Presenting, Analysing and Charting Data | Microsoft Excel | Mean

Learning Development Unit Training and Skills Development Programme

Course Code: XL0705 Excel 2007: Presenting, Analysing and Charting Research Data

www.istraining.bham.ac.uk

Excel 2007: Presenting, Analysing and Charting Research Data (XL0705)
Author: Sonia Lee Cooke (The course is substantially based on a previous course developed and presented by Duncan Greenhill, Barbara Hallam and Dr Graham Hendry). Version: 1.0, October 2009 © 2009 The University of Birmingham All rights reserved; no part of this publication may be photocopied, recorded or otherwise reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any electrical or mechanical means without permission of the copyright holder.

Trademarks: Microsoft Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. All brand names and product names used in this handbook are trademarks, registered trademarks, or trade names of their respective holders.

Excel 2007: Presenting, Analysing and Charting Research Data

Contents
ABOUT THE WORKBOOK......................................................................................................................1 HOW TO DO SOMETHING ....................................................................................................................1 ABOUT EXCEL ............................................................................................................................................. 2 FORMATTING CELLS .............................................................................................................................2 CUSTOM FORMATS ...................................................................................................................................... 2 Cells with text or symbols ................................................................................................................... 4 Number formats ................................................................................................................................. 4 Leaving space ..................................................................................................................................... 4 Conditions in Custom Formats ............................................................................................................ 5 COPYING FORMATS ...................................................................................................................................... 5 Format Painter ................................................................................................................................... 5 Styles .................................................................................................................................................. 6 ARRAY FORMULAE ...............................................................................................................................8 Array constants .................................................................................................................................. 9 CHARTS .............................................................................................................................................. 10 CREATING A CHART .................................................................................................................................... 10 The elements of a chart .................................................................................................................... 10 CHART LOCATION ...................................................................................................................................... 11 SAVE THE CHART FORMATTING AND LAYOUT AS A TEMPLATE ............................................................................. 12 APPLYING A CHART TEMPLATE TO AN EXISTING CHART ...................................................................................... 12 REMOVING OR DELETING A CHART TEMPLATE ................................................................................................. 13 ADDING ERROR BARS TO A CHART ................................................................................................................. 13 ADDING MORE SERIES TO A CHART ................................................................................................................ 15 Missing data points .......................................................................................................................... 15 ADDING A SECOND Y AXIS ........................................................................................................................... 16 ADDING A SECOND X AXIS ............................................................................................................................ 17 COMBINATION CHARTS ............................................................................................................................... 18 X-Y SCATTER CHARTS ................................................................................................................................. 18 ADD A TRENDLINE TO A CHART .................................................................................................................... 18 WORKING WITH COMMENTS ....................................................................................................................... 19 PRINTING COMMENTS ................................................................................................................................ 20 FORM CONTROLS ............................................................................................................................... 22 STATISTICS WITH EXCEL ..................................................................................................................... 24 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS .............................................................................................................................. 24 Conditional formatting for extreme values ...................................................................................... 25 EXCEL ADD-INS.......................................................................................................................................... 30 PRODUCING HISTOGRAMS .......................................................................................................................... 31 Dynamic histograms ......................................................................................................................... 33 LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION ............................................................................................................ 33 Calculating linear regression coefficients ......................................................................................... 34 Calculating best fit values................................................................................................................. 36 2 Calculating r .................................................................................................................................... 36 Reduced Major Axis regression ........................................................................................................ 36 MULTIPLE REGRESSION ............................................................................................................................... 36 Calculating polynomial regression coefficients ................................................................................ 37 CONFIDENCE INTERVALS.............................................................................................................................. 37
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FORMULAE REFERENCES .................................................................................................................... 38 REFERRING TO CELLS .................................................................................................................................. 38 Relative references ........................................................................................................................... 38 Absolute references .......................................................................................................................... 38 FORMULAE ACROSS WORKSHEETS ................................................................................................................. 39 NAMED RANGES ........................................................................................................................................ 40 EXCEL RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................. 41 WEBSITES ................................................................................................................................................ 41 NEWSGROUPS .......................................................................................................................................... 41 SEARCH ENGINES ....................................................................................................................................... 42 APPENDIX A – CUSTOM FORMATTING CODES ................................................................................... 43 NUMBER CODES ........................................................................................................................................ 43 TEXT CODES.............................................................................................................................................. 43 DATE CODES ............................................................................................................................................. 43 TIME CODES ............................................................................................................................................. 44 APPENDIX B – EXCEL FUNCTIONS ....................................................................................................... 45 STATISTICAL FUNCTIONS.............................................................................................................................. 45 CURVE FITTING FUNCTIONS.......................................................................................................................... 46 DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS ........................................................................................................................... 47 SIGNIFICANCE TEST FUNCTIONS .................................................................................................................... 48

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About the workbook
The workbook is designed as a reference for you to use after the course has finished. The workbook is yours to take away with you so feel free to make any notes you need in the workbook itself. The workbook is divided into sections with each section explaining about a particular feature of Excel or how to do a particular task. Sections that take you through a particular procedure step-by-step look like this:

How to do something
Do this first. Then do this. Then do this to finish.

There are also a number of text boxes to watch out for throughout the workbook. These will help you to get the most out of Excel.

Tip The thumbs-up symbol in the margin indicates a tip. These tips will help you work more effectively.

Danger! The skull and crossbones picture in the margin indicates common mistakes or pitfalls to be avoided.

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About Excel
The handbook introduces some of the analytical and presentational features of Excel 2007, as well as looking at some of the more powerful formatting features. Excel 2007 is powerful enough to be used for the analysis of data from many research projects. There are a number of add-ins, both from Microsoft and other companies, which can extend its capabilities. Many of the dedicated statistical and graphing packages can read the Excel files if features are required that aren‟t provided in Excel.

Formatting cells
Custom formats
Formatting of numbers for statistical data can sometimes be critical. Suppose we have some data from analysing the concentration of copper in sediment samples. Half of the results might be accurate to two decimal places, but the other half might have been produced using a different analysis technique and might only be accurate to one decimal place. When the cells are displayed the decimal points won‟t line up. We can‟t simply format all the cells to one decimal place since we would lose precision in half the data. Neither can we format all the data to two decimal places since that would imply half of the data is more accurate than it actually is. So how do we make the cells line up? The answer is to use custom formats. When a number is typed into a cell, Excel initially stores it with the General format, unless it recognises it as a date, currency, or as a percentage. The General number format shows numbers with more than eleven digits in scientific format, such as 1.23E+11. The custom format can contain three sections for numbers and an additional section for text. The sections are separated by semicolons. Positive; negative; zero; text An example is shown below. ##0.00 ; [RED](##0.00) ; 0.00 ; “format for text” If we miss out any sections we still need to add in the semicolons. For example, if we wanted to enter a format for positive and zero numbers but not for negative numbers we would have two semicolons. Excel would recognise that the negative section was empty and that the second set of formatting codes applied to zeros.

To create a custom format:
Select a cell or range of cells.
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Click on the Home tab, in the Cells group, click on Format button. and select Format Cells… Alternatively, press Ctrl 1, the Format Cells dialogue box appears:

The Number tab is selected by default, under Category: click on Custom in the list of categories. Delete the word General from the Type: text box and enter the codes for the format you want. E.g. lets say we want to create a custom format to display degree census (oC). Enter the format code, then type quotes before the degree sign and after the C. It should now look like this (0 “oC”) Confirm that the sample is showing the data in the correct format.

Click on the OK button.

The codes that we can enter to create a custom format can be found in the Excel help system.

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Why have I got all these formats? Every time we modify an existing custom format, the original format stays in the list. Make sure you delete any that you don‟t need. If you accidentally delete a custom format you need, all the cells that use the format will lose the custom formatting. For example, if we have a custom o format to show 21 as 21 C and we delete the custom format then the cell will revert to displaying 21.

Cells with text or symbols
If we are recording some temperature data we might want to include the units. For example, we might want a temperature to be displayed as 21oC or 294K. If we just type 294K into a cell, Excel will interpret it as text and we won‟t be able to do any calculations with the value. The way we would solve the problem is by creating a custom format consisting of the number codes and any other text we need. To display text in a cell (with or without numbers) we enclose the text in quotes. Single characters can also be „escaped‟ i.e. treated literally by putting a backslash \ before the character. Some characters display without needing a backslash. These are: $ - + / ( ) { }: ! ^ & ~ = < > „ and the space character. If the cell is going to contain text, we use a code of @ to represent the cell content, e.g. “My name is ”@.

Number formats
When we create custom formats for numbers we put in placeholders to contain the digits. A # displays only significant digits and will not display zeros that are not significant. A 0 will display zeros that are not significant if the number has fewer digits than the format. If we want to have the thousands separated by commas we can include the commas in the format.

Leaving space
The Excel help system tells us that we can use a ? in the format to leave space. However, that method works best if we are using a monospaced font, i.e. each character is the same width, and most fonts installed on computers do not have equal width characters. We can get around the problem by using the underscore character. The underscore character leaves space equal to the width of the character that follows it. For example, _m will leave blank space that is the width of an m, while _i will leave space the width of an i. Neither code will put an m or i on screen.

I’m adding up time. Can I show a total more than 24 hours? If we are using any of the standard time formats and add up times we can run into problems if the total is more than 24 hours. For example, a timesheet would add up to 35 hours for a normal working week, but the standard time formats would display this as 11:00 i.e. the whole day has been discarded. We can get around the problem with a custom format of [hh]:mm which will display elapsed hours.
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I’ve lost my data If we don‟t put in the number or text codes then Excel will only display the o o text entered in quotes, for example, C instead of 21 C

So what does my cell contain? It contains the value you typed in. Think of it like typing in a number and then using the formatting to make it display with a pound sign. The cell still only contains the number, but the formatting is making it display differently.

Conditions in Custom Formats
If we want the custom formats to be conditional on some value then we can include conditions in the format. For each of the number sections the order would be: [condition][colour]codes Examples would be: [Green][>100]###.00;[<0][Red]###.00;0.00 This would give numbers larger than 100 in green, negative numbers in red and zeros as 0.00.

Caution! The conditions can override the „logic‟ of the sections, which are positive; negative; zero; text. For example: [Green][<-20]###.00 ; [>100][Red]###.00;0.00 would mean a value of -20 would be green, any number above 100 would be red, while –10 would have no formatting applied to it.

What colours can I use? The help system tells us we can have any one of eight colours. These are black, blue, cyan, green, magenta, red, white and yellow. However, we can get more. If we look at the patterns tab in the Format Cells dialogue box we see a grid of colours. Imagine them numbered from 1 2 3 … across the first row and 9 10 11 … across the second down to 56 in the bottom right-hand corner. If we type [color n] Excel will use that colour for that section. We need to use the American spelling for Excel to understand what we want.

Copying formats
Format Painter
Setting up formatting can be time consuming, but Format painter allows us to copy formats from one cell to another.

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To copy formats with Format Painter:
Click on the cell that has the formatting you wish to copy. Click on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click on the Format Painter icon.

The mouse pointer will change and have a paintbrush attached to it. Click on the cell you want to change. The mouse pointer will return to normal. Alternatively, double-click on the Format Painter icon and then click on the cells you want to change. The Format painter will remain switched on until ESCAPE is pressed or the icon is clicked again.

Styles
Format painter works well but it has its disadvantages. Suppose we have formatted a cell to have a red background and size 14 text and then used format painter to copy that format to 40 other cells. If we now change our mind and decide we want a blue background and size 16 text we will have to use format painter again. A better solution would be to use styles. Styles are a way of giving a nickname to the formatting applied to a cell. We can use styles to rapidly apply formatting to a cell, and we can change formatting throughout a spreadsheet by modifying the style.

To create a cell style
Select the cell that has the formatting to be copied. Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on the Cell Styles

button select New Cell Styles… at the bottom of the list, the Styles dialogue box appears:

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Type the name of the style in the Style name: box. Click on the Format... button and select the required format from the Format Cells dialogue box and click on the OK button to return to the Styles dialogue box. Click on the OK button on the Styles dialogue box

To apply a cell style:
Select the cells you want to apply the style to.

Click on the Cell Styles button, the style is displayed under Custom at the top of the list, select it. Alternatively you can rightclick on the style and select

To remove a cell style
Select the cells where the style has been applied. Click on the Cell Styles button. Under Good, Bad, and Neutral, click Normal, or right-click on the style and select Delete to delete it from the list.

To modify a cell style
Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on Cell Styles and right-click the Cell Style name and select Modify…

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Array formulae
Array formulae are one of the most powerful and least understood features of Excel. An array formula can give us back a single result or multiple results from complex calculations, without us having to enter the intermediate steps into the worksheet. We can also use arrays inside a normal formula. These are called array constants. Some of the functions in Excel require us to use an array formula because the function either uses an array or produces an array as a result. An example would be the matrix functions.

What’s an array? Think of an array as being like a grid. An array formula uses groups of cells instead of single cells as the source data for its calculation.

Suppose we have the following worksheet:

We can select cells C1 to C4 and type a formula =A1:A4+B1:B4. If we press enter we‟ll get the answer 6 in C1 only. If we press CTRL SHIFT ENTER then we will enter three formulas at the same time and we‟ll have the answers 2, 9, 6 and 8 in C1, C2, C3 and C4 respectively. Using an array formula has allowed us to create a calculation that gives us more than one answer. Excel has done this by „looping‟ through the array, i.e. Excel first adds A1 and B1 and puts the answer in C1, then Excel adds A2 and B2 and puts the answer into C2, then Excel adds A3 and B3 and puts the answer into C3 and finally adds A4 and B4 and puts the answer in C4.

To create an array formula for a single result:
Click in a single cell. Type the formula as normal. Press and hold down both the Ctrl and the Shift keys, and then press the ENTER key.

To create an array formula for a multiple result:
Select a range of cells. Type the formula as normal.

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Press and hold down both the Ctrl and the Shift keys, and then press the ENTER key.

Editing arrays When we have created an array formula with results in multiple cells we can‟t edit a single cell of the array. We have to select the whole range, edit the formula, and then press Ctrl Shift ENTER to re-create the array formula.

Where did the { } brackets come from? Excel has placed the { } brackets around the formula when we pressed Ctrl Shift ENTER. We can‟t type them normally as part of the formula and then press ENTER, we have to press Ctrl Shift ENTER.

Array constants
An array constant takes the place of a constant in a normal formula. For example, the „Large‟ function in Excel returns the nth largest number from a range. The syntax is where k is the place that we want i.e. 1 for the largest, 2 for the second largest and so on. The formula: =LARGE(A1:C20,1) would give us the largest number within the block of cells from A1 to C20. An array constant lets us find more than one number. For example, we might want the three largest numbers, or the 1st, 3rd and 5th numbers in the list. We can do this by entering a formula such as: =LARGE(A1:C20,{1,2,3}) =LARGE(A1:C20,{1;3;5}) or

To enter a formula with an array constant
Select a range of cells. The number of cells selected should be the same as the number of answers required. The selection can be vertical or horizontal. Type the formula and type the { } brackets around the array constant part. If the range selected is horizontal separate the array constants with commas. If the range selected is vertical separate the array constants with semi-colons. Press Ctrl Shift ENTER.

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My answers are identical If we have entered a formula with an array constant to give us multiple answers we can sometimes find all the answers are the same when we can see quite clearly from the data that they shouldn‟t be. An array constant varies according to whether we want a horizontal or vertical result. If we want results horizontally the array constants need to be separated with commas, e.g. {1,2,3}, but if we want results displayed vertically then we need to separate the array constants with semi-colons e.g. {1;3;5}.

Charts
Excel lets us create charts very easily. We can create a variety of different types of charts such as bar charts, pie charts, x-y scatter charts and many others. Once the chart has been created we can select various elements within them and modify or format them to suit the needs of that particular chart.

Creating a chart
To create a chart:
Select the data in the worksheet. Click on the Insert tab, choose the chart type from the Chart group. You can format different elements of the chart by clicking on the Format tab and select a required option from Current Selection and Shape Styles group.

The elements of a chart
A chart will consist of various elements and it can be useful to know what Excel calls them, for example, the help system might tell us to select a certain part of a chart.

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Chart location
When you create a chart, by default the chart is placed within the current worksheet. When the chart is within the worksheet it is sometimes called an embedded chart, you can click on it and drag it to a different location on the worksheet. You can also choose a different location on a completely separate worksheet. If you have a chart on a completely separate worksheet it can sometimes be more useful because it gives you more room to work.

I have an embedded chart. Can I print it on a separate page? Yes. If the chart is not selected then when you print you get what you can see on screen – the data and the chart together. If you click on the chart to select it you will see small dots in each corner and the middle of each side, within double-borders around the chart. If you print with the chart selected the chart will be printed on a separate page by itself, scaled up to fit the size of the paper.

To change chart location:
Click on the chart to select it. Click on the Design tab, in the Location group, click on the Move Chart button.

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The Move Chart dialogue box appears:

Choose the location and click on the OK button.

Save the Chart Formatting and Layout as a Template
There are a number of standard formats to pick from when creating a chart. We can change to a different format later, but quite often we find the standard formats are not quite what we want. If we are creating a series of charts then it can be quite long-winded to modify them all by hand. What we could do instead is to create our own custom format, store it and then apply it to all the other charts as well.

To save the chart as a template:
Create a chart and select areas of the chart and format as necessary. Click on the chart to select it. Under Chart Tools, click on the Design tab, in the Type group, click on Save as Template, the Save Chart Template dialogue box appears, make sure the Chart folder is selected, and in the File name: text box, enter a name for the Chart Template. Click on the OK button.

Applying a Chart Template to an existing chart
To apply a chart template to an existing chart:
Click on the chart to select it Click on the Insert tab, in the Chart group, click on chart dialogue box launcher

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The Change Chart Template dialogue box appears. Click on Template in the left pane Pick the required chart template from the list on the right Click on the OK button.

Removing or Deleting a Chart Template
To remove or delete a chart from the chart template folder:
Click on the Insert tab, in the Chart group, click on chart dialogue box launcher, and the Change Chart Type dialogue box appears. Click on the Manage Template button at the bottom of the Change Chart Type dialogue box. To remove the chart template from the Charts folder, to another folder, drag it to the folder where you want to store it. To delete the chart template from your computer, right-click it, and then click Delete.

Adding error bars to a chart
You can create a chart with a number of data series and then add error bars to the data. You have the choice of making the error bars show a variation of a fixed amount, a percentage, and one or more standard deviations, standard error or by a custom amount. The data for the custom variation is normally typed into a range of cells on the worksheet. Standard error is calculated by dividing the standard deviation by √n, where n is the number of data points. Additionally, we can choose to show error bars above the data point, below the data point or both.

To apply error bars:
Click on the data series; make sure they are all selected. Under Chart Tools, click on the Layout tab, in the Type group Click on the arrowhead to the right of Error Bars and select More Error Bars Options…the Format Error Bars dialogue box appears:

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Under Display you can choose plus, minus, both or none. Under Error Amount select the type of error bar required. If custom is chosen, either type the references in or click on the Specify Value button the Custom Error Bars dialogue box appears:

Click on the button with the red arrow and drag on the worksheet to select a range.

Click on the OK button on the Custom Error Bars dialogue box and click on the Close button on Format Error Bars dialogue box.

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I can’t enter my custom error bars If you type in the range for the error bars manually you may get an error when you try and press Enter. This is because Excel needs the exact reference, including any worksheet names. The full reference should be something like Sheet2!b3:b19, with an exclamation mark after the worksheet name. Alternatively, you can select from the worksheet directly as shown above.

Adding more series to a Chart
Each column or line is called a data series, since it is constructed from a series of data points. We can create a chart using a number of series by selecting the data before we create the chart. We might also be in the situation where we have an existing chart and we want to add another data series to it.

To add another series:
Select the cells containing the new values. Copy using the Copy icon, in the Clipboard group, on the Home tab or press Ctrl C. Click on the chart to select it. Click on the Home tab, in the Clipboard group, click on Paste and select Paste Special… the Paste Special dialogue box appears:

Ensure New series is selected and click on the OK button to insert the new series onto the chart.

Missing data points
Suppose we have a series of data points plotted as a line. If there is a value missing, i.e. a blank cell in the range, then Excel will leave a gap between and our data series will show as two lines instead of one, although both line fragments will have the same formatting. We can trick Excel into including the unknown value as part of the series when plotting the data.
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To include missing data points:
Click on the blank cell where the value should be. Type in #N/A.

Hiding the #N/A Typing in the #N/A code will make Excel treat the data as a continuous series for plotting, but doesn‟t look particularly good when printing the worksheet. We can work around this problem by formatting the cell so that the text is the same colour as the background.

Adding a second Y axis
We may have two data series that are difficult to plot on the same chart. We might have one data series with values that vary between 1 and 50, while a second series has values up to 4500. If we plot them together then we won‟t be able to see the detail on the first series because it will be very close to the x-axis.

We could do two different charts but that makes it awkward to compare the two series. An alternative solution would be to plot one of the data series on a second y-axis.

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To add a second y axis to a chart
Right-click on one of the data points in a data series. Select Format Data Series… the Format Data Series dialogue box appears:

Click on Series Options and select Secondary Axis. Click on the Close button.

I can’t add a secondary axis We can‟t add a secondary axis, either x or y, unless we have at least two data series on the chart. Another common problem is that we can‟t access the secondary axis area on the Format Data Series dialogue box. We need to set one of our data series to have a secondary axis first, before we can access that area on the Format Data Series dialogue box.

Adding a second x axis
Although rarer, there is sometimes a need to have two x axes as part of the same graph, it may be useful in an xy (scatter) chart or bubble chart.

To add a second x axis
Click a chart that displays a secondary vertical axis. The Chart Tools appears at the top right of the screen adding the Design, Layout, and Format tabs. Click on the Layout tab, in the Axes group, click Axes. Point to Secondary Horizontal Axis and select the required option. If you select More Secondary Horizontal Axis Options…
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the Format Axis dialogue box will open and you can select the display option that you want. Click on the Close button.

Combination charts
If we have more than one data series on a chart then we can include more than one chart type. For example, we could have one series plotted as a set of columns and one plotted as a line.

To create a combination chart:
Create or select a chart with more than one data series. Select one of the series. (We are going to apply a line chart to our existing chart) Click on the Insert tab, in the Charts group, click Line and choose the style you want.

I can’t pick the series If there are a lot of elements on a graph it can be difficult to select the one that we want, particularly if there are a number of series and regression lines. We can select the chart and then use the left, right, up and down arrows on the keyboard to cycle through all the elements on the chart

Alternatively, select the chart, click on the Layout tab, in the Current Selection group, click on the Chart Elements arrowhead and pick a series.

X-Y Scatter charts
Many types of experimental data involve sets of numbers plotted against each other. Depending on what options we pick, Excel can join the points with jagged or smooth lines, or leave them as separate points. We can then choose to add a trendline which will be a best-fit to the data. A trendline is more normally called a regression line. We can tell Excel to try and fit the regression line using a linear, polynomial, logarithmic, power or exponential relationship.

Add a Trendline to a Chart
To insert a trendline:
Click on the data series in the chart to select them.

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Click on the Layout tab, in the .Analysis group, click on Trendline

and select More Trendline Options… alternatively, right-click on the data series and select Add Trendline…, the Format Trendline dialogue appears:

Choose the type, and click on the Close button

What do the options in the Format Trendline dialogue box do? The options can be used to name the trendline by using the Trendline Name area, extend the line forwards or backwards by using the Forecast area, and 2 also to display the equation and R value. More detailed instructions are on page 34 in the section on linear regression.

Working with Comments
Comments are notes that you attach to cells. You can attach comments in a worksheet you share with others or if your worksheet contains complex formulas that are difficult to work out, inserting comments in a cell can add clarity to the data.

To add a Comment to a cell
Select the cell in which you want to add the comment.

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Click on the Review tab, in the Comment group, click on New

Comment

alternatively, press Shift F2.

A text box appears in the cell, enter your comment, you can change the size of the box by clicking dragging the sizing handles (small white squares around the text box)

Click outside of the text box after you have entered your comment. A small red triangle appears in the top right corner of the cell. To read the comment hover the mouse over the cell that contains the comment.

To edit a comment in the cell:
Select the cell that contains the comment you want to edit. Click on the Review tab, in the Comment group, (notice that the New Comment changes to Edit Comment) click on Edit comment. Click outside of the comment box to save the changes.

To Delete a Comment from a cell:
Select the cell that contains the comment you want to delete. Click on the Review tab, in the Comment group, click on Delete to delete the comment.

Printing Comments
Comments are visible on screen, when you print your worksheet the comments will not be printed.

To print comments:
Click on the Page Layout tab, in the Page Setup group, click on the dialogue box launcher, setup dialogue box appears: the Page

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Click on the Sheet Tab. Under Print click on the arrowhead to the right of Comments: and select one of the options.

You can print all the comments at the end of a worksheet or as displayed on the worksheet. Click the Print button, the Print dialogue box appears, click OK to print the worksheet and comments. The example below shows a worksheet with comments in three cells A2:A4 the option selected from the above drop down menu is At end of sheet

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Form controls
Excel allows us to add form controls to a worksheet. By form controls, we mean elements such as tick boxes, buttons to click on, spinners, scroll bars, and lists to pick from. We can have elements on the worksheet that we are more used to seeing as part of a dialogue box. To create the form controls we need to have the forms toolbar displayed on screen.

To display the Developer tab, if it’s not on the Ribbon:
Click on the Office button at the top left of the screen, click on the Excel Options button, the Excel Options dialogue box appears:

Ensure Popular is selected. Under Top options for working with Excel, select Show Developer tab in the Ribbon. Click on the OK button to add the Developer tab to the Ribbon.
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Once the Developer tab is on the Ribbon we can choose which controls we want to add to the worksheet by clicking on Insert in the Controls group.

Check box Spin button Combo Box Button Option Group Label Scroll bar Text Field Combo List List box Option button Combo Drop-Down - Edit

We can also connect the control to a cell on the spreadsheet so that we can use the control to enter a range of data.

To create a form control
Click on the Developer tab, in the Controls group, click on Insert. Click on the control required. Click and drag on the worksheet to create the control. Right-click on the control and select Format Control… the Format Control dialogue box appears: Click on the Control tab.

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Set any properties required. This screenshot shows the options for a spin button control.

My option buttons don’t work properly To create option buttons successfully, we first need to create an option group. Then we create the option buttons within the option group. If we just create the buttons on the worksheet without an option group (or outside its border) then Excel doesn‟t know which set of options the button is supposed to relate to.

Statistics with Excel
Excel has many built-in functions, from simple mathematical calculations like average and sum, trigonometric functions like tan and cos, to complex financial and engineering functions. A partial list of Excel functions is provided in Appendix B. It is advisable to check the formulae used internally by the functions to ensure that they will give correct answers for the data used. The Excel help system will sometimes give the formula used for the statistic functions and the knowledge base at the Microsoft web site can be searched for known issues with particular functions.

Descriptive statistics
Descriptive statistics are those that describe the characteristics of the data. We will be looking at mean, trimmed mean, standard deviation, median, maximum, minimum, skew and kurtosis.

Mean
The mean calculates the average of the data.

Trimmed mean
The mean may be distorted by values that are untypical or wrong. A trimmed mean calculates the average by excluding the most extreme data in pairs. For example, we can calculate the average with the highest and lowest values removed, or with the two highest and two lowest values removed. The trimmed mean always removes the data values in pairs.

Standard deviation
The standard deviation is a measure of how much the data is dispersed from the mean. For a normal distribution, 68% of the values should lie within 1 standard deviation from the mean, 95% of the values will lie within 2 standard deviations from the mean, and 99.7% of the values would lie within 3 standard deviations from the mean.

Median
The median is the middle value in an ordered set of data points, or the average of the two middle values if there is an even number of data points.
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Maximum and minimum
The largest and smallest values in a data set.

Skew
A measure of how asymmetric the distribution is. If the chart extends further to the left of the mean than it does to the right, then the distribution of the data has negative skewness. If the chart extends further to the right of the mean than it does to the left then the distribution has positive skewness.

Kurtosis
Kurtosis is a measure of how „peaked‟ a distribution is. The normal distribution has a kurtosis value of zero, and is sometimes referred to as being mesokurtic. A negative number indicates the data is less peaked than the normal distribution, which is sometimes called a platykurtic. A positive number indicates the data is more peaked than the normal distribution. The term leptokurtic is sometimes used in this circumstance. There are different ways of calculating the kurtosis statistic. If you are comparing your calculations to published values, try to ensure that the same statistical formula is being used for both data sets.

Conditional formatting for extreme values
We can use conditional formatting to „flag up‟ when particular data values are outside certain limits. There are two types of conditional formatting – the conditional formatting we apply when we set up a custom format, and the conditional formatting we apply to cells through Conditional Formatting in the Styles group on the Home tab. It is this second option we use to highlight extreme data points, and we can enter conditions. The conditions in custom formats only change how the data is displayed. It may cause it to have a certain number of digits or display in a certain colour, but it can‟t, for example, change the background colour of the cell, or put a border around it. Conditional formatting for cells allows us to do just that. When we create conditional formats for cells we can include a subset of the formatting available from the Format Cells window. In conditional formatting we can choose from border, pattern and some options from font. We can set up to sixty-four different conditions each with its own formatting. This means that including the unchanged look we can have one or more sets of formatting applied to a particular cell. The conditions can be set based on the cell value or on the result of a formula. The formula must reduce to a yes (true) or false (no) answer. For example, we can‟t use =SUM(b3:b7) since that would simply add up the cells, but we could use =SUM(b3:b7)>=0 i.e. is the sum bigger than zero?

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To create conditional formatting:
Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on Conditional Formatting. You can select an option from the drop-down list, New Rules or Manage Rules.

Select Manage Rules…, the Conditional Formatting Rules Manager dialogue box appears, click on the New Rule… button the New Formatting Rule dialogue box appears. Set a condition based on the cell value or on the result of a formula.

Click on the Format… button, choose a format and click on the OK button to close the New Formatting Rule dialogue box and return to the Conditional Formatting rules Manager dialogue box. Click on the New Rule… button to add another condition and format.
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Click on OK.

To use formulae within conditional formatting:
Highlight the data range you want to apply the conditional formatting to. Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on Conditional Formatting. Or if you select New Rule… the New Formatting Rule dialogue box appears:

Select a Rule type from the list – e.g. if you choose Use a formula to determine which cell to format, you could enter a formula that will evaluate to either a true or false result. Choose the format to be applied, by clicking on the Format... button, the Format Cells dialogue box appears. Select the format you want and click on the OK button. Click on the OK button.

An example will help to make this clearer:
Suppose we have selected cells B4 to B24 and enter this formula:

=ABS(B4-AVERAGE(B4:B24))>=STDEV(B4:B24)*3
The B4-AVERAGE(B4:C24) part takes the data value and subtracts the average to give us a number. The number shows how far the data point is from the mean. If B4 is smaller than the mean the number will be negative, so the ABS function converts it to a positive number.
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The left hand side of the formula is calculating a positive number indicating how the data point is away from the mean. This number is then compared to three times the standard deviation. In plain language, the formula is asking: is the data point more than three times the standard deviation away from the mean? The answer is either yes (true) or no (false). If the answer is true the format will be applied. (As shown in the New Formatting Rule dialogue box below)

You could also use the option – Format only values that are above or below average and select the appropriate amount of standard deviation below or above the mean. Ensure you select the range of cells you want to apply the condition to. Let‟s say we want to see data point(s) that are two standard deviation below the mean for the selected range. On the New Formatting Rule dialogue box, under Format values that are: click on the arrowhead and select 2 std dev below Click on the Format… button and select a format – e.g. you could select a fill colour to highlight all the cells that are 2 std dev below the mean.

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Click on the OK button to apply the formatting rule to the data range.

To manage the rules:
Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on Conditional Formatting. Select Manage Rules… the Conditional Formatting Rules Manager dialogue box appears:

The Conditional Formatting Rules Manager allows you to create, edit, delete and view all your conditional formatting rules.

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To delete or edit conditional formatting:
Click on the Home tab, in the Styles group, click on Conditional Formatting. Select Manage Rules…, the Conditional Formatting Rules Manager dialogue box appears. Tick the boxes for the condition or conditions you want to delete or edit and click on the Delete Rule button. Click on the OK button.

Formula order! The order in which we enter the formulae for the conditions can be very important. The conditional formatting works in reverse order. For example, we can set three conditions that test if the data is one, two or three standard deviations away from the mean. For this to work, we first need to test for data that is more than three standard deviations away, then two, and then one. If the conditions are not in reverse order Excel will automatically change it for you. Suppose the data point is between two and three standard deviations away from the mean. If we test for three standard deviations first the answer will be false, the format won‟t be applied and condition two (more than two standard deviations) will be tested. This time the answer is true and the format is applied. If we do the formulae in the opposite order and test for one standard deviation first the formula will calculate to true, and the format will be applied even though the data point is more than two standard deviations away. Condition two to test for more than two standard deviations away will never be reached.

Excel add-ins
The standard capabilities of Excel can be extended by using add-ins. Some of the add-ins are produced by Microsoft, but there are also many other add-ins produced by other companies and individuals, for example the Chart Tools add-in mentioned in the section on resizing charts.

To activate or deactivate add-ins:
Click on the Office button, top left of the screen, click on Excel Options button, and the Excel Options window opens. Select Add-Ins and click on the Go… button, to the right of Manage: Excel Add-ins

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The Add-Ins dialogue box appears:

Click to add ticks to activate an Add-in, or remove the ticks to deactivate the Add-in. Click on the OK button, notice a new Analysis group is added to the right of the Data tab, displaying Data Analysis and Solver.

Producing Histograms
A histogram is not the same as a column graph. If we create a column graph then the individual data points will be plotted. What we want with the histogram is to plot a summary of our data, for example the frequency with which a particular value or range of values occurs. The categories into which we summarise the data are called bins.

To create a histogram:
Click on the Data tab, in the Analysis group, (if the Analysis group is not on the Data tab, you will need to add it to the Ribbon in order to access the histogram, see the section above on Add-ins. Enter the bins values into some cells. Click on the Data tab, in the Analysis group, click on Data Analysis, the Data Analysis dialogue box appears:

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Under Analysis Tools, scroll down and click on Histogram and click on the OK button, the Histogram dialogue box appears:

Click in the Input Range: box and either type the cell references or select them from the worksheet by clicking on the Collapse/Expand button to the right of the box. Click in the Bin Range: box and either type the cell references or select them from the worksheet. The default location for the results is on a new worksheet. Click in the New Worksheet Ply: box and type the name for the new worksheet. Alternatively, click on the Output Range: option, click in the white box to the right and either type a cell reference or click on a single cell on the worksheet. This single cell is the top lefthand corner of the output. Tick Chart Output and click on the OK button to generate the histogram on the worksheet.

The disadvantage with the histogram produced by the Data Analysis option is that the graph won‟t change if the data it was based on subsequently changes; the graph is not dynamic.
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What bin ranges can I use? We can use whatever bin ranges we need to use, with the advantage that they don‟t have to be equal sizes. We could leave the bin range blank and Excel will choose equal-sized bins for us, but there is no guarantee of getting sensibly-sized bins.

I don’t have Data Analysis on my Ribbon In order to use the „Data Analysis…‟ functions on the Ribbon, we need to have the Analysis Toolpak add-in installed. See the section on Excel Add-ins on page 33 for instructions on how to do this.

Dynamic histograms
We can use one of Excel‟s built-in functions to create a dynamic histogram. The function is the „Frequency‟ function, which is an array function.

To create a dynamic histogram:
In a blank area of the worksheet enter the values for the bins. Select a range of cells for the output to go into. The number of cells selected should be one more than the number of bins. Type the formula „=Frequency(data_range,bin_range)‟. Press CTRL SHIFT ENTER. Plot the bins and frequency results as a column chart.

Least squares regression
Least squares regression is a way of fitting a best-fit line to a set of data points and deriving an equation that describes the line. The line is described by the equation: y = mx + c Where m is the slope of the line and c is the intercept with the y-axis. The data points consist of an independent variable (our known data, plotted on the x-axis) and an dependent variable (our measured data, plotted on the y-axis). Least squares regression has a number of assumptions. Firstly, we assume that there are no errors in our known data (x values) and that all the errors are in our measured data (y values). Secondly, we assume that there is a linear relationship between the known values and the measured values. We also assume that the residuals are normally distributed with a mean of zero and that the variance of the errors is constant for all values of X. By residuals or errors, we mean the vertical distance between the best fit line and the data point.
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As with all statistical methods, we would need to test that the assumptions are met before we can draw any valid conclusions from the data.

To add a regression line to a data series:
Right click on one of the data points in the series. Click Add Trendline…

Under Trend/Regression Type, select Linear and click on. Click to tick Display equation on chart and Display R-squared value on chart. Click on the Close button.

Should I set an intercept? You should be very careful about specifying an intercept through zero, since that forces the line through that point, and may result in a much poorer fit.

Calculating linear regression coefficients
We can also calculate the line parameters directly by using the formula „Linest‟. The LINEST function has the syntax: =LINEST(y values,x values,const,stats) The x and y values are the known values. Const can be set to either true or false. If it is set to true Linest will calculate an intercept. If it is set to
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false, no constant will be produced and the line will be forced through zero. The stats option controls whether we only get the slope and intercept or whether we get some additional statistics. The Linest function is an array function and we need to select multiple cells and use CTRL SHIFT ENTER to enter the formula. An example would be: =LINEST(B4:B20,B4:B20,true,true)

To calculate linear regression coefficients:
Select two cells in a row or ten cells (two columns, five rows) if the extra statistics are required. Type in:

Select or type the cell references for the known y values and the known x values. Enter True to calculate a constant Type True to generate extra statistics or false to just produce the slope and constant. Close the brackets and press CTRL-SHIFT-ENTER.
Without the additional statistics we get two numbers, which are:

slope (m)

0.040138

14.30746 constant (c)

With the additional statistics we get ten numbers:

slope (m) standard error of m r-squared F statistic regression sum of squares

0.040138 14.30746 constant (c) 0.003231 0.579939 standard error of c 0.900797 1.144838 standard error of y 154.3656 17 degrees freedom

residual sum of 202.3199 22.28112 squares

The function only produces numbers. The descriptions in italics have been added for clarity.
Linest warning There are known problems with Linest. It can produce meaningless or incorrect statistics, and it may have problems with some datasets or those containing large numbers. Adding a trendline to a chart will produce a better result.
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Calculating best fit values
The Trend function can be used to generate a set of y values using the known x values and the best fit line. The syntax of the trend function is: =Trend(y values, known x, new x, const) The x and y values are the known values, and the new x values are additional values for which we want to generate more y values. Const, as in linest, will force the best fit line through zero if set to false.

Calculating r2
The r2 statistic gives a measure of how well the fitted line would fit the data. The equation ranges from 1.0 for a perfect correlation, to 0 for a set of data with no correlation between the values.

Reduced Major Axis regression
Suppose we are looking at the relationship between the weight and length of a particular organism. Both weight and height are measured quantities and there will be errors when we take the measurements, but least squares regression assumes that the errors are only in the y (dependent) variable. This means that if we use least squares we may find that our results are not valid. The solution is use reduced major axis regression, which takes into account errors in both variables. We can calculate the equation of a straight line y = mx + c with RMA by using: c = sy / sx, where sy and sx are the standard deviations of the x and y variables, and m = y – cx where y and x are the means of the x and y data. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ If there is a power relationship between the variables, as there often is with biological growth data, then a linear equation can be produced by taking logs.

Multiple regression
If we are trying to predict a child‟s height from their age and weight then we have two sets of x values (age and weight) and one set of y values (height). This type of situation is called multiple regression. Because we have extra sets of values we would need to select extra cells when we are creating array formulae such as Linest or trend. For example, for the age, weight and height example we would select three cells in a row rather than two and the result would be: Slope (m) for x2 -6.91524 Slope (m) for x1 2.795071 Intercept (c) 11.62541

Likewise, if we wanted the additional statistics we would select three columns and five rows.
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Slope (m) for x2 -6.9152 standard error of m r-squared F statistic regression sum of squares 38.0062 0.9501 9.5107

Slope (m) for x1 2.7951 2.4435 2.7634 1.0000

Constant (c) 11.6254 24.8179 #N/A #N/A standard error of c standard error of y degrees freedom residual sum of squares

145.2513

7.6362

#N/A

The headings shown in italics have been added for clarity.

Calculating polynomial regression coefficients
We can add a polynomial trendline to a chart but quite often we don‟t get a very good fit because we can only go up to order six, i.e. we have an expression starting with an x6 term. We can use Trend to generate fitted Y values using a polynomial of an order greater than six, and then using Linest to calculate the coefficients We do this by entering formulae in columns to generate the x values to the power we require. So the first column would contain x, the second x2, the third x3 and so on. The Trend function would then be used with our known y values and our new x value columns as the known x values. This would calculate the new, fitted y values. We can then use Linest to calculate the coefficients with our known y values, and the new x value columns.
Linest accuracy Linest can deviate from accurate least squares from polynomials with an 3 order of 3, i.e. anything containing a x or higher power. Linest can be very inaccurate for higher order polynomials. If we want accurate answers rather than just initially exploring the data, then a dedicated statistical package should be used.

Confidence intervals
We can calculate a confidence interval for the mean of a set of data using a student‟s t-test. To calculate the confidence interval we need to know the number of observations, the average, and the standard deviation. The first step is to calculate the t statistic. In order to work out the t statistic we need to know the probability of the result occurring by chance and the degrees of freedom. If we want a 95% confidence level then the probability of a chance result is 5%. The
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degrees of freedom is one less than the number of observations. The t statistic is calculated using the TINV function. This function has the syntax: =TINV(probability, degrees of freedom) We then calculate the half-width by multiplying the t statistic with the standard error. This gives us the distance either higher or lower than the mean where the mean is likely to be, within the confidence level chosen. To find the upper confidence interval we add the half width to the mean and to find the lower confidence level we subtract the half width from the mean.

Formulae references
Referring to cells
Relative references
Suppose we enter a formula in C1: =A1+B1 The formula is not looking specifically for A1 and B1, the formula is actually looking at the two cells immediately to the left of C1. So if we copy this formula to D4, click on the cell and look in the formula bar we find that the formula now says =B4+C4 i.e. the two cells immediately to the left of where we are now. The formula works relative to its current location.

Absolute references
Sometimes we want a formula to always use a value from a particular cell and for that part of the formula to be fixed when we copy the formula to another cell. For example, we could have a cell at the top of the column that holds a value used by all the other formulae in the column. We don‟t really want to enter the other formulae one-by-one, it would be much better to enter one formula and copy it down. We can fix one part of a formula by putting, or getting Excel to put, $ signs in front of the cell reference, so A4 would become $A$4. This is called absolute addressing.

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What do the $ signs mean? The $ signs mean that that part of the reference is fixed and won‟t change when we copy the formula around the worksheet. We can fix the row, column or whole cell. For example, $A$4 always refers to cell A4 wherever we copy the formula. $A4 means that the column is fixed and the formula will always look in column A but the row number is still relative and will change as we copy the formula around. A$4 means that the row is fixed and the formula will always look in row 4, although the column letter can still change as we copy the formula around.

To create a formula using absolute addressing:
Start typing the formula. Type the cell reference and press the F4 key. Keep pressing the F4 key until the $ signs are in front of the part of the reference to be fixed. Type the rest of the formula and press ENTER.

To edit an existing formula to use absolute addressing:
Click on the cell and the formula is displayed in the formula bar. Click on the cell reference in the formula to be changed. Press F4 until the $ signs are in front of the part of the reference to be fixed. Press ENTER.

Formulae across worksheets
Sometimes we may need to enter a formula that refers to a cell on another worksheet, or even a separate workbook (Excel file). When we enter a formula to refer to a separate worksheet the worksheet name is typed in with a ! between the sheet name and the cell reference. For example, the following reference refers to cell C9 on the Arrays worksheet: =Arrays!C9 When we want a formula to refer to a separate workbook we need to type the workbook name (including the .xlsx extension) in square brackets and surround the workbook and worksheet names with single quotes. For example to refer to cell C3 on the Arrays worksheet in the Stats workbook we would use: =‟[Stats.xlsx]Arrays‟!C3
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Named ranges
We can use named ranges to refer to a particular group of cells. We can then use the name inside a formula instead of typing or picking the cell references. For example, if cells A5:A20 contain nitrate concentrations we could name that group of cells Nitrate_Conc and enter a formula =AVERAGE(Nitrate_Conc) and Excel will calculate the correct answer for us.

To create a named range:
Select a group of cells on screen. Click on the Formulas tab, in the Defined Names group, click on Defined name, the New Name dialogue box appears:

Type the name and click on the OK button.

To select a named range:
Click on the triangle to the right of the Name box to the left of the formula bar.

Click on the name from the list. Excel will move to that part of the worksheet and select it.

To delete a named range:
Click on the Formulas tab, in the Defined Names group, and click on Name Manager, the Name Manager dialogue box appears:

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Select the name from the list and click on Delete.

Excel Resources
There are a number of online resources available to help.

Websites
www.j-walk.com www.bmsltd.ie John Walkenbach‟s site, useful for links, tips and example worksheets. Stephen Bullen‟s site, with many examples of programming and charting techniques. Chip Pearson‟s site.

www.cpearson.com

Microsoft has a support site at http://support.microsoft.com, which has section dedicated to Microsoft Office and the different versions of Excel.

Newsgroups
Newsgroups can also be a useful source of information. Microsoft hosts a number of newsgroups about Excel on its own server. For this to work, our newsgroup reader needs to be set to use msnews.microsoft.com. Useful newsgroups include: Microsoft.public.excel Microsoft.public.excel.worksheetfunctions Microsoft.public.excel.programming Microsoft.public.excel.charting
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Search engines
Searching using some keywords related to the problem is often productive. For example, typing in “Excel” and a function name into a search engine can often produce useful help or identify known problems.

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Appendix A – Custom formatting codes
Number codes
0 # ? Digit placeholder. This code adds zeros to fill the format. Digit placeholder. This code does not display extra zeros. Digit placeholder. This code leaves a space for insignificant zeros but doesn‟t display them. Inserts a decimal point. Percentage. Thousands separator. Scientific notation.

. (full stop) % , (comma) E+ E- e+ e-

Text codes
$-+/() Literal characters displayed in the number. For any other characters enclose them in quotes or place a backslash before them. This code displays the following character. This code displays the quoted text. This character repeats the next character to fill the column width. This code leaves space equal to the width of the next character. This code is the text placeholder.

\ “text” * _ (underscore) @

Date codes
m mm mmm mmmm d dd ddd dddd yy yyyy Month as a number without a leading zero (1 – 12). Month as a number with a leading zero (01 – 12). Month as an abbreviation (Jan – Dec). Full month (January, February, etc). Day without a leading zero (1 – 31 ). Day with a leading zero (01 – 31). Weekday as an abbreviation (Sun, Mon, etc). Full day (Monday, Tuesday, etc). Year as a two digit number. Year as a four digit number.

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Time codes
h Hours as a number without a leading zero (0 – 23). hh Hours as a number with a leading zero (0 – 23). m Minutes as a number without a leading zero (0 – 59). mm Minutes as a number with a leading zero (00 – 59). s Seconds as a number without a leading zero (0 – 59). ss Seconds as a number with a leading zero (00 – 59). AM/PM am/pm Time based on the twelve-hour clock. [code] Elapsed time.

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Appendix B – Excel functions
Some of the Excel functions that can be used for analysing data are listed in this appendix. Further help can be found by starting the Excel help system and searching by typing the function name in the keyword box on the index page.

Statistical functions
Avedev The function works out the deviations of the data from the mean of the data and then calculates the average of the deviations. Average This function calculates the average of a group of cells. Confidence This function calculates a confidence interval based on the standard deviation and size of the sample. Correl The Correl function calculates the correlation coefficient between two sets of data. Count Counts the number of number values in a group of cells. The function ignores text and logical values. Counta Counts the number of values in a group of cells. This function includes any text or logical values in the count. Fisher The Fisher transformation produces a normally distributed result from skewed data. It is typically used to transform correlation coefficients before testing for significance. Fisherinv This function produces the inverse of the Fisher transformation. Frequency This function is an array function and produces the frequency distribution of a list of values. Kurt The function calculates the kurtosis of a set of data which indicates how peaked or flat the distribution is compared to the normal distribution. Large This function produces the nth largest number from a data set. Max The result of this function is the largest number within a set of data.
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Median The result of this function is the middle value of a data set, or the average of the middle two values if there is an even number of data points. Min This function produces the smallest number within a set of data. Mode The result of this function is the most common data value within the data set. Rank This function produces a number. The number would be the position of the number if the list were sorted in ascending or descending order. Small This function produces the nth smallest value from a data set. Standardize This function produces a normalised number from a distribution with a particular mean and standard deviation. Stdev The function calculates the standard deviation of the sample of the population. StdevP The function calculates the standard deviation of the entire population. Trimmean This function calculates the mean of a data set after excluding a percentage of the most extreme data points. Var The function calculates an estimate of the variance of the sample. VarP This function calculates an estimate of the variance of the whole population.

Curve fitting functions
Forecast This function calculates a value from existing values. It is used to extrapolate from data with a linear fit. Growth This function calculates a value from existing values. It is used to extrapolate from data with an exponential fit. Intercept The function calculates where on the y axis the intercept would be using a linear fit to the data.

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Linest This function is used in an array formula to calculate the slope and intercept using a linear fit to the data. Additional statistical information can also be produced. Logest This function is used in an array formula to calculate the slope and intercept using a logarithmic fit to the data. Additional statistical information can also be produced. Rsq The Rsq function calculates the goodness of fit statistic (r2) between series of data. Slope This function calculates the slope of a best fit line. Trend This function produces values for a best fit line, assuming a linear relationship for the data.

Distribution functions
Binomdist This function produces the individual term within the Binomial distribution of probability. Options allow us to calculate the cumulative probability. Chidist The answer from this function is the one-tailed probability of the chisquared distribution. This function is often used in hypothesis testing. Chiinv This function returns the inverse of the chi-squared distribution. Fdist The function produces the F probability distribution. Finv The function produces the inverse of the F probability distribution. Negbinomdist The function produces the negative binomial distribution. Normdist This function produces the normal distribution using a specified mean and standard deviation. Optional parts to the formula allow us to produce a cumulative distribution if needed. Norminv This function produces the inverse of the normal distribution. Normsdist The result from this function is the standard normal distribution, i.e. a normal distribution with a mean of zero and a standard deviation of one.
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Normsinv The function is the inverse of the standard normal distribution. Poisson The function produces the Poisson distribution. Tdist The function produces a probability using the student‟s t-distribution. Tinv This function produces t-value using the probability and the degrees of function. Weibull The function produces the Weibull distribution.

Significance test functions
Chitest The function returns the value from the chi-squared distribution with the appropriate degrees of freedom. It is often used to compare results against a null hypothesis using discontinuous data. Ftest The F test is designed to test if the variances of two populations are equal. The function produces a number, the F-statistic.. Ttest The function returns the probability associated with a student‟s t-test. Ztest The z test generates a standard value for a data point compared to the data set.

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