You are on page 1of 40

BJ

a

Lake County Food Guide

WHY A LOCAL FOOD PRODUCER GUIDE?
The purpose of this food guide is to invite your participation in supporting and expanding our local food system and to make healthy foods more easily accessible to everyone in our community. It is not intended to be an exhaustive compilation of food resources, but to highlight Lake County's rich tapestry of agriculture as one of its key assets. The food guide is part of a countywide effort to promote "Eat Fresh -Buy Lake County Grown" by encouraging all residents to buy local first. Look for promotional messages on barmers at local Fanners' Markets, in newspaper articles featuring local fanners, the website URL to order produce online wwwl.akeCOlmtyGrowncom, and among restaurants and other institutions who support purchasing local produce. Because of the focus on increasing local sales, the guide is being distributed primarily within Lake County and features food producers currently engaged in local sales. The absence of detailed information about Lake County's large-scale fanning operations is not intended to diminish their very important contributions to our community and economy. Please take a few minutes to read the brief overview of their history and local role on pages 12 and 13. A secondary purpose of the guide is to promote healthy food choices. Eating widely from the array of fruit, vegetables and tree nuts available from local growers contributes to individual health as well as the health of our economy. Food is a basic essential of life, the more local food we produce and consume the more we bolster our health, local food availability and food security. Again, the information on any of these topics is not intended to be exhaustive but to elevate awareness and stimulate interest. We are grateful to all the growers who took the time to provide information as well as those entities mentioned elsewhere in the guide. Although the editors worked diligently to locate and verify information, we acknowledge this food guide is a first edition and may not be flawless.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Acknowledgments FOO<:i Nature's Pharmacy as Why Support Local FOO<:i Producers Where to Buy Local Food Products Online Ord.ering Systems Retail Outlets Annual Food. Events Lake County's Agricultural Heritage Lake County's Food Exports FOO<:i Producer listings Growing Practice Definitions Seasonal Harvest Guide Local Resources for FOO<:i Producers Cooking &:: FOO<:i Preservation Classes Farm to School and School Gardens Child Nutrition Community CalFresh Nutrition
Est;

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 5 6 7 8
9

1O~1l
12

l3 14~21 22 23 24 25 26

Act

27
28~29 30 31 32~34 35-36 37 38-39 40

Gard.ens &:: FOO<:i Resources Lake County Food Assistance

Local Food. System Tips Healthy Eating Matters Lake County FOO<:i Economy Local Food. System Goals Lake County FOO<:i Guide Map

l\CI(NOWLEDGMENTS
vVe acknowledge the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) for funding that enabled printing and mass distribution of this food guide. This funding was part of a CDFA specialty crop block grant to increase production and consumption of specialty crops in our community. Specialty crops include fruit, vegetables and tree nuts. We acknowledge the California Endowment for funding the food assessment that enabled us to lay the groundwork for this food guide by collecting information on local food availability, with particular emphasis on locally grown farm products. California Endowment funds were part of a collaborative obesity prevention project. We acknowledge our local farmers for the invaluable role they play in supporting the economic well-being of our community as well as the unique contribution they make to personal health through the bounty of nutritious, delicious foods that they grow. They labor long and hard under unpredictable weather conditions, with little recognition. The food guide is an effort to highlight the essential contribution they make to our community. We encourage everyone who eats food to buy local first, and to become an advocate for local food by requesting that it be made available wherever food is served or purchased. Get to know your local fanners and participate in our deb agricultural heritage, We acknowledge all those who playa part in our local food system in some way-all the individuals, organizations and institutions who process, package, distribute, transport, buy, sell, serve, promote, market, educate, develop food policies and programs, coordinate community food events, and/or endeavor to ensure healthy food access and sufficiency. The food guide celebrates healthy food and is a tribute to all the hands and hearts that join in growing our local food economy. We also acknowledge all who have made a contribution to this food guide by sharing ideas, participating in discussion, providing intormation, writing, organizing, editing, printing, distributing, and lending expertise and support, A special thanks to Jackie Armstrong for her primary role in formatting and arranging ilie template for print, Another special thanks to County of Lake Department of Health Services for their leadership role in administrating the CDFA grant and the health safety net they provide to the community.

4

Lahe COllnty's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

FOOD AS NATURE'S PHARMACY
7 Reasons to Write Your Own Prescription for Health
The best predictor certain cancers. of Iong term weight management is fiberinrake. The

larger the waist girth., the higher the risk for cardiovascular The gene-Tallpopulation for fiber.
Aim,

disease and

eats ornJlyB! third to half of the
1

daily recommendations Frequent consumption of heartattack

for 35-40 grmns daily, against heart disease, Various

of rusts protects

studies show that eating nuts at Ieast :5 times a week can lower yom· risk by 3S'jO.I:)0 50%. Walnuts Welle among the first nuts studied to be a nutritional superstar. for their health benefits and continue Vegetables such as broccoli,

cabbage, cauliflower,

Brussel's sprouts, greeJ.'l!.

leafy vegetables,

citrus fruits and other vitamin C-lich fruit and vegetables

are protecaive against strokes. 4,. People who eat more than 3 servings of whole grains daily have a mower risk of dying from any disease compared serving per day. Studies conducted by the American Cancer Society show that a higher to those who eat less thanhalf a

intake of fruit and vegetables of dyiIlig hom any disease.

(at least 5 servings daily) Iowers probability

Aoc.orrling to national Healthy People 20m baseline data for creating health goals, only 28% of those age 2 and older eat at least 2 servings only 7% get:3 servmgs of whole graiI1!Sdaily. Consider immediately protections According vegetables these statistics

Ll.S. of ill.

frufut da:iJly;only 8% get a dark green leafy or orange vegetable daily; and light of the diseases that people are dying from every day and it becomes evident that people me not talking advantage available to us TIll food. to the California fIeallih Indicators Survey ~CHIS), fewer than at a healthy of all the health

half (43%) of Lake County adults are eating :5 servings of frult and daily. And only 2r,lo of Lake County adultsare children weight .. lake County appear to be doing better, in that 62%aIre

eating 5 servings oHruit and vegetables do notindicate whether vegetables, of rhe key predictors on creating

daily, However, these statistics
in children's food intake. One is having obesity prevention efforts focus

these servings include green leafy or orange a child will become overweight

which are generally uncommon of whether

an overweight parent. Current childhood environmeuts that support being active. This has led to national prevention campaign.

making healthy food choices and

efforts such as FanID to School,

Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food, am! Michelle Obama's 'Obesity

Lake

COImty's

Local Food GI.1.i de

WHY SUPPORT LOCAL FOOD PRODUCERS
• • • • • Farm-direct food is fresher and retains mope nutritional
time,

benefit because fewer nutrientsare

lost in transport
food,

Farm-direet food contrtbutesto Supporting local agliculture

Eood safety because the buyers know the source of their will be preserved andconrributes of food availability during to IDe

ensures that Iarmland Iendseape,

beauty of our nacurakrural Strengthening

our local food system increases the likelihood may be disrupted.

emergencies when outside connections business

Buying illocilly groW1[land value added foods helps Lake County on food with theremainjng advertismg,

food producers stay in the transportation and

of feeding us. On avemge, fanners receive only lO-cents, of each dollar we spend SO-cents going to processing, packagillg,

FEeT
spend it,
spent at store,

If e:ve.r:ycn
significant'i pact on
OUl:

ec

. example, increasing

Iocal S0~ln1
SQurce: Sustain~bl

more than dou

the local effect from

$2

HOW TO SUPPORT LOCAL FOOD PRODUCERS
• Buy ~ocillY-gImvnfoods • • • • • • • FarmersMarkets Farms andFarm Stands Local Online Marketplaces Local Retail Outlets each week at:

Ask your groOCly store to sell locallygrov-vn foods. Eat at restaurants foods are sewed. Voice your interest local restaurants, hospitals by encouraging schools, markets, where locally-grown

to offer Iocal rood products. school food service staff to keep building their Farm to School program. Eat Fn.sh -BllJwcal

• 6

Encourage

Lake COl-ll1ty's local Food ,Guide

VVHERETOBUYLOCALPRODUCTS
There are a number of ways to meet local fanners and food producers, learn about what they do and why it's important to East Fresh, Buy Lake County Grown.

CERTIFIED FARMERS' MARKETS
www.1akecountyfannersflnest.org

Redbud Park June thru Aug. Fli. 5:00-8:00 p.m. September Fri.5:00-7:00 p.m.

Steele Winery May thru Oct. Sat. 8:30a.m.-Noon

Library Park June thru Oct. Wed 4:00-7:00 p.rn.

See Farm & Food Producer Listings for contact information.

SEASONAL FARM STANDS
CLEARlAKE Jaguar Gardens Nursery KELSEYVIllE Hanson Ranch Ma Greer Farm AREA UPPERIAKE Saecho Strawberries Seely Farm Stand Rancho de la Fuente Renker Family Farm ineyards

Loasa Farms/Dorn

ON SITE SALES BY APPOINTMENT
CLEARlAKE Hrutky'S Egg Ranch KELSEYVILLE AREA 3G Familv Farm BioFann Buckley Ranch Elderbroc Farm Full Moon Farm Leonardis Organics SCOTIS VAIlEY Jaguar Gardens Nursery Rockn M Ranch

Main Street Bakery

TOURS BY APPOINTMENT

Lake COllnty's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

7

FOR LOCAL FOODS &FOOD PRODUCTS
www.LakeCountyGrown.com
www.lakeCountyGrowIl.comis an online marketplace for all locally-grown fresh food and value added products. Membership is not required. Ordering from lakeCountyGrown.com helps build and support our community and preserves our precious agricultural land for the future. Shopping at this virtual market is E-A-S- Y.

ONLINE ORDERING AVAILABLE

E- Enter the online marketplace.
A-Access the website's wide variety of products and place your order by 5 p.m. Sunday.

• •

S- Select your payment

option.

Orders are emailed to the growers on Monday and harvested on Tuesday.

• y- You pick up your farm-fresh purchases

from 4 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday at lVlt.Konocti

Growers, 2550 Big Valley Rd., Finley. More pick-up sites are in development. For more information call (707) 263-0911or go to vvww.lakeCountyGroV'lIl.COm.

www.Lakct.to-Op.org
The lake County Community Co-op is a member owned cooperative that features an online ordering system (FOODS) for its members. Members can purchase a variety of organic produce from local growers; local and regional value added products (baked goods, oils, sea vegetables, grains, and more); a weekly modified CSA (community supported agriculture) box filled with mixed vegetables and fruit sourced from lake County farms first, regional farms second, and through an organic distributor third. The ordering cycle is open from Sunday through Tuesday. Deliveries are on Thursday at over ten drop point locations throughout the county. The Co-op also sponsors community gardens, a monthly education series and the Friday Night Fanners' Market in Clearlake, June through . September.

Lake County Community Co-op
wwwJakeco-op.or-g

For more information call (707) 993-4270 or go to ww\v.lakeco-op.org.

8

Lake County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

RETAIL OUTLETS
SOUTHCOUNTY Earth Goods KELSEYVILLE NORTHEAST NORTHWEST

Dadiing's Vitamins jomi's Market Olivilla's Organics Rfuviera Foods

Foods Etc, We Care Nutrition Nature's O'Nll Oak's Red &: VVbiIJe

Bruno's Foods Lake View Market
Nature's Food Center

Hardester's Cobb HaTdesteI·'sHidclenVly Hardester's Mt\ViL"l

Northshore Sentry We Care Nutrition

now

TO RECOGNIZE LOCALLY-GROWN FOODS PROCESSED OUTSIDE OIFLAKE COUNTY

Many of Lake Ccunzy's Iarger fanning operations sell their crops to food packaging or processing facilities outside of Lake County because producrion exceeds local market capacity. Those foods (primill'lly peru:s and walnuts) often come back to' the county under labels that onlly identify the Iocation of the prooessor, not the g::n.'ower. ecause these large B localgrowers deserveyour support as much as the. smaller growe.rs,. we encourage you to Iook for canned, packagedand frozen foods processed by purchasers of Lake County agricultural products under labels such as Libby's, Seneca, Stokley's and Diamond Walnuts.

RETAIL LOCATIONS FOR LOCALLY-PRODUCED lFOODS
Bruno's Darlings SaveMart Vitamin Connection 355 Lakeport Blvd. Lakeport IKelseyvilie Middletown Clearlake Cobb Mtn (707) 263-7337

3965 Maim, St.
21037 Calistoga

P07) 278-<0501
(707) 987-4939

Earth Goods, Inc.

Foods Etc.
Hardesters Hardesters Hardesters John's lucerne Cobb Mtn Hidden Valley

1.5290 Lakeshore Dr ..
16295 Hwy 175

P07) 994-6423
(707) 928-5233

1.9849 Hartmann
21088 Calistoga

Rd.

Hidden Vall!ey
Middletown IKelseyvilie lucerne Ilucerne Lakeport Clearlake Nice Clearlake Upper

POl) 987-2200
(707) 987-2325

Middletown

Market
Health Foods

3860 Maim, St.
5880 E. Hwy 20

(07) 279-2440
(707) 274-1963

Lail\;eView Nature's Nature's

Maln·llket Food Center Own Health Ifoods

6068 E.. Hliwy 20
360 lakeport Blvd.

P07) 274-5573
(707) 263-5359

14087 ILakeshore Dr ..
2265 E. Hwy 20

P07) 994-3080
(707) 274-0127

North Shore Sentry Oa,k's IRed & Whitlte Store Olivia's Organics Riviera

12580 IE.Hliwy 20
9490 Main St.

081 1\:5
1

(07) 998-3767
(707) 275-9565

Lake

Foods
Store Store

9730 Hwy 281 1.4085 ILakeshore 841 Bevins St.
Dr ..

IKelseyvilie

P07) 277-7601 P07) 994-2959

We Care Nutriitiom,-WIC We Care Nutnitiollli-WIC

Clearlake
Ilakeport

LakeCOW:IIJ'S local Food G.lide

ANNUAL FOOD EVENTS
KELSEYVIllE OLIVE FESTIVAL

In March, II a.m, to 5 p.rn. 5625 Gaddy Lane, Kelseyville www.kelseyvilleolivefestival.com. Tours, samples, cooking demos, olive pit spitting contest, recipe contest, poster contest, arts and crafts, For more information, call (107) 279~0483.

STEELE WINES

HARVEST FESTIVAL

Second weekend in October 4350 Thomas Drive, Kelseyville www.steelewines.corn Annual festival famous for its grape-stomping competition for kids and adults, as well as its Vineyard Run for Literacy. Live musicians, vendor booths, fine arts, crafts, unique gifts; 4~H BBQ, Sat &: Sun; Boy Scout Pancake Breakfast on Sun. For more information, call (107) 279~9475.

10

L(jheCounty'.~ Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

KELSEYVILLE PEAR FESTIVAL
Last Saturday in September Downtown Kelseyville www.kelseyvillepearfestival.com Parade, quilt &; fine arts show, children's activities, arts &: crafts booths, Pear Pavilion, live music, food, antique tractor and unique engine exhibit. For more information, call (107) 279~9022.

Did you know the Greeks loved pears so much that Homer refers to them in The Odyssey.

LAKE COUNTY FAIR
Labor Day Weekend 401 Martin Street, Lakeport wwwlakecountyfair.com The Lake County Fair features a variety of live entertainment, art, textile, contests, landscape and other exhibits, carnival, food, livestock shows. For more information, call (107) 263~618l

Lake County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -BlIy Local

U

LAKE COUNTY'S AGRICULTURAL

HERITAGE

The original Porno, Lake Miwok, and Wappo peoples thrived on the bounty of acorns, berries, roots, fish and game by hunting and gathering. Salvadore Vallejo brought the first herds of horses and cattle to his Kelseyville land grant in 1839. At the time, their hides and tallow were more important than the meat. European settlers who moved to Lake County following the Gold Rush in 1849 practiced subsistence-level agriculture based on dally and livestock Anderson Marsh was a farm, dairy and cattle ranch from 1855 until the late 1960's. In the 1870's, crops were expanded to include wheat, wine grapes, hops, walnuts, "Blue Lake" green beans and pears. The most important crops in early Lake County were grains and hay. Fruit cops came just in time to solve the problem of soil exhaustion. The first pear trees were planted in the 1880s and some orchards founded by the Holdenreids in 1890 are still in production farmed by cousin Diane Henderson. 1932 was an all time high for Bartlett pears with a total of 7,295 bearing acres. (Mt. Konocti Growers crew below in 1930.)

1960~1980 Tons per acre Cost per acre to grow Price per ton 13~15 $1,000 $80-$187

2010 16.69 $3,000 $421

r"

....._.-..f:.00IIIf.~,

""

."

-.

.'

12

Lake County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

LAKE COUNTY FOOD EXPORTS
While focus of this gui:de is on increasing local production and consumption of Lake County specialty crops, It would be an enormous, oversight not 'itomentton how much ourcommunity benefits from larger fanning operattons (wine; grop.'"s, peals, walnuts, wild rice, etc.) that sell their crops outside Lake County because production exceeds local market capacity. In agriculture, as In most environments, diversity is a good thing, Small mrrnillng operations offer access to fjeM.. resh produce and entrepreneurial opportunities, Large farming operatieus f create jobs and bring outside revenue into the county, To put Lake County's fanrung commu rrity into perspective the 2008 Ag
Commissioner'serop

Crops by Acreage
,
I

report indicated there were 12.,897 acres in production; • 35 in vegetable crops, and 60 III nursery produ cti oa, • • • 2,650 In walnuts 2:,208 in pears, and! 8,004 ill wine grapes.

• Vegetables & INursery

,, I

.IPears ~ • Wille Grapes

In terms of estimated revenue, to' the county, • $219,767 Vegetables and $5,714,193 Nursery $1,2:48;000 Walnuts $15,50B,753Pears

Crops by Dollar Value
• Vegetables &.

INLJn'1>ery
• Walnl!Jts

• • •

.IPears

$34,226,955 Wine. 'Grapes

Another $4,BO,639 was generated by livestock and poultry producers and field and seed crops. It's important to' remember that exported local crops often come, back 1:0' the county. Every MI and winter, you can ifillnd! Scully and Adobe: Creek pears at SaIDe:way, ma])y local walnut growers sell their crops teoDiamond Walnutswhtch are sold. inmost gmoery stores, and Indian Harvest rice mixes lliay contain locally gro¥i11.Lake County Wild Rice. Local pears may also be found In Seneca and Libby canned pears an d fruit cocktail, Please; support these volume gmwe.rs by looking for labels that buy lake Ccuutyerops,

Lake Couuty's wcal .Food Guide

Etit ~rfSh -Buy Local

1'3

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
As previously mentioned, this food guide is not intended to be an exhaustive compilation, but to highlight Lake County's rich agricultural tapestry as one of its key assets.

2 BEE GARDEN FARM
Armenian cucumbers, beets, bok choy, herbs, melons, Rainbow Chard. Growing Practice: Natural fanners who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at Lakeport or Kelseyville Fanners Markets (707) 263~5430 www.LakeCountyGrown.com

BARRETT FARMS
Clucky Plucky Poultry including eggs, chicken, game fowl, pheasant and turkey. Growing Practice: Certified Organic (707) 263~4211
www.barrettfarms.corn

3G FAMILY FARM
Nigerian Dwarf goats, goat milk Available at the farm, 9120 Kelsey Creek Dr., Kelseyville (707) 277~On6 www.Sgfamilyfarm.com

BIOFARM
Summer and winter vegetables, seasonal fruits and walnuts. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at the farm by appointment or the Online Markets: www.Lakec.ouuryc-rown.com www.Lakec.o-Op.org (707) 695-7705 Email: biofann®rocketmail.com

ADOBE CREEK PACKING CO.
Boxed pears and packing shed tours available july-August by appointment. 4825 Loasa Dr., Kelseyville (707) 279~4204

BUKINGHAM HERBS FRUIT & NUTS
Oranges, nectarines, plums, walnuts, herbs and seasonal vegetables. Growing Practice: Pesticide &: spray free. Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market or Online Market: www.Lakec.o-Op.org (707) 279-4690

BARBER'S COUNTRY FARM
On hiatus in 2011. The farm will be back in production in 2012 with summer and winter vegetables, melons, and organic nursery. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available in 2012 at the Fanners Markets, on the farm by appointment, or the Online Market: www.Lakec.o-Op.org Email: barberscountryfann@mchsi.com
14 Laue County's Local Food Guide

BUCKLEY RANCH

Livestock and ~ ----------------, packaged ground beef. Available at the ranch. 3155 Soda Bay Rd., Lakeport (707) 849-6764 Email: pbuckireemyway.com
Eat Fresh -Buy Local

=-.-::.

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
CEAGO VINEGARDEN CLOVER CREEK FARM
Apples and plums. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at selected markets. Email: clovercreekfarm@gmail.com

COW MTN KIKa GOATS
Figs, herbs, kiwis, olives, olive oil, table grapes, walnuts. Showcase for biodynamic agriculture, Tours by appointment. 5115E. Hwy 20, Nice (107) 274-1462 www.Ceago.com Seasonal vegetables, berries, flowers, goat vegetation management. Tours by appointment. (107) 262-1577 www.cmkikogoats.com

CHACEWATER

OLIVE MILL

Olives and Olive Oil Mill services. Tours by appointment, 5625 Gaddy Lane Kelseyville (107) 279-2995 www.chacewaterwines.com

DANCING TREEPEOPLE FARM
Seasonal vegetables, walnuts, herbs, peaches, and persimmons. Tours by appointment. Growing Practice: Certified Organic and Permaculture Certified. Available Online: www.LakeCo-Op.org www.LakeCountyGrown.com WW'vv. dancingtreepeople. com 1445 Pitney Lane, Upper Lake (107) 275-8890

CLARK'S FAMILY FARM
Seasonal vegetables, Growing Practice: Natural, farmers who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at Clearlake, Kelseyville, and Lakeport Farmers Markets, or Online www.LakeCountyGrown.com. (107) 279-4343 Email: Clarksfamilyfru:m@Yahoo.com
Laue
COWlty'S

Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Blly Local

15

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
GBARGRANCH
Specialty pears and gourmet gift packs. Growing Practices: Certified Organic and Conventional. Available at Foods, Etc. and by mail order. (707) 279~1910

ELDERBROC FARM
Melons (cantaloupe, ambrosia, various honeydew, galia, yellow w atennelons), green beans, canning and fresh market peaches, roasting peppers. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at thefann by appointment only. 5250 Davis Dr. Lakeport (707) 262~0l72 Email: elderbrocfann@Yahoo.com

GLO'S GLEE GARDEN
Summer vegetables, including heirloom tomatoes, apricots, chard/kale/arugula mix, cherries, figs, herbs, horseradish, melons, nuts, okra, peaches, pears, persimmons, plums, pomegranates, potatoes, raspberries. Growing Practice: Certified Organic. Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market. (707) 987~2888

HANSON RANCH &: FARM STAND

F&:GFARM
Summer and winter vegetables, Asian pears, blackberries, figs, herbs, table grapes. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at Kelseyville Fanners Market, (707) 279~6020

FULL MOON FARM
Seasonal vegetables (lettuce, kale, tomatoes, cucumbers, winter and summer squash, potatoes and more, apples (6 varieties), melons, O'Henry peaches, walnuts. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at Kelseyville or Lakeport Fanners Markets, at the farm by appointment, or Online Market www.LakeCountyGrown.com 2000 Smith Lane, Kelseyville (707) 245~5779
16 Lahe County 's Local Food Guide

Apples (Gravenstein), melons, peaches, pears (Asian, Star Crimson, Mountain Bartlett), tomatoes, walnuts. Available at seasonal farm stand., August -December: 9 a.m.-6 p.rn, or Online www.LalzeCountyGrown.com. 3360 Merritt Rd. Kelseyville (707) 279~4761 www.hansonfamilyranch.com

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
HOPS MEISTER
Fresh and dried pellet hops, seasonal vegetables, almonds, Asian pears, walnuts, watermelon. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at Clearlake Farmers Market, or Online Markets: www.LakeCountyGrown.com. www.Lakec.o-Op.org (415) 828~3087 www.hopsmeister.com

IRENE FARM
Variety of summer vegetables, and winter greens. Growing Practice: Organic in Practice (not certified) Available in Community Support Agriculture boxes Online Market: www.LakeCo-Op.org 16625 Rose St., Lower Lake (707) 994~4899

JAGUAR GARDENS NURSERY
Annuals, perennials, nursery stock, bedding and landscape plants, trees. Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market, seasonal farm stand, and at the nurselY by appointment. 12921Murphy Springs Rd., Lower Lake (707) 995~5218 or 350~1l92

HRUTKY'S EGG RANCH
Eggs. Tours by appointment. Available at the ranch 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Tuesday and Saturday. 2750 Old Hwy 53, Clearlake (707) 994~2317

HUE DE LAROQUE FARM
Seasonal vegetables, apricots, Asian pears, peaches, plums, table grapes, melons, watermelon, jams, jellies, pickles. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market, Seely's Farm Stand, Hardester's Market, or Online Market at www.Lakec'o-Op.org (707) 998~4832 vvw.grannyjams.com

LAKE ADDED VALUE AGRICULTURE-LAVA
The LAVA Center is dedicated to providing services and a facility to add value to the agricultural products of Lake County and surrounding areas. Products include relishes, chutneys, fruit spreads, fruit in wine, pickled vegetables, flavored walnuts. Available at Lakeport or Kelseyville Farmers Markets, or Online Market www.LakeCountyGrown.com. (707) 35~3907 www.TheI.AVACenter.com
Eat Fresh -Buy Local 17

Lake

COIO!ty'S

Local Food Guide

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
LEONARDIS ORGANICS
Seasonal vegetables, flowers, fruit and walnuts. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Pick-your-own by appointment. Available at _ ature's Bounty or Online www.LakeCo-Op.org, 1010Argonaut Rd, Lakeport (107) 483,4004 Email: jimleonardis@hotmail.com

MAGREERFARM
Summer and winter vegetables including beets, cabbage, garlic, turnips. Growing Practice: Natural, farmers who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at Seasonal farm stand May thru October, 10 am. to 5 p.m. Wed-Sun 5990 Kelsey Creek Rd., Kelseyville (107) 279,1560 Email: pattygreerwatt.net

LOASA FARMS/DORN VINEYARDS
Seasonal fruits and vegetables, chestnuts, Flame Seedless grapes, olive oil Growing Practice: Natural, fanners who utilize organic

MAIN STREET BAKERY
Organic French and country style breads and roils, baked sweets. Available at Kelseyville and Lakeport Fanners Markets, Seely's Farm Stand, Grinder's Steep, Riviera Foods, Nature's Food Center, Laket'.o-Op.org, and the bakery 8:30 a.m. to 1p.m. Thur., Fri. and Sat. 3928 Main Street, Kelseyville (707) 245,4558

L_

_j

practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at Kelseyville Fanners Market, seasonal farm stand August thru October or Online Market, www.LakeCountyGrown.com 5645 Soda Bay Rd., Kelseyville (107) 279,4330 http://loasaoliveoil.blogspot.com

LOVE FARMS
Lettuce and other seasonal vegetables, goat meat, nectarines, peaches, plums. Growing Practice: Natural farmers who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at the farm by appointment, Nature's Food Center, Kelseyville Farmers Market, or Online Markets www.LakeCountyGrown.com; www.Lake Co-Op.org 8025 Hwy 175,Kelseyville (107) 349,7880 www.Lovel-arms.net
18

MORGAN VALLEY PRODUCTS
Basil, beets, bell peppers, cucumbers, gladiolas, melons, onions, snap beans, squash, strawberries, tomatoes, awardwinning tomato salsas, herbs. Growing Practice: Pesticide and spray free. Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market. (107) 994,5043 www.soccorasalsa.com

Laue COUllty'S Local Food Guide

Eat Ff'eslz -Buy Local

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
MT. KONOCTI GROWERS
Pears by the box. Shed tours by appointment. August thru first week in September. 2550 Big Valley Rd., Kelseyville (707) 279~4213

RANCHO DELAFUENTE
Seasonal vegetables, apples, melons, nectarines, peaches, persimmons, plums, watermelon. Available at seasonal farm stand. 2290 Soda Bay Rd., Lakeport (707) 263~3160 www.ranchweddingsevents.com

R. B. LANDRUM'S HONEY

OOPS RANCH
Breeding stock usually for sale year round. Farm tours by appointment. 4980 Konocti Rd., Kelseyville (707)279~8n7 or 2n~5059

PICKLE MAN
Jams, jellies, peppers, pickles, table grapes. Available at Clearlake Farmers Market, Red &:; White Market, Pear Festival and Dickens Fair. (707) 998~4600. Seasonal vegetables, wild-harvested honey. Available at Kelseyville &; Lakeport Farmers Markets, Seely's Farm Stand, Nature's Food Center, John's Market, Olivia's Organics, Lakeshore Feed &; Grain, Kindred Spirits, (707) 995~0260

POE ORCHARDS &: PASTURES
Dry-land pasture grass hay, alfalfa hay and walnuts. Growing Practice: Certified Organic Available onsite by appointment, Kelseyville and Lakeport Farmers Markets. 6850 Scotts Valley Rd., Lakeport (707) 263~7561

RENKER FAMILY FARM
Seasonal vegetables, apples, apricots, berries, cherries, melon, nuts (hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, walnuts), peaches, pears, persimmons, plums, pomegranates, table grapes, strawberries, Growing Practice: Conventional Available at seasonal farm stand June to November from 7 a.m, to 7 p.m. 2297 Argonaut Rd., Kelseyville (707) 279~4409
Eat Fresh -Buy Local 19

Lahe

COlDlty'S

Local Food Guide

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
ROCKN M FARM
Apples, apricots, Asian pears, cherries, nectarines, peaches, persimmons, plums, pomegranates, table grapes, strawberries. Growing Practice: Natural, farmers who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. (707) 263~3391

SCOTT'S MINI FARM
Eggs. Available at the farm by appointment, 6300A Scotts Valley Rd., Lakeport (707) 263~1266

ROCKN M RANCH SCULLY PACKING CO.
Pears. 3275 Stone Dr., Finely (707) 263~7327

SEELY FARM STAND
All natural, horrnone and antibiotic free eggs, beef, goat, lamb, pork. Available at the ranch. 18795 Grange Rd., Middletown (707) 987~9682 www.rockn-m-ranch.com Family farm stand in operation for over 30 years features wide .variety of local fruit and vegetables including apples, greens, melons, peaches, pears, squash, tomatoes, herbs and flowers. Also features locally produced eggs, goat cheeses, honey, jams, jellies, artisan breads. Pick your own herbs and bouquets. Growing practice: Combination Open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Memorial Day through mid-November, Also available at Kelseyville Farmers Market or Online Market, www.LakeCountyGrown.com. 80 E. Hwy 20, Upper Lake (707) 275~0525 (May-Nov) Email: seelystand®rnchsi.com
Eat Fnsl! -Buy Local

SAECHO STRAWBERRIES
Strawberries. Available at seasonal farm stand. 935 E. Hwy 20, Upper Lake (707) 275~9033

20

Lalle

COUllty'S

Local Food Guide

LAKE COUNTY FOOD PRODUCERS
SIX SIGMA RANCH SUENRAM RANCH
Seasonal vegetables, pomegranates, melons, eggs. Available Online Market: www.LakeCountyGrown.com (707) 279~4580

WILDCAT BEES
All natural grass fed beef and lamb. Growing Practice: Transitional Please call to get on waiting list. 1332 Spruce Grove Rd., Lower Lake (707) 994~4068 www.SixSigmaRanch.com Wildflower honey. Available at Kelseyville & Lakeport Farmers Markets. (707)279~4571

WISE ACRES FARM
Seasonal vegetables, melons, specialty tomatoes. Available at the farm. 19118Comstock Ct., Middletown (707) 987~0421

SKY HOYT SPECIALTY GROWER
Seasonal vegetables, strawberries, melons, garlic, tomatoes (Brandywine, modem), figs, winter squash, rare fig plants. Growing Practice: Combination Available at Kelseyville Farmers Market, Seely's Farm Stand, or Online Market: www.Lakec.ounty'Grown.com. 2650 Waldo Lane, Lakeport (707) 279~0859 or (866) SKY~HOYT Email: skyhoyt@cwnet.com

YERBA SANTA DAIRY
Soft, semi-soft and my aged goat cheeses made from pasteurized and raw milk. Growing Practice: Natural, fanners who utilize organic practices, but choose not to become "Certified" organic. Available at Kelseyville and Lakeport Farmers Markets, ature's Food Center, Bruno's, Seely's Farm Stand Tel: (707) 263~8131 www.yerbasantadairy.com

Lake County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

21

GROWING PRACTICE DEFINITIONS
The folIowi.ng brief definitions are provided as an introduction to the topic of growing practices. We are [ortunate that all of our local farmers are careful about their growing rn.cthods. The best way to expand. your Iowwledge is to talk with local fanners. COMBINATION: Grower uses set of practices not adequately described by conventional or organic. Grower may use both conventional and organic practices.

CONVENTIONAL: Conventional fanning refers to an undefined group of growing practices that may vary widely depending on crop, location, season and grower preference. Typical conventional priorities include absence of pest and disease damage, low production cost, excellent appearance, absence of microbe contamination and resistance to post-harvest decay.

ORGANIC: Organic fanning refers to practices that comply with the National Organic Program ( OP). Farmers who follow NOP and register with the state are allowed to sell their produce as organic. "Certified Organic" requires documentation to prove NOP compliance. The philosophical basis of organic farming centers on utilizing natural biological processes and prohibits use of synthetic fertilizers, and pesticides. Pesticides listed for organic production are non-synthetic and intended to cause the least ecological disruption. BIODYNAMIC employs organic growing

practices that emphasize the total farm as a holistic organism in which most fertilizers and animal food are produced on the farm itself.

TRANSITIONAL: Engaged in a 3'year process to become "Certified Organic."

22

Lcme COU1!ty's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

SEASONAL HARVEST GUIDE
and the.farmer's y"",r1y deEerminatiDI"~s to which crops will return a sufficient income to sustain the following year's crop. MAR

APR

l\.1AY

JUNE

JL'ilY

AUG CARROTS

SEPT

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

BEETS, CABBAGE, CAULIFLOWER, PLUMS BlACKBERRJES

STRA WBERRlES GRAPES, I(]VVl, SQUASH WALNUTS

OLIVES

MEIDNS, PEARS CHARD, COllARDS, HER&S, LEEKS, RADISHES, WRNIPS PERSIMMONS BROCCOLI,. KAL!E PEAS A1'PI£S, EGGPL" ..\T]" J ONIONS

BASIL, POTATOES BROCCOLI, KALE PEAS BEANS, CUCm,ffiERS, PEACHES, PEPPERS, TOMATOES

~--------------------------------~

GARIK,

LOCAL RESOURCES FOR GROWERS
Lake County Dept. of Agricultme 883 Lakeport Blvd, Lakeport (107) 263~0217 www.lakecountyag.com/commissioner Lake County Farm Bureau 65 Soda Bay Rd., Lakeport (707) 263~0911 www.lakecofb.com Local Food Roundtable 1st Thursday each month at 3 PM www.lakecountyfooclgroupsite.com Mendocino College-s-Lake Campus 1005 Parallel Drive, Lakeport (707) 263~4944 www.mendocino.edu Transition Lake County (707) 279~2957 or 928~0l59 www.transitionlakecounty.org UC Davis Cooperative Extension 883 Lakeport Blvd, Lakeport (707) 263~6838 Heep:l/celake.ucdavis.edu Yuba College-Clearlake Campus 15880 Dam Road Ext., Clearlake (707) 995~7900 www.yccdedu/clearlake Farmer and Neighbor Land Use Conflicts Cst Solutions, Land se Issues, Guide to Orchard and Vineyard Operations, Water se Issues.

Annual equipment, pesticide and worker safety workshops; Irrigated Agricultural Lands Programs,

Member-driven information exchange and public forum for local agricultural issues of interest. Plant Pest and Disease Management, Plant Propagation, Soils and Fertility Management, ursery Practices

Local sustainable community network includes Local Farmer Group, Seed Group and online educational resources. Master Gardeners, Fruits Cst Nuts, Unmanaged Apple and Pear Orchard Outreach Program, Integrated Pest Management, Livestock and Range Management, ANR Safety Notes, 4H. Principles of Plant Science, Fertilizers and Plant utrition, Introduction to Soils, Principles of Pest Management, Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture, Pesticide Applicator Certificate.

Above: Growers' Panel at 2010 Local Foods Forum Left: Oct. 2010 'Growing Our Local Food Economy.'
24 LalU! County's Local Food Guide Eat Fresh -Buy Local

COOKING

&,

FOOD PRESERVj_L\TION CLASSES

CHIC LE CHEF 18983 Hartmann Rd., Hidden Valley Lake (107) 987~9664 lAKE COUNTY HUNGER TASK FORCE (707) 277~9227 LO\NER LAKE HIGH SCHOOL CULINARY ARTS CLASSES (Students only) (707) 994~6471 SU RISE SPECIAL SERVICES 4634 E. Hwy 20, Nice (707) 274~9121 l'UBA COLLEGE-CLEARLAKE 15880 Dam Rd. Ext., Clearlake (707) 995~7900 www.yccd.edu/clearlake CAt\llP S

Culinary Demonstration Classes, Hands On Classes, Cooking Parties, Teen &; Kid Classes

Calming classes in August or early September; locations valy. Elective high school classes focusing on the basics of cooking and nutrition.

Cooking classes for adults and families at various locations throughout the county.

Basic Food Preparation, Professional Baking, Sanitation, Safety/Storage, Advanced Foods and Catering, Food Service Operation and Management.

iVHY EAT FOODS I

SEASON

You get superior flavor and nutrition when produce is fresh from the field or orchard. Many foods only retain peak flavor for a few days after picking or when they ripen on a tree. Most people, including children, think they don't like vegetables because they have never tasted really fresh varieties that are grown for flavor rather than storage, transport or handling. It strengthens OUT economy when you buy from local producers. Agriculture jobs have a high multiplier effect (see page 6) which means the money stays in Lake County. Local farmers are our best guarantee for food security. We are relatively isolated geographically. A disaster anywhere in California could interrupt our food supply for weeks or even months.
COImly's

• •

Lake

Local Food Guide

Eat Fresli -Buy Local

25

FARM TO SCHOOL
Farm to School programs connect schools (K-12) and local farms with the objectives of serving healthy meals in school cafeterias, improving student nutrition, providing agriculture, health and nutrition education opportunities and supporting local and regional farmers. The National Farm to School Network sprouted from a desire to support community based food systems, strengthen family farms, and improve student health by reducing childhood obesity. Each Farm to School program is shaped by its unique community. Most of Lake County's school districts are in the process of growing Farm to School programs that reflect individual community interests and resources. In addition to winter squash soup and home-made pesto pizzas (using local basil and fresh veggies), Kelseyville Unified School District sends baskets of local apples, pears and zucchini bread to elementary school classrooms (top left) with the help of PTO volunteers. Cobb Elementary School volunteers recently resurrected their salad bar and 30-year-old school garden. Konocti Unified's local produce purchasing tripled during the 2010-11schoolyear. Cobb and Lakeport'S school districts (top right and lower left) participated in the First Lady's 2011Healthy Recipes far Ki.ds competition. Recipes are posted online at www.lakehln.org. School district purchasing is a very important component of student health and the sustainability of our local food economy.

SCHOOL GARDENS
Duling the last century, school gardens were often created as a hands-on extension of science programs. In the 21st century, the same gardens have become a VelY effective way to teach students, accustomed to prepared and fast foods, how to grow and prepare fresh produce as well as to highlight nutritional value and how good "fresh" tastes, thanks to dedicated staff and volunteers. Cobb Mtn. Elementary Lower Lake High School Riviera Elementary
26 Lake COWtty's Local Food Guide

Kelseyville Elementary Minnie Cannon Elementary pper Lake Elementary

Lower Lake Elementary
Mtn, View Middle School

Upper Lake High School
Eat Fresh -Buy Local

CHILD NUTRITION ACT
The Healthy, Hunger- Free Kids Act aims to make school foods more nutritious and expand the reach of lunches and dinners to thousands of children. 11key points of the law are:

Reimbursement increases for nutritional school meals.

for school meals and snacks.

Federal funds for local food and Farm to School.

Nutrition standards for noncafeteria foods sold on campus.

Free and reduced-price meals in high poverty areas.

Funds for fitness and nutrition education.

Water must be available and free during meals.

Grants for causes and consequences of hunger.

Programs to influence healthy choices at a young age.

Performance bonuses for high breastfeeding rates.
Lake COllnty's Local Food Guide

Automatic free meal eligibility for foster children.
Eat Fresh -Buy Local 27

GARDENS ts: EMERGENCY FOOD RESOURCES
GARDENS
Highlands Senior Ctr.

Lake County Hunger
Task Force Garden (707) 2Tl ~9227

Lakeport

Senior Ctr;

3245 Bowers St.
Clearlake (707) 994~ 3051

51] Konocti Lakeport (107) 263A2I8
Lucerne Flow Garden H",,"Y20 &: Bih S1:. Lucerne

Phyllis Kelsey 21080 Loconomi
Middletown

(707) 490~2497

Methodist Church 12487 The Plaza
Clearlake Oaks (707) 998;m67

Lloyd P. Hance 15lliO MgonalJl1: Rd. Kelseyville (107) 2Tl~9227

(107) 174-~2T10

(107) 994~5148

(107) 994-4213 (707) 994.-{i618

6:00prnw 6:30pm 12:00 pm to 12:30 pm Tuesday and Thursday 10::00 1:0 2:.00 Must be HIV/ AIDS rn:agnosed

(707) 995~16:O6

Ist Tuesday

of every month

and age is required (707) 279~8448

2:00pm - 3:00 pm
No set days or w.-[llites. Justtcall No ]0 01: proof of address required

28

LakeCorll1.ty's loml Food Guide

EMERGENCY FOOD RESOURCE
Wednesday of every month 8:00 am to 10:00 am (107) 263-4785 or (707) 279,2721 (707) 263~OO2 Community Services Program Tuesdays: 10:00 am to 12:00 pm Commodities Supplemental Program: lst Tuesday only: 11:30to 12:30 Commodities require proof incom

(107) 263-4788

Proof of income and age is required

Tuesday of each month

Lake

COlOlty'S

Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

29

CALFRJESH HELPS LO\rV~INCOME. PEOPLE ANDFANIILIES BUY THE FOOD THEY NEED FOR GOOD HEALTH!
Fonnerly
knO'W11!i!S

food .s tamps.

NOvV YOU CAN ...
• • • • Applliy online ill. l5 minutes. Submst verifications by fax,

DID YOU KNOW
• If everyone eligible for £'ood stamps would
take advantage of these benefits, it would food purchases at local bring about $6 mdllkm into the local eoonomy through stores (Lost Dollars, Empty • Food seeds and starter approved • Plates).

mail or dTOP off.
Interview by T elephone Check EBT balance online Go to

www.c-eyourself.com
No computer? Department Please contact: of Social Services Rancb Pkwy

plants are an

e;"''Pense [or CaIF:n:esh benefits .. are working to get

Local FarmersMarkets

the necessary equipment
to accept EBT cards.

ill. plece to be able

]15975 Anderson

Lower Lake, CA 95457 (707) 995-4200 (800) 628-5188

BASIC INCOME EilGIBIUIT Number ill Household Gross Monthly Income 1 2 3 4 Net Montlily fncome Amount ofBenefit

SU74
$],,579 $1,984 $2,389

s 903
$1,2]15 $1,526 $1,836

$200 $367 $526 $668

For campletl': digim.lity information cal! (7iD7}995-4200; ,or go to:
'W'V\!'I1'.dss.

cahwoct.govIJoodsramps ..

ASSISif ANCE
WIC-Womell,. Infants &:: ClhlMren 831 Bevins St., Lakeport, 01' 14085 Lakeshore rx., Clearlake Department, . . 15975 A.mderson LO"V€jj" Lake .30 Lake
COUll!)",';

(10T)263-5253 or (BT!) 942~2220 Appointment Onl.y (107) 995~4200 OJ: (BOO) 262~0299

Provides vouchers fOJ[' Iow-income pH~gnEmlt,lactating &; postpartum women, infants &:: children to age:) DSS , services to persons are m need of emergency"

yrs.

, Services Ranch. Pailkway

Local F"ood Gilide

WHEEL OF OPPORTUNITY FOR GROWING A LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM
Everyone in a community has an important role to play in supporting a Iocal food system, Consumer demand for local products is at the very core of growing a local food economy. As we better understand the costs to' grow local food we are 'liVillllingo pay a bit more for its many t benefits. The follillowing is a visual snapshot of food system componenes we can work together to fulfill. We are optimistic about our current and future progress ill. these areas"

Ames in farm

production
increase, new crops: such as ,grain sand

legumes added
Infrastructure fur Food processing,

Farm M~"k"ts, Co-op, Online Orders increase; public requests Ioca] products at mil :food outlet.s

.storage and
distribution

Community and School gardens
rncrease access :t: 0 h",~It:b_y food, lin k

Local Food
System.
Promote Fresh "'Eat

Local produce

and produces available ye~rround; fi3!inl1ers e~TT1~ living wage

to

nutritjori

00.,

canning,

etc.

-Buy L>k,e County Grown"

Schools, chefs, ho s p itals, gmcery stores, increase use and :prom ate local. products
fOT

Land.energy,

health policies
supp"rt local

Farmer co ... ops equipment, food storage,

purchasing, A,g, opportututfes and healthy loving

seed ban ks,
internships established

Entities such as Public Health, the local Food Roundtable, Hunger Task Foree, Health Leadership Network, Lake County Farm Bureau, Lake County Co-op, schools, hospitals, restaurants, groceJ1y markets, funnel's, agricultural organizations, county gOVeTIlllJLent, nd a others are working on various aspects of the aibove wheelto more fully develop the potential of our O\VU local food system, While acknowledging tile limits to what can be produced Iocally, there are still many ways we can continue to cultivate the potential of 'Our local iood system comprised of production, processing, marketing and distribution of local products ![jnked to policies and education that support and sustain these efforts over time. Lake
COImty's

Local Food G~!ide

EAT FRESH -BUY LAKE COUNTY GROWN
DIETARY FIBER Protects against:
• • • • • •
Obesity High cholesterol Heart disease Constipation Diabetes Certain cancers

Food Source Examples:
• • • • • • • •
Berries, avocado Pears, apples Broccoli, carrots Peas, dried beans Figs. apples Nuts, seeds Oranges, bananas Sweet potato

A TIOXIDANTS Inhibits:
Highest Oxidation which can lead to cell damage and disease.
(not in order)

Veget.able Sources

Highest

Fruit Sources

(not in order)


• • • • •

Kale Red Peppers Spinach Corn Artichoke hearts Cabbage


• •

Garlic Beets Broccoli Sweet Potato Cauliflower Carrots


• •

• • • •
• •

Blueberries Cranberries Cherries Blackberries Strawberries Raspberries

• • • • • •

Plums Pears Grapes Apples Bananas Melon

VITAMIN-A Benefits:
• • • • Protects against infection Promotes healthy eyes & skin Has antioxidant properties Growth of bones & teeth

Food Source Examples:
• • • • • All yellow & orange produce Deep leafy greens, Whole grains Broccoli, B1USSelS sprouts Cantaloupe, persimmon

Benefits:
• • Facilitates release of energy hum food Thiamin (Bl) essential for nervous system, muscular function, energy conversion Riboflavin (B2) important to growth, red cell production, healthy skin & vision Niacin (B3) helps digestive system, healthy skin, nerves
COU1lty's

B-VITAMI

S

Food Source Examples:
• Whole grains


Peas. legumes, nuts
Corn


Lake

Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

33

FOLIC ACIDIFOLACIN (VITAMIN-B9)
Folacin comes from the word for foliage

Benefits:
• Important for production &: maintenance of new cells Prevents anemia Reduces risk of birth defects, low birth weight and premature babies

Food Source Examples: • Leafy greens

• •

• • •

Asparagus Spinach ROll1ainelettuce Beets

Benefits:
• • • • Healing cuts and wounds Healthy gums and teeth Strengthens immune system May delay aging process and prevent disease by destroying free radicals; antioxidant

VITAMIN-C

Food Source Examples:
• •

• •

All citrus fruits Bell peppers, broccoli Kiwi, peaches, watermelon Strawberries. tomatoes Leafy greens, cauliflower

IRON: Every living cell contains iron Benefits:
• • • • • Builds strong bones Transmit nerve impulses To maintain regular heartbeat Transporting oxygen Prevents anemia

Food Source Examples:
• • • • Widespread in food Walnuts, other nuts Dried figs lima beans, legumes Leafy greens, peas

Benefits:
• • • Builds muscle Metabolizes protein and carbohydrates Balances water and acid in blood and body tissues

POTASSIUM

Food Source Examples:



Fresh foods of all kinds Fruit, vegetables Whole grains Legumes Winter squash
00

Benefits:
• • • Brain function Reduce inflammation Reduce heart disease

OMEGA-3FATrYACIDSF

dS ource Ex amp 1es:


Walnuts Pumpkin seeds Flax seeds Chiaseeds

Foods tluu: appear on more than one list are those you Dlay want to consider eating more then once per week.
34 Lahe County's Local Food Guide Eat Fresl: -Buy Local

FOLIC ACID/FOLACI Benefits:
• Important for production &; maintenance of new cells Prevents anemia Reduces risk of birth defects, low birth weight and premature babies

(VITAMI

-B9)

Folacin comes from the word for foliage

Food Source Examples:

• • •

Leafy greens Asparagus Spinach Romaine lettuce Beets

• •

Benefits:
• • • • Healing cuts and wounds Healthy gums and teeth Strengthens immune system May delay aging process and prevent disease by destroying free radicals; antioxidant

VITAMIN-C

Food Source Examples:
• •

• •

All citrus fruits Bell peppers, broccoli Kiwi, peaches, watermelon Stravvberries.tolnatoes Leafy greens, cauliflower

IRON: Every living cell contains iron Benefits:
• • • • • Builds strong bones Transmit nerve impulses To maintain regular heartbeat Transporting oxygen Prevents anemia

Food Source Examples:
• • • • Widespread in food Walnuts, other nuts Dried figs lima beans, legumes Leafy greens, peas

Benefits:
• • • Builds muscle Metabolizes protein and carbohydrates Balances water and acid in blood and body tissues

POTASSIUM

Food Source Examples:

• • • •

Fresh foods of all kinds Fllllt, vegetables Whole grains Legumes Winter squash

Benefits:
• • • Brain function Reduce inflammation Reduce heart disease

OMEGA-3FATTY

ACIDS F 00 dS ource Examp 1 es:
• • • • Walnuts Pumpkin seeds Flax seeds Chiaseeds

Foods that appear
34 Lalle County's Local Food Guide

OIl

1110re then one list are those
Eat Fresh -Buy Local

you l11aywant to consider eating more clisn once per week.

Healthy Eating Matters
We hear a lot about obesity prevention these days. The following maps provide a visual depiction of what has been happening in our country in terms of obesity prevalence and why this issue has become alarming. The maps were prepared by the Centers for Disease Control to convey results of their Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The dramatic increase in obesity has been a driving force behind myriad obesity prevention programs. We have never before had obesity rates at this level, and nobody fully understands the implications of this on our future in terms of cost, or in terms of disease. Some researchers have predicted that for the first time, future generations are going to have decreased life spans compared to those who have gone before them. Obesity is a risk factor for a number of chronic diseases and health conditions, such as coronary artery disease, diabetes, hypertension, and certain cancers. The number of children and youth diagnosed with Type II diabetes is steadily increasing. This is a health condition that at one time was called adult-onset diabetes because it was almost never seen in children. These maps were instrumental in launching many nationwide programs designed to increase access to fresh produce such as Farm to School. Farm to School is at work in our community ensuring that children /youth enjoy the nutritional benefits of local produce by connecting school food service to local farmers.

COLOR KEY:

<10%

10%-14%

-15%-19%

D

20%-24%

-

25%-29%

II

~30%

Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults: BRFSS for 1990
(*BMI 330, or about 30 Ibs. overweight for 5'4" persorr)

1990

Lake County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

35

Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults: BRFSS for 1999 &: 2008

1999

2008

Summary
• In 1990, among states participating in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, ten states had a prevalence of obesity less than 10% and no states had prevalence equal to or greater than 15%.

By 1999, no state had prevalence less than 10%, eighteen states had a prevalence of obesity between 20-24%, and no state had prevalence equal to or greater than 25%.

In 2008, only one state (Colorado) had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. Thirty-two states had a prevalence equal to or greater than 25%; six of these states (Alabama, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia) had a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30%.
Lake County's Local Food Guide Eat Fresh -Buy Local

36

LAKE COUNTY'S FOOD ECONOMY
Agriculture has been the second most important industry in the Lake County since the 1880s when wheat was the biggest crop and the first pear and walnut trees were planted. Over the years, primary crops shifted from wheat to 'wine grapes to pears and walnuts, then recently, back to wine grapes. There are a handful of farmers who are currently reintroducing grain production back to the county. In addition to these important export crops, Lake County has been fortunate to attract a number of small farmers of fresh fruits and vegetables who depend entirely on local and regional sales.

*

The purpose of this Guide to Local Food Producers is to increase: • • • Consumption of local fresh foods The number of farmers and acreage in production Local support for local farmers

.~. Annual production and economic information about specific crops can be found in the Agriculture Commissioner's Annual Crop Report available at www.lakecountyag.comunderPublications.

WHAT YOU CAN DOl
• • • • Voice your interest in. ask for and purchase Lake County-grown foods as your first preference. Ask your grocery store to sell locally-grown foods. Many already are, let them know it's appreciated. Eat at restaurants where Lake County-grown foods are served. Let them know it's appreciated. Ask schools, hospitals and other places where food is served to offer Lake County-grown products. Encourage school food service staff to keep building their Farm to School programs. For information about Lake County wine grape growers, not covered in the grant's nutrition focused proposal, please visit these websites: • • • Lake County Winegrape Commission at www.lakecountywinegrape.org, Lake County Winery Association at www.lakecountywinelies.org, Lake County Visitor Center at www.lakecounty.com or

~1Ul_

or (J07) 274~5652
Eat Fresh -Buy Local 37

Lake County's Local Food Guide

LOCAL FOOD SYSTEM GOALS ts: OPPORTUNITIES
GOAL I. INCREASE LOCAL DEMAND & CONSUMPTION:

Eat fJ-...-

BDJlake [ODU Gren

~ Eat Fresh-Buy Lake County Grown logo and messaging becomes adopted among food entities and used to promote locally grown food as first and best choice. Local farmers are more fully valued as prune asset to the community. Community awareness regarding true cost of food and relevant issues is increased. Farmers are paid a living wage.

~ Farm to School programs are taking root. Some schools are initiating local purchasing programs while others have doubled and tripled local purchasing. Optimally, Farm to School programs become institutionalized as a best practice, linking nutrition to wellness, culinary arts, 4H, Fu ture Fanners, etc. Parents become advocates for healthy menus.

"*" Local grOcely stores,

restaurants, hospitals, casinos are beginning to consider locally grown purchases. These commercial and institutional customers expand their efforts to work with farmers and brokers to facilitate ordering, purchasing and delivery to support local agriculture. Consumers validate institutions for use of locally grown products.

*

GOAL 2. INCREASE PRODUCTION:
Local farmers identify new crops and expand cultivation of existing specialty crops as demand increases. More farmers engage in year-round production. Equipment needs identified; cooperatives formed to share costs; commercial kitchens made available; food storage and distribution mechanisms support increased production. ~ Existing food processing efforts are hampered by lack of startup funding, equipment and marketing expertise. ext steps include: a) expanding processing of local produce to fill niche and general markets; b) identifying native plants (acorns, tules, etc.) that could be processed; c) satisfying equipment needs and engaging cooperative efforts to maximize processing and distribution potential.

38

Lahe County's Local Food Guide

Eat Fresh -Buy Local

GOAL 3. INCREASE ACCESS TO LOCAL FOODS:

*

www.LakeCountyGrown.com provides year~ round market for all farmers and value-added processors, individual and institutional buyers. umber of pickup sites are expanded to all Lake County areas. Number of sellers and buyers are increased to maximum potential.

~ The Lake County Community Co-Op continues to provide and promote access to local, fresh and value-added, organic foods to its members via delivery of individual produce and value added products and modified community-supported agriculture (CSA) boxes, through their online ordering system, and sponsors the Friday ight Farmers Market, community gardens, farm tours and community education.

lake County Community Co-op
VJWW. '"

kpc o-op. org

*

There are currently three Certified Fanners Markets in Lake County (see page 7). Efforts continue to expand the number, locations and frequency of Farmers Markets and develop mini-markets at schools, hospitals, county offices and other high traffic locations.

-*" WIC

coupons are currently accepted at most Farmers Markets. Next steps include facilitating use of Cal Fresh (formerly known as food stamps) EBT transaction cards and increasing participation in Cal Fresh to generate an additional $6 million in local revenue. Community gardens help increase access to fresh produce.

a

GOAL 4. POLICIES FOR PROSPERITY: ~<t-Local government,
institutions, businesses and institutions more fully embrace our local food system as a means to improve population health and economic wellbeing. Not only will fanner's realize predictable income and markets, but the County will benefit from decreased healthcare costs. Opportunities to more fully develop our local food system become part of a shared vision among consumers, policy makers and community leaders.
Eat Fresh -Buy Local 39

Lake

COlOlty'S

Local Food Guide

COUNTY FOOD GUIDE MAP

Clear Lake

Cearlake CI>Ik ..

Legend
• • Farmers Ma.rket Seasonal Farm Stand


Tours by Aooo: trnent
On Site S ales by Appointment Miles

o

2_5

5

10

J