select the USTC Coord Correction Mode using IQ Link, select the recommended other(1) as shown below.

Figure 200 Setting Coord Correction Mode


NTCIP Object 2.5.3 states that the Coord Maximum Mode Parameter defines the Coord Maximum Mode. The possible modes are: other: the maximum mode is determined by some other mechanism not defined in this standard. maximum1: the internal Maximum 1 Timing shall be effective while coordination is running a pattern.

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation maximum2: the internal Maximum 2 Timing shall be effective while coordination is running a pattern. maxInhibit: the internal Maximum Timing shall be inhibited while coordination is running a pattern. In Coordination, each programmed Phase can terminate in three manners. If the Minimum Green timing has been completed and the Extend timing for that Phases Detector has reached zero, the Phase will Gap Out. If the Extend timing stays active for that Phases Detector and extends the Phase out to the Maximum Timings in effect (Maximum 1 or Maximum 2), the Phase will Max Out. If the Extend timing stays active for that Phases Detector and extends the Phase to the limit of its programmed Split, then the Phase will Force Off. If the Maximum Timings in effect (Maximum 1 or Maximum 2) are shorter than the programmed Split, and the Maximum is not inhibited, then the Phase will terminate by Max Out spoiling the efficiency of Coordination. If the Maximum Timings in effect (Maximum 1 or Maximum 2) are shorter than the programmed Split, and a Force Off is desired, then maxInhibit should be selected. If all the Maximum Timings in effect (Maximum 1 or Maximum 2) are longer than all the programmed Splits, and a Force Off is desired, then maxInhibit is not required to be selected. This may be an advantage, if the Controller is programmed for Free Operation part of the day and Coordination for part of the day. The recommended mode is to activate Coord Maximum Mode Parameter of maxInhibit during Coordination. 21. Set the Maximum Mode on the ATC-1000 to the value 4. maxInhibit, as shown below.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 201 Setting the Maximum Inhibit value


To select the Maximum Mode in IQ Link, select option 4. maxInhibit as shown below.

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Figure 202 Setting the Maximum Mode in IQ Link


NTCIP Object 2.5.4 states that the Coord Force Mode Parameter is the object that defines the Pattern Force Mode. The possible modes are: other: the controller implements a mechanism not defined in this standard. floating: each non-coordinated phase will be forced to limit its time to the split time value. This allows unused split time to revert to the Coordinate phase(s). fixed: each non-coordinated phase will be forced at a fixed position in the cycle. This allows unused split time to revert to the following phase/phase pair. Force Offs are applied by the Coordinator to terminate a Phase/Phase Pair, if the Phase has not already terminated due to a Gap Out or a Max Out. If the Yield Point in the cycle (Local Zero) is referenced to the End of Main Street Green, then the Main Street Force Off is calculated to occur at the Cycle Zero Point. If the Yield Point is referenced to the Beginning of Main Street Green, the Main Street Force Off will be calculated as cycle zero + (main street split - main street clearance). In the Fixed Pattern Force Mode, Side Street Force Off Points are then computed sequentially from the Coordinated Phase/Phase Pair Force Off Point. In the Floating Pattern Force Mode, the Force Offs are more like Max times. This decision should be based on which provides maximum benefit to the intersection. If the best thing to do is give the Main Street every unused second, then choose Floating Pattern Force Mode. If the best thing to do is give the Side Street, especially thrus, any extra time that might occur from skipped phases or early Gap Outs, then use Fixed Pattern Force Mode. Phase Max Time settings

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation also play an important role in Phase timing during Coordination. If the Max Time in effect for a Phase during Coordination is about the same as its Split, then the operation will be much like Floating Pattern Force Mode on, even if Fixed Pattern Force Mode is programmed. This is because if the Phase starts early, it will Max Out before being Forced Off, unless it is a Coordination Phase. With Fixed Pattern Force Mode enabled, without the Max Timer influencing termination, a Phase that starts early with no Gap Out will use all of the unused time from the previous Phase/Phase Pair. This leaves none of the unused time for subsequent Non-coordinated Phases/Phase Pairs. A Phases Max Time can be used to control the distribution of unused time to subsequent Non-coordinated Phases/Pairs, where Coord Maximum Mode maxInhibit is not used. 22. Set Force Mode on the ATC-1000 to option 3. fixed, as shown in Figure 203.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 203 Setting the Force Mode


To select the Pattern Force Mode in IQ Link, select 3. fixed as shown below.

Figure 204 Setting Coord Force Mode in IQ Link

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Example: Programming of Coordination NTCIP Object 2.5.14 states that the System Pattern Control parameter defines this object as used to establish the Called System Pattern/Mode for the device. The possible values are: Table 21 System Pattern Available Values Value
0 1-253 254 255

Description
Standby - the system relinquishes control of the device. Pattern - these values indicate the system commanded pattern Free - this value indicates a call for Free Flash - this value indicates a call for Automatic Flash

If an unsupported / invalid pattern is called, Free shall be the operational mode. The device shall reset this object to ZERO when in BACKUP Mode. A write to this object shall reset the Backup timer to ZERO. This object/feature allows the end-user to operate an ATC-1000 in a local environment and impose programmed System Patterns. One use for this feature is to test the operation of a newly programmed Pattern Number in an ATC-1000 connected to a Light Board, or in a cabinet that is not connected to a Central System. 23. Set the System Pattern on the ATC-1000 interface to the value 000.
2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........000

Figure 205 Setting System Pattern on the ATC-1000 screen


If instead you wish to set the System Pattern to actual pattern to be run, select the three digit value for the programmed Pattern Number (1-253) desired. 001 is the example shown in Figure 206.

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2.3.1 COORD VARIABLES PG1OF1

OPERATIONAL MODE......000 (0-255) CORRECTION MODE.......shortway(3) USTC CORRECTION MODE..other(1) MAXIMUM MODE..........maxInhibit(4) FORCE MODE............fixed(3) SYSTEM PATTERN........001

Figure 206 Setting System Pattern 001


To set the System Pattern in IQ Link, select a value from the System Pattern Control drop-down list, as shown below.

Figure 207 Setting System Pattern in IQ Link


The ATC-1000 uses a dynamic or auto-calculation method to manage Permissive (windows). The method is hard-coded and currently not selectable. The ATC-1000 uses a hybrid permissive combination of a 5% Yield, on the Coordinated Phases and a Multiple Permissive style on the Non-Coordinated Phases. Permissive Periods are not applied to Coordinated Phases. Each Coordinated Phase has a pre-calculated Yield Point. This Yield Point occurs when Hold drops and Force Off activates, allowing the Coordinated Phase(s) to advance to ped clearance if CNA is applied, or yellow clearance if no CNA and permitted conflicting call(s) exist.

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Example: Programming of Coordination Actuated Phase Yield Point = split end point - (yellow + red clearance) CNA Phase Yield Point = actuated phase yield point - ped clearance time The Yield Window opens at the first Coordinated Phase Yield Point. The Yield Window closes at the last Coordinated Phase Yield Point, plus the 5% yield time. If a Coordinated Phase advances at its Yield Point, the Multiple Permissive style calculates Phase N's vehicle permissive period terminations when insufficient time is remaining to terminate all Conflicting Phases and run Phase N's Initial/Min Green time prior to Phase N's fixed force off point. The Pedestrian permissive period terminates when insufficient time is remaining to terminate all Conflicting Phases and run Phase N's Walk plus Ped Clear time prior to Phase N's fixed force off point. Because the possibility exists that phases have unequal yellow, red and ped clear times, the permissive period terminations update when a phase state change occurs. The mathematical formulas are: EndVehPermissive = FixedForceOff - MinGreen - (VehClearFactor + PedClearFactor); EndPedPermissive = FixedForceOff - PedTime - (VehClearFactor + PedClearFactor; MinGreen is defined as the larger of the phase's Initial/Min Green time and Max Initial time, if Volume Density is active to ensure a proper force off with the extra Min Green. PedTime is the smaller of the phase's Walk + Ped Clear and (Split Yellow - RedClear) to ensure a long enough permissive period, if the ped time is greater than split time. VehClearFactor is the largest conflicting green phase's yellow + red clearance time. PedClearFactor is the largest conflicting CNA green/walk phase's ped clearance time.

Note

VehClearFactor and PedClearFactor add separately because conflicting ped clearances finish prior to conflicting greens going yellow.

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The following are three scenario examples of how the permissive algorithms work: Calculating EndVehPermissive for Phase 1 -- Phase 1's FixedForceOff = 50. Phase Times: Phase 1 2 10 4 1 10 3 10 6 1 0 4 10 3 3 8 5 10 3 4 0 6 10 3 3 16 7 10 4 2 0 8 10 3 2 5

MinGreen 10 Yellow 5 RedClr 0 PedClr 0 Scenario 1: Phase 3 is green

Phase 8 is in CNA green/walk VehClearFactor = ph 3 y+r = 6+1 = 7 ph 8 y+r = 3+2 = 5 max[7,5] = 7 PedClearFactor = ph 8 ped clear time = 5 max[8] = 5 EndVehPermissive phase 1 = 50 - 10 - (7 + 5) = 28 Scenario 2: Phase 3 is green Phase 8 is in CNA green/pclr VehClearFactor = ph 3 y+r = 6+1 = 7 ph 8 y+r = 3+2 = 5 max[7,5] = 7 = 0 (no CNA walks conflicting with phase 1)

PedClearFactor

EndVehPermissive Phase 1 = 50 - 10 - (7 + 0) = 33 Scenario 3: Phase 3 is yellow/4 next Phase 8 is in CNA green/pclr VehClearFactor = ph 8 y+r 3+2 = 5 = max[5] = 5 PedClearFactor = 0 (no CNA walks conflicting with phase 1) EndVehPermissive phase 1 = 50 - 10 - (0 + 5) = 35

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Pedestrian Override Mode (POM)


There is no programming for POM. This proprietary feature is automatically activated by entering coordination data in the ATC-1000. When POM is active and an actuated ped is serviced, the local cycle counter is frozen at the force off point of that phase until the end of the pedestrian clearance interval. Then the counter resumes timing from where it left off and the ATC-1000 immediately begins Correction Mode selected offset seeking until it gets back into step. POM allows the coordinator to run a pattern that has an actuated ped phase that is longer than the time allocated to the phase. POM is typically used for any actuated Ped that is extremely low volume (less than two actuations her hour). The split plan timing then is set-up for normal vehicular demand and does not take into account ped timing. When the occasional ped occurs, the cycle timer stops to accommodate it, a late return occurs, then offset seeks to get in step. Ped Override will be ON if (Walk + Ped Clearance + Yellow + Red) is greater than the Phase Split.

Note

POM works best when Short Route Correction Mode (Offset Seeking) is selected. Small offset errors can be corrected within one cycle.

When all requisite Coordination parameters are entered and a Pattern is selected and activated, an internal Coordination Plan Check is executed. The following checks are run for validity before the coordinator will start: 1. Cycle time cannot be less than 30 seconds. If the cycle length is less than 30 seconds, then an INVALID_CYCLE_TIME error will occur. 2. Coordinated Phases must be mutually compatible. If the Coordinated Phases are not compatible, then a COORD_PHASES_NOT_COMPATIBLE error will occur. 3. A Coordinated Phase must be in each utilized ring, when possible. For example, in an 8-Phase Quad Left intersection with Phases 7 and 8 omitted, Phase 2 cannot be designated as the only the Coordinated Phase or an error will occur, unless Phase 6 is designated as a Coordinated Phase in Ring 2. However, it is satisfactory for either Phase 3 or 4 to be the only Coordinated Phase, because there is no eligible Phase in Ring 2 compatible with Phase 3 or 4. If only one Coordinated Phase is selected and there is a programmed compatible Phase available for selection and no selected in each Ring, then a NO_COORD_PHASE_IN_RING error will occur. 4. The sum of the Co-Phase Group splits must be less than or equal to the cycle length. If the sum is less than the cycle length, the extra time goes to the Coordinated Phases, as required by NTCIP Object 1.1.1.1 Split Time Parameter. Co-Phase Groups are logical groupings of phases (Co-Phase 1 = Phases 1, 2, 5 & 6; Co-Phase 2 = Phases 3, 4 ,7 & 8) that determine whether Phases in different Rings are compatible or conflicting. Phases in different Rings and in different Co-Phase Groups are conflicting. Phases in different Rings and in the same Co-Phase Group are

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation compatible. If the sum of the Co-Phase Group splits is not less than or equal to the cycle length, then a SPLIT_SUM_GREATER_THAN_CYCLE_TIME error will. 5. The sum of each Co-Phase Group splits by Ring must be equal. In an 8-Phase Quad Left intersection, the splits of Phases 1 + 2, must equal Phases 5 + 6; and Phases 3 + 4, must equal Phases 7 + 8. If the sum of each Co-Phase Group splits by Ring is not equal, then a COPH_RING_SPLIT_SUMS_NOT_EQUAL error will occur.

Definition

A Barrier Phase is the last phase in each concurrency Group in each Ring. In a standard 8-phase, 2-ring sequence, phases 2,4,6, and 8 are Barrier Phases.

6. Phase Minimum Green Check. An INIT_GREATER_THAN_PHASE_SPLIT error will occur if: a) Each non-Barrier phases Initial/Min Green + Yellow + Red Clear is greater than the Split Time, OR b) Each Barrier phases Initial/Min Green + (largest Yellow + Red Clear sum of the Concurrency Groups phases) is greater than the Split Time. 7. Phase Minimum Pedestrian Check. A PED_TIME_GREATER_THAN _PHASE_SPLIT error will occur if: a) Each CNA non-Barrier phases Walk+Ped Clearance + Yellow + Red Clear is greater than the Split Time, OR b) Each CNA Barrier phases Walk+Ped Clearance + (largest Yellow + Red Clear sum of the Concurrency Group phases) is greater than the Split Time.

Note

An actuated Pedestrian Phase always uses POM because there is no NTCIP Object to activate it.

8. A Trail or Trailing Overlap is the NTCIP Object feature commonly known as a Double Clearing Overlap. A Trail (or Trailing) Overlap yellow + Trail Overlap red + Parent Phase initial/min green must be less than or equal to the Parent Phases split time. For example, Phase 1 is a Parent Phase for Overlap A, which is a Trail Overlap. Phase 1s split = 20 seconds. Phase 1s initial/min green = 10 seconds. A TRAILING_OVERLAP_SPLIT_ERROR error will occur, if Overlap As programmed trail yellow + trail red is greater than 10 seconds. 9. The Offset time for each Cycle cannot be greater than the cycle time. If cycle length is 100 seconds and Offset for 110 seconds is entered, it will use an offset of 10 seconds, and an OFFSET_TIME_GREATER_THAN_CYCLE_TIME error will occur.

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Example: Programming of Coordination The dynamic display reads Bad Plan-> X, where X is one of the nine errors listed above. If more than one error is found, only one error will be displayed at one time. All errors must be cleared for the ATC-1000 to enter Coordination. The Coord Pattern Status, Local Free Status, Coord Cycle Status (Seconds) and Coord Synch Status (Seconds) on the Mode/Status/Control Tab of the Coordination Window submenu will be explained after the Pattern Table and Split Table Tabs are discussed below, so operating Coordination will display status seen during normal Coordination operation.

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Programming the Pattern Table for Coordinated Operation


To start programming the Pattern Table of the Coordination Window, place the cursor on the Tab and left mouse click. The Pattern Table should appear as below:

Figure 208 Pattern table in the Coordination window of IQ Link


A Pattern, as defined by NTCIP, consists of one Cycle time (length in seconds), one Offset time, one Split table number and a sequence number (i.e. for lead-lag adjusting). The Maximum Patterns Parameter is a read-only NTCIP object. IQ Link displays several read-only NTCIP Objects. These read-only NTCIP Objects are displayed in IQ Link only to show the capacity (i.e. maxOverlaps, maxPhases). NTCIP Object 2.5.5 maxPatterns specifies Pattern 253 as the maximum possible Coordination value. The ATC-1000 has 48 Phase-based Patterns denoted 1 thru 48, as shown in the Coordination Windows Pattern Table. Patterns 49-253 are for pre-timed operation or reserved for future use and not relevant to this Phase-based Coordination chapter. NTCIP Object 2.5.5, states that the Maximum Patterns Parameter is the maximum number of Patterns this Actuated Controller Unit (ATC-1000) supports. This object indicates how many rows are in the patternTable object (254 and 255 are defined as non-pattern status for Free and Flash).

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Example: Programming of Coordination Since the ATC-1000 supports 48 patterns, enter 48 to in the field to the left of Max Patterns, as indicated below:

Figure 209 Setting Max Patterns in IQ Link


NTCIP Object 2.5.6, states that the object of Pattern Table Type provides information about any special organizational structure required for the Pattern Table. The defined structures are as follows: other: The Pattern Table setup is not described in this standard, refer to device manual. patterns: Each row of the Pattern Table represents a unique pattern and has no dependencies on other rows. offset3: The Pattern Table is organized into plans which have three offsets. Each plan uses three consecutive rows. Only patternOffsetTime and patternSequenceNumber values may vary between each of the three rows. Plan 1 is contained in rows 1, 2 and 3, Plan 2 is contained in rows 4, 5 and 6, Plan 3 is in rows 7, 8 and 9, etc. In the ATC-1000, this object should be currently entered as other.

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation The Pattern Table setup is not described in NTCIP, but is set up as one Pattern Cycle Time, one Pattern Offset Time, one Pattern Split Number and Pattern Sequence Number, as displayed in Figure 210.

Figure 210 Pattern Table overview in IQ Link


The Pattern Table Type is currently hard-coded in the ATC-1000. There is no entry selection for keypad entry. The Pattern Table Type can be uploaded from the ATC-1000, as shown above. NTCIP Object 2.5.7, states that the object of Pattern Table is a sequence table containing Actuated Controller Unit Coordination Pattern Parameters. The number of rows in this table is equal to the maxPatterns object. Parameters for a specific Actuated Controller Unit pattern are: patternNumber, patternCycleTime, patternOffsetTime, patternSplitNumber and patternSequenceNumber. Keeping in mind that the ATC-1000 may be used in a threshold-based Traffic Responsive mode available in IQ Central, the entry of Plans should be in an organized manner conducive to Traffic Responsive Operations. For example purposes, the programming demonstrated below will consist of four progressive Pattern Cycle Time(s) or cycle lengths arranged from shortest to longest; three Pattern Offset Time(s) arranged as Inbound (I), Balanced (B) and Outbound (O); and four splits for Balanced (B), Slightly (S), Moderately (M) and Heavily (H) favoring the Main Street Coordinated Phases.

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Example: Programming of Coordination These four split modes will follow the percentage table listed below: Split Mode Balanced Slightly Moderately Heavily Percentage (%) by Phase Pair 1/5 25% 23% 15% 15% 2/6 25% 29% 35% 40% 3/7 25% 23% 15% 15% 4/8 25% 25% 25% 20%

However, since NTCIP does not support entry by percentage, sixteen different splits (Split Pattern Numbers) will have to be entered to provide time in seconds parameters for four split modes over four cycle lengths. An outlined table showing this logic is as follows:
Plan # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Cycle 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 110 Offset I B O I B O I B O I B O I B O I B O I B O I B O Split Mode/Number B/1 B/1 B/1 S/2 S/2 S/2 M/3 M/3 M/3 H/4 H/4 H/4 B/5 B/5 B/5 S/6 S/6 S/6 M/7 M/7 M/7 H/8 H/8 H/8 Plan # 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 Cycle 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 130 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 150 Offset Split Mode/Number I B/9 B B/9 O B/9 I S/10 B S/10 O S/10 I M/11 B M/11 O M/11 I H/12 B H/12 O H/12 I B/13 B B/13 0 B/13 I S/14 B S/14 O S/14 I M/15 B M/15 O M/15 I H/16 B H/16 O H/16

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation

Enter the four Pattern Parameters under each Plan, in accordance with the field value limits displayed below:

Figure 211 Pattern Cycle Time limits

Figure 212 Pattern Offset Time limits

Figure 213 Split Number details

Figure 214 Sequence Number details

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Example: Programming of Coordination The ATC-1000 screens to program this data into the Coordination Pattern Table screens were previously discussed and displayed in Chapter 5 of this manual. The Pattern Sequence Number is obtained from the Ring Window shown below. In this example, the Sequence Data Sequence 1 is utilized.

Figure 215 Ring Window in IQ Link


The ATC-1000 screens to program this data into the Ring Sequencing screens were previously discussed and displayed in Chapter 3, of this manual. This completes the programming required to start Coordination operation in the ATC-1000. If the ATC-1000 is currently running with free operation programming already installed in IQ Link, then a complete download of the database can be accomplished by closing the Coordination Window and pressing the DB -> Controller button.

Figure 216 DB to Controller button in IQ Link

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation The DB (Database) to Controller Button, which is the second from the right on the second row of buttons in IQ Link, will download the complete ATC-1000 database into the Controller. To ensure that a correct and complete download has occurred, the database should then be uploaded into IQ Link again so that a comparison can take place. To upload, select the Controller --> DB Button, which is the third from the right on the second row, as shown in Figure 217.

Figure 217 Controller to DB button in IQ Link


After pressing the button, a caution screen will appear.

Figure 218 Database Download warning message


Select Yes, and the database will upload. Scan the database values for any red-colored values. Red indicates that the database values are different. Correct any issues causing these unmatched values. Repeat the upload until all values appear black on all database screens.

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Example: Programming of Coordination

Verifying Proper Coordinated Operation


To check the ATC-1000 for proper operation in Coordination, select the Coordination Status screen 1.4, by selecting the buttons: Main Menu (MNU) > 1.Status > 4.Coordination.
1.4 COORDINATION STATUS Local :012 Offset:000 PG1OF1

Master:023 Ptn:001 Status:In Sync

Phase 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Color :G r r r G r r r r r r r r r r r Perm :B C B C Hold-FO: H 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Patn 150 350 150 250 150 350 150 250 Curr 150 350 150 250 150 350 150 250 Cmnd 150 350 150 250 150 350 150 250 Run 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Status

Figure 219 Checking the Coordination Status screen for coordination


The three digits to the right of Local: is the Local Cycle time in seconds. The three digits to the right of Master: is the Master Cycle time in seconds. If these two time values are counting up to the currently commanded cycle length, reset to zero and start counting again, the ATC-1000 is in Coordination. Ptn is the currently commanded Pattern being run. Offset is the currently selected Offset being run. In the example above, 000 for the Offset usually indicates the first intersection on the coordinated corridor. Status: shows the current status of Phase-based operation. The Status: can indicate Free, Flash or In Sync.

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Chapter 6 Coordinated Operation

Checking Coordination in IQ Link


The Coord Pattern Status, Local Free Status, Coord Cycle Status (Seconds) and Coord Synch Status (Seconds) values are displayed on the Mode/Status/Control Tab of the Coordination Window. 1. 2. To view these parameters, select the Mode/Status/Control Tab and the yellow Select All button to highlight the Mode/Status/Control Tab. Now click the Read Data from ASTC button. This action will upload all of the Tabs data programmed in the selected Controller. The status values showing that the ATC-1000 is operating in Coordination are displayed in pink below:

Figure 220 Key operating coordination parameters in IQ Link

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Traffic Responsive Operation

TRAFFIC RESPONSIVE OPERATION


Traffic responsive, or the arterial coordination of many intersections using a central system as the coordinator, is possible and has been configured using ATC-1000 controllers and either Peeks IQ Central central system software, or third party central system applications. The controller will take pattern changes from the central system as the primary method of controlling Traffic Responsive operation. This capability is described in detail in the IQ Central Operating Manual.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

This chapter describes the interface and methods used to program the ATC-1000 for pre-timed operation. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Overview of Pre-timed operation, on page 230. Pattern to Pre-timed Plan mapping, on page 231. Using the Pre-timed programming screens, on page 232. Details about pre-timed preemption, on page 251. Setting up Leading or Lagging left turns using pre-timed plans, on page 254.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

OVERVIEW
Pre-timed operation is divided into two major functions, signal plans and timing plans. Signal Plans There are four signal plans available. A signal plan is basically a mapping of the signals and outputs for each interval. The signal plan is the sequence of color indications for all used channel outputs that will appear on the street. The signal plan also includes minimum times for all used intervals and programmable options for each interval covering manual control, transitional control, and semi-actuation of vehicle or pedestrian. Timing Plans There are 32 available timing plans. Each timing plan defines how many intervals will be used in the pattern. A timing plan can use up to 24 intervals. The plan also includes a cycle length, an offset, and a set of split times, one for each of the intervals in the plan. Plan Processing When a pretimed pattern is in effect, the controller starts the associated timing plan, using the associated signal plan signal output assignments for the intervals. The timing plan starts at interval #1 when the controller powers up, or when a new pattern is called. When one interval ends, the next in the sequence starts automatically. Unless options have been set for manual control (such as MCE or Actuated) in the signal plan, the timing plan sequence will only pause at All Red intervals. As an example of how the sequence may be paused in a given state, a signal plan may be configured to be Actuated so that the interval sequence will rest on main street green until an actuation is received. Exiting a Timing Plan Sequence Signal plans can be exited at a specified interval so that they can transition either to another signal plan, another timing plan, or to automatic flash.

Calling the Plans


But how are the pre-timed plans called into operation? Its all based on Pattern. When a pattern number between 101 and 224 is called, either by the time of day scheduler, or by a central command or override, those pattern automatically evoke a preset Signal plan and timing plan. The assignments are hard coded in the ATC controller and follow the assignment pattern shown in Table 22.

Note

These assignments are also visible on the ATC front panel interface, along with some additional information, on the Timing Plan > Signal/Offset/Split Data screen. (M a i n M e n u > 2 . P r o g r a m m i n g > 7 . P r e t i m e d > 1 . T i m i n g P l a n s > 1 . C y c l e / O f f s e t / S p l i t D a t a ) However, the assignments cannot be modified on these screens.

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Table 22 Pattern to Pretimed Signal Plan and Timing Plan assignments


Pattern 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 Timing Plan 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Signal Plan 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Pattern Timing Plan 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Signal Plan 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 Pattern Timing Plan 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 Signal Plan 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

USING THE PRETIMED PROGRAMMING SCREENS


Most of the interface and controls for the ATC-1000 have an implicit assumption that most users of the controller will be working with a NEMA style, actuated, phase-based operation in their traffic cabinets. This includes the preemption, TSP and most other parts of the interface. The Pre-timed menu is where most of the settings are located to operate the other type of traffic pattern control in the ATC-1000: pre-timed interval based, rather than NEMA phase-based. Whereas phases assume signals respond to provide traffic movements, pre-timed operation is more concerned with signal outputs. The first 48 patterns in the controller, as well as the special case patterns 254 and 255, are the NEMA patterns. The rest of the usable patterns, 101 to 228, are pre-timed patterns, whose signal outputs and operating parameters are defined in these screens. (M AIN
2.7
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED )


FIXED TIMING MENU

1. TIMING PLANS 2. SIGNAL PLANS 3. PREEMPTION 4. PREEMPTION AND INTERVAL SKIPPING

Figure 221 Pretimed menu

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Timing Plans Screens


Also known as the Fixed Timing Menu, the Timing plans area of the ATC menu system are where you can program the cycle length, offset, the number of intervals used, and the split times for each of those intervals within the timing plan.

Timing Plans Menu


This is also known as the Fixed Timing Menu. (M AIN
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 1.T IMING P LANS )
FIXED TIMING MENU

2.7.1

1. CYCLE / OFFSET / SPLIT DATA 2. TIMING PLAN SETUP

Figure 222 Timing Plans Menu


Cycle/Offset/Split Data This series of screens is primarily a way to view the current status of pretimed operations. It also provides a method to do a manual override of the current pattern selection. Timing Plan Setup This is where all of the timing information is entered for each of the 32 timing plans, including split times, cycle length, and offset.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation Cycle / Offset / Split Data Screens The Cycle / Offset / Split Data Screens show the current status of pretimed operation, including the current pattern, timing plan and signal plan in effect. But most of the screens are occupied by a table showing the fixed mapping of patterns to timing plans and signal plans, along with the programmed values within those timing plans of Cycle length and Offset times. (M AIN MENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 1.T IMING P LANS > 1.C YCLE /O FFSET /S PLIT D ATA )
2.7.1.1.1 TIMING DATA PG 1 of 16

|Pattern|Timing|Signal|Cycle|Offset| | 101 | 001 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 102 | 002 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 103 | 003 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 104 | 004 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 105 | 005 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 106 | 006 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 107 | 007 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| | 108 | 008 | 001 | 000 | 000 S| Current Pattern Current Timing Plan Current Signal Plan Commanded Plan 001 00 00 000

Figure 223 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 1)


The table will show the currently running pattern number, along with the associated timing plan and signal plan that is currently being used to run the intersection. The table shows what timing plans and signal plans are assigned to each pattern, as well as the current values for Cycle length and offset times for each of the 32 timing plans.

Note

The same timing plan data is shown four times in the table, one for each of the four signal plans.

The only value that can be entered directly on this screen is the Commanded Plan. This is the location where pretimed operation can be set directly by entering a pattern number to run. Otherwise, the pattern number is selected by time of day, or by central command. Press the D WN button to navigate to the other 15 screens to see the Cycle/Offset/Split settings for Patterns 101 through 228.

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens Timing Plan Setup Screens These are screens where the actual times are entered for each of the 32 timing plans, each with its own set of 24 interval split times. (M AIN MENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 1.T IMING P LANS > 2.T IMING P LAN S ETUP )
2.7.1.2.1 TIMING PLAN 1 PG 1 of 32

Cycle Length....000 (ent = split sum) Offset..........000 Offset Type..sec Intervals used..00 SPLIT 1 Type..sec Time..000 SPLIT 9 Type..sec Time..000 SPLIT 17 Type..sec Time..000 2 sec 000 10 sec 000 18 sec 000 3 sec 000 11 sec 000 19 sec 000 4 sec 000 12 sec 000 20 sec 000 5 sec 000 13 sec 000 21 sec 000 6 sec 000 14 sec 000 22 sec 000 7 sec 000 15 sec 000 23 sec 000 8 sec 000 16 sec 000 24 sec 000

Figure 224 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 1)


Cycle Length This is the length of time to complete an entire loop of the timing plan, from interval 1 to the last Interval used in the plan, and then back to interval 1. The cycle length is calculated automatically if the Split Type is seconds or tenths of seconds. You will need to enter the cycle length manually (in seconds) if the Split Type is Percentage (per). Offset This is the offset time that this intersection will start the cycle after a new pattern is called, assuming this controller is part of a coordination plan. Pretimed coordination is based on synchronized clocks. Each intersection has the same cycle length, and each intersection switches to a new pattern at the same time of the day. This offset value then allows the intersection signals to be coordinated. This value can either be a number in seconds (0 to 254 seconds) or a percentage (0 to 100%). The units are set using the Offset Type parameter (below.) Offset Type Use the right arrow to navigate to this field to set the units that will be used with Offset (above). This value can be either sec (seconds) or per (percentage), which tells the ATC how to interpret the value you enetered for Offset. Intervals used This is the number of intervals (out of 24) that will be used in this timing plan. Even if times are entered for splits beyond this number, only the first number of splits up to this value will actually be used in the plan. So if you call for the Intervals used to be 13, then the first 13 splits in the table below are the ones that will be timed during the pretimed cycle.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation Split Type This is a global value, showing what units are used for all of the split times in this timing plan. The possible values are sec (seconds), ten (tenths of seconds), or per (percentage of the cycle length.) Split Time A three digit number for each split that represents either seconds, tenths of seconds, or percentage of cycle time, depending on what Split Type has been chosen. Valid values are between 000 and 255, so 0 to 255 seconds, 0.0 to 25.5 seconds, or 0 to 100 percent. (Values over 100 if the Split Type is per are not accepted.) After you have entered all of your split times, if the times are all seconds or tenths of a second, then the cycle length will be calculated automatically as soon as you exit Edit mode. If you have entered your split times as percentages, you will need to supply the Cycle length, in seconds, yourself. All 24 splits possible for the current timing plan are shown on this one screen. Press the D WN button to navigate to all 32 of the available pretimed Timing Plans.
2.7.1.2.32 TIMING PLAN 32 PG32 of 32

Cycle Length....000 (ent = split sum) Offset..........000 Offset Type..sec Intervals used..00 SPLIT 1 Type..sec Time..000 SPLIT 9 Type..sec Time..000 SPLIT 17 Type..sec Time..000 2 sec 000 10 sec 000 18 sec 000 3 sec 000 11 sec 000 19 sec 000 4 sec 000 12 sec 000 20 sec 000 5 sec 000 13 sec 000 21 sec 000 6 sec 000 14 sec 000 22 sec 000 7 sec 000 15 sec 000 23 sec 000 8 sec 000 16 sec 000 24 sec 000

Figure 225 Pretimed Cycle/Offset/Split Data (Page 16)

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens

Signal Plans Menu


This menu is where all the pre-timed signal plan parameters can be programmed, from one of the three available input screens. (M AIN
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 2.S IGNAL P LANS )
INTERVAL MENU

2.7.2

1. INTERVAL MODIFIERS 2. CHANNELS TO INTERVALS MAPPING 3. OUTPUTS TO INTERVALS MAPPING

Figure 226 Signal Plan screen


Interval Modifiers This is the place to assign transfer, flash entry, and flash exit intervals, as well as special modifier tags for individual interfals, such as actuation, recalls, and dwells. Channels to Interval Mapping This is where the channel signal assignments (Green, Yellow, Red, Walk, Flashing Dont Walk, Dont Walk) are set for each interval and each of the channels in each of the four signal plans. Outputs to Intervals Mapping This is the place to assign more granular output assignments for all of the intervals in the signal plan.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

Interval Modifiers
This is the screen that defines special functions and roles for all of the intervals in the signal plan. This includes minimum timings, transfer intervals (in and out of the plan), actuation, dwell and recall, as well as several other functions. (M AIN MENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 2.S IGNAL P LANS > 1.I NTERVAL M ODIFIERS )
2.7.2.1 INTERVAL MODIFIERS PG 1 of 2 Signal Plan..001 Press 1-4 to select Timing Plan Transfer Interval..00 Signal Plan Transfer Interval..00 Flash Entry Interval...........00 Flash Exit Interval............00 1 1 1 Interval -> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 M.C.E....... Actuated.... Recall...... Non-Lock.... Dwell....... min(1-6) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 min(7-12) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Figure 227 Signal Plan Per Interval Modifiers (Screen 1 for Plan 1)
Signal Plan This number shows which signal plan is being edited. This screen can be used to edit all four of the available signal plans. To switch to another signal plan, press the number button for the signal plan in question (1, 2, 3, or 4). Timing Plan Transfer Interval In each Signal Plan, you can specify one interval as the Timing Plan Transfer interval. When a call is made to change to a different timing plan, the controller waits until the end of this interval before it switches to the new plan. Signal Plan Transfer Interval Similarly, in each Signal Plan, you can specify one interval as the Signal Plan Transfer interval. When a call is made to change to a different signal plan, the controller waits until the end of this interval before it switches to the new plan. Flash Entry Interval In each Signal Plan, one interval can be specified as the Flash Entry Interval. If the controller is switching to Automatic Flash mode, it will wait until the end of this specified interval before making the switch. Flash Exit Interval In each Signal Plan, one interval can be specified as the Flash Exit Interval. If the controller is switching from Automatic Flash mode and will be starting this signal plan, the controller will launch the plan by going directly to the beginning of this specified interval. M.C.E. (Manual Control Enabled) This value is either OFF or ON for each interval in the plan. When this value is ON (X) for an interval, it is available for variable operation, including a police button advance of the intersection, force-offs, and offset correction

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens timing. By selecting which of the intervals is enabled in this way, you can control how a police button stepping through the cycle will function. Only those intervals with the X next to MCE will respond to the button. Actuated An X placed in an intervals column indicates that the interval is actuated by a detector input. However, the assignment of which detector or detectors (including pedestrian detectors) will cause this actuation is not available from the controller front panel in build 304 of the firmware. To make the detector assignment for each interval, you will need to edit the device database using IQ Link or IQ Central. Recall When checked, it indicates that an interval MUST be serviced during the cycle. In effect, this is an artificial call on that interval ; one that isnt being generated by a detector input. Non-Lock By default, intervals are locking on detector inputs, meaning that if a call is placed (and the interval is Actuated), then the demand for service on that interval remains, even if the call goes away. If you set Non-Lock to ON (X), then this intervals detectors do not latch in this manner, meaning that if the call goes away, then the demand for service on this interval also goes away.

Note

Pedestrian detector calls are always locking, no matter how the Non-Lock parameter is set.

Dwell An interval marked as Dwell is used by the traffic engine to get the intersection back into coordination. Since pretimed operation does not have other methods for coordination offset recovery, Dwell is the only option available for the coordinator to modify the cycle time in order to resynchronize the intersection with the coordination timing. Typically, only one interval is marked as the Dwell interval, and its usually the interval that supplies the Green light to the main traffic artery. However, the ATC firmware will allow multiple intervals to be available for Dwell operation. If more than one are checked (X), and the coordinator needs to Dwell to resync coordination, then it will use the first interval encountered that has the Dwell function flagged. min These are the minimum times required for each interval. Valid values can be anything from 0.0 to 25.5 seconds. This is typically used to protect a minimum time for the amber (yellow) portion of a cycle to prevent it from falling below the legal limit for that signal (This is 3.0 seconds in the United States, but the operator can set this minimum to any value in the range mentioned previously.) As of build 304 of the controller firmware, the only function that may potentially shorten an interval, and which must be protected against using this min value, is Transit Signal Priority (TSP) operation. TSP can shorten some intervals in order to recover after a transit vehicle has taken priority in the intersection and knocked the intersection out of coordination.

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation The Pre-timed Interval Modifiers area forms a 4 x 2 array of screens. (Press the numbers 1 through 4 to see the four signal plan screens, and press the D WN button to see the modifiers for intervals 13 through 24 for each plan.)
2.7.2.1 INTERVAL MODIFIERS PG 2 of 2 Signal Plan..004 Press 1-4 to select Timing Plan Transfer Interval..00 Signal Plan Transfer Interval..00 Flash Entry Interval...........00 Flash Exit Interval............00 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 Interval -> 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 M.C.E....... Actuated.... Recall...... Non-Lock.... Dwell....... min(13-18) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 min(19-24) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Figure 228 Signal Plan Per Interval Modifiers (Screen 2 for Plan 4)

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens

Channels to Intervals Mapping


This is the area in the interface where signal channels are assigned to the intervals in your signal plans. (M AIN
MENU TO I NTERVALS

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 2.S IGNAL P LANS > 2.C HANNELS M APPING )
of 2 select 1 1 1 1 3 4 5 6

2.7.2.2.1 CHANNEL SETUP PG 1 Signal Plan..001 Press 1-4 to 1 1 1 chnl->1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 I 1.. I 2.. I 3.. I 4.. I 5.. I 6.. I 7.. I 8.. I 9.. I 10.. I 11.. I 12..

Figure 229 Pretimed Channels-to-Intervals Map Page 1 for Signal Plan 1


Each signal plan features two pages of channel output to interval # assignments, all in a 24 row x 16 column table. Each location in the table allows the operator to assign a signal output on a particular channel for that interval. Each cell in the table can be set to one of these available signal options: G Solid green Y Solid yellow (amber) R Solid Red W Walk F Flashing Dont Walk D Dont Walk g Flashing green (blank) No signal on this channel for this interval

Note

y for Flashing yellow and r for Flashing red will also be available in the interface at some point, however they are not available in the interface as of Build 304.

These screens form a 4 x 2 array of screens. (Press the numbers 1 through 4 to see the four signal plan screens, and press the D WN button to see the channel assignments for intervals 13 through 24 for each plan.)

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

Outputs to Intervals Mapping


These screens allow you to define which intervals will be linked to which controller outputs. There are four available sign output plans. (M AIN MENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 2.S IGNAL P LANS > 3.O UTPUTS I NTERVALS M APPING )
2.7.2.3. 1 OUTPUT SETUP PG 1 of 16 Signal Plan..001 Press 1-4 to select 1 1 1 Interval -> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 Out 1....... Out 2....... Out 3....... Out 4....... 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 Interval -> 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 Out 1....... Out 2....... Out 3....... Out 4.......
TO

Figure 230 Outputs-to-Intervals Map screen


This is a way to control the controllers physical pin outputs directly from your pre-timed signal plan. These function alongside your Channels-to-Intervals assignments. For each of the 24 intervals in the signal plan, you can specify an output on any of the 64 available outputs. The exact pins that these outputs trigger depend on how you have configured your I/O Mapping for this controller. (Refer to I/O Mapping, on page 101) Each output can be set to one of three states: (blank) Output is OFF X Output is ON F Output is FLASHING You can toggle the value for each input using any of these three keypad keys: YES, NO, or NXT. These screens form a 4 x 16 array of screens. Press the numbers 1 through 4 to see the output assignments for each of the four signal plan screens, and press the D WN button to see the output assignments for all 64 outputs.

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2.7.2.3. 1 OUTPUT SETUP PG 1 of 16 Signal Plan..004 Press 1-4 to select 1 1 1 Interval -> 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 Out61....... Out62....... Out63....... Out64....... 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 Interval -> 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 Out61....... Out62....... Out63....... Out64.......

Figure 231 Outputs-to-Intervals Map screen (Outputs 61-64, Signal Plan 4)

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Chapter 7 Pretimed Operation

Pretimed Preemption Screens


This screen will host the main parameters to program the six available pre-timed preemption runs. (M AIN
MENU

> 2.P ROGRAMMING > 7.P RETIMED > 3.P REEMPTION )


PRETIMED PREEMPT

2.7.3

Figure 232 Pretimed Preemption screen


In build 304 of the ATC firmware, the Pretimed preemption functions are included in the firmware, however the data entry for those parameters are not yet available from the front panel interface. Or, in other words, the capability is there, but it cannot be programmed from the keypad. To program pretimed preemption, you will need to use either IQ Link or IQ Central instead. Preempt Number There are six available preemption inputs, each of which can have its own values for the following parameters. Preempt Control (Non-Locking Memory) When set, the preemption will not occur if the preemption input goes away before the controller has the time to transition to the preemption run. (By default, pretimed preemption inputs are latching.) Preempt Control (Preempt Override Flash) When this option is set to ON, the preemption run will not be serviced if the controller is currently in Automatic Flash mode. Preempt Control (Cycle Dwell) The pretimed preemption run has a section of intervals called Dwell. If the Cycle Dwell value is set to ON, then those intervals will be cycled over and over until the preemption call goes away. If this value is OFF, the dwell portion of the run will be served once and then wait in the last dwell interval until the preemption call goes away. Delay This is the delay on the start of the preemption run. This is the amount of time (from 0 to 600 seconds) that the controller will wait to service a preemption run after a preemption input becomes active. A Non-Locking run (see Non-Locking Memory, above) whose preemption input goes off before this delay period has completed will not be serviced.

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens Minimum Duration This is the minimum amount of time that the entire preemption run must be active, from 0 to 65,535 seconds (0 to 18.2 hours), once it starts being serviced. This timer begins counting at the end of the runs Delay period. This counter will hold the prun in the Dwell state until this minimum duration time has elapsed. Maximum Presence This is the maximum time that an active preemption input can be considered valid. The primary purpose of this function is to prevent a faulty input from locking the preemption run for an excessive amount of time. This can be any value between 0 and 65,535 seconds (0 to 18.2 hours). When set to zero, the maximum presence test is disabled. After an input has been ON for the defined length of time, the input is considered invalid, and the controller returns to normal operation. The preemption input will be considered invalid until it returns to the OFF state. Per-Interval Parameters The rest of the pre-timed preemption values are set for each interval in the run. Time The duration of each interval of the preemption run. Any interval can be any value between 0 and 25.5 seconds. Channels 1 through 12 These are the assigned signals to show, set by the load switch channels for your cabinet. Each channel can be set to one of these values for that interval: None (OFF), Green, Yello, Red, Walk, Flashing Dont Walk, and Solid Dont Walk). Track Clear intervals These six intervals at the beginning of the preemption run are used for railroad track clearance timing. They are optional and are only used for handling train crossings, specifically to clear the road before a train comes through. If the time value of an interval is zero, then it is unused. Unused intervals must be placed at the end of the Track Clear section. If the time for all these Track Clear intervals are zero, then there will be no track clearance used during the run, and the preemption will proceed directly to the Dwell section of the run (which is the normal setup for emergency vehicle preemption). Dwell intervals These six intervals constitute the main body of the preemption run. If the timing for an interval is set to zero, it is considered to be unused. Any unused intervals during the Dwell portion of the run should be placed at the end of the Dwell section. If ALL of the Dwell intervals have a zero time, then the controller will automatically dwell in all red during the run. The used Dwell intervals will be repeated for as long as the preemption input is active if the Preempt Control: Cycle Dwell parameter is set ON. Exit intervals These six intervals are used to transition the intersection back to normal operation after the preemption input has gone inactive. Again, intervals with zero time are unused, and any unused Exit intervals should be placed at the end of the run.

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Additional Notes About Pre-timed Preemption

Pre-Timed Preemption
A preemption interrupts the normal sequence of vehicle and pedestrian movements to allow an emergency vehicle or train to have priority through the intersection. The controller creates an orderly green-amber-red sequence of new intervals to reach the preprogrammed preempt plan. If a signal is green and this matches the programmed preempt plan, that signal will stay green while all other signals transition to the preempt plan. After preempt has ended, the controller will use its programmed timing and signal plans to operate the intersection. If preempt occurs, the controller advances to main street green (interval 1) when the time-based plan would normally have caused this; for example, at a specific time of the internal clock of the controller. The specifications dictate a priority level for all inputs: preempt input is a higher priority than stop time and cab flash. The result of this is that the controller does not stop preempt processing if the cabinet goes into flash. If an event in the preempt plan causes a flash condition, the controller will not stop three-color operation. The controller and the cabinet must be observed during the preempt operation to determine the cause of any conflict. The controller will honor the stop time input after preempt processing has been completed. There are several stages to preempt processing: Preparation intervals before going into preempt - these are the intervals that cycle the intersection from the current signal conditions (red/amber/green) to the first interval in the track clearance definition (if present) or the first interval in the dwell definition. The controller uses default times for these new intervals (three seconds for amber, two seconds for red, and three seconds for flashing Dont Walk). These times can be changed on the Preempt & Interval Skipping tab after the Preempt tab of the pre-timed window. This tab has entries for pedestrian clearance, amber clearance, and red time for each channel. Preempt Track Clearance intervals - these intervals are optional and are only used for handling train crossings. If they are not configured, then the first interval run during the actual preempt will be the first dwell interval that follows. If a road crosses a railroad track, a track clearance interval would need to be defined so that the road can be cleared before the train comes through. Preempt Dwell stage intervals - these are the actual intervals that run during preempt. These intervals give priority to emergency vehicles.

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens After the dwell times are completed, these intervals return the intersection to normal operation. Normal operation starts in Interval 1 so the controller will appear to dwell in the last preempt interval until the proper coordinated time to advance to Interval 1. This advance to Interval 1 is the TBC time as determined by the controllers clock and the current timing plan. Because of this dwell it may appear that the controller has hung. The controller will return to Interval 1 at the same coordinated time, as if the preemption did not occur. It is possible to configure preempt to flash the dwell intervals. By using the preempt option to cycle the dwell phases and having two alternate intervals of one half second each, the intersection can be doing a flash sequence while in preemption. In the example IQ Link preemption configuration screen shown below, channels 1 and 5 are flashing red simultaneously with channels 2 and 6, which are flashing yellow. Channels 3, 4, 7, and 8 will flash red, but on the alternate half of the 30 second in a wig-wag fashion.

Figure 233 Wig-wag signals during pre-timed preemption using Cycle Dwell
Preemption intervals can have of maximum duration of 25.5 seconds, so if an interval time greater than 25.5 seconds is desired, duplicate the interval and use times that add up to the desired total time.

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Pretimed Preempt and Interval Skipping Screens


This screen will be used to host the Pre-timed preemption and interval skipping conditional parameters. These are extra performance requirements placed on the outputs of pre-timed operation during either preemption or interval skipping operation.

Note
(M AIN

An interval during normal operation is available for skipping if it is both A) Actuated and B) NOT Recalled.
AND I NTERVAL

MENU

> 9.P RETIMED > 4.P REEMPT

S KIPPING )

2.7.4 PRETIMED PEEMPT AND INTERVAL SKIPP

Figure 234 Pretimed Preempt & Interval Skipping screen


In build 304 of the ATC firmware, the Pretimed preemption interval skipping function is included in the firmware, however the data entry for these parameters are not yet available from the front panel interface. Again, the capability is there, but it cannot be programmed from the keypad. To program pretimed preemption interval skipping, you will need to use either IQ Link or IQ Central instead. Channels 1 through 12 The parameters on this screen are set PER LOAD SWITCH, so the output channel in your cabinet will have the following restrictions. Ped Clearance This is a minimum time placed on the pedestrian clearance portion of a pre-timed plan if either interval skipping or a preemption run become active. This is a value in seconds between 0 and 255 that the flashing Dont Walk signal must be displayed (if present in the plan). If no value is set, there is no minimum ped clearance time requirement during operation. Amber Clearance This is a minimum time placed on the vehicular clearance (Yellow/Amber) portion of a pre-timed plan if either interval skipping or a preemption run become active. This is a value in seconds between 0.0 and 25.5. If no value is set, there is no minimum clearance time requirement during operation. The requirement in the NTCIP standard for this feature is: Following the termination of the Green interval of each channel the controller shall provide a minimum Amber Clearance interval during initial preemption or interval skipping.

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Using the PreTimed Programming Screens Red Time After a vehicular clearance (Yellow or Amber) signal and a Ped Clearance signal, this is the minimum time that the controller must show the red signal when transitioning to interval skipping or a preemption run. Valid values are 0.0 to 25.5 seconds.

Additional Details about Skipping and Preemption Transitions Pre-timed signal plans are based on a predefined sequence of intervals. These intervals have a specific signal light pattern. A series of intervals that control a specific direction of vehicle movements (green, amber, red) is what drives a channel and the output of that channel feeds a load switch. If more than one interval is defined as actuated, the controller will be able to skip intervals that do not have an associated call on them. The skipping of intervals is from one actuated interval to another actuated interval. For some signal plan configurations, the specific interval defined as actuated might have to be adjusted to achieve the correct color operation on the signal head. Typically, this means that Interval 3 will need to be set as actuated. Another point to note is that if the signal plan or timing plan transfer interval is not reached, the signal plan or timing plan is not reloaded. This only becomes a factor if the timing or signal plan has been changed via the IQ Link software or some other NTCIP central system. However, the plans will always be loaded when a plan change occurs due to a time-of-day event. Just like with preempt processing, the controller will have to create new intervals to achieve an orderly and proper transition between intervals. If new intervals need to be created, the controller will use the same minimums for interval skipping as it uses for preempt processing: three seconds for amber, two seconds for red, and three seconds for flashing Dont Walks. These values can be set on the Preempt & Interval Skipping tab. This tab has entries for pedestrian clearance, amber clearance and red time for each channel. Note that the controller has a minimum three second delay for any amber interval. The below is an example of interval skipping.

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Figure 235 Actuated intervals in the IQ Link Pre-timed table


In the above example, intervals 6 and 10 are actuated. The controller will dwell in Interval 1 until a call is placed on Vehicle 1 or Pedestrian 1 (for interval 6) or Vehicle 2 or Pedestrian 2 (for interval 10). If a call is placed on both 1 (either pedestrian or vehicle) and 2 (either pedestrian or vehicle), the controller will cycle through all 12 intervals. If a call is placed on 1 (either pedestrian or vehicle) and no call on 2 (either pedestrian or vehicle), the controller will go from Interval 1 to 6, 7, 8, and 9, then back to Interval 1. If a call is placed on 2 (either pedestrian or vehicle), the controller will go from Interval 1 to 10, 11, and 12 then back to Interval 1.

Note

The controller skips from actuated interval to actuated interval (Interval 1 is an actuated interval by default). If there is a specific signal pattern that has to run after Interval 1 but before the actuated Interval 6 (for example to bring up an arrow), then Interval 3 should be defined as actuated and not Interval 6.

Note

All interval-skipping configurations must be tested in a cabinet with a correctly configured conflict monitor. Each actuated interval should be tested and watched closely to verify proper three-color operation.

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Details About Pre-timed Preemption

DETAILS ABOUT PRE-TIMED PREEMPTION


The controller includes an internal preemptor that can support up to six unique preempt sequences.

Operation
Internal Preemption is a special program that operates within the controller. The preemption program accepts commands from six preempt inputs and provides the timing and signal display programmed to occur in response to each. Preemption controls are applied using the IQ Link software. Internally applied preempt controls have priority. The preemption program reads the current signal display at the time of preempt and provides transition timing, and signal display, to a specified preempt setting. Once preempt has been satisfied, the preemption program provides an exit transition timing and signal display to a programmed (one for each of the six preempt inputs) return-tonormal condition.

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Input Priority
The Preemption program allows you to set priorities of the preemption inputs. The priorities are as follows: Table 23 Input Priority Input Priority Preempt 1 Description Normally has priority over Preempt 2. If Preempt 1 becomes active while the Preemption program is in the Preempt 2 routine, the controller immediately terminates the Preempt 2 routine and enters the Preempt 1 routine. When Preempt 2 has been terminated by Preempt 1, control will not return to Preempt 2 at the end of Preempt 1 except when Preempt 2 demand is still present at the end of Preempt 1. The priority of Preempt 1 over Preempt 2 can be cancelled. If the priority has been canceled and the Preempt 1 becomes active while the preemption program is in the Preempt 2 routine, the Preempt 2 completes normally. After Preempt 2 is complete, the controller enters the Preempt 1 routine only if the Preempt 1 demand is still present. When Preempt 2 becomes active while the preemption program is in the Preempt 1 routine, the Preempt 1 routine complete normally regardless of the priority of Preempt 1 versus Preempt 2. After Preempt 1 is complete, the controller enters the Preempt 2 routine only if the Preempt 2 demand is still present. Whenever both inputs become active at the same time, Preempt 1 occurs first. Normally has priority over Preempt 3. The priority of Preempt 2 over Preempt 3 can be cancelled via program entry. Normally has equal status (priority cancelled). A priority of Preempt 3 over Preempt 4, Preempt 4 over Preempt 5, and Preempt 5 over Preempt 6 can be set using the IQ Link software. Operation capability as described above for Preempt 1 and 2 is provided for Preempt 2 and 3, 3 and 4, 4 and 5, and 5 and 6. The default priorities above were established assuming Preempt 1 and Preempt 2 were set as railroad and Preempt 3 to Preempt 6 as emergency vehicle (Authorized Engineering Information). All Preempt routines will normally have priority over Automatic Flash. If any Preempt becomes active while the controller is in Automatic Flash, Automatic Flash terminates normally and the controller enters the Preempt routine. The priority of Preempt over Automatic Flash can be cancelled using the IQ Link software. If the priority of Preempt over Automatic Flash has been cancelled, and a Preempt input becomes active while the controller is in Automatic Flash, the controller will remain in Automatic Flash until the demand (both Automatic Flash and Preempt) is terminated

Preempt 2 Preempt 3, 4, 5, and 6

Automatic Flash

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Details About Pre-timed Preemption Input Priority Start Up Flash Description Start-Up Flash will always have priority over all Preempt routines. If a Preempt input becomes active or is active during Start-Up Flash, the controller maintains the Start-Up Flash condition for the duration of the both Preempt demand and Start-Up Flash time External Start always has priority over all Preempt routines. If External Start becomes active during a Preempt routine, the controller reverts to Start-Up Flash rather than the Initialization condition. The controller maintains the StartUp Flash condition for the duration of the External Start, Preempt demand, and Start-Up Flash time The controller provides input memory which can set to locking or non-locking. When input memory is set for non-locking, termination of the input prior to implementation of the routine will not initiate preempt operation

External Start

Memory

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SETTING UP AN ACTUATED LEADING OR LAGGING LEFT TURN


Some special attention is required when using pre-timed operations to set up the ATC1000 for a split main street, a leading left turn movement, and skipping on both the side street and the left turn. The actuated interval for the side street must be placed before the interval where the side street turns green, otherwise both sides of the main street will already have changed to red before the side street is skipped. This is because the actuated intervals are the skip from and skip to points.

Wrong Way to Program a Leading Left Turn


Take this example of a pre-timed signal plan 1:

Figure 236 Wrong way to program a leading left turn in pre-timed mode (IQ Link)
This is the intuitive way to set the side street actuated interval; however when the side street (intervals 6-9) are skipped the start point has both sides of the main street already red. This has channel 2 clear unnecessarily.

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Setting up an Actuated Leading or Lagging Left Turn The pattern with no skipping is as follows: INT SPL 1 5.0 2 6.0 3 10.0 4 3.0 5 2.0 6 6.0 7 12.0 8 3.0 9 2.0 10 6.0 11 3.0 12 2.0 ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 5.0 1.0 G G R W 11.0 1.0 G G R W 21.0 1.0 G G R F 24.0 3.0 Y Y R D 26.0 1.0 R R R D 32.0 1.0 R R G D 44.0 1.0 R R G D 47.0 3.0 R R Y D 49.0 1.0 R R R D 55.0 1.0 R G G R D 58.0 1.0 R G Y R D 60.0 1.0 R G R D 6 D D D D D W F D D D D D

When the leading left is skipped to serve the cross street, the skipping sequencer generates this pattern: INT ORG SPL ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5.0 5.0 1.0 G G R W D 2 2 17.0 22.0 1.0 G G R W D 3 3 10.0 32.0 1.0 G G R F D 4 4 3.0 35.0 3.0 Y Y R D D 5 5 2.0 37.0 1.0 R R R D D 6 6 6.0 43.0 1.0 R R G D W 7 7 12.0 55.0 1.0 R R G D F 8 8 3.0 58.0 3.0 R R Y D D 9 9 2.0 60.0 1.0 R R R D D And when the side street is skipped to serve the left turn, this is the generated pattern: INT ORG SPL ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5.0 5.0 1.0 G G R W D 2 2 29.0 34.0 1.0 G G R W D 3 3 10.0 44.0 1.0 G G R F D 4 4 3.0 47.0 3.0 Y Y R D D 5 5 2.0 49.0 1.0 R R R D D 6 10 6.0 55.0 1.0 R G G R D D 7 11 3.0 58.0 1.0 R G Y R D D 8 12 2.0 60.0 1.0 R G R D D The ATC skips from interval 5 to interval 10. Note that because the skipping starts with interval 6, channel 2 has been cleared but it then reverts to green.

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Correct Way to Program a Leading Left Turn


The revised signal plan 1 has the actuated interval for the side street moved to interval 3:

Figure 237 Correct Programming for a Leading left turn in IQ Link


Red cells have been modified from the previous example. The pattern with no skipping will be the same as before: INT SPL ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 6 1 5.0 5.0 1.0 G G R W D 2 6.0 11.0 1.0 G G R W D 3 10.0 21.0 1.0 G G R F D 4 3.0 24.0 3.0 Y Y R D D 5 2.0 26.0 1.0 R R R D D 6 6.0 32.0 1.0 R R G D W 7 12.0 44.0 1.0 R R G D F 8 3.0 47.0 3.0 R R Y D D 9 2.0 49.0 1.0 R R R D D 10 6.0 55.0 1.0 R G G R D D 11 3.0 58.0 1.0 R G Y R D D 12 2.0 60.0 1.0 R G R D D And the pattern when skipping the leading left turn to serve the cross street is the same as before:

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Setting up an Actuated Leading or Lagging Left Turn INT ORG SPL ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5.0 5.0 1.0 G G R W D 2 2 17.0 22.0 1.0 G G R W D 3 3 10.0 32.0 1.0 G G R F D 4 4 3.0 35.0 3.0 Y Y R D D 5 5 2.0 37.0 1.0 R R R D D 6 6 6.0 43.0 1.0 R R G D W 7 7 12.0 55.0 1.0 R R G D F 8 8 3.0 58.0 3.0 R R Y D D 9 9 2.0 60.0 1.0 R R R D D But when the side street is skipped to serve the leading left turn, channel 2 now remains green: INT ORG SPL ACC MIN CH1 2 3 4 5 6 1 1 5.0 5.0 1.0 G G R W D 2 2 36.0 41.0 1.0 G G R W D 3 0 3.0 44.0 3.0 G G R F D 4 0 3.0 47.0 3.0 Y G R D D 5 0 2.0 49.0 2.0 R G R D D 6 10 6.0 55.0 1.0 R G G R D D 7 11 3.0 58.0 1.0 R G Y R D D 8 12 2.0 60.0 1.0 R G R D D The ATC skips from interval 2 to interval 10, generating new clearance intervals for channel 1 with channel 2 remaining green. Note that in the modifications the do not lock here intervals for actuated interval 3 extend from interval 3 to interval 7. This means that detector calls for interval 3 will not lock during these intervals. This is not a problem since intervals 3-5 only ever occur when the side street is not skipped, so there is already a locked call, and if any additional calls were locked they would just be cleared in interval 6 anyway. Whenever the ATC is dwelling at main street green, or while the side street is being skipped, any calls will be locked.

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Correct Way to Program a Lagging Left Turn


The following example shows the correct way to implement a lagging left turn. This configuration of signal plan 2 uses the same vehicle detector inputs and pedestrian call inputs as the previous example of signal plan 1; vehicle detector one and pedestrian call input one bring service to the cross street whereas vehicle detector two serves the left turn. Note that the order of vehicle detectors is independent of intervals or interval sequence. Actuated interval seven is not assigned any vehicle detector but is used to indicate the desire to skip the termination of channel 2 (the concurrent main street green) when the left turn terminates in order to return to both directions of main street traffic vehicle movements. Because the intervals for the left turn and cross street are at different locations in the sequence of intervals for signal plans 1 and 2 then different timing plans must be used that have matching timings for the two different signal sequences. However, if the correct timing plans are invoked for each signal plan then it is possible for a change from a leading left turn to a lagging left turn based on time of day operation using these two signal plans.

Figure 238 Programming a lagging left turn

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Setting up an Actuated Leading or Lagging Left Turn It should be noted that preempt and interval skipping table should be programmed with the desired minimums for Ped Clearance, Amber Clearance and Red Clearance times for the corresponding channels, as shown in Figure 239. These values will be used during the skipping operation of the controller for any intervals that may be generated on the fly when the controller goes to service the calling detector. Intervals in the signal plan will be skipped but coordination will be fooled into thinking the interval progression is normal. Furthermore, the controller will have to create intervals in order to terminate pedestrian and vehicle movements safely by inserting new pedestrian clearance indications, yellow change and red clearance indications.

Figure 239 Inserting pedestrian clearance intervals to support a lagging left

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Chapter 8 Preemption

This chapter describes how to set up preemption in the ATC-1000 controller, including configuring a set of preemption intervals and configuring how preemption is triggered. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Overview of Preemption, on page 262 Phases of a Preemption Run, on page 262 Preemption Linking, on page 264 Parameters Used to Configure Preemption, on page 265

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OVERVIEW
The ATC-1000 controller has screens to configure up to six preemption patterns. These patterns are configured on these six screens, which can be navigated using the UP+ and DWN buttons. The exact preemption inputs and outputs used by the controller depend on which of the I/O modules are being used in your unit. (See Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details starting on page 329 for details on pin assignments.)

Note

The topics in this chapter describe Phase-based preemption. Pre-timed preemption is handled in a separate set of screens and with a different operating theory, which are described in the Error! Reference source not found. topic, starting on page Error! Bookmark not defined..

(M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 6. P REEMPTION )


2.6.1 PREEMPT 1 PG 1 of 6 OVERRIDE FL... PRTY OVERRIDE. 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 X

NON-LOCK CALL.. FLASH DWELL....X 1 2 3 4 5 6 TRACK Ph. X DWELL Ph. X X DWELL Pd. EXIT Ph. EXIT Pd. DELAY......... MIN GREEN..... MIN WALK...... ENT PED CLEAR. RED DWL TIME.. 0 1 1 1 0

TRACK GREEN... 5 DWELL GREEN... 1 MIN DURATION..00040 MAX PRESENCE..00060 LINK.......... 0

Figure 240 Preemption #1 Screen


Press the D WN button to proceed to the other Preempt setup screens.
2.6.6 PREEMPT 6 PG 6 of 6

NON-LOCK CALL.. OVERRIDE FL... FLASH DWELL.... PRTY OVERRIDE. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 TRACK Ph. DWELL Ph. DWELL Pd. EXIT Ph. EXIT Pd. DELAY......... MIN GREEN..... MIN WALK...... ENT PED CLEAR. RED DWL TIME.. 0 0 0 0 0 TRACK GREEN... 0 DWELL GREEN... 0 MIN DURATION..00000 MAX PRESENCE..00000 LINK.......... 0

Figure 241 Preemption #6 Screen

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Overview Before we get into the meanings of each of the parameters on the Preemption screens, we must first introduce the basic operating theory of preemption in the Peek ATC controllers. The ATC-1000 has six available preemption runs, each associated with a Preemption Call input. So preemption input 1 calls Preemption Run #1, and so on. Each of the Preemption Runs can have up to four phases, but not all of these phases need to be used in each run. Figure 242 shows the basic phases of a preemption run. (Note that these preemption phases are not the same thing as a NEMA phase, but merely parts of the ATC run.)

Figure 242 Phases in a Peek ATC Preemption Run


A preemption run goes through the four phases in sequence, and it does not repeat the sequence. Preemption is a once through set of steps. The Track phase is optional. Most of the time used by a preemption run is typically taken up by the Dwell phase, which is normally the phase in which the green signal is shown along the street on which an emergency vehicle, or other prioritized traffic, will travel. The values for all portions of a Preemption run are defined on a single screen in the controller.

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Preemption Linking
One additional feature of ATC preemption is the ability to link one preemption run to another. This Link can be defined in each of the runs, but only to a higher number run (so run 5 can link to 4 or 3 or 2 or 1, but run 1 cannot be linked to any other run.) A run with a defined link switches to that run after it completes its own Dwell phase. And it links to the new run at the beginning of its Track phase. The new run is maintained as long as the initial preemption call input is active. When the call goes away, the new run exits as it normally would. This is shown in Figure 243 on page 264. It is possible to link multiple preemption runs in this way. One could link all six preemption runs in this way, creating a single preemption call that generates one entry, six different track and dwell phases, and one exit phase.

Figure 243 Preemption run linking

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Overview

Preemption Parameters
Here are the details about the various preemption parameters: Non-Lock Call This toggles on (X) or off ( ) to indicate whether this preemption run has a non-locking input call. This means that if Non-Lock Call has an X, and if a call is placed on this Preemption input, but the call goes away before the Delay timer has completed (see Delay, below), the call will be discarded and no preemption run will result. Flash Dwell This is an option that tells the preemption run how to handle phases that are marked as a DWELL Ph. When this option is checked X, dwell phases in the run flash Yellow during the dwell period. Active phases that are not listed as dwell phases will flash Red. If you inadvertently mark conflicting phases as dwell phases, all active phases will flash Red. Override FL Do not allow preemption to override flash. If this option is checked X, a preemption call will not override automatic flash mode. PRTY Override Normally, preemption calls are able to interrupt one another with no priority, the Priority Override command, however, tells this preemption run that the priority order of the preemption numbers will apply to this run. If this option is checked, the number order of the call is important, Preemption run 1 is a higher priority than 2 and so on. So, if the controller is running Preemption Run #3, and a Preemption #2 call comes in, and the PRTY Override for run #3 is set to X, then Preemption #2 will interrupt Run 3 and begin operating. If PRTY Override was set to , Run #3 would continue and the controller would ignore the Preemption #2 call. Track Ph Use these check boxes to select which phases will be green during the Track clearance phase portion of the run. This portion of the run is optional. You do not need to have any phases selected and it can still be a valid preemption run. Dwell Ph Use the Yes and No buttons to select which of the intersection phases will be Green during the Dwell portion of the preemption run. An X indicates that this phase will be a Dwell phase during the run. At least one Dwell phase is required in order for the controller to judge this is a valid preemption run. If the Flash Dwell option is checked, above, then these phases will be displayed as flashing yellow rather than green. Dwell Pd Use this array to select which of the intersection phases will be pedestrian Walk phases during the Dwell portion of the preemption run. Exit Ph Use this array of checkboxes to select which of the intersection phases will be green during the Exit portion of the preemption run. Delay This is a delay time, in seconds, that the controller will wait after the preemption input goes active before the controller will begin executing the Entry phase of the run. Note that if the input goes OFF before the delay time is over, and the NonLock Call option is selected above, the run will not start.

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Chapter 8 Preemption Min Green This is the minimum amount of time, in seconds, that any of the preemption phases can be allowed to show a green signal. This is to prevent a Dwell or other phase from being truncated in an unsafe manner should the preemption input suddenly go away. This minimum time also applies to the normal operation greens that are active when the Preemption run is first activated. Min Walk This is similar to the Min Green function for preemption, only it prevents any Pedestrian Walk phase during the preemption run from being cut off by the sudden removal of the preemption input signal. This is the minimum time, in seconds, that should be allowed for preemption run Walk signals. This minimum walk time also applies to the normal operation pedestrians phases that are being serviced when the Preemption run is first activated. Ent Ped Clear This is the amount of clearance time that is allotted to a pedestrian phase that is interrupted by the preemption run. The actual amount of time that is used for pedestrian clearance is either this time, or the time stored in the normal pedestrian phase, whichever is the lower value. Track Green The amount of time, in seconds, that is allotted to the Track phases portion of this pedestrian run. The default value is zero. Dwell Green The amount of time, in seconds, that is allotted to the Dwell phases portion of this pedestrian run. This is the minimum time that can be used by the dwell phases. The actual duration of the Dwell phase will be a combination of the preemption input signal, this Dwell Green minimum value, and the Max Duration time shown below. Max Duration This is the minimum length of time, in seconds, that the full preemption is allowed to run. This timer begins at the end of any Delay time youve placed on the run input, and it will prevent the Dwell phase from ending until this time has elapsed. Max Presence This is the time in seconds that the controller will consider a preemption input valid. If the preemption detector is faulty, or if a vehicle parks within sight-line of the preemption receiver and keeps the intersection input high the whole time, this timer functions as a time out for the preemption input. Link This is a way to link the operation of one preemption run to another, but it only works if you are linking to a higher priority run (i.e. Run #2 links to Run#1 is valid, but Run#1 cannot link to any other run) The link is activated at the end of the Dwell phase of the current run, and jumps to the beginning of the Track phase of the linked run. The rest of the new run is performed as defined, however its input is controlled by the original runs preemption call input.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority

This chapter describes how to set up transit signal priority in the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: An introduction to what TSP is, on page 268 A discussion of how TSP is implemented in the ATC, on page 269 A quick description of how to set up TSP, on page 273 A detailed description of the ATC TSP screens and parameters, starting on page 275

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority

WHAT IS TSP?
TSP stands for Transit Signal Priority. In a way, TSP is similar to preemption, but instead of being triggered by emergency vehicles like ambulances, police cars and fire rescue vehicles, it is triggered by public transportation vehicles, usually buses. And rather than triggering a hard preemption of the normal intersection pattern, a TSP call provides a more subtle adjustment of traffic flow. It creates a priority change in the intersection operation, meaning the transit vehicle is given preference by the traffic controller over timing and signal changes.

Figure 244 TSP Timing Adjustment in an Intersection


For example, if the light is green in the direction the transit vehicle is currently travelling, the controller will hold the green long enough for the bus to get through the light. If the light is red in the direction of travel, the controller will shorten the cross streets greens to bring up the green light for the transit vehicle more quickly. These are the basics of how TSP functions; however, there are complexities to how this is implemented and how it functions on real city streets. These are discussed in greater detail in the rest of this chapter.

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How TSP Functions in the Peek ATC Controller

HOW TSP FUNCTIONS IN THE PEEK ATC CONTROLLER


Although TSP has been defined in general terms by the U.S. Department of Transportation, there is not truly standard way that it is implemented. Each city and equipment manufacturer has been required to decide how to implement the capability. In the Peek ATC controllers, TSP has been implemented using the parameters stored in the TSP menu, shown in Figure 245.
2.8 TRANSIT PRIORITY MENU 1. UNIT PARAMETERS 2. RUN PARAMETERS 3. ACTIONS PLANS 4. RUN CONFIGURATION 5. QUEUE JUMPING 6. SPLIT TABLE

Figure 245 Transit Priority Menu


It is important to take a moment to understand the way that Transit Signal Priority is applied to intersection operation in the Peek ATC controllers, as it can be a bit confusing to those unfamiliar with the process. As shown in Figure 246, the operator can select one of 48 TSP Action Plans which are composed of a Run Config number and a couple other parameters. This Run Config calls one of eight TSP Run Configurations. Each Run Configuration includes 8 individual TSP Runs that can be called at any time when that Run Configuration is active. A TSP Run is somewhat equivalent to a Preemption Run, meaning it is a sequence of events that occur when a TSP call is detected. There are eight Runs in each Run Configuration, so that a separate set of events can be triggered for each phase in a standard 8 phase intersection. This also corresponds to the eight TSP inputs available on the ATC controllers. Although there are only 8 sets of Runs that can be chosen by your TSP Action Plans, each Action Plan can also enable/disable individual runs, and also change the re-service time and recover strategy to be used by all of the runs in the current active plan. This provides some additional options beyond the eight basic Run Configurations.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority

Figure 246 TSP Action Plans, Run Configs and Runs


So, as you can see from the above illustration, there are 48 available TSP Action plans in the ATC controller. Each Action plan can call one and only one of the eight available Run Configurations, however each Action plan can enable or disable individual runs within the selected Run Configuration. Which TSP Action Plan the controller uses at any given time is normally defined by the TOD schedule, however there are also default action plans that can be defined for whenever the controller is under central system control. TSP operation is not supported when the controller is running in Free mode. Each Run Configuration is a set of 8 individual runs that are all available at the same time in the intersection. The fact that multiple runs are available allows you to set up a

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How TSP Functions in the Peek ATC Controller different signal behavior based on which TSP input is detected, meaning if you detect a bus coming southbound, you might call Run 1, but if you detect a bus coming eastbound, you can call Run 2 instead. Each run is a set of time changes and methods that grant the transit vehicle a higher priority to green lights within the intersection. The time changes are set in the TSP Split table (option 6 on the Transit Priority menu). The methods to be used are specified by the user in each Run Configuration.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority

Prioritization Methods
The Peek ATC controllers actually provide the higher priority for the transit vehicle in a number of ways. Four are described in the US DOT TSP Handbook, and Peek supplies an additional method not described there. Any or all of these methods may be used in conjunction with one another: Green Extension This is the primary method used by most TSP systems. Green extension simply extends the amount of time available to the transit vehicles green light. The ATC controllers provide a number of options on how to deal with the associated pedestrian phases or intervals. Early Green The most common secondary method used in most TSP systems is to shorten the green times on the other phases in the intersection. So if the North/Southbound lanes are currently being serviced in green, and a bus approaches in the Eastbound direction, the Early Green method would reduce the amount of time the green is displayed to North and Southbound traffic; bringing the green to the bus more quickly. This method is known as Reduction in the ATC interface. Phase Insertion This method is used when there is a dedicated signalized transit lane or turn lane that is only activated when a transit vehicle is present. This is possible in the ATC interface by setting up dedicated phases for transit vehicles with zero split times. The phase can then be activated via the normal Green Extension function, which takes the phase to a non-zero split time, which then gets serviced. This method of phase insertion is sometimes known as Phase-OnDemand. Phase Rotation This method can be used if more than one phase must be served before the transit phase can be served. If phase rotation is configured, the two upcoming phases are rotated, thus serving the transit phase first, and then going back to serve the other rotated phase, before going back to the normal order. In the ATC environment, this is labeled as a phase Shift. Phase Skipping This option is not described in the US DOT TSP handbook but is provided in the ATC environment. This is a simpler version of rotation, in that the intervening phase is simply skipped during the current cycle so that the transit phase can be serviced more quickly. This is often used to skip a dedicated turn signal, since any vehicles that might be stranded in that phase can usually proceed during the subsequent through-phase. The ATC environment provides options to serve TSP during independent local NEMA operation (most of the methods assume that this is the baseline operating mode), but also during coordinated NEMA operation, pre-timed operation, and Free operation. Individual Run Configurations can be set up with their own input signal extend, delay, and failure detection options. And a modification of the basic operation is available to allow a bus to jump ahead of the normal traffic queue. This is known as Q Jumping.

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GETTING TSP SET UP


These are the basic steps to get started with Transit Signal Priority Operation. 1. 2. Choose and install a vehicle detection system on your transit vehicles and at the intersections to be given TSP response. Determine which approach detection output will be fed into which input on the Controller. The particular input/output module installed in your ATC-1000 will determine which pins or input method should be used to connect the detection signals to the controller. (See Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details, starting on page 329 for pin assignment information.) The ATC-1000 can accept up to 6 inputs for TSP signals. Go into the Run Parameters screen and enter the type of TSP Inputs you wish to use. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 2.R UN P ARAMETERS ) Were going to start out by setting up one TSP Action Plan (Number 1) and one Run Configuration (also Number 1). Go into the Action Plans screens (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 3.A CTION P LANS ), and on screen 1 (the first one that appears), enable all of the TSP inputs that you will be using. Now go into the Run Configuration screen (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 4.R UN C ONFIGURATION ) and on the first Run screen (Run #1 of 8) put Xs under each Call to indicate which phases will be extended based on TSP Input 1. Enter which phases will be active Queue Jumps based on TSP Input 1. (Be sure the Queue Jump phases are also checked in the Calls array.) And finally, put Xs next to each phase that will be skipped, shifted, or reduced as a result of this TSP Input 1. Press the DWN button to go to the screen for Run 2 in Run Configuration 1. Repeat the actions of Step 5 for the phases that will be affected by TSP Input 2. Repeat the above two steps for each of the 8 Runs in Run Configuration 1. Go into the TSP Split Tables screens (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 6.S PLIT T ABLE ) and enter values for GRN EXT for each phase on each of the 16 split tables screens. (You will need to know how your normal split tables are timed in order to do this wisely.) Note here that we are assuming that you are using the normal Green Extend, which also extends your Solid Dont Walk pedestrian phases. If you wish to use a different Green Extend mode, that value would be set in step 3 above, on the Run Parameters screen.)

3.

4.

5.

6. 7. 8.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority 9. Go to the Time of Day Actions screens (M AIN M ENU > 4.T IME OF D AY > 1.A CTIONS ) and place a value of 1 under each TOD event that gets used in your system. (This is calling TSP Action Plan 1 for all of your TOD values.)

10. Go onto the Unit Parameters screen in the TSP menu (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 1.U NIT P ARAMETERS ) and put a 1 next to Default Coord Pattern, Systems TSP Action Plan, and Default TSP Action Plan. 11. Finally, on the same screen (Unit Parameters), change the value of TSP Enable from OFF to ON (using the Y ES button). This will enable TSP actions in the intersection whenever TSP calls are detected and passed to the controller.

Important

There are numerous places in the chain of requirements where you may run into problems setting up TSP operation on the ATC controller. To help with these, weve added a TSP Troubleshooting section to Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance, starting on page 313.

Note

The above procedure assumes a very simplified TSP configuration with only a single Action Plan and Run Configuration, and the default methods used for Green extend and other variables. You can, of course, modify these steps to make your TSP plan as simple or complex as are needed within each intersection, including placing delays and extends on individual TSP inputs, setting up multiple run configurations called by multiple TSP action plans that can then be called by events in your TOD schedule, or by other triggering events such as Central pattern changes. The rest of this chapter describes the details of those features, should you wish to utilize them.

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TSP SCREENS AND PARAMETERS


With only a couple of exceptions, all of the parameters and screens used to set up Transit Signal Priority on a Peek ATC controller are located under the Transit Priority Menu (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY )
2.8 TRANSIT PRIORITY MENU 1. UNIT PARAMETERS 2. RUN PARAMETERS 3. ACTIONS PLANS 4. RUN CONFIGURATION 5. QUEUE JUMPING 6. SPLIT TABLE

Figure 247 Transit Priority Menu


The only parts of the ATC interface that concern TSP operation that are not under this menu are the Time of Day action plan settings, which are stored under the Time of Day menu, on the Actions screens (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4. T IME OF D AY > 1. A CTIONS ), and the TSP Status screens, which can be accessed from the Status menu (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > B. T.S.P.)

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Unit Parameters
The Unit Parameters screen under the Transit Priority menu is used to set and store values related to global TSP operation. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 1.U NIT P ARAMETERS )
2.8.1 TRANSIT UNIT PARAMETERS PG 1 OF 1 TSP ENABLE: OFF DEFAULT COORD PATTERN: 000 (0-253) SYSTEM TSP ACTION PLAN: 00 (0-48) DEFAULT TSP ACTION PLAN: 00 (0-48) UTILIZATION PERIOD: 00 (0-24)

Figure 248 Unit Parameters screen TSP Enable This is the master switch to turn the TSP capability ON and OFF in the ATC controller. TSP ENABLE is OFF by default, but it must be ON for TSP to be used in the intersection. Default Coord Pattern This is the TSP Action plan to use when the controller goes into NEMA Free operation (Pattern 254) and a transit vehicle is detected. A value of 0 (zero) means that the ATC controller should not use TSP during NEMA Free operation. The default value is 0. System TSP Action Plan If the controller is under central system control (i.e. there currently exists a Central Override, Traffic Responsive, or Adaptive pattern call from a central system), then this is the TSP Action plan to run whenever a transit vehicle is detected and the current pattern is in the range from 1 to 48. You can call any of the 48 TSP action plans, or set it to 0 (zero) to disable TSP operation whenever the controller is under System control. If the controller is not under a system command and not currently in Free operation, it will use whatever TSP Action plan is specified in your TOD table. The default value is 0. Default TSP Action Plan This is the TSP Action plan to use when the controller goes into NEMA Free operation (Pattern 254) and a transit vehicle is detected. A value of 0 (zero) means that the ATC controller should not use TSP during Pretimed Free operation. The default value is 0. Utilization Period This parameter is used for logging the effectiveness of TSP operations in the intersection. This Peek-specific parameter tells the controller how often (in hours) to log data on the operating effectiveness of TSP actions. This is similar to the

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TSP Screens and Parameters Peek MOE (Measure-of-Effectiveness) logging feature of the 3000E controllers. A value of 0 (zero) disables this form of logging. The default value is 0. There is more detail about configuring and managing data logging services in the ATC controller starting on page 301.

Run Parameters
This screen provides a location to enter parameters that are global values, per Run. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 2.R UN P ARAMETERS )
2.8.2 TRANSIT RUN PARAMETERS PG 1 OF 1

RUN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 INPUT MODE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 VALUES: 0 = Constant Call, 1 = Check-In/Out 2 = Check-In Plus Time GRN EXTEND MODE 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 VALUES: 0 = Grn/SDW, end of FDW decision 1 = Grn/SDW, end of Walk decision 2 = Grn/Walk, end of Walk decision 3 = Grn/Walk+SDW, end of Walk decision 4 = Mode 3 with Advance Cancel Input

Figure 249 Run Parameters screen


Input Mode Each TSP input channel can be assigned to use one of three input methods to generate a TSP Request, depending on what type of detection equipment (and the resulting detection output method) is installed at the intersection.

Note

A Run Request is an internal ATC controller concept that functionally means the Run Input + the Input Mode method for determining the request length.

Mode 0 Constant Call. Uses Check-In input as a steady signal. This tells the TSP algorithms that the input signal on that channel stays on the entire time that the transit vehicle is in range of the detector. In Mode 0, the detection signal is assumed to stay True from the time the detector first detects the vehicle, until the vehicle passes through the intersection or out of sight/range of the detector. This is the most common type of signal generated by devices that use a single output channel per detector. This is the default mode for all Run inputs. Mode 1 Check-in Check-out. This input mode uses both the Check-In and Check-Out inputs. This mode assumes that the detector generates a short pulse on one channel when the transit vehicle is first detected, and a second short pulse on the other channel when the detector loses sight of the vehicle.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority Mode 2 Check-in Plus Time. This input mode uses the Check-In input channel, when the detector only sends a short High signal pulse when the transit vehicle is first detected. The TSP Request that results from this signal is then active for a preset number of seconds, defined by the Extend time that you define for each Run on the Run Configuration screen. Green Extend Mode This value determines how the green extend prioritization method deals with the extra phase time for related pedestrian phases, on a run-by-run basis. In all cases, the FDW (Flashing Dont Walk) portion of the pedestrian phase is not changed. It remains at the value defined in the current pattern. This mode also determines whether or not the TSP modification will be allowed to occur, based on where the associated pedestrian phase is in its signal processing. Meaning, the way that TSP Green Extend operates also depends on at what point in the pedestrian phase the TSP input signal arrives. Mode 0 Dont Walk mode. For TSP Green Extend to be granted, the TSP input must arrive before the end of the flashing Dont Walk (FDW) portion of the Pedestrian phase. When TSP Green Extend is allowed to occur, the extra time is also added to the Solid Dont Walk portion of the pedestrian phase. This is the default mode for all Runs. Mode 1 Dont Walk mode with an End of Walk decision. For TSP Green Extend to be granted, the TSP input must arrive before the end of the Walk portion of the associated Pedestrian phase. When TSP Green Extend is allowed to occur, the extra time is added to the Solid Dont Walk (SDW) portion of the pedestrian phase. Mode 2 Walk mode. For TSP Green Extend to be granted, the TSP input must arrive before the end of the Walk portion of the Pedestrian phase. When TSP Green Extend does occur, the extra time is added to the Walk portion of the pedestrian phase. Mode 3 Walk and Dont Walk mode. For TSP Green Extend to be granted, the TSP input must arrive before the end of the Walk portion of the Pedestrian phase. When TSP Green Extend is allowed to occur, the extra time is split between the Walk and Solid Dont Walk portion of the pedestrian phase. Mode 4 Walk and Dont Walk mode, plus Advance Cancel. Mode 4 is the same as Mode 3, except that it is aware of the Advance Cancel input. If the Advance Cancel Input transitions from active to inactive, this mode terminates the Walk extension and the pedestrian phase advances to the Flashing Dont Walk portion of the ped phase.

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TSP Action Plans


Option 3 under the Transit Priority menu is where TSP Action Plans are defined. Use the U P + and D OWN keys to switch between the 48 available action plan definition screens. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 3.A CTION P LANS )
2.8.3 TRANSIT ACTION PLAN 1 OF 48 RUN # Run Enable: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Run Configuration: 001 (1-8) Master Reservice Time: 00000 (0-65535) Recovery Strategy: 0 (0-2) 0 = Normal 1 = Offset Correction 2 = Split Balance

Figure 250 TSP Action Plan screen


Run Enable settings In each of the 48 TSP action plans, it is possible to disable one or more of the 8 available runs in the selected Run Configuration (See next item). Place an X under the run number (by pressing the Y ES button) to enable that run. By default, all runs are disabled. Run Config This is where one of the eight available Run Configurations is chosen for use in this TSP Action plan. This tells the action plan which set of 8 Runs will be available in the intersection while this Action Plan is in effect. The default value is Run Config = 1. Master Reservice Time Reservice time is the amount of time that the controller locks out all additional TSP requests after completion of a TSP Run. A value of 0 (zero) means that this reservice limit is deactivated, meaning a second TSP call will be accepted immediately after the first call. This is the Master reservice time. Note that there is also a reservice time value associated with each Run Configuration. Whichever value is greater (either the Master Reservice Time stored here in the selected Action Plan, or the Reservice Time stored in the associated Run Configuration) will be the active requirement in the intersection. Recovery Strategy This is a parameter that is only used with the ambient pattern that the TSP action interrupts is a NEMA coordinated pattern. It defines how the controller will respond after the transit vehicle has gone through the intersection to recover from the changed timing, and its effect on coordinated operation. The three possible modes are:

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority Mode 0 Normal recovery. In this mode of recover, the TSP module restores the offset by extending/reducing phase times over one or more cycles (within the max and min times of the cycles phases.) This is the default recovery method. Mode 1 Offset Correction recovery. In this option, the TSP module terminates its operation as soon as it is finished extending and reducing phases in the current cycle. It then steps aside to allow the Coordinator module to use its own Offset Correction methods to recover the offset time. Mode 2 Split Balance recovery. This is a variation of the Mode 0 recovery method. Again, the TSP module itself is the one managing the offset recovery. The difference from Mode 0 is that in Mode 2, the times of phases are adjusted by the TSP module in exactly inverse of the TSP operation. So if a phase was green extended, during recovery operation it is reduced by the same number of seconds. And if phases were reduced, they will be extended by the same number of seconds during the recovery effort. For example, if the TSP phase is Phase 4, Mode 2 recovery might look like this (depending on your exact extend and reduce times:) Table 24 Split Balance recovery method - example Phase
Cycle #1 TSP Adjustment Cycle #2 Split Balance Adjustments

1
0 0

2
-5 +5

3
-5 +5

4
+ 10 - 10

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Run Configuration
The Run Configuration screens form an 8 by 8 matrix of screens that allow the operator to define the parameter values for the eight Run Configurations, and the eight Runs associated with each of them. Pressing the numbers 1 through 8 on the keypad will switch to the selected Run Configuration set of screens. Using the U P + and D OWN buttons will allow you to switch between individual Run screens. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 4.R UN C ONFIGURATION )
2.8.4 TRANSIT RUN CONFIGURATION 1 OF 8 Number keys select Run Configuration Run 1 of 8 Page Up/Down for more Delay 000 Ext 000 Fail 000 Reserve 00000 Ph/Ivl Calls Q Jump Skip Shift Reduce Reserve 11111111112222222222333 12345678901234567890123456789012 X X X X X X XXXX X

Figure 251 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 1, Config 1)


Figure 254 shows how to navigate between these screens. Page D WN to get the next Run:
2.8.4 TRANSIT RUN CONFIGURATION 1 OF 8 Number keys select Run Configuration Run 2 of 8 Page Up/Down for more Delay 000 Ext 000 Fail 000 Reserve 00000 Ph/Ivl Calls Q Jump Skip Shift Reduce Reserve 11111111112222222222333 12345678901234567890123456789012 X X X X X XX X

Figure 252 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 2, Config 1)

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority Hit numbers 1 through 8 to get that Run Config set. ( For example, pressing 3 gives):
2.8.4 TRANSIT RUN CONFIGURATION 3 OF 8 Number keys select Run Configuration Run 2 of 8 Page Up/Down for more Delay 000 Ext 000 Fail 000 Reserve 00000 11111111112222222222333 Ph/Ivl 12345678901234567890123456789012 Calls X Q Jump X X Skip X X Shift X Reduce XX Reserve X

Figure 253 TSP Run Configuration screen (Run 2, Config 3)

Figure 254 Navigating Run Configuration screens

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TSP Screens and Parameters Config Number This is the Run Configuration number for this set of Run screens. This can be any value between 1 and 8, and is changed by pressing the 1 through 8 buttons on the ATC keypad at any time. When you do so, you are not changing this value, but instead switching to another set of Run Configuration screens. (See above.) Run # This indicates which of the eight runs within the Run Configuration you are currently viewing or editing. You can navigate between the Run screens by using the Up and Down buttons. Delay This is a modification on the TSP input that feeds this run. When set, the TSP Run waits this number of seconds before processing the request. An example use could be that a bus has non-directional TSP indicator and crosses the street upstream in one direction of the intersection. You would not want that bus to trigger TSP activity in this intersection, so you could put a delay in to cover the period when the bus may be visible by this intersections TSP detector. The default value is 0. Ext (Extend) This is also a modification on the TSP input that feeds this run. If Extend is set, the input is artificially maintained ON for this number of seconds beyond the time it would normally turn OFF in each of the three input modes. (For a discussion of Input Mode, see page 277.) The default value is 0.

Note

The Extend value on this screen is NOT the amount of time that the green is extended when the TSP Input is received. The actual extension time values for TSP operation are set on the TSP Split Table screens. (M AIN

M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 6.S PLIT T ABLE )

Fail This is a test on the TSP input. If the input stays ON for this number of seconds, the input is ignored, and no further inputs on this channel will be accepted until the ON signal goes away. This has a couple of purposes. It can take care of the case where a transit vehicle may be stopped near an intersection for repair, or for some other activity, and the TSP emitter on the vehicle remains on and visible to the intersections TSP detector. Or it can also handle the case where the detector or input line are faulty and keep the input ON in error. The default value is 0. Reserve (Reservice) Reservice time is the amount of time that the controller locks out all additional TSP Requests after a TSP Run has finished. (Actually, for reservice criteria, the test is actually the time since the TSP Request went away OR there is a Clearance Fail.) A value of 0 (zero) means that this reservice limit is deactivated, meaning a second TSP call will be accepted immediately after the first request. The value stored on this screen is the Per Run reservice time. Note that there is also a reservice time value associated with the overall TSP Action Plan, known as the Master Reservice Time. Whichever value is greater (either the Master Reservice Time described on page 279, or the Reservice Time stored here in the individual Run) will be the active requirement within the intersection.

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Chapter 9 Transit Signal Priority Calls This is the master list of phases or intervals that will be serviced by TSP actions whenever this TSP Input is activated and this TSP Run Configuration group is the selected group. When an X is placed under one of these calls, the associated phase number, or interval if running in a Pre-timed pattern, will receive the calls to Green Extend. Green Extend is the default action of a TSP priority call. If you wish to apply the additional Q Jump function available below, the phases also need to be selected here in the Calls array. Use the Y ES button to place an X and the N O button to remove an X. Q Jumps This array of values is used to enable and disable Queue jumping on the selected phases or intervals when a TSP input is received on this channel. Typically, this is an extra phase or interval that is only activated during TSP actions. For a Q Jump action to occur, an X must be placed in that phase/interval, and the associated Call phase above must also be checked. Use the Y ES and N O buttons to control which Q Jump phases are checked. Skip phases Use the Y ES and N O buttons to places Xs next to those phases that should be skipped over during the upcoming cycle as a result of this TSP input. If the same phase is called above in the Call array and also here in the Skip array, the Skip action will be ignored. In US DOT vernacular, this is known as the Phase Skipping capability. This TSP method will not be used if the controller is currently operating in a Pre-timed pattern. Shift phases Use the Y ES and N O buttons to places Xs next to those phases that will be shifted to the most favorable sequence position within the phases concurrency group, causing quicker transit vehicle service. Example: Standard 8-phase dual ring sequence, TSP phase = 4/8, Shift phase = 4/8. If a TSP call occurs during 2/6, shifting causes 2/6 -> 4/8 -> 3/7 -> 2/6. If a TSP call occurs during 3/7, no shifting occurs because 4/8 are in the most favorable position. Reduce phases Use the Y ES and N O buttons to places Xs next to those phases that should be split reduced. The normal way to use this is to have all of the phases that are not selected as Calls (above) be selected (X) to allow them to be split reduced. In US DOT vernacular, this is known as the Early Green capability. This TSP method will not be used if the controller is currently operating in a Pre-timed pattern. The Reduce flag shortens intermediate phase splits, thus causing an earlier TSP phase start than would be possible otherwise. Reserve phases This option allows a Shift phase to run twice per cycle.

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Queue Jumping
Queue jumping inserts a Transit-Vehicle Signal into the cycle, while holding the associated phase Red, thus allowing the transit vehicle to jump out ahead of the rest of the queue waiting at the lights. The way that queue jumping operates is defined on the Queue Jumping screens under the Transit Priority menu. Each screen corresponds to one of the six Queue Jump outputs on the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 5.Q UEUE J UMPING )
2.8.5 QUEUE JUMPING OUTPUT 1 OF 6 Queue Jump Time: 000 Enabled Phases: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Enabled Intervals: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 cont. 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2

Figure 255 TSP Queue Jumping screen


When a phase is marked as a QJump phase in the Run Configuration screens, the controller searches the Queue Jumping Output screens to see which screen has an X next to that phase as well. If you say that phase 2 is a QJump phase on the Run screens, the controller will then look through the six Queue Jumping output screens to find one that has phase 2 selected. When the phase is found, the output pin corresponding to that screen (Output 1, in our example above) is sent High for the number of seconds specified on that screen. (or 8 seconds in our example.) This search only looks for the first instance of that phase on the six Queue Jumping Output screens, and then discontinues so that the TSP Run can continue. Queue Jump Time This is the time, in seconds, that this Transit Vehicle Signal output (aka Queue Jumping Output) goes High. Enabled phases This array indicates which phases in the cycle, if indicated with a QJump X in the TSP Run screens, will trigger this Queue Jump output. Enabled intervals These fields are not currently implemented since TSP does not function during Pre-timed operation.

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Split Table
These tables are the times, in seconds, that are added on a phase-by-phase basis, when TSP is activated on the given phase. These times are the maximum allowable extension and reduction times that are used on the associated split table. If the current pattern is running split table 10, then the TSP Run uses TSP Split Table 10. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 6.S PLIT T ABLE )
2.8.6 TSP SPLIT TABLE PHASE 1 GRN EXT:000 GRN RED:000 WLK EXT:000 WLK RED:000 PHASE 9 GRN EXT:000 GRN RED:000 WLK EXT:000 WLK RED:000 2 000 000 000 000 10 000 000 000 000 3 000 000 000 000 11 000 000 000 000 4 000 000 000 000 12 000 000 000 000 5 000 000 000 000 13 000 000 000 000 1 of 16 6 000 000 000 000 14 000 000 000 000 7 000 000 000 000 15 000 000 000 000 8 000 000 000 000 16 000 000 000 000

ALL VALUES 0-255 SECS PAGE DOWN FOR MORE SPLITS

Figure 256 Split Table screen


The sixteen screen correspond to the 16 screens in the coordination split tables. (M AIN M ENU > 1.P ROGRAMMING > 3. C OORDINATION > 3. S PLIT T ABLE ) You can define how times will be added to and reduced from the 16 available phases (in NEMA Phase-based pattern operation) when TSP operations causes that phase to be Green Extended. All times are in seconds. GRN EXT (Green Extend Maximum) This is the maximum time that can be added to the phase/ped phase combination when you are using Green Extend modes 0, 1, 3, and 4. The time to be added to the split when the phases TSP action is Called. GRN RED (Green/SDW Reduction Maximum) When a phase is allowed to TSP Reduce by the Run settings, this is the maximum time that each split is allowed to be reduced, in seconds. This is the maximum time that can be reduced using a shortened solid Dont Walk ped phase for this split. WLK EXT (Green/Walk Extension Maximum) The maximum amount of time that can be added to the Walk portion of the phase when the TSP Request is Called before the end of the Walk portion of the associated Pedestrian phase. This is only used when youve set the run to use Green Extend modes 2, 3 or 4. The extra time will be added to the Walk portion of the associated Pedestrian phase. WLK RED (Green/Walk Reduction Maximum) When a phase is allowed to TSP Reduce by the Run settings, this is the maximum time that each split is allowed to be reduced, in seconds, using a shortened Walk phase for this split.

Note

The Flashing Dont Walk (FDW) portion of the Pedestrian phase will never be adjusted by any TSP operation.

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TSP Status Monitoring

TSP STATUS MONITORING


There are three Status screens that can be used to monitor the current state of TSP operations: The Time of Day Status screen always shows the current TSP Action Plan assignment. (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > 5. T IME OF D AY ) The TSP Inputs Status screen shows the current TSP inputs, the status of each of the eight TSP Runs, the signal colors of all of the NEMA phases. (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > B. TSP > 1. I NPUTS ) The TSP Outputs Status screen shows the TSP outputs, the Q Jump outputs, the default programmed splits, and the TSP adjusted splits. (M AIN M ENU > 1. S TATUS > B. TSP > 2. O UTPUTS )

TSP TROUBLESHOOTING
Details are provided to help with the initial setup of TSP operations, and also for troubleshooting ongoing operation, in Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance, with the TSP materials starting on page 313.

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Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance

This chapter describes the Utilities configuration menu of the ATC-1000 controller, as well as several hardware tools and techniques to troubleshoot the operations of the unit. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Accessing the Utilities menus, on page 290 Firmware diagnostics mode, on page 310 Data Logging, on page 305 System maintenance, on page 310 General troubleshooting hints, on page 311 TSP Configuration hints, on page 314

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OVERVIEW
This chapter describes the utilities, diagnostics and troubleshooting techniques that may be employed to configure the controller and to respond to issues with its operation. These are divided into tools available from the keyboard and display interface, hardware status indicators, and a general troubleshooting checklist.

UTILITIES MENUS
There are several configuration and diagnostics tools available from within the controllers firmware.

Utilities Menu for the Keyboard and Display


The Utilities menu can be opened from the controllers keypad by pressing the Blue function button ( ) and then the MNU button (i.e. the Voltage button).
** ATC TS2 Utilities Main Menu ** < < < < < < 1 2 3 4 5 6 > > > > > > Keypad Test Display Test Voltage Status Operational Status Miscellaneous Status Revision Info

<ESC> Quit

Figure 257 Keyboard/Display Utilities menu


Press the numbers corresponding on the keypad to the test or status screens shown above. To return to this menu from a test or status screen, press the MNU button.

Note

The keypad test screen requires you to press MNU twice to return to this menu.

Use these screens to test the operation of your keypad, the display and to show the current operating voltages within the controller. The Operational Status screen provides information about internal monitoring variables used to track the overall health of the controller. The Miscellaneous Status screen can be used to test the backlight, set the backlight timer, view the internal temperature of the display module, view the contrast value, and test the controllers buzzer, amongst a few other miscellaneous items. The Revision Info screen gives the revision level and release date information about the hardware components of the ATC-1000. To exit out of this menu back to the regular menu system and status displays, press the CLR/ESC key.

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Utilities Menus

Diagnostics Mode
The Diagnostics menus can be used to test the inputs, outputs, communications, memory, real time clock and USB port of the controller.

Caution

Be aware that entering the Diagnostics mode will place the controller into FLASH mode! And the only way to return to normal operations after entering the Diagnostics menu is either to reboot the controller or powering the unit down, waiting for residual power to fade, and then restarting it.

(M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT)
DIAGNOSTICS MENU 1.INPUTS/OUTPUTS TEST 2.COMMS 3.MEMORY TEST (RAM, SRAM, FLASH) 4.TIME TEST (RTC) 5.USB (WRITE/READ) 6.UPDATE FIRMWARE

Figure 258 Diagnostics Menu screen Inputs/Outputs Diagnostic Menu


Inputs and outputs can be tested from a single menu. The I/O Diagnostic Menu is for ATC-1000s with TS2, Type 2 I/O Modules. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 1.I NPUTS /O UTPUTS T EST )
I/O DIAGNOSTIC MENU 1.STANDARD INPUTS 2.STANDARD OUTPUTS 3.D-TYPE MODULE INPUTS 4.D-TYPE MODULE OUTPUTS

Only visible when D module is installed and recognized

Figure 259 I/O Diagnostic Menu

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Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance Standard Inputs Test Screen This screen is used to test the physical inputs of the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 1.I NPUTS /O UTPUTS T EST > 1.S TANDARD I NPUTS )
DIAGNOSTIC INPUT TEST

>>PREV TO GO BACK<<

Figure 260 Standard Input Test screen


To perform the Standard Input Test, attach the ATC-1000 to any NEMA light board (such as a Transyt TD-1800 test board). Activate each switch. Check the Diagnostic Input Test screen to see that the corresponding NEMA input is displayed as the correct MS Connector (A, B, & C) and assigned pin. For example, vehicle detection phase 1 should be displayed as A-f.

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Utilities Menus Standard Outputs Diagnostics Use this screen to test the outputs of the controller (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 1.I NPUTS /O UTPUTS T EST > 2.S TANDARD O UTPUTS )
DIAGNOSTIC OUTPUT TEST 1.Start Output Cycling 2.Pause Output Cycling 3.Resume Output Cycling 4.Stop Output Cycling ACTIVE OUTPUT : NONE Output Number : 0

>>'PREV' TO GO BACK<<

Figure 261 Outputs Diagnostics Test screen


To perform a standard output test, connect the ATC-1000 to a NEMA light board (such as the Transyt TD-1800 Test Board). Apply power to the ATC-1000 and the test board. Navigate to the above screen, and choose option 1. Start Output Cycling. Observer the output LEDs on the light board for proper operation. Pause the output cycling if you see something suspect. The output will halt the changing of the output LEDs so you can record the suspect issue. Resume the output cycling to continue the LED sequence. Use the Stop Output Cycling option to halt the test after you have confirmed the proper operation of all outputs.

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Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance D Module Input Diagnostics If a D-type module is attached to your ATC-1000 I/O Module, this is the screen to use to analyze the inputs coming into it. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 1.I NPUTS /O UTPUTS T EST > 3.D-T YPE M ODULE I NPUTS ) This D-Module input test operates in the same fashion as the Standard NEMA Inputs test, on page 293. D Module Output Diagnostics If a D-type module is attached to your ATC-1000 I/O Module, this is the screen to use to analyze the outputs generated at its pins. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 1.I NPUTS /O UTPUTS T EST > 4.D-T YPE M ODULE O UTPUTS ) This D-Module output test operates in the same manner described for the Standard output tests, as described on page 293.

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Utilities Menus

Communications Diagnostics
This screen can be used to test any of the serial ports on the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 2.C OMMS )
COMMUNICATION DIAGNOSTICS 1.SDLC Port 1 (SP5) Loopback Test 2.Port 3.Port 4.Port 5.Port 2 3 4 5 (SP3) (SP1) (SP4) (SP2) Loopback Loopback Loopback Loopback Test Test Test Test

6.Run All Async Port Loopback Tests 7.Flow Control Test (PORT 2,3,5) >>'PREV' TO GO BACK<<

Figure 262 Communication Diagnostics screen

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Memory Diagnostics
Use this screen to have the controller run a series of tests on its RAM, SRAM and Flash memory. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 3.M EMORY T EST (RAM, SRAM, FLASH))
DIAGNOSTIC MEMORY TEST Testing available RAM Test 0: 13 % Status: Testing... Test 1: 0 % Status: Testing... Test 2: 0 % Status: Testing... Testing RAM Testing SRAM Memory: In Progress... Memory: Not yet started.

Testing Flash Memory: Not yet started.

Figure 263 Memory Diagnostics screen Before Testing Starts


After the testing has started, if the controller passes them successfully, you will see the following screen. If the test takes longer than a few minutes, the test has failed.
DIAGNOSTIC MEMORY TEST Testing Test 0: Test 1: Test 2: available 100 % 100 % 100 % RAM Status: Complete Status: Complete Status: Complete

Testing RAM Testing SRAM

Memory: Passed Memory: Passed

Testing Flash Memory: Passed

Figure 264 Diagnostic Memory Test screen

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Utilities Menus

Time Diagnostics
This screen is used to perform an internal diagnostic on the controllers real-time clock. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 4.T IME T EST (RTC))
Testing Real Time Clock RTC Time: 13:22:37 Status: Testing...

Figure 265 Testing Real Time Clock test in progress


A successful test should be visible in only a few seconds.
Testing Real Time Clock RTC Time: 13:22:54 Status: Passed.

Figure 266 Testing Real Time Clock screen Status result

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USB Diagnostics
This screen can be used to test the USB hub, port, and any device you plug into them. Start this screen first, and then insert the USB thumbdrive or memory device you wish to use to test. Note that data stored on the device will not be damaged. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 5.USB (W RITE /R EAD ))
Testing USB Device USB Detected: No Status: Not testing. Insert a USB storage device Press <Enter> after the USB device has been detected to begin the test. Do not remove the USB device during the test. Note: Device detection may take up to 9 seconds

Figure 267 Testing USB Device screen


When a USB device is detected:
Testing USB Device USB Detected: Yes Status: Passing

Press <Enter> after the USB device has been detected to begin the test. Do not remove the USB device during the test. Note: Device detection may take up to 9 seconds

Figure 268 Testing USB Device screen when USB device is detected

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Utilities Menus

Update Firmware
Use this control to activate an update of the controllers firmware from an attached USB device, or across an Ethernet connection when the ATC firmware loader application is connected to the controller. (M AIN M ENU > 3.S YSTEM M AINTENANCE > 3.E NTER D IAGNOSTICS M ODE > NXT > 6.U PDATE F IRMWARE )

Starting FW Loader

Figure 269 Launching the FW Loader screens


After the Firmware Loader application loads, you will see:
ATC FW Loader v2.0 Waiting for SUB Listening on ETH eth0: 128.2.60.198 eth1: 192.168.60.199

Figure 270 Waiting for firmware file on USB or Ethernet


At this point you will want to initiate the IQ Link Ethernet connection, or plug in the USB thumbdrive containing the updated firmware.

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Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance If the files are properly detected, the screen displayed in Figure 271 will appear.
Select FW File: natc_v002R106.bin natc_v003R148.bin natc_v005R184.bin natc_v005R186.bin natc_v005R188.bin natc_v005R259.bin natc_v005R297.bin > natc_v005R304.bin natc_v005R319.bin

Figure 271 Update Firmware file list


Use the green down arrow button to move the > cursor to the left of the desired firmware revisions. Press the ENT button to select that file. A screen will appear showing the progress of the traffic application update process. The message Firmware Update Complete, Restart is required. Cycle controller power OFF/ON or press ESC to update again will display. Power the controller completely down. (Wait for any text visible on the controllers screen to disappear.) Remove the USB drive or disconnect the cable to the IQ Link computer. Reapply power to the controller. The screen shown in Figure 272 will appear.
HARDWARE / SOFTWARE TYPE MISMATCH HW = TS22, SW = TS22 DHW = OTH , DSW = OTH E C Yes * E WILL FORCE HW TYPE SYST:128.002.060.198 LOC: 192.168.060.199

Figure 272 Hardware/Software mismatch message


Press the following buttons, one at a time, in order, to restore normal operation: E C YES E

Verify that the controller has returned to normal operation.

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USB Operations

USB OPERATIONS
The USB port on the front of the ATC controller is typically used to move data, in the form of controller databases, log files, and firmware in to and out of the controller.

USB Menu
The following menu will appear automatically whenever you plug a USB thumbdrive or other passive device into the USB port on the ATC controller. Note that the appearance of this menu does not interrupt the normal operation of the controller.
USB device detected remove to exit >1.USB->DATABASE 4.CMU_LOG->USB 2.DATABASE->USB 5.UPS_LOG->USB 3.LOG->USB

Figure 273 USB Menu


To select an option on this menu, use the green up and down arrow buttons on the controller keypad to move the > cursor next to the object you want to select, then press the ENT key. The entries on this menu do exactly what they describe; they move data from one location to another. The USB tag indicates whether data will be going to the USB thumbdrive (-->USB) or coming off of the USB drive and being stored on the controller (USB-->). The other object in each menu item specifies what type of data or file is being moved. Those items where multiple files may be available provide a second display that allows the operator to select which file should be transferred. To get out of this menu and return to the Main Menu system of the controller, simply remove the USB device from the controllers USB port.

Note

The USB menu will not appear if the controller is already in the Diagnostics menu.

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Moving Databases Using a USB Drive


The controller database, or the set of all operating parameters stored in the controller, can be stored on a USB thumbdrive to be copied from controller to controller, or to be stored and retrieved from a PC-based software system such as IQ Link or IQ Central.

To move a database from a USB drive to the Controller


1. 2. If the USB device has not been formatted previously to work with Peek ATC controllers, use IQ Link to format the USB device. Place a copy of the database you want to use on the controller onto the USB thumbdrive. This can be done either by writing it there from IQ Link, storing it on the USB device out of IQ Central, or copying the database out of another controller onto the USB device. Plug the USB drive containing the database into the controller to be updated. When the USB Menu appears, make sure the cursor (>) is pointing to USB->Database and press the ENT button. The controller will ask for verification: Download astcFFFF ? ENT=Y ESC=N The astcFFFF is the standard filename for a complete ATC controller database. If you agree that you want to overwrite all of the settings currently stored in your controller, press the ENT button. If you realize that you do not want to do this, press the CLR/ESC button to exit out of the copy process without overwriting the current database. If you press ENT, the file will be copied into the controller and decompressed into memory. Note that the new settings will start to control the controller immediately. Next, the controller will ask if you wish to Download the IO Map? Again, press the ENT button if you do want to overwrite the current I/O output mapping data to the controller, or press ESC if you do NOT want to overwrite these settings. Finally, the controller will ask if you wish to copy over the USB Objects. Press ENT to copy those items into the controller. Press ESC if you wish to cancel that process. You will be returned to the USB menu. Remove the USB drive from the port and verify that the new database values are in place and functioning.

3. 4. 5.

6. 7.

8.

9.

To store the controller database on a USB drive


1. 2. If the USB device has not been formatted previously to work with Peek ATC controllers, use IQ Link to format the USB device. Plug the USB drive into the controller.

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USB Operations 3. When the USB Menu appears, use the up and down arrow buttons on the controller to place the cursor (>) next to DATABASE-->USB and press the ENT button. If a database is already stored on the drive, you will be asked if you want to overwrite it. Press the ENT button to overwrite the database file currently stored on the USB thumbdrive, or press CLR/ESC to cancel out of the process. If you press ENT to proceed with the write operation, the controller will report the action and then return you to the USB menu. Remove the thumbdrive from the USB port.

4.

5.

This completes the storage of a controller database onto a USB thumbdrive.

Moving Logs Using a USB Drive


There are three types of logs stored on an ATC controller: Event logs (or just LOG), CMU logs, and UPS logs. You will have the option to choose which one to store on the USB thumbdrive in step 3 below. 1. 2. 3. If the USB device has not been formatted previously to work with Peek ATC controllers, use IQ Link to format the USB device. Plug the USB drive into the controller. When the USB Menu appears, use the up and down arrow buttons on the controller to place the cursor (>) next to the menu item of the log file you want to store on the drive: You can either choose the LOG file (the event log), the CMU_LOG file, or the UPS_LOG file. When youve positioned the cursor on the menu item you want, press the ENT button. Repeat the previous step if you wish to store one of the other types of log files onto the USB drive. The controller will report the data transfer action and then return you to the USB menu. Remove the thumbdrive from the USB port.

4. 5.

This completes the storage of one or more log files onto a USB thumbdrive.

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USB File System


The directories and files stored on a thumbdrive to be used with a Peek ATC controller follow a standard arrangement and naming conventions. The file system is normally laid out like this:

Figure 274 ATC USB thumbdrive file system


The ASTC_DATA_DISK file stored in the root directory tells the ATC controller and IQ Data that the thumbdrive has been formatted and arranged specifically for use with Peek ATC controllers. The \USTC_data folder is where log data and controller database files are stored on the drive. The \USTC_firmware folder is where firmware files for a Peek ATC controller are stored. If the filename starts with natc, then the firmware is intended for a NEMA-type ATC controller such as the ATC-1000 and ATC-2000. If the filename starts with atc, then the firmware is intended for a New York CBD-type ATC controller such as the ASTC 3000 or the Phase 2 IQ ATC controller. Each controller will only recognize the firmware files of the correct type when attempting to update the firmware on that controller.

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Data Logging

DATA LOGGING
All of the logging functions of the ATC-1000, as well as the onscreen viewers of the various data logs, are all accessed by going into the Logs menu on the controllers main menu. A variety of data logging options are available on the screens under this menu. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS )
4 LOGS MENU

1. controller MESSAGE LOG 2. NTCIP EVENT LOG 3. ADVANCED controller LOG

Figure 275 Log Data menu


At this time, the log files cannot be retrieved by IQ Central, however they can be offloaded from the ATC-1000 by using the USB menu to store the files on a USB thumb drive. (Refer to Moving Logs Using a USB Drive on page 303.)

Controller Message Log


Press 1 on the Logs menu to see the data in the Controller Message Log onscreen, with the oldest data shown first. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS > 1.C ONTROLLER M ESSAGE L OG )
4.1 controller MESSAGE LOG 1..21 1. 2009-Jan-24 00:01:27 Tue: CMU Control Changed to 0 2. 2009-Jan-26 00:01:27 Tue: POWER UP status 0x00 (b0-4: flash, stop time, alarm, minrcall, MCE) 3. 2009-Jan-26 00:02:32 Tue: External restart: command 1 pattern 255 cycle 0 4. 2009-Jan-26 23:40:33 Tue: CMU Control Changed to 0 5. 2009-Jan-26 23:40:33 Tue:

Figure 276 Controller Message Log


Use the DWN button to see additional screens of the log. Use the U P + button to go back toward the beginning of the log, one screen at a time. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 305

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4.1 controller MESSAGE LOG 2..21 POWER UP status 0x00 (b0-4: flash, stop time, alarm, minrcall, MCE) 6. 2009-Jan-26 23:49:34 Tue: UPDATE FIRMWARE 3 7. 2009-Jan-26 23:54:14 Tue: CMU Control Changed to 0 8. 2009-Jan-26 23:54:14 Tue: POWER UP status 0x00 (b0-4: flash, stop time, alarm, minrcall, MCE) 9. 2009-Jan-27 01:27:47 Wed: CMU Control Changed to 0

Figure 277 Controller Message Log (Page 2)


A typical log entry shows the sequential entry number, followed by the date, time, and day of the week that the entry was recorded, then the type of event that occurred, followed by any details about that event. Here is an example entry: 130. 2009-Oct-13 06:21:57 Tue: External restart: command 1 pattern 255 cycle 0

Figure 278 Sample log entry

NTCIP Event Log


This log shows a listing, from most recent to oldest, of the NTCIP communications events. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS > 2.NTCIP E VENT L OG )
4.2 NTCIP EVENT LOG

Figure 279 NTCIP Event Log screen

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Data Logging

Advanced Controller Logging Menu


The Advanced Controller Logging Menus provide the capability to set up custom data logging by selecting options in the onscreen interface. Advanced Controller logging is divided into two areas: Logging Setup and the Advanced Logging Viewer. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS > 3.A DV ANCED C ONTROLLER L OG )
4.3 ADVANCED controller LOG

1. SETUP LOGGING OPTIONS 2. VIEW LOG

Figure 280 Advanced Controller Log menu


ATC-1000 Advanced Logging allows the controller to gather data, at one-tenth second resolution.

Setup Logging Options


This screen is where the Advanced logging feature is configured. Use the parameters on this screen to select what data points will be collected and showed on the View Log screen. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS > 3.A DV ANCED C ONTROLLER L OG > 1.S ETUP L OGGING O PTIONS )
4.3.1 ADVANCED controller LOG SETUP

ADVANCED LOGGING ENABLED..X PHASE STATUS..X PHASE TIMING.. DET VOL/OCC .. PREEMPT.......X UNIT.......... CHANNELS...... PHASE CONTROL.. DETECTORS...... OVERLAPS....... COORD.......... DET ALARMS..... ALARMS.........X

Figure 281 Setup Logging Options screen


To change the current Advanced logging options, enter Edit mode ( + E) and use the arrow keys to navigate to the setting you wish to modify. Use the Y ES and N O buttons to ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 307

Chapter 10 Configuration and Maintenance either place or remove an X next to a data type. An X indicates that that piece of data will be recorded in the Advanced logs, with tenth-of-a-second resolution. The controller can gather event data for the following controller events: Phase changes Phase ON, Phase OFF, Begin phase Next, Begin phase green, yellow, and red, and begin ped walk, clear, and dont walk. Phase control ON and OFF events for each of the following control events: Phase Hold, Phase Omit, Phase Force OFF, Ped Omit, Vehicle Call, and Ped Call. Phase timing Phase Min Complete, Phase Termination Gap-Out, Phase Termination Max-Out, Phase Termination Force-Off, and begin and end of Allocated Split. Detectors On and Off events for vehicle detectors and ped detectors Detector Volume/Occupancy Volume/Occupancy sequence change, Vehicle detector volume change, and Vehicle detector occupancy change. Overlaps Overlap On and OFF, Begin overlap green, green extension, yellow, and red clear. Preemption events Preemption input ON and OFF, Preemptor in control ON and OFF. Coordination events Pattern status change, free status change, cycle length change, offset length change, and split change. Unit events Changes to the following parameters are recorded: Pattern, Control status, Flash status, Alarm status 1 and 2, Short alarm status, as well as Special function ON and OFF events Detector Alarms Vehicle detector alarm changes and Pedestrian detector alarm changes Channel events Begin channel green, yellow and red events Alarms Power interrupt ON and OFF, Manual control enabled ON and OFF, and Interval advance ON and OFF.

Export of Advanced Log Data


With the normal USB log transfer controls, you can output the above data points in a comma-delimited text file to a USB thumbdrive. It is possible with these data points and an external data processing system, to replay the entire operation of an intersection.

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Data Logging

View Logs Screen


This screen is used to display the data gathered by the ATC-1000 Advanced Logging function. (M AIN M ENU > 4.L OGS > 3.A DV ANCED C ONTROLLER L OG > 2.V IEW L OG )
4.3.2 Choose Log File LOG_10.120.0.247_2010_3_23_11.dat > LOG_10.120.0.247_2010_4_1_11.dat

Figure 282 View Advanced Log Screen Use the up and down arrow buttons to move the cursor (>) next to the log file you wish to view. Press ENT to open the file for viewing. When a file is opened, you will see a screen requesting which information from the dataset you wish to view:
4.3.2 Choose Data to View NXT = CONTINUE C = NONE

A = ALL

PHASE STATUS.. PHASE TIMING.. DET VOL/OCC... PREEMPT....... UNIT.......... CHANNELS......

PHASE CONTROL.. DETECTORS...... OVERLAPS....... COORD.......... DET ALARMS..... ALARMS.........

Figure 283 Choose Log Data to view If you wish to view all of the advanced log data, press the A button to place an X next to every category on the screen at once. Press the NXT button to view the data showing all of the fields. If you inadvertently pressed the A button, but do not wish to view all data at once, press the C button to clear all of the Xs. To view just one portion of the data in the file, use the arrow buttons to move the cursor (an underscore character _) around on the screen. When the cursor is to the right of the desired data, press the NXT button to view the data. From this screen, press the PRV or MNU buttons to exit the Advanced Logging Viewer.

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SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Preventive Maintenance and Calibration


The ATC-1000 controller is designed to require minimum maintenance, however, certain simple steps should be taken to insure proper operation. It is a good idea to periodically check the units wiring, terminals, and connectors for signs of breakage and wear. Replace, if necessary. Vacuuming dust out of the unit and cleaning the front panel is a valuable step in maintaining good air circulation. The controller should also be checked after it has been installed for six months, and then at least annually thereafter. Once the initial check is performed, a regular interval for preventive maintenance should be established based on the install and environmental conditions. During such a maintenance visit, the following procedures should be performed: Check all wiring connections for tightness, corrosion, damaged insulation, etc. Check all mounting hardware for proper tightness. It is also recommended that the controllers software be updated with the latest revisions, when updates are warranted. This will allow more efficient and trouble-free operation. Contact your Peek Traffic support representative to find out if updated firmware is available.

Diagnosing Controller Operation


Heartbeat LED
A 3mm RED LED is located on the front panel just above and to the right of the USB port. This will flash about twice per second to indicate that the controllers microprocessor is functioning. It will double its flash rate whenever the operator makes changes to the controller database. If it is lit continuously, this indicates that the controller CPU has stalled.

Important

When the LED flashes in this double-speed mode, be sure to allow it to finish the memory write operation before you attempt to navigate the menus or make further changes to the database.

PC Communications
The controller must be powered up and in its normal operating mode in order to communicate with a PC. When having problems establishing communications, check the LEDs above the port to see if communications are occurring. If none are, or no connection can be established, be sure the controllers port settings (baud rate, bit length, etc.) are set correctly in the controllers Main Menu > Configuration > Comm Ports & IP/Cab Setup menu, and make sure they match the settings of the computers COM port and within the PC application being run (i.e. IQ Link, HyperTerminal, IQ Central, TransSuite, etc.)

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Troubleshooting

TROUBLESHOOTING
When a failure occurs during normal operation, after isolating the problem, most problems can be corrected using a screwdriver, a multimeter and/or simply replacing the CPU board. The most common problems are directly related to loose connections or broken wires. After that, the you may have a failed ATC CPU board. The controller diagnostics will easily notify you if the controller has a problem. If the controller is suspected, run its diagnostics and note any failures. All procedures relative to good troubleshooting techniques should be followed. Also refer to the suggestions in Table 25 Troubleshooting the ATC-1000 Controller on page 311. Clearly identify the problem. Verify fuse conditions. Check all breakers for proper position. Visually check all cables, harnesses and plugs for loose or worn connections. Replace defective parts as required. When troubleshooting, refer to the cabinet prints and parts lists. If a defective ATC Controller module is found, contact your local service representative or a Peek Traffic service representative (see page 3 for contact information) so you can arrange to repair or replace the faulty unit. Table 25 Troubleshooting the ATC-1000 Controller
Symptoms Possible Cause Power cord not plugged into controller receptacle. Controller does not have power. Blown Controller fuse in Cabinet PDA. Blown Controller fuse in Controller Front Panel No valid communication with controller. BIU FAULT light flashing. Faulty BIU. Faulty controller. No valid communication with MMU. Controller Heartbeat LED not flashing. Faulty MMU. Faulty controller. No valid communication through Serial Port. Faulty Serial Port Unit (PC, etc.) Faulty controller. Corrective Action Plug in power cord to controller receptacle. Determine the cause of the blown fuse. Correct and install new fuse Determine the cause of the blown fuse. Correct and install new fuse Replace faulty communication cable. Replace BIU. Replace controller. Replace faulty communication cable. Replace MMU. Replace controller Replace faulty communication cable. Replace faulty Serial Port Unit. Replace controller.

Controller TX LEDs not flashing.

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Symptoms Possible Cause No valid communication through Serial Port Faulty Serial Port Unit (PC, etc.) Faulty controller. No valid communication through LAN Port Controller LINK LED not on. Faulty LAN Port Unit (PC, etc.) Faulty controller. No valid communication through LAN Port Controller ACT LED not flashing. Faulty LAN Port Unit (PC, etc.) Faulty controller. Corrective Action Replace faulty communication cable. Replace faulty Serial Port Unit Replace controller. Replace faulty communication cable. Replace faulty LAN Port Unit Replace controller. Replace faulty communication cable. Replace faulty LAN Port Unit Replace controller.

Controller RX LEDs not flashing.

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Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting Transit Signal Priority Operation


There are two areas of TSP troubleshooting well address. First, when setting up TSP for the first time, it can be a bit confusing and it is possible to miss a step that prevents TSP from operating.

Getting Up and Running


Here is a simple list of items that might prevent TSP from functioning when you first set up the function: Are the signal lines from the transit vehicle sensor correctly wired to the controller inputs? Is the TSP master Enable switch tuned ON? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 1.U NIT P ARAMETERS > TSP E NABLE = ON) Is TSP set up to expect the correct input type from your transit vehicle detection system. (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 2. R UN P ARAMETERS > I NPUT M ODE VALUES ) Is the correct TSP Action plan being called in your Time of Day schedule? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME OF D AY > 1.A CTIONS > TSP = A CTION P LAN #) Does the currently active TSP Action Plan have the correct Runs enabled? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY >3. A CTION P LAN (P ICK THE CORRECT PLAN ) > R UN E NABLE = X) Does the currently active TSP Action Plan call the correct Run Configuration? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 4.T IME OF D AY > 1.A CTIONS > TSP = A CTION P LAN #) Is the Run calling the correct phase or phases for Green Extension? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 4.R UN C ONFIGURATION > D WN OR U P SO R UN = TSP I NPUT # > C ALLS = P HASES TO EXTEND ) Is the TSP Split Table for that Phase properly configured with extension and reduction times? (M AIN M ENU > 2.P ROGRAMMING > 8.T RANSIT S IGNAL P RIORITY > 6. S PLIT T ABLE > S WITCH TO TSP S PLIT THAT CORRESPONDS TO THE S PLIT TABLE THAT IS BEING CALLED BY THE CURRENT ACTIVE P ATTERN > V ERIFY T IMES )

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TSP Symptoms and Remedies


Second, if you are having problems with TSP operation, this checklist should help assess and correct such problems. Table 26 TSP Troubleshooting Checklist Symptom
TSP Run never activates

Possible Causes
Coordination is not active. TSP does not function during Free operation (Pattern = 254) Running a pretimed pattern. TSP does not function from pretimed patterns. TSP signal not reaching the controller TSP signal is being input on the incorrect pin or connector TSP is not enabled TSP Run is not enabled TSP Input type is not correct

Suggested Remedies
Make sure the controller is not running in FREE mode (pattern 254) when the TSP call is received. Switch to a NEMA, actuated pattern (patterns between 1 and 48) Verify output from the TSP vehicle detector Verify TSP input pin in the IO mapping table of the ATC controller Make sure main TSP ENABLE is ON (MM > 2 > 8 > 1) Make sure the Run being called is enabled in the TSP Action Plan Make sure the TSP Input Mode for the input in question is set to the proper Input Mode (MM > 2 > 8 > 2) Make sure the Delay on the TSP Input is not too high (MM > 2 > 8 > 4 > R UN C ON FIG # > D E L AY V AL UE ) There are two places where Reservice time can be input, in the Action Plan, and in the Run Configuration. The higher value is the one that takes precedence. Go into the Run Configuration screen for this TSP Run and make sure an X is placed under the desired phase(s) in the Call array. Make sure youve entered times in the correct TSP Split screen. Make sure youre entering extension times for the proper Green Extend mode. Double check which Green Extend mode you intend to use.

TSP input delay is too high

TSP Reservice delay is too long

TSP Status displays an R under Run Status, but there is no TSP phase green extension

TSP Run for the active Run Configuration does not place a Call on a valid Phase

Extension times on the TSP Split table are zero

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Troubleshooting Symptom
TSP Status displays an R under Run Status, but there is no non-TSP phase reduction

Possible Causes
Reduce is not active for the desired phases

Suggested Remedies
Make sure an X is placed under the desired phase(s) to reduce in the Reduce array on the Run screen for the active TSP Run Configuration. Make sure valid reduction times are placed in the phases for the correct TSP Split plan. Make sure the TSP Split plan matches the active Coordination Split plan. Increase the minimum value in the split table, or lower the reduction time to use.

Reduction times in the TSP Split tables are set to zero

Reduction times cause times that are lower than the phase minimum in the split table

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Chapter 11 Controller Specifications

This section details some of the physical characteristics of the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this appendix: An overview of the controllers design, on page 318. Physical/environmental specifications, on page 319. NTCIP compliance specifications, on page 320.

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OVERVIEW OF CONTROLLER SPECIFICATIONS


The ATC-1000 is a modular, standards-based controller that uses an Freescale Power Quix 2 hardware platform with memory management unit and floating point capabilities. It uses the Linux operating system with memory management for process isolation and to ensure operational integrity. The Peek line of ATC controllers fully support NEMA TS2 Type 1 and TS2 Type 2 functionality and are compliant with NTCIP 1201 and 1202. It has 3 built-in front panel serial ports, two 10/100 Base-T Ethernet ports, a high speed SDLC port for communications to the cabinet BIU(s) and MMU 2070-compatible modem slot with full modem flow control support can be installed. A high speed USB2 port is standard. All of the ATC timing functions and clocks are referenced to the 60 Hz AC power line when AC power is available. Thus, the ATCs timing will track any frequency drift of AC power. The ATC does not use a battery backup for memory storage or the real time clock. All static memory (SRAM) and the real time clock are powered by 2 super capacitors, which provide sufficient power to operate the SRAM and clock functions of the controller for up to 7 days without AC power. Programs and operation database information is stored and preserved indefinitely in non-volatile flash memory. The controller continuously monitors the STOP TIMING function from a conflict monitor, CMU or MMU. It uses the transition from ON to OFF to resume proper traffic operation. The ATC also sends a watchdog signal (CVM) to the cabinet conflict monitor or fault monitor to MMUs, which keeps the cabinet from going into FLASH condition. The ATC enforces a minimum time of 3 seconds for each yellow signal. A shorter time for any yellow signal is not allowed because the CMU identifies a short yellow time as a fault and would automatically put the cabinet into FLASH. This minimum time value is preset in the CMU (2.7 seconds) and is called out in the CMU specification. The Peek ATC controllers can be interrogated by a Microsoft Windows-based software package known as IQ Link running on an external computer for setting and retrieving data from the unit via the front panel serial or Ethernet ports. This same capability is also available from Peeks central system software package: IQ Central. The front panel display and keypad can be used to view the status of the controller, view most of the available program parameters, and also to modify the programming of the unit. The ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 feature dual traffic applications for pre-timed or NEMA Actuated operation. These applications are fully NTCIP-compliant implementations that easily integrate into any NTCIP-compliant ITS or traffic control system.

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Physical/Environmental Specifications
Table 27 Physical and Environmental Specifications Property
Temperature Range Relative Humidity Input Supply Voltage and Frequency Power Consumption Dimensions Weight Mounting Wiring CPU / Clock Speed Non-volatile Memory RAM SRAM Display Contrast Serial Ports Ethernet Port Fuse Keypad

Value
35 to +165 F (37 to +74 C) 0% to 95% 95 to 135 VAC, 60 3 Hz <25 VA (nominal w/o display backlight or heater on) 10 H x 14 W x 10 D 261mm 375mm 267mm 9 to 11 pounds (4 to 5 kg) depending on which I/O modules, D modules and modem options are installed Cabinet shelf mounted MIL-W 16878D, Type B or better Freescale Power Quix 2 at 300 MHz 16 MB Flash 16 MB SDRAM (32MB, 64MB SDRAM, optional) 1 MB 40 character by 16 line, alpha-numeric, LED-backlit LCD Keypad contrast adjustment 4 Ports with 2 DB-9 male (RS-232); 1 DB-15 female High speed (SDLC), and 1 DB-25 Modem Two 10/100 Base-T 2A slow-blow fuses on AC Line and 24VDC 32 key softtouch keypad in two parts: 16 key hex alphanumeric keypad. 16 key function-based keypad with color-coded navigation and function keys High Speed USB-2 port 6 power monitor LEDs. Heartbeat LED, and 12 port status LEDs Optional 2070 compatible modem slot with full modem control support Optional Datakey slot English Spanish Afrikaans Field swappable I/O and D Modules are available to support these cabinet types: NEMA TS2 Type 1

USB Lamps Modem Slot DataKey Language Support in the front panel interface Cabinet I/O

Traconex 390

Multisonics 820 NEMA TS2 Type 2 HMC-1000 (Honeywell) LMD-9200 / 40 Modules are auto-recognized by the controller
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NTCIP Compliance
The Peek ATC controllers use Port 1 and the Ethernet ports to communicate with the central computer using NTCIP (National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol). NTCIP conforms to NEMA TS2-2003 for Pretimed Type 1 (P1N Level 2) controllers. NTCIP communications protocol and the full object set have not yet been completely specified. The NTCIP communications support adheres to the following timing constraints: whenever a message is received by the controller and that requires the controller to respond, (e.g. all messages except a broadcast message) the controller will initiate its response (i.e., start the transmission of data) within 40 ms. Further, the data is transmitted continuously (i.e., no gaps between characters) until the transmission is complete. Once-per-second communications will be critical to the central management of the controllers. NTCIP relies on dynamic object capability to allow the central computer to program a list of data items to be returned in response to a short-hand request. The controller will support dynamic objects. In order to support the uploading and downloading of the controller database over relatively slow channels, the controller supports the concept of logical blocks. Peek Traffic and US Traffic have defined NTCIP manufacturer proprietary objects that encapsulate a group of data elements (e.g., phase timings block, coordination plan block, detector configuration block, etc.). By grouping the objects into blocks, the number of objects to transfer is reduced, and, since the bulk of the NTCIP overhead is in the object headers and identifiers, transfer time is much more sensitive to the number of blocks than to the size of each block. However, the storage medium and update procedures do not interfere with rapid data transfer. Upon receipt of a database download block, the controller responds within the timing envelope described. In addition, the receipt of multiple database download blocks in rapid succession does not result in any communications errors, NTCIP (SNMP) error codes, or communications turn-around delays.

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Chapter 12 Serial and Data Connectors

This appendix provides details about the serial ports and data connectors of the ATC-1000 controller, including pin locations and functions. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: Port 1, the SDLC port, on page 322. Port 2, the RS-232 connector, on page 323. Port 3, the optional 2070 connector, on page 324. Port 4, the Local serial connector, on page 325. Port 5, the SPARE port, on page 326. Ethernet ports, on page 327. USB ports, on page 328.

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OVERVIEW
The following topics describe the functions of the pins for each of the port connectors on the front of the ATC-1000 controller. Here, we list the per-pin functions of the communications ports and then the cabinet connectors. We dont define the USB ports pin assignments here, since they use the standard USB layout.

PORT 1 - SDLC CONNECTOR


Port 1 has a female 15-pin, metal shell, D-type connector and mates with a male connector of the same form factor.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Figure 284 Pin assignment looking into the Port 1 connector


Table 28 Pin Assignments for Port 1 SDLC PIN
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

FUNCTION
Tx Data + Logic Ground Tx Clock + Logic Ground Rx Data + Logic Ground Rx Clock + Logic Ground

I/O
Output

Output

Input

Input

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Port 2 RS-232C Connector


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Tx Data Unused Tx Clock Earth Ground Rx Data Reserved Rx Clock Input Input Output Output

PORT 2 RS-232C CONNECTOR


Port 2 is a 25 pin, female, D-sub connector which functions as the RS-232C port for the ATC-1000.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Figure 285 Pin assignment looking into the Port 2 connector

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Chapter 12 Serial and Data Connectors Table 29 Pin Assignments for Port 2 RS-232C
Pin
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 20 22

Function
Chassis GND TD RD RTS CTS DSR LOGIC GND CD DTR R1

PORT 3 2070 PORT


Port 3 on the ATC-1000 and ATC-2000 controllers is the name assigned to whatever communications module is installed in the 2070 slot of the controller. Details about the connector pin assignments for your Port 3 should be defined in your 2070 module documentation.

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Port 4 - Local Connector

PORT 4 - LOCAL CONNECTOR


The ATC-1000 controllers front panel serial ports (Ports 2, 4, and 5) have the same connector and pin assignments as a PC serial port. Cables designed for PCs can be used with the ATC-1000. These communication ports mate with a 9-pin, metal shell, D-sub female connector. Connections are made as shown in Figure 286.

5 4

9 8

3 7 2 1 6

Figure 286 Pin assignment, looking into the male Port 4 connector
Table 30 Pin Assignments for Port 4 PIN
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

FUNCTION
DCD Rx DATA Tx DATA DTR SIGNAL GROUND DSR RTS CTS RI

I/O
Input Input Output Output

Input Output Input Input

The firmware in the ATC-1000 Controller can be used to enable or disable the port, set the parity, stop bits and baud rate of the port, as well as to define the type of HW flow control to be used.

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PORT 5 SPARE/UPS CONNECTOR


Port 5 is a standard RS-232 serial port that has the additional capability, thanks to the firmware, to communicate via the NTCIP protocol. This means that it can be used either for a local serial connection, for instance to an on-site PC or a USB monitoring channel, or as a connection point to a central system that speaks the NTCIP protocol, such as IQ Central.

5 4

9 8

3 7 2 1 6

Figure 287 Pin assignment looking into the Port 5 connector


Table 31 Pin Assignments for Port 5 PIN
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

FUNCTION
DCD Rx DATA Tx DATA DTR SIGNAL GROUND DSR RTS CTS RI

I/O
Input Input Output Output

Input Output Input Input

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Ethernet Connectors

ETHERNET CONNECTORS
The two (or optionally, four) Ethernet connectors on the front panel of the ATC-1000 controller are 10/100Base-T, using a standard RJ-45 socket.

Figure 288 Pin assignment looking into the Ethernet ports


Table 32 Pin Assignments for the Ethernet ports PIN
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

FUNCTION
RTS DSR DCD RXD TXD GND DTR CTS

The left of the two Ethernet ports is the standard NTCIP port, intended for connection to the central system software. The right of the two Ethernet ports is typically used to connect your local laptop running IQ Link. The two ports have different IP addresses, which can be set on the IP/Cabinet Address screen. (See page 100).

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USB CONNECTORS
The single USB (Universal Serial Bus) port on the front of the ATC-1000 controller is a standard USB 2.0 port and will accept any standard USB RAM device. Devices can be hot swapped into and out of this USB port just like on a PC.

4 3 2 1
Figure 289 Pin assignments looking into the USB port
Table 33 Pin Assignments for the ATC-1000 USB port PIN
1 2 3 4

Function
+VCC Data Data + GND

Cable Color
Red White Green Black

The USB port on Peek ATC controllers follow the Universal Serial Bus standard and improve plug-and-play capabilities by allowing devices to be hot swapped or added to the system without rebooting the controller. When a new device first plugs in, the host board enumerates it and loads the device driver necessary to run it. The loading of the appropriate driver is done using a PID/VID (Product ID/Vendor ID) combination supplied by the attached hardware. The USB host controller in the Peek ATC controllers uses the EHCI (Enhanced Host Controller Interface), meaning it is compatible with USB 2.0 devices, however the Controllers will only recognize passive USB devices such as RAM or Flash memory devices, but not cameras, external hard drives, or other active devices. The USB specification limits the cable length of a cable between full speed devices to 16 feet, 4.8 inches (5.0 meters). For low speed devices, the computer cable limit is 9 feet, 10 inches (3.0 meters).

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details

This appendix provides details about the ports and connectors on the various Input/Output modules available for the ATC-1000 controller, including pin locations and functions. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: TS2 Type 1 Connectors, on page 330. TS2 Type 2 I/O Connectors, on page 332. HMC-1000 I/O Connectors, on page 342. LMD I/O Connectors, on page 345.

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CONNECTOR DETAILS
The following topics describe the functions of the pins for each of the port connectors on the front of the ATC-1000 controller. Here, we list the per-pin functions of the communications ports and then the cabinet connectors. We dont define the USB ports pin assignments here, since they use the standard USB layout.

NEMA TS2 TYPE 1 I/O MODULE


The ATC TS2 Type 1 I/O Module has a single I/O connector, the round, screw attached Port A connector specified in the TS2 Type 1 standard. Its primary purpose is to provide the controller with power, fault monitoring and ground lines through the front panel of the device.

Port A Connector

H G F E I J

A B C D

Figure 290 TS2 Type 1 MS-A Connector


Table 34 Pin Assignments for the ATC-1000 TS2 Type 1 MS-A connector
Pin A B C D E F Function AC Neutral Not Used AC Line Not Used Not Used Fault Monitor I/O Input N/A Input N/A N/A Output

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NEMA TS2 Type 1 I/O Module


Pin G H I J Function Logic Ground Earth Ground Not Used Not Used I/O Output Input N/A N/A

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NEMA TS2 TYPE 2 I/O MODULE


The ATCs NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O module has three standard connectors for attaching the controller to the cabinet hardware. The three connectors are keyed circular MilSpec Amphenol connectors, each with a different pin count. They are known, from left to right, as Connectors A, B, and C, and they are described in the next three topics.

Port A Connector
Port A is a standard of the NEMA TS2 Type 2 controller specification. It is a circular keyed male pin MilSpec connector with 55 pins in the following arrangement:

Figure 291 Pin assignment, looking INTO the male Port A connector
These are the pin function assignments for the Port A connector when the ATC-1000 controller is operating in its default input/output mode (i.e. Mode 0). For details on switching to one of the other input/output modes, refer to Alternate Input/Output Mode Selection on page 334. Table 35 Port A Pin Functions
Pin
A B C

Function
Fault Monitor +24VDC CVM

Description
Optional, used in TS 2-1 mode only 24 Volt D.C. output. The Controller Voltage Monitoring signal is present here when the controller is not in UCF Flash, no checksum failures are present, and operating voltages are all good. Vehicle Phase 1 Red signal. Pedestrian Phase 1 Don't Walk signal.

I/O
-O O

D E

1 Red 1 Don't Walk

O O

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NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module


Pin
F G H J K L M

Function
2 Red 2 Don't Walk 2 Ped Clr 2 Walk Detector 2 Ped. Det. 2 2 Hold

Description
Vehicle Phase 2 Red signal. Pedestrian Phase 2 Don't Walk signal. Pedestrian Phase 2 Ped Clearance signal. Pedestrian Phase 2 Walk signal. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 2 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 2 when activated. When controller is not in CNA mode, activating this input inhibits termination of Green service to vehicle Phase 1, and inhibits concurrent ped. service recycle. When in CNA mode, termination of Walk is inhibited. Suspends all interval timing for ring 1. Prevents max termination of ring 1 vehicle phases when extending. Initiates start up sequence. Provides manual advance of controller sequencing. If MCE is active, clearance intervals will be timed. LCD backlight control / Door Open event Common lead of AC supply Chassis ground DC I/O logic ground reference Alternating True/False output at 1 pulse per second, 50% duty cycle. Coded Status Bit C for ring 1. Vehicle Phase 1 Yellow signal. Pedestrian Phase 1 Ped Clearance signal. Vehicle Phase 2 Yellow signal. Vehicle Phase 2 Green signal. Active when a call is present on phase 2 but unit is not in phase 2. Active when phase 2 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 1 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 1 when activated. See 2 Hold description above Terminates Green service in ring 1 provided a conflicting call is present and Walk or Ped Clearance are not timing. Places all phases on min recall. Places termination of Green and Walk intervals under control of the Interval Advance input and places calls on all phases. Clearance intervals will time normally. Activates CNA mode for the programmed phases. In this mode, ped movements are recalled so that they are serviced with the concurrent vehicle phase. Can be used to activate UCF. AC Supply Voltage One of the three pins used to set the I/O Mode for a TS 2 Type 2 controller (Also A-z, and A-HH)

I/O
O O O O I I I

N P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k

Ring 1 Stop Time Ring 1 Inhibit Max Term External Start Interval Advance Ind. Lamp Control AC Neutral Chassis Ground Logic Ground Flashing Logic Ring 1 Status Bit C 1 Yellow 1 Ped Clr 2 Yellow 2 Green 2 Check 2 On Detector 1 Ped. Det. 1 1 Hold Ring 1 Force Off Ext. Min Recall Manual Control Enable

I I I I I AC Cgnd Lgnd O O O O O O O O I I I I I I

CNA 1

n p q

Test A AC+ I/O Mode A

I AC + I

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Pin
r s t u v w x y z AA BB

Function
Ring 1 Status Bit B 1 Green 1 Walk 1 Check 2 Ped Omit Ring 1 Omit Red Clearance Ring 1 Red Rest I/O Mode B CNA 2 Test B Walk Rest Modifier

Description
Coded Status Bit B for Ring 1. Vehicle Phase 1 Green signal. Pedestrian Phase 1 Walk signal. Active when a call is present on phase 1 but unit is not in phase 1. Prevents ped service on phase 2. Causes programmed red clearance timing for ring 1 vehicle phases to be omitted. Causes ring 1 phases to rest in red when no conflicting calls are present. See CNA 1 (pin m) One of the three pins used to set the I/O Mode for a TS 2 Type 2 controller (Also A-q, and A-HH) Can be used to activate UCF Modifies CNA operation. When active, CNA phases remain in the timed out Walk state in the absence of a conflicting call regardless of the Hold input. Coded Status Bit A for Ring 1 Active when phase 1 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Prevents ped service on Phase 1 In CNA mode, if the phase has reached a green dwell state, and the Ped Omit is not active, and a serviceable conflicting call does not exist, the ped movement will be recycled if the input is active. In non-CNA mode, if a serviceable ped call exists and Hold is active, the ped movement will be recycled when the input is active regardless of conflicting calls. Selects Max 2 timing instead of Max 1 One of the three pins used to set the I/O Mode for a TS 2 Type 2 controller (Also A-q, and A-z)

I/O
O O O O I I I I I I I

CC DD EE FF

Ring 1 Status Bit A 1 On 1 Ped Omit Ring 1 Ped Recycle

O O I I

GG HH

Ring 1 Max 2 I/O Mode C

I I

Alternate Input/Output Mode Selection


A TS2 Type 2 controller can map the outputs on its A, B and C connectors in a number of ways. Three of the pins on the Port A connector are used to define the input/output mode that the controller will operate in. This mode selection is part of the standard for a NEMA TS2 Type 2 controller. These modes determine which pin on the four cabinet connectors are used for which function. As with all of these inputs and outputs, the inputs used to set the mode follow the NEMA signal standard, i.e. TRUE = 0VDC and FALSE = 24VDC. Table 36 To set the TS2/2 Input/Output Mode, set these inputs to these values: I/O Mode
0 1

Description
TS1 pin assignments TS2 hardware interoperability mode

Pin q on Port A
OFF ON

Pin z on Port A
OFF OFF

Pin HH on Port A
OFF OFF

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NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module


2 6 7 TS2 System mode Boston standard D Module standard OFF OFF ON ON ON ON OFF ON ON

When the ATC-1000 controller is switched to one of the other Input/Output modes, some, but not all, of the default pin function assignments on the Port A, B, and C connectors are modified. These changes are listed in the next two tables. The ATC-1000 auto-recognizes each D module and self-activates Mode 7. Table 37 Cabinet Port Input Changes, by Mode
Pin
A-M A-h A-v A-EE B-R B-S B-T B-U B-g B-h B-i B-j B-k B-m B-n B-x C-X C-m C-n C-p C-q C-r C-s C-EE D-All

Input #
Input 2 Input 1 Input 18 Input 17 Input 11 Input 10 Input 21 Input 9 Input 12 Input 4 Input 3 Input 19 Input 22 Input 23 Input 24 Input 20 Input 8 Input 5 Input 13 Input 6 Input 14 Input 15 Input 16 Input 7 --

MODE 0 (TS 1)
Phase 2 Hold Phase 1 Hold Phase 2 Ped Omit Phase 1 Ped Omit Phase 3 Phase Omit Phase 2 Phase Omit Phase 5 Ped Omit Phase 1 Phase Omit Phase 4 Phase Omit Phase 4 Hold Phase 3 Hold Phase 3 Ped Omit Phase 6 Ped Omit Phase 7 Ped Omit Phase 8 Ped Omit Phase 4 Ped Omit Phase 8 Hold Phase 5 Hold Phase 5 Phase Omit Phase 6 Hold Phase 6 Phase Omit Phase 7 Phase Omit Phase 8 Phase Omit Phase 7 Hold Inactive

MODE 1
Preempt 3 Preempt 1 Automatic (UCF) Flash Dimming Enable Timing Plan C Veh Det 12 Offset 1 Veh Det 11 Timing Plan D Veh Det 10 Veh Det 9 Timing Plan A Offset 2 Offset 3 TBC On Line Timing Plan B Veh Det 16 Veh Det 13 Alternate sequence A Veh Det 14 Alternate sequence B Alternate sequence C Alternate sequence D Veh Det 15 Inactive

MODE 2
Preempt 3 Preempt 1 Local Flash Status Dimming Enable Veh Det 17 Veh Det 12 Address bit 2 Veh Det 11 Veh Det 18 Veh Det 10 Veh Det 9 Address bit 0 Address bit 3 Address bit 4 MMU Flash Status Address bit 1 Veh Det 16 Veh Det 13 Veh Det 19 Veh Det 14 Veh Det 20 Alarm 1 Alarm 2 Veh Det 15 Inactive

MODE 7
Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Active

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details Table 38 Cabinet Port Output Changes, by Mode
Pin
A-d A-e A-u A-DD B-A B-C B-K B-e B-f B-r B-s B-t C-M C-N C-k C-BB C-CC C-DD C-FF C-GG C-HH C-MM C-NN C-PP D-All

Output #
Output 18 Output 2 Output 17 Output 1 Output 9 Output 10 Output 20 Output 4 Output 12 Output 19 Output 3 Output 11 Output 13 Output 5 Output 21 Output 22 Output 6 Output 14 Output 24 Output 8 Output 16 Output 23 Output 7 Output 15 --

MODE 0 (TS 1)
Phase 2 Phase Check Phase 2 Phase ON Phase 1 Phase Check Phase 1 Phase ON Phase 1 Phase Next Phase 2 Phase Next Phase 4 Phase Check Phase 4 Phase ON Phase 4 Phase Next Phase 3 Phase Check Phase 3 Phase ON Phase 3 Phase Next Phase 5 Phase Next Phase 5 Phase ON Phase 5 Phase Check Phase 6 Phase Check Phase 6 Phase ON Phase 6 Phase Next Phase 8 Phase Check Phase 8 Phase ON Phase 8 Phase Next Phase 7 Phase Check Phase 7 Phase ON Phase 7 Phase Next Inactive

MODE 1
Automatic (UCF) Flash Out Preempt 3 Status Free/Coord status Preempt 1 Status Preempt 2 Status Preempt 4 Status Reserved TBC Aux 2 Out Preempt 6 Status TBC Aux 3 Out TBC Aux 1 Out Preempt 5 Status Offset 3 Out Timing Plan A Output Reserved Reserved Timing Plan B Output Timing Plan C Output Reserved Offset 2 Out Reserved Reserved Offset 1 Out Timing Plan D Output Inactive

MODE 2
Automatic (UCF) Flash Out Preempt 3 Status Free/Coord status Preempt 1 Status Preempt 2 Status Preempt 4 Status Reserved TBC Aux 2 Out Preempt 6 Status TBC Aux 3 Out TBC Aux 1 Out Preempt 5 Status Offset 3 Out Timing Plan A Output System Special Function 1 System Special Function 2 Timing Plan B Output Timing Plan C Output System Special Function 4 Offset 2 Out Reserved System Special Function 3 Offset 1 Out Timing Plan D Output Inactive

MODE 7
Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Default Active

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NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module

Port B Connector
Port B is a standard of the NEMA TS2 Type 2 controller specification. It is a circular keyed female socket MilSpec connector with 55 holes in the following arrangement:

Figure 292 Pin assignment, looking INTO the female Port B connector
These are the pin function assignments for the Port B connector when the ATC-1000 controller is operating in its default input/output mode (i.e. Mode 0). For details on switching to one of the other input/output modes, refer to Alternate Input/Output Mode Selection on page 334. Table 39 Port B Pin Functions
Pin
A B C D E F G H J K L M N

Function
1 Next Lead/Lag 1 2 Next 3 Green 3 Yellow 3 Red 4 Red 4 Ped Clr 4 Don't Walk 4 Check Detector 4 Ped. Det. 4 Detector 3

Description
Active when phase 1 has been selected for next service. Activates Phase Pair 4 in all Lead/Lag Patterns. Active when phase 2 has been selected for next service. Vehicle Phase 3 Green signal. Vehicle Phase 3 Yellow signal. Vehicle Phase 3 Red signal. Vehicle Phase 4 Red signal. Pedestrian Phase 4 Ped Clearance signal. Pedestrian Phase 4 Don't Walk signal. Active when a call is present on Phase 4 but unit is not in Phase 4 green. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 4 when activated. Puts a Ped call on phase assigned to ped detector 4 when activated. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 3 when activated.

I/O
O I O O O O O O O O I I I

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Pin
P R S T U V

Function
Ped. Det. 3 3 Omit 2 Omit 5 Ped Omit 1 Omit Ring 2 Ped Recycle

Description
Puts a Ped call on phase assigned to ped detector 3 when activated. Prevents service on phase 3 when active. Prevents service on phase 2 when active. Prevents ped service on phase 5. Prevents service on phase 1 when active. In CNA mode, if the phase has reached a green dwell state, and the Ped Omit is not active, and a serviceable conflicting call does not exist, the ped movement will be recycled if the input is active. In non-CNA mode, if a serviceable ped call exists and Hold is active, the ped movement will be recycled when the input is active regardless of conflicting calls. Activates Phase Pair 2 in all Lead/Lag Patterns. Activates Phase Pair 3 in all Lead/Lag Patterns. Pedestrian Phase 3 Walk Signal. Pedestrian Phase 3 Ped Clearance .signal. Pedestrian Phase 3 Don't Walk signal. Vehicle Phase 4 Green signal. Vehicle Phase 4 Yellow signal. Pedestrian Phase 4 Walk signal. Active when Phase 4 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Active when phase 4 has been selected for next service. Prevents service on phase 4 when active. When controller is not in CNA mode, activating this input inhibits termination of Green service to vehicle phase 4, and inhibits concurrent ped. service recycle. When in CNA mode, termination of Walk is inhibited. Same as 4 Hold description above. Prevents ped service on phase 3. Prevents ped service on phase 6. Prevents ped service on phase 7. Prevents ped service on phase 8. Vehicle Overlap A Yellow signal. Vehicle Overlap A Red signal. Active when a call is present on phase 3 but unit is not in phase 3. Active when phase 3 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Active when phase 3 has been selected for next service. Vehicle Overlap D Red signal. Activates Phase Pair 4 in all Lead/Lag Patterns. Vehicle Overlap D Green signal. Prevents ped service on phase 4.

I/O
I I I I I I

W X Y Z a b c d e f g h

Lead/Lag 2 Lead/Lag 3 3 Walk 3 Ped Clr 3 Dont Walk 4 Green 4 Yellow 4 Walk 4 On 4 Next 4 Omit 4 Hold

I I O O O O O O O O I I

i j k m n p q r s t u v w x

3 Hold 3 Ped Omit 6 Ped Omit 7 Ped Omit 8 Ped Omit OLA Yellow OLA Red 3 Check 3 On 3 Next OLD Red Lead/Lag 4 OLD Green 4 Ped Omit

I I I I I O O O O O O I O I

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module


Pin
y z AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH

Function
Spare 5 Ring 2 Max 2 OLA Green OLB Yellow OLB Red OLC Red OLD Yellow OLC Green OLB Green OLC Yellow

Description
Unused. Selects Max 2 timing instead of Max 1. Vehicle Overlap A Green signal. Vehicle Overlap B Yellow signal. Vehicle Overlap B Red signal. Vehicle Overlap C Red signal. Vehicle Overlap D Yellow signal. Vehicle Overlap C Green signal. Vehicle Overlap B Green signal. Vehicle Overlap C Yellow signal.

I/O
-I O O O O O O O O

Port C Connector
Port C is a standard of the NEMA TS2 Type 2 controller specification. It is a circular keyed female socket MilSpec connector with 61 holes in the following arrangement:

Figure 293 Pin assignment, looking INTO the female Port C connector
These are the pin function assignments for the Port C connector when the ATC-1000 controller is operating in its default input/output mode (i.e. Mode 0). For details on switching to one of the other input/output modes, refer to Alternate Input/Output Mode Selection on page 334.

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details Table 40 Port C Pin Functions


Pin
A B C D E F G H J K L M N P R S T U V W X

Function
Ring 2 Status Bit A Ring 2 Status Bit B 8 Don't Walk 8 Red 7 Yellow 7 Red 6 Red 5 Red 5 Yellow 5 Ped Clr 5 Don't Walk 5 Next 5 On Detector 5 Ped. Det. 5 Detector 6 Ped. Det. 6 Ped. Det. 7 Detector 7 Ped. Det. 8 8 Hold

Description
Coded Status Bit A for Ring 2. Coded Status Bit B for Ring 2. Pedestrian Phase 8 Don't Walk signal. Vehicle Phase 8 Red signal. Vehicle Phase 7 Yellow signal. Vehicle Phase 7 Red signal. Vehicle Phase 6 Red signal. Vehicle Phase 5 Red signal. Vehicle Phase 5 Yellow signal. Pedestrian Phase 5 Ped Clearance signal. Pedestrian Phase 5 Don't Walk signal. Active when phase 5 has been selected for next service. Active when phase 5 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 5 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 5 when activated. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 6 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 6 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 7 when activated. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 7 when activated. Puts a ped call on phase 8 when activated. When controller is not in CNA mode, activating this input inhibits termination of Green service to vehicle phase 8, and inhibits concurrent ped. service recycle. When in CNA mode, termination of Walk is inhibited. Terminates Green service in ring 2 provided a conflicting call is present and Walk or Ped Clearance are not timing. Suspends all interval timing for ring 2. Prevents max termination of ring 2 vehicle phases when extending. Unused. Coded Status Bit C for Rng 2. Pedestrian Phase 8 Walk signal. Vehicle Phase 8 Yellow signal. Vehicle Phase 7 Green signal. Vehicle Phase 6 Green signal. Vehicle Phase 6 Yellow signal. Vehicle Phase 5 Green signal. Pedestrian Phase 5 Walk signal. Active when a call is present on phase 5 but unit is not in phase 5 green. Same as previous hold descriptions. Prevents service on phase 5 when active.

I/O
O O O O O O O O O O O O O I I I I I I I I

Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k m n

Ring 2 Force Off Ring 2 Stop Time Ring 2 Inhibit Max Term Spare 1 Ring 2 Status Bit C 8 Walk 8 Yellow 7 Green 6 Green 6 Yellow 5 Green 5 Walk 5 Check 5 Hold 5 Omit

I I I -O O O O O O O O O I I

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

NEMA TS2 Type 2 I/O Module


Pin
p q r s t u v w x y z AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH JJ KK LL MM NN PP

Function
6 Hold 6 Omit 7 Omit 8 Omit Detector 8 Ring 2 Red Rest Ring 2 Omit Red Clearance 8 Ped Clr 8 Green 7 Don't Walk 6 Don't Walk 6 Ped Clr 6 Check 6 On 6 Next 7 Hold 8 Check 8 On 8 Next 7 Walk 7 Ped Clr 6 Walk 7 Check 7 On 7 Next

Description
Same as previous hold descriptions. Prevents service on phase 6 when active. Prevents service on phase 7 when active. Prevents service on phase 8 when active. Puts call on phase assigned to detector 8 when activated. Causes ring 2 phases to rest in red when no conflicting calls are present. Causes programmed red clearance timing for ring 2 vehicle phases to be omitted. Pedestrian Phase 8 Ped Clearance signal. Vehicle Phase 8 Green signal. Pedestrian Phase 7 Don't Walk signal. Pedestrian Phase 8 Don't Walk signal. Pedestrian Phase 6 Ped Clearance signal. Active when a call is present on phase 6 but unit is not in phase 6. Active when phase 6 is in Green. Yellow, or Red Clearance. Active when phase 6 has been selected for next service. Same as previous hold descriptions. Active when a call is present on phase 8 but unit is not in phase 8 green. Active when phase 8 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Active when phase 8 has been selected for next service. Pedestrian Phase 7 Walk signal. Pedestrian Phase 7 Ped Clearance signal. Pedestrian Phase 6 Walk signal. Active when a call is present on phase 7 but unit is not in phase 7. Active when phase 7 is in Green, Yellow, or Red Clearance. Active when phase 7 has been selected for next service.

I/O
I I I I I I I O O O O O O O O I O O O O O O O O O

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details

HMC-1000 I/O MODULE


The HMC-1000 I/O Module has a single round MIL-SPEC style connector with keys and a switch for Stop Time input.

HMC Input / Output Connector

Figure 294 HMC-1000 Input/Output Connector

Table 41 HMC-1000 Input/Output Connector Pin Functions


Pin
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Function
Output-21 Output-11 MAN-ADV STOP-TIME Output-24 OFFSET1 OFFSET3 Output-15 Preemption 2 Advance Output-23 Restart

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HMC-1000 I/O Module


Pin
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54

Function
Output-32 Offset 2 Output-16 Preemption 1 Output-25 Output-28 Spare 1 Spare 2 Output-7 Output-18 Output-21 Output-22 Dial 3 Dial 2 Output-1 Output-14 Output-4 Output-29 Output-27 Output-17 Output-9 Output-19 Dial-4 Online Flash Bus Manual Output-30 Output-31 Output-12 Output-10 Output-2 Output-3 Output-13 Output-8 Output-26 0V Input-16 Input-17 Output-5 Output-6 0V 0V

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details


Pin
55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

Function
Input-18 Input-19 Input-20 Input-21 24V External Input-22 AC Live (120VAC Line Voltage) AC-Neutral AC Ground

Stop Time Switch


Use to set the value of the Stop Time reference channel.

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LMD40 I/O Module

LMD40 I/O MODULE


The LMD40 I/O Module has three round MIL-SPEC connectors: A, B, and D, and a 15 pin D-sub connector (C).

LMD40 Port A Connector

Figure 295 LMD40 I/O Module - Port A

Table 42 LMD40 Port A Pin Functions Pin A B C D E F G H J K L M N P Function ACTUATION 3 +24V EXTERNAL VOLTAGE MONITOR ACTUATION 1 ACTUATION 2 PRE-EMPT 2 PRE-EMPT 1 INTERVAL ADVANCE STOP TIME MAN. CONTROL ENABLE EXTERNAL CSO SIGNAL PLAN 2 SIGNAL PLAN 3 SYSTEM CONT/AZ RESET Signal DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC

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Chapter 13 I/O Module Connector Details Pin R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e f g h i j k m n p q r s t u v w x y z AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH Function EXTERNAL START REMOTE FLASH (AC) INTERCONNECT COM AC- (COMMON) CHASSIS GND LOGICGND OUTPUT 1 OUTPUT 2 OUTPUT 3 OUTPUT 4 OUTPUT 5 OUTPUT 6 OUTPUT 7 OUTPUT 8 OUTPUT 9 OUTPUT 10 OUTPUT 11 OUTPUT 12 OUTPUT 13 OUTPUT 14 OUTPUT 15 OUTPUT 16 AC+ OUTPUT 17 OUTPUT 18 OUTPUT 19 OUTPUT 20 OUTPUT 21 SPARE OUTPUT SPARE OUTPUT SPARE OUTPUT CYCLE 2 (User Defined 2) CYCLE 3 (User Defined 3) SPLIT 2 (User Defined 4) SPLIT 3 (User Defined 5) OUTPUT 22 OUTPUT 23 OFFSET 1 OFFSET 2 OFFSET 3 (User Defined 1) OUTPUT 24 Signal DC 115 VAC 115 VAC AC EARTH DC REF. DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC 115 VAC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC 115 VAC 115 VAC 115 VAC 115 VAC DC DC 115VAC 115VAC 115VAC DC

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

LMD40 I/O Module

LMD40 Port B Connector

Figure 296 LMD40 I/O Module - Port B


Table 43 LMD40 Port B Pin Functions Pin A B C D E F G H J K L M N P R S T U V Function Signal DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC

Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25 Output 25
Actuation 4 Hold Force-Off

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LMD40 Communication Inputs Connector

Figure 297 LMD40 I/O Module Communication Inputs Connector

Table 44 LMD40 Communication Inputs Connector Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Function Vehicle Detector 17 Vehicle Detector 18 Vehicle Detector 19 Vehicle Detector 20 Vehicle Detector 21 Vehicle Detector 22 Vehicle Detector 23 Vehicle Detector 24 Monitor Status B Monitor Status A Monitor Status C User Defined 1 Ground Logic User Defined 2 User Defined 3 Signal DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC DC

Input and Output pin functions are defined within the ATC controller by the I/O Map. The I/O Map has the ability to be mapped to custom input and output locations. (See I/O Mapping Menu, starting on page 101.)

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

LMD40 I/O Module

LMD Port D Connector

Figure 298 LMD I/O Module - Port D


On the LMD 40, LMD 9200, and the 3000E controllers, this connector was included on a separate D Module. Although the port operates in the exact same way as the D port on those earlier controller, the Peek ATC versions of the LMD D port has been included as a standard connector on the basic LMD40 I/O Module, so no separate D Module for the ATC is required to fully support LMD40 cabinets. Table 45 LMD Port D Pin Functions
Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Function UCF Flash Ofst 1/alarm 8 in Inter. common Enable excl. ped Ofst 2/alarm 7 in Ofst 3/alarm 6 in Cycle 2/alarm 1 in Group 2 switching Spare Call to Free Det input 31 Cycle 3/alarm 2 in Description Calls for UCF flash Offset 1 in or alarm 8 if not interconnect mode Common ref. for opto inputs Enables exclusive ped operation Offset 2 in or alarm 7 if not interconnect mode Offset 3 in or alarm 8 if not interconnect mode Cycle 2 in or alarm 1 if not interconnect mode Activates group 2 detector switching Spare Calls to free operation for all coord select modes Activates Detector input 31 Cycle 3 in or alarm 2 if not interconnect mode I/O opto-I opto-I com I opto-I opto-I opto-I I I I I opto-I Level See note See note See note 0 VDC See note See note See note 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC See note

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Pin 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Function Split 2/alarm 5 in Split 3/alarm 3 in Det input 25 Det input 27 Det input 28 Dimming Dual Entry System/alarm 4 in Det input 29 Det input 30 Det input 32 Det input 13 Det input 9 Det input 10 Ped. Det. 9 Not Used Det input 12 Det input 14 Det input 15 Det input 16 Cond. Service Preempt 5 input Preempt 1 output Preempt 2 output Interconnect Inhib. Time Clock Sync Det input 26 Preempt 1 input Preempt 2 input Preempt 3 input Preempt 3 output Not Used Preempt 4 output Preempt 5 output System output PE 6/Flash output Preempt 4 input User 1 out User 2 out User 3 out Spare User 4 out Ckt 8 (Flash) out Ckt 3 (Ofst 1) out Ckt 4 (Ofst 2) out Description Split 2 in or alarm 5 if not interconnect mode Split 3 in or alarm 3 if not interconnect mode Detector input 25 Detector input 27 Detector input 28 Calls for signal dimming operation Calls for dual entry operation System in or alarm 4 if not interconnect mode Detector input 29 Detector input 30 Detector input 32 Detector input 13 Detector input 9 Detector input 10 Puts a ped call on phase 9 when activated No Wire Detector input 12 Detector input 14 Detector input 15 Detector input 16 Activates Conditional Service when programmed to activate by input Activates preempt 5 run Activated by preempt programming Activated by preempt programming Inhibits interconnect, calls TBC Sets clock to preset time of day Detector input 26 Activates preempt 1 run Activates preempt 2 run Activates preempt 3 run Activated by preempt programming No Wire Activated by preempt programming Activated by preempt programming Active when coordination achieved Preempt 6 out or remote flash achieved Activates preempt 4 run User defined output 1 User defined output 2 User defined output 3 Spare User defined output 4 Clock Ckt 8 output Clock Ckt 3 output Clock Ckt 4 output I/O opto-I opto-I I I I I I opto-I I I I I I I I -I I I I I I O O I I I I I I O -O O O O I O O O O O O O O Level See note See note 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC See note 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC -0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC -0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC

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LMD40 I/O Module


Pin 58 59 60 61 62 63 Function Ckt 5 (Ofst 3) out Ckt 1 (Cyc 2) out Ckt 2 (Cyc 3) out Ckt 6 (Splt 2) out Ckt 7 (Splt 3) out Preempt 6 input Description Clock Ckt 5 output Clock Ckt 1 output Clock Ckt 2 output Clock Ckt 6 output Clock Ckt 7 output Activates preempt 6 run I/O O O O O O I Level 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC 0 VDC

NOTE : Pins designated as opto-I indicate an opto-isolated input. If Inter. common is tied to 24V, then the input is Logic Ground = True (NEMA input) and the input function is not interconnect mode. If Int. common is tied to AC-, then the input is 115VAC = True and the input function is interconnect mode. External resistors must be externally provided to reduce AC voltage.

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ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Chapter 14 D Modules

This chapter describes the D Connector Modules that are available for the ATC-1000 controller. The following topics are discussed in detail in this chapter: ATC D Module, on page 354. Additional D modules, on page 356.

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Chapter 14 D Modules

OVERVIEW
This chapter describes the pinouts of the various Peek ATC controller D modules.

ATC D MODULE
Port D is only defined in the NEMA TS2 Type 2 controller specification as an optional MilSpec connector whose size, pin arrangement, and pin functions can be set by the manufacturer. In the case of the ATC-1000 controller, Port D is a circular keyed male pin MilSpec connector with 61 pins in the following arrangement:

Figure 299 Pin assignment, looking INTO the male Port D connector
These are the pin function assignments for the Port D connector. Note that when the ATC-1000 controller is operating in its default input/output mode (i.e. Mode 0), the Port D connector is disabled. The controller must be placed in Mode 7 for the Port D pins to become active. For details on switching to one of the other input/output modes, refer to Alternate Input/Output Mode Selection on page 334. As with the inputs and outputs on the other cabinet connectors, the inputs and outputs on the Port D connector follow the NEMA signal standard, i.e. TRUE = 0VDC and FALSE = 24VDC.

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ATC D Module Table 46 Port D Pin Functions


Pin
A B

Function
Not Used Preempt Input

Description
-Held at 0VDC to allow controller to cycle normally-Open circuit to trigger preemption. If no preempt is selected, the input has no effect True during preemption Interval 1 True during preemption Interval 2 True during preemption Interval 3 True during preemption Interval 4 True during preemption Interval 5 True during preemption Interval 6 True during preemption Interval 7 True during preemption Interval 8 -A 120VAC input indicating to an 820A-VMS controller or master that the cabinet is currently in FLASH mode ---Special function output 1 controlled by a VMS master Special function output 2 controlled by a VMS master Special function output 3 controlled by a VMS master Special function output 4 controlled by a VMS master Special function output 5 Special function output 6 --When true, causes the controller to service EVP channel 1 When true, causes the controller to service EVP channel 2 When true, causes the controller to service EVP channel 3 When true, causes the controller to service EVP channel 4 When true, tells the controller to ignore all coordination settings and inputs. Instead, the controller will run in timebased, VMS and dial unit coordination. Feeds back to a VMS for split input Feeds back to a VMS for split input Shows when the controller is being coordinated by VMS or hardware interconnect -Shows a true state when EVP channel 1 is being served Shows a true state when EVP channel 2 is being served Shows a true state when EVP channel 3 is being served Shows a true state when EVP channel 4 is being served

I/O
N/A I

C D E F G H J K L M N P R S T U V W X Y Z a b c d e

Preempt Output 1 Preempt Output 2 Preempt Output 3 Preempt Output 4 Preempt Output 5 Preempt Output 6 Preempt Output 7 Preempt Output 8 Not Used Cabinet Flash Input Not Used Not Used Not Used Output 1 - VMS Output 2 - VMS Output 3 - VMS Output 4 - VMS Output 5 - 820A SF1 Output 6 - 820A SF2 Not Used Not Used EVP Input 1 EVP Input 2 EVP Input 3 EVP Input 4 No Coord Input

O O O O O O O O N/A I N/A N/A N/A O O O O O O N/A N/A I I I I I

f g h i j k m n

Special Function 1 Input (Split 2) Special Function 2 Input (Split 3) System Coord Output Not Used EVP Output 1 EVP Output 2 EVP Output 3 EVP Output 4

I I O N/A O O O O

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Chapter 14 D Modules
Pin
p q r s t u v w x y z AA BB CC DD EE FF GG HH JJ KK LL MM NN PP

Function
Not Used Not Used Offset 1 Offset 2 Offset 3 Dial 2 Dial 3 Not Used Not Used Not Used Not Used Detector 9 Input Detector 10 Input Detector 11 Input Detector 12 Input Detector 13 Input Detector 14 Input Detector 15 Input Detector 16 Input External ReSync Input Not Used Telem Line - 2 wire Telem Line - 2 wire Telem Line - 4 wire Telem Line - 4 wire

Description
--External sync pulse External sync pulse External sync pulse When true, tells controller to select Dial 2 settings. When true, tells controller to select Dial 3 settings. ----System detector 9 input System detector 10 input System detector 11 input System detector 12 input System detector 13 input System detector 14 input System detector 15 input System detector 16 input Resets the internal time clock to the T0 reference time -2 Wire telemetry line 2 Wire telemetry line 4 Wire telemetry line 4 Wire telemetry line

I/O
N/A N/A I I I I I N/A N/A N/A N/A I I I I I I I I I N/A O O O O

ADDITIONAL D MODULES
The specifications for the other available D connectors were not available in publishable format at the time this book was printed. Please check for updates to this manual on the Peek Traffic website, at http://www.peektraffic.com/ptmanuals.htm.

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Glossary

3000E A traffic controller produced by Peek Traffic Corporation. AC Alternating Current Actuated Identifies a type of controller which responds to calling signals generated by the actions of either vehicles or pedestrians. See also Semi-actuated and Fullyactuated. Adaptive Split Control A means of intersection split selection based on vehicular activity. ADC Analog-to-Digital Converter ACD, Advance Call Detector A detector located a considerable distance upstream from an intersection which calls the green to that approach. AW, Advance Warning A per-movement output used to give advance notice of an upcoming yellow or red indication. Typically used at hidden intersections with prepare to stop indicators. ASCII American standard code of information interchange. A standard code that assigns eight-bit codes to individual alphanumeric characters. ASTC Advanced Solid State Traffic Controller: the name given to a controller design specified by New York City DOT. This acronym was chosen to distinguish it from the more general ATC standards development program. The ATC-1000 controller is an ASTC controller. ATC Advanced Traffic Controller, a design developed per the ATC standards development program of the State of California and the Federal Highway Administration. Requires the controller to have a separate engine board and run the Linux operating system. The ATC-1000 controller is not an ATC controller.

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Glossary Auto/Manual Switch A cabinet switch, when operated, discontinues normal signal operation and permits manual operation. AWG American Wire Gauge used to identify wire thickness Backplane A printed circuit connector interface board, typically with no active or passive components. However, the use of passive components is accepted for most applications. Back Panel A board within the controller cabinet upon which are mounted field terminals, fuse receptacles or circuit breakers, and other components of controller operation not included in the controller unit itself, or its ancillary devices. Such back panels are typical in older traffic control cabinets. Barrier A logical term to describe a line of compatibility in a multi-ring signal plan in which all rings are interlocked. Barriers assure that there will be no concurrent selection and timing of conflicting phases for traffic phases on different rings. Baud rate The data transfer rate of data transmission to a communications channel, usually expressed in bits per second. BIU Bus Interface Unit, required to interface a TS-2, Type 1 controller to any type of cabinet hardware. Converts NEMA TS2-Type 1 EIA/TIA-485 Serial Data to cabinet discrete inputs and outputs. BPS Bits Per Second - a measure of data transmission speed Buffer A temporary storage location for data. The buffer accumulates backed-up information for later release. A device or section of memory used to compensate for differences in data transfer flow speeds or variable latencies in a communications channel. CA Controller Assembly Cabinet An outdoor enclosure for housing controller units, master units, detector electronics and other associated equipment. Call The result of a detector or signal activation by either a pedestrian or a vehicle. A signal to the controller indicating that a vehicle or pedestrian is present and is requesting the right-of-way. Capacity The maximum number of vehicles that can pass over a given lane or roadway during a given period, under prevailing traffic conditions. CBD Central business district. The portion of a municipality in which the dominant land use is intense business activity. CH, CHAN, Channel An information path from a discrete input to a discrete output.

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Glossary Checksum A numerical value that is calculated by applying a predefined algorithm to a set of data. It is used to determine if a portion of memory or a message has been corrupted in any way. CIC Critical Intersection Control Clearance Interval The interval from the end of the right-of-way of one phase to the beginning of a conflicting phase. Closed-Loop System A software and hardware system in which a computer controls an external process using information received from the process. For example, the closed loop in a traffic control system is from the computer to the controllers and then from the detectors back (through the controller) to the computer. CLR Phase Clearance. Includes Ped Clearance times for CNA phases. CMU/MMU Conflict Monitor Unit Also known as MMU (Multifunction Management Unit). This device monitors the green, yellow, and red AC loadswitch outputs for conflicts, the absence of a proper red signal and the watchdog signal from the controller. Any real and potential unsafe condition will force the cabinet into flash. CMOS Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor a type of integrated circuit chip used on electronic boards. CNA Call to Non-Actuated. Provides a method of phase timing where vehicle and pedestrian detectors are not required to serve the associated phases, with operation as defined by NEMA. An actuated controller feature in which the associated phase will always serve the Walk plus Ped Clear time, regardless of detector inputs. Compatibility Line The dividing line crossing both rings (in dual ring operation) that separates compatible phase combinations. Usually, it divides phases associated with North/South from those associated with East/West. Also known as the Barrier. Conditional Service A dual-ring feature which allows re-service to an odd phase (i.e. a left turn phase) once the opposite through phase has gapped out. The service is conditional upon the time remaining in the adjacent through phases Max timer. Conflict Monitor A device used to continually check for the presence of conflicting signal indications coming from the controller, and to provide an output in response to the conflict (usually All Flash). Conflicting Phases Two or more traffic flows which would result in interfering traffic movements if operated concurrently. Controller A device which, through software and firmware programming, manages the sequence and duration of traffic signals. CRD, COORD Coordination

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359

Glossary Coordination The state where two or more intersections are configured to communicate with each other in order to time their signals in some manner that improves the greater system performance, rather than being timed independently at each intersection. This independent operation, by contrast, is known as Free operation. COTS Commercial off the Shelf standard product offering available for purchase from commercial vendors. CPU Central Processing Unit - The chip that controls all computer operations and performs computations. Also may refer to the entire physical unit housing the chip. CRC Cyclic Redundancy Check Critical Intersection A selected, heavily traveled intersection within a coordinated traffic artery. This intersection would be employed to dynamically control the split at other intersections within the artery, based on its vehicle detector inputs. controller Controller Unit, another term used to describe the overall traffic controller unit. CU Controller unit, in some standards documents, notably those from the States of California and New York in the United States, traffic controllers are often refered to by this two-letter acronym. Occasionally, this abbreviation sneaks into the documentation from Peek. CVM Controller voltage monitor. An open collector output that is maintained low by the controller as long as the internally generated operating voltages are within tolerances. This output is used by a conflict monitor to place the intersection in Flash, should all voltages fail in the controller. Cycle The total time required to complete one complete set of signal states around an intersection. In basic, pre-timed control, the cycle length is fixed. In actuated systems the cycle length can be increased up to a predetermined maximum, based on the continued detection of vehicles. Cycle Zero Point See Time Reference Point Database Traffic controllers and central system software typically uses two distinctly different meanings for the term database. The first is the typical one used in most computer systems: a central system stores and maintains all of the information it gathers from the field about all connected controllers in a set of database files on the central computer. The second meaning of database is the complete set of operating parameters stored in a single controller or master controller. Density A measure of the concentration of vehicles in an intersection, stated as the number of vehicles per mile (space density) or as the flow volume divided by the average speed (point density.)

360

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Glossary Detection Zone The area of the roadway in which a vehicle will be detected by a vehicle detector. Detector A device that senses the presence or absence of a vehicle in a particular area (the Detection Zone). Vehicle detection methods include inductance detecting loops (the most common type), piezo pressure sensors, light beam sensors, radio ID sensors, air tube sensors, and mechanical switches. Detector Failure A detector which fails to indicate that vehicle is present when it is, or fails to go off when a vehicle is absent. Types of failures include non-operation, chattering, and erroneous signaling. Detector Memory A feature of some controllers in which the actuation of a detector is retained in memory until the corresponding phase is serviced. Dimming This feature of some controllers allows the brightness of selected traffic signal indicators to be lowered during night time operation, typically by lowering the voltage applied to the output. DLL A dynamically linked library file. In the Windows environment, programs store data, graphics, and other resources in these linked libraries. CLMATS, TOPS, Z-Link and most other Windows applications use them. Dual Entry A mode of dual-ring operation in which one phase in each ring must be in service. If a Call does not exist in a ring when the controller crosses the barrier to activate a phase within the ring, a phase is selected in that ring to be activated in a predetermined manner. Duplex Two-way communications over a single communications link. EPROM Erasable Programmable ReadOnly Memory (typically using UV light to erase) EEPROM Electronically erasable/programmable read-only memory, the programmable memory storage area in many traffic control components. EGB Extended Green Band EP End of Permissive EPP End of Pedestrian Permissive EVP Emergency Vehicle Preemption. Occasionally used by state and municipal agencies to describe the basic intersection preemption capability. Flash memory Flash memory is a type of nonvolatile memory. The data stored in flash will be saved during long periods of power outage. It is a variation of electrically erasable programmable read-only memory. FO Force Off

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

361

Glossary FOM Fiber Optic Modem, a device that modulates a signal appropriately for transmission over fiber optic cables Force Off Action taken by an external source which generates a signal to the intersection controller, causing termination to begin in the phase currently exhibiting the right-of-way. Used in Preemption and Coordinated operation. FSK Frequency shift key, A form of digital frequency modulation employing discrete frequencies for specific signals, for example for marking signals. The transmitter is changed from one frequency to another, keyed to represent a different information character with each frequency. Fully-actuated Identifies a type of intersection control in which every phase has a vehicle detector input capability Green Band The time, in seconds, elapsed between the passing of the first vehicle and the last possible vehicle in a group of vehicles moving in accordance with the designed speed of a progressive traffic control system. Greenband Analysis a method of analyzing the amount of green light time available in a set of coordinated traffic intersections. Hz Hertz, a unit of frequency indicating cycles per second INIT Initial or Initialization Intersection The location where two roadways meet or cross, or a Controller assigned to such a location. INT Interval Interval A unit of time that is assigned a certain of controller behavior and signal output in a time-based (non-NEMA) controller. ITS Intelligent transportation systems Jumper A means of connecting/disconnecting two or more conductive points by soldering/de-soldering a conductive wire or a removable short. kb One thousand bytes (actually 210 or 1,024 bytes). Computer RAM memories are usually defined in terms of kilobytes. Thus when a computer has 128K of memory, it has 131,072 bytes of memory. LCD Liquid Crystal Display used for alphanumeric displays; very low power consumption, which operates using reflective or transmission properties of display material. Lead/Lag Operation A feature of some traffic controllers which makes it possible to reverse the phase sequence on a phase-pair basis. When the phase pairs (such as 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8) are reversed, the odd phase will lag the even phase instead of leading it as it does in normal operation. 362 ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Glossary LED Light Emitting Diode - low-power colored lights Local Connection to a Controller unit LOL Laughing out loud LSB east significant bit / byte M3000 The model number of a master unit manufactured by Peek Traffic Corporation. Often used in conjunction with Peeks Series 3000 and 3000E Traffic Controllers MAC Address The unique numerical identifier for a physical device that is attached to the Internet. Stands for Media Access Control Address. MAX Maximum time MB One million bytes (actually 220 or 1,048,576 bytes). Used to define a large volume of data. Hard disk storage capacity is measured in megabytes. MCE Manual Control Enable MIN Minimum (usually time) MMU Malfunction Management Unit Module A functional unit that plugs into an assembly MOE Methods of efficiency ms Milliseconds MSB Most significant bit / byte MSCLR Main Street Clearance MTBF Mean time between failures MTTR Mean time to repair n/a, N/A Not assigned; not available; not applicable. N/C Not connected NEMA National Electrical Manufacturers Association. The industry group that has designed one of a couple of competing standards for intelligent traffic control systems. NASCAR The National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing NTCIP The National Transportation Communications for ITS Protocol. The NTCIP protocol conforms to NEMA TS2-1998, Section 3.3.6. OID Object Identifier. A way to identify a unique piece of information within a device that uses the SNMP protocol for data management and communications, or that uses its more pertinent descendant protocol: NTCIP. ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller 363

Glossary OLA Overlap A (for example) PA Phase Allocation PC Personal computer PE Preemption Ped Pedestrian or Pedestrian phase PED CLR Pedestrian Clearance Interval Phase a single traffic movement. NEMA compatible controllers typically manage the intersection in terms of phases, while earlier controllers use intervals and circuits instead. POM Pedestrian Override Mode Port A channel (outlet) that connects the controller to external devices. May be parallel or serial. Power failure Incoming Line Voltage falls below 95 (93 2) VAC for 50 milliseconds or more. Power restoration Incoming Line Voltage rises above 96 VAC (or into the range of 98 2 VAC) for 50 milliseconds or more. PROM Programmable Read-Only memory Quagmire An area of sticky mud, muck or quicksand. Symbolically, a bad situation that perpetually and slowly deteriorates. RAM Random Access Memory. The main memory of a computer while power is on. Typically does not maintain its contents when power is turned off. RU Remote Communications Unit Used in some cities to interface the controller to a coaxial cable communications facility. RGB Reduced Green Band ROM Read Only Memory, hard written memory in a computer that is maintained even when power is removed. Typically used to store basic OS code and firmware programs. ROTFL Rolling on the Floor Laughing RX Reception SDLC Synchronous Data Link Control Semi-actuated Identifies a type of intersection control that has one or more phases that lack a vehicle detector input capability. Serial interface A device, which processes information one (1) bit at a time from the computer to a printer or another peripheral unit. 364 ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Glossary SNMP Simple Network Management Protocol. The basis for the NTCIP protocol. SP Start Permissive Period (for Phase-based operation) or Signal Plan (for Pretimed operation) SPL Split, in a coordinated traffic system, each intersection in an artery must have the same cycle time. So instead of set times for each phase, a coordinated intersection has a split assigned to each phase. A split is a percentage of the total time available in the cycle. SPP Start Pedestrian Permissive Period TANSTAAFL "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch" TBC Time-based coordination. Indicates that coordination or plan selection is based upon the time of day using an internal clock. T/F Terminal and Facilities TCP/IP Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. The most common pair of protocols used to send data across an Ethernet or the Internet. Each component in such a system is assigned a unique IP address. TIC Time Implemented Command TRP, Time Reference Point A point in time which serves as the time reference for an entire artery or region of traffic flow. For example, in the timing diagram for a single street, each intersection has a time offset between the start of its cycle and one arterial signal which serves as the Time Reference Signal. The start of the Green time reference signal in this system is known as the Time Reference Point. TOD Time of Day TP Timing plan. Interval times for use when running an interval-based pattern (i.e. pre-timed operation) TSP Transit Signal Priority. The system in place where transit vehicles, typically buses, transmit a signal to a detector in the intersection, and the intersection controller responds by giving the transit vehicle additional green time, and/or if the light is currently red, shortens the side street green times to bring the green back to the buss light more quickly. TX Transmission USB Universal Serial Bus. A common computer peripheral interface. USTC U.S. Traffic Corporation UV Ultraviolet VAC Volts (RMS), Alternating Current

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

365

Glossary VDC Volts, Direct Current WLK, WALK Walk Interval Time Watchdog A monitoring circuit external to the IQ ASTC which senses an ASTC output via the BIU. No change in state of this output for a CMU programmed period (typically 1 second) denotes an ATC unit error and the CMU or MMU will put the cabinet in FLASH. WRM Walk Rest Modifier Zeugma From the Greek word to yoke, zeugma is a rhetorical device in which a single word or phrase is grammatically related to two or more other words or phrases, as in He lost his coat and his temper. If its meaning relative to each term is different, this is a particular type of zeugma called a syllepsis. An example of a sylleptic zeugma is Benjamin Franklins well known phrase, If we dont hang together, we shall surely hang separately. Another is supplied by Groucho Marx: You can leave in a taxi. If you can't get a taxi, you can leave in a huff. If that's too soon, you can leave in a minute and a huff.

366

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index

1
10Base-T............................................................... 17

2
2070-6A Async card............................................. 17 24v_inhib .............................................................. 81 24v1 ...................................................................... 81

3
3000 Series ...................................................... 355

A
A connector......................................................... 328 A to F keys............................................................ 12 AASHTO ........................................................ 2, 112 AC....................................................................... 355 access diagnostics ............................................... 179 accessing help ....................................................... 57 accessing menus ................................................... 62 accessing the menus.............................................. 30 accessing the USB menu ...................................... 59 accessing the utilities menu .................................. 31 act LED ................................................................. 17 action................................................................... 150 action mask ........................................................... 73 action number ....................................................... 73

action plan TSP ................................................................ 268 action plans TSP ................................................................ 277 actions......................................................... 146, 147 activating edit mode ............................................. 12 active..................................................................... 84 active detectors ..................................................... 76 active preempt ...................................................... 74 actuated....................................... 237, 238, 247, 248 Actuated.............................................................. 355 actuated phase yield point .................................. 213 actuated rest in walk ........................................... 128 actuated rest-in-walk .......................................... 153 Adaptive Split Control ....................................... 355 ADC.................................................................... 355 add init ................................................................ 164 add only correction mode................................... 205 add/remove programs ........................................... 47 added initial ........................................................ 129 added initial timing screens................................ 119 adding SNMP manager ........................................ 45 addonly ............................................................... 205 address HDLC group address....................................... 99 adjusting screen contrast ...................................... 28 adjusting the clock................................................ 22 Advance Call Detector ....................................... 355 Advance Warning............................................... 355 advanced logging................................................ 305

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

367

Index
advanced time setup ........................................... 155 advanced transportation controller......................... 2 Afrikaans ............................................................ 112 alarm logging...................................................... 306 alarms.................................................................... 79 alarms/event log screen ........................................ 78 alphabetic keys ..................................................... 12 alt half hz channel................................................. 93 alt half Hz channel................................................ 94 alt1/2 ..................................................................... 96 amber clearance .................................................. 246 arrow buttons .................................................. 13, 30 arrow keys ............................................................ 12 ARW ................................................................... 128 ASCII.................................................................. 355 assigning a detector to a phase ........................... 166 ASTC .................................................................. 355 ASTC cabinet install guide .................................. 53 ASTC controller display.............................................................. 11 ATC .................................................................... 355 definition............................................................ 2 ATC-1000 housing ............................................................ 10 maintenance................................................... 308 photo .................................................................. 6 auto ....................................................................... 53 auto pedclear......................................................... 91 Auto/Manual Switch........................................... 356 autodetect.............................................................. 19 automatic mode .................................................. 140 automatic polling in IQ Link.............................. 198 AUX.................................................................... 149 auxiliary functions................................................ 73 auxiliary outputs ................................................. 149 availability of help................................................ 57 available overrides.............................................. 152 available types of overlap................................... 134 average flow ....................................................... 182 AWG................................................................... 356 begin month.........................................................161 begin occur ..........................................................161 bin file....................................................................35 BIOS......................................................................11 BIOS version .........................................................87 BIU ................................................. 97, 98, 356, 364 BIUs.......................................................................98 blue function key...................................................30 blue key .................................................................14 boot loader...................................................... 34, 87 bps .......................................................................356 buffer ...................................................................356 build number .....................................................2, 37 build rev.................................................................87 buttons ...................................................................12 numbers ............................................................12

C
CA .......................................................................356 cabinet ................................................ 244, 248, 356 cabinet address ............................... 44, 50, 100, 199 cabinet environment ................................................9 cabinet map .........................................................104 cable lengths attached to USB port.....................326 calibration............................................................308 call .............................................................. 164, 356 call ph ..................................................................168 call to non act ......................................................126 calling a pre-timed plan.......................................228 calls TSP .................................................................282 CalTrans TEES......................................................17 cancel function ......................................................14 capabilities...............................................................7 capacitor power backup ........................................21 capacity................................................................356 cars B4 gap reduction..........................................121 caution .....................................................................4 CBD.............................................................. 44, 356 CBD controller ........................................................2 central communications ........................................16 central system......................................................247 channel ............................................... 244, 247, 356 green .................................................................96 red.....................................................................96 channel event logging .........................................306 channel to interval map .......................................235 channels copying ...........................................................175 channels screen......................................................96 channels to interval map .....................................239 check-in check-out ..............................................275 check-in plus time ...............................................276 checking firmware version....................................32 checking for install components ...........................42

B
Back Panel .......................................................... 356 backlight ............................................................... 29 backlight timer...................................................... 29 backplane ............................................................ 356 backup power........................................................ 21 back-up time ......................................................... 91 balance .................................................................. 84 balanced mode .................................................... 220 Barrier................................................................. 356 baud rate ....................................................... 99, 356 begin day of month............................................. 161 begin day of week............................................... 161 begin mins from midnight .................................. 161

368

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
checklist field deployment .............................................. 53 checksum ............................................................ 357 CHN ...................................................................... 67 choosing an interface language .......................... 112 CIC.............................................................. 226, 357 clear....................................................................... 14 clear time ............................................................ 138 clearance fail....................................................... 281 clearance Interval................................................ 357 clearance timing.................................................. 113 clearance timing screens..................................... 117 clock................................................................ 21, 22 closed-loop system ............................................. 357 CLR..................................................................... 357 CLR button ........................................................... 14 cmnd...................................................................... 72 CMOS ................................................................. 357 CMU ...................................11, 16, 20, 80, 316, 357 CMU log ............................................................. 301 CNA ......................................69, 126, 152, 216, 357 CNA override...................................................... 152 CNA phase yield point ....................................... 213 CNA2 .................................................................. 127 codes flash................................................................ 135 color codes .................................................... 71, 224 comm ports screen ................................................ 97 commanded action mask ...................................... 73 commanded plan......................................... 232, 234 commands ........................................................... 147 comms connectors ................................................ 14 communications diagnostics............................... 293 community name .................................................. 49 compatibility overlap ........................................................... 135 compatibility line ................................................ 357 compatibility settings............................................ 95 compliance with NTCIP ..................................... 318 conditional service...................................... 128, 357 CONF.................................................................... 81 config number..................................................... 281 configuration overview ........................................................ 288 configuration menu......................................... 61, 90 configuring controller operation......................... 288 configuring daylight saving time.......................... 25 configuring SNMP manager................................. 45 conflict monitor .......................................... 135, 357 conflicting phases ............................................... 357 connecting multiple preemption runs ................. 262 connecting with IQ Central .................................. 39 connections I/O module ....................................................... 19 connector port 2 .............................................................. 321 connector details......................................... 320, 328 TS2 Type 2 .................................................... 330 constant call ........................................................ 275 contact information ................................................ 3 contrast ................................................................. 28 contrast control ..................................................... 11 control................................................................... 96 control panel ......................................................... 47 controller............................................................. 357 controller menu............................................. 61, 113 controller message log........................................ 303 controller status .................................................... 65 controller status display........................................ 65 controller status screen ......................................... 62 controller unit ..................................................... 358 coord ................................................................... 357 coord active .......................................................... 78 coord correction mode........................ 140, 204, 205 coord fail............................................................... 78 coord fault............................................................. 78 coord force mode........................................ 140, 209 coord maximum mode................................ 140, 207 coord operational mode...................................... 140 coord patterns ..................................................... 143 coord phases not compatible .............................. 215 coord status screen.............................................. 224 coordinated correction mode.............................. 141 coordinated patterns ............................................... 8 coordination........................................................ 358 actuated controllers ....................................... 187 definition ....................................................... 358 example ......................................................... 198 general discussion ......................................... 182 overview .................................................. 90, 182 coordination data copying .......................................................... 177 coordination events logging ............................... 306 coordination menu........................................ 61, 139 coordination parameters ..................................... 190 coordination status screen .................................... 71 coordination variables ........................................ 140 co-phase................................................................ 95 co-phase group ................................................... 216 co-phases .............................................................. 95 copy from............................................................ 176 copy to ................................................................ 176 copying wildcard commands....................................... 176 copying the database .......................................... 175 correction mode.................. 140, 141, 144, 145, 204 COTS .................................................................. 358 CPU .................................................... 308, 316, 358 CRC .................................................................... 358 CRD .................................................................... 357 crdphase.............................................................. 143 critical alarm......................................................... 79

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

369

Index
critical intersection ............................................. 358 critical intersection control......................... 226, 357 CU....................................................................... 358 curr........................................................................ 72 current control plan .............................................. 73 current pattern............................................. 232, 234 current protection.................................................. 21 current signal plan ...................................... 232, 234 current timezone ................................................. 154 current timing plan ..................................... 232, 234 cursor .................................................................... 56 customer service ..................................................... 3 cvm ....................................................................... 81 CVM ................................................................... 358 cycle............................................................ 182, 358 definition........................................................ 183 cycle dwell.......................................................... 242 cycle fault ............................................................. 78 cycle length................................................. 183, 233 cycle zero point................................................... 358 cycle/offset/split data.......................................... 231 cycle-offset-split patterns ................................... 143 default DST settings............................................156 default gateway .....................................................51 default TSP action plan .......................................274 delay ........................................... 169, 242, 260, 263 detector ...........................................................165 TSP .................................................................281 density .................................................................358 maximum initial .............................................120 time before reduction .....................................121 time to reduce.................................................122 DET BIU map view ............................................110 detection zone......................................................359 detector ................................................................359 active ................................................................76 fail time ..........................................................166 failed.................................................................76 maximum presence ........................................168 no activity diagnostic .....................................168 reseting a ........................................................164 detector alarms logging.......................................306 detector call phases screen ..................................166 detector failure ....................................................359 detector fault..........................................................79 detector inputs .........................................................8 detector logging...................................................306 detector mapping .................................................110 detector memory..................................................359 detector menu ............................................... 61, 163 detector non-lock.................................................131 detector rack ..........................................................98 detector to phase assignment ..............................166 detectors copying ...........................................................175 detectors status screens .........................................76 DHCP server .........................................................51 DIAGF...................................................................81 diagnostics.............................................................13 diagnostics mode.......................... 57, 172, 179, 289 dimming ....................................................... 96, 359 directory structure on USB thumbdrives ............302 disabling DST............................................. 156, 158 display ............................................................ 10, 11 display backlight ...................................................29 display button ........................................................56 display contrast......................................................28 display current DST settings ...............................156 display language..................................................112 display test...........................................................288 DLL .....................................................................359 documentation .........................................................2 DST .......................................................................25 DST status ...........................................................154 dual entry............................................ 128, 152, 359 duplex ..................................................................359 dwell ........................................................... 204, 238 interval............................................................237

D
D module ........................................................ 8, 352 data key................................................................. 20 database .................................................. 11, 43, 358 copy ............................................................... 175 default .............................................................. 52 moving ........................................................... 300 DataKey Electronics............................................. 20 date day plan ......................................................... 151 date setting............................................................ 22 day ...................................................................... 154 day plan ......................................................... 151 day plan............................................................... 151 day plan screens.................................................. 150 day plan status ...................................................... 73 day plans ................................................. 8, 146, 194 daylight saving settings ...................................... 156 daylight saving time ............................................. 25 adjustment time ............................................. 159 default settings............................................... 156 disabling ........................................................ 158 enabling ......................................................... 158 daylight savings .................................................... 14 daylight savings time.......................................... 154 DB ver................................................................... 87 DC monitor ........................................................... 81 deactivating the backlight..................................... 29 debris .................................................................... 10 default coord pattern........................................... 274 default database .............................................. 43, 52 default database load .......................................... 173

370

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
pre-timed cycle .............................................. 242 dwell coord correction mode .............................. 205 dwell green..........................................169, 260, 264 dwell intervals..................................................... 243 dwell pd .............................................................. 263 dwell ph ...................................................... 169, 260 dwell phase ................................................. 261, 263 DWN button.......................................................... 13 dynamic max limit ...................................... 124, 125 dynamic max step ....................................... 124, 125 dynamic max timing screens .............................. 124 dynamic objects .................................................. 318 dynamically linked library.................................. 359 ESC button ........................................................... 14 escape ................................................................... 14 ethernet ................................................................. 43 addresses........................................................ 100 connector ....................................................... 325 ethernet port.......................................... 17, 317, 325 Ethernet port ......................................................... 14 ethernet ports ...................................................... 316 event ................................................................... 147 event data............................................................ 304 event log status ..................................................... 78 event number ...................................................... 150 evp ...................................................................... 359 exit intervals ....................................................... 243 exit MUTCD flash................................................ 93 exit ph ................................................. 169, 260, 263 exit phase preemption..................................................... 261 exiting a pre-timed timing plan .......................... 228 expansion slots ..................................................... 17 exporting advanced logs..................................... 306 ext st...................................................................... 69 ext start ................................................................. 78 extend ......................................................... 144, 166 detector .......................................................... 165 TSP ................................................................ 281 extend green ....................................................... 115 external start ....................................................... 251

E
E key ..................................................................... 12 early green .................................................. 270, 282 edit mode ......................................12, 13, 14, 30, 62 EEPROM ............................................................ 359 EGB .................................................................... 359 ehci...................................................................... 326 EIA-232 .............................................................. 321 email address .......................................................... 3 enabled intervals ................................................. 283 enabled phases .................................................... 283 enabling DST ...................................................... 158 enabling frame 40 ................................................. 98 enabling phases................................................... 114 enclosure ............................................................... 10 end day of month ................................................ 162 end day of week .................................................. 162 end mins from midnight ..................................... 162 end month ........................................................... 162 end occur............................................................. 162 endvehpermissive ............................................... 213 English ................................................................ 112 ENT key................................................................ 13 ent ped clear........................................169, 260, 264 Enter button .......................................................... 13 enter MUTCD flash .............................................. 93 entering diagnostics mode .................................. 179 entering edit mode .......................................... 12, 30 entering parameters............................................. 192 entering the menu screens .................................... 30 entry TOD schedule ................................................ 151 entry phase .......................................................... 261 environmental specs ........................................... 317 EP 359 EPP...................................................................... 359 EPROM............................................................... 359 err cnt .................................................................. 168 err cts........................................................... 165, 166 erratic counts diagnostic ............................. 165, 168 esc button .............................................................. 56

F
f/o 69 fail TSP ................................................................ 281 fail T ................................................................... 166 fail time............................................................... 166 failed detectors ..................................................... 76 fault................................................................. 78, 79 fault monitor output.............................................. 21 fault monitoring.................................................. 364 fax ........................................................................... 3 field deployment................................................... 53 file system............................................................. 35 USB ............................................................... 302 firmware ................................................. 11, 32, 297 build#................................................................. 2 firmware file names.............................................. 36 firmware flowchart ............................................... 58 firmware update.............................................. 34, 57 firmware upgrade ................................................. 15 firmware version................................................... 87 fixed .................................................................... 209 fixed force........................................................... 142 fixed timing menu .............................................. 231 fl enab ................................................................. 134 flash .................................................. 44, 78, 93, 244

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

371

Index
slow.................................................................. 94 steady red during ........................................... 112 flash data erasing............................................................ 173 flash dwell .......................................... 169, 260, 263 flash entry interval...................................... 236, 238 flash exit interval ........................................ 236, 238 flash exit red time ........................................... 93, 94 flash exit yellow time ..................................... 93, 94 flash memory ...................................................... 359 flash mode .......................................................... 142 flashing an output ............................................... 240 flashing dwell intervals ...................................... 245 flashing green ..................................................... 239 flashing yellow or red......................................... 239 floating................................................................ 209 floating force ...................................................... 142 flowchart of firmware logic.................................. 58 FO ....................................................................... 359 FOM.................................................................... 360 force mode .................................................. 142, 209 force off ...................................... 131, 187, 359, 360 force-off ...................................................... 115, 209 frame 129.............................................................. 81 frame 40................................................................ 98 frame 40 enable .................................................... 98 free ........................................................................ 78 free mode ............................................................ 142 French ................................................................. 112 front panel............................................................. 10 FSK ..................................................................... 360 FSK modem.......................................................... 17 fully-actuated ...................................................... 360 function key .................................................... 14, 30 fuse.......................................................... 10, 21, 317 green rest .............................................................127 green timing screens................................... 113, 115 greenband analysis ..............................................360 grn ext..................................................................284 grn red..................................................................284 ground connection...................................................7 group address.........................................................99 guaranteed passage..............................................128

H
half power balancing .............................................96 handshake ....................................................... 16, 99 HDLC group address ............................................99 heartbeat LED .................................. 10, 14, 20, 308 heater .....................................................................11 help button.............................................................56 help screens ...........................................................57 help system..................................................... 13, 31 history synchronization ..............................................186 HLP button ............................................................13 HMC I/O...................................................................102 HMC input/output port........................................340 HMC-1000 module ...........................................7, 19 HME ......................................................................12 hold......................................................................187 hold-fo ...................................................................72 home button...........................................................12 Honeywell ...............................................................7 hour............................................................. 150, 154 hour to second conversion table............................24 hours of operation ...................................................3 housing ..................................................................10 Hz 360

G
gap ...................................................................... 122 gap reduction ...................................... 120, 122, 123 gap reduction timing........................................... 121 gap-out ................................................................ 152 simultaneous .................................................. 128 gapping out ......................................................... 115 gateway................................................................. 51 gateway address.................................................... 43 global time .................................................... 24, 155 glossary............................................................ 355 GMT ................................................................... 154 green minimum........................................................ 115 green arrows ......................................................... 12 green band .......................................................... 360 green extend........................................................ 282 green extend mode.............................................. 276 green extension................................................... 270

I
I/O function map setup........................................103 I/O function mapping ..........................................102 I/O mapping................................................ 101, 103 I/O module NEMA TS2 Type 1 ........................................328 NEMA TS2 Type 2 ........................................330 I/O modules .............................................................7 overview ...........................................................19 idle .........................................................................84 idle pending ...........................................................84 important .................................................................4 inbound................................................................182 included ...............................................................137 INIT .....................................................................360 input delay .............................................................75 input mode TSP .................................................................275 input priority........................................................250

372

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
input status screen................................................. 68 inputs TSP .................................................................. 82 insertion .............................................................. 270 int adv ................................................................... 69 interface ................................................................ 39 interface navigation .............................................. 56 Internet site ............................................................. 3 intersection.................................................. 245, 360 intersection list.................................................... 201 intersection name ................................................ 199 intersection programming..................................... 54 intersection startup................................................ 92 interval ....................9, 238, 244, 245, 247, 248, 360 interval advance .................................................. 131 interval modifiers........................................ 235, 236 interval skipping ......................................... 246, 248 interval-based operation ......................................... 8 intervals used ...................................................... 233 invalid cycle time................................................ 215 IP addr high word ................................................. 99 IP address................................................ 43, 52, 201 setting the......................................................... 50 IP address local ................................................... 100 IP address system................................................ 100 IP addresses .......................................................... 50 IP/Cabinet address .............................................. 100 IP/Cabinet setup screen ........................................ 97 IPL ........................................................................ 87 IQ Central .............................................39, 100, 226 IQ Link....................................16, 45, 100, 198, 316 DB to controller transfer................................ 223 login ............................................................... 198 IQ Link manual....................................................... 2 IQ Link manual ordering info .............................. 38 IQCentral communication .......................................... 16, 17 IQCentral manual ................................................... 2 IQLink....................................................... 38, 43, 44 communications............................................... 17 ITE .......................................................................... 2 ITS ...................................................................... 360 keypad test .......................................................... 288

L
lagging left turn .................. 252, 253, 254, 256, 257 language selection .............................................. 112 last car passage ................................................... 122 launching a pre-timed timing plan ..................... 228 LCD ...................................................................... 11 contrast ............................................................ 11 definition ....................................................... 360 LCD specs ............................................................ 10 lead/lag operation ............................................... 360 leading left turn .................. 252, 253, 254, 256, 257 LEDs............................................................. 10, 317 definition ....................................................... 361 ethernet ............................................................ 17 heartbeat .......................................................... 20 link ...................................................... 169, 260, 264 link LED ............................................................... 17 linking................................................................. 262 Linux....................................................... 32, 87, 316 LMD 40 I/O.................................................................. 102 LMD module .................................................... 7, 19 load switch.......................................................... 135 load switches ...................................................... 135 loading a database from a USB thumbdrive ...... 300 loading a default database ............................ 52, 173 loading default DST settings...................... 156, 157 loadswitch........................................................... 357 local ...................................................... 71, 224, 361 local address ....................................................... 100 local connector ................................................... 323 local cycle........................................................... 183 local cycle reference point.................................. 184 local cycle zero ............................................... 73, 79 local flash........................................................ 78, 81 local free ............................................................... 78 local override ........................................................ 79 local time differential ................................... 23, 154 local time differentiation .................................... 155 log data ............................................................... 304 copying .......................................................... 303 logs moving log data on USB thumbdrives.......... 301 loopback test....................................................... 293 LSB..................................................................... 361

J
jumper ................................................................. 360 jumpers spare port configuration................................... 17

K
kb 360 Kern controller firmware........................................................... 32 keyboard conventions............................................. 4 keypad................................................................... 12 numbers............................................................ 12

M
M3000................................................................. 361 MAC address .............................. 17, 43, 50, 87, 361 main menu ...................................................... 61, 62 main menu button................................................. 56 main module ..................................................... 6, 10 maintenance........................................................ 308

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

373

Index
overview ........................................................ 288 malfunction management unit.................... 357, 361 management and monitoring tools ....................... 48 Manhattan RCU.................................................... 16 manual IQ Link ............................................................ 38 manual control enabled ...................................... 236 manual flash........................................................ 203 manual flash mode.............................................. 140 manual free ......................................................... 203 manual free mode ............................................... 140 manual on uniform traffic control devices........... 93 manual pattern .................................................... 203 manual pattern mode .......................................... 140 manuals................................................................... 2 map command .................................................... 102 mapping .............................................. 101, 109, 112 master............................................................ 71, 224 master cycle ................................................ 183, 184 master operation ................................................. 112 master reservice time.................................. 277, 281 max ............................................................. 131, 361 MAX 1 ................................................................ 115 max duration ....................................................... 264 max II.................................................................. 116 max initial ........................................................... 119 max pres.............................................................. 168 max presence ...................................... 169, 260, 264 max prs ....................................................... 165, 166 max recall ................................................... 130, 152 maximum 1 ......................................................... 115 maximum initial.................................................. 120 maximum mode .................................................. 141 maximum patterns .............................................. 140 maximum presence....................................... 75, 243 maximum1 .................................................. 141, 207 maximum2 .................................................. 141, 207 maxinhibit................................................... 141, 207 maxpatterns......................................................... 217 MB ...................................................................... 361 mce................................................................ 69, 238 MCE............................................................ 236, 361 media access control address.............................. 361 memory....................................... 131, 251, 316, 359 memory diagnostics............................................ 294 menu alarms/event log .............................................. 61 configuration.............................................. 61, 90 controller........................................................ 113 coordination............................................. 61, 139 detector ............................................................ 61 detectors......................................................... 163 I/O mapping................................................... 101 main ........................................................... 61, 62 status .......................................................... 61, 64 TOD plans ....................................................... 61 menu button...........................................................13 menu diagram........................................................59 menu help system........................................... 56, 57 menu navigation ....................................................56 menu news.............................................................56 menu system..........................................................30 top view ............................................................59 menus.....................................................................59 controller ..........................................................61 pretimed................................................. 170, 230 system maintenance .......................................172 transit signal priority ......................................273 USB ................................................................299 utilities............................................................288 microprocessor heartbeat LED ...........................308 min...................................................... 150, 238, 361 min duration ............................................... 169, 260 min flash ................................................................91 min gap ................................................................122 min green.................................... 116, 169, 260, 264 min rcl....................................................................69 min recall.................................................... 130, 152 min times interval............................................................237 min walk ............................................. 169, 260, 264 MINC.....................................................................81 minimum duration........................................ 75, 243 minimum dwell .....................................................75 minimum flash time ....................................... 93, 94 minimum gap.......................................................122 minimum green ...................................................115 minute..................................................................154 minutes to adjust time ........................ 159, 160, 162 misc setup screen...................................................97 miscellaneous status ............................................288 mm.................................................................. 1, 239 MMU ............ 16, 20, 44, 53, 96, 135, 357, 361, 364 connection ........................................................16 enable ...............................................................98 MMU status screens..............................................80 MNU......................................................................13 MNU button ..........................................................14 mode ....................................................................143 model .....................................................................87 modem slot ..........................................................317 modifier ...............................................................137 modifying the internal clock .................................22 module .................................................................361 module locations .....................................................7 module type .........................................................102 moe ......................................................................274 MOE ....................................................................361 monitoring tools ....................................................48 month...................................................................154 day plan ..........................................................151 motherboard ..........................................................87

374

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
moving databases................................................ 300 moving logs using a USB drive.......................... 301 ms 361 MSB .................................................................... 361 MSCLR .............................................................. 361 MTBF.................................................................. 361 MTTR ................................................................. 361 MUTCD flash screen............................................ 93 offset correction extend ............................................................ 144 percentages .................................................... 145 reduce ............................................................ 144 offset correction recovery................................... 278 offset correction screen ...................................... 144 offset seeking.............................................. 186, 205 offset type ........................................................... 233 offset3 ................................................................. 218 OFS....................................................................... 67 OID ..................................................................... 361 OLA .................................................................... 362 omit a phase........................................................ 153 opening help ......................................................... 57 opening help screens ............................................ 31 operating system......................................... 8, 11, 32 operational mode ........................................ 140, 203 operational status................................................ 288 options for phases............................................... 126 ordering a data key ............................................... 20 outbound ............................................................. 182 output diagnostics............................................... 291 output to interval map ................................ 235, 240 outputs .................................................................. 85 TSP .................................................................. 85 outputs status screen............................................. 70 overlap .................................................. 96, 134, 362 channels ......................................................... 135 type modes..................................................... 134 overlap FL .......................................................... 263 overlap logging................................................... 306 overlap screens ........................................... 133, 137 overlap status screen............................................. 80 overlaps copying .......................................................... 175 override......................................................... 79, 215 PRTY............................................................. 263 override commands ............................................ 152 override fl ................................................... 169, 260 overview ................................................................. 6 menu system .................................................... 56 ovl ......................................................................... 80

N
n/a 361 n/c 361 navigating status screens ...................................... 13 navigating the interface ........................................ 56 navigating the status screens ................................ 64 navigating the TSP screens................................. 281 NEMA........................................................... 1, 7, 44 definition.................................................... 8, 361 gap reduction ................................................. 121 TS2..................................................................... 8 NEMA I/O version ............................................... 87 NEMA operation .................................................... 8 NEMA standard .................................................. 316 NEMA timing ..................................................... 115 NEMA TS2-1998 spec ......................................... 16 NEMA-Interval-based transitions .......................... 9 new install............................................................. 42 next........................................................................ 14 no act........................................................... 165, 166 no activ................................................................ 168 no/yes button......................................................... 14 non-critical alarm.................................................. 79 non-lock ...................................................... 131, 238 interval ........................................................... 237 non-lock call .......................................169, 260, 263 non-locking memory........................................... 242 non-volitile.......................................................... 108 normal recovery .................................................. 278 note.......................................................................... 4 NTCIP...............................................8, 17, 190, 247 definition........................................................ 361 NTCIP compliance ............................................. 318 NTCIP event log ................................................. 304 NTCIP pattern..................................................... 191 NTCIP protocol .................................................. 363 number buttons ..................................................... 12 NXT button........................................................... 14

P
P0Z1 ..................................................................... 72 P1TO..................................................................... 81 PA ....................................................................... 362 page down button ................................................. 13 page up/down buttons........................................... 56 parent phases ...................................................... 134 parents................................................................. 134 parity............................................................... 16, 99 passage........................................................ 115, 164 passage timer .............................................. 123, 131 passage timing .................................................... 115

O
O Relay ................................................................. 81 object identifier................................................... 361 objects ................................................................. 190 occ det ................................................................. 164 offset .....................................71, 143, 182, 224, 233 definition........................................................ 185

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

375

Index
password IQ Link .......................................................... 198 PAT..................................................................... 147 patn ....................................................................... 72 patt ...................................................................... 196 pattern ......................................................... 232, 234 system ............................................................ 142 pattern call .......................................................... 142 pattern control..................................................... 211 pattern selection.................................................. 147 pattern sync................................................. 154, 155 pattern table ........................................ 190, 192, 219 pattern table programming ................................. 217 pattern table screens ........................................... 143 pattern table type ................................................ 218 pattern to timing plan map ................................. 229 patterns.................................................................... 8 PC 362 PC communications............................................ 308 PC port.................................................................. 16 PE 362 ped...................................................................... 362 ped c...................................................................... 69 ped clearance ...................................... 118, 127, 246 PED CLR............................................................ 362 ped o ..................................................................... 69 ped omit .............................................................. 153 ped overlaps........................................................ 137 ped phs.................................................................. 96 ped recall............................................................. 152 ped timing ........................................................... 113 ped walk.............................................................. 118 pedclearfactor ..................................................... 213 pedestrian detectors screen................................. 168 pedestrian inputs..................................................... 8 pedestrian override mode ........................... 215, 362 pedestrian recall.................................................. 131 pedestrian timing screens ................................... 118 Peek Traffic ............................................................ 3 per interval modifiers ......................................... 238 perm .............................................................. 71, 224 permissive................................................... 187, 212 permissive left turn ............................................. 131 phase ................................................................... 143 definition........................................................ 362 phase call ............................................................ 168 phase changes logging........................................ 306 phase compatibility............................................. 111 phase compatibility screens.................................. 95 phase control logging ......................................... 306 phase enables screen........................................... 114 phase insertion .................................................... 270 phase max recall ................................................. 152 phase min recall.................................................. 152 phase omit........................................................... 153 phase option screens........................................... 126 phase rotation ......................................................270 phase skipping ............................................ 270, 282 phase timing ........................................................117 phase timings.......................................................115 phase-on-demand ................................................270 phases ......................................................................8 copying ...........................................................175 phone number..........................................................3 photo comms ports .....................................................14 photo of ATC-1000 .................................................6 pid........................................................................326 pin assignments ...................................................104 HMC...............................................................340 LMD port A....................................................343 LMD port B....................................................345 LMD port C....................................................346 LMD port D....................................................347 port A..............................................................330 port B..............................................................335 port C..............................................................337 port D..............................................................352 plan split .................................................................183 plan processing....................................................228 police button........................................................236 poll for service.......................................................98 POM ........................................................... 215, 362 port USB ................................................................326 port 1............................................................. 16, 320 enable ...............................................................98 port 1 screen ..........................................................97 port 1 settings screen.............................................98 port 2......................................................................16 port 3......................................................................16 port 4............................................................. 17, 323 port 5............................................................. 17, 324 port A...................................................................330 LMD ...............................................................343 port B...................................................................335 LMD ...............................................................345 port C...................................................................337 LMD ...............................................................346 port D...................................................................352 LMD ...............................................................347 ports 2 through 5 setup screen ..................................99 communications ...............................................14 data key ............................................................20 definition ........................................................362 ethernet .............................................................17 expansion slots .................................................17 HMC...............................................................340 input/output ....................................................340 LMD port A....................................................343

376

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
LMD port B ................................................... 345 LMD port C ................................................... 346 LMD port D ................................................... 347 MSA............................................................... 330 MSB ............................................................... 335 MSC ............................................................... 337 MSD............................................................... 352 PC16 SDLC ............................................................... 16 spare ................................................................. 17 specifications ................................................. 317 system .............................................................. 16 USB.................................................................. 15 power ...................................................................... 9 power failure....................................................... 362 power inputs............................................................ 7 power module ......................................................... 6 power restart ......................................................... 78 power restoration ................................................ 362 power supply......................................................... 21 power supply status .............................................. 10 preempt .........................................79, 244, 245, 247 preempt control................................................... 242 preempt override flash ........................................ 242 preemption ...................................................... 8, 249 linking ............................................................ 262 phases............................................................. 261 pre-timed........................................................ 242 pre-timed interval skipping ........................... 246 pre-timed interval time .................................. 243 priority ........................................................... 263 preemption channels ........................................... 243 preemption events logging ................................. 306 preemption screens ............................................. 260 preemption status screen....................................... 74 pretimed flashing output ............................................... 240 pre-timed interval modifiers........................................... 236 signal output options...................................... 239 pre-timed preemption ..................................................... 242 pre-timed preemption delay ........................................... 242 pre-timed actuated interval operation ............................ 248 pre-timed leading left turn.............................................. 252 pre-timed lagging left turn ............................................. 252 pre-timed leading left turn.............................................. 253 pre-timed lagging left turn ............................................. 253 pre-timed leading left turn.............................................. 254 pre-timed lagging left turn ............................................. 254 pre-timed leading left turn ............................................. 256 pre-timed lagging left turn ............................................. 256 pre-timed leading left turn ............................................. 257 pre-timed lagging left turn ............................................. 257 pretimed menu ............................................ 170, 230 pretimed modifiers ............................................. 238 pre-timed operation ............................................ 228 pre-timed pattern to plan assignments ............... 229 pretimed status screen .......................................... 67 prev menu button.................................................. 56 previous button ..................................................... 13 priority TSP ................................................................ 270 priority of preemption calls ................................ 263 programmed splits ................................................ 85 programming coordination................................. 198 programming the controller.................................. 54 progression ......................................................... 182 PROM................................................................. 362 PRS ..................................................................... 165 prty override ............................................... 169, 260 PRTY override ................................................... 263 PRV ...................................................................... 13 ptn ................................................................. 71, 224 public .................................................................... 49

Q
q jujmp................................................................ 282 q jump ................................................................. 282 q jumping............................................................ 270 q jumps ................................................................. 85 quagmire ............................................................. 362 queue................................................... 164, 165, 166 queue jump time ................................................. 283 queue jumping .................................................... 283 quick start ............................................................. 42

R
R1W...................................................................... 72 RAM ................................................................... 362 RAM devices ........................................................ 15 range copying ..................................................... 176 RCU .............................................................. 16, 362 read create............................................................. 49 real-time clock ...................................................... 21 recall ................................................... 115, 152, 238 interval........................................................... 237 pedestrian....................................................... 131 recall screens ...................................................... 130

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

377

Index
receive LEDs ........................................................ 10 recovery ................................................................ 84 recovery strategy ................................................ 277 red clearance ....................................................... 117 red fail................................................................... 81 red flash channel............................................. 93, 94 red lock ............................................................... 164 red rest ............................................................ 9, 153 red revert....................................................... 91, 117 red time ............................................................... 247 reduce.................................................................. 144 reduce phase ....................................................... 282 reduction ............................................................. 270 related documents................................................... 2 release notes.......................................................... 32 remove all flash data........................................... 173 r-en........................................................................ 81 request time sync ................................................ 112 reservice.............................................................. 281 reservice time...................................................... 277 reset............................................................... 81, 164 RESP to FAIL....................................................... 81 response fault........................................................ 78 rest-in-walk......................................................... 153 restoration of power............................................ 362 revision info.................................................. 87, 288 revisions screen .................................................... 87 RGB .................................................................... 362 right turn on red .................................................. 131 ring compatibility ................................................. 95 ring max 2........................................................... 153 ring max inhibit .................................................. 153 ring omit reclear ................................................. 153 ring ped reclear ................................................... 153 ring red rest......................................................... 153 ring sequencing screens...................................... 111 ring status.............................................................. 75 rings ........................................................................ 8 copying .......................................................... 175 ROM ................................................................... 362 rotation................................................................ 270 RS232 ................................................................... 17 RS-232C ............................................................. 321 RS485 ................................................................... 17 RS-485 .................................................................. 16 run TSP ................................................................ 268 run config............................................ 268, 270, 277 run configuration TSP ................................................................ 279 run enable ........................................................... 277 run number.......................................................... 281 run parameters TSP ................................................................ 275 run request .......................................................... 275 run status............................................................... 72 rx 362

S
safety .......................................................................1 schedule...............................................................146 copying ...........................................................175 schedule date .......................................................151 schedule day ........................................................151 schedule day plan ................................................151 schedule month....................................................151 schedule screens ..................................................151 schedules .................................................................8 scope........................................................................1 screen backlight.....................................................29 screen contrast .......................................................28 SDLC...................................................................362 SDLC cable ...........................................................53 SDLC connector..................................................320 SDLC port .............................................................16 SDLC status screen ...............................................77 sec/actuation ........................................................119 second..................................................................154 secondary to secondary enable..............................98 security settings of SNMP.....................................49 selecting an interface language ...........................112 semi-actuated.......................................................362 seq no...................................................................143 sequencing...........................................................111 serial interface .....................................................362 serial ports .............................................................14 service information..................................................3 services ..................................................................46 set DST by day of week ............................. 156, 161 set DST by exact date................................. 156, 160 set local time........................................................154 setting IP address...................................................50 setting screen contrast ...........................................28 setting the date and time........................................22 setting the length of the timing plan ...................233 setting up a basic intersection ...............................54 setting up advanced logging................................305 setting up daylight saving time .................... 25, 156 setting up I/O maps .............................................102 setting up TSP .....................................................271 setup checklist ................................................ 43, 53 SGO .....................................................................128 shift......................................................................270 shift phase............................................................282 shipping .................................................................10 short alarm status screen .......................................79 shortway ..............................................................204 shortway coord correction mode.........................205 signal on/off...........................................................53 signal output options ...........................................239 signal plan ...........................................................236

378

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
signal plan transfer interval ........................ 236, 238 signal plans ......................................................... 228 pattern map .................................................... 229 signal plans menu ............................................... 235 signal system master........................................... 112 signal timing ....................................................... 183 signature file ................................................... 34, 35 simple eight phase dual ring database ................ 173 simple network management protocol ............... 363 simultaneous gap out .......................................... 128 simultaneous gap-out.......................................... 152 skills needed............................................................ 1 skip phase............................................................ 282 skipping............................................................... 270 slow flash .............................................................. 94 SNMP..............................................17, 48, 361, 363 community setting ........................................... 49 security............................................................. 49 SNMP manager............................................... 45, 47 soft recall ............................................131, 132, 152 software..................................................... 32, 38, 87 software update..................................................... 34 software version.................................................... 87 software version info ............................................ 32 software version number ...................................... 37 source phase.......................................................... 96 SP 67, 363 Spanish................................................................ 112 spare connector ................................................... 324 spare port .............................................................. 17 SPC ..................................................................... 149 special function..................................................... 14 special function outputs...................................... 149 special functions ................................................... 73 specifications ...................................................... 316 basic ................................................................... 8 SPL...................................................................... 363 split.............................................................. 143, 182 definition........................................................ 183 split balance recovery ......................................... 278 split modes .......................................................... 220 split plan.............................................................. 183 split table............................................................. 193 TSP ................................................................ 284 split table screens................................................ 143 split time ............................................................. 234 split type.............................................................. 234 splits TSP .................................................................. 85 splt no.................................................................. 143 SPP...................................................................... 363 SRAM ........................................................... 21, 316 ssh ....................................................................... 100 SSM .................................................................... 112 stalled CPU ......................................................... 308 standards ................................................................. 8 definition ........................................................... 1 standby mode...................................................... 142 start up flash ....................................................... 251 startup call ............................................................ 81 start-up configuration screen................................ 91 startup settings...................................................... 92 start-up timing ...................................................... 91 status controller status display................................... 65 coord ........................................................ 71, 224 coordination status screen ............................... 71 detectors status screens ................................... 76 inputs status screen.......................................... 68 MMU ............................................................... 80 outputs status display ...................................... 70 overlap status screen........................................ 80 preemption status screen ................................. 74 pretimed status display .................................... 67 SDLC............................................................... 77 short alarms ..................................................... 79 TOD status screen ........................................... 73 TSP ............................................................ 82, 86 voltage ........................................................... 288 status menu ..................................................... 61, 64 status screen.................................................... 56, 62 status screens ........................................................ 12 navigation ........................................................ 64 steady red during flash ....................................... 112 stop bit .................................................................. 16 stop bits................................................................. 99 stop time ............................................................... 78 stop time switch.................................................. 342 stop timing .......................................................... 316 storing a controller database on a USB thumbdrive300 subnet mask .......................................................... 51 super capacitor.................................................... 316 super capacitors .................................................... 21 switch-to phase screen........................................ 167 symbols used in the manual ................................... 4 sync pulses.......................................................... 186 synchronization methods.................................... 186 synchronous data link........................................... 16 synchronous data link control .............................. 77 system address.................................................... 100 system maintenance............................................ 308 system maintenance menu.................................. 172 system pattern..................................... 140, 142, 211 system port............................................................ 16 system TSP action plan ...................................... 274

T
t and f flash ........................................................... 79 T/F ...................................................................... 363 TBC .................................................................... 363 TBR ............................................................ 121, 122

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

379

Index
TCP/IP .......................................................... 17, 363 tech support ............................................................ 3 temperature range for LCD .................................. 11 temperature response of display........................... 28 term & facils ......................................................... 98 TF BIU map screens........................................... 108 thumb drive..................................................... 34, 35 thumb drives ......................................................... 15 TIC...................................................................... 363 time ..................................................................... 243 back-up ............................................................ 91 time B4 gap reduction ........................................ 121 time before reduction.......................................... 121 time diagnostics .................................................. 295 time of day action ............................................... 131 time of day action plans.......................................... 8 time of day actions ............................................. 147 time of day functions.......................................... 146 time reference point............................................ 363 time set screen .................................................... 154 time setting ........................................................... 22 time setup advanced ........................................................ 155 time sync requesting ...................................................... 112 time to reduce ..................................................... 122 timer on the screen light ....................................... 29 timezone.............................................................. 154 timing signals in a coordinated environment............ 183 start-up ............................................................. 91 timing logs .......................................................... 306 timing plan.......................................... 245, 247, 363 timing plan screen .............................................. 231 timing plan setup ................................................ 231 timing plan transfer interval ....................... 236, 238 timing plans ........................................................ 228 pattern map .................................................... 229 pretimed ................................................. 232, 233 timing status.......................................................... 65 timings ................................................................ 115 timings at startup .................................................. 92 TOD .................................................................... 363 TOD actions........................................................ 196 TOD commands.................................................. 147 TOD flash modes.................................................. 93 TOD menu .......................................................... 146 TOD plans menu................................................... 61 TOD programming to run coordination ............. 194 TOD status screen ................................................ 73 toggle between status and menus ......................... 62 top-down view of menus ...................................... 59 Toronto coord correction mode.......................... 206 Toronto correction .............................................. 141 Toronto offset correction method....................... 144 TP 67, 363 track clearance intervals......................................243 track clearance using pre-timed preemption.......244 track green .......................................... 169, 260, 264 track ph ....................................................... 169, 260 track phase.................................................. 261, 263 traffic engines..........................................................8 traffic responsive.................................................226 traffic responsive operation...................................91 trail green/yellow/red ..........................................134 trailing overlap ....................................................216 trailing values ......................................................134 transfer DB to controller from IQ Link ..............223 transfer interval .......................................... 236, 238 transit signal priority .............. 82, 86, 147, 266, 363 transitions between NEMA and interval-based ......9 transmit LEDs .......................................................10 TranSuite .............................................................100 troubleshooting....................................................309 TSP .................................................................311 trp 363 TS1 ..........................................................................1 TS2 ....................................................................1, 19 TS2 standard............................................................8 TS2 Type 2 ............................................................16 TS2/2 output..........................................................21 TSP ............................................................. 147, 363 action plans.....................................................277 configuration ..................................................271 copying ...........................................................175 definition ........................................................266 delay ...............................................................281 extend .............................................................281 extension modes .............................................276 inputs ................................................................82 menu ...............................................................273 methods ..........................................................270 overview .........................................................267 run parameters................................................275 split tables.......................................................284 status.................................................................72 troubleshooting...............................................311 TSP action plan .....................................................73 TSP enable...........................................................274 TSP output status...................................................85 TSP splits...............................................................85 TSP status..............................................................84 TSP status screens .......................................... 82, 86 TTR .....................................................................122 turning on the backlight ........................................29 tx 363 TX/RX ...................................................................10

U
unit events logging ..............................................306 unit min recall override .......................................152

380

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Index
unit parameters screen ........................................ 274 unit WRM override............................................. 152 universal time...................................................... 154 up button ............................................................... 13 updating firmware................................................. 34 updating the firmware......................................... 297 UPS ....................................................................... 17 UPS connector .................................................... 324 UPS log ............................................................... 301 US DOT .................................................................. 2 USB............................................................... 15, 363 distance limits ................................................ 326 specification................................................... 317 version............................................................ 326 USB connector.................................................... 326 USB diagnostics ................................................. 296 USB file system .................................................. 302 USB firmware install ............................................ 11 USB menu............................................... 15, 59, 299 USB port ............................................................... 34 USB ports.............................................................. 14 using the menu system.......................................... 62 USTC .................................................................. 363 USTC coord correciton mode............................. 206 USTC correction mode............................... 141, 144 USTC miscellaneous .......................................... 112 UTC time .............................................................. 24 utilities menu ....................................31, 57, 59, 288 utilization period................................................. 274 uv 363 version info........................................................... 32 vid ....................................................................... 326 viewing detector mapping .................................. 110 viewing logs ....................................................... 307 viewing main status screen................................... 62 vol det ................................................................. 164 voltage status ...................................................... 288 volume/occupancy logging ................................ 306

W
WALK ................................................................ 364 walk hold state.................................................... 127 walk rest.............................................................. 128 walk rest modifier....................................... 152, 364 walk rest state ..................................................... 127 walk time ............................................................ 137 walk timing......................................................... 118 walk timing state ................................................ 127 warning ................................................................... 4 watchdog............................................... 11, 316, 364 water intrusion...................................................... 10 web site................................................................... 3 where to find a data key ....................................... 20 wig wag preemption signals............................... 245 wig-wag flash ....................................................... 94 Windows components .......................................... 48 Windows install disks........................................... 45 wlk ext ................................................................ 284 wlk red ................................................................ 284 working with status displays ................................ 64 wrm....................................................................... 69 WRM .................................................. 128, 152, 364

V
VAC .................................................................... 363 variable density................................................... 121 variable density operation................................... 119 VDC .................................................................... 364 veh c...................................................................... 69 veh h...................................................................... 69 veh o...................................................................... 69 veh phs .................................................................. 96 vehclearfactor ..................................................... 213 vehicle detector options screens ......................... 163 vehicle detector timing screens .......................... 165 vehicle interval.................................................... 248 vehicle maximum ............................................... 131 vehicle minimum ................................................ 130 vehicle movement....................................... 244, 247 ventilation ............................................................. 10

Y
year ..................................................................... 154 year plan ............................................................. 146 yel lock ............................................................... 164 yellow clearance ................................................. 117 yellow flash channel............................................. 93 yes/no button ........................................................ 14 yes/no buttons....................................................... 30 yield point........................................................... 213

Z
zeugma................................................................ 364 zulu time ............................................................. 154

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

381

Index

382

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

Firmware Flow Chart

Figure 40 Top-down view of the ATC-1000 Menu System

ATC-1000 Advanced Traffic Controller

61