RESTAURANT WEEK

New Mexico

2011

T H E S A N TA F E N E W M E X I C A N • W W W. S A N TA F E N E W M E X I C A N . C O M

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Restaurant Week

Restaurant Week

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CHOOSE YOUR APPETIZER CHOOSE YOUR ENTRÉE CHOOSE YOUR DESSERT
What’s your pleasure? Hot tortilla soup, smoked pork carne adovada nachos, prairie sage rabbit pasta, ancho-peach BBQ glazed baby back ribs, and for dessert, a crème brulee du jour or a green apple crisp. These are just a few culinary selections that await. Book now at 505.819.2056.

T C D DINNER - $20
March 6 - 13

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Restaurant Week

505.819.2056 | buffalothunderresort.com

COVER PHOTO

Kitty Leaken Luminaria at The Inn and Spa at Loretto Deborah Villa
COVER DESIGN

Robin Martin Ginny Sohn Rob Dean

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

MANAGING EDITOR

RESTAURANT WEEK
P U B L I S H E D F E B R U A RY 2 4 , 2 0 1 1

New Mexico

FEBRUARY 20

MARCH 20, 2011

Magazine editor Inez Russell 986-3093, irussell@sfnewmexican.com Magazine art director Deborah Villa 986-3027, dvilla@sfnewmexican.com Copy editing Kristie Jones and Rosemary Jackson Director of photography Clyde Mueller
ADVERTISING

EDITORIAL

2011 Sponsors NEW MEXICO RESTAURANT WEEK

Advertising director Joe Vigil, 986-3007 Marketing, design and production agency manager David Del Mauro, 995-3862 Advertising layout Christine Huffman, 995-3864
GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Albuquerque, Las Cruces, Santa Fe & Taos Southern Wine & Spirits New Mexico Tourism Department New Mexico Rail Runner Express Open Table Sysco SouthwestRestaurants.com Albuquerque, Santa Fe & Taos Marble Brewing Company Devine Limousine JANE PHILLIPS Albuquerque & Santa Fe The Santa Fe New Mexican Local IQ Edible Santa Fe American General Media Albuquerque & Las Cruces Su Casa Magazine Albuquerque Citadel Broadcasting Corporation The Santa Fe New Mexican Las Cruces Las Cruces Bulletin Santa Fe & Taos Santa Fean Santa Fe Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta Hutton Broadcasting Santa Fe Restaurant Association Localflavor The Printers & The Copy Center Taos The Taos News DMC Broadcasting

Dale Deforest, Enrique Figueredo, Scott Fowler, Elspeth Hilbert, Bill Jacobi Michael Brendel, 995-3825 Gary Brouse, 995-3861 Cristina Iverson, 995-3830 Alex J. Martinez, 995-3841 Jan Montoya, 995-3838 Vincent Torres, 995-3835 Art Trujillo, 995-3820 Rick Wiegers, 995-3840 David Wilkinson, 995-3852 Jim Keyes, 995-3819
SYSTEMS ONLINE SALES MANAGER RETAIL ADVERTISING SALES

What’s inside
66 Who’s in: Taos, Santa Fe and Albuquerque 69 New Mexico Restaurant Week expands statewide. 13 Special events spice up dining celebration. 14 Events schedule 16 Eating local boosts the economy. 20 Restaurant Week heads north.

Technology director Michael Campbell
PRODUCTION

Operations director Al Waldron Assistant production director Tim Cramer Prepress manager Dan Gomez Press manager Larry Quintana Packaging manager Brian Schultz
WEB

Web editor Henry M. Lopez www.santafenewmexican.com
ADDRESS

Office: 202 E. Marcy St. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday Advertising information: 505-986-3082 Delivery: 505-984-0363, 800-873-3372 For copies of the magazine: 505-490-0316

Restaurant Week

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PA R T I C I PAT I N G R E S TA U R A N T S
Restaurants were still being added at the time this went to press. Check newmexicorestaurantweek. com for updated information. 125 E. Palace Ave., 988-9232 At La Fonda Hotel 100 E. San Francisco St., 982-5511 at The Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7915 217 Johnson St., 946-1065 50 Lincoln Ave., 983-8687
OSTERIA D’ASSISI ORE HOUSE AT MILAGRO O’KEEFFE CAFÉ LUMINARIA LA PLAZUELA LA CASA SENA

N E W M E X I CO R E S TAU R A N T W E E K

TAOS
$40 per person
at El Monte Sagrado Resort & Spa 317 Kit Carson Road, 575-758-3502 470 State Hwy 150, 575-776-3333 101 Stakeout Drive, Ranchos de Taos, 575-758-2042 at the Edelweiss Lodge & Spa 106 Sutton Place Taos Ski Valley, NM, 575-737-6900 48 N. Angel Fire Road, Angel Fire 575-377-0636
THE ROASTED CLOVE THE BLONDE BEAR TAVERN La Plazuela at La Fonda Hotel, Santa Fe
KIM KURIAN

DE LA TIERRA

SABROSO

STAKEOUT RESTAURANT

58 S. Federal Place, 986-5858 526 Galisteo St., 820-0919 548 Agua Fria St., 982-8608
SAN FRANCISCO STREET BAR & GRILL RISTRA RESTAURANT MARTÍN

125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte 575-758-1977
THE GORGE BAR & GRILL

DOC MARTIN’S RESTAURANT

653 Canyon Road, 982-4353

THE COMPOUND

$30 per person
221 Shelby St., 988-2355 at Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 955-7805 at the Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi 113 Washington Ave., 988-3030 500 Sandoval St. 989-1730 3347 Cerrillos Road 473-2800
COWGIRL BBQ EL FAROL CASTLE RANCH STEAKHOUSE CAFÉ CAFÉ ANASAZI RESTAURANT AMAYA AMAVI RESTAURANT

50 E. San Francisco St., 982-2044 187 Paseo de Peralta, 982-3033 3462 Zafarano Drive, 471-6800 321 Johnson St., 982-9708 at the Eldorado Hotel 309 W. San Francisco St., 995-4530 434 W. San Francisco St., 982-9966
VANESSIE OF SANTA FE THE OLD HOUSE SHOHKO CAFÉ SANTA FE CAPITOL GRILL SANTA FE BAR & GRILL

$30 per person
1014 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur 575-737-0410 1017 Paseo del Pueblo Norte 575-751-3337 106 Paseo del Pueblo Norte 575-751-1350 Resort Country Club 1 Country Club Drive, Angel Fire 575-377-3055 at Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa 50 Los Baños Drive, Ojo Caliente 505-583-2233
THE ARTESIAN RESTAURANT STONEWOOD at the Angel Fire GRAHAM’S GRILLE EL MEZE CHEF DAMON’S

103 East Plaza, 575-758-8866

Lodging Partners
EL MONTE SAGRADO RESORT & SPA

317 Kit Carson Road 575-758-3502

125 Paseo del Pueblo Norte 575-758-2233

THE HISTORIC TAOS INN

SANTA FE
$40 per person
132 W. Water St., 983-1615 724 Canyon Road, 982-1500
IL PIATTO ITALIAN FARMHOUSE KITCHEN & ENOTECA GERONIMO COYOTE CAFÉ

319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 808 Canyon Road 983-9912 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 416 Agua Fria St., 988-5991 at La Posada de Santa Fe 330 East Palace Ave., 986-0000 227 Galisteo St. 982-3700
GALISTEO BISTRO El Monte Sagrado’s De La Tierra Restaurant, Taos
MICHAEL NELSON

$25 per couple
125 Paseo Del Pueblo Norte 575-758-2233
THE ADOBE BAR

EL MESON

95 W. Marcy St. 984-1091 72 W. Marcy St. 982-3433
LA BOCA

EPAZOTE FUEGO!

$20 per person
122 Doña Luz, 575-751-4800
ANTONIO’S

at Encantado Resort 198 State Road 592 946-5800

TERRA

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Restaurant Week

PA R T I C I PAT I N G R E S TA U R A N T S
709 Don Cubero Alley, 820-9205
VINAIGRETTE

N E W M E X I CO R E S TAU R A N T W E E K
HOTEL ST. FRANCIS

201 Don Gaspar Ave., 983-5700 113 Washington Ave. 988-3030 725 Cerrillos Road 866-433-0335
SANTA FE SAGE INN ROSEWOOD INN OF THE ANASAZI

$25 per couple
133 W. Water St., 984-1800 4056 Cerrillos Road, 438-1800 229 Galisteo St., 820-2253 204 North Guadalupe St., 982-8474 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 60 E. San Francisco St., 984-0008 114 W. San Francisco St. 982-4335
SLEEPING DOG TAVERN Zinc Wine Bar & Bistro, Albuquerque TABLA DE LOS SANTOS
COURTESY

5021 Pan American West Fwy 505-344-9169
PRAIRIE STAR RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

NICK & JIMMY’S

BLUE CORN CAFÉ

BLUE CORN CAFÉ & BREWERY LOUIE’S CORNER CAFÉ PIZZERIA DA LINO

288 Prairie Star Road Santa Ana Pueblo 505-867-3327
SAVOY BAR & GRILL

211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 988-5531

THE INN AND SPA AT LORETTO

10601 Montgomery Blvd. N.E. 505-294-9463 3500 Central Ave. S.E. 505-255-8781 2031 Mountain Road N.W. 505-766-5100 901 Rio Grande Blvd. N.W. 505-243-9916 3109 Central Ave. N.E. 505-268-9250
SEASONS ROTISSERIE & GRILL SCALO

ALBUQUERQUE
$40 per person
2201 Q St., Suite B 505-837-2467
MARCELLO’S CHOP HOUSE

PRANZO ITALIAN GRILL ROOFTOP PIZZERIA

ST. CLAIR WINERY & BISTRO

$30 per person
424 Central Ave. S.E., 505-243-0200 221 Highway 165 Suite L Placitas 505-771-0695 3001 Central Ave. N.E. 505-254-7644
BRASSERIE LA PROVENCE BLADE’S BISTRO ARTICHOKE CAFE

$20 per person
315 RESTAURANT AND WINE BAR

210 Don Gaspar Ave. 983-5700

YANNI’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

315 Old Santa Fe Trail 986-9190
ANDIAMO!

138 Tesuque Village Road 988-8848 311 Old Santa Fe Trail 984-8500 326 S. Guadalupe St. 988-7008
ZIA DINER ZE FRENCH BISTRO

TESUQUE VILLAGE MARKET

4800 Montgomery Blvd. N.E. 505-878-9327 3009 Central Ave. N.E. 505-254-9462
ZINC WINE BAR & BISTRO

ZEA ROTISSERIE AND GRILL

322 Garfield St., 995-9595 106 North Guadalupe St., 820-2075 510 North Guadalupe St. 982-4321 2801 Rodeo Road, A-5 471-3800 555 W. Cordova Road 983-7929
Ó EATING HOUSE MARIA’S NEW MEXICAN KITCHEN JOE’S JINJA BAR AND BISTRO DINNER FOR TWO

Lodging Partners
BUFFALO THUNDER RESORT & CASINO

4541 Corrales Road, Corrales 505-508-3244
CHAMA RIVER BREWING COMPANY

CASA VIEJA RESTAURANT

$20 per person
NICKY V’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZERIA

30 Buffalo Thunder Trail 877-848-6337 103 Catron St. 955-6540
EL REY INN

4939 Pan American Fwy. N.E. 505-342-1800 At Hyatt Regency Tamaya 1300 Tuyuna Trail Santa Ana Pueblo 505-771-6037 at Hotel Albuquerque 800 Rio Grande Blvd. N.W. 505-222-8766 10500 4th St. N.W., 505-898-1771 40 Tramway Road NE, 505-243-9742 at Hotel Andaluz 125 Second St. N.W. 505-242-9090
LUCIA HIGH FINANCE EL PINTO CRISTOBAL’S CORN MAIDEN

9780 Coors Blvd. Suite A 505-890-9463 3128 Central Ave. 505-266-4455
PARS CUISINE

NOB HILL BAR AND GRILL

EL CORAZÓN DE SANTA FE

86 Cities of Gold Road 455-2000 3466 Zafarano Drive 424-0755
RED SAGE PLAZA CAFÉ SOUTHSIDE

4320 The 25 Way N.E. Suite 100 505-345-5156 40 Tramway Road N.E. 505-856-6692
SANDIAGO’S MEXICAN GRILL

1862 Cerrillos Road 982-1931 309 W. San Francisco St. 800-955-4455 198 State Road 592 877-262-4666
HOTEL SANTA FE ENCANTADO RESORT ELDORADO HOTEL

Lodging Partners
800 Rio Grande Blvd. N.W. 505-843-6300
HYATT REGENCY TAMAYA RESORT & SPA HOTEL ALBUQUERQUE

at the Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail 877-848-6337 104 B Old Las Vegas Hwy. 988-3333
STEAKSMITH AT EL GANCHO

1501 Paseo de Peralta 800-825-9876

1300 Tuyuna Trail Santa Ana Pueblo 505-867-1234

Restaurant Week

7

FLY WITH THE BEST!
TUMI | BRIGGS & RILEY | EAGLE CREEK | SWISS ARMY

Santa Fe’s premier luggage shop!

505.986.1260 • 328 S. Guadalupe • Santa Fe, NM

Food on TV C-2 Food in brief C-2 Travel C-4 Time Out C-5 Comics C-6

TASTE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2011 THE NEW MEXICAN

Dulce owners keep serving

More the merrier: Officials expect biggest turnout since 2005 at this year’s Mardi Gras. Travel, C-4

cheer despite revisions to

original plan

C

Incan grain gains culinary cult following
“It has an incredible cult following,” says Alex Postman, editor-in-chief for Martha Stewart’s Whole Living magazine and site, where quinoa is one webof top search terms. “It’s so the nutritionally packed. But the first It’s official: Quinoa has time I cooked it, I said, ‘What is achieved cult status. The ancient up with this?’ I was not a quinoa Incan grain has captured connoisseur.” the public’s imagination with That’s its of nutritional superpowers mix simple because there are a few , delitricks for turning that cious flavor and rainbow colors, bag of tiny seeds into a gustatory popping up on trendy restaurant wunderkind. First, quinoa needs menus and holistic health to be rinsed before use, webto elimisites alike. nate the bitter coating that surWith all nine essential rounds each seed. Overcook amino it or acids, it’s a complete protein use too much water, and quinoa — like meat — which makes loses its marvelous, fluffy it texthe holy grail of the vegetarian ture. And then there’s the color world. And, it’s gluten-free. — yes, black quinoa cooks into The only question is whether inky hues and red stays richly it grows magic beanstalks, vibrant. That can be a perk too. or a And how best to cook the liability. sometimes tricky grain. Please see INCAN, Page C-2
By Jackie Burrell
Contra Costa Times

Quinoa renowned for health superpowers

Pastries line the counters at Dulce Bakery. Co-owner ‘You’re going to go to Dennis Adkins says the secret to his baked them because it’s all the trouble of putting all those different goods is overpowered by sugar, ingredients in your product ... and if you balance. what’s the point?’ PHOTOS can’t taste BY ROB DEWALT/THE
NEW MEXICAN

SUGAR, SPICE, A SIDE OF NICE
The New Mexican

THE LOWDOWN ON QUINOA
We may call quinoa — nounced KEEN-wah — proa but it’s really the seed grain, of the South American goosefoot plant. The gluten-free seeds high in protein, and quinoa’s are amino acid profile is comparable to casein, the complete protein found in milk, according to United Nations’ Food and the Agricultural Organization. Quinoa is easy to digest quick to prepare, but the and seeds, which are coated with saponin, must be rinsed before cooking to remove bitterness. Dry the kernels before proceeding. Some recipes also suggest toasting the seeds in a hot saucepan for a few minutes until the water evaporates and the quinoa becomes aromatic, before adding simmering stock to cook. Then, use the same proportions you would with plain white rice, a 1:2 ratio of grain to or stock. Bring it to a boil water simmer it, covered, for and 10-15 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat source, then leave the lid on for a few minutes more. Then, fluff the grains with a fork, as you would couscous. The kernels should be translucent and fluffy, with small threads.

Candelora Versace

“E

very calculation based on experience elsewhere fails in New Mexico,” said Lew Wallace, New Mexico territorial governor, back in the 19th century. Many residents agree this ho holds true today, and for Dulce bakery owners k Barnett and Dennis Adkins, r expectations — sometimes it’s meant revising on a daily basis. t’s still so much of a learning process after five nths,” Barnett said. “How much to order, what the y rhythm is, what the holidays were going to be ut. ... We were not quite prepared in the begin” ulce’s motto — “Be Fresh. Be weet.”— pretty much sums Local. Be Good. up sophy: to use local products their business o bake fresh goodies every whenever possible nvironment as they can; day; to be as gentle to and not only to serve a product, but to serve it sweetly ceness and spreading overall as well, bringgood cheer to their mers. far they’ve maintained this overriding philosoven while learning how to keep xpectations mash up against moving when reality. The pair ted to Santa Fe in 2008 from Los Angeles and ed to open last spring. Construction issues at mer Pete’s Pets building on Don Diego Avenue y regulatory processes pushed their opening ember, barely giving them before the holiday season’s a chance to hit their oversized need for set in. r plan was to be a bakery with an open kitchen. s coffee could be served as well, st as an afterthought, according they decided to Barnett. e mildly astonished that they shop that has baked goods are perceived as on the sheer amount of coffee the side. Consaid the partners are glad drinks they sell, they bought a shiny ustrial-strength espresso machine instead of one they were originally planning to use. tt, who manages the business, y intended to bake alongside said he had mary artist in the kitchen his partner, who with a background -making in Paris and The Four y Hills, Calif. Perhaps naively, Seasons Hotel he admitted, n’t expect the “business” part of the business ll-time job.

Kirk Barnett, co-owner of

It’s still so much of a learning process after five months . How much to order, what the daily rhythm is, what the holiday s were going to be about. ... We were not quite prepared in the beginni ng.”
Dulce

IF YOU GO DULCE BAKERY
Motto: “Be fresh. Be local. Be good. Be sweet.” Menu: Cupcakes, tarts and other baked goods; fair-trade coffee. and organic, Hours: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Saturday, closed Sunday. Location: 1100 Don Diego Ave., Suite A. Facility: Has ample parking; is compliant with Americans abilities Act; offers free with DisWi-Fi. Contact: Call 989-9966.
Quinoa-turkey patties in pita.
MARK DUFRENE CONTRA COSTA TIMES

Please see SWEETS, Page

C-3

Dulce has been serving

up baked goods since

September.

QUINOA-TURKEY PATTIES IN PITA WITH TAHINI Makes 6 servings Tahini sauce: Preparation: In a food 1 garlic clove pro1 cessor, process tahini sauce ⁄4 cup tahini 1 ingredients until smooth. ⁄4 cup fresh lemon juice Chill. 1 Bring 2 cups water to a ⁄4 cup water boil in a saucepan. Add quinoa. Patties: Stir once, cover and reduce 2 cups water, or more heat. Simmer until tender, about 1 cup quinoa, rinsed and minutes. Fluff with a fork; 15 drained let cool. 12 ounces ground turkey 1 In a clean food processor, ⁄4 teaspoon plus 1 pinch pulse turkey, spices, mint, ground allspice scal1 lions and 3⁄4 teaspoon salt ⁄2 teaspoon plus 1 pinch to a smooth paste. Add quinoa; ground cumin process until mixture comes Pinch crushed red pepper together around the blade. flakes into 24 balls; flatten slightlyRoll 2 tablespoons finely to chopped form patties. fresh mint Heat oil in a large skillet. 2 scallions, finely chopped Working in batches, fry Coarse salt patties until cooked through. 2 teaspoons canola or Divide lettuce, cucumber safflower oil, or more onion evenly among pita and 6 lettuce leaves breads. Top each with 4 quinoa 1 English cucumber patties, drizzle with about 1 tablespoon 1 small red onion, halved and tahini dressing. thinly sliced Fold pitas over filling and 6 pita breads serve.

FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ogram’s chefs the main
a Merklein
Mexican

a Fe Community College’s s degree program has rs for many students, ntegral skills needed for

lead instructor Chef Michelle Roetzer continue to inspire “Mica” students well into their culinary careers. Aurora Fernandez, a sophomore in the Associate of Applied Science program in culinary arts, will graduate in the f ll b h

said. She has a lot of food allergies, so Fernandez enjoys building things scratch rather than consuming from that has been overly processed.food to celebrate the construction “I want of food, rather than its d

ingredients in inspiring student
Fe’s Galisteo Bistro, putting tice what she has learned into pracat SFCC. “The owners are great and the restaurant is run very well,” she said. But that doesn’t F

cooks

After graduation, Fernandez to transfer to The University plans of New Mexico to pursue other academic studies but she said sh ill

8

Restaurant Week

For a second year, event celebrates eating out
BY ARIN MCKENNA Expectations for the second annual New Mexico Restaurant Week have moved from last year’s cautious optimism to eager anticipation. “It really exceeded everyone’s expectations. One restaurateur told us that we under-promised and over-delivered,” said Michele Ostrove, president of Wings Media Network, who organizes the event with her husband, Lucien Bonnafoux.
Chris Harvey, partner and general manager of Geronimo, wrote in the follow-up survey, “It was like Valentine’s Day for most of the week. Half of our customers were there because of Restaurant Week, and we sold out for most seatings. The event far exceeded our expectations.” Tony Smith, executive chef at The Old House, said, “We were caught off guard a little bit. We were New Mexico Restaurant week is doing 30 to 40 covers taking place across the state from normally, so thought Feb. 20-March 20. we might get 50 to 60. Las Cruces Feb. 20-Feb. 27 We weren’t expecting Taos Feb. 27-March 6 150 people on a Sunday night. And we did that Santa Fe March 6-March 13 every night for the whole Albuquerque March 12-March 20 week. So we signed up right away this year.” The event was so successful that when The Old House transformed from fine French dining to upscale, casual American cuisine last May, the restaurant relaunched with its own version of Restaurant Week. Smith hopes to draw 200 or more diners a night this year and has hired more cooks to prepare for it.

FOCUS ON FOOD

DETAILS

The Old House at the Eldorado Hotel

COURTESY

Restaurant Week

9

Maria’s New Mexican Kitchen

JANE PHILLIPS

Andiamo!

COURTESY

It is not surprising that Restaurant Week was so well-received. “Santa Fe is a food destination. We are so blessed and fortunate to have so many wonderful restaurants representing cuisine from all around the world, and we have such wonderfully creative chefs who have chosen to make Santa Fe their home,” said Simon Brackley, president and CEO of the Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce. “I don’t realize that until I go to another town of similar size and I’m stuck with Arby’s and Bob’s Big Boy, and then I say, ‘Wow, how lucky I am to live in Santa Fe and have fifty or so choices every day for lunch and dinner.’” “It got people thinking about eating out and the great restaurants in Santa Fe. That was the most important part of the promotion: getting locals and visitors alike to see Santa Fe as a culinary destination,” said Al Lucero, co-owner of Maria’s New Mexican Kitchen and board member for both the Santa Fe Restaurant Association and the Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta. “We were very pleased. There was increased traffic throughout the community, and when restaurants do well, it helps the entire community.” Restaurateurs such as Corey Fiddler, food and beverage director for Hotel Santa Fe, were especially pleased with local turnout. He anticipated 10 to 15 more people a night, and instead averaged 25 or more. In his follow-up response, Fiddler wrote, “We were thrilled and surprised by the level of success. So many guests that week had never tried our Amaya Restaurant and stated they would be returning regularly. We developed a whole new list of patrons from

Restaurant Week and we are looking forward to being part of the next one.” Like most restaurants, Amaya does not have a mechanism to track how many first-time visitors returned during the year, but most restaurateurs believe there has been some residual effect. Ristra owner Eric Lamalle also saw an increase in local business. “I saw a lot more of regular guests than we do the rest of the year, and they are coming for the Restaurant Week.” The $500 fee participants pay for marketing the event stretches advertising dollars beyond individual efforts. The 2010 promotion garnered an estimated $250,000 in free PR and paid advertising, organizers believe. The Restaurant Week website was visited by 40,000 people, and participating restaurants received 96,000 page views. The Wine & Chile Fiesta and the restaurant association both are underwriting a portion of their members’ fee again this year. “Both organizations saw the value in it and how it would benefit the restaurants, and I’m happy to say that both boards voted to continue their sponsorship of their member restaurants going into Restaurant Week,” said Jeff Jinnet, president of the Santa Fe Restaurant Association. Jinnett is also president of Santa Fe Dining, a local restaurant chain that owns several restaurants in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. All their restaurants except the Rio Chama — which will be kept hopping during the legislative session — are in again this year. “All of our general managers were excited to participate again,” Jinnett said. “So

10

Restaurant Week

NEW IN 2011
New Mexico Restaurant Week is expanding this year. Sixtythree restaurants participated In 2010: this year there are more than 100. Restaurant Weeks are running eight days instead of seven in each city. Restaurants may choose between four price-points instead of three: $25 for two or $20, $30 or $40 per person for a three-course, prix fixe dinner. A new promotion, called Dinner’s On Us, encourages local businesses to offer Restaurant Week gift certificates as incentives for their customers and/or employees. The most significant change, though, is an expansion into Taos and Las Cruces. “This was a natural extension. Last year I got more than one e-mail from some angry person saying, ‘How do you have the nerve to call this New Mexico Restaurant Week when you’re not including the entire state?’ So, in response to those people, I wanted to make it a statewide event this year and bring those great value-priced meals to everybody,” said Michele Ostrove, an organizer of the event. In the future, Maria’s New Mexican Kitchen’s Al Lucero would like to COURTESY Doc Martin’s, Taos see galleries and other retailers offer special promotions to make Restaurant Week a more communitywide event. Visit nmrestaurantweek.com to check out menus, hotel discounts and look for updates on special events and participating restaurants. That is also the place to enter the Restaurant Week Sweepstakes for the chance to win gift certificates for dining or staying in a hotel.

Geronimo

COURTESY

we’re looking forward to it.” Restaurants across the board — from the “white tablecloth” venues to the less expensive ones — benefited, especially those that went all out with menu choices and extras such as specially priced wine pairings. Many diners took advantage of reduced pricing to try restaurants that are usually outside their budget, while others who cannot normally afford to eat out enjoyed lower-end offerings. “Since last year, I keep running into random strangers who find out that we were in charge of Restaurant Week, and they say, ‘Oh, that was so great. We went out three or four times that week,’ ” Ostrove said. Participants expect to see increased response this year and in the future. Maria’s started receiving phone calls in mid-January asking if Restaurant Week was happening again. “We hope that people will actually plan a trip to Santa Fe — a culinary vacation where they can eat out every night. We probably won’t get too much of that this year, but more than last year, and that should continue to increase,” Lucero said. “Wine & Chile Fiesta was also started to boost tourism during a slow season. It has built and built over the years until now the last week in September is one of the busiest weeks of the year, and I think eventually the same thing will happen for Restaurant Week.”

SUMMING UP
A survey taken of 2010 participants shows impressive results:

• Restaurants averaged an increase of 72 percent over the previous week, and 62 percent over the same time the previous year. Almost half the restaurants sold out at least one night, and several sold out more than three nights. • The event generated more than $2.6 million in revenue, • An estimated 47,000 diners turned out in Santa Fe and
an increase of $1.2 million over the previous year, with an estimated $98,000 in additional state tax revenue. Albuquerque. More than half of those came to take advantage of value-priced menus. 40 percent were patronizing a restaurant for the first time, and 29 percent were from out-oftown.

Restaurant Week

11

INTRODUCING

CHURRASCO

dinner special
Las Fuentes Restaurant & Bar at Bishop’s Lodge is offering a very special three-course dinner for any time, any day, any appetizer, any entrée and any dessert for New Mexico Residents.

resident’s $34

THE HEAT IS ON!
On Thursday nights at 6 pm, Las Fuentes Restaurant & Bar will be transformed into a Churrascaria - A Brazilian Bistro serving prime, select grilled meats complete with an extensive salad bar, complementary ethnic selections and a taste of South American music. Join us for this festive, weekly event!

$34 per person
plus tax and gratuity.

$31 per person plus tax & gratuity
1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd. bishopslodge.com

Reservations recommended.

Reservations 819.4035

505.819.4035
1297 Bishop’s Lodge Rd. bishopslodge.com

Substance
Monday-Saturday 10-5ish 102 Doña Luz • 751-0992

12

Restaurant Week

Special events demystify, add enjoyment
BY ARIN MCKENNA So often we taste a remarkable wine or an exquisite dish and wish we knew more about it or how to prepare it. Restaurant Week events provide some of the answers, revealing the secrets of sake and Caesar salad and the alchemy of basic ingredients.
Wine lovers can enjoy wine tasting at La Casa Sena Wine Shop & Cantina (noted for its award-winning wine list) or sample wine and a Gorgonzola cheese fondue at a Tour of Italian Wine and Fondue at Osteria d’Assisi. La Casa Sena is also having a special ’70s show in The Cantina. Delve into the exotic at The ABC’s of Sake: Seminar and Tasting at Shohko Café. Ayame Fukuda — a certified sake professional, enlightens guests about the grades of sake, the brewing process and food pairing. “Sake is a very obscure, mysterious, bottled, beautiful Japanese product, and most people don’t really know how to approach it,” Fukuda said. “My role is to demystify KIM KURIAN that. I’m taking these La Casa Sena Wine Shop & Cantina really obscure sake bottles and opening them up and really explaining them to people. I want people to be able to go to a store, look at a sake label, and know what they’re buying, so they can make educated choices.” Fukuda plans to debunk myths and misunderstandings about sake, like why calling it “rice wine” is a misnomer. (Sake is actually

EXTRA HELPINGS

Osteria d Assisi

KIM KURIAN

closer to beer in the fermentation process.) She explains the history behind heating sake and why fine sake is best served cold. “There is a renaissance movement now in Japan toward making premium, pure rice sake. These artisanal, handcrafted sakes are so complex and aromatic, with such great flavor that you wouldn’t want to heat them,” Fukuda said. The tastings at the seminar should help develop people’s palates. “Wine has 200 flavor components, and sake has 400 flavor components. A lot of people don’t know quite how to taste those 200 extra flavor components. Our palates haven’t been trained to taste all the subtleties in sake,” Fukuda said. “Sake has a really broad flavor palate. They can run from super aromatic to acidic and dry; they can be full-bodied or light and delicate. They can be rich and creamy or they can be refreshing and effervescent. “I have a lot of passion about sake because it’s a clean, pure drink. It’s sulphite-free, it’s gluten-free, it’s histamine-free, it has negligible sugar content, and it’s made out of only rice, water, yeast and koji,” said Fukuda. “I like to use the word harmonious when it comes to sake, just because it’s a third less acidic than wine, so it doesn’t have the bite that wine does. It really does harmonize well with all types of cuisines.”

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Fukuda plans to present four to six sakes for tasting. Those who stay for dinner can receive a $5 discount on a bottle or demi-carafe of sake. Osteria d’Assisi is repeating two popular events, including Italian Spirits & Cocktails. Last year guests learned how to make Limoncello, a traditional Italian liqueur. “It’s amazing how we’ve lost the art of making some of these liquors,” said proprietor Lino Pertusini. “I remember a friend of my mother’s. She had all these beautiful flavored liqueurs. You had a stomachache; she had this herbal liqueur, and then another liqueur for something else. They used different types of herbs and extracted the flavors into these various liqueurs.” Osteria’s Caesar salad has been a favorite since Pertusini introduced it at the Palace Restaurant. “We wanted to take this opportunity to show people that were interested how we make this incredible Caesar salad,” said Pertusini, whose brother, Pietro, is giving the presentation. This event nearly sold out last year. At Pertusini’s newest restaurant, Pizzeria da Lino, Carlo Gislimberti presents, How to Make Gourmet Italian Pizza, which includes tastings of several varieties of pizza. Joan Gillchrist, owner of Andiamo!, helps simplify your life with Organize Your Pantry for Healthy Anytime Meals. Guests receive a list of 15 to 20 basic ingredients to keep on hand, with suggestions for simple meals they can create from them and tips on how to reduce cooking stresses. The featured dish is a tomato, basil, garlic pasta called Spaghetti alla Carrettiera.

WHAT’S HAPPENING

RESTAURANT WEEK SANTA FE

Tuesday, March 8

4:30-5:30 p.m. Shohko Café. The ABC’s of Sake: Seminar and Tasting with Ayame Fukuda, certified sake specialist. $10. Reservation required. 982-9708 6 p.m. Osteria d’Assisi. Italian Spirits & Cocktails. $10. 986-5858

MIXING IT UP
Restaurant Week diners can savor the results of one event closed to the public. Southwest Wine & Spirits (a platinum sponsor of Restaurant Week) is hosting Mixology 101 classes for participating bartenders. Participants are encouraged to take that knowledge and create special cocktails for Restaurant Week. “We’re trying to promote craft cocktails with seasonal, fresh ingredients, and just really promote the bartenders and what they’re doing inside of their bar,” said mixologist Michael Trujillo, who teaches the class. Trujillo’s enthusiasm for mixology is contagious. “My whole goal is always trying to bring the kitchen into the bar. It’s a culinary approach: fresh pressed juices, muddling grapes and strawberries and using aromatics like sage and rosemary. In bringing those into the bar we’re able to expand what we do so much,” Trujillo said. “For too long bartenders have gotten into the habit of using premade mixers and things that were put in front of them by default. In the 1800s, when cocktails and mixology really started to come to life, there was no such thing as mixers. The grenadine they had was made from scratch: everything from fresh ingredients and real ingredients.”

Wednesday, March 9

5 p.m. Andiamo! Organize Your Pantry for Healthy Anytime Meals, presented by Joan Gillcrist and Guest Chef. Free. 995-9595 5 p.m. Pizzeria da Lino. How to Make Gourmet Italian Pizza with Carlo Gislimberti. Wine specials available. $10. 982-8474 6 p.m. Osteria d’Assisi. The Art of Making Caesar Salad with Pietro Pertusini. $10. 986-5858

6 p.m. La Casa Sena Wine Shop & Cantina. Wine tasting with James Cook, La Casa Sena wine director. $20 cost will be credited toward a purchase and 15 percent discount on wines purchased that night. Reservations required. 982-2121 6 p.m. Osteria d’Assisi. Tour of Italian Wine and Fondue. $10. 9865858

Thursday, March 10

5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. (two shows) The Cantina at La Casa Sena. ’70s Show: favorite ’70s hits performed by the Cantina Singers. Free. Reservations required. 988-9232

Friday, March 11

Trujillo said he boasts a spice rack “that chefs could only dream of.” “Restaurant Week is a great opportunity, because we’re promoting restaurants and the chefs and all of their creativity. So I want to make sure the bartenders have a chance to shine as well,” Trujillo said. Look for table tents announcing the special cocktails or ask your server for more information.

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Restaurant Week

Dip ‘n Dine
Experience The Artesian Restaurant at Ojo Caliente Mineral Springs Resort & Spa

Taos Restaurant Week February 27th - March 6th
Three courses of your choosing for just $30 per person. Menu includes: Toasted Barley & Wild Mushroom “Risotto” Enchilada of Lobster, Crab & Shrimp Roasted Buffalo & Vegetable Chile Relleno

NEW MEXICO RESTAURANT WEEK
$20 PER PERSON 505.820.9205 FOR RESERVATIONS FOR OUR COMPLETE MENU GO TO: WWW.NEWMEXICORESTAURANTWEEK.COM

PROUD TO BE PARTICIPATING IN

Reservations recommended. *Proof of purchase required.

What our guests are saying: “The food is without question, 5-star!” “The restaurant is one of the best anywhere in New Mexico. I would travel there just to eat!”

Vinaigrette features 20 classic & signature salads built upon fresh, organic greens & produce from our ten-acre farm in Nambé. Delicious meats & seafoods can be partnered with each salad, creating innovative pairings such as Grilled Caesar with Seared Diver Scallops or Apple Cheddar Chop with Grilled Pork Tenderloin.
709 Don Cubero Alley Santa Fe, NM 87505 505.820.9205 www.vinaigretteonline.com

Call 505.583.2233 for reservations. Visit ojospa.com for details.

Restaurant Week

Photos: Douglas Merriam

And as a special offer, we're extending 20% off Springs’ entry or lodging for those who dine off the Restaurant Week Menu.*

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RESTAURANTS KEEP ECONOMY ROLLING ALONG

Ahi Tuna Tartare an entree at Restaurant Martín

LOCAL ENGINE

BY ARIN MCKENNA Having someone else prepare delicious food, serve you and clean up afterward might feel wonderfully indulgent. But you can bask in the experience guilt-free knowing that restaurants are a backbone of the Santa Fe economy.
“There are over 150 restaurants in this town. Each of those restaurants has staff, front and back of the house and administrative staff. Each of those employees spends their money in the local economy. They eat out, they shop in local stores. That all circulates and keeps other people employed. That’s the way an economy works: the money multiplies throughout the community,” said Simon Brackley, president and CEO of the Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce. Brackley also sits on the board of the Santa Fe Restaurant Association. Gross receipts taxes on those transactions provide services such as public safety, education and street upkeep, all of which benefits the entire community. “A strong community depends upon a strong business climate, and every transaction that takes place within the community, whether it’s someone visiting or whether it’s a local person shopping here, helps to benefit the community as a whole,” Brackley said. Studies show that 45 cents of every dollar spent at locally owned businesses stay in the community, as opposed to 13 cents when those dollars go to nonlocal business. Another study posted by the

Martín Rios of Restaurant Martín.

PHOTOS BY JANE PHILLIPS

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Restaurant Week

Roland Richter of Joe’s

FILE PHOTO

Patrick Gharrity, executive chef La Casa Sena

KIM KURIAN

through, from the celebrities who come and make movies here to the locals who keep our business alive. That is why we’re here. We’re not here because of the tourists. No business can stay alive like that. When the tourists are here, it’s great. It seems like they’re going to always be there, because you’re just flush. But there are a lot of months of down time, when you have to stay afloat,” said Ayame Fukuda, whose family owns Shohko Café. Eating locally brings its own rewards. “The advantage of a chain is that they’re always consistent. That’s how they’re successful — they can open a store in any town and have consistent cooking and consistent ingredients,” Brackley said. “But that’s predictable, and kind of dull. Why go to a restaurant in a town that has its own flavor to eat the same old thing? You want to sample the local talent, the local flavors, the local ingredients. Then you’re going to get the flavor of the community.”

Santa Fe Alliance — a nonprofit “devoted to building a stronger local economy” (santafealliance.com) — found that independent local businesses account for 78 percent of Santa Fe’s employment. “The values of local businesses are reflected in the community, as opposed to the chain restaurants, whose values are the bottom line of that corporation,” said Kathleen Chambers, Santa Fe Alliance program coordinator. “Those restaurants supported by the community are able then to give back to the community. For instance, the Santa Fe Farmers Market Institute is having a film series: there’s not one corporate sponsor.” Local restaurant owners frequently contribute to fundraisers for schools and nonprofits, and several major fundraisers feature Santa Fe’s gourmet cuisine. Taste of Santa Fe raises money for New Mexico museums, the Souper Bowl benefits The Food Depot and ArtFeast supports art programs for Santa Fe youth. Events such as the Santa Fe Wine & Chile Fiesta and Restaurant Week boost tourism, but also encourage locals to dine out during the slow season. “One of the challenges in Santa Fe is the seasonality. Anyone can make a business successful in August, but the ones who survive have to make it in February,” Brackley said. “In 37 years, we have had so many kinds of different people come

Local to the core
Many Santa Fe Restaurants go the extra mile by buying from area farmers and ranchers. “I could choose to send our buying power to other parts of the country or I could choose to keep that money here, and I’d rather support our local economy,” said Megan Tucker, executive chef at Amavi Restaurant. “And the closer you are to your food, the more you know about it, so the better I can feel about what I serve. I know 20 farmers on a personal level at this point. I feel really good about not only putting dollars in their pocket, but also the fact that the products I’m getting from them are significantly higher in quality both from a freshness standpoint and nutritional standpoint than something I’m buying in a cardboard box that comes from California.” Joe’s owner, Roland Richter, also likes knowing his growers. He recalled working with a producer to improve egg quality. “I was able to see him, shake his hand, talk to him, and three months later it was taken care of. With national companies, I don’t even know who the owners are. Here I was able to speak with the guy who is hands- on with the chickens. He sees the birds every day, he feeds them, he’s the one who’s collecting the eggs. He cleans them and packages

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Chef Estevan Parra of Andiamo!

DOUGLAS MERRIAM

Above, chef-co-owners, Alea Jensen and Robin Hardie of Louie’s Corner. Bottom, the sandwich combo with carrot ginger soup is a lunch special at Louie’s.

PHOTOS BY JANE PHILLIPS

them and delivers them. And I like that very much.” Procuring local food can be challenging and time consuming. The Santa Fe Alliance Farm to Restaurant Project, which began as a marketing campaign highlighting restaurants that support local producers, has expanded to address that issue. A two-year grant from the United States Department of Agriculture helped launch a pilot distribution project called Farm to Restaurant Delivers. During peak production months, the distribution center receives food from producers and delivers to restaurants. “I only have to talk to one person, instead of 14 people or more. It really saves me a lot of time and just frees me up,” Tucker said. Restaurateurs involved in the project have a noncompetitive, collaborative attitude. La Casa Sena Executive Chef Patrick Gharrity, serves on the organizing committee. He encourages other restaurants to participate so the distribution project can continue. “We need volume. We need more restaurants to participate so the program can sustain itself.” Gharrity has long been a “huge supporter” of sourcing locally. “I’ve received such an education about the food we serve by talking to the farmers,” said Gharrity, who appreciates knowing which producers avoid antibiotics and the difference between a hundred percent grass-fed cow and one “finished” on grain. “And I have some young children that I would like to see grow up and live in a beautiful clean world. It’s inspired me to change things around.” Cost is another deterrent to serving locally produced food.

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Chef Peter Walsh of Zia Diner

JANE PHILLIPS

Gharrity features most of the local foods on the dinner menu, rather than the lower-priced cantina or lunch menus. “For small restaurants it’s even harder, but there are some smaller restaurants that are really trying hard and I think they need to be given attention. I think the Santa Fe public needs to go the restaurants that are supporting local farmers maybe a little more to get the other restaurants to start doing it,” Gharrity said. “And, in the end, it’s going to help us all.”

Top, Chef Candelario Gonzalez of Maria’s Bottom, Maria’s New Mexican Kitchen is a Santa Fe landmark.

PHOTOS BY JANE PHILLIPS

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El Monte Sagrado’s De La Tierra Restaurant, Taos

PHOTOS BY MICHAEL NELSON

BY ARIN MCKENNA How many times have you meant to check out Taos and just have not gotten around to it? Or have you been putting off that ski weekend for too long? Follow through on those plans during Taos Restaurant Week (Feb. 27-March 6) and you could finish out the day with a scrumptious dinner at a greatly reduced price.
When organizers Michele Ostrove and Lucien Bonnafoux approached Jamie Tedesco about expanding Restaurant Week to Taos, he gladly presented the idea to the Taos Tourism Council, which embraced the idea. Tedesco is president of the council and marketing director for the Historic Taos Inn. “People are hungry for any kind of event or attraction to bring people in — not just people that have heard about Taos, but people that haven’t or who maybe have heard about Taos but never have taken the drive

CELEBRATION OF DINING OUT MOVES TO TAOS, ANGEL FIRE

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Restaurant Week

NORTHERN

up from Albuquerque or Santa Fe,” Tedesco said. “We all believe that we have some really great restaurants, and that Taos is a real New Mexico gem. We want people to come up, have a good time, maybe learn some new things about Taos, and hopefully come back and make some new friends over time.” Tom Bowles, owner/chef of The Roasted Clove in Angel Fire, has had personal experience with Restaurant Week. “I came from Colorado, and Restaurant Week was very popular in Denver. So I was glad to see it expand into Taos. I think it entices people to come out,” Bowles said. “And I like the fact that the restaurants in the state are joining together, because there’s strength in numbers. If we can all promote each other, it’s going to help business across the board.” Many are anticipating long-term effects. “I decided to participate because for a reasonable amount of money, it seems like a very good deal for what I get in return,” said Damon Simonton, chef/owner of Chef Damon’s. “I think we’ll get a lot of response from it, because all of the media is involved. Instead of just paying for one newspaper or

TAOS SPECIAL EVENTS
Special events add extra zest to New Mexico Restaurant Week, and Taos has several to offer. More information is available at http:// newmexicorestaurantweek.com. Southern Wine & Spirits will present a port tasting at Chef Damon’s. “We’re going to send out a wide variety of foods: savory, sweet, different textures, and let people taste the ports with the different foods and decide for themselves what they think goes well together,” owner Damon Simonton said. “It’s to let people know that a lot of different foods go well with port. You can have it with your entrée, with salads, with seafood, with meats, spicy foods. It’s not just something you can have as an aperitif or with you desert.” Doc Martin’s Restaurant, Taos
COURTESY

magazine or radio advertisement, it will be all over the place. And it’s advertising one particular week, but their website is available for an entire year.” To accommodate towns too small to host a successful Restaurant Week, organizers are taking a regional approach. That means that restaurants in Ojo Caliente and Angel Fire are participating in the Taos event. Christy Germscheid, director of public relations for the new Angel Fire Resort, recalled how her friends drove to Albuquerque Restaurant Week for a girls’ night out. She hopes that, likewise, people from Santa Fe and Albuquerque drive up for a deal. “We thought this was the perfect opportunity to maximize some media exposure and bring people into the Stonewood Restaurant who might not otherwise venture up here. I’m hoping that we’ll gain a lot of awareness and exposure within the state, and that we will have a new clientele because of it,” Germscheid said. “And if they can’t come during New Mexico Restaurant Week, maybe they’ll come up at a

EXPOSURE

later date.” Participants voiced one concern about the event: holding it during ski season. “When Michele approached us, she said, ‘because it’s slow season.’ Well, this is our high season. We are very busy between now and the end of March,” Germscheid said. Simonton believes that April or early November would have greater benefit for Taos restaurants. Many are taking a “wait-and-see” approach about this first year. “Taos is new and it’s a little further out. The people in Taos, I’m sure, are going to be frequenting and taking up these offers. But to get a visitor or a tourist, I think we’re going to have to rely very strongly on the media that we’re getting,” Tedesco said. He believes the web and social networking may be strong factors in the event’s success. El Monte Sagrado and The Historic Taos Inn are offering discounted lodging during Restaurant Week. Go to http:// taosvacationguide.com or http://taoswebb. com to learn more about Taos attractions. One famous attraction, Taos Pueblo, is closed through March 28.

The Roasted Clove is hosting two special events. Intro to Beer Tasting & Food Pairing will feature seven different craft beers paired with appetizers. About Knife Skills 101, owner Tom Bowles wrote, “Meal preparation will be faster, easier and more enjoyable when you learn to slice, dice, julienne, and chiffonade like a professional.”The menu includes tortilla soup, pico de gallo, guacamole, and Southwestern shrimp fajitas. At the Historic Taos Inn, the Adobe Bar holds a weekly beer tasting that diners might want to take advantage of on Monday. On Wednesday, Doc Martin sommelier Craig Dunn will present a wine class focused on food pairings. The restaurant has received Wine Spectator Magazine’s Award of Excellence for 22 years. The bar also has free live music every night.

Sunday, February 27

5 p.m. Chef Damon’s. Port tasting with food pairing. $25 dollars (does not include tax and gratuity). Reservations required. 575-737-0410

Monday, February 28 Wednesday, March 2

5:30 p.m. The Adobe Bar. Beer tasting. Free. 575-758-2233

11 a.m. The Roasted Clove. Knife Skills 101, a hands on cooking class presented by Chef Tom Bowles. $100. 575-377-0636 5:30 p.m. Doc Martin’s Restaurant. Seminar: pairing food and wine. $25. 575-758-1977

Thursday, March 3

4 p.m. The Roasted Clove. Intro to Beer Tasting and Food Pairing, presented by Chef Tom Bowles. $25. 575-377-0636

Restaurant Week

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Saturday February 26th Saturday March 5th
thru

is participating in

New Mexico Restaurant Week
For $30 per person* come and experience regionally inspired rustic New Mexican, Spanish and Mediterranean cuisine with a creative twist from Chef & Food Historian

Frederick Muller Reservations Recommended
575-751-3337
Monday – Saturday 5:30pm to 9:30 pm 1017 Paseo del Pueblo Norte (1.2 miles north of the Taos Plaza) Rated #1 in Taos on TripAdvisor www.elmeze.com *gratuity, tax and beverages not included –
menu for event on www.nmrestaurantweek.com

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Restaurant Week

Restaurant Week

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The

A PERFECT MATCH:
Fine Food and Magnificent Music
Double your SFCA concert pleasure with dinner at one of Santa Fe's superb restaurants!

The Music Man
March 6 • 3 pm • Lensic Performing Arts Center

National Philharmonic of Poland
March 9 • 7:30 pm Lensic Performing Arts Center

David Finckel, Wu Han & Philip Setzer
play Schubert’s Piano Trios
April 15 • 7:30 pm • St. Francis Auditorium

Tickets $20-$72 • student discounts available • Call Tickets Santa Fe, 988-1234 or SFCA, 984-8759

Six of our recent concerts sold out! Don't be disappointed - make your reservations now!
Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission; New Mexico Arts, a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs; and the National Endowment for the Arts

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Restaurant Week

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