CPWF Proposal Development Workshop: Ganges Basin

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Ruvicyn Bayot, Martin van Brakel, Boru Douthwaite and Larry Harrington
CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food January 2011

This report is a documentation of the workshop process and outputs. The Challenge Program on Water and Food would like to acknowledge the workshop participants and the facilitators for the insights and inputs presented in this report. If you have any questions or need for clarification regarding this report, please email Dr. Boru Douthwaite, b.douthwaite@cgiar.org.

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CONTENTS
About CPWF Phase 2 .....................................................................................................................................................5 The CPWF Core Principles ..........................................................................................................................................5 Page | 3 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................................6 Workshop Objectives.....................................................................................................................................................6 Workshop Participants ..................................................................................................................................................7 Expectations of the Workshop ....................................................................................................................................15 Workshop Road Map ...................................................................................................................................................17 Introductions ...........................................................................................................................................................18 Welcome Remarks and Background Information ................................................................................................18 Project Presentations ..........................................................................................................................................19 Video Presentation ..............................................................................................................................................20 Identifying Opportunities ............................................................................................................................................21 Requirements for Contracting .....................................................................................................................................25 Site Selection ...............................................................................................................................................................27 Role of the Coordination Project .................................................................................................................................28 Bilateral Discussions ....................................................................................................................................................29 Topic Working Groups .................................................................................................................................................30 Communication Strategy for the Basin ........................................................................................................................30 Parking Lot ...................................................................................................................................................................31 Workshop Evaluation ..................................................................................................................................................32 Photos ..........................................................................................................................................................................34

FIGURE 1. EXPECTATIONS SET BY THE PARTICIPANTS ................................................................................................................15 FIGURE 2. WORKSHOP ROAD MAP ......................................................................................................................................17 FIGURE 4. CPWF PHASE 2 FOCUSES ON SIX RIVER BASINS ........................................................................................................18 FIGURE 3. LARRY HARRINGTON PRESENTING THE CHALLENGE PROGRAM ON WATER AND FOOD ......................................................18 FIGURE 6. TARGET AREA OF THE GANGES BDC R4DP .............................................................................................................19 FIGURE 5. BILL COLLIS WELCOMING THE PARTICIPANTS ON BEHALF OF THE WORLDFISH CENTER ......................................................19 FIGURE 7. PARTICIPANTS WORKING ON THE GIANT GANTT CHART ............................................................................................25 Page | 4 FIGURE 8. SITES SELECTED BY G2 ........................................................................................................................................27 FIGURE 9. CROSS BASIN LEARNING ......................................................................................................................................30 FIGURE 10. WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS (GROUP PHOTO) ........................................................................................................34 FIGURE 11. WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS (COLLAGE).................................................................................................................34

TABLE 1. EXPECTATIONS OF THE WORKSHOP ..........................................................................................................................15 TABLE 2. SUMMARY OF THE DISCUSSION FOLLOWING THE PROJECT PRESENTATIONS .....................................................................20 TABLE 3. G1 OPPORTUNITIES .............................................................................................................................................21 TABLE 4. G2 OPPORTUNITIES .............................................................................................................................................22 TABLE 5. G3 OPPORTUNITIES .............................................................................................................................................23 TABLE 6. G4 OPPORTUNITIES .............................................................................................................................................23 TABLE 7. G5 OPPORTUNITIES .............................................................................................................................................24 TABLE 8. SUMMARY OF THE DISCUSSION FOLLOWING THE PRESENTATION OF THE PROJECT OPPORTUNITIES .....................................24 TABLE 9. CRITERIA USED BY G2 FOR SELECTING THE PRIORITY SITES ..........................................................................................27 TABLE 10. ISSUES IDENTIFIED AND RESOLVED DURING THE WORKSHOP ........................................................................................31 TABLE 11. SUMMARY OF RESPONSES FROM THE WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS ................................................................................32

ABOUT CPWF PHASE 2
The CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF) works to increase the productivity of water for food and livelihoods in a manner that is environmentally sustainable, socially acceptable, and alleviates poverty for all disadvantaged groups. The First Phase of the CPWF ran from 2003-2008, while the Second Phase will run from 2009-2013. In its Second Phase the CPWF works in six river basins (Mekong, Ganges, Limpopo, Volta, Nile, and the Page | 5 Andean Basins System) in the developing world. More information about the CPWF can be obtained at

www.waterandfood.org.
Research in CPWF’s Phase II is designed to contribute to solving an important and pressing basin development challenge (BDC). Each BDC research challenge is made up of four to five projects of which one is a coordination project responsible for fostering learning across the BDC in support of innovation and adaptive management. The CPWF seeks to contribute to developmental outcomes and impact by ensuring quality of research and quality of process. We are explicit about the causal pathways, derived from experience and theory, by which we expect our research to lead to change. Research must be tied to a plausible causal pathway to be a priority. Research projects are expected to be proactive about moving along these pathways. We are also guided by core principles and seek to foster an evaluative culture that regularly questions assumed causal pathways, is self-critical, seeks to learn from experience and which adapts the program-of-work to emerging opportunities and threats.

THE CPWF CORE PRINCIPLES
CAPACITY BUILDING Making change happen often requires training, capacity building, changes in knowledge, attitudes and skills PARTNERSHIP Research won’t be relevant nor research outputs put into use without partnership INTERDISCIPLINARY INTEGRATION Real world problems are complex and multifaceted and unlikely to fall to single disciplinary research ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT Real world problems are complex and dynamic, goal post shift, opportunities emerge. Projects, BDCs and the Program must be able to learn and ‘fall forward’ – be intelligent GENDER We work to benefit women, youth, socially excluded ACCOUNTABILITY We are accountable to our ultimate beneficiaries, out stakeholders, our donors and each other

INTRODUCTION
The CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food, in coordination with the WorldFish Center Bangladesh and South Asia Office organized a proposal development workshop to facilitate the design of the five pre-determined project proposals that will help address the Ganges Basin Development Challenge. The Challenge is to reduce poverty and improve food security through improved water governance and management, and more productive Page | 6 and diversified agricultural-aquaculture systems for more resilient communities in the fresh-brackish water coastal zones of the Ganges delta. The framework of the research for development program that integrates these five projects were developed by an Expert Panel, composed of Dr. To Phuc Tuong, Dr. William Collis, Dr. Manoranjan Mondal, and the CPWF Management Team, in August 2010. The five projects are: PROJECT G1. RESOURCE PROFILES, EXTRAPOLATION DOMAINS AND LAND-USE PLANS PROJECT G2. RESILIENT INTENSIFIED AND DIVERSIFIED AGRICULTURE AND AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS PROJECT G3. WATER GOVERNANCE AND COMMUNITY-BASED MANAGEMENT PROJECT G4. ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF ANTICIPATED EXTERNAL DRIVERS OF CHANGE ON WATER RESOURCES OF THE COASTAL ZONE PROJECT G5. COORDINATION AND CHANGE-ENABLING PROJECT This was a four-day facilitated workshop that helped the participants think through the line of outputs, outcomes and impact. It has a combination of project concept presentations to set the scene; identifying what the projects will change, and how will these changes happen, and identifying risks and opportunities; and provision of guidance on completing the conditions and documents required for project contracting. It also provided time for the members within and among the project teams to exchange information and knowledge, and discuss partnerships, activities, and expectations of each other. The workshop was held at the Hotel Lake Castle, Dhaka, Bangladesh, from January 24 to 27, 2010. Boru Douthwaite served as the Main Facilitator, supported by Larry Harrington, Tonya Schuetz, and Michael Victor. Ruvicyn Bayot and Martin van Brakel were in charge of the workshop documentation.

WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES
The workshop was designed to: 1. have a common understanding of the overall BDC and its project components a. understand the roles separate projects will play and identify interdependencies with other projects have promoted integration between project teams, and developed a sense of belonging to the Ganges BDC and the CPWF

b.

c.

be inspired and motivated by the Ganges BDC and its contribution to the global CPWF program of work

2.

have discussed, explored and identified core project proposal components (including outcomes, outputs, activities, indicators, core approaches, partners) in line with the CPWF planning framework understand the CPWF contracting process and requirements, and be clear on next steps Page | 7

3.

WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS
PROJECT G1. RESOURCE PROFILES, EXTRAPOLATION DOMAINS AND LAND-USE PLANS ANDREW NELSON – Project Leader Scientist – Geographic Information Systems Specialist International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) a.nelson@cgiar.org

MD. MOQBUL HOSSAIN Senior Scientific Officer Data Processing and Statistical Section Soil Resource Development Institute (NARES) moqbul_h@yahoo.com

MD. ABDUL MALEK SARKER Executive Engineer Integrated Water Management Unit Local Government Engineering Department (GO) mamalek59@yahoo.com

MD. NAZMUL HASAN Chief Engineer Local Government Engineering Department (GO)

PROJECT G2. RESILIENT INTENSIFIED AND DIVERSIFIED AGRICULTURE AND AQUACULTURE SYSTEMS TO PHUC TUONG – Project Leader (also with G1) Principal Scientist International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) t.tuong@cgiar.org

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ABDELBAGI ISMAIL Senior Scientist International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) abdelbagi.ismail@cgiar.org

ELIZABETH HUMPHREYS Senior Scientist International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) e.humphreys@cgiar.org

BENOY KUMAR BARMAN Research Coordinator The WorldFish Center (CGIAR) b.barman@cgiar.org

M. RAFIQUL ISLAM Principal Scientific Officer Plant Breeding Division Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (NARES) mrishaon@yahoo.com

MD. JAHANGIR ALAM Chief Scientific Officer Mymensingh Freshwater Station Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute (NARES) alammj_bfri@yahoo.com Page | 9

BIMAL K. BANDYOPADHYAY Principal Scientist and OIC Canning Town Regional Research Station Central Soil Salinity Research Institute (NARES) bimalbkb@gmail.com

JITENDRA KUMAR SUNDARAY Principal Scientist and OIC Kakdwip Research Centre Central Institute of Brackishwater Aquaculture (NARES) jsundaray@gmail.com

MANORANJAN K. MONDAL (also with G3) Programme Head Agriculture and Food Security Programme BRAC (NGO) manoranjan.km@brac.net

HUMNATH BHANDARI – Guest Presenter Scientist International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) h.bhandari@cgiar.org

PROJECT G3. WATER GOVERNANCE AND COMMUNITY-BASED MANAGEMENT ADITI MUKHERJI – Project Leader Researcher International Water Management Institute (CGIAR) a.mukherji@cgiar.org

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BHARAT R. SHARMA (also with G4) Senior Researcher International Water Management Institute (CGIAR) b.sharma@cgar.org

NO PHOTO

M. ASADUZZAMAN Research Director Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (RO) asad@bids.org.bd A.K.M. ALAMGIR CHOWDHURY Director SocioConsult, Ltd (NGO) alamgirch@gmail.com

A.H.M. KAUSHER Chief Engineer – Hydrology Bangladesh Water Development Board (GO) engineerkausher@yahoo.com

PROJECT G4. ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF ANTICIPATED EXTERNAL DRIVERS OF CHANGE ON WATER RESOURCES OF THE COASTAL ZONE MD. ZAHIR UL-HAQUE KHAN – Project Leader Director Coast Port and Estuary Management Division Institute of Water Management (RO) zhk@iwmbd.org

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NO PHOTO

ABU SALEH KHAN Deputy Executive Director Institute of Water Management (RO) ask@iwmbd.org S.M. MAHBUBUR RAHMAN Director Water Resource Planning Division Institute of Water Management (RO) smr@iwmbd.org FARHANA AKHTER KAMAL Water Resources Management Specialist Institute of Water Management (RO) fal@iwmbd.org

NO PHOTO

MD. MOBASSARUL HASAN Research Officer Institute of Water Management (RO) mbh@iwmbd.org

ASAD HUSSAIN Assistant Professor Institute of Flood and Water Monitoring Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (RO) asadh@iwfm.buet.ac.bd Page | 12

MD. MAHFUZUR RAHMAN Excutive Engineer Bangladesh Water Development Board (GO) mmahfuz82@yahoo.com

PROJECT G5. COORDINATION AND CHANGE-ENABLING PROJECT WILLIAM COLLIS – Interim Project Leader Director Bangladesh and South Asia Office The WorldFish Center (CGIAR) w.collis@cgiar.org

NO PHOTO

PATRICK J. DUGAN Deputy Director General The WorldFish Center (CGIAR) p.dugan@cgiar.org CHARLES C. CRISSMAN Program Leader The WorldFish Center (CGIAR) c.crissman@cgiar.org

MICHAEL JOHN PHILLIPS Senior Scientist The WorldFish Center (CGIAR) m.phillips@cgiar.org Page | 13

M.A. HAMID MIAH Liaison Scientist, Bangladesh International Rice Research Institute (CGIAR) h.miah@irri.org

NUR AHAMED KHONDAKER National Research Grants Administrator Food and Agriculture Organization (UN) nur.khondaker@fao.org

CHALLENGE PROGRAM ON WATER AND FOOD LARRY W. HARRINGTON Research Director l.harrington@cgiar.org

BORU DOUTHWAITE Innovation and Impact Director b.douthwaite@cgiar.org

PAMELA GEORGE Program Manager p.george@cgiar.org

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TONYA SCHUETZ Information Manager t.schuetz@cgiar.org

MICHAEL VICTOR Communications Coordinator m.victor@cgiar.org

MARTIN VAN BRAKEL Researcher m.vanbrakel@cgiar.rog

RUVICYN S. BAYOT Innovation and Impact Assistant r.bayot@cgiar.org

EXPECTATIONS OF THE WORKSHOP
Boru Douthwaite and Michael Victor facilitated the expectations setting by asking the participants to choose a partner and ask each other the following questions: • • • How can we make this workshop work? What are the possible “traps”? What is keeping us up at night? Page | 15

Figure 1. Expectations set by the participants

Table 1. Expectations of the workshop

How can we make this work?

Clear research objectives identified priorities

and

Good partnership

• • •

Commitment

What are the traps?

Imbalance views

• • • • • • • • •

Impracticality

• •

Identify core challenges in the target areas by consulting with people who have experienced working in the sites. Identify the proper technologies and solutions to the core challenges Identify key project partners Identify key people who would work on the proposal Interaction and information sharing within and across groups Respect each other’s views Full participation Focus on priorities Time management Disrespect for other’s opinions Domination by few individuals Imposing views on others Sticking too much on own organization Narrow and specific disciplinebased thinking Ambitious planning and wishful thinking Too much details and side thinking

Loss of focus

• • •

What is keeping us up at night?

Making it happen

• • • • Deadline • •

Reinventing the wheel Unclear assignment Moving too fast to finalizing the proposal without understanding the process How to make people work together and avoid conflict Page | 16 between people, and between institutions Proper project planning Ensure participatory activities Consciousness about environmental issues Hazardous conditions in the field How to finish the documents by Feb. 28 G1 requires data sharing and IPR agreements across multiple agencies

WORKSHOP ROAD MAP
Boru Douthwaite presented to the participants the workshop road map. It includes an iterative process that promotes the integration of the project design to the overall program design, and how the program affects the planning of the activities within the project.

INTRODUCTIONS
Workshop CPWF BDC each other BDC Projects

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PROJECT DESIGN
Opportunities for BDC projects Common Vision Research to outcome pathways

PROGRAM DESIGN
Site selection Project Role of coordination project

interdependencies

NEXT STEPS, CLOSURE
Open space Action plans Contracting Evaluation

Figure 2. Workshop Road Map

INTRODUCTIONS WELCOME REMARKS AND BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Dr. Larry Harrington welcomed the participants on behalf of the Challenge Program on Water and Food contingent. He explained briefly to the group that CPWF is a research for development program that aims to increase the resilience of social and ecological systems through better water management for food production. The CPWF focuses its efforts on six river basins (i.e., Andes, Nile, Volta, Limpopo, Mekong and Ganges). The research program in each river basin addresses a basin development challenge that was identified through various stakeholders’ consultations.
Figure 3. Larry Harrington presenting the Challenge Program on Water and Food

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Figure 4. CPWF Phase 2 focuses on six river basins

Larry also informed the group that CPWF encourages cross-basin learning through the following Topic Working Groups: • • • • • Multiple uses Resilience Learning to Innovate Global drivers Others (to be identified)

Slides: The Challenge Program on Water and Food: Current Status and Future Directions

On behalf of The WorldFish Center group, Dr. William “Bill” Collis welcomed the participants. Bill explained that the research for development program that addresses the Ganges development challenge will be conducted within the polders of coastal Bangladesh. It will also conduct work in salt-affected areas in India, for comparison. Page | 19

Figure 5. Bill Collis welcoming the participants on behalf of the WorldFish Center

Figure 6. Target area of the Ganges BDC R4DP

PROJECT PRESENTATIONS
The Project Leaders each gave a 15 minute presentation showing their proposed project activities. The intention is to present to the group the concept that came with their approved Expressions of Interest. They also presented how they intend to link with the other projects, and with institutions outside of the Ganges program. Detailed background information: Ganges BDC Research Slides: G1: Resource profiles, extrapolation domains and land use plans – presented by A. Nelson Slides: G2: Resilient intensified and diversified agriculture and aquaculture systems – presented by A. Ismail Slides: G3: Water governance and community-based management – presented by A. Mukherji Slides: G4: Assessment of the impact of anticipated external drivers – presented by Z.H. Khan Slides: G5: Coordination and change-enabling project - presented by N. Khondaker and M. Phillips Slides: Tracking changes in rural poverty in Bangladesh: a project overview – presented by H. Bhandari

Table 2. Summary of the Discussion Following the Project Presentations Project G1 Comments G1 will only work in Bangladesh. polder system in India. There is no Suggestions Consider also the information that is already available in India Link with other institutions (e.g. CEGIS, WARPO) that have spatial information and other Page | 20 databases. G5 will help in getting the contact people.

G2

Sequence and logic of project; successive approximation No data sharing policy for SDI (spatial data infrastructure) The coastal area of Bangladesh has the weakest market in the region.

Consider incorporating a module for market analysis in the project. Work with G3 to include water use strategies Consider the learning from PN 35 on community participation Incorporate upscaling strategies Work with G4 to identify opportunities for saline water use. Enhance research and extension linkages

G3

Governance + maintenance How are learning alliances linked to G5? What are the roles and responsibilities? Work with G4 on policy for water management in Bangladesh and India Work with G5 to increase external partners Coordinate with the CSISA project. They have done surveys on gender.

G4

G5

Gender issues have to be understood (men, women, caste, religion) Have you considered upstream groundwater use? Scope for aligning/ coordinating analysis with the Nile No notes

VIDEO PRESENTATION
Two videos were presented by the Bangladesh Water Development Board. One was presented on Day 1 and the second video was presented on Day 4. The videos provided insights about polder management, community participation, and gender issues. Both videos can be viewed from The Water Channel website Video: Partnership in Practice Video: Awakening Hope

IDENTIFYING OPPORTUNITIES
Boru Douthwaite gave a presentation on conceptualizing projects on an impact perspective showing how the projects can influence change. He also showed the pathway of impact, beginning from activities and outputs; the actors; and the scaling up and out process. This short lecture helped the participants understand the logic of showing the impact pathways using the Outcome Logic Model. Slides: Ganges Agenda Day 1 and 2 – presented by Boru Douthwaite Table 3. G1 Opportunities Actor(s) Local Government Extension Services G1, G2, G3. G5 Opportunity(ies) Support technological adoption Role(s) of Research Characterization of test sites Methods to extrapolate domains (niche modeling) Output(s)/ Outcome(s) Higher likelihood of success of adoption Better targeting of technology options Location(s) Project polders Risk(s) and Assumption(s) Quality of input data is sufficient Timely information on test sites available (G2, G3) Cooperation with G1 partners to obtain data for extrapolation Cooperation with G1 partners to obtain data for extrapolation Timely information on scenarios available (G4) Quality of input data is sufficient Non adoption of land use information

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Local Government G1, G4, G5

Support improved land use planning

Methods to derive future land use scenarios (comparative land use models)

Awareness of improved land use options Better decision making

Project polders

Table 4. G2 Opportunities Actor(s) Farmers Opportunity(ies) Farmers’ participatory cage fish culture in canals Access to canals Role(s) of Research Adaptive research to refine technologies for coastal areas Institutional and technical issues Output(s)/ Outcome(s) Guidelines of the technology and the know how Knowledge and strategies of mutual benefits Policy support Communication of the benefits Effective system, knowledge and varieties Areas where sufficient water resources can be developed Location(s) Areas with water depth of 0.5 to 1.5m for 1.5 to 3 months Areas with water depth of 0.5 to 1.5 m for 1.5 to 3 months Same as above Risk(s) and Assumption(s) Availability of inputs (fingerlings, fry, feed, cage material, market) Sufficient area for application (may not apply in India but more in Bangladesh) Marketing channels are available Manpower and equipment are also available for timely operation

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Canal managers Lease holders Department of Fisheries

Extension and capacity building Support to policy Farmers practicing ricerice-non-rice (triple cropping)

Demonstrate the benefits

Farmers

Department of agriculture Ministry of agriculture

Extension and capacity building Extension, capacity building, resources

Develop the system, suitable crops and varieties, freshwater resources availability Demonstrate the benefits and feasibility Establish the benefits, feasibility, resilience, environmental issues

Communicating research output to DAE Communicating research output to DAE and other policy makers

Areas where sufficient water resources can be developed Same as above

Table 5. G3 Opportunities Actor(s) Farmers Fishermen Laborers Livestock All communities Opportunity(ies) Increased production, income, employment, better road access, better education Better polder management Role(s) of Research Ascertain positive and negative and equity impacts of different governance models Identifying what works and what does not Identifying what works and what does not Output(s)/ Outcome(s) Better livelihood opportunities Location(s) Polder level Risk(s) and Assumption(s) Natural disasters Government decisions Page | 23

WMOs BWDB LGED (Local offices) GoB BWDB

Better functioning WMOs Better return on investments

Several polders

Natural disasters Government decisions Political compulsions

Whether their investment works

National level

Table 6. G4 Opportunities Actor(s) Researchers Academics NGOs Opportunity(ies) New database New methodology and scenarios of external drivers and climate change Scenarios and impacts Role(s) of Research Develop database and methodologies Output(s)/ Outcome(s) Database improve and modeling exercises Location(s) Whole project area and polder level Risk(s) and Assumption(s) Uncertainty in input data and outputs

BWDB LGED DAE DMB MoWR MoEF MoA C.C. Cell

Assessment and quantifying impacts Development of climate resilient management plan

Temporal and spatial impacts

Whole project area and polder level Coastal area of Bangladesh

Impacts of climate change and external drivers, targeted investment, advocacy to the donors

Climate resilient management plan

Uncertainty of impacts, confidence of the government in the results Limited time for implementation, availability of resources

Table 7. G5 Opportunities Actor(s) G1, G2, G3, G4 Opportunity(ies) Add value to their work in ways that increase development outcomes Disposition of government to respond to well presented solutions Role(s) of Research Develop/ adapt and implement processes to harvest key learning and innovations from projects Demonstrate value of integrated solutions (G1 to G4) to achieving progress Tease out policy implications and strategies from research Output(s)/ Outcome(s) Knowledge sharing Products and systems in place and used Location(s) Within project teams Risk(s) and Assumption(s) Lack of well structured incentives to cooperate Natural disasters Government fora Natural disasters

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Government

Knowledge products, policy briefs, interventions that work with policy makers Products that create visibility of project outputs to government and development actors Demonstrated approaches for scaling out effectively in specific conditions of focal hubs

Other development actors

Actors making large scale investment in similar locations

Test strategies for scaling out with other development actors

Project sites

Research products in appropriate

Table 8. Summary of the Discussion Following the Presentation of the Project Opportunities Project G1 How to deal with non-adoption Real exchange of input/output data between G1 and G2/ G3 How can G5 help in wider dissemination? Comments Suggestions Build in communication proposal in OLM Clarify information needs with G2/ G3/ G5

G2 What about crops other than rice?

G3

Adaptive management – high levels of uncertainty

Consider conflict in land use planning (what do we mean by LUP in the context of water governance?) Consider risk dimension in LUP Invest in communication to influence behavior CSISA-G2 need to link up to diversify (include other crops_ Consider market pull rather than being crop driven Be explicit about disaster risk mitigation

Project

Comments User driven approach

Suggestions Consider conditions at polder level

G4

Sensitization of information Anticipate future impacts; G1/ G2/ G3 should be the target groups to think about future impacts Page | 25

G5

M&E and reporting is missing Knowledge repository Leadership Be more explicit on the strategies for systematic partner commitment. Each project is responsible. G5 will provide help and support.

REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTRACTING
Boru Douthwaite and Tonya Schuetz explained about the EOI process, the timeline, and the requirements for contracting. Boru explained that the CPWF chose the EOI process to commission research, based on what we have learned. The same process was done in the Volta and Limpopo. The Proposal format and the Workbook template were shown and explained to the participants. All contracting templates can be found in the CPWF Online Handbook. After lunch, the participants were asked to work on a giant Gantt chart showing the events and outputs of all the projects.

Figure 7. Participants Working on the Giant Gantt Chart

Document: Proposal Format Document: Workbook Template Document: Giant Gantt Chart

Timeline: 24-30 September 2009 12-14 August 2010 October 2010 29 November 2010 17 December 2010 24-27 January 2011 28 February 2011 March 2011 March-April 2011 April-May 2011 Ganges Stakeholder Consultation Design of the Ganges BDC by the Expert Panel Invitations for EOIs sent to lead organizations Deadline for submission of EOIs to CPWF management team (CPMT) Decisions and comments on EOIs sent to lead organizations Ganges Proposal Development Workshop Deadline for project proposals to be submitted for external review External review and feedback Project documents modified and finalized Projects contracted

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SITE SELECTION
Site selection was delegated to projects G2 and G3 being the two projects that will conduct field work and surveys. Dr. Abdel Ismail, on behalf of G2, presented their target sites and the justification for selecting the sites Page | 27

Figure 8. Sites selected by G2

Legend:

Priority sites

Alternative site

Sites in India

Table 9. Criteria Used by G2 for Selecting the Priority Sites Polder 3 (Kaligonj, Shatkira) High Salinity Polder 30 (Batiaghata, Khulna) ~4500ha Medium to high salinity (entire Barisal division will be similar in the future) Low cropping intensity (~140%) Potential for triple cropping Potential for fish in wet season rice Potential for cage culture in canals in Aman and part of Boro season Long-term historical household survey data is available Accessible Polder 43/2F (Patuakhali,Barisal) or Polder 39-1 (Barguna, Barisal) Medium salinity

Mostly one crop per year (rice, sometimes rice + shrimp) Potential for rice + fish-shrimp Potential for increasing rice productivity (now local variety) Potential for increasing shrimp productivity in the dry season Long-term historical household survey data is available Moderately accessible

Low cropping intensity (~150%) Potential for triple cropping, including fish with Aman rice Potential for increasing rice productivity (now local variety) Will choose the one with long term historical data after verification Accessible

Polder 3 (Kaligonj, Shatkira) No water management group in place Not much done there so far

Polder 30 (Batiaghata, Khulna) ~4500ha Water management group in place The team is familiar with the polder

Polder 43/2F (Patuakhali,Barisal) or Polder 39-1 (Barguna, Barisal) No water management group in place Not much done there so far Page | 28

G3 also plan to work in Polder 3 and Polder 30. The two teams will further discuss to select the third site.

ROLE OF THE COORDINATION PROJECT
The facilitators asked the participants to write in cards the three most important expectations from the Coordination and Change Project (G5). The G5 team will reply: “YES”, if they agree that those activities should be done by G5; “MAYBE”, if there’s a possibility that G5 can help, but should not necessarily be responsible for the activity; and “NO”, if they think it shouldn’t be done by them. Likewise, G5 wrote in cards their expectations of the other project teams (G1 to G4)

Box 1. Expectations of G5 YES Facilitation and Coordination • G1: Facilitation: entry points, key contacts for data for G1 • G1: Coordinating with projects on site visits • G1: Realistic lead times on requests • G3: Logistical support and facilitation (organize dates, logistics may be handled by the projects) • G4: Organizing and facilitating interaction meetings with G1, G2, G3 Consultation • G1: Consultation: Consultation with projects on key BDC decision making Communication and Knowledge Sharing rd • G1: Output delivery: Consensus building with 3 partner on G1 outputs • G1: Dissemination of G1 outputs (extrapolation domains, land use pans) • G2: Linkages and information exchange among projects through annual meetings and other means • G2: Champion the Ganges Basin and facilitate exchange of knowledge across basins Uptake of Research Outputs • G2: Influence policy to ensure uptake and outscaling • G2: Undertake socio-economic and impact/ monitoring across projects for over-all evaluation of the program • G3: Synthesize findings from G1-G4 and communicate to communities (Agreed communication strategy coordinated by G5) • G3: Use socio-economic analysis of good water governance to encourage further investments • G3: Promote conclusion from G3 project on water governance • G4: Upscaling and scaling out of G4 outputs • G4: Workshop for finalizing external drivers (help set up the workshop and the methodology) MAYBE • G2: Facilitate cross-country interactions including tours

Box 2. Expectations of G1, G2, G3 and G4 • Participation in the design and implementation of participatory M&E system • Engage common communication strategy • Earlier delivery of knowledge products (before end of year 2) • Designated locally based person to participate in monthly/ bi-monthly management meetings • Commitment to adaptive management practices and process

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BILATERAL DISCUSSIONS
The bilateral discussions activity is a special time given to the project groups to ask questions, discuss, and seek clarifications regarding things that concern both discussing parties. The groups were given 20 minutes for each round. Schedule: First round Second round Third round Fourth round Fifth round G1 x G2 G1 x G3 G1 x G4 G1 x G5 G1 x CPWF G3 x G5 G2 x CPWF G2 x G3 G2 X G3 G2 X G5 G4 x CPWF G4 x G5 G5 x CPWF G3 x CPWF G3 X G4

Box 3. Topics/ Issues raised during the discussions of the project teams with the CPWF • Linkages and communication with the project teams in the other basins are through the Topic Working Groups and the International Forum on Water and Food • Project teams will report through the Basin Leader every six months. The BL will give the recommendation to the CPWF Management Team on the acceptability of the outputs and report that will influence the tranche of payment. • The Management Team will have its parallel monitoring of the projects through project site visits twice a year. These visits should be carefully planned with the project teams. • The total budget for the project teams has been set. The budget details and allocation to partners will be discussed and decided upon within the team. • Financial report that would go with the six monthly report need not be audited. It should be signed by the Chief Finance Officer. • The project teams could get research students to do the project activities. This is a capacity building strategy. • G5 will be involve in the Innovation Research. • CPWF will assist in setting up websites and web-based information exchange platforms. • CPWF will assist the projects in requesting for open access to published journal articles • G5 to consider forming a steering committee composed of government officials that could help in the scaling out of project activities and outputs.

TOPIC WORKING GROUPS
Larry Harrington provided the group with an overview of the CPWF Topic Working Groups. The Topic Working Group are community of people sharing interest on a topic. It has a mechanism for cross basin learning. It contributes key messages at the program and global level. Page | 30

Figure 9. Cross Basin Learning

The Topic Working Groups are led by Topic Leaders. They have their own budget to implement activities across basins. The existing Topic Working Groups are: • • • • • Multiple uses Resilience – led by Line Gordon and Elin Enfors from the Stockholm Resilience Center Learning to Innovate – coordinated by Boru Douthwaite (this involves the Basin Leaders) Global drivers – led by Simon Cook Others (to be identified)

COMMUNICATION STRATEGY FOR THE BASIN
Michael Victor, CPWF Communications Coordinator, discussed with the group the approach and the communication principles that the CPWF is following. Communication and communication products should be focused on who do we affect by the change, and on how it will facilitate change. The CPWF would like to have a niche on communication for development and policy advocacy. Michael also emphasized to the group that the CPWF also provides communication services or support to facilitate information exchange and team building. Slides: Everyone is a communicator: CPWF information and communication services and strategic framework – presented by Michael Victor

PARKING LOT
Table 10. Issues identified and resolved during the workshop Issues Deadline for proposal submission Budget allocation in/out of basin Are the worksheets in the Project Workbooks linked? Reflection Workshops Resolutions (Boru please check this section carefully) Proposals should be submitted on or before February Page | 31 28, 2011 At least 35% of the total project going to partners based in the basin budget should be used in the basin No Should coincide with times when research results are in and planning for the next season is needed (April before the Reflection / Annual Meeting) Report should be finalized after the Reflection Workshop Projects will submit the reports to the Basin Leader and the basin Leader will recommend the release of payment to the Management Team Projects will report every six months, with annual reports due April and six-monthly ones due October. The BDC Inception Meeting will be held in May this year Will be tackled by G4 and the Global Drivers Topic Working Group (TWG) Will be tackled by G5 and the Management Team Will be tackled by G2, G3 and G5. CSISA covers the whole BDC area Will be tackled by G3 and G5 Will be tackled by G2, G3, G4 and G5, being mindful that successful intensification and diversification will need to respond to market demands – market pull, not production push Sites represent a range of salinity levels, where higher salinity levels are more favorable to shrimp, G1 may be needed on targeting, note shrimp research would focus on smallholders not large commercial enterprises Was taken into account in Site Selection discussion Will be tackled by G3 and G5 The program would not be responsible for major polder rehabilitations, but we may (through G5) coordinate with the responsible agencies through policy recommendations supported by our research results. Site selection will take account of a range of polder conditions, some rehabilitated, some not G2 will work in India Projects have considered these linkages

Reporting schedule as affected by payment

Linkages between projects and global issues (e.g., climate change) Link to CRP5, CRP3, CRP1.3 Link with CSISA Linkages to other partners for development services (roads, markets) Markets, value chains and real opportunities for farmers

How does shrimp production fit in?

Design criteria for aquaculture site selection Conflict resolution between crop and fish farmers Do we need major investment in polder rehabilitation before projects?

G1 presence in India Place of India in the projects G1 x G4 data management coordination G2 X G3 site selection G1 x G5 roles in scaling up and out

Gender mainstreaming

Need for fast synthesis of current context Phrasing of goal statement add “food security”

On the agenda in the Workshop; the responsibility of G5 to help ensure it happens in the Ganges BDC Program No need identified Goal rephrased by the project leaders Page | 32

WORKSHOP EVALUATION
Table 11. Summary of Responses from the Workshop Participants

What are the good ideas that you are taking home with you?
• Outcome Logic Model (OLM)

• •



• • •

Communication Strategy (2x) Bilateral Discussions (2x) Giant Gantt Chart (2x)

Parking Lot (3x)

• Participatory approach in proposal development (7x)

The degree of preparation of research support infrastructure needed to create an integrated program Method and thinking process that would help in the development of CRPs Discussion on research needs and solutions: “bird’s eye view vs. detailed case study”

• • •

Has a very strong platform that would benefit the poor and vulnerable people in the coastal delta; opportunity to create an impact (3x)

Clarity of roles in the CPWF management All projects agreed on working in Khulna International Forum on Water and Food

What do you like most about the workshop?

Appreciation of the Ganges Basin Development Challenges

• Team Building; working together within and across projects; participatory project planning and site selection (giant Gantt chart)(15x)
• • • •

Learning Outcome Logic Model (OLM) (2x)

• Workshop facilitation (4x)
Transparency of the CPWF team Availability of documentation

Learning a new method of proposal development; learning the thinking process (5x)

Overall workshop organization (5x)

What are the issues that still need to be solved?
• Basin Leadership (G3 and G4)


Coordination and Change Project Clarity (G3 and G4) (2x) Who will do the socio-economic aspects of the Ganges BDC program? (G2) (2x)
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• • • • • • • •

Need more information on how G5 will coordinate the communication aspect of the program (G3) Support from the various government departments like LGED (G1) How will we establish and strengthen linkages – water vs. fish, water vs. other crops? (G5) How will we develop a strategy to sustain the project after its completion? (G5) Capitalizing on CSISA for technology dissemination (G2) How do we address resilience issues in the Ganges BDC program? (G5) Schedule of report submission, annual reflection workshop and release of funds (could be adjusted to the cropping season) (G2) Involvement of India in the other projects (G2) Format for proposal budget breakdown (G4)

What could we have done better?

• • • • •

• Provided more time and more focused discussion on the actual research project; more time on proposal development (what the facilitators could have done is to assign a CPWF staff to each project to assist in the process) (11x)
• • • • •

Discussed data sharing protocols/ strategy (G1) Discussed gender issues (G5) Discussed technology adoption (G4) Discussed/ worked on the budget allocation/ budget breakdown (G2) Encourage more women participant (G2)

Provided ample time for discussion between the project teams and the CPWF team (G2) Provided the program before the workshop to have ample time for the project teams to prepare (G4) Provided more information about the CPWF’s previous activities before the workshop (G4) Provided more information on how the projects were identified and selected (G4)

Provided bigger work space (2x)

Reduced the duration of the workshop (G4)

PHOTOS

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Figure 10. Workshop Participants (Group Photo)

Figure 11. Workshop Participants (Collage)

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