You are on page 1of 104

DIR RECTORAT TEOFURBA ANLANDT TRANSPOR RT

DRA REP AFT PORT

Non M rized T Motor Traffic (NMT c T) Netw D n work Design In th Vic he cinity o MG Road of G d

June20 011

Tra ansport Tra aining Inst titute & C Consultancy c

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter 1 Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Background ....................................................................................................................................................1 1.2 Study Area .....................................................................................................................................................2 1.3 Objectives of the Study ...................................................................................................................................3 1.4 Layout of the Document..................................................................................................................................3 Chapter 2 Planning of NMT Facilities ......................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................4 2.2 Design Elements .............................................................................................................................................6 Chapter 3 Study Area Characteristics ........................................................................................................ 8 3.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................8 3.2 MG Road ........................................................................................................................................................9 3.3 St.Marks Road .............................................................................................................................................. 14 3.4 Kamaraj Road .............................................................................................................................................. 18 3.5 Cubbon Road ............................................................................................................................................... 20 3.6 Richmond Road ............................................................................................................................................ 22 3.7 Residency Road ............................................................................................................................................ 25 Chapter 4 Planning of Bicycle Facilities ................................................................................................... 29 4.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 29 4.2 Bicycle ......................................................................................................................................................... 29 4.3 Bicycle User ................................................................................................................................................. 29 4.4 Types of Facilities ......................................................................................................................................... 30

4.4.1 Shared Roadway (No Bikeway Designation)............................................................................................ 30 4.4.2 Signed Shared Roadway........................................................................................................................ 30 4.4.3 Bike Lane or Bicycle Lane ...................................................................................................................... 31
4.5 Selection of the Bicycle Facility ...................................................................................................................... 33 4.6 Bicycle Corridors ........................................................................................................................................... 34 Chapter 5 Bicycle Network Design .......................................................................................................... 36 5.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 36 5.2 MG Road ...................................................................................................................................................... 37

5.2.1 Profile/Cross Sections ......................................................................................................................................................................... 40 5.2.2 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 42 5.2.3 Bus Stop Interventions ....................................................................................................................................................................... 46 5.2.4 Car/Cycle Parking ................................................................................................................................................................................. 48 5.2.5 Modifications to Bicycle Alignment due to proposed Bus bays by BMRCL ..................................................................... 50

5.3 St.Marks Road .............................................................................................................................................. 54

5.3.1 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 57 5.3.2 Bus Stops ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 60 5.3.3 Car/Cycle Parking ................................................................................................................................................................................. 62
5.4 Residency Road ............................................................................................................................................ 63

5.4.1 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 66


5.5 Richmond Road ............................................................................................................................................ 69

5.5.1 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 71


5.6 Kamaraj Road .............................................................................................................................................. 72

5.6.1 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 74


5.7 Cubbon Road ............................................................................................................................................... 75

5.7.1 Junction Improvements ..................................................................................................................................................................... 77


5.8 Special Considerations for Bicyclists at Signalized Intersections ....................................................................... 78 5.9 Special Considerations for Bicyclists at Bus Stops............................................................................................ 79 5.10 Shared Lane Marking .................................................................................................................................. 80 Chapter 6 Components of Bicycle Network ............................................................................................. 81 6.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 81 6.2 Pigmented Bicycle Lanes ............................................................................................................................... 81 6.3 Lane Separators ........................................................................................................................................... 82 6.4 Bicycle Racks................................................................................................................................................ 84 6.5 Signs and Pavement Markings ....................................................................................................................... 85 Chapter 7 Walkway Design ...................................................................................................................... 88 7.1 Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 88 7.2 The Curb Zone ............................................................................................................................................. 89 7.3 The Furniture Zone ....................................................................................................................................... 89 7.4 The Pedestrian Zone ..................................................................................................................................... 89 7.5 The Frontage Zone ....................................................................................................................................... 89 7.6 Recommendations for Walkways (Footpaths) ................................................................................................. 90 7.7 Kerb Ramps ................................................................................................................................................. 90 7.8 Underground Utilities .................................................................................................................................... 91 7.9 Midblock Crossing ......................................................................................................................................... 92 7.10 Traffic Calming Measures ............................................................................................................................ 93 Chapter 8 Implementation Plan .............................................................................................................. 94 8.1 Phasing ........................................................................................................................................................ 95

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1.1 Bicycle Corridors ...................................................................................................................................2 Figure 4.1 Types of Facilities ............................................................................................................................... 32 Figure 4.2 Dedicated and Mixed Cycle Corridors ................................................................................................... 35 Figure 5.1 Cross section of MG Road between Queens Circle and Anil Kumble Circle .............................................. 40 Figure 5.2 Cross section of MG Road between Anil Kumble Circle and Brigade Circle............................................... 40 Figure 5.3 Cross section of MG Road between Webbs Circle and Madras Road ...................................................... 41 Figure 5.4 Anil Kumble Circle .............................................................................................................................. 42 Figure 5.5 Brigade Circle ..................................................................................................................................... 43 Figure 5.6 Mayo Hall Junction ............................................................................................................................. 44 Figure 5.7 Webbs Circle ..................................................................................................................................... 45 Figure 5.8 Bus Stop near MG Park ....................................................................................................................... 46 Figure 5.9 Bus Stop near Mayo Hall Junction ........................................................................................................ 47 Figure 5.10 Proposed Cycle Stand near Webbs Junction ....................................................................................... 48 Figure 5.11 Proposed Cycle Stand and Car Parking near Brigade Road Junction ..................................................... 49 Figure 5.12 Plan showing the proposed bus bay by BMRCL ................................................................................... 51 Figure 5.13(A) Bicycle lane Alignment at Bus bays proposed by BMRCL ................................................................. 52 Figure 5.13(B) Bicycle lane Alignment at Bus bays proposed by BMRCL ................................................................. 53 Figure 5.14 St.Marks Road-Residency Road Junction ............................................................................................ 57 Figure 5.15 St.Marks Road-Madras Bank Circle ..................................................................................................... 58 Figure 5.16 BRV Circle ........................................................................................................................................ 59 Figure 5.17 Proposed Bus Stop near Mysore Bank Junction ................................................................................... 60 Figure 5.18 Proposed Bus Stop near Police Ground...............................................................................................61 Figure 5.19 Proposed Car Parking Area near Bowing Institute ............................................................................... 62 Figure 5.20 Residency Road-Brigade Road Junction .............................................................................................. 66 Figure 5.21 Residency Road-Museum Road Junction.............................................................................................67 Figure 5.22 Residency Road-St.Marks Road Junction............................................................................................68 Figure 5.23 Richmond Road- Hosur Road Junction................................................................................................ 71 Figure 5.24 Kamaraj Road- Cubbon Road Junction ............................................................................................... 74 Figure 5.25 Cubbon Road- Main Guard Cross Street Junction ................................................................................ 77

LIST OF TABLES
Table 5.1 List of Mixed lane corridors .................................................................................................................. 80 Table 8.1 Summary of Cost Estimate ................................................................................................................... 94

LIST OF APPEDICES
APPENDIX A Key Network Plan APPENDIX B Signal Timings APPENDIX C Detailed Cost Estimate

1.1 Background
Bangalore is fast falling victim to the trend of motorization i.e., the increasing use of personal cars and two wheelers. Lack of decent public transport and Non Motorized Transport (NMT) facilities have forced commuters to shift to using personal motorized vehicles, which occupy more road space, consume more fuel and disturb the citys environmental and social balance. Increasing the road space to cater to the use of motorized modes has worsened the mobility situation and reduced the importance of nonmotorized transport. This has left the commuters to travel in difficult conditions and made exposed to a plethora of transport related negative externalities like bad air quality, road accidents, high noise levels etc. In Bangalore, development is equated to motorization and speed, and modes such as bicycles have very low image and are associated with poverty. Despite the National Urban Transport Policy (NUTP), the motorized vehicles continue to dominate the Bangalore transport planning scenario, where more cars and two wheelers are added to the roads daily and in turn, more road space is getting taken away from the NMT facilities. Unfortunately, neither the Master Plan nor the budgetary allocations for city infrastructure incorporate or promote NMT in Bangalore. A number of facilities like Museum, Open Air Theater etc, have been proposed on MG Road along the Metro corridor. The increase in motorized traffic in a highly dense urban core has already led to severe congestion and will only get worse in the future. A shared NMT program including the pedestrian and bicycle network can service the entire CBD area addressing all segments of the population from schools in the area to shops and offices. The bicycles can provide a convenient mode of personal transport which offers maneuverability next to that of pedestrians. In this regard, Directorate of Urban Land Transport (DULT) along with Praja a nonprofit citizen organization, has identified roads in the CBD area where NMT corridors (bicycle and pedestrian) are to be built. The DULT has hired M/S Transport Training Institute and Consultancy (TTIC) to plan and design the NMT network around MG Road area. The Central Business District (CBD) area of Bangalore is moving to be a high density core with both Metro (which will be operational in the coming months) and Buses servicing it. Increase of FAR is being encouraged here with metro stations cutting across the CBD.

Chapter 1 Introduction

1.2 Stud Area dy a


A map of the route for the bicycle lane (together with footpath is presented in Figure 1.1. e es hs) e This route cove the major public transi points withi the CBD an also severa shopping districts ers r it in nd al an educationa institutions. The total len nd al ngth of the id dentified NMT network is a T approximately 8 km. y The NMT netw work covers p prominent str reets like MG Road, Resid G dency Road, Saint Marks Road, Richmond Road, Brigade Ro oad, Kamaraja Road etc. a

Figure 1.1 Bi F icycle Corrid dors

Some of the important land S dmarks in the area include e e Garuda Mall Brigade Road/Comme ercial Street Mayo Ha all Chinnaswamy Stadium Bishop Cotton Boys S C School St.Josep phs Boys High School h Shivaji Nagar Bus Sta N and Metro St tations

1.3 Objectives of the Study


The main objective of the study is to plan and design a network of NMT in the vicinity of MG Road that provides safe and convenient connectivity to all the upcoming metro stations, schools and other attraction centers form the surrounding areas. The specific tasks include: Identifying the condition of the existing infrastructure in the study area by inventory and topographic surveys Ascertaining the feasibility of providing the NMT corridors identified Planning of the NMT network Suggesting interventions required at the junctions, bus stops etc. due to the construction of the NMT corridors Exploring the possibilities of a Traffic Calming and Road Dieting measures Designing the planned network and providing the necessary drawings

1.4 Layout of the Document


The remainder of this document is divided into the following chapters: Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Overview of the planning of NMT facilities; goals and objectives are given in this chapter Information about the existing conditions within the study area is given; salient features like roadway right of way availability, presence of obstructions etc. are showcased for the road network defined. presence of obstructions etc. are showcased for the road network defined.

Chapter 4

Gives information about the general principles involved in the planning of NMT facilities. Types of bicycle facilities, their selection criteria; importance of pedestrian facilities, their integration with the bicycle facilities are described. This chapter provides the corridor-wise planning and Design of the bicycle facility Describes the various elements involved in the design of bicycle network. Elements like, markings and signage, bicycle stands, lane surface, lane separations etc. are addressed. Design of walkway network is presented here. Detailed cost estimates are presented here.

Chapter 5 Chapter 6

Chapter 7 Chapter 8

2.1 Introduction
Conventional traffic/transport studies focus on vehicular movement rather than NMT. While large investment was made to improve vehicular traffic flow, minimal budget has been allocated to improve the

Chapter 2 Planning of NMT Facilities

convenience/safety of NMT. The importance of pedestrians and NMVs in Indian cities has largely been neglected in planning for mobility improvement, and Bangalore is no exception to that. Motorized trips, however, also involve walking and cycling as feeder or transfer. A high percentage of trips below 3 to 4 kilometers in Bangalore are performed by walking or NMVs, such as bicycles and there is an acute need to improve NMT facilities and safety considerations. In this regard, planning for NMT network in the vicinity of MG Road makes an ideal start, as the upcoming Metro can be effectively connected and serviced by the NMT network and its users. It is important to have the NMT network well integrated with the other road network within the study area. strive for the following Goals: GOAL 1: MOBILITY AND ACCCESSIBILITY The integrated network should

Maximum number of people should be able to move fast, safely and conveniently through the integrated network.
GOAL 2: SAFETY AND COMFORT

Make streets safe clean and walkable, create climate sensitive design.
GOAL 3: ECOLOGY

Reduce impact on the natural environment; and Reduce pressure on built infrastructure.

The planning of NMT net T twork should consider the following principles: p All ro oads within the networ under rk consid deration should be made pedes strian, disable and bicycle friendly. ed e All tr ransit (bus, metro) stati ions and stops need to be c connected to the local ts street by adequate pedestrian facilities. All Metro stations need to have bike s facilities. sion for introducing cycle lanes, Provis pedes strian and disa abled friendly features y in roads. There are ma T any specific w ways to impr rove nonmotorized tran m nsportation: Impro ove sidewalk ks, crosswalk ks, paths and bike lanes. ct adway hazard to nonds Correc specific roa motor rized transpo (sometime called ort es spot improvement programs). t ove NMT Facility Managem ment and Impro Mainte enance, cleanliness. ase road an path Con nd nnectivity, Increa with special non motorized s shortcuts, m destrian links. . such mid-block ped including i reducing conflic between u cts users, and ma aintaining

Stre furniture ( eet (e.g., benches s). Traf ffic Red ductions, Calming, Traffic Vehicle Streetscape S Speed and ctions Restric Imp provements,

Roa Space Real ad llocation. Safe education law enforc ety n, cement and enco ouragement p programs. Inte egration with Namma Metr transit. ro

The roads within the study area are mainly ds. arterial road The roa hierarchy guidelines ad mandate inc clusion of cycle lanes and footpaths d as part of the road cr ross-section. These are rough traffic is high, c streets where the thr periods; as th connect hey especially during peak p her volume, higher speed arterials. d to the high Besides, the roads se ese erve commerc as well cial as institution traffic. nal Buses also ply on mos of the ro st oads under on. ads have hig level of gh consideratio These roa activity, as t they serve co ommercial nee like big eds retail outlets banks, restaurants, etc. They also s, support and enhance the social life o the area. d e of Residents sh hould feel sa and comfo afe ortable and the area ne eeds to be co onnected to the rest of the City by public transit and pede y estrian and non-motoriz modes. zed

2.2 2 Design Ele ements


Th Consultan he nts will focu on sever us ral design ele ements while planning th NMT netw e he work. The ke design com ey mponents of this project are cycle tra acks, walkwa ays, drainage officially-d e, designated pa arking, access man nagement, str reetscaping/la andscaping, room for uti ilities, and qu uality of work kmanship. Jun nction design is critical n for safety and movement. A brief desc cription of ach element is followed by a more in-depth e ea dis scussion in th later sectio he ons: 1. Drainage: critical to the success of th project, c he go ood drainage will eliminat a major o te obstacle to co omfort and attractiveness standing w a s: water and sp plashing from passing tra m affic. A redu uced curb he eight makes the cycle trac and walkw t cks ways more ac ccessible and inviting, and it helps with driveway h an access des nd sign. 2. Cycle tra acks: separa ation creates a more s tractive att env vironment fo or cyclists; elevation ma akes cyclists more visible t motorists. to

also be re egulated so valuable space is not taken e n from pede estrians, cyclis and other users. sts r 7. Bus St tops: Buses operate on s several of the e streets in mixed traffic, and pull ove to the curb er b op sengers. The e to pick up and dro off pass signs will mak it easier for ke r proposed bus stop des to d operators to stop and pull back int traffic, and to easier for passengers t board and alight. tscaping/lan ndscaping: 8. Street Street/lan ndscaping provides opportu unities for beautification and for s stakeholders t express to tivity and ima agination, add ding their creat spontaneity and charm to the street m t. ity of wor rkmanship: All of the e 9. Quali recommen ndations are accepted p practices that t have pro oven success sful elsewhe ere and will improve t quality of the experien for users, the f nce , but only on the co ondition the are welley ed ntained. NMT users have T e constructe and main very little tolerance for uneven sur rfaces, so the e final oduct pro depends being on cont tractors and d and d inspectors s conscient tious

understan nding the end-users needs s. 10. Junct tion and mid dblock cross sing design: : Most cras shes occur a junctions, and most of at f those invo olve turning m movements. Junctions are e also wher most traffic back-ups oc re c ccur. Junction n designs m must carefull balance s ly safety for all 3. Walkways: pedestrians need a clear, obstacle: , fre area with a smooth surf ee face. 4. Property access: mu ultiple poorly designed ccesses to pr rivate propert create obs ty stacles for ac wa alkers; they also create inefficient access and dr rainage proble ems for adjac cent propertie es. 5. Designate parking: on-street p ed parking is itical to the success of sm businesses located s mall cri dir rectly at th back of walk for s he short-term cu ustomer use; long-term em mployee use m must users and capacity. Long distances between d n junctions limit crossin opportunit ng ties, so it is s also al vita to provi ide legitimate midblock k crossings with median breaks betwe junctions. een

Issues relating to non moto orized vehicle and pedest es trians are add dressed in th report sep his parately as th he ature of their movement and requireme ents are different. There i no single c is correct solutio to providin on ng na su uitable infrast tructure for NMVs. Str rategies that emphasize traffic restra aint, speed r reduction an nd In the end, t the success o the chose of en pr romotion of environmenta friendly m e ally modes will te end to benefit NMVs. Dif fferent scena arios for NMV Vs re equire the co onsideration o techniques for managing them. of s sc cenario will depend upon the effective eness of the techniques f implementing it. It is important t for s to re egularly review NMV transp w port in order t monitor flo to ows and usag characteristics for future planning an ge e nd for evaluating the effectiven t ness of any measures.

3.1 Intr roduction


Planning for bicycle f facilities begi ins with obs serving and gathering da ata on the e existing s y conditions for bicycle travel. Problems, deficiencies, safety concerns and bicyclists needs

Chapter 3 Study Area Characteristics

should be identified. The existing b bicycling envir ronment shou be observ uld ved. Bicycle f facilities s typically used by bicyclists should be e d s examined for their suitab r bility for as well as roads not t bicycling. Motor vehicle traffic volum the percen e me, ntage and volume of bus t traffic and the speed e s nsidered, sinc they have a significant impact on bicyclists. In ad ce ddition, of traffic should be con obstructions and imped diments to bicycle travel s should be not ted, such as incompatible grates, debris, tre ees, utility p poles, electri transforme ic ers, driveway rough pavements, curbside ys, parking, poor sight dis p stance and tr raffic signals that are not responsive to bicycles. Po otential corridors for shared use should be e f e explored. The physical improvem ment plan sho ould also iden ntify locations in need of bicycle parking and s acilities. In ge eneral, provis sions for bicyc parking should be con cle nsidered at all major storage fa traffic gen nerators and a Metro statio and bus s at ons stops to encourage intermodal travel. Since the bicycle netw work corridors have alread been iden s dy ntified by DULT, the Cons sultants e f dge the feasibility of intro oducing have done a thorough inventory of the given network to jud bicycle lan on the id nes dentified corri idors. Topog graphic surve conducted on these co eys d orridors help in the design. e The list of Roads identified as Bicycle Network Co f e orridors are:
St.Marks Road Brigade Road

MGRoad

Ka amaraj Road R

Dedicat ted CycleTra ack

Residency Road

Cub bbon Ro oad

Richmond Road

The salien existing fea nt atures of the above mentioned corridors are presen nted in the fo ollowing sections:

3.2 MG Road G

Queens Circle

Anil Kumbl le Circle

Brigade Ci ircle Webbs Circle Mayo Hall Ci ircle

Feature es

M. G. Road is on of the busiest roads in the city and is lined on one side with ret stores, food o one t y etail outlets and restaurants It has many off buildings, sho and theatres. It is also a hom to a large num s. ffice hops s. me mber of buildings and ba anks. It is one of the M Major Roads conn necting Queens S Statue Circle & Tr Trinity Circle. The Namma Me Metro is proposed on the Norther side of the MG Road and Met Station is pro d rn tro oposed between Anil Ku umble and Brigade Circle. de

Roadway stretch from Queens Circle to Anil Kumble Circle

Six lane, divided roadway 3 m wide footpath on both sides Footpath on the north side - to the east of the driveway leading to KSCA stadium, is raised by about one meter Buses run on this stretch of MG Road No on-street parking is allowed on this stretch

Obstructing the Footpath- Forcing Pedestrians to walk on the Road

10

Road way stretch from Anil Kumble Circle to Brigade Circle


Four lane divided 3 m wide footpath on both sides
Footpath on north side proposed as boulevard is

One lane on the south is used for on-street parking Metro pillars run along the carriageway on the north side No buses are allowed on this stretch

11

Road way stretch from Brigade Circle to Mayo Hall Circle

Five lanes, 3 lanes on the north and 2 lanes on the south 3 m wide footpath on both sides Metro pillars run along the carriageway on the north side Buses are allowed on this stretch On-street parking is allowed on this stretch on both sides

12

Roadway stretch from Mayo Hall Circle to Trinity Circle

Five lanes, 3 lanes on the north and 2 lanes on the south 3 m wide footpath on both sides Metro pillars run along the carriageway on the north side Buses are allowed on this stretch

13

3.3 St.Marks Roa M ad


BRV Circle B

Anil K Kumble Circle

Madras B Bank Circle


Features

It is one of the Major Roa connecting e oads Residenc Road & Cubbo Road. ncy on One-way towards south b ay between Madras Bank Cir and Residenc Road; One-way rcle cy ay towards north between M s Madras Bank Circl cle and MG Road G

Residency Road J R Junction

14

Road way stretch from Residency Road to Madras Bank Circle


Four lane, undivided, one way 2 m wide footpath on both sides Buses are allowed on this stretch On street parking is predominant on western side of the road Two bus stops located adjacent to each other.

15

Road way stretch from Madras Bank Circle to Anil Kumble Circle

Four lane, undivided, one way 2 m wide footpath on both sides Buses are allowed on this stretch

16

Road way stretch from Anil Kumble Circle to BRV Circle

4 Lane Divided -Two way Road 3m wide Footpath on Both Sides No On-street found on this Road Bus stop exists on West side

17

3.4 Ka amaraj Road

Cubbon Road n Junction

MG Road G Jun nction

18

Roadway stretch from Cubbon Road to MG Road

4 Lane divided, Two way Road 3 m wide Footpath on both sides On street parking is predominant on the Eastern side of the road Buses run on this Road.

19

3.5 Cubbon Road

Central Street Junction

Main Guard Cross Road Junction

Kamaraj Road Junction

20

Roadway stretch from Central Street to Kamaraj Road

4 Lane divided, Two way Road 2 m wide footpath on both Sides (except some place) No on street parking found on this stretch Buses are running on this Road

21

3.6 Richmond Road


DSouza Circle u

Hosur Road Junction

Hayes Road s Junc ction

Featur res

It is on of the Major Ro ne Roads connecting H Hayes Road and V Victoria Road. Hosur R Road junction and DSouza Circle a the only majo junction found along the Richmond Road. nd are or d m

22

Roadway stretch from Hayes Road Junction to Hosur Road Junction


5 Lane undivided, One way Road 2 m wide Footpath on both sides No on street parking found on this Road Buses run on this Road

23

Roadway stretch from Hosur Road Junction to Victoria Road Junction

5 Lane undivided, One way Road 2 m wide Footpath on both sides No on street parking found on this Road Buses are running on this Road

24

3.7 Residency Road


MG Road Junction

Museum Road d Junction

St.M Marks Road Junction J

Features

It is one of t Major Roads c the connecting Fort R Road(Richmond C Circle) and MG Ro oad The major ju unctions are St.M Marks Road junctio Museum Road junction and MG Road junction. ion, d

25

Roadway stretch from St.Marks Road Junction to Museum Road Junction


4 Lane undivided, One way Road 2 m wide Footpath on both sides Predominant On street parking found on the northern side of the road Buses are running on this Road

26

Roadway stretch from Museum Road Junction to MG Road Junction

4 Lane undivided, One way Road More than 3m wide Footpath on Both Sides No on street parking found on this Road Buses are running on this Road

27

Bi cle Netw Bicyc N work De Design

28

4.1 Introduction
Bicyclists have the same mobility needs as every other user of the transportation system and use the roadway system as their primary means of access should to be jobs, services and into recreational the overall

Chapter 4 Planning of Bicycle Facilities

activities. Planning for potential bicycle use integrated transportation planning process. Plans for implementing bicycle projects should be consistent with communitys transportation plan and should reflect overall community goals. Some zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations inhibit bicycle use and may need to be amended to support shared use paths and bicycle-compatible roadway design, bicycle parking and land use policies.

4.2 Bicycle
As shown in Figure 1, bicyclists require at least 1.0 m of essential operating space based solely on their profile. An operating space of 1.5 m is assumed as the minimum width for any facility designed for exclusive or preferential use by bicyclists. Where the bicyclists have to travel adjacent to other motor vehicles, a more comfortable operating space of 2 m is desirable. The Indian Road Congress (IRC: 11- Design and Layout of Cycle Tracks) states that the minimum width required for one cycle is one meter and it recommends that the minimum width of the cycle track be 2 meters. When an additional lane is provided for the bi-directional movement of the cycles, the total minimum width of the bicycle lane is 3 meters.

4.3 Bicycle User


Three categories (A, B and C) of bicycle users normally use the bicycles. They include:

Advanced or experienced riders generally use


their bicycles as they would a motor vehicle. They ride for convenience and speed and want direct access to destinations with a minimum of detour or delay. They are typically comfortable riding with motor vehicle traffic.

Basic or less confident adult riders may also


be using their bicycles for transportation purposes, e.g., to get to the store or to visit friends, but prefer to avoid roads with fast and busy motor vehicle traffic unless there is ample roadway width to allow easy overtaking by faster motor vehicles.

Children may not travel as fast as their adult


counterparts but still require access to key destinations facilities. in their community, such as schools, convenience stores and recreational

29

4.4 Types of Facilities


Selection of a bicycle facility type is dependent on many factors, including the ability of the users, specific corridor conditions and facility cost. design. The descriptions below provide an overview of each facility type and general

4.4.2 Signed Shared Roadway


Signed shared roadways are those that have been identified by signing as preferred bike routes. There are several reasons for designating signed bike routes: a. The route provides continuity to other bicycle

4.4.1 Shared Roadway Bikeway Designation)

(No

facilities such as bike lanes and shared use paths. b. The road is a common route for bicyclists through a high demand corridor. c. The can route extend along local

Most bicycle travel now occurs on streets without bikeway designations. This probably will be true in the future as well. In some instances, the existing street network may be fully adequate for efficient bicycle travel and signing and striping for bicycle use may be unnecessary. In other cases, some streets may be unsuitable for bicycle travel at present, and it would be inappropriate to encourage bicycle travel by designating the routes as bikeways. cyclists without any bikeway designation. Width is the most critical variable affecting the ability of a roadway to accommodate bicycle traffic. In order for bicycles and motor vehicles to share the use of a roadway without compromising the level of service and safety for either, the facility should provide sufficient paved width to accommodate both modes. Shared roadways without any bikeway designation is not safe for the bicycle riders and will discourage cycles. them from using of Hence, we will not be this type These types of streets offer shared roadway to the

neighborhood streets and collectors that lead to an internal neighborhood destination such as a park, school or commercial district. Signing of shared roadways indicates to cyclists that there are particular advantages to using these routes compared to alternate routes. This means the responsible agencies have taken action to ensure these routes are suitable as shared routes and will be maintained.

recommending network plan.

facility in the present bicycle

30

The

following

criteria

should

be

Bike lanes are intended to delineate the right of way assigned to bicyclists and motorists and to provide for more predictable movements by each. Bike lanes also help to increase the total capacities of highways carrying mixed bicycle and motor vehicle traffic. Another important reason for constructing bike lanes is to better accommodate bicyclists where insufficient space exists for comfortable bicycling on existing streets. This may be accomplished by reducing the width of vehicular lanes or prohibiting parking in order to delineate bike lanes. In addition to lane striping, other measures should be taken to ensure that bicycle lanes are effective facilities.

considered prior to signing a route: a. The route provides through and direct travel in bicycle-demand corridors. b. The route connects discontinuous segments of shared use paths, bike lanes and/or other bike routes. c. An effort has been made to adjust traffic control devices (e.g., stop signs, signals) to give greater priority to bicyclists on the route, as opposed to alternative streets. d. Street parking has been removed or restricted in areas of critical width to provide improved safety. e. A smooth surface has been provided (e.g., adjust utility covers to grade, install bicycle-safe drainage grates, fill potholes, etc.) f. Maintenance of the route will be sufficient to prevent accumulation of debris (e.g., regular street sweeping). Typical bicycle route signing is shown in Figure x. For these signs to be more functional, supplemental destination plates should be placed beneath them when located along routes leading to high demand destinations (e.g., To Ulsoor, To Chinna Swamy Stadium, etc.). The signs must be placed at every 500 meters, every turn and at intersections.

4.4.3 Bike Lane or Bicycle Lane


Bike lanes are established with appropriate pavement markings and signing along streets in corridors where there is significant bicycle demand and where there are distinct needs that can be served by them.

31

Figure 4.1 Types of Facilities

32

4.5 Se election of F y Bicycle Facility


any Ma factors should be b

the
in

Pavement s P surface qualityBikeway should ys be b free of bumps, hole and other surface es r irregularities if they are to attract and s satisfy the needs of bicy n yclists. Utility covers and drainage y grates should be at gra g d ade and, if possible, outside the ex o xpected path of travel.

consider red

det termining the appropriate bicycle facility type: e y Cra Reducti ash ionThe reduction or pre evention of bicycle crashes (i.e., bic cycle/motor v vehicle, cycle/bicycle, bicycle/pede estrian and single bic bic cycle crashes is importa s) ant. Therefore, the pot tential for re educing crash problems t h through the e improveme ent of a facility shou uld be ass sessed. Plans for constr s ructing new bicycle fac cilities should be reviewe to identi d ed ify and res solve potentia safety issue al es. Ac ccessibility In locating a bicycle facility, con nsideration should be giv ven to the pr rovision for frequent and convenie r a ent bicycle access. Adequate acces for emerg ss gency, maint tenance d hicles should also be cons sidered. and service veh Oth her major traffic gen nerators such as edu ucational facilities, office buildings, sh hopping are eas, parks etc. should a e also be con nsidered wh hen evaluatin bicycle a ng accessibility. In the pre esent study, accessibility to Metro stations is an important co onsideration. otor Vehicle ParkingT e The density of onMo street parking can affect bicyclist safety (e.g., y ening car doors and ca ars leaving parallel ope par rking spaces Diagonal and perpen s). ndicular par rking arrange ements are n compatib with not ble bic cycle facilitie because of restricted sight es d dis stance and th related p he potential for bicyclemo otor vehicle conflicts. They should be a c y avoided wh herever possib ble.

Directness D Particularly for utilitarian bicycle n trips, facilities should conn t s nect traffic generators and should b located a a be along a direc line of ct travel that is c t convenient fo users. or Intersection Conditions I n sA high prop portion of bicycle crashe occur at i b es intersections. Facilities should be sele s ected so as to minimize the number o e of o crossings, o intersection should be improved or ns to t reduce crossing conflicts. At-grade intersections on high-volume (or hig gh-speed) roadways and mid-block crossings should be r analyzed wit bicyclists needs in mind to a th determine the most appro d e opriate crossin design ng treatments. t

Bus Stops B When bus st tops are located along a bicycle route, conflicts with bus loa ading and unloading and pavement deterioration, such as u d , asphalt pavem a ment shoving, may be prob , blems.

33

4.6 Bic cycle Co orridors s


econnaissance of the After conducting the re e idors were existing road network, the bicycle corri ther as exclusive bicycle lanes or identified, eit as mixed lanes. The d differentiation is purely n he s based on th available road widths and the constraints they have. t The corrid dors with exclusive bicy ycle lanes will have separa lane(s) ate for the move ement of bicyc cles. There c could be a single wider bicycle lan accommod r ne dating bidirectional cycle moveme ent, or, one lane on e each side of the road for each direction of o bicycle travel The mixed lane corrido will not l. d ors have any ex xclusive cycle lanes. e Th cyclists he share their sp pace with oth vehicles. However, her these corrido will have separate sig ors gnage and road marking to indicat that they are cycle gs te routes. g have been Accordingly, the following corridors h t eparate bicycle lanes: e identified as those with se MG Road (from Q R Queens Circle to Trinity e Circle e) St. Marks Road (from Reside M ency Road to Cu ubbon Road) Resid dency Road (f from Cash Ph harmacy to Mayo Hall Junction o n) Richm mond Road ( (from Richmo ond Circle to D Souza Circle) Cubb Road (from BRV to XXX bon XXX) Kama araja Road ( (from Cubbon Road to n MG Road) R There ar several advantages as well as re disadvantages in having exclusive bike lanes on these corridors. The rest of the roads w f within the ne etwork have been ident tified as mix xed lanes. network is shown in Figure 4.2. The bicycle Advantage es: The provide greater sense of security ey to NMV user The can allow for two-direc ey ctional NMV trav vel even on one way roads (eg: n Res sidency Road and Richmon Road) nd The ensure th ey hat NMV use will not ers ma sudden m ake movements int the motor to veh hicle lanes or obstruct mo otorists Disadvant tages: If the lane is to obstruct ted, go ar round it is the

inconvenient struction obs

The are more prone to filling with ey e deb bris, vendors etc. The can make truck delive ey e eries to the sto orefronts less convenient

34

Figure 4.2 Dedicate and Mixed Cycle Corridors u ed

35

5.1 Introduction

A 0.5 M buffer is kept between NMV and MV lanes in order to provide safety feeling to the cyclists and to maximize the speed, efficiency and capacity of the NMV Lane. This buffer space has been utilized segregate motorists. Special interventions at the junctions have been proposed for the safe passage of NMV users, including new signal timings and phases. Bicycle stand locations have been for installing the cyclists barriers from to the

The Cyclists (NMVs) are the second most vulnerable group of road users -after the pedestrians, and therefore must be clearly segregated from faster moving motorized traffic, on major arterials. As discussed in earlier

Chapter 5 Bicycle Network Design

sections, several of the main roads in the study area have been identified as corridors having separate bicycle lane(s). General principles adopted for this study for the design of bicycle network include: The NMV lane should be constructed with smooth-finished cement Concrete or Asphalt in order to ensure a low maintenance and smooth riding surface. In the absence of this, cyclists will tend to move into the MV lanes which may be more comfortable. Since, in this study, a portion of the existing carriageway itself will be marked as bicycle lane, no further treatment to the surface is needed except providing pigmentation to the bicycle lane. Minimum width of NMV lane is 2.0 M if the cycle travel is uni-directional or, 3.50 M if it is bi-directional. The bicycle lanes are proposed only on one side of the street in some corridors and on both sides of the street in some other corridors. The location of the bicycle lane is decided based on the characteristics of the street, upcoming happenings parking etc. (viz. Namma Metro), location of bus stops, existing on-street

identified at appropriate places. Necessary management road users. on-street measures have parking been

suggested for the smooth flow of all

36

Co orridor Plans
Deta ailed plans showing the proposed b s bicycle corr ridor network have been presented in the k follo owing sections s.

The pillars of th metro dec are placed on MG he ck oad (between Anil Kumble Circle and Brigade n e Ro Ro Junction) at an approx oad ximate distanc of 38 ce fee from the w of the Para Ground. et wall ade The Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Limited MRCL) is pro oposing a bo oulevard com mprising (BM parks, open air theaters, m r museums etc. in the . ace between the compou n und and the metro e spa col lumns. Henc the 3.5 m wide carriageway ce, str to the sou of metro columns is u rip uth used as the bicycle lane. e Between Briga ade Road Ju unction and Trinity rcle In this stretch of the roadwa the f ay, Cir me etro columns are placed in the middle of the e roa The prop ad. posed bicycle lane is aligne along ed the northern k e kerb. It will continue till Trinity Cir rcle. The proposed bicycle plan along MG R Road is own in the pla ans. sho

5.2 MG Road R
The bicycle lane has been proposed o the e on thern carriage eway on MG Road. It wil be a ll nort 3.5 m wide lane catering to bi-directional cycle e l fic. traff The bic cycle lane st tarts from Queens Circle and ends just before the Metro s station r e. near Trinity Circle Betw ween Queens Circle and A Kumble C s Anil Circle The bicycle lane will be the s strip of 3.5 m wide riageway from the north ke m erb. carr Betw ween Anil Ku umble Circle and Brigade Road Junc ction - The elevated co orridor of Namma Metro enters MG Road at Anil Kumble Circle e.

So ource: BMRC CL

37

CORRIDOR PL N R LAN G OAD MG RO D CORR OR P AN- M ROAD O RIDO PLA MG A


38

Interventions
1. The bus shelter located between Queens Circle and Anil Kumble Circle is to be shifted towards the carriageway so as to let the bicycle lane go behind the bus shelter. At this stretch, the bicycle lane and the pedestrian footpath are combined. 2. The existing median to be slightly shifted (shown in the plan) to maintain uniform lane configuration throughout. 3. In the stretch between Anil Kumble Circle and Brigade Road, the existing median that runs for a shorter distance is to be removed. MG Road to the east of Kumble Circle has five-lanes, with three lanes on the north and two on the south. To accommodate the bicycle lane, one lane in the north is utilized. By taking out an entire lane from the carriageway that is meant for motor vehicles and giving the same to NMT, we are following the Road Dieting measures to promote NMT. The same measure is followed (four lanes of carriageway for MV) up to Trinity Circle Junction. Accordingly, new median is to be built on this stretch to match the new lane configuration. 4. Space for bicycle stand has been provided in the stretch between Brigade Road Junction and Mayo Hall. 5. On-street parking locations are also identified as shown in the plans. 6. Footpath widening and improvements are recommended at certain places as shown in plans. 7. The bus shelter located to the east of Mayo Hall near Webb Junction is to be shifted towards the carriageway to accommodate the bicycle lane to run behind the shelter. 8. On the north side between Webb Junction and Trinity Circle, a strip of area measuring about 250 m long and 2 m wide is identified and reserved for non motorized activities. This strip of land can be used for installing bicycle stands, road furniture, landscaping etc.

39

5.2 Profile 2.1 e/Cross S Sections

Figure 5.1 Cross sectio of MG Road between Queens Circle and Anil Kumble Ci C on n ircle

Figure 5.2 Cross sectio of MG Ro on oad between Anil Kumble Circle and Brigade Ci n d ircle

40

Figure 5.3 Cross section of MG Road between Webbs Circle and Madras Road

41

5.2.2 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.4 Anil Kumble Circle

42

Figure 5.5 Brigade Circle

43

Figure 5.6 Mayo Hall Junction

44

Figure 5.7 Webbs Circle

45

5.2.3 Bus St 5 top Interventions n

Figure 5.8 B Stop near MG Park Bus

46

Figure 5.9 Bus St g top near Mayo Hall Junction

47

5.2.4 Car/Cycle Parking

Figure 5.10 Proposed Cycle Stand near Webbs Junction

48

Figure 5.11 Proposed Cycle Stand and Car Parking near Brigade Road Junction

49

5.2.5 Modifications to Bicycle Alignment due to proposed Bus bays by BMRCL


The Bangalore Metro Rail Limited (BMRCL) has proposed a boulevard behind the columns of the elevated metro deck on the stretch of MG Road between Anil Kumble Circle and Brigade Road Junction. The boulevard supposed to have open-air theatres, auditoriums, museums etc. as per BMRCLs plan. The BMRCL has identified a few bus bay locations to bring in feeder bus service to these attractions. (Refer Figure 5.12 for BMRCL Plan). Hence, the proposed bicycle lane will have conflicts with the movement of buses at these bus bays. As the safety of cyclists is atmost important, we have suggested slight modifications to the bicycle lane alignment near proposed bus bays. The first bus bay proposed by BMRCL close to Anil Kumble Circle is not practical to construct, as there is no turning radius available. Hence, we suggest that the bus bay be discarded. The interventions proposed include: 1. Introduce a STOP BAR 15m before the start of bus bay; install a rubber stopper before the STOP BAR 2. Discontinue(Remove the lane separation barrier) the bicycle lane beyond the STOP BAR 3. Continue (Re-Introduce the lane separation barricade) the bicycle 15m beyond the bus bay. 4. Take the bicycle lane behind the proposed bus bay on to the pedestrian walkway; bring back the cycle lane to its original alignment after the bus bays. 5. Behind the bus bays, the bicycle lane and pedestrian walkway are combined and together act as NMT path for that stretch. The modifications suggested to the bicycle lane to avoid conflicts of cyclists with the buses are detailed out in Figure 5.13(a) and 5.13(b)

50

5.3 St.Marks Road


The bicycle lane has been proposed on the eastern side on St. Marks Road between Residency Road and MG Road (Anil Kumble Circle). It will be a 3.5 m wide lane catering to bi-directional cycle traffic. The bidirectional bicycle lane starts from Residency Road and ends at Anil Kumble Circle on MG Road. To the north of Kumble Circle and up to Cubbon Road, bicycle lanes are proposed on both sides of St. Marks Road. This stretch of the road has been recently widened and can accommodate 2 m wide bicycle lane, one on each side of the road. These lanes are proposed to carry bicycle traffic in opposite directions. The proposed bicycle plan along St. Marks Road is shown in the plans.

54

CORRI IDOR PL N LAN ST.M RKS RO D MAR S OAD


55

Interventions
1. On west side of St. Marks Road between Residency Road and State Bank Circle, the width of foot path is inconsistent. The width varies from 2 m to 5 m at various places. It has been proposed to retain a standard width of 2 m throughout the stretch and utilize the excess width as part of carriageway. This will provide required space for accommodating the proposed bicycle lanes. 2. The bus shelter located on the east side near SBI ATM is to be shifted towards the carriageway to accommodate the bicycle lane to run behind the shelter.

3. The existing Island at State Bank Junction is to be redesigned to let the bicycle lane pass through the island and continue towards MG Road. Two raised pedestrian crosswalks are also proposed at this junction for the safe crossing of pedestrians. The intersection is also recommended to be signalized considering the volume of traffic it carries, especially at peak hours. improvement measures at the junction are presented in the drawings. 4. In front of Bowring Institute, on-street angular parking is allowed at all times. The footpath at this stretch has widths in excess of 3.5 m. It is recommended to keep 2 m wide footpath uniformly, and use the additional width as a part of carriage. It is also recommended to convert the angular on street parking to parallel parking. All these

5. On the stretch of St. Marks Road north of MG road and up to Cubban Road, the BMTC bus shelter is located on the west side near Anil Kumble Circle. The bus shelter is to be shifted towards the carriageway to accommodate the bicycle lane to run behind the shelter.

56

5.3.1 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.14 St.Marks Road-Residency Road Junction

57

Figure 5.15 St.Marks Road-Madras Bank Circle

58

Figure 5.16 BRV Circle

59

5.3.2 Bus Stops S

Figure 5.17 Proposed Bu Stop near Mysore Bank Junction 1 us y c

60

Figure 5.18 Propose Bus Stop nea Police Ground e ed ar d

61

5.3.3 Car/Cycle Parking

Figure 5.19 Proposed Car Parking Area near Bowing Institute

62

5.4 Residency Road


The bicycle lane has been proposed on the south side on Residency Road. The bicycle lane starts in front of Cash Pharmacy near St. Marks Road Junction and ends near Mayo Hall Junction with MG Road. It will be a 3.5 m wide lane catering to bi-directional cycle traffic. The proposed bicycle plan along Residency Road is shown in the plans.

63

COR DOR PL C RRID R LAN RESI NCY RO D R IDEN Y OAD

64

Interventions
Residency Road is a one-way street with the traffic moving towards east from Richmond Circle. Between Cash Pharmacy and Madras Bank Road Junction, there are five lanes. The southernmost lane has been used as the bicycle lane. Between Madras Bank Road and Brigade Road, and to some stretch to the east of Brigade Road, the width of the roadway reduces. The principle of Road Dieting is applied at these stretches of roadway. Besides, the footpath on the southern side is as wide as five meters. Keeping a minimum width of two- meters, the additional width is used for the bicycle lane.

65

5.4.1 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.20 Residency Road-Brigade Road Junction

66

Figure 5.21 Residency Road-Museum Road Junction

67

Figure 5.22 Residency Road-St.Marks Road Junction

68

5.5 Richmond Road


The bicycle lane has been proposed on the north side on Richmond Road between Hayes Road and DSouza Circle. Khode Circle. The proposed bicycle plan along Richmond Road is shown in the plans. It will be a 3.5 m wide lane catering to bi-directional cycle traffic. No major interventions are needed for the introduction of bicycle lane, except for footpath improvements near

69

COR DOR PL N RRID R LAN RICH OND RO D R HMO D OAD

70

5.5.1 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.23 Richmond Road- Hosur Road Junction

71

5.6 Kamaraj Road


The bicycle lanes are proposed on both sides of Kamaraja Road on the stretch between Cubbon Road and MG Road. Each bicycle lane is 2.5 m wide and caters to cycle traffic in opposite directions. No major interventions are required on this road for the introduction of bicycle lanes. The proposed bicycle plan along Residency Road is shown in the plans.

72

COR DOR PL N RRID R LAN KA AMARAJ RO OAD

73

5.6.1 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.24 Kamaraj Road- Cubbon Road Junction

74

5.7 Cubbon Road


The bicycle lanes are proposed on both sides of Cubbon Road on the stretch between Central Street Junction (BRV Theater) and Kamaraja Road. Each bicycle lane is 2.5 m wide and caters to cycle traffic in opposite directions. No interventions are required on this road for the introduction of bicycle lanes. The proposed bicycle plan along Residency Road is shown in the plans.

75

COR DOR PL RRID R LAN CU ON R AD UBBO ROA

76

5.7.1 Junction Improvements

Figure 5.25 Cubbon Road- Main Guard Cross Street Junction

77

5.8 Special Considerations for Bicyclists at Signalized Intersections


Intersections are the most likely place for motorized vehicle -bicycle collisions. Intersections should be carefully designed to reduce the chance of conflict. Driveways should have adequate sight lines to see all traffic on the road. Cycle lanes at intersections should be carefully designed. For a signalized intersection to function properly for a bicyclist crossing a major roadway at a signalized intersection, the following considerations must be addressed: Easy and accurate detection by the traffic signal controller by one of the following: 1. An embedded loop with placement and sensitivity to detect a bicycle. Identify loop with the standard Bicycle Detector Symbol 2. Video detection technology. 3. Use of a bicyclist-activated push button, as long as they do not require bicyclists to dismount or make unsafe leaning movements. These devices should be placed as close to the street as possible in a location that is unobstructed by parked vehicles or motorists making left-hand turns.

Safe location to wait for green signal Bicyclists awaiting a green light should not block vehicle left turns (if allowed). Sufficient lane width or stenciling can help with lane positioning and traffic flow. Signal timing providing adequate time for bicyclists to safely cross the intersection. The Consultants recommend for this project, an extended pedestrian and cyclists timing embedded in to the green timing. The existing signal timings at all the junctions on corridors having dedicated bicycle lanes have been collected and analyzed. Appropriate signal timings and phasings are recommended at these junctions. The same have been presented in APPENDIX B. The main interventions suggested at junctions include: 1. Pulling ahead of the STOP BAR by one meter for the safety of NMT users 2. Clearly marking the cycle crossing lines along with the pedestrian zebra crossings 3. Revised signal timings including an extended green time for the crossing of NMT users 4. Appropriate signage and road markings

Detailed drawings of all the junctions and suggested improvements are already shown separately for each intersection.

78

5.9 Specia Cons al siderati ions Bicyclis at B Stop sts Bus ps for B
Since th bus stops are located a the curb si he at ide, and the bicy ycle lanes als run along the curb side there so e, always exists a con nflict between the buses e n entering elter and the cyclists on the bicycle lane This c e es. the she is norm mally handled by breaking the bicycle lane as g the bus stop approa s aches, provid ding warning signage for the cyclists and continuing th lane after the bus he stop. T buses en The nter and leave the shelters at the e s section where the bicycle lane is broken. T b This is a angerous pre eposition in I Indian condit tions as very da the safe of the cyc ety clists is compr romised.

Un nder these c circumstances the best s s, solution is to o take the bicycl lane behin the bus st le nd tops and pull l ack owever, non a availability of f ba the footpath also. Ho ad dditional right of way to take the bicycle lane behind t e d the existing lo ocation of the bus stops in the study e y rea ar under consideration n needs an n alternative e so olution. Ac ccordingly, it is recommended that the bus stops be e pu ulled from the curb edg to the e ge edge of the e ca arriageway lan ne. The bicy ycle lane is th combined hen d wi the footp ith path and tak ken behind th bus stop. he . Af fter clearing t the bus stop, the bicycle lane is again , n pu ulled back sep parately to its original align s nment. De etailed drawin showing the interventions needed ngs d at the bus stop are present in previou sections. ps ted us

79

5.10 Shared Marking

Lane

Shared lane marking provide increased visibility and awareness for motorists to be aware of the likelihood of cyclists along the route. The use of signage or shared lane markings also serve to guide cyclist along designated bicycle routes. Some of the shared/mixed lane corridors in the study area are listed in Table 5.1. Table 5.1 List of Mixed lane corridors
Sl no 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Name of Road Lavelle Road Road behind St marks Cathedral Church Madras bank Road Portion of Vittal Malya Road Church Street Musium Road Wellington Road Rhenius Road O'Shaughnessy Road Hayes Road Brigade Road Resthouse Park Road Portion of Victoria Road Portion of Lower Agaram Road Magrath Road Portion of Richmond Road towards Flyover Portion of Richmond Road towards Trinity Brunton Road Primrose Road Commisionarate Road Dickension Road Portion of Kamaraja Road Main Guard Cross Road Road Central Street Hospital Road Dispensory Road Portion of Old Madras Road Portion of Residency Road towards Flyover

80

6.1 Introduction
A well designed and executed alternative transportation network is comprised of many

Material for NMT lanes: In general, to attract NMT users, the cycle lanes should have good riding qualities and reflecting qualities, better than the carriageway. This would mean, same materials that are used for the carriageway could be used for NMT lanes, but care and maintenance of these lanes need to be of higher priority. However, a coloured surface treatment needs to do more than just provide a colour contrast. It must be designed to function like any other road surfacing, providing a sound, durable surface layer, which maintains the required texture and skid resistance for its design life. The design and specification of a coloured surface treatment for bicycle lanes should ensure the suitability of the existing surface to support and bond with the colour designed and treatment; and provide a surface texture and skid resistance suitable for bicycle use, including in wet conditions; and limit differential skid resistance between the bicycle lane and adjacent traffic lanes. A range of products of varying cost are available for achieving coloured surfaces on roads. Specialist linemarking companies offer surface treatments, which may include cold or hot coloured thermosetting, thermoplastic or epoxy binders, with natural or synthetic coloured aggregates. A coloured bituminous seal or asphalt layer, or coloured concrete, may also have application in some circumstances. The coloured binder, and any coloured surface coating on the aggregate, will wear and expose more of the base aggregate colour over time. Use of a product incorporating a clear synthetic aggregate with coloured surfaces can enhance colour retention. (Source: Pedestrian guidelines, DULT)

Chapter 6 Components of Bicycle Network

elements that combine to ensure a safe, efficient, and pleasant bicycling experience for residents and visitors to reach desired destinations. A bicyclist must feel safe in order to utilize a cycling network and they must have clear direction and system information. A wellutilized bicycle facility must be free of too many physical barriers, provide as much separation from motorists as possible, present a clear understanding of bicycling options, and lastly, to the best extent possible, be comprised of fairly continuous and direct routes. Bicycle facilities must be

constructed to meet different physical and site characteristics and must consider multiple user types and comfort levels. An overview of the components necessary to create a safe and effective bicycle network are presented below.

6.2 Pigmented Bicycle Lanes


Pigmented bicycle lanes are common in many cities throughout the world. The coloured bicycle lanes which differ from the motor vehicle lanes have the following benefits: Increase driver and cyclist awareness of a bicycle lane, and to discourage drivers from encroaching into a bicycle lane. Highlight the presence of a bicycle lane to reduce the potential for conflict between bicycles and other vehicles; Motor vehicle parking is discouraged

81

his REEN For th study, Consultants recommend GR colour to be used for the bicycle lanes. r f e

Bollard ds

6.3 Lane Separa 3 S ators


n e ysical Bicycle paths often need some form of phy er ay nt hicles barrie at roadwa to preven motor veh from entering. Lis sted below are some pos ssible cal examples of physic barriers.

82

Cur rb

Plantation n

83

6.4 Bicycle Racks e s


In order to promote the use o bicycles as a of on cyclists must be viable transportatio mode, bic ed nities to sto ore bicycles at provide opportun commu unity destinat tion points, tr ransit stops, a and trail head locations. There are a number of e ns bicycle rack design available, simple designs mit sibility of ben nding of bicy ycle that lim the poss wheels and ease of use are pref s f ferred. Also, i is it importa to locate racks so they have space so ant e as not hamper pede estrian flow, a located close are tination and/o building entrances, and are or to dest approp priately lighte and locate with a cl ed ed lear view to ensure saf o fety for the user. Below are examples of some commonly used bike r e rack ms. system

84

6.5 Signs and Pavement Markings


The design of signs and marking must be consistent with the standards of IRC or any other international standards like MUTCD. The three sign categories affecting motorists, pedestrians and cyclists are: Regulatory warning Guidance

Regulatory Sign
The regularity signs convey traffic laws or regulations which would not otherwise be apparent. Designated bicycle lane signs should be located prior to the beginning of a marked designated bicycle lane to warn motorists of the presence of cyclists.

85

Warning Sign
These signs warn motorists and cyclists of potential hazardous conditions on or adjacent to the road. The use of warning signs must be limited to areas where the condition might not be apparent to avoid over use of a sign.

Guidance Sign
These provide cyclists with information relating to route identification and direction to ensure that the route is accurately followed.

86

Wa way Ne Walkw y Network k De Design

87

7.1 Introduction
A clear, wide, obstacle-free walkway area with a smooth surface is needed to attract pedestrians. An idealistic footpath (commonly seen in all developed countries) is the one that has four zones embedded in to it. The four zones are: The The The The curb zone furniture zone pedestrian/walking zone frontage zone

Chapter 7 Walkway Design


Each zone has its function, and omitting a zone compromises the quality of the walking experience. The zone system makes it easier to provide a continuous, smooth and level sidewalk free of obstacles as its easier to keep the sidewalk level across driveways, and all potential obstructions (poles, signs, trees, drinking fountains, benches, etc.) can be placed in the furniture or frontage zones. Separation from the roadway also places pedestrians further from traffic, increasing comfort and security.

88

7.2 The Curb Zone


A vertical (barrier) curb channelizes drainage and prevents people from parking their cars on the Side-walk. The curb zone is where a sidewalk transitions to the street at junctions. For this project a 150 mm vertical curb is recommended, so pedestrians dont have to step up too high to access the Side-walk. This also facilitates cyclist access to the cycle track, and driver access to private properties.

The

ITDP

Street

Design

Manual

minimum

pedestrian zone width is 2 m; 2.5 m is preferred. This width allows to people walk side by side, or to pass each other comfortably. Clearance to vertical obstructions (signs, tree limbs, etc.) must be at least 2.1 m. At no point should the pedestrian zone be less than 1.5 m wide at pinch points such as around poles. The pedestrian zone should be straight, but can meander occasionally to avoid large obstacles such as mature trees or other objects too big to move.

7.3 The Furniture Zone


The furniture zone is located between the curb and pedestrian zones and has many functions: Room for street trees, landscaping and street furniture, bicycle and two-wheeler parking, poles, posts, mailboxes, parking meters, zone. Pedestrians are separated from traffic, increasing a walker's sense of security and comfort. The sidewalk stays level across driveways. Improved drainage: prevents water in puddles from splashing onto pedestrians. The furniture zone should be 1.5 m wide or more. Where constraints preclude the use of the same width throughout a street segment, the furniture zone can be interrupted and resumed where the constraint ends. etc. They are no longer obstructions if placed out of the walking

7.5 The Frontage Zone


The frontage zone is located between the pedestrian zone and the right-of-way. Some street furniture can be placed there, but in this project, its primary function is to provide room for storefront businesses to display their goods and for shoppers to browse. Its where people enter and exit buildings. The recommended width is 1 m or greater. The total recommended width for the furniture, walking and frontage zones is 5 m; the nominal dimensions of these zones indicate they can vary, as long as there is always a clear walking path at least 2 m wide.

7.4 The Pedestrian Zone


This is where people walk. The design and construction documents should clearly state the pedestrian zone dimension is to be clear of obstructions.

89

7.6 Recommendations for Walkways (Footpaths)


Sidewalks and Cycle Lanes are regarded as a transportation system which is connected and continuous, just like roadways and railways. Key Design Guidelines: Avoid sidewalk interruptions by minimizing kerb cuts i.e. Minimize the number of driveways that cross the sidewalk in order to support pedestrian safety and a continuous sidewalk. Maintain an even surface and elevation of the pavement at 150 MM or less from surrounding road level. At entry points of properties introduce raised driveway or table-top details where pedestrian and cycle tracks continue at their same level, but the motorized vehicles have to move over a gentle ramp to enter the property. Remove all obstructions from the sidewalks. Consistency of design elements, color and texture, help provide visual continuity and calm traffic, even at crossings. It is recommended that a minimum of 2 m wide footpath be maintained on all the corridors within the study area. The lane widths are not consistent throughout the stretch on corridors like MG Road and Residency Road. It is recommended that a constant carriageway width accommodating four lanes be maintained throughout the stretch, and any additional available space be given up for NMT users. Street FurnitureStreet furniture makes the pedestrian experience comfortable and encourages using the pedestrian/NMT walkway. All street furniture should be relocated.

be it electric poles, trees, trash cans (in mixed use/commercial areas), informational as well as directional signage, so that the minimum 2m width of pedestrian through zone is maintained. Trash cans should be placed at every 100 m in crowded commercial areas.

7.7 Kerb Ramps


Kerb ramps provide pedestrian access between the sidewalk and roadway for people using wheelchairs, strollers, walkers, crutches, handcarts, bicycles, and pedestrians who have trouble stepping up and down high kerbs. The absence of kerb ramps prevents any of the above users from crossing streets. Kerb ramps must be installed at all intersections and mid-block locations where pedestrian crossings exist. At Signalized Crossings: Use Kerb Cut- Ramps. Location of Kerb Ramps must align with the Zebra Crossing location and the location of Kerb-ramp on the opposite side.

90

Key D Design Guidelines: Standard kerb ramps a cut back into the k are footpath (f flush with roa adway), at a gradient no greate than 1:12 with flare sides er 2, ed (1:10) providing tr p ransition in three n directions. Width of the kerb ram should not be less t mp t than 1.2 M. M Tactile warning strip to be provided on the o d e slope, so that persons t kerb side edge of the s with vision impairment do not acc n t cidentally walk onto the road. The ramps should be flared smooth into the s h street surf face and checked period dically to make sur large gaps do not develop re between th gutter and street surfac he d ce. It is desira able to provid two kerb cuts per de corner. Sin ngle ramp loc cated in the c center of a corner is less desira i able. Separat ramps te provide gr reater inform mation to pedestrians with vision impairment in street crossings. n Mid block crossings ac ccessible for persons be or with disability should b provided fo blocks n longer than 250M.

Ke Design Guidelines: ey Placem ment of servic ces which req quire access covers should not be done und the NMV der s end b lane as the covers te to disturb the cyclists ride quality. Indian and intern national sta andards are ng available for spacin between the various uld ed. services. These shou be followe Locatio should be decided afte accounting ons er for all the different utilities to b placed in t be eet. Individua utility prov al viders should the stre get the locations and routes appr e d roved. The St tudy Area C Corridors cou uld consider providin Common Utility Ducts for carrying ng the se ervices. This will preve s ent periodic digging up of roads for maintenance. g Utilities must be placed in a ne and tidy s eat manner. Poorly inst talled service make the es ok area loo ugly. It would be prudent to leave pipe under the t es th e d footpat to provide cabling and services in the fut ture. This will help avoid unnecessary digging and damag to the pa g ge avement and road su urfaces.

7.8 Under 8 rground Utiliti d ies


ul nd f mportant Carefu location an planning of services is im in ord der to cause minimum d e disturbance t street to users during repair and mainte rs enance of utili ities. The s street is also a carrier of u urban utilities such as s water lines, sewer, electrical an telecom dis r , nd stribution cables gas pipes etc. thes must be located s, s, se under rground and in some cas ses over grou und in a prope manner. er

91

7.9 Midblock Crossing


Raised Crosswalks (Table tops) are designed to increase the visibility of pedestrians to motorists, to encourage drivers to proceed at or below the posted speed limit and for safe passage of pedestrians. Raised crosswalks can be used at mid-block or at intersections. The raised crosswalks are proposed at locations where the distance between two junctions on any road is more than 250 metres.The Raised Crosswalks are also proposed at Madras bank circle on St.Marks Road.

Key Design Guidelines: Zebra width - 2 to 4 meters Not within 150 meters from each other Median strip should be adequate width (this is the only reference to pedestrian refuges) Mid-block crossings should be provided when distance between two consecutive intersections is more than 250 meters Control measure could be a push button pelican signal when pedestrians are fewer

92

7.1 Traffic Calm 10 ming M Measure es


Traffi calming is intended to s ic slow or reduce motor-vehic traffic in o e cle order to improve safety fo pedestrians or s and b bicyclists and improve the environmen for residen d e nt nts. The traff calming m fic measures ado opted for the e prese study are listed below. ent Exclusive Bicycle Lanes s High Raise Pedestrian Crossings at every 250 m and at pro ed n ominent locati ions On street parking restrictions Speed Lim mitation / slow sign boards w Cycle frien ndly Junctions s Advanced STOP bar at junctions f vehicles for Separate signal phasing s g Redistribution of Carria ageway Ro oad Dieting

93

A detailed cost estimate has been done for implementing the NMT Network. This includes the costs for introducing the bicycle network, as well as for improving the pedestrian walkways. The total cost for implementing the NMT Network is Rs.4.57 Crs. The summary of costs is presented in Table 8.1 Table 8.1 Summary of Cost Estimate

Chapter 8 Implementation Plan

Chinage in Meters Sl No Description From To

Length in Meters

Cost in Rs.

Part-A Dedicated Corridors for Cycle Track (Separated track) 1 2 3 4 5 6 Cost Estimate for M G Road Cost Estimate for St.Marks Road Cost Estimate for Richmond Road Cost Estimate for Residency Road Cost Estimate for Cubbon Road Cost Estimate for Kamaraj Road 0 0 500 0 1250 0 Total 2200 1250 1500 1250 2000 200 6.65Km 2200 1250 1000 1250 750 200 6650 14450000 7080000 6615000 9900000 5460000 1665000 45170000

Part-B MixedTraffic Corridors for Cycle Track 7 Cost Estimate for Mixed/laneTraffic Corridors for Cycle Track 28 Roads Total TOTAL COST IN Rs 17.62Km 24.27KM 24266.00 17616.00 510000 510000 45680000

Total Cost in crores

4.57

94

The detailed costs (Corridor wise) are presented in Appendix C.

8.1 Phasing
The implementation of the NMT Network can be carried out in the following phased manner:

Phase 1:
Signages and Markings on all Shared (Mixed) bicycle lane corridors. Bicycle lane on MG Road Bicycle lane on St.Marks Road Bicycle lane on Cubbon Road Bicycle lane on Kamaraj Road

Phase 2:
Bicycle lane on Richmond Road Bicycle lane on Residency Road

Cost for Phase 1: Rs. 2.92 Crs Cost for Phase 2: Rs. 1.65 Crs

95

96