A First Course in

Complex Analysis
Version 1.31
Matthias Beck, Gerald Marchesi,
Dennis Pixton, Lucas Sabalka
Department of Mathematics Department of Mathematical Sciences
San Francisco State University Binghamton University (SUNY)
San Francisco, CA 94132 Binghamton, NY 13902-6000
beck@math.sfsu.edu marchesi@math.binghamton.edu
dennis@math.binghamton.edu
sabalka@math.binghamton.edu
Copyright 2002–2011 by the authors. All rights reserved. The most current version of this book is
available at the websites
http://www.math.binghamton.edu/dennis/complex.pdf
http://math.sfsu.edu/beck/complex.html.
This book may be freely reproduced and distributed, provided that it is reproduced in its entirety
from the most recent version. This book may not be altered in any way, except for changes in
format required for printing or other distribution, without the permission of the authors.
2
These are the lecture notes of a one-semester undergraduate course which we have taught several
times at Binghamton University (SUNY) and San Francisco State University. For many of our
students, complex analysis is their first rigorous analysis (if not mathematics) class they take,
and these notes reflect this very much. We tried to rely on as few concepts from real analysis as
possible. In particular, series and sequences are treated “from scratch.” This also has the (maybe
disadvantageous) consequence that power series are introduced very late in the course.
We thank our students who made many suggestions for and found errors in the text. Special
thanks go to Joshua Palmatier, Collin Bleak and Sharma Pallekonda at Binghamton University
(SUNY) for comments after teaching from this book.
Contents
1 Complex Numbers 1
1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 Definitions and Algebraic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 From Algebra to Geometry and Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.3 Geometric Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
1.4 Elementary Topology of the Plane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.5 Theorems from Calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2 Differentiation 15
2.1 First Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
2.2 Differentiability and Holomorphicity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
2.3 Constant Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2.4 The Cauchy–Riemann Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3 Examples of Functions 26
3.1 M¨obius Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.2 Infinity and the Cross Ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.3 Stereographic Projection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.4 Exponential and Trigonometric Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
3.5 The Logarithm and Complex Exponentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
4 Integration 44
4.1 Definition and Basic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
4.2 Cauchy’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
4.3 Cauchy’s Integral Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
5 Consequences of Cauchy’s Theorem 55
5.1 Extensions of Cauchy’s Formula . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
5.2 Taking Cauchy’s Formula to the Limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
5.3 Antiderivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
3
CONTENTS 4
6 Harmonic Functions 65
6.1 Definition and Basic Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
6.2 Mean-Value and Maximum/Minimum Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
7 Power Series 70
7.1 Sequences and Completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
7.2 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
7.3 Sequences and Series of Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
7.4 Region of Convergence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
8 Taylor and Laurent Series 86
8.1 Power Series and Holomorphic Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
8.2 Classification of Zeros and the Identity Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
8.3 Laurent Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
9 Isolated Singularities and the Residue Theorem 97
9.1 Classification of Singularities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
9.2 Residues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
9.3 Argument Principle and Rouch´e’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
10 Discrete Applications of the Residue Theorem 108
10.1 Infinite Sums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
10.2 Binomial Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
10.3 Fibonacci Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
10.4 The ‘Coin-Exchange Problem’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
10.5 Dedekind sums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Solutions to Selected Exercises 113
Chapter 1
Complex Numbers
Die ganzen Zahlen hat der liebe Gott geschaffen, alles andere ist Menschenwerk.
(God created the integers, everything else is made by humans.)
Leopold Kronecker (1823–1891)
1.0 Introduction
The real numbers have many nice properties. There are operations such as addition, subtraction,
multiplication as well as division by any real number except zero. There are useful laws that govern
these operations such as the commutative and distributive laws. You can also take limits and do
calculus. But you cannot take the square root of −1. Equivalently, you cannot find a root of the
equation
x
2
+ 1 = 0. (1.1)
Most of you have heard that there is a “new” number i that is a root of the Equation (1.1).
That is, i
2
+ 1 = 0 or i
2
= −1. We will show that when the real numbers are enlarged to a new
system called the complex numbers that includes i, not only do we gain a number with interesting
properties, but we do not lose any of the nice properties that we had before.
Specifically, the complex numbers, like the real numbers, will have the operations of addition,
subtraction, multiplication as well as division by any complex number except zero. These operations
will follow all the laws that we are used to such as the commutative and distributive laws. We will
also be able to take limits and do calculus. And, there will be a root of Equation (1.1).
In the next section we show exactly how the complex numbers are set up and in the rest
of this chapter we will explore the properties of the complex numbers. These properties will be
both algebraic properties (such as the commutative and distributive properties mentioned already)
and also geometric properties. You will see, for example, that multiplication can be described
geometrically. In the rest of the book, the calculus of complex numbers will be built on the
propeties that we develop in this chapter.
1.1 Definitions and Algebraic Properties
There are many equivalent ways to think about a complex number, each of which is useful in its
own right. In this section, we begin with the formal definition of a complex number. We then
1
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 2
interpret this formal definition into more useful and easier to work with algebraic language. Then,
in the next section, we will see three more ways of thinking about complex numbers.
The complex numbers can be defined as pairs of real numbers,
C = {(x, y) : x, y ∈ R} ,
equipped with the addition
(x, y) + (a, b) = (x +a, y +b)
and the multiplication
(x, y) · (a, b) = (xa −yb, xb +ya) .
One reason to believe that the definitions of these binary operations are “good” is that C is an
extension of R, in the sense that the complex numbers of the form (x, 0) behave just like real
numbers; that is, (x, 0) + (y, 0) = (x + y, 0) and (x, 0) · (y, 0) = (x · y, 0). So we can think of the
real numbers being embedded in C as those complex numbers whose second coordinate is zero.
The following basic theorem states the algebraic structure that we established with our defini-
tions. Its proof is straightforward but nevertheless a good exercise.
Theorem 1.1. (C, +, ·) is a field; that is:
∀ (x, y), (a, b) ∈ C : (x, y) + (a, b) ∈ C (1.2)
∀ (x, y), (a, b), (c, d) ∈ C :

(x, y) + (a, b)

+ (c, d) = (x, y) +

(a, b) + (c, d)

(1.3)
∀ (x, y), (a, b) ∈ C : (x, y) + (a, b) = (a, b) + (x, y) (1.4)
∀ (x, y) ∈ C : (x, y) + (0, 0) = (x, y) (1.5)
∀ (x, y) ∈ C : (x, y) + (−x, −y) = (0, 0) (1.6)
∀ (x, y), (a, b), (c, d) ∈ C : (x, y) ·

(a, b) + (c, d)

= (x, y) · (a, b) + (x, y) · (c, d)

(1.7)
∀ (x, y), (a, b) ∈ C : (x, y) · (a, b) ∈ C (1.8)
∀ (x, y), (a, b), (c, d) ∈ C :

(x, y) · (a, b)

· (c, d) = (x, y) ·

(a, b) · (c, d)

(1.9)
∀ (x, y), (a, b) ∈ C : (x, y) · (a, b) = (a, b) · (x, y) (1.10)
∀ (x, y) ∈ C : (x, y) · (1, 0) = (x, y) (1.11)
∀ (x, y) ∈ C \ {(0, 0)} : (x, y) ·

x
x
2
+y
2
,
−y
x
2
+y
2

= (1, 0) (1.12)
Remark. What we are stating here can be compressed in the language of algebra: equations (1.2)–
(1.6) say that (C, +) is an Abelian group with unit element (0, 0), equations (1.8)–(1.12) that
(C \ {(0, 0)}, ·) is an abelian group with unit element (1, 0). (If you don’t know what these terms
mean—don’t worry, we will not have to deal with them.)
The definition of our multiplication implies the innocent looking statement
(0, 1) · (0, 1) = (−1, 0) . (1.13)
This identity together with the fact that
(a, 0) · (x, y) = (ax, ay)
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 3
allows an alternative notation for complex numbers. The latter implies that we can write
(x, y) = (x, 0) + (0, y) = (x, 0) · (1, 0) + (y, 0) · (0, 1) .
If we think—in the spirit of our remark on the embedding of R in C—of (x, 0) and (y, 0) as the
real numbers x and y, then this means that we can write any complex number (x, y) as a linear
combination of (1, 0) and (0, 1), with the real coefficients x and y. (1, 0), in turn, can be thought
of as the real number 1. So if we give (0, 1) a special name, say i, then the complex number that
we used to call (x, y) can be written as x · 1 +y · i, or in short,
x +iy .
The number x is called the real part and y the imaginary part
1
of the complex number x+iy, often
denoted as Re(x +iy) = x and Im(x +iy) = y. The identity (1.13) then reads
i
2
= −1 .
We invite the reader to check that the definitions of our binary operations and Theorem 1.1 are
coherent with the usual real arithmetic rules if we think of complex numbers as given in the form
x + iy. This algebraic way of thinking about complex numbers has a name: a complex number
written in the form x +iy where x and y are both real numbers is in rectangular form.
In fact, much more can now be said with the introduction of the square root of −1. It is not
just that the polynomial z
2
+ 1 has roots, but every polynomial has roots in C:
Theorem 1.2. (see Theorem 5.7) Every non-constant polynomial of degree d has d roots (counting
multiplicity) in C.
The proof of this theorem requires some important machinery, so we defer its proof and an
extended discussion of it to Chapter 5.
1.2 From Algebra to Geometry and Back
Although we just introduced a new way of writing complex numbers, let’s for a moment return to
the (x, y)-notation. It suggests that one can think of a complex number as a two-dimensional real
vector. When plotting these vectors in the plane R
2
, we will call the x-axis the real axis and the
y-axis the imaginary axis. The addition that we defined for complex numbers resembles vector
addition. The analogy stops at multiplication: there is no “usual” multiplication of two vectors in
R
2
that gives another vector, and certainly not one that agrees with our definition of the product
of two complex numbers.
Any vector in R
2
is defined by its two coordinates. On the other hand, it is also determined
by its length and the angle it encloses with, say, the positive real axis; let’s define these concepts
thoroughly. The absolute value (sometimes also called the modulus) r = |z| ∈ R of z = x +iy is
r = |z| :=

x
2
+y
2
,
and an argument of z = x +iy is a number φ ∈ R such that
x = r cos φ and y = r sin φ.
1
The name has historical reasons: people thought of complex numbers as unreal, imagined.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 4

DD
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
kk
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
WW
z
1
z
2
z
1
+z
2
Figure 1.1: Addition of complex numbers.
A given complex number z = x +iy has infinitely many possible arguments. For instance, the
number 1 = 1 + 0i lies on the x-axis, and so has argument 0, but we could just as well say it has
argument 2π, 4π, −2π, or 2π ∗ k for any integer k. The number 0 = 0 + 0i has modulus 0, and
every number φ is an argument. Aside from the exceptional case of 0, for any complex number z,
the arguments of z all differ by a multiple of 2π, just as we saw for the example z = 1.
The absolute value of the difference of two vectors has a nice geometric interpretation:
Proposition 1.3. Let z
1
, z
2
∈ C be two complex numbers, thought of as vectors in R
2
, and let
d(z
1
, z
2
) denote the distance between (the endpoints of ) the two vectors in R
2
(see Figure 1.2).
Then
d(z
1
, z
2
) = |z
1
−z
2
| = |z
2
−z
1
|.
Proof. Let z
1
= x
1
+iy
1
and z
2
= x
2
+iy
2
. From geometry we know that d(z
1
, z
2
) =

(x
1
−x
2
)
2
+ (y
1
−y
2
)
2
.
This is the definition of |z
1
−z
2
|. Since (x
1
−x
2
)
2
= (x
2
−x
1
)
2
and (y
1
−y
2
)
2
= (y
2
−y
1
)
2
, this is
also equal to z
2
−z
1
.
That |z
1
− z
2
| = |z
2
− z
1
| simply says that the vector from z
1
to z
2
has the same length as its
inverse, the vector from z
2
to z
1
.
It is very useful to keep this geometric interpretation in mind when thinking about the absolute
value of the difference of two complex numbers.

DD
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
kk
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
j
44
z
1
z
2
z
1
−z
2
Figure 1.2: Geometry behind the “distance” between two complex numbers.
The first hint that the absolute value and argument of a complex number are useful concepts
is the fact that they allow us to give a geometric interpretation for the multiplication of two
complex numbers. Let’s say we have two complex numbers, x
1
+ iy
1
with absolute value r
1
and
argument φ
1
, and x
2
+ iy
2
with absolute value r
2
and argument φ
2
. This means, we can write
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 5
x
1
+iy
1
= (r
1
cos φ
1
) +i(r
1
sinφ
1
) and x
2
+iy
2
= (r
2
cos φ
2
) +i(r
2
sin φ
2
) To compute the product,
we make use of some classic trigonometric identities:
(x
1
+iy
1
)(x
2
+iy
2
) =

(r
1
cos φ
1
) +i(r
1
sin φ
1
)

(r
2
cos φ
2
) +i(r
2
sin φ
2
)

= (r
1
r
2
cos φ
1
cos φ
2
−r
1
r
2
sin φ
1
sin φ
2
) +i(r
1
r
2
cos φ
1
sinφ
2
+r
1
r
2
sin φ
1
cos φ
2
)
= r
1
r
2

(cos φ
1
cos φ
2
−sin φ
1
sin φ
2
) +i(cos φ
1
sin φ
2
+ sinφ
1
cos φ
2
)

= r
1
r
2

cos(φ
1

2
) +i sin(φ
1

2
)

.
So the absolute value of the product is r
1
r
2
and (one of) its argument is φ
1

2
. Geometrically, we
are multiplying the lengths of the two vectors representing our two complex numbers, and adding
their angles measured with respect to the positive x-axis.
2

FF M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
ff
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
xx
. .
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
. .
.
.
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
..
. .. . .. . ..
.
..
.
..
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
.. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. .
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
..
.
.
.
z
1
z
2
z
1
z
2
φ
1
φ
2
φ
1

2
Figure 1.3: Multiplication of complex numbers.
In view of the above calculation, it should come as no surprise that we will have to deal with
quantities of the form cos φ + i sin φ (where φ is some real number) quite a bit. To save space,
bytes, ink, etc., (and because “Mathematics is for lazy people”
3
) we introduce a shortcut notation
and define
e

= cos φ +i sin φ.
At this point, this exponential notation is indeed purely a notation. We will later see in Chapter 3
that it has an intimate connection to the complex exponential function. For now, we motivate this
maybe strange-seeming definition by collecting some of its properties. The reader is encouraged to
prove them.
Lemma 1.4. For any φ, φ
1
, φ
2
∈ R,
(a) e

1
e

2
= e
i(φ
1

2
)
(b) 1/e

= e
−iφ
(c) e
i(φ+2π)
= e

(d)

e

= 1
2
One should convince oneself that there is no problem with the fact that there are many possible arguments for
complex numbers, as both cosine and sine are periodic functions with period 2π.
3
Peter Hilton (Invited address, Hudson River Undergraduate Mathematics Conference 2000)
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 6
Formal
(x, y)
Algebraic:
Geometric:
rectangular exponential
cartesian polar
x +iy re

r
θ
x
y
z z
Figure 1.4: Five ways of thinking about a complex number z ∈ C.
(e)
d

e

= i e

.
With this notation, the sentence “The complex number x+iy has absolute value r and argument
φ” now becomes the identity
x +iy = re

.
The left-hand side is often called the rectangular form, the right-hand side the polar form of this
complex number.
We now have five different ways of thinking about a complex number: the formal definition, in
rectangular form, in polar form, and geometrically using Cartesian coordinates or polar coordinates.
Each of these five ways is useful in different situations, and translating between them is an essential
ingredient in complex analysis. The five ways and their corresponding notation are listed in Figure
1.4.
1.3 Geometric Properties
From very basic geometric properties of triangles, we get the inequalities
−|z| ≤ Re z ≤ |z| and −|z| ≤ Imz ≤ |z| . (1.14)
The square of the absolute value has the nice property
|x +iy|
2
= x
2
+y
2
= (x +iy)(x −iy) .
This is one of many reasons to give the process of passing from x + iy to x − iy a special name:
x −iy is called the (complex) conjugate of x +iy. We denote the conjugate by
x +iy = x −iy .
Geometrically, conjugating z means reflecting the vector corresponding to z with respect to the
real axis. The following collects some basic properties of the conjugate. Their easy proofs are left
for the exercises.
Lemma 1.5. For any z, z
1
, z
2
∈ C,
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 7
(a) z
1
±z
2
= z
1
±z
2
(b) z
1
· z
2
= z
1
· z
2
(c)

z
1
z
2

=
z
1
z
2
(d) z = z
(e) |z| = |z|
(f) |z|
2
= zz
(g) Re z =
1
2
(z +z)
(h) Imz =
1
2i
(z −z)
(i) e

= e
−iφ
.
From part (f) we have a neat formula for the inverse of a non-zero complex number:
z
−1
=
1
z
=
z
|z|
2
.
A famous geometric inequality (which holds for vectors in R
n
) is the triangle inequality
|z
1
+z
2
| ≤ |z
1
| +|z
2
| .
By drawing a picture in the complex plane, you should be able to come up with a geometric proof
of this inequality. To prove it algebraically, we make extensive use of Lemma 1.5:
|z
1
+z
2
|
2
= (z
1
+z
2
) (z
1
+z
2
)
= (z
1
+z
2
) (z
1
+z
2
)
= z
1
z
1
+z
1
z
2
+z
2
z
1
+z
2
z
2
= |z
1
|
2
+z
1
z
2
+z
1
z
2
+|z
2
|
2
= |z
1
|
2
+ 2 Re (z
1
z
2
) +|z
2
|
2
.
Finally by (1.14)
|z
1
+z
2
|
2
≤ |z
1
|
2
+ 2 |z
1
z
2
| +|z
2
|
2
= |z
1
|
2
+ 2 |z
1
| |z
2
| +|z
2
|
2
= |z
1
|
2
+ 2 |z
1
| |z
2
| +|z
2
|
2
= (|z
1
| +|z
2
|)
2
,
which is equivalent to our claim.
For future reference we list several variants of the triangle inequality:
Lemma 1.6. For z
1
, z
2
, · · · ∈ C, we have the following identities:
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 8
(a) The triangle inequality: |±z
1
±z
2
| ≤ |z
1
| +|z
2
|.
(b) The reverse triangle inequality: |±z
1
±z
2
| ≥ |z
1
| −|z
2
|.
(c) The triangle inequality for sums:

n
¸
k=1
z
k


n
¸
k=1
|z
k
|.
The first inequality is just a rewrite of the original triangle inequality, using the fact that
|±z| = |z|, and the last follows by induction. The reverse triangle inequality is proved in Exercise 22.
1.4 Elementary Topology of the Plane
In Section 1.2 we saw that the complex numbers C, which were initially defined algebraically, can
be identified with the points in the Euclidean plane R
2
. In this section we collect some definitions
and results concerning the topology of the plane. While the definitions are essential and will be
used frequently, we will need the following theorems only at a limited number of places in the
remainder of the book; the reader who is willing to accept the topological arguments in later proofs
on faith may skip the theorems in this section.
Recall that if z, w ∈ C, then |z −w| is the distance between z and w as points in the plane. So
if we fix a complex number a and a positive real number r then the set of z satisfying |z −a| = r
is the set of points at distance r from a; that is, this is the circle with center a and radius r. The
inside of this circle is called the open disk with center a and radius r, and is written D
r
(a). That
is, D
r
(a) = {z ∈ C : |z −a| < r}. Notice that this does not include the circle itself.
We need some terminology for talking about subsets of C.
Definition 1.7. Suppose E is any subset of C.
(a) A point a is an interior point of E if some open disk with center a lies in E.
(b) A point b is a boundary point of E if every open disk centered at b contains a point in E and
also a point that is not in E.
(c) A point c is an accumulation point of E if every open disk centered at c contains a point of E
different from c.
(d) A point d is an isolated point of E if it lies in E and some open disk centered at d contains no
point of E other than d.
The idea is that if you don’t move too far from an interior point of E then you remain in E;
but at a boundary point you can make an arbitrarily small move and get to a point inside E and
you can also make an arbitrarily small move and get to a point outside E.
Definition 1.8. A set is open if all its points are interior points. A set is closed if it contains all
its boundary points.
Example 1.9. For R > 0 and z
0
∈ C, {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R} and {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| > R} are open.
{z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| ≤ R} is closed.
Example 1.10. C and the empty set ∅ are open. They are also closed!
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 9
Definition 1.11. The boundary of a set E, written ∂E, is the set of all boundary points of E. The
interior of E is the set of all interior points of E. The closure of E, written E, is the set of points
in E together with all boundary points of E.
Example 1.12. If G is the open disk {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R} then
G = {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| ≤ R} and ∂G = {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| = R} .
That is, G is a closed disk and ∂G is a circle.
One notion that is somewhat subtle in the complex domain is the idea of connectedness. Intu-
itively, a set is connected if it is “in one piece.” In the reals a set is connected if and only if it is an
interval, so there is little reason to discuss the matter. However, in the plane there is a vast variety
of connected subsets, so a definition is necessary.
Definition 1.13. Two sets X, Y ⊆ C are separated if there are disjoint open sets A and B so that
X ⊆ A and Y ⊆ B. A set W ⊆ C is connected if it is impossible to find two separated non-empty
sets whose union is equal to W. A region is a connected open set.
The idea of separation is that the two open sets A and B ensure that X and Y cannot just
“stick together.” It is usually easy to check that a set is not connected. For example, the intervals
X = [0, 1) and Y = (1, 2] on the real axis are separated: There are infinitely many choices for A and
B that work; one choice is A = D
1
(0) (the open disk with center 0 and radius 1) and B = D
1
(2)
(the open disk with center 2 and radius 1). Hence their union, which is [0, 2] \{1}, is not connected.
On the other hand, it is hard to use the definition to show that a set is connected, since we have
to rule out any possible separation.
One type of connected set that we will use frequently is a curve.
Definition 1.14. A path or curve in C is the image of a continuous function γ : [a, b] →C, where
[a, b] is a closed interval in R. The path γ is smooth if γ is differentiable.
We say that the curve is parametrized by γ. It is a customary and practical abuse of notation
to use the same letter for the curve and its parametrization. We emphasize that a curve must have
a parametrization, and that the parametrization must be defined and continuous on a closed and
bounded interval [a, b].
Since we may regard C as identified with R
2
, a path can be specified by giving two continuous
real-valued functions of a real variable, x(t) and y(t), and setting γ(t) = x(t) + y(t)i. A curve is
closed if γ(a) = γ(b) and is a simple closed curve if γ(s) = γ(t) implies s = a and t = b or s = b
and t = a, that is, the curve does not cross itself.
The following seems intuitively clear, but its proof requires more preparation in topology:
Proposition 1.15. Any curve is connected.
The next theorem gives an easy way to check whether an open set is connected, and also gives
a very useful property of open connected sets.
Theorem 1.16. If W is a subset of C that has the property that any two points in W can be
connected by a curve in W then W is connected. On the other hand, if G is a connected open
subset of C then any two points of G may be connected by a curve in G; in fact, we can connect
any two points of G by a chain of horizontal and vertical segments lying in G.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 10
A chain of segments in G means the following: there are points z
0
, z
1
, . . . , z
n
so that, for each
k, z
k
and z
k+1
are the endpoints of a horizontal or vertical segment which lies entirely in G. (It is
not hard to parametrize such a chain, so it determines a curve.)
As an example, let G be the open disk with center 0 and radius 2. Then any two points in G can
be connected by a chain of at most 2 segments in G, so G is connected. Now let G
0
= G\ {0}; this
is the punctured disk obtained by removing the center from G. Then G is open and it is connected,
but now you may need more than two segments to connect points. For example, you need three
segments to connect −1 to 1 since you cannot go through 0.
Warning: The second part of Theorem 1.16 is not generally true if G is not open. For example,
circles are connected but there is no way to connect two distinct points of a circle by a chain of
segments which are subsets of the circle. A more extreme example, discussed in topology texts, is
the “topologist’s sine curve,” which is a connected set S ⊂ C that contains points that cannot be
connected by a curve of any sort inside S.
The reader may skip the following proof. It is included to illustrate some common techniques
in dealing with connected sets.
Proof of Theorem 1.16. Suppose, first, that any two points of G may be connected by a path that
lies in G. If G is not connected then we can write it as a union of two non-empty separated subsets
X and Y . So there are disjoint open sets A and B so that X ⊆ A and Y ⊆ B. Since X and Y are
disjoint we can find a ∈ X and b ∈ G. Let γ be a path in G that connects a to b. Then X
γ
= X∩γ
and Y
γ
= Y ∩ γ are disjoint and non-empty, their union is γ, and they are separated by A and B.
But this means that γ is not connected, and this contradicts Proposition 1.15.
Now suppose that G is a connected open set. Choose a point z
0
∈ G and define two sets: A is
the set of all points a so that there is a chain of segments in G connecting z
0
to a, and B is the set
of points in G that are not in A.
Suppose a is in A. Since a ∈ G there is an open disk D with center a that is contained in G.
We can connect z
0
to any point z in D by following a chain of segments from z
0
to a, and then
adding at most two segments in D that connect a to z. That is, each point of D is in A, so we
have shown that A is open.
Now suppose b is in B. Since b ∈ G there is an open disk D centered at b that lies in G. If z
0
could be connected to any point in D by a chain of segments in G then, extending this chain by at
most two more segments, we could connect z
0
to b, and this is impossible. Hence z
0
cannot connect
to any point of D by a chain of segments in G, so D ⊆ B. So we have shown that B is open.
Now G is the disjoint union of the two open sets A and B. If these are both non-empty then
they form a separation of G, which is impossible. But z
0
is in A so A is not empty, and so B must
be empty. That is, G = A, so z
0
can be connected to any point of G by a sequence of segments in
G. Since z
0
could be any point in G, this finishes the proof.
1.5 Theorems from Calculus
Here are a few theorems from real calculus that we will make use of in the course of the text.
Theorem 1.17 (Extreme-Value Theorem). Any continuous real-valued function defined on a closed
and bounded subset of R
n
has a minimum value and a maximum value.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 11
Theorem 1.18 (Mean-Value Theorem). Suppose I ⊆ R is an interval, f : I →R is differentiable,
and x, x + ∆x ∈ I. Then there is 0 < a < 1 such that
f(x + ∆x) −f(x)
∆x
= f

(x +a∆x) .
Many of the most important results of analysis concern combinations of limit operations. The
most important of all calculus theorems combines differentiation and integration (in two ways):
Theorem 1.19 (Fundamental Theorem of Calculus). Suppose f : [a, b] →R is continuous. Then
(a) If F is defined by F(x) =

x
a
f(t) dt then F is differentiable and F

(x) = f(x).
(b) If F is any antiderivative of f (that is, F

= f) then

b
a
f(x) dx = F(b) −F(a).
For functions of several variables we can perform differentiation operations, or integration op-
erations, in any order, if we have sufficient continuity:
Theorem 1.20 (Equality of mixed partials). If the mixed partials

2
f
∂x∂y
and

2
f
∂y∂x
are defined on
an open set G and are continuous at a point (x
0
, y
0
) in G then they are equal at (x
0
, y
0
).
Theorem 1.21 (Equality of iterated integrals). If f is continuous on the rectangle given by a ≤
x ≤ b and c ≤ y ≤ d then the iterated integrals

b
a

d
c
f(x, y) dy dx and

d
c

b
a
f(x, y) dxdy are equal.
Finally, we can apply differentiation and integration with respect to different variables in either
order:
Theorem 1.22 (Leibniz’s
4
Rule). Suppose f is continuous on the rectangle R given by a ≤ x ≤ b
and c ≤ y ≤ d, and suppose the partial derivative
∂f
∂x
exists and is continuous on R. Then
d
dx

d
c
f(x, y) dy =

d
c
∂f
∂x
(x, y) dy .
Exercises
1. Let z = 1 + 2i and w = 2 −i. Compute:
(a) z + 3w.
(b) w −z.
(c) z
3
.
(d) Re(w
2
+w).
(e) z
2
+z +i.
2. Find the real and imaginary parts of each of the following:
(a)
z−a
z+a
(a ∈ R).
4
Named after Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716). For more information about Leibnitz, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Leibnitz.html.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 12
(b)
3+5i
7i+1
.
(c)

−1+i

3
2

3
.
(d) i
n
for any n ∈ Z.
3. Find the absolute value and conjugate of each of the following:
(a) −2 +i.
(b) (2 +i)(4 + 3i).
(c)
3−i

2+3i
.
(d) (1 +i)
6
.
4. Write in polar form:
(a) 2i.
(b) 1 +i.
(c) −3 +

3i.
(d) −i.
(e) (2 −i)
2
.
(f) |3 −4i|.
(g)

5 −i.
(h)

1−i

3

4
5. Write in rectangular form:
(a)

2 e
i3π/4
.
(b) 34 e
iπ/2
.
(c) −e
i250π
.
(d) 2e
4πi
.
6. Write in both polar and rectangular form:
(a) 2
i
(b) e
ln(5)
i
(c) e
1+iπ/2
(d)
d

e
φ+iφ
7. Prove the quadratic formula works for complex numbers, regardless of whether the discrimi-
nant is negative. That is, prove, the roots of the equation az
2
+bz +c = 0, where a, b, c ∈ C,
are
−b±

b
2
−4ac
2a
as long as a = 0.
8. Use the quadratic formula to solve the following equations. Put your answers in standard
form.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 13
(a) z
2
+ 25 = 0.
(b) 2z
2
+ 2z + 5 = 0.
(c) 5z
2
+ 4z + 1 = 0.
(d) z
2
−z = 1.
(e) z
2
= 2z.
9. Fix A ∈ C and B ∈ R. Show that the equation |z
2
| + Re(Az) + B = 0 has a solution if and
only if |A
2
| ≥ 4B. When solutions exist, show the solution set is a circle.
10. Find all solutions to the following equations:
(a) z
6
= 1.
(b) z
4
= −16.
(c) z
6
= −9.
(d) z
6
−z
3
−2 = 0.
11. Show that |z| = 1 if and only if
1
z
= z.
12. Show that
(a) z is a real number if and only if z = z;
(b) z is either real or purely imaginary if and only if (z)
2
= z
2
.
13. Find all solutions of the equation z
2
+ 2z + (1 −i) = 0.
14. Prove Theorem 1.1.
15. Show that if z
1
z
2
= 0 then z
1
= 0 or z
2
= 0.
16. Prove Lemma 1.4.
17. Use Lemma 1.4 to derive the triple angle formulas:
(a) cos 3θ = cos
3
θ −3 cos θ sin
2
θ.
(b) sin 3θ = 3 cos
2
θ sin θ −sin
3
θ.
18. Prove Lemma 1.5.
19. Sketch the following sets in the complex plane:
(a) {z ∈ C : |z −1 +i| = 2} .
(b) {z ∈ C : |z −1 +i| ≤ 2} .
(c) {z ∈ C : Re(z + 2 −2i) = 3} .
(d) {z ∈ C : |z −i| +|z +i| = 3} .
(e) {z ∈ C : |z| = |z + 1|} .
20. Show the equation 2|z| = |z +i| describes a circle.
CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 14
21. Suppose p is a polynomial with real coefficients. Prove that
(a) p(z) = p (z).
(b) p(z) = 0 if and only if p (z) = 0.
22. Prove the reverse triangle inequality |z
1
−z
2
| ≥ |z
1
| −|z
2
|.
23. Use the previous exercise to show that

1
z
2
−1


1
3
for every z on the circle z = 2e

.
24. Sketch the following sets and determine whether they are open, closed, or neither; bounded;
connected.
(a) |z + 3| < 2.
(b) |Imz| < 1.
(c) 0 < |z −1| < 2.
(d) |z −1| +|z + 1| = 2.
(e) |z −1| +|z + 1| < 3.
25. What are the boundaries of the sets in the previous exercise?
26. The set E is the set of points z in C satisfying either z is real and −2 < z < −1, or |z| < 1,
or z = 1 or z = 2.
(a) Sketch the set E, being careful to indicate exactly the points that are in E.
(b) Determine the interior points of E.
(c) Determine the boundary points of E.
(d) Determine the isolated points of E.
27. The set E in the previous exercise can be written in three different ways as the union of two
disjoint nonempty separated subsets. Describe them, and in each case say briefly why the
subsets are separated.
28. Show that the union of two regions with nonempty intersection is itself a region.
29. Show that if A ⊂ B and B is closed, then ∂A ⊂ B. Similarly, if A ⊂ B and A is open, show
A is contained in the interior of B.
30. Let G be the annulus determined by the conditions 2 < |z| < 3. This is a connected open
set. Find the maximum number of horizontal and vertical segments in G needed to connect
two points of G.
31. Prove Leibniz’s Rule: Define F(x) =

d
c
f(x, y) dy, get an expression for F(x) − F(a) as an
iterated integral by writing f(x, y) − f(a, y) as the integral of
∂f
∂x
, interchange the order of
integrations, and then differentiate using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
Chapter 2
Differentiation
Mathematical study and research are very suggestive of mountaineering. Whymper made several
efforts before he climbed the Matterhorn in the 1860’s and even then it cost the life of four of
his party. Now, however, any tourist can be hauled up for a small cost, and perhaps does not
appreciate the difficulty of the original ascent. So in mathematics, it may be found hard to
realise the great initial difficulty of making a little step which now seems so natural and obvious,
and it may not be surprising if such a step has been found and lost again.
Louis Joel Mordell (1888–1972)
2.1 First Steps
A (complex) function f is a mapping from a subset G ⊆ C to C (in this situation we will write
f : G → C and call G the domain of f). This means that each element z ∈ G gets mapped to
exactly one complex number, called the image of z and usually denoted by f(z). So far there is
nothing that makes complex functions any more special than, say, functions from R
m
to R
n
. In
fact, we can construct many familiar looking functions from the standard calculus repertoire, such
as f(z) = z (the identity map), f(z) = 2z + i, f(z) = z
3
, or f(z) =
1
z
. The former three could be
defined on all of C, whereas for the latter we have to exclude the origin z = 0. On the other hand,
we could construct some functions which make use of a certain representation of z, for example,
f(x, y) = x −2iy, f(x, y) = y
2
−ix, or f(r, φ) = 2re
i(φ+π)
.
Maybe the fundamental principle of analysis is that of a limit. The philosophy of the following
definition is not restricted to complex functions, but for sake of simplicity we only state it for those
functions.
Definition 2.1. Suppose f is a complex function with domain G and z
0
is an accumulation point
of G. Suppose there is a complex number w
0
such that for every ǫ > 0, we can find δ > 0 so that
for all z ∈ G satisfying 0 < |z −z
0
| < δ we have |f(z) −w
0
| < ǫ. Then w
0
is the limit of f as z
approaches z
0
, in short
lim
z→z
0
f(z) = w
0
.
This definition is the same as is found in most calculus texts. The reason we require that z
0
is
an accumulation point of the domain is just that we need to be sure that there are points z of the
domain which are arbitrarily close to z
0
. Just as in the real case, the definition does not require
15
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 16
that z
0
is in the domain of f and, if z
0
is in the domain of f, the definition explicitly ignores the
value of f(z
0
). That is why we require 0 < |z −z
0
|.
Just as in the real case the limit w
0
is unique if it exists. It is often useful to investigate limits
by restricting the way the point z “approaches” z
0
. The following is a easy consequence of the
definition.
Lemma 2.2. Suppose lim
z→z
0
f(z) exists and has the value w
0
, as above. Suppose G
0
⊆ G, and
suppose z
0
is an accumulation point of G
0
. If f
0
is the restriction of f to G
0
then lim
z→z
0
f
0
(z)
exists and has the value w
0
.
The definition of limit in the complex domain has to be treated with a little more care than its
real companion; this is illustrated by the following example.
Example 2.3. lim
z→0
¯ z
z
does not exist.
To see this, we try to compute this “limit” as z →0 on the real and on the imaginary axis. In the
first case, we can write z = x ∈ R, and hence
lim
z→0
z
z
= lim
x→0
x
x
= lim
x→0
x
x
= 1 .
In the second case, we write z = iy where y ∈ R, and then
lim
z→0
z
z
= lim
y→0
iy
iy
= lim
y→0
−iy
iy
= −1 .
So we get a different “limit” depending on the direction from which we approach 0. Lemma 2.2
then implies that lim
z→0
¯ z
z
does not exist.
On the other hand, the following “usual” limit rules are valid for complex functions; the proofs
of these rules are everything but trivial and make for nice exercises.
Lemma 2.4. Let f and g be complex functions and c, z
0
∈ C. If lim
z→z
0
f(z) and lim
z→z
0
g(z)
exist, then:
(a) lim
z→z
0
f(z) +c lim
z→z
0
g(z) = lim
z→z
0
(f(z) +c g(z))
(b) lim
z→z
0
f(z) · lim
z→z
0
g(z) = lim
z→z
0
(f(z) · g(z))
(c) lim
z→z
0
f(z)/ lim
z→z
0
g(z) = lim
z→z
0
(f(z)/g(z)) ;
In the last identity we also require that lim
z→z
0
g(z) = 0.
Because the definition of the limit is somewhat elaborate, the following fundamental definition
looks almost trivial.
Definition 2.5. Suppose f is a complex function. If z
0
is in the domain of the function and either
z
0
is an isolated point of the domain or
lim
z→z
0
f(z) = f(z
0
)
then f is continuous at z
0
. More generally, f is continuous on G ⊆ C if f is continuous at every
z ∈ G.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 17
Just as in the real case, we can “take the limit inside” a continuous function:
Lemma 2.6. If f is continuous at an accumulation point w
0
and lim
z→z
0
g(z) = w
0
then lim
z→z
0
f(g(z)) =
f(w
0
). In other words,
lim
z→z
0
f(g(z)) = f

lim
z→z
0
g(z)

.
This lemma implies that direct substitution is allowed when f is continuous at the limit point.
In particular, that if f is continuous at w
0
then lim
w→w
0
f(w) = f(w
0
).
2.2 Differentiability and Holomorphicity
The fact that limits such as lim
z→0
¯ z
z
do not exist points to something special about complex
numbers which has no parallel in the reals—we can express a function in a very compact way in
one variable, yet it shows some peculiar behavior “in the limit.” We will repeatedly notice this kind
of behavior; one reason is that when trying to compute a limit of a function as, say, z →0, we have
to allow z to approach the point 0 in any way. On the real line there are only two directions to
approach 0—from the left or from the right (or some combination of those two). In the complex
plane, we have an additional dimension to play with. This means that the statement “A complex
function has a limit...” is in many senses stronger than the statement “A real function has a limit...”
This difference becomes apparent most baldly when studying derivatives.
Definition 2.7. Suppose f : G → C is a complex function and z
0
is an interior point of G. The
derivative of f at z
0
is defined as
f

(z
0
) = lim
z→z
0
f(z) −f(z
0
)
z −z
0
,
provided this limit exists. In this case, f is called differentiable at z
0
. If f is differentiable for
all points in an open disk centered at z
0
then f is called holomorphic at z
0
. The function f is
holomorphic on the open set G ⊆ C if it is differentiable (and hence holomorphic) at every point in
G. Functions which are differentiable (and hence holomorphic) in the whole complex plane C are
called entire.
The difference quotient limit which defines f

(z
0
) can be rewritten as
f

(z
0
) = lim
h→0
f(z
0
+h) −f(z
0
)
h
.
This equivalent definition is sometimes easier to handle. Note that h is not a real number but can
rather approach zero from anywhere in the complex plane.
The fact that the notions of differentiability and holomorphicity are actually different is seen in
the following examples.
Example 2.8. The function f(z) = z
3
is entire, that is, holomorphic in C: For any z
0
∈ C,
lim
z→z
0
f(z) −f(z
0
)
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
z
3
−z
3
0
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
(z
2
+zz
0
+z
2
0
)(z −z
0
)
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
z
2
+zz
0
+z
2
0
= 3z
2
0
.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 18
Example 2.9. The function f(z) = z
2
is differentiable at 0 and nowhere else (in particular, f is
not holomorphic at 0): Let’s write z = z
0
+re

. Then
z
2
−z
0
2
z −z
0
=

z
0
+re

2
−z
0
2
z
0
+re

−z
0
=

z
0
+re
−iφ

2
−z
0
2
re

=
z
0
2
+ 2z
0
re
−iφ
+r
2
e
−2iφ
−z
0
2
re

=
2z
0
re
−iφ
+r
2
e
−2iφ
re

= 2z
0
e
−2iφ
+re
−3iφ
.
If z
0
= 0 then the limit of the right-hand side as z → z
0
does not exist since r → 0 and we get
different answers for horizontal approach (φ = 0) and for vertical approach (φ = π/2). (A more
entertaining way to see this is to use, for example, z(t) = z
0
+
1
t
e
it
, which approaches z
0
as t →∞.)
On the other hand, if z
0
= 0 then the right-hand side equals re
−3iφ
= |z|e
−3iφ
. Hence
lim
z→0

z
2
z

= lim
z→0

|z|e
−3iφ

= lim
z→0
|z| = 0 ,
which implies that
lim
z→0
z
2
z
= 0 .
Example 2.10. The function f(z) = z is nowhere differentiable:
lim
z→z
0
z −z
0
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
z −z
0
z −z
0
= lim
z→0
z
z
does not exist, as discussed earlier.
The basic properties for derivatives are similar to those we know from real calculus. In fact, one
should convince oneself that the following rules follow mostly from properties of the limit. (The
‘chain rule’ needs a little care to be worked out.)
Lemma 2.11. Suppose f and g are differentiable at z ∈ C, and that c ∈ C, n ∈ Z, and h is
differentiable at g(z).
(a)

f(z) +c g(z)


= f

(z) +c g

(z)
(b)

f(z) · g(z)


= f

(z)g(z) +f(z)g

(z)
(c)

f(z)/g(z)


=
f

(z)g(z) −f(z)g

(z)
g(z)
2
(d)

z
n


= nz
n−1
(e)

h(g(z))


= h

(g(z))g

(z) .
In the third identity we have to be aware of division by zero.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 19
We end this section with yet another differentiation rule, that for inverse functions. As in the
real case, this rule is only defined for functions which are bijections. A function f : G → H is
one-to-one if for every image w ∈ H there is a unique z ∈ G such that f(z) = w. The function is
onto if every w ∈ H has a preimage z ∈ G (that is, there exists a z ∈ G such that f(z) = w). A
bijection is a function which is both one-to-one and onto. If f : G →H is a bijection then g is the
inverse of f if for all z ∈ H, f(g(z)) = z.
Lemma 2.12. Suppose G and H are open sets in C, f : G → H is a bijection, g : H → G is the
inverse function of f, and z
0
∈ H. If f is differentiable at g(z
0
), f

(g(z
0
)) = 0, and g is continuous
at z
0
then g is differentiable at z
0
with
g

(z
0
) =
1
f

(g(z
0
))
.
Proof. We have:
g

(z
0
) = lim
z→z
0
g(z) −g(z
0
)
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
g(z) −g(z
0
)
f(g(z)) −f(g(z
0
))
= lim
z→z
0
1
f(g(z)) −f(g(z
0
))
g(z) −g(z
0
)
.
Because g(z) →g(z
0
) as z →z
0
, we obtain:
g

(z
0
) = lim
g(z)→g(z
0
)
1
f(g(z)) −f(g(z
0
))
g(z) −g(z
0
)
.
Finally, as the denominator of this last term is continuous at z
0
, by Lemma 2.6 we have:
g

(z
0
) =
1
lim
g(z)→g(z
0
)
f(g(z)) −f(g(z
0
))
g(z) −g(z
0
)
=
1
f

(g(z
0
)
.
2.3 Constant Functions
As an example application of the definition of the derivative of a complex function, we consider
functions which have a derivative of 0. One of the first applications of the Mean-Value Theorem for
real-valued functions, Theorem 1.18, is to show that if a function has zero derivative everywhere
on an interval then it must be constant.
Lemma 2.13. If f : I →R is a real-valued function with f

(x) defined and equal to 0 for all x ∈ I,
then there is a constant c ∈ R such that f(x) = c for all x ∈ I.
Proof. The proof is easy: The Mean-Value Theorem says that for any x, y ∈ I,
f(y) −f(x) = f

(x +a(y −x))(y −x)
for some 0 < a < 1. If we know that f

is always zero then we know that f

(x + a(y −x)) = 0, so
the above equation yields f(y) = f(x). Since this is true for any x, y ∈ I, f must be constant.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 20
There is a complex version of the Mean-Value Theorem, but we defer its statement to another
course. Instead, we will use a different argument to prove that complex functions with derivative
that are always 0 must be constant.
Lemma 2.13 required two key features of the function f, both of which are somewhat obviously
necessary. The first is that f be differentiable everywhere in its domain. In fact, if f is not
differentiable everywhere, we can construct functions which have zero derivative ‘almost’ everywhere
but which have infinitely many values in their range.
The second key feature is that the interval I is connected. It is certainly important for the
domain to be connected in both the real and complex cases. For instance, if we define
f(z) =

1 if Re z > 0,
−1 if Re z < 0,
then f

(z) = 0 for all z in the domain of f but f is not constant. This may seem like a silly example,
but it illustrates a pitfall to proving a function is constant that we must be careful of.
Recall that a region of C is an open connected subset.
Theorem 2.14. If the domain of f is a region G ⊆ C and f

(z) = 0 for all z in G then f is a
constant.
Proof. We will show that f is constant along horizontal segments and along vertical segments in G.
Then, if x and y are two points in G which can be connected by horizontal and vertical segments,
we have that f(x) = f(y). But any two points of a region may be connected by finitely many such
segments by Theorem 1.16, so f has the same value at any two points of G, proving the theorem.
To see that f is constant along horizontal segments, suppose that H is a horizontal line segment
in G. Since H is a horizontal segment, there is some value y
0
∈ R so that the imaginary part of
any z ∈ H is Im(z) = y
0
. Consider the real part u(z) of the function f. Since Im(z) is constant on
H, we can consider u(z) to be just a function of x, the real part of z = x + iy
0
. By assumption,
f

(z) = 0, so for z ∈ H we have u
x
(z) = Re(f

(z)) = 0. Thus, by Lemma 2.13, u(z) is constant on
H. We can argue the same way to see that the imaginary part v(z) of f(z) is constant on H, since
v
x
(z) = Im(f

(z)) = 0. Since both the real and imaginary parts of f are constant on H, f itself is
constant on H.
This same argument works for vertical segments, interchanging the roles of the real and imagi-
nary parts, so we’re done.
There are a number of surprising applications of this basic theorem; see Exercises 14 and 15 for
a start.
2.4 The Cauchy–Riemann Equations
When considering real-valued functions f(x, y) : R
2
→ R of two variables, there is no notion of
‘the’ derivative of a function. For such functions, we instead only have partial derivatives f
x
(x, y)
and f
y
(x, y) (and also directional derivatives) which depend on the way in which we approach a
point (x, y) ∈ R
2
. For a complex-valued function f(z) = f(x, y) : C → R, we now have a new
concept of derivative, f

(z), which by definition cannot depend on the way in which we approach
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 21
a point (x, y) ∈ C. It is logical, then, that there should be a relationship between the complex
derivative f

(z) and the partial derivatives
∂f
∂x
(z) and
∂f
∂y
(z) (defined exactly as in the real-valued
case). The relationship between the complex derivative and partial derivatives is very strong and
is a powerful computational tool. It is described by the Cauchy–Riemann Equations, named after
Augustin Louis Cauchy (1789–1857)
1
and Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann (1826–1866)
2
, (even
though the equations first appeared in the work of Jean le Rond d’Alembert and Euler):
Theorem 2.15. (a) Suppose f is differentiable at z
0
= x
0
+iy
0
. Then the partial derivatives of f
satisfy
∂f
∂x
(z
0
) = −i
∂f
∂y
(z
0
) . (2.1)
(b) Suppose f is a complex function such that the partial derivatives f
x
and f
y
exist in an open
disk centered at z
0
and are continuous at z
0
. If these partial derivatives satisfy (2.1) then f is
differentiable at z
0
.
In both cases (a) and (b), f

is given by
f

(z
0
) =
∂f
∂x
(z
0
) .
Remarks. 1. It is traditional, and often convenient, to write the function f in terms of its real and
imaginary parts. That is, we write f(z) = f(x, y) = u(x, y) +iv(x, y) where u is the real part of f
and v is the imaginary part. Then f
x
= u
x
+ iv
x
and −if
y
= −i(u
y
+ iv
y
) = v
y
− iu
y
. Using this
terminology we can rewrite the equation (2.1) equivalently as the following pair of equations:
u
x
(x
0
, y
0
) = v
y
(x
0
, y
0
)
u
y
(x
0
, y
0
) = −v
x
(x
0
, y
0
) .
(2.2)
2. As stated, (a) and (b) are not quite converse statements. However, we will later show that if f
is holomorphic at z
0
= x
0
+ iy
0
then u and v have continuous partials (of any order) at z
0
. That
is, later we will prove that f = u +iv is holomorphic in an open set G if and only if u and v have
continuous partials that satisfy (2.2) in G.
3. If u and v satisfy (2.2) and their second partials are also continuous then we obtain
u
xx
(x
0
, y
0
) = v
yx
(x
0
, y
0
) = v
xy
(x
0
, y
0
) = −u
yy
(x
0
, y
0
) ,
that is,
u
xx
(x
0
, y
0
) +u
yy
(x
0
, y
0
) = 0
and an analogous identity for v. Functions with continuous second partials satisfying this partial
differential equation on a region G ⊂ C (though not necessarily (2.2)) are called harmonic on G;
we will study such functions in Chapter 6. Again, as we will see later, if f is holomorphic in an
open set G then the partials of any order of u and v exist; hence we will show that the real and
imaginary part of a function which is holomorphic on an open set are harmonic on that set.
1
For more information about Cauchy, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Cauchy.html.
2
For more information about Riemann, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Riemann.html.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 22
Proof of Theorem 2.15. (a) If f is differentiable at z
0
= (x
0
, y
0
) then
f

(z
0
) = lim
∆z→0
f(z
0
+ ∆z) −f(z
0
)
∆z
.
As we saw in the last section we must get the same result if we restrict ∆z to be on the real axis
and if we restrict it to be on the imaginary axis. In the first case we have ∆z = ∆x and
f

(z
0
) = lim
∆x→0
f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆x
= lim
∆x→0
f(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
) −f(x
0
, y
0
)
∆x
=
∂f
∂x
(x
0
, y
0
).
In the second case we have ∆z = i∆y and
f

(z
0
) = lim
i∆y→0
f(z
0
+i∆y) −f(z
0
)
i∆y
= lim
∆y→0
1
i
f(x
0
, y
0
+ ∆y) −f(x
0
, y
0
)
∆y
= −i
∂f
∂y
(x
0
, y
0
)
(using
1
i
= −i). Thus we have shown that f

(z
0
) = f
x
(z
0
) = −if
y
(z
0
).
(b) To prove the statement in (b), “all we need to do” is prove that f

(z
0
) = f
x
(z
0
), assuming the
Cauchy–Riemann equations and continuity of the partials. We first rearrange a difference quotient
for f

(z
0
), writing ∆z = ∆x +i∆y:
f(z
0
+ ∆z) −f(z
0
)
∆z
=
f(z
0
+ ∆z) −f(z
0
+ ∆x) +f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆z
=
f(z
0
+ ∆x +i∆y) −f(z
0
+ ∆x)
∆z
+
f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆z
=
∆y
∆z
·
f(z
0
+ ∆x +i∆y) −f(z
0
+ ∆x)
∆y
+
∆x
∆z
·
f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆x
.
Now we rearrange f
x
(z
0
):
f
x
(z
0
) =
∆z
∆z
· f
x
(z
0
) =
i∆y + ∆x
∆z
· f
x
(z
0
) =
∆y
∆z
· if
x
(z
0
) +
∆x
∆z
· f
x
(z
0
)
=
∆y
∆z
· f
y
(z
0
) +
∆x
∆z
· f
x
(z
0
) ,
where we used equation (2.1) in the last step to convert if
x
to i(−if
y
) = f
y
. Now we subtract our
two rearrangements and take a limit:
lim
∆z→0
f(z
0
+ ∆z) −f(z
0
)
∆z
−f
x
(z
0
)
= lim
∆z→0
¸
∆y
∆z

f(z
0
+ ∆x +i∆y) −f(z
0
+ ∆x)
∆y
−f
y
(z
0
)

(2.3)
+ lim
∆z→0
¸
∆x
∆z

f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆x
−f
x
(z
0
)

.
We need to show that these limits are both 0. The fractions ∆x/∆z and ∆y/∆z are bounded by
1 in modulus so we just need to see that the limits of the expressions in parentheses are 0. The
second term in (2.3) has a limit of 0 since, by definition,
f
x
(z
0
) = lim
∆x→0
f(z
0
+ ∆x) −f(z
0
)
∆x
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 23
and taking the limit as ∆z → 0 is the same as taking the limit as ∆x → 0. We can’t do this for
the first expression since both ∆x and ∆y are involved, and both change as ∆z →0.
For the first term in (2.3) we apply Theorem 1.18, the real mean-value theorem, to the real and
imaginary parts of f. This gives us real numbers a and b, with 0 < a, b < 1, so that
u(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+ ∆y) −u(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
)
∆y
= u
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+a∆y)
v(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+ ∆y) −v(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
)
∆y
= v
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+b∆y) .
Using these expressions, we have
f(z
0
+ ∆x +i∆y) −f(z
0
+ ∆x)
∆y
−f
y
(z
0
)
= u
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+a∆y) +iv
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+b∆y) −(u
y
(x
0
, y
0
) +iv
y
(x
0
, y
0
))
= (u
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+a∆y) −u
y
(x
0
, y
0
)) +i (v
y
(x
0
+ ∆x, y
0
+a∆y) −v
y
(x
0
, y
0
)) .
Finally, the two differences in parentheses have zero limit as ∆z → 0 because u
y
and v
y
are
continuous at (x
0
, y
0
).
Exercises
1. Use the definition of limit to show that lim
z→z
0
(az +b) = az
0
+b.
2. Evaluate the following limits or explain why they don’t exist.
(a) lim
z→i
iz
3
−1
z+i
.
(b) lim
z→1−i
x +i(2x +y).
3. Prove Lemma 2.4.
4. Prove Lemma 2.4 by using the formula for f

given in Theorem 2.15.
5. Apply the definition of the derivative to give a direct proof that f

(z) = −
1
z
2
when f(z) =
1
z
.
6. Show that if f is differentiable at z then f is continuous at z.
7. Prove Lemma 2.6.
8. Prove Lemma 2.11.
9. Find the derivative of the function T(z) :=
az+b
cz+d
, where a, b, c, d ∈ C and ad −bc = 0. When
is T

(z) = 0?
10. Prove that if f(z) is given by a polynomial in z then f is entire. What can you say if f(z) is
given by a polynomial in x = Re z and y = Imz?
11. If u(x, y) and v(x, y) are continuous (respectively differentiable) does it follow that f(z) =
u(x, y) +iv(x, y) is continuous (resp. differentiable)? If not, provide a counterexample.
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 24
12. Where are the following functions differentiable? Where are they holomorphic? Determine
their derivatives at points where they are differentiable.
(a) f(z) = e
−x
e
−iy
.
(b) f(z) = 2x +ixy
2
.
(c) f(z) = x
2
+iy
2
.
(d) f(z) = e
x
e
−iy
.
(e) f(z) = cos xcosh y −i sin xsinh y.
(f) f(z) = Imz.
(g) f(z) = |z|
2
= x
2
+y
2
.
(h) f(z) = z Imz.
(i) f(z) =
ix+1
y
.
(j) f(z) = 4(Re z)(Imz) −i(z)
2
.
(k) f(z) = 2xy −i(x +y)
2
.
(l) f(z) = z
2
−z
2
.
13. Consider the function
f(z) =

xy(x +iy)
x
2
+y
2
if z = 0,
0 if z = 0.
(As always, z = x + iy.) Show that f satisfies the Cauchy–Riemann equations at the origin
z = 0, yet f is not differentiable at the origin. Why doesn’t this contradict Theorem 2.15
(b)?
14. Prove: If f is holomorphic in the region G ⊆ C and always real valued, then f is constant in
G. (Hint: Use the Cauchy–Riemann equations to show that f

= 0.)
15. Prove: If f(z) and f(z) are both holomorphic in the region G ⊆ C then f(z) is constant in
G.
16. Suppose that f = u +iv is holomorphic. Find v given u:
(a) u = x
2
+y
2
(b) u = cosh y sin x
(c) u = 2x
2
+x + 1 −2y
2
(d) u =
x
x
2
+y
2
17. Suppose f(z) is entire, with real and imaginary parts u(z) and v(z) satisfying u(z)v(z) = 3
for all z. Show that f is constant.
18. Is
x
x
2
+y
2
harmonic on C? What about
x
2
x
2
+y
2
?
CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 25
19. The general real homogeneous quadratic function of (x, y) is
u(x, y) = ax
2
+bxy +cy
2
,
where a, b and c are real constants.
(a) Show that u is harmonic if and only if a = −c.
(b) If u is harmonic then show that it is the real part of a function of the form f(z) = Az
2
,
where A is a complex constant. Give a formula for A in terms of the constants a, b
and c.
Chapter 3
Examples of Functions
Obvious is the most dangerous word in mathematics.
E. T. Bell
3.1 M¨obius Transformations
The first class of functions that we will discuss in some detail are built from linear polynomials.
Definition 3.1. A linear fractional transformation is a function of the form
f(z) =
az +b
cz +d
,
where a, b, c, d ∈ C. If ad −bc = 0 then f is called a M¨ obius
1
transformation.
Exercise 10 of the previous chapter states that any polynomial (in z) is an entire function.
From this fact we can conclude that a linear fractional transformation f(z) =
az+b
cz+d
is holomorphic
in C \
¸

d
c
¸
(unless c = 0, in which case f is entire).
One property of M¨obius transformations, which is quite special for complex functions, is the
following.
Lemma 3.2. M¨ obius transformations are bijections. In fact, if f(z) =
az+b
cz+d
then the inverse
function of f is given by
f
−1
(z) =
dz −b
−cz +a
.
Remark. Notice that the inverse of a M¨obius transformation is another M¨obius transformation.
Proof. Note that f : C\ {−
d
c
} →C \ {
a
c
}. Suppose f(z
1
) = f(z
2
), that is,
az
1
+b
cz
1
+d
=
az
2
+b
cz
2
+d
.
As the denominators are nonzero, this is equivalent to
(az
1
+b)(cz
2
+d) = (az
2
+b)(cz
1
+d) ,
1
Named after August Ferdinand M¨obius (1790–1868). For more information about M¨obius, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Mobius.html.
26
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 27
which can be rearranged to
(ad −bc)(z
1
−z
2
) = 0 .
Since ad − bc = 0 this implies that z
1
= z
2
, which means that f is one-to-one. The formula for
f
−1
: C\ {
a
c
} →C\ {−
d
c
} can be checked easily. Just like f, f
−1
is one-to-one, which implies that
f is onto.
Aside from being prime examples of one-to-one functions, M¨ obius transformations possess fas-
cinating geometric properties. En route to an example of such, we introduce some terminology.
Special cases of M¨obius transformations are translations f(z) = z +b, dilations f(z) = az, and in-
versions f(z) =
1
z
. The next result says that if we understand those three special transformations,
we understand them all.
Proposition 3.3. Suppose f(z) =
az+b
cz+d
is a linear fractional transformation. If c = 0 then
f(z) =
a
d
z +
b
d
,
if c = 0 then
f(z) =
bc −ad
c
2
1
z +
d
c
+
a
c
.
In particular, every linear fractional transformation is a composition of translations, dilations, and
inversions.
Proof. Simplify.
With the last result at hand, we can tackle the promised theorem about the following geometric
property of M¨obius transformations.
Theorem 3.4. M¨ obius transformations map circles and lines into circles and lines.
Proof. Translations and dilations certainly map circles and lines into circles and lines, so by the
last proposition, we only have to prove the theorem for the inversion f(z) =
1
z
.
Before going on we find a standard form for the equation of a straight line. Starting with
ax + by = c (where z = x + iy), let α = a + bi. Then αz = ax + by + i(ay − bx) so αz + αz =
αz +αz = 2 Re(αz) = 2ax + 2by. Hence our standard equation for a line becomes
αz +αz = 2c, or Re(αz) = c. (3.1)
Circle case: Given a circle centered at z
0
with radius r, we can modify its defining equation
|z −z
0
| = r as follows:
|z −z
0
|
2
= r
2
(z −z
0
)(z −z
0
) = r
2
zz −z
0
z −zz
0
+z
0
z
0
= r
2
|z|
2
−z
0
z −zz
0
+|z
0
|
2
−r
2
= 0 .
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 28
Now we want to transform this into an equation in terms of w, where w =
1
z
. If we solve w =
1
z
for
z we get z =
1
w
, so we make this substitution in our equation:

1
w

2
−z
0
1
w
−z
0
1
w
+|z
0
|
2
−r
2
= 0
1 −z
0
w −z
0
w +|w|
2

|z
0
|
2
−r
2

= 0 .
(To get the second line we multiply by |w|
2
= ww and simplify.) Now if r happens to be equal to
|z
0
|
2
then this equation becomes 1 −z
0
w −z
0
w = 0, which is of the form (3.1) with α = z
0
, so we
have a straight line in terms of w. Otherwise |z
0
|
2
− r
2
is non-zero so we can divide our equation
by it. We obtain
|w|
2

z
0
|z
0
|
2
−r
2
w −
z
0
|z
0
|
2
−r
2
w +
1
|z
0
|
2
−r
2
= 0 .
We define
w
0
=
z
0
|z
0
|
2
−r
2
, s
2
= |w
0
|
2

1
|z
0
|
2
−r
2
=
|z
0
|
2
(|z
0
|
2
−r
2
)
2

|z
0
|
2
−r
2
(|z
0
|
2
−r
2
)
2
=
r
2
(|z
0
|
2
−r
2
)
2
.
Then we can rewrite our equation as
|w|
2
−w
0
w −w
0
w +|w
0
|
2
−s
2
= 0
ww −w
0
w −ww
0
+w
0
w
0
= s
2
(w −w
0
)(w −w
0
) = s
2
|w −w
0
|
2
= s
2
.
This is the equation of a circle in terms of w, with center w
0
and radius s.
Line case: We start with the equation of a line in the form (3.1) and rewrite it in terms of w,
as above, by substituting z =
1
w
and simplifying. We get
z
0
w +z
0
w = 2cww.
If c = 0, this describes a line in the form (3.1) in terms of w. Otherwise we can divide by 2c:
ww −
z
0
2c
w −
z
0
2c
w = 0

w −
z
0
2c

w −
z
0
2c


|z
0
|
2
4c
2
= 0

w −
z
0
2c

2
=
|z
0
|
2
4c
2
.
This is the equation of a circle with center
z
0
2c
and radius
|z
0
|
2|c|
.
There is one fact about M¨obius transformations that is very helpful to understanding their
geometry. In fact, it is much more generally useful:
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 29
Lemma 3.5. Suppose f is holomorphic at a with f

(a) = 0 and suppose γ
1
and γ
2
are two smooth
curves which pass through a, making an angle of θ with each other. Then f transforms γ
1
and γ
2
into smooth curves which meet at f(a), and the transformed curves make an angle of θ with each
other.
In brief, an holomorphic function with non-zero derivative preserves angles. Functions which
preserve angles in this way are also called conformal.
Proof. For k = 1, 2 we write γ
k
parametrically, as z
k
(t) = x
k
(t) + iy
k
(t), so that z
k
(0) = a. The
complex number z

k
(0), considered as a vector, is the tangent vector to γ
k
at the point a. Then f
transforms the curve γ
k
to the curve f(γ
k
), parameterized as f(z
k
(t)). If we differentiate f(z
k
(t))
at t = 0 and use the chain rule we see that the tangent vector to the transformed curve at the
point f(a) is f

(a)z

k
(0). Since f

(a) = 0 the transformation from z

1
(0) and z

2
(0) to f

(a)z

1
(0) and
f

(a)z

2
(0) is a dilation. A dilation is the composition of a scale change and a rotation and both of
these preserve the angles between vectors.
3.2 Infinity and the Cross Ratio
Infinity is not a number—this is true whether we use the complex numbers or stay in the reals.
However, for many purposes we can work with infinity in the complexes much more naturally and
simply than in the reals.
In the complex sense there is only one infinity, written ∞. In the real sense there is also a
“negative infinity”, but −∞= ∞ in the complex sense. In order to deal correctly with infinity we
have to realize that we are always talking about a limit, and complex numbers have infinite limits
if they can become larger in magnitude than any preassigned limit. For completeness we repeat
the usual definitions:
Definition 3.6. Suppose G is a set of complex numbers and f is a function from G to C.
(a) lim
z→z
0
f(z) = ∞ means that for every M > 0 we can find δ > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying
0 < |z −z
0
| < δ, we have |f(z)| > M.
(b) lim
z→∞
f(z) = L means that for every ǫ > 0 we can find N > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying
|z| > N, we have |f(z) −L| < ǫ.
(c) lim
z→∞
f(z) = ∞ means that for every M > 0 we can find N > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying
|z| > N we have |f(z)| > M.
In the first definition we require that z
0
is an accumulation point of G while in the second and third
we require that ∞ is an “extended accumulation point” of G, in the sense that for every B > 0
there is some z ∈ G with |z| > B.
The usual rules for working with infinite limits are still valid in the complex numbers. In fact, it
is a good idea to make infinity an honorary complex number so that we can more easily manipulate
infinite limits. We then define algebraic rules for dealing with our new point, ∞, based on the usual
laws of limits. For example, if lim
z→z
0
f(z) = ∞ and lim
z→z
0
g(z) = a is finite then the usual “limit of
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 30
sum = sum of limits” rule gives lim
z→z
0
(f(z) +g(z)) = ∞. This leads us to want the rule ∞+a = ∞.
We do this by defining a new set,
ˆ
C:
Definition 3.7. The extended complex plane is the set
ˆ
C := C∪ {∞}, together with the following
algebraic properties: For any a ∈ C,
(1) ∞+a = a +∞= ∞
(2) if a = 0 then ∞· a = a · ∞= ∞· ∞= ∞
(3) if a = 0 then
a

= 0 and
a
0
= ∞
The extended complex plane is also called the Riemann sphere (or, in a more advanced course, the
complex projective line, denoted CP
1
).
If a calculation involving infinity is not covered by the rules above then we must investigate the
limit more carefully. For example, it may seem strange that ∞+ ∞ is not defined, but if we take
the limit of z +(−z) = 0 as z →∞we will get 0, but the individual limits of z and −z are both ∞.
Now we reconsider M¨obius transformations with infinity in mind. For example, f(z) =
1
z
is
now defined for z = 0 and z = ∞, with f(0) = ∞ and f(∞) = 0, so the proper domain for
f(z) is actually
ˆ
C. Let’s consider the other basic types of M¨obius transformations. A translation
f(z) = z + b is now defined for z = ∞, with f(∞) = ∞+ b = ∞, and a dilation f(z) = az (with
a = 0) is also defined for z = ∞, with f(∞) = a · ∞ = ∞. Since every M¨obius transformation
can be expressed as a composition of translations, dilations and the inversion f(z) =
1
z
we see that
every M¨obius transformation may be interpreted as a transformation of
ˆ
C onto
ˆ
C. The general
case is summarized below:
Lemma 3.8. Let f be the M¨ obius transformation
f(z) =
az +b
cz +d
.
Then f is defined for all z ∈
ˆ
C. If c = 0 then f(∞) = ∞, and, otherwise,
f(∞) =
a
c
and f


d
c

= ∞.
With this interpretation in mind we can add some insight to Theorem 3.4. Recall that f(z) =
1
z
transforms circles that pass through the origin to straight lines, but the point z = 0 must be excluded
from the circle. However, now we can put it back, so f transforms circles that pass through the
origin to straight lines plus ∞. If we remember that ∞ corresponds to being arbitrarily far away
from the origin we can visualize a line plus infinity as a circle passing through ∞. If we make
this a definition then Theorem 3.4 can be expressed very simply: any M¨obius transformation of
ˆ
C
transforms circles to circles. For example, the transformation
f(z) =
z +i
z −i
transforms −i to 0, i to ∞, and 1 to i. The three points −i, i and 1 determine a circle—the unit
circle |z| = 1—and the three image points 0, ∞ and i also determine a circle—the imaginary axis
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 31
plus the point at infinity. Hence f transforms the unit circle onto the imaginary axis plus the point
at infinity.
This example relied on the idea that three distinct points in
ˆ
C determine uniquely a circle
passing through them. If the three points are on a straight line or if one of the points is ∞ then
the circle is a straight line plus ∞. Conversely, if we know where three distinct points in
ˆ
C are
transformed by a M¨obius transformation then we should be able to figure out everything about the
transformation. There is a computational device that makes this easier to see.
Definition 3.9. If z, z
1
, z
2
, and z
3
are any four points in
ˆ
C with z
1
, z
2
, and z
3
distinct, then their
cross-ratio is defined by
[z, z
1
, z
2
, z
3
] =
(z −z
1
)(z
2
−z
3
)
(z −z
3
)(z
2
−z
1
)
.
Here if z = z
3
, the result is infinity, and if one of z, z
1
, z
2
, or z
3
is infinity, then the two terms on
the right containing it are canceled.
Lemma 3.10. If f is defined by f(z) = [z, z
1
, z
2
, z
3
] then f is a M¨ obius transformation which
satisfies
f(z
1
) = 0, f(z
2
) = 1, f(z
3
) = ∞.
Moreover, if g is any M¨ obius transformation which transforms z
1
, z
2
and z
3
as above then g(z) =
f(z) for all z.
Proof. Everything should be clear except the final uniqueness statement. By Lemma 3.2 the inverse
f
−1
is a M¨obius transformation and, by Exercise 7 in this chapter, the composition h = g ◦ f
−1
is a M¨obius transformation. Notice that h(0) = g(f
−1
(0)) = g(z
1
) = 0. Similarly, h(1) = 1 and
h(∞) = ∞. If we write h(z) =
az+b
cz+d
then
0 = h(0) =
b
d
=⇒ b = 0
∞= h(∞) =
a
c
=⇒ c = 0
1 = h(1) =
a +b
c +d
=
a + 0
0 +d
=
a
d
=⇒ a = d ,
so h(z) =
az+b
cz+d
=
az+0
0+d
=
a
d
z = z. But since h(z) = z for all z we have h(f(z)) = f(z) and so
g(z) = g ◦ (f
−1
◦ f)(z) = (g ◦ f
−1
) ◦ f(z) = h(f(z)) = f(z).
So if we want to map three given points of
ˆ
C to 0, 1 and ∞ by a M¨obius transformation then
the cross-ratio gives us the only way to do it. What if we have three points z
1
, z
2
and z
3
and we
want to map them to three other points, w
1
, w
2
and w
3
?
Theorem 3.11. Suppose z
1
, z
2
and z
3
are distinct points in
ˆ
C and w
1
, w
2
and w
3
are distinct
points in
ˆ
C. Then there is a unique M¨ obius transformation h satisfying h(z
1
) = w
1
, h(z
2
) = w
2
and h(z
3
) = w
3
.
Proof. Let h = g
−1
◦ f where f(z) = [z, z
1
, z
2
, z
3
] and g(w) = [w, w
1
, w
2
, w
3
]. Uniqueness follows
as in the proof of Lemma 3.10.
This theorem gives an explicit way to determine h from the points z
j
and w
j
but, in practice, it
is often easier to determine h directly from the conditions f(z
k
) = w
k
(by solving for a, b, c and d).
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 32
3.3 Stereographic Projection
The addition of ∞to the complex plane C gives the plane a very useful structure. This structure is
revealed by a famous function called stereographic projection. Stereographic projection also gives
us a way of visualizing the extended complex plane – that is, the point at infinity – in R
3
, as the
unit sphere. It also provides a way of ‘seeing’ that a line in the extended complex plane is really a
circle, and of visualizing M¨obius functions.
To begin, think of C as the xy-plane in R
3
= {(x, y, z)}, C = {(x, y, 0) ∈ R
3
}. To describe
stereographic projection, we will be less concerned with actual complex numbers x +iy and more
with their coordinates. Consider the unit sphere S
2
:= {(x, y, z) ∈ R
3
|x
2
+ y
2
+ z
2
= 1}. Then
the sphere and the complex plane intersect in the set {(x, y, 0)|x
2
+ y
2
= 1}, corresponding to the
equator on the sphere and the unit circle on the complex plane. Let N denote the North Pole
(0, 0, 1) of S
2
, and let S denote the South Pole (0, 0, −1).
Definition 3.12. The stereographic projection of S
2
to
ˆ
C from N is the map φ S
2

ˆ
C defined as
follows. For any point P ∈ S
2
−{N}, as the z-coordinate of P is strictly less than 1, the line
←→
NP
intersects C in exactly one point, Q. Define φ(P) := Q. We also declare that φ(N) = ∞∈ C.
Proposition 3.13. The map φ is the bijection
φ(x, y, z) =

x
1 −z
,
y
1 −z
, 0

,
with inverse map
φ
−1
(p, q, 0) =

2p
p
2
+q
2
+ 1
,
2q
p
2
+q
2
+ 1
,
p
2
+q
2
−1
p
2
+q
2
+ 1

,
where we declare φ(0, 0, 1) = ∞ and φ
−1
(∞) = (0, 0, 1).
Proof. That φ is a bijection follows from the existence of the inverse function, and is left as an
exercise. For P = (x, y, z) ∈ S
2
− {N}, the straight line
←→
NP through N and P is given by, for
t ∈ ∞,
r(t) = N +t(P −N) = (0, 0, 1) +t[(x, y, z) −(0, 0, 1)] = (tx, ty, 1 +t(z −1)).
When r(t) hits C, the third coordinate is 0, so it must be that t =
1
1−z
. Plugging this value of t
into the formula for r yields φ as stated.
To see the formula for the inverse map φ
−1
, we begin with a point Q = (p, q, 0) ∈ C, and solve for
a point P = (x, y, z) ∈ S
2
so that φ(P) = Q. The point P satisfies the equation x
2
+y
2
+z
2
= 0.
The equation φ(P) = Q tells us that
x
1−z
= p and
y
1−z
= q. Thus, we solve 3 equations for 3
unknowns. The latter two equations yield
p
2
+q
2
=
x
2
+y
2
(1 −z)
2
=
1 −z
2
(1 −z)
2
=
1 +z
1 −z
.
Solving p
2
+q
2
=
1+z
1−z
for z, and then plugging this into the identities x = p(1−z) and y = q(1−z)
proves the desired formula. It is easy to check that φ ◦ φ
−1
and φ
−1
◦ φ are now both the identity;
we leave these as exercises. This proves the proposition.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 33
We use the formulas above to prove the following.
Theorem 3.14. The stereographic projection φ takes the set of circles in S
2
bijectively to the set
of circles in
ˆ
C, where for a circle γ ⊂ S
2
we have that ∞∈ φ(γ) – that is, φ(γ) is a line in C – if
and only if N ∈ γ.
Proof. A circle in S
2
is the intersection of S
2
with some plane P. If we have a normal vector
(x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) to P, then there is a unique real number k so that the plane P is given by
P = {(x, y, z) ∈ R
3
|(x, y, z) · (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) = k} = {(x, y, z) ∈ R
3
|xx
0
+yy
0
+zz
0
= k}.
Without loss of generality, we can assume that (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) ∈ S
2
by possibly changing k. We may
also assume without loss of generality that 0 ≤ k ≤ 1, since if k < 0 we can replace (x
0
, y
0
, z
0
) with
−(x
0
, y
0
, z
0
), and if k > 1 then P ∩ S
2
= ∅.
Consider the circle of intersection P ∩ S
2
. A point (p, q, 0) in the complex plane lies on the
image of this circle under φ if and only if φ
−1
(p, q, 0) satisfies the defining equation for P. Using
the equations from Proposition 3.13 for φ
−1
(p, q, 0), we see that
(z
0
−k)p
2
+ (2x
0
)p + (z
0
−k)q
2
+ (2y
0
)q = z
0
+k.
If z
0
−k = 0, this is a straight line in the pq-plane. Moreover, every line in the pq-plane can be
obtained in this way. Notice that z
0
= k if and only if N ∈ P, which is if and only if the image
under φ is a straight line.
If z
0
−k = 0, then completing the square yields

p +
x
0
z
0
−k

2
+

q +
y
0
z
0
−k

2
=
1 −k
2
(z
0
−k)
2
.
Depending on whether the right hand side of this equation is positive, 0, or negative, this is the
equation of a circle, point, or the empty set in the pq-plane, respectively. These three cases happen
when k < 1, k = 1, and k > 1, respectively. Only the first case corresponds to a circle in S
2
. It is
an exercise to verify that every circle in the pq-plane arises in this manner.
We can now think of the extended complex plane as a sphere in R
3
, called the Riemann sphere.
It is particularly nice to think about the basic M¨obius transformations via their effect on the
Riemann sphere. We will describe inversion. It is worth thinking about, though beyond the scope
of these notes, how other basic M¨obius functions behave. For instance, a rotation f(z) = e

z,
composed with φ
−1
, can be seen to be a rotation of S
2
. We encourage the reader to verify this
to themselves, and consider the harder problems of visualizing a real dilation f(z) = rz or a
translation, f(z) = z +b. We give the hint that a real dilation is in some sense ‘dual’ to a rotation,
in that each moves points ‘along’ perpendicular sets of circles. Translations can also be visualized
via how they move points ‘along’ sets of circles.
We now use stereographic projection to take another look at f(z) = 1/z. We want to know
what this function does to the sphere S
2
. We will take an (x, y, z) on S
2
, project it to the plane by
stereographic projection φ, apply f to the point that results, and then pull this point back to S
2
by φ
−1
.
We know φ(x, y, z) = (x/(1 −z), y/(1 −z)) which we now regard as the complex number
x
1 −z
+i
y
1 −z
.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 34
We use
1
p +qi
=
p −qi
p
2
+q
2
.
We know from a previous calculation that p
2
+q
2
= (1 +z)/(1 −z). This gives
f

x
1 −z
+i
y
1 −z

=

x
1 −z
−i
y
1 −z

1 −z
1 +z

=
x
1 +z
+i
−y
1 +z
.
Rather than plug this result into the formulas for φ
−1
, we can just ask what triple of numbers will
go to this particular pair using the formulas φ(x, y, z) = (x/(1−z), y/(1−z)). The answer is clearly
(x, −y, −z).
Thus we have shown that the effect of f(z) = 1/z on S
2
is to take (x, y, z) to (x, −y, −z). This
is a rotation around the x-axis by 180 degrees.
We now have a second argument that f(z) = 1/z takes circles and lines to circles and lines. A
circle or line in C is taken to a circle on S
2
by φ
−1
. Then 1/z rotates the sphere which certainly
takes circles to circles. Now φ takes circles back to circles and lines. We can also say that the circles
that go to lines under f(z) = 1/z are the circles though 0. This is because 0 goes to (0, 0, −1)
under φ
−1
so a circle through 0 in C goes to a circle through the south pole in S
2
. Now 180 rotation
about the x-axis takes the south pole to the north pole, and our circle is now passing through N.
But we know that φ will take this circle to a line in C.
We end by mentioning that there is in fact a way of putting the complex metric on S
2
. It is
certainly not the (finite) distance function induced by R
3
. Indeed, the origin in the complex plane
corresponds to the South Pole S of S
2
. We have to be able to get arbitrarily far away from the
origin in C, so the complex distance function has to increase greatly with the z coordinate. The
closer points are to the North Pole N (corresponding to ∞ in
ˆ
C), the larger their distance to the
origin, and to each other! In this light, a ‘line’ in the Riemann sphere S
2
corresponds to a circle
in S
2
through N. In the regular sphere, the circle has finite length, but as a line on the Riemann
sphere with the complex metric, it has infinite length.
3.4 Exponential and Trigonometric Functions
To define the complex exponential function, we once more borrow concepts from calculus, namely
the real exponential function
2
and the real sine and cosine, and—in addition—finally make sense
of the notation e
it
= cos t +i sin t.
Definition 3.15. The (complex) exponential function is defined for z = x +iy as
exp(z) = e
x
(cos y +i sin y) = e
x
e
iy
.
This definition seems a bit arbitrary, to say the least. Its first justification is that all exponential
rules which we are used to from real numbers carry over to the complex case. They mainly follow
from Lemma 1.4 and are collected in the following.
2
It is a nontrivial question how to define the real exponential function. Our preferred way to do this is through a
power series: e
x
=

k≥0
x
k
/k!. In light of this definition, the reader might think we should have simply defined the
complex exponential function through a complex power series. In fact, this is possible (and an elegant definition);
however, one of the promises of these lecture notes is to introduce complex power series as late as possible. We agree
with those readers who think that we are “cheating” at this point, as we borrow the concept of a (real) power series
to define the real exponential function.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 35
Lemma 3.16. For all z, z
1
, z
2
∈ C,
(a) exp (z
1
) exp (z
2
) = exp (z
1
+z
2
)
(b)
1
exp(z)
= exp (−z)
(c) exp (z + 2πi) = exp (z)
(d) |exp (z)| = exp (Re z)
(e) exp(z) = 0
(f)
d
dz
exp (z) = exp (z) .
Remarks. 1. The third identity is a very special one and has no counterpart for the real exponential
function. It says that the complex exponential function is periodic with period 2πi. This has many
interesting consequences; one that may not seem too pleasant at first sight is the fact that the
complex exponential function is not one-to-one.
2. The last identity is not only remarkable, but we invite the reader to meditate on its proof. When
proving this identity through the Cauchy–Riemann equations for the exponential function, one can
get another strong reason why Definition 3.15 is reasonable. Finally, note that the last identity
also says that exp is entire.
We should make sure that the complex exponential function specializes to the real exponential
function for real arguments: if z = x ∈ R then
exp(x) = e
x
(cos 0 +i sin 0) = e
x
.
//
exp


6

π
3
0
π
3

6
−1 0 1 2
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
q
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
Figure 3.1: Image properties of the exponential function.
The trigonometric functions—sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, etc.—have their complex ana-
logues, however, they don’t play the same prominent role as in the real case. In fact, we can define
them as merely being special combinations of the exponential function.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 36
Definition 3.17. The (complex) sine and cosine are defined as
sin z =
1
2i
(exp(iz) −exp(−iz)) and cos z =
1
2
(exp(iz) + exp(−iz)) ,
respectively. The tangent and cotangent are defined as
tan z =
sinz
cos z
= −i
exp(2iz) −1
exp(2iz) + 1
and cot z =
cos z
sin z
= i
exp(2iz) + 1
exp(2iz) −1
,
respectively.
Note that to write tangent and cotangent in terms of the exponential function, we used the fact
that exp(z) exp(−z) = exp(0) = 1. Because exp is entire, so are sin and cos.
As with the exponential function, we should first make sure that we’re not redefining the real
sine and cosine: if z = x ∈ R then
sin z =
1
2i
(exp(ix) −exp(−ix)) =
1
2i
(cos x +i sin x −(cos(−x) +i sin(−x))) = sin x.
A similar calculation holds for the cosine. Not too surprisingly, the following properties follow
mostly from Lemma 3.16.
Lemma 3.18. For all z, z
1
, z
2
∈ C,
sin(−z) = −sinz cos(−z) = cos z
sin(z + 2π) = sin z cos(z + 2π) = cos z
tan(z +π) = tan z cot(z +π) = cot z
sin(z +π/2) = cos z cos(z +π/2) = −sin z
sin(z
1
+z
2
) = sin z
1
cos z
2
+ cos z
1
sin z
2
cos (z
1
+z
2
) = cos z
1
cos z
2
−sin z
1
sin z
2
cos
2
z + sin
2
z = 1 cos
2
z −sin
2
z = cos(2z)
sin

z = cos z cos

z = −sin z .
Finally, one word of caution: unlike in the real case, the complex sine and cosine are not
bounded—consider, for example, sin(iy) as y →±∞.
We end this section with a remark on hyperbolic trig functions. The hyperbolic sine, cosine,
tangent, and cotangent are defined as in the real case:
Definition 3.19.
sinhz =
1
2
(exp(z) −exp(−z)) cosh z =
1
2
(exp(z) + exp(−z))
tanh z =
sinhz
cosh z
=
exp(2z) −1
exp(2z) + 1
coth z =
cosh z
sinhz
=
exp(2z) + 1
exp(2z) −1
.
As such, they are also special combinations of the exponential function. They still satisfy the
identities you already know, including
d
d
sinhz = cosh z
d
dz
cosh z = sinhz.
Moreover, they are now related to the trigonometric functions via the following useful identities:
sinh(iz) = i sin z and cosh(iz) = cos z .
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 37
3.5 The Logarithm and Complex Exponentials
The complex logarithm is the first function we’ll encounter that is of a somewhat tricky nature. It
is motivated as being the inverse function to the exponential function, that is, we’re looking for a
function Log such that
exp(Log z) = z = Log(exp z) .
As we will see shortly, this is too much to hope for. Let’s write, as usual, z = r e

, and suppose
that Log z = u(z) +iv(z). Then for the first equation to hold, we need
exp(Log z) = e
u
e
iv
= r e

= z ,
that is, e
u
= r = |z| ⇐⇒ u = ln |z| (where ln denotes the real natural logarithm; in particular we
need to demand that z = 0), and e
iv
= e

⇐⇒v = φ+2πk for some k ∈ Z. A reasonable definition
of a logarithm function Log would hence be to set Log z = ln |z| + i Arg z where Arg z gives the
argument for the complex number z according to some convention—for example, we could agree
that the argument is always in (−π, π], or in [0, 2π), etc. The problem is that we need to stick to
this convention. On the other hand, as we saw, we could just use a different argument convention
and get another reasonable ‘logarithm.’ Even worse, by defining the multi-valued map
arg z = {φ : φ is a possible argument of z}
and defining the multi-valued logarithm as
log z = ln |z| +i arg z ,
we get something that’s not a function, yet it satisfies
exp(log z) = z .
We invite the reader to check this thoroughly; in particular, one should note how the periodicity
of the exponential function takes care of the multi-valuedness of our ‘logarithm’ log.
log is, of course, not a function, and hence we can’t even consider it to be our sought-after
inverse of the exponential function. Let’s try to make things well defined.
Definition 3.20. Any function Log : C \ {0} → C which satisfies exp(Log z) = z is a branch of
the logarithm. Let Arg z denote that argument of z which is in (−π, π] (the principal argument of
z). Then the principal logarithm is defined as
Log z = ln |z| +i Arg z .
The paragraph preceding this definition ensures that the principal logarithm is indeed a branch
of the logarithm. Even better, the evaluation of any branch of the logarithm at z can only differ
from Log z by a multiple of 2πi; the reason for this is once more the periodicity of the exponential
function.
So what about the other equation Log(exp z) = z? Let’s try the principal logarithm: Suppose
z = x +iy, then
Log(exp z) = Log

e
x
e
iy

= ln

e
x
e
iy

+i Arg

e
x
e
iy

= ln e
x
+i Arg

e
iy

= x +i Arg

e
iy

.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 38
The right-hand side is equal to z = x + iy only if y ∈ (−π, π]. The same happens with any
other branch of the logarithm Log—there will always be some (in fact, many) y-values for which
Log(exp z) = z.
To end our discussion of the logarithm on a happy note, we prove that any branch of the
logarithm has the same derivative; one just has to be cautious about where each logarithm is
holomorphic.
Theorem 3.21. Suppose Log is a branch of the logarithm. Then Log is differentiable wherever it
is continuous and
Log

z =
1
z
.
Proof. The idea is to apply Lemma 2.12 to exp and Log, but we need to be careful about the
domains of these functions, so that we get actual inverse functions. Suppose Log maps C\{0} to G
(this is typically a half-open strip; you might want to think about what it looks like if Log = Log).
We apply Lemma 2.12 with f : G → C \ {0} , f(z) = exp(z) and g : C \ {0} → G, g(z) = Log: if
Log is continuous at z then
Log

z =
1
exp

(Log z)
=
1
exp(Log z)
=
1
z
.
We finish this section by defining complex exponentials. For two complex numbers a and b, the
natural definition a
b
= exp(b log a) (which is a concept borrowed from calculus) would in general
yield more than one value (Exercise 42), so it is not always useful. We turn instead to the principal
logarithm:
Definition 3.22. For a complex number a ∈ C, the exponential function with base a is the multi-
valued function
a
x
:= exp(b log a).
The principal value of a
x
at x (unfortunately) uses the same notation, and is defined as
a
x
:= exp(xLog a) .
When we write a
x
we are referring to the principal value unless otherwise stated.
It now makes sense to talk about the exponential function with base e. In calculus one proves
the equivalence of the real exponential function (as given, for example, through a power series)
and the function f(x) = e
x
where e is Euler’s
3
number and can be defined, for example, as
e = lim
n→∞

1 +
1
n

n
. With our definition of a
x
, we can now make a similar remark about the
complex exponential function. Because e is a positive real number and hence Arg e = 0, we obtain
e
z
= exp(z Log e) = exp (z (ln |e| +i Arg e)) = exp (z lne) = exp (z) .
A word of caution: this only works out this nicely because we have now carefully defined a
x
for
complex numbers. Different definitions will make it so that e
z
= exp(z)!
3
Named after Leonard Euler (1707–1783). For more information about Euler, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Euler.html.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 39
Exercises
1. Show that if f(z) =
az+b
cz+d
is a M¨obius transformation then f
−1
(z) =
dz−b
−cz+a
.
2. Show that the derivative of a M¨obius transformation is never zero.
3. Prove that any M¨obius transformation different from the identity map can have at most two
fixed points. (A fixed point of a function f is a number z such that f(z) = z.)
4. Prove Proposition 3.3.
5. Show that the M¨obius transformation f(z) =
1+z
1−z
maps the unit circle (minus the point z = 1)
onto the imaginary axis.
6. Suppose that f is holomorphic on the region G and f(G) is a subset of the unit circle. Show
that f is constant. (Hint: Consider the function
1+f(z)
1−f(z)
and use Exercise 5 and a variation of
Exercise 14 in Chapter 2.)
7. Suppose A =
¸
a b
c d

is a 2 × 2 matrix of complex numbers whose determinant ad − bc is
non-zero. Then we can define a corresponding M¨obius transformation T
A
by T
A
(z) =
az+b
cz+d
.
Show that T
A
◦T
B
= T
A·B
. (Here ◦ denotes composition and · denotes matrix multiplication.)
8. Let f(z) =
2z
z+2
. Draw two graphs, one showing the following six sets in the z plane and the
other showing their images in the w plane. Label the sets. (You should only need to calculate
the images of 0, ±2, ∞ and −1 −i; remember that M¨obius transformations preserve angles.)
(a) The x-axis, plus ∞.
(b) The y-axis, plus ∞.
(c) The line x = y, plus ∞.
(d) The circle with radius 2 centered at 0.
(e) The circle with radius 1 centered at 1.
(f) The circle with radius 1 centered at −1.
9. Find M¨obius transformations satisfying each of the following. Write your answers in standard
form, as
az+b
cz+d
.
(a) 1 →0, 2 →1, 3 →∞. (Use the cross-ratio.)
(b) 1 →0, 1 +i →1, 2 →∞. (Use the cross-ratio.)
(c) 0 →i, 1 →1, ∞→−i.
10. Let C be the circle with center 1+i and radius 1. Using the cross-ratio, with different choices
of z
k
, find two different M¨obius transformations that transform C onto the real axis plus
infinity. In each case, find the image of the center of the circle.
11. Let C be the circle with center 0 and radius 1. Find a M¨obius transformation which transforms
C onto C and transforms 0 to
1
2
.
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 40
12. Describe the image of the region under the transformation:
(a) The disk |z| < 1 under w =
iz−i
z+1
.
(b) The quadrant x > 0, y > 0 under w =
z−i
z+i
.
(c) The strip 0 < x < 1 under w =
z
z−1
.
13. The Jacobian of a transformation u = u(x, y), v = v(x, y) is the determinant of the matrix
¸
∂u
∂x
∂u
∂y
∂v
∂x
∂v
∂y
¸
. Show that if f = u +iv is holomorphic then the Jacobian equals |f

(z)|
2
.
14. Find the fixed points in
ˆ
C of f(z) =
z
2
−1
2z+1
.
15. Find the M¨obius transformation f:
(a) f maps 0 →1, 1 →∞, ∞→0.
(b) f maps 1 →1, −1 →i, −i →−1.
(c) f maps x-axis to y = x, y-axis to y = −x, and the unit circle to itself.
16. Show that the image of the line y = a under inversion is the circle with center
−i
2a
and radius
1
2a
.
17. Suppose z
1
, z
2
and z
3
are distinct points in
ˆ
C. Show that z is on the circle passing through
z
1
, z
2
and z
3
if and only if [z, z
1
, z
2
, z
3
] is real or infinite.
18. Find the image under the stereographic projection φ of the following points:
(0, 0, −1), (0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0), (0, 1, 0), (1, 1, 0).
19. Prove that the stereographic projection of Proposition 3.13 is a bijection by verifying that
that φ ◦ φ
−1
and φ
−1
◦ φ are the identity.
20. Consider the plane P determined by x + y − z = 0. What is a unit normal vector to P?
Compute the image of P ∩ S
2
under the stereographic projection φ.
21. Prove that every circle in the extended complex plane is the image of some circle in S
2
under
the stereographic projection φ.
22. Describe the effect of the basic M¨obius transformations rotation, real dilation, and translation
on the Riemann sphere. hint: for the first two, consider all circles in S
2
centered on the NS
axis, and all circles through both N and S. For translation, consider two families of circles
through N, ‘orthogonal’ to and ‘perpendicular’ to the translation.
23. Prove that sin(z) = sin(z) and cos(z) = cos(z).
24. Prove that sin(x+iy) = sinxcosh y+i cos xsinh y, and cos(x+iy) = cos xcosh y−i sin xsinhy.
25. Prove that the zeros of sin z are all real-valued.
26. Describe the images of the following sets under the exponential function exp(z):
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 41
(a) the line segment defined by z = iy, 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π.
(b) the line segment defined by z = 1 +iy, 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π.
(c) the rectangle {z = x +iy ∈ C : 0 ≤ x ≤ 1, 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π}.
27. Prove Lemma 3.16.
28. Prove Lemma 3.18.
29. Let z = x +iy and show that
(a) sin z = sinxcosh y +i cos xsinhy.
(b) cos z = cos xcosh y −i sin xsinh y.
30. Let z = x +iy and show that
(a) |sinz|
2
= sin
2
x + sinh
2
y = cosh
2
y −cos
2
x.
(b) |cos z|
2
= cos
2
x + sinh
2
y = cosh
2
y −sin
2
x.
(c) If cos x = 0 then |cot z|
2
=
cosh
2
y−1
cosh
2
y
≤ 1.
(d) If |y| ≥ 1 then |cot z|
2

sinh
2
y+1
sinh
2
y
= 1 +
1
sinh
2
y
≤ 1 +
1
sinh
2
1
≤ 2.
31. Show that tan(iz) = i tanh z.
32. Evaluate the value(s) of the following expressions, giving your answers in the form x +iy.
(a) e

(b) e
π
(c) i
i
(d) e
sin i
(e) exp(Log(3 + 4i))
(f)

1 +i
(g)

31 −i
(h)

i+1

2

4
33. Find the principal values of
(a) log i.
(b) (−1)
i
.
(c) log(1 +i).
34. Determine the image of the strip {z ∈ C : −π/2 < Re z < π/2} under the function f(z) =
sin z.
35. Is arg(z) = −arg(z) true for the multiple-valued argument? What about Arg(z) = −Arg(z)
for the principal branch?
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 42
36. Is there a difference between the set of all values of log

z
2

and the set of all values of 2 log z?
(Try some fixed numbers for z.)
37. For each of the following functions, determine all complex numbers for which the function is
holomorphic. If you run into a logarithm, use the principal value (unless stated otherwise).
(a) z
2
.
(b)
sin z
z
3
+1
.
(c) Log(z −2i + 1) where Log(z) = ln |z| +i Arg(z) with 0 ≤ Arg(z) < 2π.
(d) exp(z).
(e) (z −3)
i
.
(f) i
z−3
.
38. Find all solutions to the following equations:
(a) Log(z) =
π
2
i.
(b) Log(z) =

2
i.
(c) exp(z) = πi.
(d) sin z = cosh 4.
(e) cos z = 0.
(f) sinh z = 0.
(g) exp(iz) = exp(iz).
(h) z
1/2
= 1 +i.
39. Find the image of the annulus 1 < |z| < e under the principal value of the logarithm.
40. Show that |a
z
| = a
Re z
if a is a positive real constant.
41. Fix c ∈ C\ {0}. Find the derivative of f(z) = z
c
.
42. Prove that exp(b log a) is single-valued if and only if b is an integer. (Note that this means
that complex exponentials don’t clash with monomials z
n
.) What can you say if b is rational?
43. Describe the image under exp of the line with equation y = x. To do this you should find
an equation (at least parametrically) for the image (you can start with the parametric form
x = t, y = t), plot it reasonably carefully, and explain what happens in the limits as t →∞
and t →−∞.
44. For this problem, f(z) = z
2
.
(a) Show that the image of a circle centered at the origin is a circle centered at the origin.
(b) Show that the image of a ray starting at the origin is a ray starting at the origin.
(c) Let T be the figure formed by the horizontal segment from 0 to 2, the circular arc from
2 to 2i, and then the vertical segment from 2i to 0. Draw T and f(T).
(d) Is the right angle at the origin in part (c) preserved? Is something wrong here?
CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 43
(Hint: Use polar coordinates.)
45. As in the previous problem, let f(z) = z
2
. Let Q be the square with vertices at 0, 2, 2 + 2i
and 2i. Draw f(Q) and identify the types of image curves corresponding to the segments
from 2 to 2 + 2i and from 2 + 2i to 2i. They are not parts of either straight lines or circles.
(Hint: You can write the vertical segment parametrically as z(t) = 2 + it. Eliminate the
parameter in u +iv = f(z(t)) to get a (u, v) equation for the image curve.)
Chapter 4
Integration
Everybody knows that mathematics is about miracles, only mathematicians have a name for
them: theorems.
Roger Howe
4.1 Definition and Basic Properties
We begin integration by focusing on ‘1-dimensional’ integrals over lines. We delay discussion of
antiderivatives until Chapter 5.
At first sight, complex integration is not really anything different from real integration. For a
continuous complex-valued function φ : [a, b] ⊂ R →C, we define

b
a
φ(t) dt =

b
a
Re φ(t) dt +i

b
a
Imφ(t) dt . (4.1)
For a function which takes complex numbers as arguments, we integrate over a curve γ (instead
of a real interval). Suppose this curve is parametrized by γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b. If one meditates about
the substitution rule for real integrals, the following definition, which is based on (4.1) should come
as no surprise.
Definition 4.1. Suppose γ is a smooth curve parametrized by γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b, and f is a complex
function which is continuous on γ. Then we define the integral of f on γ as

γ
f =

γ
f(z) dz =

b
a
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt .
This definition can be naturally extended to piecewise smooth curves, that is, those curves γ
whose parametrization γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b, is only piecewise differentiable, say γ(t) is differentiable on
the intervals [a, c
1
], [c
1
, c
2
], . . . , [c
n−1
, c
n
], [c
n
, b]. In this case we simply define

γ
f =

c
1
a
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt +

c
2
c
1
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt +· · · +

b
cn
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt .
In what follows, we’ll usually state our results for smooth curves, bearing in mind that practically
all can be extended to piecewise smooth curves.
44
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 45
Example 4.2. As our first example of the application of this definition we will compute the integral
of the function f(z) = z
2
=

x
2
−y
2

−i(2xy) over several curves from the point z = 0 to the point
z = 1 +i.
(a) Let γ be the line segment from z = 0 to z = 1 + i. A parametrization of this curve is
γ(t) = t +it, 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. We have γ

(t) = 1 +i and f(γ(t)) = (t −it)
2
, and hence

γ
f =

1
0
(t −it)
2
(1 +i) dt = (1 +i)

1
0
t
2
−2it
2
−t
2
dt = −2i(1 +i)/3 =
2
3
(1 −i) .
(b) Let γ be the arc of the parabola y = x
2
from z = 0 to z = 1 + i. A parametrization of this
curve is γ(t) = t +it
2
, 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. Now we have γ

(t) = 1 + 2it and
f(γ(t)) =

t
2

t
2

2

−i 2t · t
2
= t
2
−t
4
−2it
3
,
whence

γ
f =

1
0

t
2
−t
4
−2it
3

(1 + 2it) dt =

1
0
t
2
+ 3t
4
−2it
5
dt =
1
3
+ 3
1
5
−2i
1
6
=
14
15

i
3
.
(c) Let γ be the union of the two line segments γ
1
from z = 0 to z = 1 and γ
2
from z = 1 to
z = 1 +i. Parameterizations are γ
1
(t) = t, 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 and γ
2
(t) = 1 +it, 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. Hence

γ
f =

γ
1
f +

γ
2
f =

1
0
t
2
· 1 dt +

1
0
(1 −it)
2
i dt =
1
3
+i

1
0
1 −2it −t
2
dt
=
1
3
+i

1 −2i
1
2

1
3

=
4
3
+
2
3
i .
The complex integral has some standard properties, most of which follow from their real siblings
in a straightforward way. To state some of its properties, we first define the useful concept of the
length of a curve.
Definition 4.3. The length of a smooth curve γ is
length(γ) :=

b
a

γ

(t)

dt
for any parametrization γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b, of γ.
The definition of length is with respect to any parametrization of γ because, as we will see, the
length of a curve is independent of the parametrization. We invite the reader to use some familiar
curves to see that this definition gives what one would expect to be the length of a curve.
Proposition 4.4. Suppose γ is a smooth curve, f and g are complex functions which are continuous
on γ, and c ∈ C.
(a)

γ
(f +cg) =

γ
f + c

γ
g .
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 46
(b) If γ is parametrized by γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b, define the curve −γ through −γ(t) = γ(a +b −t), a ≤
t ≤ b. Then

−γ
f = −

γ
f .
(c) If γ
1
and γ
2
are curves so that γ
2
starts where γ
1
ends then define the curve γ
1
γ
2
by following
γ
1
to its end, and then continuing on γ
2
to its end. Then

γ
1
γ
2
f =

γ
1
f +

γ
2
f .
(d)

γ
f

≤ max
z∈γ
|f(z)| · length(γ) .
The curve −γ defined in (b) is the curve that we obtain by traveling through γ in the opposite
direction.
Proof.
(a) This follows directly from the definition of the integral and the properties of real integrals.
(b) This follows with an easy real change of variables s = a +b −t:

−γ
f =

b
a
f (γ(a +b −t)) (γ(a +b −t))

dt = −

b
a
f (γ(a +b −t)) γ

(a +b −t) dt
=

a
b
f (γ(s)) γ

(s) ds = −

b
a
f (γ(s)) γ

(s) ds = −

γ
f .
(c) We need a suitable parameterization γ(t) for γ
1
γ
2
. If γ
1
has domain [a
1
, b
1
] and γ
2
has domain
[a
2
, b
2
] then we can use
γ(t) =

γ
1
(t) for a
1
≤ t ≤ b
1
,
γ
2
(t −b
1
+a
2
) for b
1
≤ t ≤ b
1
+b
2
−a
2
.
The fact that γ
1
(b
1
) = γ
2
(a
2
) is necessary to make sure that this parameterization is piecewise
smooth. Now we break the integral over γ
1
γ
2
into two pieces and apply the simple change of
variables s = t −b
1
+a
2
:

γ
1
γ
2
f =

b
1
+b
2
−a
2
a
1
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt
=

b
1
a
1
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt +

b
1
+b
2
−a
2
b
1
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt
=

b
1
a
1
f(γ
1
(t))γ

1
(t) dt +

b
1
+b
2
−a
2
b
1
f(γ
2
(t −b
1
+a
2
))γ

2
(t −b
1
+a
2
) dt
=

b
1
a
1
f(γ
1
(t))γ

1
(t) dt +

b
2
a
2
f(γ
2
(s))γ

2
(s) ds
=

γ
1
f +

γ
2
f.
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 47
(d) To prove (d), let φ = Arg

γ
f. Then

γ
f

= e
−iφ

γ
f

= Re

e
−iφ

b
a
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt

=

b
a
Re

f(γ(t))e
−iφ
γ

(t)

dt

b
a

f(γ(t))e
−iφ
γ

(t)

dt =

b
a
|f(γ(t))|

γ

(t)

dt
≤ max
a≤t≤b
|f(γ(t))|

b
a

γ

(t)

dt = max
z∈γ
|f(z)| · length(γ) .
4.2 Cauchy’s Theorem
We now turn to the central theorem of complex analysis. It is based on the following concept.
Definition 4.5. A curve γ ⊂ C is closed if its endpoints coincide, i.e. for any parametrization
γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b, we have that γ(a) = γ(b).
Suppose γ
0
and γ
1
are closed curves in the open set G ⊆ C, parametrized by γ
0
(t), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
and γ
1
(t), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1, respectively. Then γ
0
is G-homotopic to γ
1
, in symbols γ
0

G
γ
1
, if there is
a continuous function h : [0, 1]
2
→G such that
h(t, 0) = γ
0
(t) ,
h(t, 1) = γ
1
(t) ,
h(0, s) = h(1, s) .
The function h(t, s) is called a homotopy and represents a curve for each fixed s, which is
continuously transformed from γ
0
to γ
1
. The last condition simply says that each of the curves
h(t, s), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 is closed. An example is depicted in Figure 4.1.
Figure 4.1: This square and the circle are (C \ {0})-homotopic.
Here is the theorem on which most of what will follow is based.
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 48
Theorem 4.6 (Cauchy’s Theorem). Suppose G ⊆ C is open, f is holomorphic in G, and γ
0

G
γ
1
via a homotopy with continuous second partials. Then

γ
0
f =

γ
1
f .
Remarks. 1. The condition on the smoothness of the homotopy can be omitted, however, then the
proof becomes too advanced for the scope of these notes. In all the examples and exercises that
we’ll have to deal with here, the homotopies will be ‘nice enough’ to satisfy the condition of this
theorem.
2. It is assumed that Johann Carl Friedrich Gauß (1777–1855)
1
knew a version of this theorem in
1811 but only published it in 1831. Cauchy published his version in 1825, Weierstraß
2
his in 1842.
Cauchy’s theorem is often called the Cauchy–Goursat Theorem, since Cauchy assumed that the
derivative of f was continuous, a condition which was first removed by Goursat
3
.
An important special case is the one where a curve γ is G-homotopic to a point, that is, a
constant curve (see Figure 4.2 for an example). In this case we simply say γ is G-contractible, in
symbols γ ∼
G
0.
Figure 4.2: This ellipse is (C \ R)-contractible.
The fact that an integral over a point is zero has the following immediate consequence.
Corollary 4.7. Suppose G ⊆ C is open, f is holomorphic in G, and γ ∼
G
0 via a homotopy with
continuous second partials. Then

γ
f = 0 .
The fact that any closed curve is C-contractible (Exercise 18a) yields the following special case
of the previous special-case corollary.
Corollary 4.8. If f is entire and γ is any smooth closed curve then

γ
f = 0 .
1
For more information about Gauß, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Gauss.html.
2
For more information about Karl Theodor Wilhelm Weierstraß (1815–1897), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Weierstrass.html.
3
For more information about Edouard Jean-Baptiste Goursat (1858–1936), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Goursat.html.
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 49
There are many proofs of Cauchy’s Theorem. A particularly nice one follows from the complex
Green’s Theorem. We will use the (real) Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We note that
with more work, Cauchy’s Theorem can be derived ‘from scratch’, and does not require any other
major theorems.
Proof of Theorem 4.6. Suppose h is the given homotopy from γ
0
to γ
1
. For 0 ≤ s ≤ 1, let γ
s
be
the curve parametrized by h(t, s), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. Consider the function
I(s) =

γs
f
as a function in s (so I(0) =

γ
0
f and I(1) =

γ
0
f). We will show that I is constant with respect
to s, and hence the statement of the theorem follows with I(0) = I(1). Consider the derivative of
I. By Leibniz’s Rule,
d
ds
I(s) =
d
ds

1
0
f (h(t, s))
∂h
∂t
dt =

1
0

∂s

f (h(t, s))
∂h
∂t

dt.
By the product rule, the chain rule, and equality of mixed partials,
d
ds
I(s) =

1
0
f

(h(t, s))
∂h
∂s
∂h
∂t
+f (h(t, s))

2
h
∂s∂t
dt
=

1
0
f

(h(t, s))
∂h
∂t
∂h
∂s
+f (h(t, s))

2
h
∂t∂s
dt
=

1
0

∂t

f (h(t, s))
∂h
∂s

dt
Finally, by the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (applied separately to the real and imaginary
parts of the above integral), we have:
d
dx
I(s) = f(h(1, s))
∂h
∂s
(1, s) −f(h(0, s))
∂h
∂s
(0, s) = 0 .
4.3 Cauchy’s Integral Formula
Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6 yields almost immediately the following helpful result.
Theorem 4.9 (Cauchy’s Integral Formula for a Circle). Let C
R
be the counterclockwise circle with
radius R centered at w and suppose f is holomorphic at each point of the closed disk D bounded by
C
R
. Then
f(w) =
1
2πi

C
R
f(z)
z −w
dz .
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 50
Proof. All circles C
r
with center w and radius r are homotopic in D \ {w}, and the function
f(z)/(z −w) is holomorphic in an open set containing D \ {w}. So Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6, gives

C
R
f(z)
z −w
dz =

Cr
f(z)
z −w
dz
Now by Exercise 15,

Cr
1
z −w
dz = 2πi ,
and we obtain with Proposition 4.4(d)

C
R
f(z)
z −w
dz −2πif(w)

=

Cr
f(z)
z −w
dz −f(w)

Cr
1
z −w
dz

=

Cr
f(z) −f(w)
z −w
dz

≤ max
z∈Cr

f(z) −f(w)
z −w

length (C
r
) = max
z∈Cr
|f(z) −f(w)|
r
2πr
= 2π max
z∈Cr
|f(z) −f(w)| .
On the right-hand side, we can now take r as small as we want, and—because f is continuous
at w—this means we can make |f(z) −f(w)| as small as we like. Hence the left-hand side has no
choice but to be zero, which is what we claimed.
This is a useful theorem by itself, but it can be made more generally useful. For example, it
will be important to have Cauchy’s integral formula when w is anywhere inside C
R
, not just at the
center of C
R
. In fact, in many cases in which a point w is inside a simple closed curve γ we can see
a homotopy from γ to a small circle around w so that the homotopy misses w and remains in the
region where f is holomorphic. In that case the theorem remains true, since, by Cauchy’s theorem,
the integral of f(z)/(z − w) around γ is the same as the integral of f(z)/(z − w) around a small
circle centered at w, and Theorem 4.9 then applies to evaluate the integral. In this discussion we
need to be sure that the orientation of the curve γ and the circle match. In general, we say a simple
closed curve γ is positively oriented if it is parameterized so that the inside is on the left of γ. For
a circle this corresponds to a counterclockwise orientation.
Here’s the general form:
Theorem 4.10 (Cauchy’s Integral Formula). Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G, w ∈ G,
and γ is a positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ.
Then
f(w) =
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
z −w
dz .
We have already indicated how to prove this, by combining Cauchy’s theorem and the special
case, Theorem 4.9. All we need is to find a homotopy in G \ {w} between γ and a small circle
with center at w. In all practical cases we can see immediately how to construct such a homotopy,
but it is not at all clear how to do so in complete generality; in fact, it is not even clear how to
make sense of the “inside” of γ in general. The justification for this is one of the first substantial
theorems ever proved in topology. We can state it as follows:
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 51
Theorem 4.11 (Jordan Curve Theorem). If γ is a positively oriented, simple, closed curve in C
then C \ γ consists of two connected open sets, the inside and the outside of γ. If a closed disk D
centered at w lies inside γ then there is a homotopy γ
s
from γ to the positively oriented boundary
of D, and, for 0 < s < 1, γ
s
is inside γ and outside of D.
Remarks. 1. The Jordan Curve Theorem is named after French mathematician Camille Jordan
(1838-1922)
4
(the Jordan of Jordan normal form and Jordan matrix, but not Gauss-Jordan elimi-
nation).
This theorem, although “intuitively obvious,” is surprisingly difficult to prove. The usual state-
ment of the Jordan curve theorem does not contain the homotopy information; we have borrowed
this from a companion theorem to the Jordan curve theorem which is sometimes called the “annulus
theorem.” If you want to explore this kind of mathematics you should take a course in topology.
A nice special case of Cauchy’s formula is obtained when γ is a circle centered at w, parametrized
by, say, z = w +re
it
, 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. Theorem 4.10 gives (if the conditions are met)
f(w) =
1
2πi


0
f

w +re
it

w +re
it
−w
ire
it
dt =
1


0
f

w +re
it

dt .
Even better, we automatically get similar formulas for the real and imaginary part of f, simply
by taking real and imaginary parts on both sides. These identities have the flavor of mean values.
Let’s summarize them in the following statement, which is often called a mean-value theorem.
Corollary 4.12. Suppose f is holomorphic on and inside the circle z = w + re

, 0 ≤ θ ≤ 2π.
Then
f(w) =
1


0
f

w +re

dθ .
Furthermore, if f = u +iv,
u(w) =
1


0
u

w +re

dθ and v(w) =
1


0
v

w +re

dθ .
This is called a mean value theorem because it is stating that f(w) is equal to an integral, where
the integral is literally the mean of the values of f along the circle of radius r:
1


0
f

w +re

dθ =
1
2πr


0
f

w +re

r dθ = lim
∆θ→0
1
2πr

¸
θ=0
f(w +re

)(r∆θ)
where in the final sum the step size is ∆θ.
Exercises
1. Use the definition of length to find the length of the following curves:
(a) γ(t) = 3t +i for −1 ≤ t ≤ 1
4
For more information on C. Jordan, see
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camille Jordan .
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 52
(b) γ(t) = e
it
for 0 ≤ t ≤ π
(c) γ(t) = i sin(t) for −π ≤ t ≤ π
(d) γ(t) = (t, t
2
) for 0 ≤ t ≤ 2
2. Integrate the function f(z) = z over the three curves given in Example 4.2.
3. Evaluate

γ
1
z
dz where γ(t) = sint +i cos t, 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π.
4. Integrate the following functions over the circle |z| = 2, oriented counterclockwise:
(a) z +z.
(b) z
2
−2z + 3.
(c) 1/z
4
.
(d) xy.
5. Evaluate the integrals

γ
xdz,

γ
y dz,

γ
z dz and

γ
z dz along each of the following paths.
Note that you can get the second two integrals very easily after you calculate the first two,
by writing z and z as x ±iy.
(a) γ is the line segment form 0 to 1 −i.
(b) γ is the counterclockwise circle |z| = 1.
(c) γ is the counterclockwise circle |z −a| = r. Use γ(t) = a +re
it
.
6. Evaluate

γ
e
3z
dz for each of the following paths:
(a) The straight line segment from 1 to i.
(b) The circle |z| = 3.
(c) The parabola y = x
2
from x = 0 to x = 1.
7. Evaluate

γ

z
2

dz where γ is the parabola with parametric equation γ(t) = t+it
2
, 0 ≤ t ≤ 1.
8. Compute

γ
z where γ is the semicircle from 1 through i to −1.
9. Compute

γ
e
z
where γ is the line segment from 0 to z
0
.
10. Find

γ
|z|
2
where γ is the line segment from 2 to 3 +i.
11. Compute

γ
z +
1
z
where γ is parametrized by γ(t), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1, and satisfies Imγ(t) > 0,
γ(0) = −4 +i, and γ(1) = 6 + 2i.
12. Find

γ
sin z where γ is parametrized by γ(t), 0 ≤ t ≤ 1, and satisfies γ(0) = i and γ(1) = π.
13. Show that
1


0
e
ikθ
dθ is 1 if k = 0 and 0 otherwise.
14. Evaluate

γ
z
1
2
dz where γ is the unit circle and z
1
2
is the principal branch. You can use the
parameterization γ(θ) = e

for −π ≤ θ ≤ π, and remember that the principal branch is
defined by z
1
2
=

re
iθ/2
if z = re

for −π ≤ θ ≤ π.
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 53
15. Let γ be the circle with radius r centered at w, oriented counterclockwise. You can parame-
terize this curve as z(t) = w + re
it
for 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. Use the definition of an integral to show
that

γ
dz
z −w
= 2πi .
16. Suppose a smooth curve is parametrized by both γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b and σ(t), c ≤ t ≤ d, and let
τ : [c, d] →[a, b] be the map which “takes γ to σ,” that is, σ = γ ◦ τ. Show that

d
c
f(σ(t))σ

(t) dt =

b
a
f(γ(t))γ

(t) dt .
(In other words, our definition of the integral

γ
f is independent of the parametrization of γ.)
17. Prove that ∼
G
is an equivalence relation.
18. (a) Prove that any closed curve is C-contractible.
(b) Prove that any two closed curves are C-homotopic.
19. Show that

γ
z
n
dz = 0 for any closed smooth γ and any integer n = −1. [If n is negative,
assume that γ does not pass through the origin, since otherwise the integral is not defined.]
20. Exercise 19 excluded n = −1 for a very good reason: Exercises 3 and 15 (with w = 0) give
counterexamples. Generalizing these, if m is any integer then find a closed curve γ so that

γ
z
−1
dz = 2mπi. (Hint: Follow the counterclockwise unit circle through m complete cycles
(for m > 0). What should you do if m < 0? What if m = 0?)
21. Let γ
r
be the circle centered at 2i with radius r, oriented counterclockwise. Compute

γr
dz
z
2
+ 1
.
(This integral depends on r.)
22. Suppose p is a polynomial and γ is a closed smooth path in C. Show that

γ
p = 0 .
23. Compute the real integral


0

2 + sin θ
by writing the sine function in terms of the exponential function and making the substitution
z = e

to turn the real into a complex integral.
24. Show that F(z) =
i
2
Log(z + i) −
i
2
Log(z − i) is a primitive of
1
1+z
2
for Re(z) > 0. Is
F(z) = arctan z?
CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 54
25. Prove the following integration by parts statement. Let f and g be holomorphic in G, and
suppose γ ⊂ G is a smooth curve from a to b. Then

γ
fg

= f(γ(b))g(γ(b)) −f(γ(a))g(γ(a)) −

γ
f

g .
26. Suppose f and g are holomorphic on the region G, γ is a closed, smooth, G-contractible curve,
and f(z) = g(z) for all z ∈ γ. Prove that f(z) = g(z) for all z inside γ.
27. This exercise gives an alternative proof of Cauchy’s integral formula (Theorem 4.10), which
does not depend on Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G, w ∈ G,
and γ is a positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve such that w is
inside γ.
(a) Consider the function g : [0, 1] →C, g(t) =

γ
f(w+t(z−w))
z−w
dz. Show that g

= 0. (Hint:
Use Theorem 1.22 (Leibniz’s rule) and then find a primitive for
∂f
∂t
(z +t(w −z)).)
(b) Prove Theorem 4.10 by evaluating g(0) and g(1).
28. Prove Corollary 4.7 using Theorem 4.10.
29. Suppose a is a complex number and γ
0
and γ
1
are two counterclockwise circles (traversed just
once) so that a is inside both of them. Explain geometrically why γ
0
and γ
1
are homotopic
in C \ {a} .
30. Let γ
r
be the counterclockwise circle with center at 0 and radius r. Find

γr
dz
z−a
. You should
get different answers for r < |a| and r > |a|. (Hint: In one case γ
r
is contractible in C \ {a}.
In the other you can combine Exercises 15 and 29.)
31. Let γ
r
be the counterclockwise circle with center at 0 and radius r. Find

γr
dz
z
2
−2z−8
for r = 1,
r = 3 and r = 5. (Hint: Since z
2
− 2z − 8 = (z − 4)(z + 2) you can find a partial fraction
decomposition of the form
1
z
2
−2z−8
=
A
z−4
+
B
z+2
. Now use Exercise 30.)
32. Use the Cauchy integral formula to evaluate the integral in Exercise 31 when r = 3. (Hint:
The integrand can be written in each of following ways:
1
z
2
−2z −8
=
1
(z −4)(z + 2)
=
1/(z −4)
z + 2
=
1/(z + 2)
z −4
.
Which of these forms corresponds to the Cauchy integral formula for the curve γ
3
?)
33. Find

|z+1|=2
z
2
4−z
2
.
34. What is

|z|=1
sinz
z
?
35. Evaluate

|z|=2
e
z
z(z−3)
and

|z|=4
e
z
z(z−3)
.
Chapter 5
Consequences of Cauchy’s Theorem
If things are nice there is probably a good reason why they are nice: and if you do not know at
least one reason for this good fortune, then you still have work to do.
Richard Askey
5.1 Extensions of Cauchy’s Formula
We now derive formulas for f

and f
′′
which resemble Cauchy’s formula (Theorem 4.10).
Theorem 5.1. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G, w ∈ G, and γ is a positively oriented,
simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. Then
f

(w) =
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w)
2
dz
and
f
′′
(w) =
1
πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w)
3
dz .
This innocent-looking theorem has a very powerful consequence: just from knowing that f
is holomorphic we know of the existence of f
′′
, that is, f

is also holomorphic in G. Repeating
this argument for f

, then for f
′′
, f
′′′
, etc., gives the following statement, which has no analog
whatsoever in the reals.
Corollary 5.2. If f is differentiable in the region G then f is infinitely differentiable in G.
Proof of Theorem 5.1. The idea of the proof is very similar to the proof of Cauchy’s integral formula
(Theorem 4.10). We will study the following difference quotient, which we can rewrite as follows
by Theorem 4.10.
f(w + ∆w) −f(w)
∆w
=
1
∆w

1
2πi

γ
f(z)
z −(w + ∆w)
dz −
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
z −w
dz

=
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w −∆w)(z −w)
dz .
55
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 56
Hence we will have to show that the following expression gets arbitrarily small as ∆w →0:
f(w + ∆w) −f(w)
∆w

1
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w)
2
dz =
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w −∆w)(z −w)

f(z)
(z −w)
2
dz
= ∆w
1
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w −∆w)(z −w)
2
dz .
This can be made arbitrarily small if we can show that the integral stays bounded as ∆w → 0.
In fact, by Proposition 4.4(d), it suffices to show that the integrand stays bounded as ∆w → 0
(because γ and hence length(γ) are fixed). Let M = max
z∈γ
|f(z)| and N = max
z∈γ
|z −w|. Since
γ is a closed set, there is some positive δ so that the open disk of radius δ around w does not
intersect γ; that is, |z −w| ≥ δ for all z on γ. By the reverse triangle inequality we have for all
z ∈ γ

f(z)
(z −w −∆w)(z −w)
2


|f(z)|
(|z −w| −|∆w|)|z −w|
2

M
(δ −|∆w|)N
2
,
which certainly stays bounded as ∆w →0. The proof of the formula for f
′′
is very similar and will
be left for the exercises (see Exercise 2).
Remarks. 1. Theorem 5.1 suggests that there are similar formulas for the higher derivatives of f.
This is in fact true, and theoretically one could obtain them one by one with the methods of the
proof of Theorem 5.1. However, once we start studying power series for holomorphic functions,
we will obtain such a result much more easily; so we save the derivation of formulas for higher
derivatives of f for later (see Corollary 8.6).
2. Theorem 5.1 can also be used to compute certain integrals. We give some examples of this
application next.
Example 5.3.

|z|=1
sin(z)
z
2
dz = 2πi
d
dz
sin(z)

z=0
= 2πi cos(0) = 2πi .
Example 5.4. To compute the integral

|z|=2
dz
z
2
(z −1)
,
we first split up the integration path as illustrated in Figure 5.1: Introduce an additional path which
separates 0 and 1. If we integrate on these two new closed paths (γ
1
and γ
2
) counterclockwise, the
two contributions along the new path will cancel each other. The effect is that we transformed an
integral, for which two singularities where inside the integration path, into a sum of two integrals,
each of which has only one singularity inside the integration path; these new integrals we know
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 57
0
1
1
2
Figure 5.1: Example 5.4
how to deal with.

|z|=2
dz
z
2
(z −1)
=

γ
1
dz
z
2
(z −1)
+

γ
2
dz
z
2
(z −1)
=

γ
1
1
z−1
z
2
dz +

γ
2
1
z
2
z −1
dz
= 2πi
d
dz
1
z −1

z=0
+ 2πi
1
1
2
= 2πi


1
(−1)
2

+ 2πi
= 0 .
Example 5.5.

|z|=1
cos(z)
z
3
dz = πi
d
2
dz
2
cos(z)

z=0
= πi (−cos(0)) = −πi .
5.2 Taking Cauchy’s Formula to the Limit
Many beautiful applications of Cauchy’s formula arise from considerations of the limiting behavior
of the formula as the curve gets arbitrarily large. We shall look at a few applications along these
lines in this section, but this will be a recurring theme throughout the rest of the book.
The first application is understanding the roots of polynomials. As a preparation we prove
the following inequality, which is generally quite useful. It simply says that for large enough z, a
polynomial of degree d looks almost like a constant times z
d
.
Lemma 5.6. Suppose p(z) is a polynomial of degree d with leading coefficient a
d
. Then there is
real number R
0
so that
1
2
|a
d
| |z|
d
≤ |p(z)| ≤ 2 |a
d
| |z|
d
for all z satisfying |z| ≥ R
0
.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 58
Proof. Since p(z) has degree d its leading coefficient a
d
is not zero, and we can factor out a
d
z
d
:
|p(z)| =

a
d
z
d
+a
d−1
z
d−1
+a
d−2
z
d−2
+· · · +a
1
z +a
0

= |a
d
| |z|
d

1 +
a
d−1
a
d
z
+
a
d−2
a
d
z
2
+· · · +
a
1
a
d
z
d−1
+
a
0
a
d
z
d

.
Then the sum inside the last factor has limit 1 as z →∞ so its modulus is between
1
2
and 2 for all
large enough z.
Theorem 5.7 (Fundamental Theorem of Algebra
1
). Every non-constant polynomial has a root
in C.
Proof.
2
Suppose (by way of contradiction) that p does not have any roots, that is, p(z) = 0 for all
z ∈ C. Then Cauchy’s formula gives us
1
p(0)
=
1
2πi

C
R
1/p(z)
z
dz
where C
R
is the circle of radius R around the origin. Notice that the value of the integral does not
depend on R, so we have
1
p(0)
= lim
R→∞
1
2πi

C
R
dz
z p(z)
. (∗)
But now we can see that the limit of the integral is 0: By Lemma 5.6 we have |z p(z)| ≥
1
2
|a
d
| |z|
d+1
for all large z, where d is the degree of p(z) and a
d
is the leading coefficient of p(z). Hence, using
Proposition 4.4(d) and the formula for the circumference of a circle we see that the integral can be
bounded as

1
2πi

C
R
dz
zp(z)


1

·
2
|a
d
| R
d+1
· (2πR) =
2
|a
d
| R
d
and this has limit 0 as R → ∞. But, plugging into (∗), we have shown that
1
p(0)
= 0, which is
impossible.
Remarks. 1. This statement implies that any polynomial p can be factored into linear terms of
the form z −a where a is a root of p, as we can apply the corollary, after getting a root a, to
p(z)
z−a
(which is again a polynomial by the division algorithm), etc. (see also Exercise 10).
2. A compact reformulation of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra is to say that C is algebraically
closed. Thus, R is not algebraically closed.
1
The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra was first proved by Gauß (in his doctoral dissertation in 1799, which had
a flaw, and later three additional rigorous proofs), although its statement had been assumed to be correct long before
Gauß’s time.
2
It is amusing that such an important algebraic result can be proved ‘purely analytically.’ There are proofs of
the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra which do not use complex analysis. On the other hand, all proofs use some
analysis (such as the intermediate-value theorem). The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra refers to Algebra in the
sense that it existed in 1799, not to modern algebra. Thus, it has been remarked that the Fundamental Theorem of
Algrebra is neither fundamental to algebra nor even a theorem of algebra.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 59
Example 5.8. The polynomial p(x) = 2x
4
+ 5x
2
+ 3 is such that all of its coefficients are real.
However, p has no roots in R. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra states that p must have one
(in fact, 4) roots in C:
p(x) = (x
2
+ 1)(2x
2
+ 3) = (x +i)(x −i)(

2x +

3i)(

2x −

3i).
A powerful consequence of (the first half of) Theorem 5.1 is the following.
Corollary 5.9 (Liouville’s
3
Theorem
4
). Every bounded entire function is constant.
Proof. Suppose |f(z)| ≤ M for all z ∈ C. Given any w ∈ C, we apply Theorem 5.1 with the circle
C
R
of radius R centered at w. Note that we can choose any R because f is entire. Now we apply
Proposition 4.4 (d), remembering that C
R
has circumference 2πR and |z −w| = R for all z on C
R
:

f

(w)

=

1
2πi

C
R
f(z)
(z −w)
2
dz


1

max
z∈γ
R

f(z)
(z −w)
2

· 2πR =
1

max
z∈γ
R
|f(z)|
R
2
2πR = max
z∈γ
|f(z)|
R

M
R
.
The right-hand side can be made arbitrarily small, as we are allowed to make R as large as we
want. This implies that f

= 0, and hence, by Theorem 2.14, f is constant.
As an example of the usefulness of Liouville’s theorem we give another proof of the fundamental
theorem of algebra, which is close to Gauß’s original proof:
Another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra. Suppose (by way of contradiction) that p
does not have any roots, that is, p(z) = 0 for all z ∈ C. Then, because p is entire, the func-
tion f(z) =
1
p(z)
is entire. But f →0 as |z| becomes large as a consequence of Lemma 5.6; that is,
f is also bounded (Exercise 9). Now apply Corollary 5.9 to deduce that f is constant. Hence p is
constant, which contradicts our assumptions.
As one more example of this theme of getting results from Cauchy’s formula by taking the limit
as a path goes to infinity, we compute an improper integral.
Example 5.10. Let σ be the counterclockwise semicircle formed by the segment S of the real axis
from −R to R, followed by the circular arc T of radius R in the upper half plane from R to −R,
where R > 1. We shall integrate the function
f(z) =
1
z
2
+ 1
=
1/(z +i)
z −i
=
g(z)
z −i
, where g(z) =
1
z +i
Since g(z) is holomorphic inside and on σ and i is inside σ, we can apply Cauchy’s formula:
1
2πi

σ
dz
z
2
+ 1
=
1
2πi

σ
g(z)
z −i
dz = g(i) =
1
i +i
=
1
2i
,
3
For more information about Joseph Liouville (1809–1882), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Liouville.html.
4
This theorem is for historical reasons erroneously attributed to Liouville. It was published earlier by Cauchy; in
fact, Gauß may well have known about it before Cauchy.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 60
and so

S
dz
z
2
+ 1
+

T
dz
z
2
+ 1
=

σ
dz
z
2
+ 1
= 2πi ·
1
2i
= π. (∗∗)
Now this formula holds for all R > 1, so we can take the limit as R → ∞. First,

z
2
+ 1


1
2
|z|
2
for large enough z by Lemma 5.6, so we can bound the integral over T using Proposition 4.4(d):

T
dz
z
2
+ 1


2
R
2
· πR =
2
R
and this has limit 0 as R →∞. On the other hand, we can parameterize the integral over S using
z = t, −R ≤ t ≤ R, obtaining

S
dz
z
2
+ 1
=

R
−R
dt
1 +t
2
.
As R → ∞ this approaches an improper integral. Making these observations in the limit of the
formula (∗∗) as R →∞ now produces


−∞
dt
t
2
+ 1
= π.
Of course this integral can be evaluated almost as easily using standard formulas from calculus.
However, just a slight modification of this example leads to an improper integral which is far beyond
the scope of basic calculus; see Exercise 13.
5.3 Antiderivatives
We begin this section with a familiar definition from real calculus:
Definition 5.11. Let G be a region of C. For any functions f, F : G →C, if F is holomorphic on
G and F

(z) = f(z) for all z ∈ G, then F is an antiderivative of f on G, also known as a primitive
of f on G.
In short, an antiderivative of f is a function with F

= f.
Example 5.12. We have already seen that F(z) = z
2
is entire, and has derivative f(z) = 2z.
Thus, F is an antiderivative of f on any region G.
Just like in the real case, there are complex versions of the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus.
the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus makes a number of important claims: that continuous func-
tions are integrable, their antiderivatives are continuous and differentiable, and that antiderivatives
provide easy ways to compute values of definite integrals. The difference between the real case
and the complex case is that for the complex case, we need to think about integrals over arbitrary
curves in 2-dimensional regions.
To state the first Fundamental Theorem, we need some topological definitions:
Definition 5.13. A region G ⊂ C is simply connected if every simply closed curve in G is G-
contractible. That is, for any simple closed curve γ ⊂ G, the interior of γ in C is also completely
contained in G.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 61
Loosely, simply connected means G has no ‘holes’.
Theorem 5.14. [The First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus] Suppose G ⊆ C is a simply-
connected region, and fix some basepoint z
0
∈ G. For each point z ∈ G, let γ
z
denote a smooth curve
in G from z
0
to z. Let f : G → C be a holomorphic function. Then the function F(z) : G → C
defined by
F(z) :=

γz
f
is holomorphic on G with F

(z) = f(z).
In short, every holomorphic function on a simply-connected region has a primitive.
Proof. We leave this to the exercises, Exercise 14.
Theorem 5.15. [The Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus] Suppose G ⊆ C is a simply
connected region. Let γ ⊂ G be a smooth curve with parametrization γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b. If f : G →C
is holomorphic on G and F is any primitive of f on G, then

γ
f = F (γ(b)) −F (γ(a)) .
Remarks. 1. Actually, more is true. The assumptions that G is simply connected and f is holo-
morphic are both unnecessary.
Proof. The antiderivative F prescribed by the First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus satisfies the
desired equation by definition. For any other antiderivative
˜
F of f, we have that F

(z) =
˜
F

(z) for
z ∈
˜
F, so the function H(z) := F(z) −
˜
F(z) is holomorphic with derivative 0, so is constant. Thus,
˜
F(z) = F(z) +c for some constant c ∈ C. Then
˜
F(γ(b)) −
˜
F(γ(a)) = F(γ(b)) −F(γ(a)) =

γ
f,
as desired.
There are many interesting consequences of the Fundamental Theorems. One consequence
comes from the proof of Theorem 5.14: we will not really need the fact that every closed curve in
G is contractible, just that every closed curve gives a zero integral for f. This fact can be exploited
to give a sort of converse statement to Corollary 4.7.
Corollary 5.16 (Morera’s
5
Theorem). Suppose f is continuous in the region G and

γ
f = 0
for all smooth closed paths γ ⊂ G. Then f is holomorphic in G.
5
For more information about Giancinto Morera (1856–1907), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Morera.html.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 62
Proof. As in the proof of Theorem 5.14, we fix an z
0
∈ G and define
F(z) =

γz
f ,
where γ
z
is any smooth curve in G from z
0
to z. As above, this is a well-defined function because
all closed paths give a zero integral for f; and exactly as in Exercise 14 we can show that F is a
primitive for f in G. Because F is holomorphic on G, Corollary 5.2 gives that f is also holomorphic
on G.
We now mention two interesting corollaries of the Second Fundamental Theorem.
Corollary 5.17. If f is holomorphic on G, then an antiderivative of f exists on G, and

γ
f is
independent of the path γ ⊂ G between γ(a) and γ(b).
If f is holomorphic on G, we say

γ
f is path-independent.
Example 4.2 shows that a path-independent integral is quite special; it also says that the
function z
2
does not have an antiderivative in, for example, the region {z ∈ C : |z| < 2}. (Actually,
the function z
2
does not have an antiderivative in any nonempty region—prove it!)
In the special case that γ is closed (that is, γ(a) = γ(b)), we immediately get the following nice
consequence (which also follows from Cauchy’s Integral Formula).
Corollary 5.18. Suppose G ⊆ C is open, γ is a smooth closed curve in G, and f is holomorphic
on G and has an antiderivative on G. Then

γ
f = 0 .
Exercises
1. Compute the following integrals, where C is the boundary of the square with corners at
±4 ±4i:
(a)

C
e
z
z
3
dz.
(b)

C
e
z
(z −πi)
2
dz.
(c)

C
sin(2z)
(z −π)
2
dz.
(d)

C
e
z
cos(z)
(z −π)
3
dz.
2. Prove the formula for f
′′
in Theorem 5.1.
3. Integrate the following functions over the circle |z| = 3, oriented counterclockwise:
(a) Log(z −4i).
(b)
1
z−
1
2
.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 63
(c)
1
z
2
−4
.
(d)
exp z
z
3
.
(e)

cos z
z

2
.
(f) i
z−3
.
(g)
sinz
(z
2
+
1
2
)
2
.
(h)
exp z
(z−w)
2
, where w is any fixed complex number with |w| = 3.
(i)
1
(z+4)(z
2
+1)
.
4. Evaluate

|z|=3
e
2z
dz
(z−1)
2
(z−2)
.
5. Prove that

γ
z exp

z
2

dz = 0 for any closed curve γ.
6. Show that exp(sin z) has an antiderivative on C.
7. Find a (maximal size) set on which f(z) = exp

1
z

has an antiderivative. (How does this
compare with the real function f(x) = e
1/x
?)
8. Compute the following integrals; use the principal value of z
i
. (Hint: one of these integrals
is considerably easier than the other.)
(a)

γ
1
z
i
dz where γ
1
(t) = e
it
, −
π
2
≤ t ≤
π
2
.
(b)

γ
2
z
i
dz where γ
2
(t) = e
it
,
π
2
≤ t ≤

2
.
9. Suppose f is continuous on C and lim
z→∞
f(z) = 0. Show that f is bounded. (Hint: From
the definition of limit at infinity (with ǫ = 1) there is R > 0 so that |f(z) −0| = |f| (z) < 1
if |z| > R. Is f bounded for |z| ≤ R?)
10. Let p be a polynomial of degree n > 0. Prove that there exist complex numbers c, z
1
, z
2
, . . . , z
k
and positive integers j
1
, . . . , j
k
such that
p(z) = c (z −z
1
)
j
1
(z −z
2
)
j
2
· · · (z −z
k
)
j
k
,
where j
1
+· · · +j
k
= n.
11. Show that a polynomial of odd degree with real coefficients must have a real zero. (Hint:
Exercise 21b in Chapter 1.)
12. Suppose f is entire and there exist constants a, b such that |f(z)| ≤ a|z| + b for all z ∈ C.
Prove that f is a linear polynomial (that is, of degree ≤ 1).
13. In this problem F(z) =
e
iz
z
2
+1
and R > 1. Modify the example at the end of Section 5.2:
(a) Show that

σ
F(z) dz =
π
e
if σ is the counterclockwise semicircle formed by the segment
S of the real axis from −R to R, followed by the circular arc T of radius R in the upper
half plane from R to −R.
CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 64
(b) Show that

e
iz

≤ 1 for z in the upper half plane, and conclude that |F(z)| ≤
2
|z|
2
for z
large enough.
(c) Show that lim
R→∞

T
F(z) dz = 0, and hence lim
R→∞

S
F(z) dz =
π
e
.
(d) Conclude, by parameterizing the integral over S in terms of t and just considering the
real part, that


−∞
cos(t)
t
2
+1
dt =
π
e
.
14. Prove Theorem 5.14, as follows.
(a) Use Cauchy’s Theorem to show that, for a given z ∈ G, the value of F(z) is independent
of the choice of γ
z
.
(b) Fix z, z

∈ G such that the straight line γ connecting z to z

is contained in G. Again
using Cauchy’s Theorem, show that
F(z

) −F(z) =

γ
f.
(c) Use the fact that f is continuous to show that for any fixed z ∈ C and any ǫ > 0, there
is a ∆z ∈ C such that

F(z) −F(z + ∆z)
∆z
−f(z)

< ǫ.
(d) Conclude that F

(z) = f(z).
15. Prove Corollary 5.17.
16. Prove Corollary 5.18.
Chapter 6
Harmonic Functions
The shortest route between two truths in the real domain passes through the complex domain.
J. Hadamard
6.1 Definition and Basic Properties
We will now spend a chapter on certain functions defined on subsets of the complex plane which
are real valued. The main motivation for studying them is that the partial differential equation
they satisfy is very common in the physical sciences.
Recall from Section 2.4 the definition of a harmonic function:
Definition 6.1. Let G ⊆ C be a region. A function u : G →R is harmonic in G if it has continuous
second partials in G and satisfies the Laplace
1
equation
u
xx
+u
yy
= 0
in G.
There are (at least) two reasons why harmonic functions are part of the study of complex
analysis, and they can be found in the next two theorems.
Proposition 6.2. Suppose f = u+iv is holomorphic in the region G. Then u and v are harmonic
in G.
Proof. First, by Corollary 5.2, f is infinitely differentiable, and hence so are u and v. In particular,
u and v have continuous second partials. By Theorem 2.15, u and v satisfy the Cauchy–Riemann
equations
u
x
= v
y
and u
y
= −v
x
in G. Hence
u
xx
+u
yy
= (u
x
)
x
+ (u
y
)
y
= (v
y
)
x
+ (−v
x
)
y
= v
yx
−v
xy
= 0
in G. Note that in the last step we used the fact that v has continuous second partials. The proof
that v satisfies the Laplace equation is completely analogous.
1
For more information about Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Laplace.html.
65
CHAPTER 6. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 66
Proposition 6.2 shouts for a converse theorem. There are, however, functions which are harmonic
in a region G but not the real part (say) of an holomorphic function in G (Exercise 3). We do
obtain a converse of Proposition 6.2 if we restrict ourselves to simply connected regions.
Theorem 6.3. Suppose u is harmonic on the simply connected region G. Then there exists a
harmonic function v such that f = u +iv is holomorphic in G.
Remark. The function v is called a harmonic conjugate of u.
Proof. We will explicitly construct the holomorphic function f (and thus v = Imf). First, let
g = u
x
−iu
y
.
The plan is to prove that g is holomorphic, and then to construct an antiderivative of g, which will
be almost the function f that we’re after. To prove that g is holomorphic, we use Theorem 2.15:
first because u is harmonic, Re g = u
x
and Img = −u
y
have continuous partials. Moreover, again
because u is harmonic, they satisfy the Cauchy–Riemann equations:
(Re g)
x
= u
xx
= −u
yy
= (Img)
y
and
(Re g)
y
= u
xy
= u
yx
= −(Img)
x
.
Now that we know that g is holomorphic in G, we can use Theorem 5.14 to obtain a primitive
h of g on G. (Note that for the application of this theorem we need the fact that G is simply
connected.) Suppose we decompose h into its real and imaginary parts as h = a +ib. Then, again
using Theorem 2.15,
g = h

= a
x
+ib
x
= a
x
−ia
y
.
(The second equation follows with the Cauchy–Riemann equations.) But the real part of g is u
x
,
so that we obtain u
x
= a
x
or u(x, y) = a(x, y) + c(y) for some function c which only depends
on y. On the other hand, comparing the imaginary parts of g and h

yields −u
y
= −a
y
or
u(x, y) = a(x, y) +c(x), and c depends only on x. Hence c has to be constant, and u = a +c. But
then
f = h −c
is a function holomorphic in G whose real part is u, as promised.
Remark. In hindsight, it should not be surprising that the function g which we first constructed is
the derivative of the sought-after function f. Namely, by Theorem 2.15 such a function f = u +iv
must satisfy
f

= u
x
+iv
x
= u
x
−iu
y
.
(The second equation follows with the Cauchy–Riemann equations.) It is also worth mentioning
that the proof shows that if u is harmonic in G then u
x
is the real part of a function holomorphic
in G regardless whether G is simply connected or not.
As one might imagine, the two theorems we’ve just proved allow for a powerful interplay between
harmonic and holomorphic functions. In that spirit, the following theorem might appear not too
surprising. It is, however, a very strong result, which one might appreciate better when looking
back at the simple definition of harmonic functions.
CHAPTER 6. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 67
Corollary 6.4. A harmonic function is infinitely differentiable.
Proof. Suppose u is harmonic in G. Fix z
0
∈ G and r > 0 such that the disk
D = {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < r}
is contained in G. D is simply connected, so by the last theorem, there exists a function f holo-
morphic in D such that u = Re f on D. By Corollary 5.2, f is infinitely differentiable on D, and
hence so is its real part u. Because z
0
∈ D, we showed that u is infinitely differentiable at z
0
, and
because z
0
was chosen arbitrarily, we proved the statement.
Remark. This is the first in a series of proofs which uses the fact that the property of being harmonic
is a local property—it is a property at each point of a certain region. Note that we did not construct
a function f which is holomorphic in G but we only constructed such a function on the disk D.
This f might very well differ from one disk to the next.
6.2 Mean-Value and Maximum/Minimum Principle
The following identity is the harmonic analog of Cauchy’s integral formula, Theorem 4.10.
Theorem 6.5. Suppose u is harmonic in the region G, and {z ∈ C : |z −w| ≤ r} ⊂ G. Then
u(w) =
1


0
u

w +re
it

dt .
Proof. The disk D = {z ∈ C : |z − w| ≤ r} is simply connected, so by Theorem 6.3 there is a
function f holomorphic on D such that u = Re f on D. Now we apply Corollary 4.12 to f:
f(w) =
1


0
f

w +re
it

dt .
The statement follows by taking the real part on both sides.
Theorem 6.5 states that harmonic functions have the mean-value property. The following result
is a fairly straightforward consequence of this property. The function u : G ⊂ C →R has a strong
relative maximum at w if there exists a disk D = {z ∈ C : |z −w| < R} ⊂ G such that u(z) ≤ u(w)
for all z ∈ D and u(z
0
) < u(w) for some z
0
∈ D. The definition of a strong relative minimum is
completely analogous.
Theorem 6.6. If u is harmonic in the region G, then it does not have a strong relative maximum
or minimum in G.
Proof. Assume (by way of contradiction) that w is a strong local maximum of u in G. Then there
is a disk in G centered at w containing a point z
0
with u(z
0
) < u(w). Suppose |z
0
−w| = r; we
apply Theorem 6.5 with this r:
u(w) =
1


0
u

w +re
it

dt .
CHAPTER 6. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 68
Figure 6.1: Proof of Theorem 6.6.
Intuitively, this cannot hold, because some of the function values we’re integrating are smaller than
u(w), contradicting the mean-value property. To make this into a thorough argument, suppose
that z
0
= w + re
it
0
for 0 ≤ t
0
< 2π. Because u(z
0
) < u(w) and u is continuous, there is a whole
interval of parameters, say t
0
≤ t < t
1
, such that u

w +re
it

< u(w).
Now we split up the mean-value integral:
u(w) =
1


0
u

w +re
it

dt
=
1

t
0
0
u

w +re
it

dt +

t
1
t
0
u

w +re
it

dt +


t
1
u

w +re
it

dt

All the integrands can be bounded by u(w), for the middle integral we get a strict inequality. Hence
u(w) <
1

t
0
0
u(w) dt +

t
1
t
0
u(w) dt +


t
1
u(w) dt

= u(w) ,
a contradiction. The same argument works if we assume that u has a relative minimum. But in this
case there’s actually a short cut: if u has a strong relative minimum then the harmonic function
−u has a strong relative maximum, which we just showed cannot exist.
A look into the (not so distant) future. We will see in Corollary 8.11 a variation of this theorem for
a weak relative maximum w, in the sense that there exists a disk D = {z ∈ C : |z −w| < R} ⊂ G
such that all z ∈ D satisfy u(z) ≤ u(w). Corollary 8.11 says that if u is harmonic in the region
G, then it does not have a weak relative maximum or minimum in G. A special yet important
case of the above maximum/minimum principle is obtained when considering bounded regions.
Corollary 8.11 implies that if u is harmonic in the closure of the bounded region G then
max
z∈G
u(z) = max
z∈∂G
u(z) and min
z∈G
u(z) = min
z∈∂G
u(z) .
(Here ∂G denotes the boundary of G.) We’ll exploit this fact in the next two corollaries.
Corollary 6.7. Suppose u is harmonic in the closure of the bounded region G. If u is zero on ∂G
then u is zero in G.
CHAPTER 6. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 69
Proof. By the remark we just made
u(z) ≤ max
z∈G
u(z) = max
z∈∂G
u(z) = max
z∈∂G
0 = 0
and
u(z) ≥ min
z∈G
u(z) = min
z∈∂G
u(z) = min
z∈∂G
0 = 0 ,
so u has to be zero in G.
Corollary 6.8. If two harmonic functions agree on the boundary of a bounded region then they
agree in the region.
Proof. Suppose u and v are harmonic in G∪∂G and they agree on ∂G. Then u−v is also harmonic
in G∪ ∂G (Exercise 2) and u −v is zero on ∂G. Now apply the previous corollary.
The last corollary states that if we know a harmonic function on the boundary of some region
then we know it inside the region. One should remark, however, that this result is of a completely
theoretical nature: it says nothing about how to extend a function given on the boundary of a
region to the full region. This problem is called the Dirichlet
2
problem and has a solution for all
simply-connected regions. There is a fairly simple formula (involving the so-called Poisson
3
kernel )
if the region in question is a disk; for other regions one needs to find a conformal map to the unit
disk. All of this is beyond the scope of these notes, we just remark that Corollary 6.8 says that the
solution to the Dirichlet problem is unique.
Exercises
1. Show that all partial derivatives of a harmonic function are harmonic.
2. Suppose u and v are harmonic, and c ∈ R. Prove that u +cv is also harmonic.
3. Consider u(z) = u(x, y) = ln

x
2
+y
2

.
(a) Show that u is harmonic in C \ {0}.
(b) Prove that u is not the real part of a function which is holomorphic in C \ {0}.
4. Let u(x, y) = e
x
siny.
(a) Show that u is harmonic on C.
(b) Find an entire function f such that Re(f) = u.
5. Is it possible to find a real function v so that x
3
+y
3
+iv is holomorphic?
2
For more information about Johann Peter Gustav Dirichlet (1805–1859), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Dirichlet.html.
3
For more information about Sim´eon Denis Poisson (1781–1840), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Poisson.html.
Chapter 7
Power Series
It is a pain to think about convergence but sometimes you really have to.
Sinai Robins
7.1 Sequences and Completeness
As in the real case (and there will be no surprises in this chapter of the nature ‘real versus complex’),
a (complex) sequence is a function from the positive (sometimes the nonnegative) integers to the
complex numbers. Its values are usually denoted by a
n
(as opposed to, say, a(n)) and we commonly
denote the sequence by (a
n
)

n=1
, (a
n
)
n≥1
, or simply (a
n
). The notion of convergence of a sequence
is based on the following sibling of Definition 2.1.
Definition 7.1. Suppose (a
n
) is a sequence and a ∈ C such that for all ǫ > 0, there is an integer
N such that for all n ≥ N, we have |a
n
−a| < ǫ. Then the sequence (a
n
) is convergent and a is its
limit, in symbols
lim
n→∞
a
n
= a .
If no such a exists then the sequence (a
n
) is divergent.
Example 7.2. lim
n→∞
i
n
n
= 0: Given ǫ > 0, choose N > 1/ǫ. Then for any n ≥ N,

i
n
n
−0

=

i
n
n

=
|i|
n
n
=
1
n

1
N
< ǫ .
Example 7.3. The sequence (a
n
= i
n
) diverges: Given a ∈ C, choose ǫ = 1/2. We consider two
cases: If Re a ≥ 0, then for any N, choose n ≥ N such that a
n
= −1. (This is always possible since
a
4k+2
= i
4k+2
= −1 for any k ≥ 0.) Then
|a −a
n
| = |a + 1| ≥ 1 >
1
2
.
If Re a < 0, then for any N, choose n ≥ N such that a
n
= 1. (This is always possible since
a
4k
= i
4k
= 1 for any k > 0.) Then
|a −a
n
| = |a −1| ≥ 1 >
1
2
.
70
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 71
The following limit laws are the relatives of the identities stated in Lemma 2.4.
Lemma 7.4. Let (a
n
) and (b
n
) be convergent sequences and c ∈ C.
(a) lim
n→∞
a
n
+c lim
n→∞
b
n
= lim
n→∞
(a
n
+c b
n
) .
(b) lim
n→∞
a
n
· lim
n→∞
b
n
= lim
n→∞
(a
n
· b
n
) .
(c)
lim
n→∞
a
n
lim
n→∞
b
n
= lim
n→∞

a
n
b
n

.
In the quotient law we have to make sure we do not divide by zero.
If f is continuous at a then
lim
n→∞
f(a
n
) = f(a) if lim
n→∞
a
n
= a ,
where we require that a
n
be in the domain of f.
The most important property of the real number system is that we can, in many cases, determine
that a sequence converges without knowing the value of the limit. In this sense we can use the
sequence to define a real number.
Definition 7.5. A Cauchy sequence is a sequence (a
n
) such that
lim
n→∞
|a
n+1
−a
n
| = 0.
We say a metric space X (which for us means Z, Q, R, or C) is complete if, for any Cauchy sequence
(a
n
) in X, there is some a ∈ X such that lim
n→∞
a
n
= a.
In other words, completeness means Cauchy sequences are guaranteed to converge. For example,
the rational numbers are not complete: we can take a Cauchy sequence of rational numbers getting
arbitrarily close to

2, which is not a rational number. However, each of Z, R, and C is complete.
It is the completeness of the reals that allows us to know sequences converge without knowing their
limits.
We will assume that the reals are complete as an axiom. There are many equivalent ways of
formulating the completeness property for the reals, including:
Axiom (Monotone Sequence Property). Any bounded monotone sequence converges.
Notice that the Monotone Sequence Property implies the Least Upper Bound Property, which
states that every non-empty set of real numbers with an upper bound in fact has a supremum, or
least upper bound.
Remember that a sequence is monotone if it is either non-decreasing (x
n+1
≥ x
n
) or non-
increasing (x
n+1
≤ x
n
).
Example 7.6. If 0 ≤ r < 1 then lim
n→∞
r
n
= 0: First, the sequence converges because it
is decreasing and bounded below by 0. If the limit is L then, using the laws of limits, we get
L = lim
n→∞
r
n
= lim
n→∞
r
n+1
= r lim
n→∞
r
n
= rL. From L = rL we get (1 − r)L = 0, so L = 0
since 1 −r = 0
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 72
The following is a consequence of the Monotone Sequence Property (via the Least Upper Bound
Property), although it is often listed as a separate axiom:
Theorem 7.7 (Archimedean
1
Property). If x is any real number then there is an integer N which
is greater than x.
This essentially says that there are no infinities in the reals. Notice that this was already
used in Example 7.2. For a proof see Exercise 5. It is interesting to see that the Archimedean
principle underlies the construction of an infinite decimal expansion for any real number, while the
monotone sequence property shows that any such infinite decimal expansion actually converges to
a real number.
We close this discussion of limits with a pair of standard limits. The first of these can be
established by calculus methods (like L’Hospital’s rule, by treating n as the variable); both of them
can be proved by more elementary considerations.
Lemma 7.8. (a) Exponentials beat polynomials: for any polynomial p(n) and any b ∈ R with
|b| > 1, lim
n→∞
p(n)
b
n
= 0.
(b) Factorials beat exponentials: for any a ∈ R, lim
n→∞
a
n
n!
= 0.
Note this lemma also works for a, b ∈ C.
7.2 Series
A series is a sequence (a
n
) whose members are of the form a
n
=
¸
n
k=1
b
k
(or a
n
=
¸
n
k=0
b
k
); here
(b
k
) is the sequence of terms of the series. The a
n
=
¸
n
k=1
b
k
(or a
n
=
¸
n
k=0
b
k
) are the partial
sums of the series. If we wanted to be lazy we would define convergence of a series simply by
refering to convergence of the partial sums of the series – after all, we just defined series through
sequences. However, there are some convergence features which take on special appearances for
series, so we should mention them here explicitly. For starters, a series converges to the limit (or
sum) a by definition if
lim
n→∞
a
n
= lim
n→∞
n
¸
k=1
b
k
= a .
To express this in terms of Definition 7.1, for any ǫ > 0 we have to find an N such that for all
n ≥ N

n
¸
k=1
b
k
−a

< ǫ .
In the case of a convergent series, we usually express its limit as a =
¸

k=1
b
k
or a =
¸
k≥1
b
k
.
1
For more on Archimedes, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archimedes. Archimedes attributes this property
to Euxodus. For more on Euxodus, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euxodus.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 73
Example 7.9. Occasionally we can find the limit of a sequence by manipulating the partial sums:
¸
k≥1
1
k(k + 1)
= lim
n→∞
n
¸
k=1

1
k

1
k + 1

= lim
n→∞
¸
1 −
1
2

+

1
2

1
3

+

1
3

1
4

+· · · +

1
n

1
n + 1

= lim
n→∞
¸
1 −
1
2
+
1
2

1
3
+
1
3

1
4
+· · · +
1
n

1
n + 1

= lim
n→∞
¸
1 −
1
n + 1

= 1.
A series where most of the terms cancel like this is called a telescoping series.
Most of the time we need to use the completeness property to check convergence of a series,
and it is fortunate that the monotone sequence property has a very convenient translation into the
language of series of real numbers. The partial sums of a series form a nondecreasing sequence if
the terms of the series are nonnegative, and this observation immediately yields:
Lemma 7.10. If b
k
are nonnegative real numbers then
¸

k=1
b
k
converges if and only if the partial
sums are bounded.
If b
k
are nonnegative real numbers and the partial sums of the series
¸

k=1
b
k
are unbounded
then the partial sums “converge” to infinity, so we can write
¸

k=1
b
k
= ∞. Using this terminology,
we can rephrase Lemma 7.10 to say:
¸

k=1
b
k
converges in the reals if and only if it is finite.
We have already used the simple fact that convergence of a sequence (a
n
) is equivalent to the
convergence of (a
n−1
), and both of these sequences have the same limit. If a
n
is the n
th
partial
sum of the series
¸
k≥1
b
k
then a
n
= a
n−1
+b
n
. From this we conclude:
Lemma 7.11. If
¸
k≥1
b
k
converges then lim
n→∞
b
n
= 0.
The contrapositive of this lemma is often used, and is called the Test for Divergence:
Lemma 7.12 (Test for Divergenge). If lim
n→∞
b
n
= 0, then
¸
k≥1
b
k
diverges.
A common mistake is to try to use the converse of this lemma, but the converse is false:
Example 7.13. The harmonic series
¸
k≥1
1
k
diverges (even though the limit of the general term
is 0): If we assume the series converges, say to L, then we have
L = 1 +
1
2
+
1
3
+
1
4
+. . .
=

1 +
1
3
+
1
5
+. . .

+

1
2
+
1
4
+
1
6
+. . .

>

1
2
+
1
4
+
1
6
+. . .

+

1
2
+
1
4
+
1
6
+. . .

=
1
2

1 +
1
2
+
1
3
+
1
4
+. . .

+
1
2

1 +
1
2
+
1
3
+
1
4
+. . .

=
1
2
L +
1
2
L = L.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 74
Here the inequality comes from
1
k
>
1
k+1
applied to each term in the first sum in parentheses.
But now we have L > L, which is impossible.
There is one notion of convergence that’s special to series: we say that
¸
k≥1
c
k
converges
absolutely if
¸
k≥1
|c
k
| < ∞. Be careful: We are defining the phrase “converges absolutely,” but
this definition does not say anything about convergence of the series
¸
k≥1
c
k
; we need a proof:
Theorem 7.14. If a series converges absolutely then it converges.
Proof. First consider the case when the terms c
k
are real. Define c
+
k
to be c
k
if c
k
≥ 0, or 0 if
c
k
< 0. Then c
+
k
≥ 0 and
¸
k≥1
c
+
k

¸
k≥1
|c
k
| < ∞ so
¸
k≥1
c
+
k
converges; let P be its limit.
Similarly, define c

k
to be −c
k
if c
k
≤ 0, or 0 if c
k
> 0. Then c

k
≥ 0 and
¸
k≥1
c

k

¸
k≥1
|c
k
| < ∞
so
¸
k≥1
c

k
converges; let N be its limit. Since c
k
= c
+
k
− c

k
we see that
¸
k≥1
c
k
converges to
P −N.
In case c
k
is complex, write c
k
= a
k
+ib
k
where a
k
and b
k
are real. Then
¸
k≥1
|a
k
| ≤
¸
k≥1
|c
k
| <
∞ and
¸
k≥1
|b
k
| ≤
¸
k≥1
|c
k
| < ∞. By what we just proved, both
¸
k≥1
a
k
and
¸
k≥1
b
k
converge
to real numbers, say, A and B. But then
¸
k≥1
c
k
converges to A+iB.
Another common mistake is to try to use the converse of this theorem, but the converse is false:
Example 7.15. The alternating harmonic series
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k+1
k
converges, but not absolutely: This
series does not converge absolutely, according to the previous example. To see that it does converge,
rewrite it as follows:
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k+1
k
= 1 −
1
2
+
1
3

1
4
+
1
5

1
6
+. . .
=

1 −
1
2

+

1
3

1
4

+

1
5

1
6

+. . .
(Technically, there is a small detail to be checked here, since we are effectively ignoring half the
partial sums of the original series. See Exercise 14.) The reader can verify the inequality 2k(2k−1) ≥
k(k + 1) for k > 1, so the general term satisfies
1
2k −1

1
2k
=
1
2k(2k −1)

1
k(k + 1)
,
so the series converges by comparison with the telescoping series of Example 7.9.
For the rest of this book we shall be concerned almost exclusively with series which converge
absolutely. Hence checking convergence of a series is usually a matter of verifying that a series
of nonnegative reals is finite. We have already used the technique of comparing a series to a
series which is known to converge; this is often called a “comparison test.” Some variants of the
comparison test will appear when we look at power series. One handy test is the following:
Lemma 7.16 (Integral Test). Suppose f is a non-increasing, positive function defined on [1, ∞).
Then


1
f(t) dt ≤

¸
k=1
f(k) ≤ f(1) +


1
f(t) dt
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 75
This is immediate from a picture: the integral of f(t) on the interval [k, k + 1] is bounded
between f(k) and f(k +1). Adding the pieces gives the inequalities above for the N
th
partial sum
versus the integrals from 1 to N and from 1 to N + 1, and the inequality persists in the limit.
Example 7.17.
¸
k≥1
1
k
p
converges if p > 1 and diverges if p ≤ 1.
To summarize, when testing the convergence of a series we have: the Test for Divergence, the
Comparison Test, and the Integral Test, as well as three related tests from calculus: the Limit
Comparison Test, the Root Test, and the Ratio Test.
7.3 Sequences and Series of Functions
The fun starts when one studies sequences (f
n
) of functions f
n
. We say that such a sequence
converges at z
0
if the sequence (of complex numbers) (f
n
(z
0
)) converges. If a sequence of functions,
(f
n
), converges at all z in some subset G ⊆ C then we say that (f
n
) converges pointwise on G. So
far nothing new; but this notion of convergence does not really catch the spirit of the function as
a whole.
Definition 7.18. Suppose (f
n
) and f are functions defined on G ⊆ C. If for all ǫ > 0 there is an
N such that for all z ∈ G and for all n ≥ N we have
|f
n
(z) −f(z)| < ǫ
then (f
n
) converges uniformly in G to f.
What’s the big deal about uniform versus pointwise convergence? It is easiest to describe
the difference with the use of quantifiers, namely ∀ denoting “for all” and ∃ denoting “there is.”
Pointwise convergence on G means
(∀ ǫ > 0) (∀ z ∈ G) (∃ N : n ≥ N ⇒ |f
n
(z) −f(z)| < ǫ) ,
whereas uniform convergence on G translates into
(∀ ǫ > 0) (∃ N : (∀ z ∈ G) n ≥ N ⇒ |f
n
(z) −f(z)| < ǫ) .
No big deal—we only exchanged two of the quantifiers. In the first case, N may well depend on
z, in the second case we need to find an N which works for all z ∈ G. And this can make all the
difference . . .
The first example illustrating this difference says in essence that if we have a sequence of
functions (f
n
) which converges uniformly on G then for all z
0
∈ G
lim
n→∞
lim
z→z
0
f
n
(z) = lim
z→z
0
lim
n→∞
f
n
(z) .
We will need similar interchanges of limits constantly.
Proposition 7.19. Suppose (f
n
) is a sequence of continuous functions on the region G converging
uniformly to f on G. Then f is continuous on G.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 76
Proof. Let z
0
∈ G; we will prove that f is continuous at z
0
. By uniform convergence, given ǫ > 0,
there is an N such that for all z ∈ G and all n ≥ N
|f
n
(z) −f(z)| <
ǫ
3
.
Now we make use of the continuity of the f
n
’s. This means that given (the same) ǫ > 0, there is a
δ > 0 such that whenever |z −z
0
| < δ we have
|f
n
(z) −f
n
(z
0
)| <
ǫ
3
.
All that’s left is putting those two inequalities together: by the triangle inequality
|f(z) −f(z
0
)| = |f(z) −f
n
(z) +f
n
(z) −f
n
(z
0
) +f
n
(z
0
) −f(z
0
)|
≤ |f(z) −f
n
(z)| +|f
n
(z) −f
n
(z
0
)| +|f
n
(z
0
) −f(z
0
)|
< ǫ ,
that is, f is continuous at z
0
.
Once we know the above result about continuity, we can ask about integration of series of
functions. The next theorem should come as no surprise, however, its consequences (which we will
only see in the next chapter) are wide ranging.
Proposition 7.20. Suppose f
n
are continuous on the smooth curve γ and converge uniformly on
γ to f. Then
lim
n→∞

γ
f
n
=

γ
f .
Proof. By Proposition 4.4(d), we can estimate

γ
f
n

γ
f

=

γ
f
n
−f

≤ max
z∈γ
|f
n
(z) −f(z)| length(γ) .
But f
n
→f uniformly on γ, and we can make max
z∈γ
|f
n
(z) −f(z)| as small as we like.
Since uniform convergence is often of critical importance, we give two practical tests: one
arguing for uniformity and the other against. They are formulated for sequences that converge to
0. If a sequence g
n
converges to a function g then we can usually apply these tests to f
n
= g −g
n
,
which does converge to 0.
Lemma 7.21. If f
n
is a sequence of functions and M
n
is a sequence of constants so that M
n
converges to 0 and |f
n
(z)| ≤ M
n
for all z in the set G f
n
converges uniformly to 0 on G.
For example, |z
n
| ≤ r
n
if z is in the closed disk
¯
D
r
(0), and r
n
→0 if r < 1, so z
n
→0 uniformly
in
¯
D
r
(0) if r < 1.
Lemma 7.22. If f
n
is a sequence of functions which converges uniformly to 0 on a set G and z
n
is any sequence in G then the sequence f
n
(z
n
) converges to 0.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 77
This is most often used to prove non-uniform convergence. For example, let f
n
(z) = z
n
and let
G be the open unit disk D
1
(0). Then |z| < 1 if z is in G, so |z|
n
→0, and so z
n
→0. However, let
z
n
= exp(−
1
n
). Then z
n
is in G but f
n
(z
n
) = e
−1
so f
n
(z
n
) does not converge to 0. Therefore z
n
does not converge uniformly to 0 on D
1
(0).
All of these notions for sequences of functions go verbatim for series of functions. Here we also
have a notion of absolute convergence (which can be combined with uniform convergence). There
is an important result about series of functions, often called the Weierstraß M-test.
Proposition 7.23. Suppose (f
k
) are continuous on the region G, |f
k
(z)| ≤ M
k
for all z ∈ G, and
¸
k≥1
M
k
converges. Then
¸
k≥1
f
k
converges absolutely and uniformly in G.
Proof. For each fixed z we have
¸
k≥1
|f
k
(z)| ≤
¸
k≥1
M
k
< ∞, so
¸
k≥1
f
k
(z) converges; call the
limit f(z). This defines a function f on G. To see that f
n
converges uniformly to f, suppose ǫ > 0.
Since
¸
k≥1
M
k
converges there is N so that
¸
k>n
M
k
=

¸
k=1
M
k

n
¸
k=1
M
k
< ǫ
for all n > N. Then, for any z in G, if n ≥ N then

f(z) −
n
¸
k=1
f
k
(z)

=

¸
k>n
f
n
(z)


¸
k>n
|f
n
(z)| ≤
¸
k>n
M
k
< ǫ
and this satisfies the definition of uniform convergence.
A good example of the difference between pointwise convergence and uniform convergence can
be seen in the following example.
Example 7.24. For simplicity and so we can draw the appropriate pictures, we restrict our at-
tention to the real axis (using x instead of z), although this example holds for complex-defined
functions. Consider the sequence of functions (f
n
) defined by f
n
(x) := sin
n
(x), on the interval
[0, π]. On this interval, for all n and all x we have 0 ≤ f
n
(x) ≤ 1, with f
n
(x) = 1 if and only if
x = π/2. It follows that, for any fixed x ∈ [0, π], the sequence (f
n
(x)) converges to 1 if x = π/2
or to 0 if x = π/2. Thus, the sequence (f
n
) converges pointwise to the function f defined by
f(x) :=

1 if x = π/2
0 if x = π/2
. Because the functions f
n
are all continuous but f is not, we can already
see by Proposition 7.19 that the convergence must not be uniform. To visualize this, consider
Figure 7.1. Away from x = π/2, pointwise convergence to f is seen by the fact that the functions
f
n
are getting closer and closer to 0. Non-uniform convergence is illustrated by the fact that, as x
gets closer and closer to π/2, the functions f take longer and longer to get to 0.
We end this section by noting that everything we’ve developed here could have been done in
greater generality - for instance, for functions from R
n
or C
n
to R
m
or C
m
.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 78
Figure 7.1: The graph of the functions f
n
(x) := sin
n
(x), showing the difference between pointwise
and uniform convergence.
7.4 Region of Convergence
For the remainder of this chapter (indeed, these lecture notes) we concentrate on some very special
series of functions.
Definition 7.25. A power series centered at z
0
is a series of functions of the form
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
.
The fundamental example of a power series is the geometric series, for which all c
k
= 1.
Lemma 7.26. The geometric series
¸
k≥0
z
k
converges absolutely for |z| < 1 to the function
1/(1 −z). The convergence is uniform on any set of the form { z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r } for any r < 1.
Proof. Fix an r < 1, and let D = { z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r }. We will use Proposition 7.23 with f
k
(z) = z
k
and M
k
= r
k
. Hence the uniform convergence on D of the geometric series will follow if we can
show that
¸
k≥0
r
k
converges. But this is straightforward: the partial sums of this series can be
written as
n
¸
k=0
r
k
= 1 +r +· · · +r
n−1
+r
n
=
1 −r
n+1
1 −r
,
whose limit as n → ∞ exists because r < 1. Hence, by Proposition 7.23, the geometric series
converges absolutely and uniformly on any set of the form {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} with r < 1. Since r
can be chosen arbitrarily close to 1, we have absolute convergence for |z| < 1. It remains to show
that for those z the limit function is 1/(1 −z), which follows by
¸
k≥0
z
k
= lim
n→∞
n
¸
k=0
z
k
= lim
n→∞
1 −z
n+1
1 −z
=
1
1 −z
.
By comparing a general power series to a geometric series we can give a complete description
of its region of convergence.
Theorem 7.27. Any power series
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
has a radius of convergence R. By this we
mean that R is a nonnegative real number, or ∞, satisfying the following.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 79
(a) If r < R then
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
converges absolutely and uniformly on the closed disk
¯
D
r
(z
0
)
of radius r centered at z
0
.
(b) If |z −z
0
| > R then the sequence of terms c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
is unbounded, so
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
does
not converge.
The open disk D
R
(z
0
) in which the power series converges absolutely is the region of convergence.
(If R = ∞ then D
R
(z
0
) is the entire complex plane, and if R = 0 then D
R
(z
0
) is the empty set.)
By way of Proposition 7.19, this theorem immediately implies the following.
Corollary 7.28. Suppose the power series
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
has radius of convergence R. Then
the series represents a function which is continuous on D
R
(z
0
).
While we’re at it, we might as well state what Proposition 7.20 implies for power series.
Corollary 7.29. Suppose the power series
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
has radius of convergence R and γ is
a smooth curve in D
R
(z
0
). Then

γ
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
dz =
¸
k≥0
c
k

γ
(z −z
0
)
k
dz .
In particular, if γ is closed then

γ
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
dz = 0.
Proof of Theorem 7.27. Define C to be the set of positive real numbers for which the series
¸
k≥0
c
k
t
k
converges, and define D to be the set of positive real numbers for which it diverges. Clearly every
positive real number is in either C or D, and these sets are disjoint. First we establish three facts
about these sets.
(∗) If t ∈ C and r < t then r ∈ C, and
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
converges absolutely and uniformly
on
¯
D
r
(z
0
). To prove this, note that
¸
k≥0
c
k
t
k
converges so c
k
t
k
→ 0 as k → ∞. In particular,
this sequence is bounded, so |c
k
| t
k
≤ M for some constant M. Now if z ∈
¯
D
r
(z
0
) we have

c
k
(z −z
0
)
k

≤ |c
k
| r
k
and
¸
k≥0
|c
k
| r
k
=
¸
k≥0
|c
k
| t
k

r
t

k

¸
k≥0
M

r
t

k
= M
¸
k≥0

r
t

k
=
M
1 −r/t
< ∞.
At the last step we recognized the geometric series, which converges since 0 ≤ r < t, and so
0 ≤ r/t < 1. This shows that r ∈ C, and uniform and absolute convergence on
¯
D
r
(z
0
) follows from
the Weierstraß M-test.
(∗∗) If t ∈ D and r > t then r ∈ D, and
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
diverges on the complement of D
r
(z
0
)
- that is, for |z −z
0
| ≥ r. To prove this, assume that c
k
r
k
is bounded, so |c
k
| r
k
≤ M for some
constant M. But now exactly the same argument as in (∗), but interchanging r and t, shows that
¸
k≥0
c
k
t
k
converges, contradicting the assumption that t is in D.
(∗ ∗ ∗) There is an extended real number R, satisfying 0 ≤ R ≤ ∞, so that 0 < r < R implies
r ∈ C and R < r < ∞ implies r ∈ D. Notice that R = 0 works if C is empty, and R = ∞ works if
D is empty; so we assume neither is empty and we start with a
0
in C and b
0
in D. It is immediate
from (∗) or (∗∗) that a
0
< b
0
. We shall define sequences a
n
in C and b
n
in D which “zero in” on
R. First, let m
0
be the midpoint of the segment [a
0
, b
0
], so m
0
= (a
0
+b
0
)/2. If m
0
lies in C then
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 80
we define a
1
= m
0
and b
1
= b
0
; but if m
0
lies in D then we define a
1
= a
0
and b
1
= m
0
. Note that,
in either case, we have a
0
≤ a
1
< b
1
≤ b
0
, a
1
is in C, and b
1
is in D. Moreover, a
1
and b
1
are closer
together than a
0
and b
0
; in fact, b
1
− a
1
= (b
0
− a
0
)/2. We repeat this procedure to define a
2
and
b
2
within the interval [a
1
, b
1
], and so on. Summarizing, we have
a
n
≤ a
n+1
a
n
∈ C
b
n
≥ b
n+1
b
n
∈ D
a
n
< b
n
b
n
−a
n
= (b
0
−a
0
)/2
n
The sequences a
n
and b
n
are monotone and bounded (by a
0
and b
0
) so they have limits, and these
limits are the same since lim
n→∞
(b
n
−a
n
) = lim
n→∞
(b
0
−a
0
)/2
n
= 0. We define R to be this limit.
If 0 < r < R then r < a
n
for all sufficiently large n, since a
n
converges to R, so r is in C by (∗).
On the other hand, if R < r then b
n
< r for all sufficiently large n, so r is in D by (∗∗). Thus R
verifies the statement (∗ ∗ ∗).
To prove Theorem 7.27, first assume r < R and choose t so that r < t < R. Then t ∈ C by
(∗ ∗ ∗), so part (a) of 7.27 follows from (∗). Similarly, if r = |z −z
0
| > R then choose t so that
R < t < r. Then t ∈ D by (∗ ∗ ∗), so part (b) of 7.27 follows from (∗∗).
It is worth mentioning the following corollary, which reduces the calculation of the radius of
convergence to examining the limiting behavior of the terms of the series.
Corollary 7.30. |c
k
| r
k
→0 for 0 ≤ r < R but |c
k
| r
k
is unbounded for r > R.
Warning: Neither Theorem 7.27 nor Corollary 7.30 says anything about convergence on the
circle |z −z
0
| = R .
Example 7.31. Consider the function f(z) = exp(z). You may recall from calculus that the real-
defined, real-valued function e
x
has an expansion as the power series
¸
k≥0
x
k
k!
. In fact, a similar
expression holds for the complex-defined, complex-valued f(z). Let g(z) =
¸
k≥0
x
k
k!
. Then
g

(z) =
d
dz
¸
k≥0
z
k
k!
=
¸
k≥0
d
dz
x
k
k!
=
¸
k≥1
x
k−1
(k −1)!
=
¸
k≥0
x
k
k!
= g(z).
Thus, g(z) has the correct derivative. The question still remains whether f(z) = g(z) or not. To
see that f(z) = g(z), first note that
1
f(z)
=
1
exp(z)
= exp(−z) = f(−z).
Thus, the function f(−z)g(z) has 0 derivative:
d
dz
[f(−z)g(z)] = −f

(−z)g(z) +f(−z)g

(z) = −f(−z)g(z) +f(−z)g(z) = 0.
This means that
g(z)
f(z)
= f(−z)g(z) = c for some constant c ∈ C. Evaluating at z = 0, we see c = 1,
so g(z) = f(z) as desired.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 81
We use the Ratio Test to determine the radius of convergence. Since

x
k+1
(k + 1)!
·
k!
x
k

=

x
k + 1

=
|x|
k + 1
→0
as k → ∞, the power series converges absolutely for all x. The radius of convergence is R = ∞.
The region of convergence is all of C, the ”disk of radius infinity” about the origin (the center of
the series).
There are many operations we may perform on series. We may add constants and polynomials to
power series. We may rearrange the terms of a series in the case that the series converges absolutely.
That absolute convergence is both necessary and sufficient for rearrangement is left as an exercise.
Thus, we may add two power series together on a common region of convergence and rearrange
their sum to collect coefficients of the same degree together, as the next example demonstrates.
We have seen that we may differentiate and integrate power series. We may also multiply series by
constants, or multiply power series by polynomials. In fact, we may multiply power series together
on their common region of convergence. We leave it as an exercise to determine a formula for
multiplying power series together.
Example 7.32. We can use the power series expansion for exp(z) to find a power series expansion
of the trigonometric functions. For instance, consider f(z) = sin(z). Then
f(z) = sin z =
1
2i

e
iz
−e
−iz

=
1
2i

¸
¸
k≥0
(iz)
k
k!

¸
k≥0
(−iz)
k
k!
¸

=
1
2i
¸
k≥0
1
k!

(iz)
k
−(−1)
k
(iz)
k

=
1
2i
¸
k≥0,k odd
2i
k
z
k
k!
=
1
2i
¸
l≥0
2i
2l+1
z
2l+1
(2l + 1)!
=
¸
l≥0
i
2l+2
z
2l+1
(2l + 1)!
=
¸
l≥0
(−1)
l+1
z
2l+1
(2l + 1)!
= z −
z
3
3!
+
z
5
5!

z
7
7!
+. . . .
Note that we are allowed to rearrange the terms of the two added sums because the corresponding
series have infinite radius of convergence.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 82
Exercises
1. Let (a
n
) be a sequence. A point a is an accumulation point of the sequence if: for every ǫ > 0
and every N ∈ N there exists some n > N such that |a
n
− a| < ǫ. Prove that if a sequence
has more than one accumulation point then the sequence diverges.
2. For each of the sequences, prove convergence/divergence. If the sequence converges, find the
limit.
(a) a
n
= e
iπn/4
.
(b)
(−1)
n
n
.
(c) cos n.
(d) 2 −
in
2
2n
2
+1
.
(e) sin

1
n

.
3. Determine whether each of the following series converges or diverges.
(a)
¸
n≥1

1+i

3

n
(b)
¸
n≥1
n

1
i

n
(c)
¸
n≥1

1+2i

5

n
(d)
¸
n≥1
1
n
3
+i
n
4. Show that the limit of a convergent sequence is unique.
5. Derive the Archimedean Property from the monotone sequence property.
6. Prove:
(a) lim
n→∞
a
n
= a =⇒ lim
n→∞
|a
n
| = |a|.
(b) lim
n→∞
a
n
= 0 ⇐⇒ lim
n→∞
|a
n
| = 0.
7. Prove Lemma 7.8.
8. Prove: (c
n
) converges if and only if (Re c
n
) and (Imc
n
) converge.
9. Prove Lemma 7.4.
10. Prove that Z is complete.
11. Use the fact that R is complete to prove that C is complete.
12. Suppose a
n
≤ b
n
≤ c
n
for all n and lim
n→∞
a
n
= L = lim
n→∞
c
n
. Prove that lim
n→∞
b
n
= L.
This is called the Squeeze Theorem, and is useful in testing a sequence for convergence.
13. Find sup
¸
Re

e
2πit

: t ∈ Q\ Z
¸
.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 83
14. Suppose that the terms c
n
converge to zero, and show that
¸

n=0
c
n
converges if and only if
¸

k=0
(c
2k
+ c
2k+1
) converges. Moreover, if the two series converge then they have the same
limit. Also, give an example where c
n
does not converge to 0 and one series diverges while
the other converges.
15. Prove that the series
¸
k≥1
b
k
converges if and only if lim
n→∞
¸

k=n
b
k
= 0 .
16. (a) Show that
¸
k≥1
1
2
k
= 1. One way to do this is to write
1
2
k
as a difference of powers of
2 so that you get a telescoping series.
(b) Show that
¸
k≥1
k
k
2
+1
diverges. (Hint: compare the general term to
1
2k
.)
(c) Show that
¸
k≥1
k
k
3
+1
converges. (Hint: compare the general term to
1
k
2
.)
17. Discuss the convergence of
¸
k≥0
z
k
for |z| = 1.
18. Prove Lemma 7.21.
19. Prove Lemma 7.22.
20. Where do the following sequences converge pointwise? Do they converge uniformly on this
domain?
(a) (nz
n
) .
(b)

z
n
n

for n > 0.
(c)

1
1+nz

, defined on {z ∈ C : Re z ≥ 0}.
21. Let f
n
(x) = n
2
xe
−nx
.
(a) Show that lim
n→∞
f
n
(x) = 0 for all x ≥ 0. Treat x = 0 as a special case; for x > 0 you
can use L’Hospital’s rule—but remember that n is the variable, not x.
(b) Find lim
n→∞

1
0
f
n
(x) dx. (Hint: the answer is not 0.)
(c) Why doesn’t your answer to part (b) violate Proposition 7.20?
22. Prove that absolute convergence is a sufficient and necessary condition to be able to arbitrarily
rearrange the terms of a series without changing the sum.
23. Derive a formula for the product of two power series.
24. Find a power series (and determine its radius of convergence) of the following functions.
(a)
1
1+4z
.
(b)
1
3−
z
2
.
(c)
z
2
(4−z)
2
for |z| < 4
25. Find a power series representation about the origin of each of the following functions.
(a) cos z
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 84
(b) cos(z
2
)
(c) z
2
sin z
(d) (sin z)
2
26. (a) Suppose that the sequence c
k
is bounded and show that the radius of convergence of
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
is at least 1.
(b) Suppose that the sequence c
k
does not converge to 0 and show that the radius of con-
vergence of
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
is at most 1.
27. Find the power series centered at 1 for the following functions, and compute their radius of
convergence:
(a)
1
z
.
(b) Log z.
28. Use the Weierstraß M-test to show that each of the following series converges uniformly on
the given domain:
(a)
¸
k≥1
z
k
k
2
on
¯
D
1
(0).
(b)
¸
k≥0
1
z
k
on {z : |z| ≥ 2}.
(c)
¸
k≥0
z
k
z
k
+ 1
on
¯
D
r
(0), where 0 ≤ r < 1.
29. Suppose L = lim
k→∞
|c
k
|
1/k
exists. Show that
1
L
is the radius of convergence of
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
.
(Use the natural interpretations if L = 0 or L = ∞.)
30. Find the radius of convergence for each of the following series.
(a)
¸
k≥0
a
k
2
z
k
, a ∈ C.
(b)
¸
k≥0
k
n
z
k
, n ∈ Z.
(c)
¸
k≥0
z
k!
.
(d)
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k
k
z
k(k+1)
.
(e)
¸
k≥1
z
k
k
k
.
(f)
¸
k≥0
cos(k)z
k
.
CHAPTER 7. POWER SERIES 85
(g)
¸
k≥0
4
k
(z −2)
k
.
31. Find a function in “closed form” (i.e. not a power series) representing each of the following
series.
(a)
¸
k≥0
z
2k
k!
(b)
¸
k≥1
k(z −1)
k−1
(c)
¸
k≥2
k(k −1)z
k
32. Define the functions f
n
(t) =
1
n
e
−t/n
for n > 0 and 0 ≤ t < ∞.
(a) Show that the maximum of f
n
(t) is
1
n
.
(b) Show that f
n
(t) converges uniformly to 0 as n →∞.
(c) Show that


0
f
n
(t) dt does not converge to 0 as n →∞
(d) Why doesn’t this contradict the theorem that “the integral of a uniform limit is the limit
of the integrals”?
Chapter 8
Taylor and Laurent Series
We think in generalities, but we live in details.
A. N. Whitehead
8.1 Power Series and Holomorphic Functions
We will see in this section that power series and holomorphic functions are intimately related. In
fact, the two cornerstone theorems of this section are that any power series represents a holomorphic
function, and conversely, any holomorphic function can be represented by a power series.
We begin by showing a power series represents a holomorphic function, and consider some of
the consequences of this:
Theorem 8.1. Suppose f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
has radius of convergence R. Then f is holo-
morphic in {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R}.
Proof. Given any closed curve γ ⊂ {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R}, we have by Corollary 7.29

γ
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
dz = 0 .
On the other hand, Corollary 7.28 says that f is continuous. Now apply Morera’s theorem (Corol-
lary 5.16).
A special case of the last result concerns power series with infinite radius of convergence: those
represent entire functions.
Now that we know that power series are holomorphic (i.e., differentiable) on their regions of
convergence we can ask how to find their derivatives. The next result says that we can simply
differentiate the series “term by term.”
Theorem 8.2. Suppose f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
has radius of convergence R. Then
f

(z) =
¸
k≥1
k c
k
(z −z
0
)
k−1
,
and the radius of convergence of this power series is also R.
86
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 87
Proof. Let f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
. Since we know that f is holomorphic in its region of conver-
gence we can use Theorem 5.1. Let γ be any simple closed curve in {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R}. Note
that the power series of f converges uniformly on γ, so that we are free to interchange integral and
infinite sum. And then we use Theorem 5.1 again, but applied to the function (z −z
0
)
k
. Here are
the details:
f

(z) =
1
2πi

γ
f(w)
(w −z)
2
dw
=
1
2πi

γ
¸
k≥0
c
k
(w −z
0
)
k
(w −z)
2
dw
=
¸
k≥0
c
k
·
1
2πi

γ
(w −z
0
)
k
(w −z)
2
dw
=
¸
k≥0
c
k
·
d
dw
(w −z
0
)
k

w=z
=
¸
k≥0
k c
k
(z −z
0
)
k−1
.
The last statement of the theorem is easy to show: the radius of convergence R of f

(z) is at least
R (since we have shown that the series converges whenever |z −z
0
| < R), and it cannot be larger
than R by comparison to the series for f(z), since the coefficients for (z −z
0
)f

(z) are bigger than
the corresponding ones for f(z).
Naturally, the last theorem can be repeatedly applied to f

, then to f
′′
, and so on. The various
derivatives of a power series can also be seen as ingredients of the series itself. This is the statement
of the following Taylor
1
series expansion.
Corollary 8.3. Suppose f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
has a positive radius of convergence. Then
c
k
=
f
(k)
(z
0
)
k!
.
Proof. For starters, f(z
0
) = c
0
. Theorem 8.2 gives f

(z
0
) = c
1
. Applying the same theorem to f

gives
f
′′
(z) =
¸
k≥2
k(k −1)c
k
(z −z
0
)
k−2
and f
′′
(z
0
) = 2c
2
. We can play the same game for f
′′′
(z
0
), f
′′′′
(z
0
), etc.
Taylor’s formulas show that the coefficients of any power series which converges to f on an
open disk D centered at z
0
can be determined from the the function f restricted to D. It follows
immediately that the coefficients of a power series are unique:
Corollary 8.4 (Uniqueness of power series). If
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
and
¸
k≥0
c

k
(z − z
0
)
k
are two
power series which both converge to the same function f(z) on an open disk centered at a then
c
k
= c

k
for all k.
1
For more information about Brook Taylor (1685–1731), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Taylor.html.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 88
We now turn to the second cornerstone result, that a holomorphic function can be represented
by a power series, and its implications.
Theorem 8.5. Suppose f is a function which is holomorphic in D = {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R}. Then
f can be represented in D as a power series centered at z
0
(with a radius of convergence at least
R):
f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
with c
k
=
1
2πi

γ
f(w)
(w −z
0
)
k+1
dw.
Here γ is any positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth curve in D for which z
0
is inside γ.
Proof. Let g(z) = f(z +z
0
); so g is a function holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z| < R}. Fix r < R, denote
the circle centered at the origin with radius r by γ
r
, and suppose that |z| < r. Then by Cauchy’s
integral formula (Theorem 4.10),
g(z) =
1
2πi

γr
g(w)
w −z
dw.
The factor 1/(w −z) in this integral can be extended into a geometric series (note that w ∈ γ
r
and
so

z
w

< 1)
1
w −z
=
1
w
1
1 −
z
w
=
1
w
¸
k≥0

z
w

k
which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γ
r
(by Lemma 7.26). Hence Proposition 7.20 applies:
g(z) =
1
2πi

γr
g(w)
w −z
dw =
1
2πi

γr
g(w)
1
w
¸
k≥0

z
w

k
dw =
¸
k≥0
1
2πi

γr
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
.
Now, since f(z) = g(z −z
0
), we apply an easy change of variables to obtain
f(z) =
¸
k≥0
1
2πi

Γr
f(w)
(w −z
0
)
k+1
dw(z −z
0
)
k
,
where Γ
r
is a circle centered at z
0
with radius r. The only difference of this right-hand side to the
statement of the theorem are the curves we’re integrating over. However, Γ
r

G\{z
0
}
γ, and we can
apply Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6:

Γr
f(w)
(w −z
0
)
k+1
dw =

γ
f(w)
(w −z
0
)
k+1
dw.
If we compare the coefficients of the power series obtained in Theorem 8.5 with those in Corol-
lary 8.3, we arrive at the long-promised extension of Theorem 5.1 (which in itself extended Cauchy’s
integral formula, Theorem 4.10).
Corollary 8.6. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G, w ∈ G, and γ is a positively oriented,
simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. Then
f
(k)
(w) =
k!
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w)
k+1
dz .
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 89
Corollary 8.6 combined with our often-used Proposition 4.4(d) gives an inequality which is often
called Cauchy’s Estimate:
Corollary 8.7. Suppose f is holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z −w| < R} and |f| ≤ M. Then

f
(k)
(w)


k!M
R
k
.
Proof. Let γ be a circle centered at w with radius r < R. Then Corollary 8.6 applies, and we can
estimate using Proposition 4.4(d):

f
(k)
(w)

=

k!
2πi

γ
f(z)
(z −w)
k+1
dz


k!

max
z∈γ

f(z)
(z −w)
k+1

length(γ) ≤
k!

M
r
k+1
2πr =
k!M
r
k
.
The statement now follows since r can be chosen arbitrarily close to R.
8.2 Classification of Zeros and the Identity Principle
Basic algebra shows that if a polynomial p(z) of positive degree d has a a zero at a (in other words,
if p(a) = 0) then p(z) has z −a as a factor. That is, p(z) = (z −a)q(z) where q(z) is a polynomial
of degree d − 1. We can then ask whether q(z) itself has a zero at a and, if so, we can factor out
another factor of z −a. continuing in this way we see that we can factor p(z) as p(z) = (z −a)
m
g(z)
where m is a positive integer, not bigger than d, and g(z) is a polynomial which does not have a
zero at a. The integer m is called the multiplicity of the zero a of p(z).
Almost exactly the same thing happens for holomorphic functions:
Theorem 8.8 (Classification of Zeros). Suppose f is an holomorphic function defined on an open
set G and suppose f has a zero at a point a in G. Then there are exactly two possibilities:
(a) Either: f is identically zero on some open disk D centered at a (that is, f(z) = 0 for all z in
D);
(b) or: there is a positive integer m and a holomorphic function g, defined on G, satisfying f(z) =
(z −a)
m
g(z) for all z in G, with g(a) = 0
The integer m in the second case is uniquely determined by f and a and is called the multiplicity
of the zero at a.
Proof. We have a power series expansion for f(z) in some disk D
r
(a) of radius r around a, so
f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z − a)
k
, and c
0
= f(0) is zero since a is a zero of f. There are now exactly two
possibilities:
(a) Either c
k
= 0 for all k;
(b) or there is some positive integer m so that c
k
= 0 for all k < m but c
m
= 0.
The first case clearly gives us f(z) = 0 for all z in D = D
r
(a). So now consider the second case.
Notice that
f(z) = c
m
(z −a)
m
+c
m+1
(z −a)
m+1
+· · · = (z −a)
m
(c
m
+c
m+1
(z −a) +· · · )
= (z −a)
m
¸
k≥0
c
k+m
(z −a)
k
.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 90
Then we can define a function g on G by
g(z) =

¸
k≥0
c
k+m
(z −a)
k
if |z −a| < r
f(z)
(z −a)
m
if z ∈ G\ {a}
According to our calculations above, the two definitions give the same value when both are appli-
cable. The function g is holomorphic at a by the first definition; and g is holomorphic at other
points of G by the second definition. Finally, g(a) = c
m
= 0.
Clearly m is unique, since it is defined in terms of the power series expansion of f at a, which
is unique.
To start using the intimate connection of holomorphic functions and power series, we apply
Theorem 8.8 to obtain the following result, which is sometimes also called the uniqueness theorem.
Theorem 8.9 (Identity Principle). Suppose f and g are holomorphic in the region G and f(z
k
) =
g(z
k
) at a sequence which converges to w ∈ G with z
k
= w for all k. Then f(z) = g(z) for all z in
G.
Proof. We start by defining h = f − g. Then h is holomorphic on G, h(z
n
) = 0, and we will be
finished if we can deduce that h is identically zero on G. Now notice the following: If b is in G then
exactly one of the following occurs:
(a) Either there is an open disk D centered at b so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D;
(b) or there is an open disk D centered at b so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D \ {b}.
To see this, suppose that h(b) = 0. Then, by continuity, there is an open disk D centered at
b so that h(z) = 0 for all z ∈ D, so b satisfies the second condition. If h(b) = 0 then, by the
classification of zeros, either h(z) = 0 for all z in some open disk D centered at b, so b satisfies the
first condition; or h(z) = (z −b)
m
φ(z) for all z in G, where φ is holomorphic and φ(b) = 0. Then,
since φ is continuous, there is an open disk D centered at b so that φ(z) = 0 for all z in D. Then
h(z) = (z −b)
m
φ(z) = 0 for all z in D except z = b, so b satisfies the second condition.
Now define two sets X, Y ⊆ G, so that b ∈ X if b satisfies the first condition above, and b ∈ Y
if b satisfies the second condition. If b ∈ X and D is an open disk centered at b as in the first
condition then it is clear that D ⊆ X. If b ∈ Y and D is an open disk centered at b as in the second
condition then D ⊆ Y , since if z ∈ D \ {b} then h(z) = 0, and we saw that this means z satisfies
the second condition.
Finally, we check that our original point w lies in X. To see this, suppose w ∈ Y , and let
D be an open disk centered at w so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D except z = b. But, since the
sequence z
k
converges to w, there is some k so that z
k
is in D, so h(z
k
) = 0. Since z
k
= w, this is
a contradiction.
Now we finish the proof using the definition of connectedness. X and Y are disjoint open sets
whose union is G, so one of them must be empty. Since a is in X, we must have Y = ∅ and X = G.
But X = G implies that every z in G satisfies the first condition above, so h(z) = 0.
Using the identity principle, we can prove yet another important property of holomorphic
functions.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 91
Theorem 8.10 (Maximum-Modulus Theorem). Suppose f is holomorphic and not constant in the
region G. Then |f| does not attain a weak relative maximum in G.
There are many reformulations of this theorem, such as: If G is a bounded region and f is
holomorphic in the closure of G, then the maximum of |f| is attained on the boundary of G.
Proof. Suppose there is a point a in G and an open disk D
0
centered at a so that |f(a)| ≥ |f(z)|
for all z in D
0
. If f(a) = 0 then f(z) = 0 for all z in D
0
, so f is identically zero, by the
identity principle. So we assume f(a) = 0. In this case we can define an holomorphic function
g(z) = f(z)/f(a), and we have the condition |g(z)| ≤ |g(a)| = 1 for all z in D
0
. Since g(a) = 1
we can find, using continuity, a smaller open disk D centered at a so that g(z) has positive real
part for all z in D. Thus the function h = Log ◦g is defined and holomorphic on D, and we have
h(a) = Log(g(a)) = Log(1) = 0 and Re h(z) = Re Log(g(z)) = ln(|g(z)|) ≤ ln(1) = 0.
We now refer to Exercise 27, which shows that h must be identically zero in D. Hence g(z) =
e
h(z)
must be equal to e
0
= 1 for all z in D, and so f(z) = f(a)g(z) must have the constant value
f(a) for all z in D. Hence, by the identity principle, f(z) has the constant value f(a) for all z
in G.
Theorem 8.10 can be used to give a proof of the analogous theorem for harmonic functions,
Theorem 6.6, in the process strengthening that theorem to cover weak maxima and weak minima.
Corollary 8.11. If u is harmonic in the region G, then it does not have a weak relative maximum
or minimum in G.
Since the last corollary also covers minima of harmonic functions, we should not be too surprised
to find the following result whose proof we leave for the exercises.
Corollary 8.12 (Minimum-Modulus Theorem). Suppose f is holomorphic and not constant in the
region G. Then |f| does not attain a weak relative minimum at a in G unless f(a) = 0.
8.3 Laurent Series
Theorem 8.5 gives a powerful way of describing holomorphic functions. It is, however, not as general
as it could be. It is natural, for example, to think about representing exp

1
z

as
exp

1
z

=
¸
k≥0
1
k!

1
z

k
=
¸
k≥0
1
k!
z
−k
,
a “power series” with negative exponents. To make sense of expressions like the above, we introduce
the concept of a double series
¸
k∈Z
a
k
=
¸
k≥0
a
k
+
¸
k≥1
a
−k
.
Here a
k
∈ C are terms indexed by the integers. A double series converges if and only if both of its
defining series do. Absolute and uniform convergence are defined analogously. Equipped with this,
we can now state the following central definition.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 92
Definition 8.13. A Laurent
2
series centered at z
0
is a double series of the form
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
.
Example 8.14. The series which started this section is the Laurent series of exp

1
z

centered at
0.
Example 8.15. Any power series is a Laurent series (with c
k
= 0 for k < 0).
We should pause for a minute and ask for which z such a Laurent series can possibly converge.
By definition
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
=
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
+
¸
k≥1
c
−k
(z −z
0
)
−k
.
The first of the series on the right-hand side is a power series with some radius of convergence
R
2
, that is, it converges in {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R
2
}. The second we can view as a “power series in
1
z−z
0
,” it will converge for
1
|z−z
0
|
<
1
|R
1
|
for some R
1
, that is, in {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| > R
1
}. For the
convergence of our Laurent series, we need to combine those two notions, whence the Laurent series
converges on the annulus {z ∈ C : R
1
< |z −z
0
| < R
2
} (if R
1
< R
2
). Even better, Theorem 7.27
implies that the convergence is uniform on a set of the form {z ∈ C : r
1
≤ |z −z
0
| ≤ r
2
} for any
R
1
< r
1
< r
2
< R
2
. Theorem 8.1 says that the Laurent series represents a function which
is holomorphic on {z ∈ C : R
1
< |z −z
0
| < R
2
}. The fact that we can conversely represent any
function holomorphic in such an annulus by a Laurent series is the substance of the next theorem.
Theorem 8.16. Suppose f is a function which is holomorphic in A = {z ∈ C : R
1
< |z −z
0
| < R
2
}.
Then f can be represented in A as a Laurent series centered at z
0
:
f(z) =
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
with c
k
=
1
2πi

γ
f(w)
(w −z
0
)
k+1
dw.
Here γ is any circle in A centered at z
0
.
Remark. Naturally, by Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6 we can replace the circle in the formula for the
Laurent series by any closed, smooth path that is A-homotopic to the circle.
Proof. Let g(z) = f(z + z
0
); so g is a function holomorphic in {z ∈ C : R
1
< |z| < R
2
}. Fix
R
1
< r
1
< |z| < r
2
< R
2
, and let γ
1
and γ
2
be positively oriented circles centered at 0 with radii
r
1
and r
2
, respectively. By introducing an “extra piece” (see Figure 8.1), we can apply Cauchy’s
integral formula (Theorem 4.10) to the path γ
2
−γ
1
:
g(z) =
1
2πi

γ
2
−γ
1
g(w)
w −z
dw =
1
2πi

γ
2
g(w)
w −z
dw −
1
2πi

γ
1
g(w)
w −z
dw. (8.1)
For the integral over γ
2
we play exactly the same game as in Theorem 8.5. The factor 1/(w −z) in
this integral can be expanded into a geometric series (note that w ∈ γ
2
and so

z
w

< 1)
1
w −z
=
1
w
1
1 −
z
w
=
1
w
¸
k≥0

z
w

k
,
2
For more information about Pierre Alphonse Laurent (1813–1854), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Laurent Pierre.html.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 93
Figure 8.1: Proof of Theorem 8.16.
which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γ
2
(by Lemma 7.26). Hence Proposition 7.20 applies:

γ
2
g(w)
w −z
dw =

γ
2
g(w)
1
w
¸
k≥0

z
w

k
dw =
¸
k≥0

γ
2
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
.
The integral over γ
1
is computed in a similar fashion; now we expand the factor 1/(w −z) into the
following geometric series (note that w ∈ γ
1
and so

w
z

< 1)
1
w −z
= −
1
z
1
1 −
w
z
= −
1
z
¸
k≥0

w
z

k
,
which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γ
1
(by Lemma 7.26). Again Proposition 7.20 applies:

γ
1
g(w)
w −z
dw = −

γ
1
g(w)
1
z
¸
k≥0

w
z

k
dw = −
¸
k≥0

γ
1
g(w)w
k
dwz
−k−1
= −
¸
k≤−1

γ
1
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
.
Putting everything back into (8.1) gives
g(z) =
1
2πi
¸
k≥0

γ
2
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
+
¸
k≤−1

γ
1
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
.
We can now change both integration paths to a circle γ centered at 0 with a radius between R
1
and R
2
(by Cauchy’s Theorem 4.6), which finally gives
g(z) =
1
2πi
¸
k∈Z

γ
g(w)
w
k+1
dwz
k
.
The statement follows now with f(z) = g(z −z
0
) and an easy change of variables.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 94
We finish this chapter with a consequence of the above theorem: because the coefficients of a
Laurent series are given by integrals, we immediately obtain the following:
Corollary 8.17. For a given function in a given region of convergence, the coefficients of the
corresponding Laurent series are uniquely determined.
This result seems a bit artificial; what it says is simply the following: if we expand a function
(that is holomorphic in some annulus) into a Laurent series, there is only one possible outcome.
Exercises
1. For each of the following series, determine where the series converges absolutely/uniformly:
(a)
¸
k≥2
k(k −1) z
k−2
.
(b)
¸
k≥0
1
(2k + 1)!
z
2k+1
.
(c)
¸
k≥0

1
z −3

k
.
2. What functions are represented by the series in the previous exercise?
3. Find the power series centered at 1 for exp z.
4. Prove Lemma 3.16 using the power series of exp z centered at 0.
5. By integrating a series for
1
1+z
2
term by term, find a power series for arctan(z). What is its
radius of convergence?
6. Find the terms through third order and the radius of convergence of the power series for each
following functions, centered at z
0
. Do not find the general form for the coefficients.
(a) f(z) =
1
1+z
2
, z
0
= 1.
(b) f(z) =
1
e
z
+1
, z
0
= 0.
(c) f(z) =

1 +z, z
0
= 0 (use the principal branch).
(d) f(z) = e
z
2
, z
0
= i.
7. Prove the following generalization of Theorem 8.1: Suppose f
n
are holomorphic on the region
G and converge uniformly to f on G. Then f is holomorphic in G. (This result is called the
Weierstraß convergence theorem.)
8. Use the previous exercise and Corollary 8.7 to prove the following: Suppose f
n
are holomorphic
on the region G and converge uniformly to f on G. Then for any k ∈ N, the k
th
derivatives
f
(k)
n
converge (pointwise) to f
(k)
.
9. Prove the minimum-modulus theorem (Corollary 8.12).
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 95
10. Find the maximum and minimum of |f(z)| on the unit disc {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1}, where
f(z) = z
2
−2.
11. Give another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5.7), using the mini-
mum-modulus theorem (Corollary 8.12). (Hint: Use Lemma 5.6 to show that a polynomial
does not achieve its minimum modulus on a large circle; then use the minimum-modulus
theorem to deduce that the polynomial has a zero.)
12. Find a Laurent series for
1
(z−1)(z+1)
centered at z = 1 and specify the region in which it
converges.
13. Find a Laurent series for
1
z(z−2)
2
centered at z = 2 and specify the region in which it converges.
14. Find a Laurent series for
z−2
z+1
centered at z = −1 and specify the region in which it converges.
15. Find the first five terms in the Laurent series for
1
sin z
centered at z = 0.
16. Find the first 4 non-zero terms in the power series expansion of tan z centered at the origin.
What is the radius of convergence?
17. (a) Find the power series representation for e
az
centered at 0, where a is any constant.
(b) Show that e
z
cos(z) =
1
2

e
(1+i)z
+e
(1−i)z

.
(c) Find the power series expansion for e
z
cos(z) centered at 0.
18. Show that
z−1
z−2
=
¸
k≥0
1
(z−1)
k
for |z −1| > 1.
19. Prove: If f is entire and Im(f) is constant on the unit disc {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} then f is
constant.
20. (a) Find the Laurent series for
cos z
z
2
centered at z = 0.
(b) Prove that
f(z) =

cos z−1
z
2
if z = 0,

1
2
if z = 0
is entire.
21. Find the Laurent series for sec z centered at the origin.
22. Suppose that f is holomorphic, f(z
0
) = 0, and f

(z
0
) = 0. Show that f has a zero of
multiplicity 1 at z
0
.
23. Find the multiplicities of the zeros:
(a) f(z) = e
z
−1, z
0
= 2kπi, where k is any integer.
(b) f(z) = sin(z) −tan(z), z
0
= 0.
(c) f(z) = cos(z) −1 +
1
2
sin
2
(z), z
0
= 0.
24. Find the zeros of the following, and determine their multiplicities:
(a) (1 +z
2
)
4
.
CHAPTER 8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 96
(b) sin
2
z.
(c) 1 +e
z
.
(d) z
3
cos z.
25. Find the three Laurent series of f(z) =
1
(1−z)(z+2)
, centered at 0, but which are defined on
the three domains |z| < 1, 1 < |z| < 2, and 2 < |z|, respectively. Hint: Use Theorem 8.16.
26. Suppose that f(z) has exactly one zero, at a, inside the circle γ, and that it has multiplicity 1.
Show that a =
1
2πi

γ
zf

(z)
f(z)
dz.
27. Suppose f is holomorphic and not identically zero on an open disk D centered at a, and
suppose f(a) = 0. Follow the following outline to show that Re f(z) > 0 for some z in D.
(a) Why can you write f(z) = (z −a)
m
g(z) where m > 0, g is holomorphic, and g(a) = 0?
(b) Write g(a) in polar form as g(a) = c e

and define G(z) = e
−iα
g(z). Why is Re G(a) > 0?
(c) Why is there a positive constant δ so that Re G(z) > 0 for all z in the open disk D
δ
(a)?
(d) Write z = a +re

for 0 < r < δ. Show that f(z) = r
m
e
imθ
e

G(z).
(e) Find a value of θ so that f(z) has positive real part.
28. Suppose |c
n
| ≥ 2
n
for all n. What can you say about the radius of convergence of
¸
k≥0
c
k
z
k
?
29. Suppose the radius of convergence of
¸
k≥0
c
k
z
k
is R. What is the radius of convergence of
each of the following?
(a)
¸
k≥0
c
k
z
2k
.
(b)
¸
k≥0
3
k
c
k
z
k
.
(c)
¸
k≥0
c
k
z
k+5
.
(d)
¸
k≥0
k
2
c
k
z
k
.
(e)
¸
k≥0
c
2
k
z
k
. (Hint: Ratio test)
Chapter 9
Isolated Singularities and the Residue
Theorem
1/r
2
has a nasty singularity at r = 0, but it did not bother Newton—the moon is far enough.
Edward Witten
9.1 Classification of Singularities
What is the difference between the functions
sinz
z
,
1
z
4
, and exp

1
z

? All of them are not defined at
0, but the singularities are of a very different nature. For complex functions there are three types
of singularities, which are classified as follows.
Definition 9.1. If f is holomorphic in the punctured disk {z ∈ C : 0 < |z −z
0
| < R} for some
R > 0 but not at z = z
0
then z
0
is an isolated singularity of f. The singularity z
0
is called
(a) removable if there is a function g holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R} such that f = g in
{z ∈ C : 0 < |z −z
0
| < R},
(b) a pole if lim
z→z
0
|f(z)| = ∞,
(c) essential if z
0
is neither removable nor a pole.
Example 9.2. The function
sinz
z
has a removable singularity at 0, as for z = 0
sin z
z
=
1
z
¸
k≥0
(−1)
k
(2k + 1)!
z
2k+1
=
¸
k≥0
(−1)
k
(2k + 1)!
z
2k
.
and the power series on the right-hand side represents an entire function (you may meditate on the
fact why it has to be entire).
Example 9.3. The function
1
z
4
has a pole at 0, as
lim
z→0

1
z
4

= ∞.
97
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 98
Example 9.4. The function exp

1
z

does not have a removable singularity (consider, for example,
lim
x→0
+ exp

1
x

= ∞). On the other hand, exp

1
z

approaches 0 as z approaches 0 from the
negative real axis. Hence lim
z→0

exp

1
z

= ∞, that is, exp

1
z

has an essential singularity at 0.
To get a feel for the different types of singularities, we start with the following results.
Proposition 9.5. Suppose z
0
is a isolated singularity of f. Then
(a) z
0
is removable if and only if lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) f(z) = 0;
(b) if z
0
is a pole then lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)
n+1
f(z) = 0 for some positive integer n.
Remark. The smallest possible n in (b) is the order of the pole. We will see in the proof that “near
the pole z
0
” we can write f(z) as
h(z)
(z−z
0
)
n
for some function h which is holomorphic (and not zero)
at z
0
. This is very similar to the game we played with zeros in Chapter 8: f has a zero of order (or
multiplicity) m at z
0
if we can write f(z) = (z − z
0
)
m
h(z), where h is holomorphic and not zero
at z
0
. We will make use of the notions of zeros and poles of certain orders quite extensively in this
chapter.
Proof. (a) Suppose z
0
is removable, and g is holomorphic on D
R
(z
0
), the open disk with radius R
centered at z
0
such that f = g for z = z
0
. Then we can make use of the fact that g is continuous
at z
0
:
lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) f(z) = lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) g(z) = g(z
0
) lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) = 0 .
Conversely, suppose that lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) f(z) = 0, and f is holomorphic on the punctured disk
ˆ
D
R
(z
0
) = D
R
(z
0
) \ {z
0
}. Then define
g(z) =

(z −z
0
)
2
f(z) if z = z
0
,
0 if z = z
0
.
Clearly g is holomorphic for z = z
0
, and it is also differentiable at z
0
, since we can calculate
g

(z
0
) = lim
z→z
0
g(z) −g(z
0
)
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)
2
f(z)
z −z
0
= lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)f(z) = 0
So g is holomorphic in D
R
(z
0
) with g(z
0
) = 0 and g

(z
0
) = 0, so it has a power series expansion
g(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
with c
0
= c
1
= 0. Hence we can factor (z −z
0
)
2
from the series, so
g(z) = (z −z
0
)
2
¸
k≥0
c
k+2
(z −z
0
)
k
= (z −z
0
)
2
f(z).
Hence, for z = z
0
, f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k+2
(z − z
0
)
k
, and this series defines an holomorphic function in
D
R
(z
0
).
(b) Suppose that z
0
is a pole of f. Then there is some R > 0 so that |f(z)| > 1 in the punctured
disk
ˆ
D
R
(z
0
), and
lim
z→z
0
1
f(z)
= 0 .
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 99
So, if we define g(z) by
g(z) =

1
f(z)
if z ∈
ˆ
D
R
(z
0
),
0 if z = z
0
,
then g is holomorphic in D
R
(z
0
) (as in part (a)). By the classification of zeros, g(z) = (z −z
0
)
n
φ(z)
where φ is holomorphic in D
R
(z
0
) and φ(z
0
) = 0. In fact, φ(z) = 0 for all z in D
R
(z
0
) since g(z) = 0
for z ∈
ˆ
D
R
(z
0
). Hence h =
1
φ
is an holomorphic function in D
R
(z
0
) and
f(z) =
1
g(z)
=
1
(z −z
0
)
n
φ(z)
=
h(z)
(z −z
0
)
n
.
But then, since h is continuous at z
0
,
lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)
n+1
f(z) = lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)h(z) = h(z
0
) lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
) = 0 .
The reader might have noticed that the previous proposition did not include any result on
essential singularities. Not only does the next theorem make up for this but it also nicely illustrates
the strangeness of essential singularities. To appreciate the following result, we suggest meditating
about its statement for a couple of minutes over a good cup of coffee.
Theorem 9.6 (Casorati
1
-Weierstraß). If z
0
is an essential singularity of f and D = {z ∈ C : 0 <
|z − z
0
| < R} for some R > 0, then any w ∈ C is arbitrarily close to a point in f(D), that is, for
any w ∈ C and any ǫ > 0 there exists z ∈ D such that |w −f(z)| < ǫ.
Remarks. 1. In the language of topology, the Casorati-Weierstraß theorem says that the image of
any punctured disc centered at an essential singularity is dense in C.
2. There is a much stronger theorem, which is beyond the scope of this book, and which implies
the Casorati-Weierstraß theorem. It is due to Charles Emile Picard (1856–1941)
2
and says that the
image of any punctured disc centered at an essential singularity misses at most one point of C. (It
is worth meditating about coming up with examples of functions which do not miss any point in C
and functions which miss exactly one point. Try it!)
Proof. Suppose (by way of contradiction) that there is a w ∈ C and an ǫ > 0 such that for all z in
the punctured disc D (centered at z
0
)
|w −f(z)| ≥ ǫ .
Then the function g(z) =
1
(f(z)−w)
stays bounded as z →z
0
, and so
lim
z→z
0
(z −z
0
)g(z) = lim
z→z
0
z −z
0
f(z) −w
= 0 .
(The previous proposition tells us that g has a removable singularity at z
0
.) Hence
lim
z→z
0

f(z) −w
z −z
0

= ∞.
But this implies that f has a pole or a removable singularity at z
0
, which is a contradiction.
1
For more information about Felice Casorati (1835–1890), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Casorati.html.
2
For more information about Picard, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Picard Emile.html.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 100
Definition 9.1 is not always handy. The following classifies singularities according to their
Laurent series.
Proposition 9.7. Suppose z
0
is an isolated singularity of f with Laurent series
f(z) =
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
(valid in {z ∈ C : 0 < |z −z
0
| < R} for some R > 0). Then
(a) z
0
is removable if and only if there are no negative exponents (that is, the Laurent series is a
power series);
(b) z
0
is a pole if and only if there are finitely many negative exponents;
(c) z
0
is essential if and only if there are infinitely many negative exponents.
Proof. (a) Suppose z
0
is removable, and g is holomorphic on {z ∈ C : |z −z
0
| < R} such that f = g
in {z ∈ C : 0 < |z −z
0
| < R}. Then the Laurent series of g in this region is a power series, and by
Corollary 8.17 (uniqueness theorem for Laurent series) it has to coincide with the Laurent series of
f. Conversely, if the Laurent series of f at z
0
has only nonnegative powers, we can use it to define
a function which is holomorphic at z
0
.
(b) Suppose z
0
is a pole of order n. Then by Proposition 9.5, the function (z −z
0
)
n
f(z) has a
removable singularity at z
0
. By part (a), we can hence expand
(z −z
0
)
n
f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
,
that is,
f(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k−n
=
¸
k≥−n
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
.
Conversely, suppose that
f(z) =
¸
k≥−n
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
= (z −z
0
)
−n
¸
k≥−n
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k+n
= (z −z
0
)
−n
¸
k≥0
c
k−n
(z −z
0
)
k
,
where c
−n
= 0. Define
g(z) =
¸
k≥0
c
k−n
(z −z
0
)
k
.
Then since g(z
0
) = c
−n
= 0,
lim
z→z
0
|f(z)| = lim
z→z
0

g(z)
(z −z
0
)
n

= ∞.
(c) This follows by definition: an essential singularity is neither removable nor a pole.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 101
9.2 Residues
Suppose z
0
is an isolated singularity of f, γ is a positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth path
around z
0
, which lies in the domain of the Laurent series of f at z
0
with domain a punctured
disk {z|0 < |z − z
0
| < R} for some radius R > 0. Then—essentially by Proposition 7.20—we can
integrate term by term:

γ
f =

γ
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
dz =
¸
k∈Z
c
k

γ
(z −z
0
)
k
dz .
The integrals inside the summation are easy: for nonnegative powers k the integral

γ
(z − z
0
)
k
is
0 (because (z − z
0
)
k
is entire), and the same holds for k ≤ −2 (because (z − z
0
)
k
has a primitive
on C \ {z
0
}, or alternatively because applying the change of variables w =
1
z−z
0
yields the integral

γ
w
−k−2
dw, where −k −2 ≥ 0). Finally, for k = −1, we can use Exercise 15 of Chapter 4. Because
all the other terms give a zero integral, c
−1
is the only term of the series which survives:

γ
f =
¸
k∈Z
c
k

γ
(z −z
0
)
k
dz = 2πi c
−1
.
(One might also notice that Theorem 8.16 gives the same identity.) Reason enough to give the
c
−1
-coefficient of a Laurent series a special name.
Definition 9.8. Suppose z
0
is an isolated singularity of f with Laurent series
¸
k∈Z
c
k
(z − z
0
)
k
in a punctured disk about z
0
. Then c
−1
is the residue of f at z
0
, denoted by Res
z=z
0
(f(z)) or
Res(f(z), z = z
0
).
The following theorem generalizes the discussion at the beginning of this section.
Theorem 9.9 (Residue Theorem). Suppose f is holomorphic in the region G, except for isolated
singularities, and γ is a positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve which
avoids the singularities of f. Then

γ
f = 2πi
¸
k
Res
z=z
k
(f(z)) ,
where the sum is taken over all singularities z
k
inside γ.
Proof. Draw two circles around each isolated singularity inside γ, one with positive, and one with
negative orientation, as pictured in Figure 9.1. Each of these pairs cancel each other when we
integrate over them. Now connect the circles with negative orientation with γ. This gives a curve
which is contractible in the region of holomorphicity of f. But this means that we can replace
γ by the positively oriented circles; now all we need to do is described at the beginning of this
section.
Computing integrals is as easy (or hard!) as computing residues. The following two lemmas
start the range of tricks one can use when computing residues.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 102
Figure 9.1: Proof of Theorem 9.9.
Lemma 9.10. Suppose f and g are holomorphic in a region containing z
0
, which is a zero of g of
multiplicity 1, and f(z
0
) = 0. Then
f
g
has a pole of order 1 at z
0
and
Res
z=z
0

f(z)
g(z)

=
f(z
0
)
g

(z
0
)
.
Proof. The functions f and g have power series centered at z
0
; the one for g has by assumption no
constant term:
g(z) =
¸
k≥1
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
= (z −z
0
)
¸
k≥1
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k−1
.
The series on the right represents an holomorphic function, call it h; note that h(z
0
) = c
1
= 0.
Hence
f(z)
g(z)
=
f(z)
(z −z
0
)h(z)
,
and the function
f
h
is holomorphic at z
0
. Even more, the residue of
f
g
equals the constant term of
the power series of
f
h
(that’s how we get the (−1)st term of
f
g
). But this constant term is computed,
as always, by
f(z
0
)
h(z
0
)
. But h(z
0
), in turn, is the constant term of h or the second term of g, which by
Taylor’s formula (Corollary 8.3) equals g

(z
0
).
Lemma 9.11. Suppose z
0
is a pole of f of order n. Then
Res
z=z
0
(f(z)) =
1
(n −1)!
lim
z→z
0
d
n−1
dz
n−1

(z −z
0
)
n
f(z)

.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 103
Proof. We know by Proposition 9.7 that the Laurent series at z
0
looks like
f(z) =
¸
k≥−n
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k
.
But then
(z −z
0
)
n
f(z) =
¸
k≥−n
c
k
(z −z
0
)
k+n
represents a power series, and we can use Taylor’s formula (Corollary 8.3) to compute c
−1
.
9.3 Argument Principle and Rouch´e’s Theorem
There are many situations where we want to restrict ourselves to functions which are holomorphic
in some region except possibly for poles. Such functions are called meromorphic. In this section,
we will study these functions, especially with respect to their zeros and poles, which—as the reader
might have guessed already—can be thought of as siblings.
Suppose we have a differentiable function f. Differentiating Log f (where Log is a branch of the
logarithm) gives
f

f
, which is one good reason why this quotient is called the logarithmic derivative
of f. It has some remarkable properties, one of which we would like to discuss here.
Let’s say we have two functions f and g holomorphic in some region. Then the logarithmic
derivative of their product behaves very nicely:
(fg)

fg
=
f

g +fg

fg
=
f

f
+
g

g
.
We can apply this fact to the following situation: Suppose that f is holomorphic on the region G,
and f has the (finitely many) zeros z
1
, . . . , z
j
of order n
1
, . . . , n
j
, respectively. Then we can express
f as
f(z) = (z −z
1
)
n
1
· · · (z −z
j
)
n
j
g(z) ,
where g is also holomorphic in G and never zero. Let’s compute the logarithmic derivative of f
and play the same remarkable cancellation game as above:
f

(z)
f(z)
=
n
1
(z −z
1
)
n
1
−1
(z −z
2
)
n
2
· · · (z −z
j
)
n
j
g(z) +· · · + (z −z
1
)
n
1
· · · (z −z
j
)
n
j
g

(z)
(z −z
1
)
n
1
· · · (z −z
j
)
n
j
g(z)
=
n
1
z −z
1
+
n
2
z −z
2
+. . .
n
j
z −z
j
+
g

(z)
g(z)
.
Something similar happens to the poles of f. We invite the reader to prove that if p
1
, . . . , p
k
are
all the poles of f in G with order m
1
, . . . , m
k
, respectively, then the logarithmic derivative of f can
be expressed as
f

(z)
f(z)
= −
m
1
z −p
1

m
2
z −p
2
−· · · −
m
k
z −p
k
+
g

(z)
g(z)
, (9.1)
where g is a function without poles in G. Naturally, we can combine the expressions we got for
zeros and poles, which is the starting point of the following theorem.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 104
Theorem 9.12 (Argument Principle). Suppose f is meromorphic in the region G and γ is a
positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve, which does not pass through any
zero or pole of f. Denote by Z(f, γ) the number of zeros of f inside γ—counted according to
multiplicity—and by P(f, γ) the number of poles of f inside γ, again counted according to order.
Then
1
2πi

γ
f

f
= Z(f, γ) −P(f, γ) .
Proof. Suppose the zeros of f inside γ are z
1
, . . . , z
j
of multiplicity n
1
, . . . , n
j
, respectively, and
the poles inside γ are p
1
, . . . , p
k
with order m
1
, . . . , m
k
, respectively. (You may meditate about the
fact why there can only be finitely many zeros and poles inside γ.) In fact, we may shrink G, if
necessary, so that these are the only zeros and poles in G. Our discussion before the statement of
the theorem yielded that the logarithmic derivative of f can be expressed as
f

(z)
f(z)
=
n
1
z −z
1
+· · · +
n
j
z −z
j

m
1
z −p
1
−· · · −
m
k
z −p
k
+
g

(z)
g(z)
,
where g is a function which is holomorphic in G (in particular, without poles) and never zero.
Thanks to Exercise 15 of Chapter 4, the integral is easy:

γ
f

f
= n
1

γ
dz
z −z
1
+ · · · + n
j

γ
dz
z −z
j
− m
1

γ
dz
z −p
1
− · · · − m
k

γ
dz
z −p
k
+

γ
g

g
= 2πi (n
1
+· · · +n
j
−m
1
−· · · −m
k
) +

γ
g

g
.
Finally,
g

g
is holomorphic in G (recall that g is never zero in G), so that Corollary 4.7 (to Cauchy’s
Theorem 4.6) gives that

γ
g

g
= 0 .
As a nice application of the argument principle, we present a famous theorem due to Eugene
Rouch´e (1832–1910)
3
.
Theorem 9.13 (Rouch´e’s Theorem). Suppose f and g are holomorphic in a region G, and γ is
a positively oriented, simple, closed, smooth, G-contractible curve such that for all z ∈ γ, |f(z)| >
|g(z)|. Then
Z(f +g, γ) = Z(f, γ) .
This theorem is of surprising practicality. It allows us to locate the zeros of a function fairly
precisely. As an illustration, we prove:
Example 9.14. All the roots of the polynomial p(z) = z
5
+ z
4
+ z
3
+ z
2
+ z + 1 have absolute
value less than two.
4
To see this, let f(z) = z
5
and g(z) = z
4
+ z
3
+ z
2
+ z + 1, and let γ denote
3
For more information about Rouch´e, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Rouche.html.
4
The fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5.7) asserts that p has five roots in C. What’s special about the
statement of Example 9.14 is that they all have absolute value < 2. Note also that there is no general formula for
computing roots of a polynomial of degree 5. (Although for this p it’s not hard to find one root—and therefore all of
them.)
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 105
the circle centered at the origin with radius 2. Then for z ∈ γ
|g(z)| ≤ |z|
4
+|z|
3
+|z|
2
+|z| + 1 = 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 31 < 32 = |z|
5
= |f(z)| .
So g and f satisfy the condition of the Theorem 9.13. But f has just a root of order 5 at the origin,
whence
Z(p, γ) = Z(f +g, γ) = Z(f, γ) = 5 .
Proof of Theorem 9.13. By our analysis in the beginning of this section and by the argument prin-
ciple (Theorem 9.12)
Z(f +g, γ) =
1
2πi

γ
(f +g)

f +g
=
1
2πi

γ

f

1 +
g
f


f

1 +
g
f
=
1
2πi

γ

¸
¸
f

f
+

1 +
g
f


1 +
g
f
¸

= Z(f, γ) +
1
2πi

γ

1 +
g
f


1 +
g
f
.
We are assuming that

g
f

< 1 on γ, which means that the function 1 +
g
f
evaluated on γ stays
away from the nonpositive real axis. But then Log

1 +
g
f

is a well defined holomorphic function
on γ. Its derivative is

1 +
g
f


1 +
g
f
, which implies by Corollary 5.18 that
1
2πi

γ

1 +
g
f


1 +
g
f
= 0 .
Exercises
1. Prove (9.1).
2. Suppose that f(z) has a zero of multiplicity m at a. Explain why
1
f(z)
has a pole of order m
at a.
3. Find the poles of the following, and determine their orders:
(a) (z
2
+ 1)
−3
(z −1)
−4
.
(b) z cot(z).
(c) z
−5
sin(z).
(d)
1
1−e
z
.
(e)
z
1−e
z
.
4. Show that if f has an essential singularity at z
0
then
1
f
also has an essential singularity at z
0
.
5. Suppose f is a non-constant entire function. Prove that any complex number is arbitrarily
close to a number in f(C). (Hint: If f is not a polynomial, use Theorem 9.6 for f

1
z

.)
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 106
6. Suppose f is meromorphic in the region G, g is holomorphic in G, and γ is a positively
oriented, simple, closed, G-contractible curve, which does not pass through any zero or pole
of f. Denote the zeros and poles of f inside γ by z
1
, . . . , z
j
and p
1
, . . . , p
k
, respectively,
counted according to multiplicity. Prove that
1
2πi

γ
g
f

f
=
j
¸
m=1
g(z
m
) −
k
¸
n=1
g(p
n
) .
7. Find the number of zeros of
(a) 3 exp z −z in {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} ;
(b)
1
3
exp z −z in {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} ;
(c) z
4
−5z + 1 in {z ∈ C : 1 ≤ |z| ≤ 2} .
8. Give another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5.7), using Rouch´e’s
Theorem 9.13. (Hint: If p(z) = a
n
z
n
+ a
n−1
z
n−1
+ · · · + a
1
z + 1, let f(z) = a
n
z
n
and
g(z) = a
n−1
z
n−1
+ a
n−2
z
n−2
+ · · · + a
1
z + 1, and choose as γ a circle which is large enough
to make the condition of Rouch´e’s theorem work. You might want to first apply Lemma 5.6
to g(z).)
9. (a) Find a Laurent series for
1
(z
2
−4)(z−2)
centered at z = 2 and specify the region in which
it converges.
(b) Compute

γ
dz
(z
2
−4)(z−2)
, where γ is the positively oriented circle centered at 2 of radius 1.
10. Evaluate the following integrals for γ(t) = 3 e
it
, 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π.
(a)

γ
cot z dz
(b)

γ
z
3
cos

3
z

dz
(c)

γ
dz
(z + 4)(z
2
+ 1)
(d)

γ
z
2
exp

1
z

dz
(e)

γ
exp z
sinh z
dz
(f)

γ
i
z+4
(z
2
+ 16)
2
dz
11. (a) Find the power series of exp z centered at z = −1.
(b) Find

γ
exp z
(z+1)
34
dz, where γ is the circle |z + 2| = 2, positively oriented.
12. Suppose f has a simple pole (i.e., a pole of order 1) at z
0
and g is holomorphic at z
0
. Prove
that
Res
z=z
0

f(z)g(z)

= g(z
0
) · Res
z=z
0

f(z)

.
CHAPTER 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 107
13. Find the residue of each function at 0:
(a) z
−3
cos(z).
(b) csc(z).
(c)
z
2
+ 4z + 5
z
2
+z
.
(d) e
1−
1
z
.
(e)
e
4z
−1
sin
2
z
.
14. Use residues to evaluate the following:
(a)

γ
dz
z
4
+ 4
, where γ is the circle |z + 1 −i| = 1.
(b)

γ
dz
z(z
2
+z −2)
, where γ is the circle |z −i| = 2.
(c)

γ
e
z
dz
z
3
+z
, where γ is the circle |z| = 2.
(d)

γ
dz
z
2
sin z
, where γ is the circle |z| = 1.
15. Suppose f has an isolated singularity at z
0
.
(a) Show that f

also has an isolated singularity at z
0
.
(b) Find Res
z=z
0
(f

).
16. Given R > 0, let γ
R
be the half circle defined by γ
R
(t) = Re
it
, 0 ≤ t ≤ π, and Γ
R
be the
closed curve composed of γ
R
and the line segment [−R, R].
(a) Compute

Γ
R
dz
(1+z
2
)
2
.
(b) Prove that lim
R→∞

γ
R
dz
(1+z
2
)
2
= 0 .
(c) Combine (a) and (b) to evaluate the real integral


−∞
dx
(1+x
2
)
2
.
17. Suppose f is entire, and a, b ∈ C with |a|, |b| < R. Let γ be the circle centered at 0 with
radius R. Evaluate

γ
f(z)
(z −a)(z −b)
dz ,
and use this to give an alternate proof of Liouville’s Theorem 5.9. (Hint: Show that if f is
bounded then the above integral goes to zero as R increases.)
Chapter 10
Discrete Applications of the Residue
Theorem
All means (even continuous) sanctify the discrete end.
Doron Zeilberger
On the surface, this chapter is just a collection of exercises. They are more involved than any of
the ones we’ve given so far at the end of each chapter, which is one reason why we lead the reader
through each of the following ones step by step. On the other hand, these sections should really
be thought of as a continuation of the lecture notes, just in a different format. All of the following
‘problems’ are of a discrete mathematical nature, and we invite the reader to solve them using
continuous methods—namely, complex integration. It might be that there is no other result which
so intimately combines discrete and continuous mathematics as does the Residue Theorem 9.9.
10.1 Infinite Sums
In this exercise, we evaluate—as an example—the sums
¸
k≥1
1
k
2
and
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k
k
2
. We hope the
idea how to compute such sums in general will become clear.
1. Consider the function f(z) =
π cot(πz)
z
2
. Compute the residues at all the singularities of f.
2. Let N be a positive integer and γ
N
be the rectangular curve from N+1/2−iN to N+1/2+iN
to −N −1/2 +iN to −N −1/2 −iN back to N + 1/2 −iN.
(a) Show that for all z ∈ γ
N
, | cot(πz)| < 2. (Use Exercise 30 in Chapter 3.)
(b) Show that lim
N→∞

γ
N
f = 0.
3. Use the Residue Theorem 9.9 to arrive at an identity for
¸
k∈Z\{0}
1
k
2
.
4. Evaluate
¸
k≥1
1
k
2
.
5. Repeat the exercise with the function f(z) =
π
z
2
sin(πz)
to arrive at an evaluation of
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k
k
2
.
108
CHAPTER 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM 109
(Hint: To bound this function, you may use the fact that 1/ sin
2
z = 1 + cot
2
z.)
6. Evaluate
¸
k≥1
1
k
4
and
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k
k
4
.
10.2 Binomial Coefficients
The binomial coefficient

n
k

is a natural candidate for being explored analytically, as the binomial
theorem
1
tells us that

n
k

is the coefficient of z
k
in (1 +z)
n
. As an example, we outline a proof of
the identity (for −1/4 < x < 1/4)
¸
k≥0

2k
k

x
k
=
1

1 −4x
.
1. Convince yourself that

2k
k

=
1
2πi

γ
(1 +w)
2k
w
k+1
dw,
where γ is any simple closed curve such that 0 is inside γ.
2. Suppose |x| < 1/4. Find a simple closed curve γ surrounding the origin such that
¸
k≥0

(1 +w)
2
w
x

k
converges uniformly on γ (as a function in w). Evaluate this sum.
3. Convince yourself that
¸
k≥0

2k
k

x
k
=
1
2πi
¸
k≥0

γ
(1 +w)
2k
w
k
x
k
dw
w
,
use 2. to interchange summation and integral, and use the Residue Theorem 9.9 to evaluate
the integral.
10.3 Fibonacci Numbers
The Fibonacci
2
numbers are a sequence of integers defined recursively as:
f
0
= 1,
f
1
= 1,
f
n
= f
n−1
+f
n−2
for n ≥ 2.
Let F(z) =
¸
k≥0
f
n
z
n
.
1
The binomial theorem says that for x, y ∈ C and n ∈ N, (x + y)
n
=

n
k=0

n
k

x
k
y
n−k
.
2
For more information about Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci (1170–1250), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Fibonacci.html.
CHAPTER 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM 110
1. Show that F has a positive radius of convergence.
2. Show that the recurrence relation among the f
n
implies that F(z) =
1
1−z−z
2
. (Hint: Write
down the power series of zF(z) and z
2
F(z) and rearrange both so that you can easily add.)
3. Verify that Res
z=0

1
z
n+1
(1−z−z
2
)

= f
n
.
4. Use the Residue Theorem 9.9 to derive an identity for f
n
. (Hint: Integrate
1
z
n+1
(1−z−z
2
)
around a circle with center 0 and radius R, and show that this integral vanishes as R →∞.)
5. Generalize to other recurrence relations.
10.4 The ‘Coin-Exchange Problem’
In this exercise, we will solve and extend a classical problem of Ferdinand Georg Frobenius (1849–
1917)
3
. Suppose a and b are relatively prime
4
positive integers, and t is a positive integer. Consider
the function
f(z) =
1
(1 −z
a
) (1 −z
b
) z
t+1
.
1. Compute the residues at all non-zero poles of f.
2. Verify that Res
z=0
(f) = N(t), where
N(t) = #{(m, n) ∈ Z : m, n ≥ 0, ma +nb = t} .
3. Use the Residue Theorem 9.9 to derive an identity for N(t). (Hint: Integrate f around a
circle with center 0 and radius R, and show that this integral vanishes as R →∞.)
4. Use the following three steps to simplify this identity to
N(t) =
t
ab

b
−1
t
a

a
−1
t
b

+ 1 .
Here, {x} denotes the fractional part
5
of x, and a
−1
a ≡ 1 (mod b)
6
, and b
−1
b ≡ 1 (mod a).
(a) Verify that for b = 1,
N(t) = #{(m, n) ∈ Z : m, n ≥ 0, ma +n = t} = #{m ∈ Z : m ≥ 0, ma ≤ t}
= #
¸
0,
t
a

∩ Z

=
t
a

t
a

+ 1 .
3
For more information about Frobenius, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Frobenius.html.
4
this means that the integers don’t have any common factor
5
The fractional part of a real number x is, loosely speaking, the “part after the decimal point.” More thoroughly,
the greatest integer function of x, denoted by ⌊x⌋, is the greatest integer not exceeding x. The fractional part is then
{x} = x − ⌊x⌋.
6
This means that a
−1
is an integer such that a
−1
a = 1 + kb for some k ∈ Z.
CHAPTER 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM 111
(b) Use this together with the identity found in 3. to obtain
1
a
a−1
¸
k=1
1
(1 −e
2πik/a
)e
2πikt/a
= −

t
a

+
1
2

1
2a
.
(c) Verify that
a−1
¸
k=1
1
(1 −e
2πikb/a
)e
2πikt/a
=
a−1
¸
k=1
1
(1 −e
2πik/a
)e
2πikb
−1
t/a
.
5. Prove that N(ab −a −b) = 0, and N(t) > 0 for all t > ab −a −b.
6. More generally, prove that, if k is a nonnegative integer, N ((k + 1)ab −a −b) = k, and
N(t) > k for all t > (k + 1)ab −a −b.
Historical remark. Given relatively prime positive integers a
1
, . . . , a
n
, let’s call an integer t repre-
sentable if there exist nonnegative integers m
1
, . . . , m
n
such that
t =
n
¸
j=1
m
j
a
j
.
In the late 19th century, Frobenius raised the problem of finding the largest integer which is
not representable. We call this largest integer the Frobenius number g(a
1
, . . . , a
n
). It is well
known (probably at least since the 1880’s, when James Joseph Sylvester (1814–1897)
7
studied the
Frobenius problem) that g(a
1
, a
2
) = a
1
a
2
− a
1
− a
2
. We verified this result in 5. For n > 2, there
is no known closed formula for g(a
1
, . . . , a
n
). The formula in 4. is due to Popoviciu. The notion of
an integer being representable k times and the respective formula obtained in 6. can only be found
in the most recent literature.
10.5 Dedekind sums
This exercise outlines yet another nontraditional application of the Residue Theorem 9.9. Given
two positive, relatively prime integers a and b, let
f(z) = cot(πaz) cot(πbz) cot(πz) .
1. Choose an ǫ > 0 such that the rectangular path γ
R
from 1 −ǫ −iR to 1 −ǫ +iR to −ǫ +iR
to −ǫ −iR back to 1 −ǫ −iR does not pass through any of the poles of f.
(a) Compute the residues for the poles of f inside γ
R
.
Hint: use the periodicity of the cotangent and the fact that
cot z =
1
z

1
3
z + higher-order terms .
7
For more information about Sylvester, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Sylvester.html.
CHAPTER 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM 112
(b) Prove that lim
R→∞

γ
R
f = −2i and deduce that for any R > 0

γ
R
f = −2i .
2. Define
s(a, b) =
1
4b
b−1
¸
k=1
cot

πka
b

cot

πk
b

. (10.1)
Use the Residue Theorem 9.9 to show that
s(a, b) +s(b, a) = −
1
4
+
1
12

a
b
+
1
ab
+
b
a

. (10.2)
3. Can you generalize (10.1) and (10.2)?
Historical remark. The sum (10.1) is called a Dedekind
8
sum. It first appeared in the study of the
Dedekind η-function
η(z) = exp

πiz
12

¸
k≥1
(1 −exp(2πikz))
in the 1870’s and has since intrigued mathematicians from such different areas as topology, number
theory, and discrete geometry. The reciprocity law (10.2) is the most important and famous identity
of the Dedekind sum. The proof that is outlined here is due to Hans Rademacher (1892–1969)
9
.
8
For more information about Julius Wilhelm Richard Dedekind (1831–1916), see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Dedekind.html.
9
For more information about Rademacher, see
http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Rademacher.html.
Solutions to Selected Exercises
Chapter 1
2. (b)
19
25

8
25
i
(c) 1
(d) 1 if n = 4k, k ∈ Z; i if n = 1 + 4k, k ∈ Z; −1 if n = 2 + 4k, k ∈ Z; −i if n = 3 + 4k, k ∈ Z.
3. (a)

5, −2 −i
(b) 5

5, 5 −10i
(c)

10
11
,
3
1
1(

2 −1) +
i
11
(

2 + 9)
(d) 8, 8i
4. (a) 2e
i
π
2
(b)

2e
i
π
4
(c) 2

3e
i

6
5. (a) −1 +i
(b) 34i
(c) −1
10. (a) z = e
i
π
3
k
, k = 0, 1, . . . , 5
(b) z = 2e
i
π
4
+
π
2
k
, k = 0, 1, 2, 3
13. z = e
i
π
4
−1 and z = e
i

4
−1
Chapter 2
2. (a) 0
(b) 1 +i
12. (a) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative −e
−x
e
−iy
(b) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic
(c) differentiable on {x +iy ∈ C : x = y} with derivative 2x, nowhere holomorphic
(d) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic
(e) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative −sin xcosh y −i cos xsinhy
(f) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic
(g) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0, nowhere holomorphic
(h) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0, nowhere holomorphic
(i) differentiable at i with derivative i, nowhere holomorphic
(j) differentiable on {x +iy ∈ C : x = y} with derivative 2x −2ix, nowhere holomorphic
(k) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0, nowhere holomorphic
(l) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative 2(z −z)
113
SOLUTIONS TO SELECTED EXERCISES 114
Chapter 3
37. (a) differentiable at 0, nowhere holomorphic
(b) differentiable and holomorphic on C \

−1, e
i
π
3
, e
−i
π
3
¸
(c) differentiable and holomorphic on C\ {x +iy ∈ C : x ≥ −1, y = 2}
(d) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic
(e) differentiable and holomorphic on C\ {x +iy ∈ C : x ≤ 3, y = 0}
(f) differentiable and holomorphic in C (i.e. entire)
38. (a) z = i
(b) There is no solution.
(c) z = ln π +i

π
2
+ 2πk

, k ∈ Z
(d) z =
π
2
+ 2πk ±4i, k ∈ Z
(e) z =
π
2
+πk, k ∈ Z
(f) z = πki, k ∈ Z
(g) z = πk, k ∈ Z
(h) z = 2i
41. f

(z) = c z
c−1
Chapter 4
3. −2πi
4. (a) 8πi
(b) 0
(c) 0
(d) 0
21. 0
23.


3
30 0 for r < |a|; 2πi for r > |a|
31 0 for r = 1; −
πi
3
for r = 3; 0 for r = 5
Chapter 5
3. (a) 0
(b) 2πi
(c) 0
(d) πi
(e) 0
(f) 0
7. Any simply connected set which does not contain the origin, for example, C \ (−∞, 0].
Chapter 7
2. (a) divergent
(b) convergent (limit 0)
(c) divergent
(d) convergent (limit 2 −
i
2
)
(e) convergent (limit 0)
SOLUTIONS TO SELECTED EXERCISES 115
24. (a)
¸
k≥0
(−4)
k
z
k
(b)
¸
k≥0
1
3·6
k
z
k
27. (a)
¸
k≥0
(−1)
k
(z −1)
k
(b)
¸
k≥1
(−1)
k−1
k
(z −1)
k
30. (a) ∞ if |a| < 1, 1 if |a| = 1, and 0 if |a| > 1.
(b) 1
(c) 1 (careful reasoning!)
(d) 1 (careful reasoning!)
Chapter 8
1. (a) {z ∈ C : |z| < 1}, {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} for any r < 1
(b) C, {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} for any r
(c) {z ∈ C : |z −3| > 1}, {z ∈ C : r ≤ |z −3| ≤ R} for any 1 < r ≤ R
3.
¸
k≥0
e
k!
(z −1)
k
10. The maximum is 3 (attained at z = ±i), and the minimum is 1 (attained at z = ±1).
12. One Laurent series is
¸
k≥0
(−2)
k
(z −1)
−k−2
, converging for |z −1| > 2.
13. One Laurent series is
¸
k≥0
(−2)
k
(z −2)
−k−3
, converging for |z −2| > 2.
14. One Laurent series is −3(z + 1)
−1
+ 1, converging for z = −1.
15.
1
sinz
= z
−1
+
1
6
z +
7
360
z
3
+. . .
20. (a)
¸
k≥0
(−1)
k
(2k)!
z
2k−2
Chapter 9
7. (a) 0
(b) 1
(c) 4
9. (a) One Laurent series is
¸
k≥−2
(−1)
k
4
k+3
(z −2)
k
, converging for 0 < |z −2| < 4.
(b) −
πi
8
10. (a) 2πi
(b)
27πi
4
(c) −
2πi
1
7
(d)
πi
3
(e) 2πi
(f) 0
11. (a)
¸
k≥0
1
e k!
(z + 1)
k
(b)
2πi
e 33!
16. (c)
π
2

2

These are the lecture notes of a one-semester undergraduate course which we have taught several times at Binghamton University (SUNY) and San Francisco State University. For many of our students, complex analysis is their first rigorous analysis (if not mathematics) class they take, and these notes reflect this very much. We tried to rely on as few concepts from real analysis as possible. In particular, series and sequences are treated “from scratch.” This also has the (maybe disadvantageous) consequence that power series are introduced very late in the course. We thank our students who made many suggestions for and found errors in the text. Special thanks go to Joshua Palmatier, Collin Bleak and Sharma Pallekonda at Binghamton University (SUNY) for comments after teaching from this book.

Contents
1 Complex Numbers 1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1 Definitions and Algebraic Properties 1.2 From Algebra to Geometry and Back 1.3 Geometric Properties . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Elementary Topology of the Plane . 1.5 Theorems from Calculus . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Differentiation 2.1 First Steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Differentiability and Holomorphicity 2.3 Constant Functions . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 The Cauchy–Riemann Equations . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 3 6 8 10 11 15 15 17 19 20 23 26 26 29 32 34 37 39 44 44 47 49 51 55 55 57 60 62

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3 Examples of Functions 3.1 M¨bius Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . o 3.2 Infinity and the Cross Ratio . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Stereographic Projection . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Exponential and Trigonometric Functions . 3.5 The Logarithm and Complex Exponentials Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Integration 4.1 Definition and Basic Properties 4.2 Cauchy’s Theorem . . . . . . . 4.3 Cauchy’s Integral Formula . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 Consequences of Cauchy’s Theorem 5.1 Extensions of Cauchy’s Formula . . . . 5.2 Taking Cauchy’s Formula to the Limit 5.3 Antiderivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .5 Dedekind sums . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Residues . . . . . . . . . .3 Argument Principle and Rouch´’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Discrete Applications of the Residue 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Power Series 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Sequences and Completeness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7. . . . . . . . .1 Power Series and Holomorphic Functions . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Sequences and Series of Functions 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Region of Convergence . . . . .2 Binomial Coefficients . . . . . 7. .3 Fibonacci Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 65 65 67 69 70 70 72 75 78 82 86 86 89 91 94 97 97 101 103 105 108 108 109 109 110 111 113 8 Taylor and Laurent Series 8. . . . . . . . .3 Laurent Series . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . e Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solutions to Selected Exercises Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Classification of Singularities . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mean-Value and Maximum/Minimum Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. . . . . . . . . . . 10. . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . 10. . . .2 Classification of Zeros and the Identity Principle 8. . . . . . Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Isolated Singularities and the Residue Theorem 9. . . .4 The ‘Coin-Exchange Problem’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .CONTENTS 6 Harmonic Functions 6. . . .1 Infinite Sums . . . . . . . . . .1 Definition and Basic Properties . . . . . . . . . 8. . . . . . . . . . . . .

You can also take limits and do calculus. 1. for example. not only do we gain a number with interesting properties. will have the operations of addition.1). There are useful laws that govern these operations such as the commutative and distributive laws. like the real numbers. We then 1 . These properties will be both algebraic properties (such as the commutative and distributive properties mentioned already) and also geometric properties. These operations will follow all the laws that we are used to such as the commutative and distributive laws. In the next section we show exactly how the complex numbers are set up and in the rest of this chapter we will explore the properties of the complex numbers. alles andere ist Menschenwerk. i2 + 1 = 0 or i2 = −1. that multiplication can be described geometrically. (1.1) Most of you have heard that there is a “new” number i that is a root of the Equation (1. you cannot find a root of the equation x2 + 1 = 0. But you cannot take the square root of −1. We will also be able to take limits and do calculus. the calculus of complex numbers will be built on the propeties that we develop in this chapter. Equivalently.1). there will be a root of Equation (1. each of which is useful in its own right. the complex numbers.0 Introduction The real numbers have many nice properties.) Leopold Kronecker (1823–1891) 1. but we do not lose any of the nice properties that we had before. (God created the integers. There are operations such as addition. subtraction. That is. we begin with the formal definition of a complex number. Specifically. subtraction. You will see. everything else is made by humans.1 Definitions and Algebraic Properties There are many equivalent ways to think about a complex number. In this section. In the rest of the book. We will show that when the real numbers are enlarged to a new system called the complex numbers that includes i.Chapter 1 Complex Numbers Die ganzen Zahlen hat der liebe Gott geschaffen. multiplication as well as division by any real number except zero. And. multiplication as well as division by any complex number except zero.

y) ∀ (x. y) · (a. 0) behave just like real numbers. 0) = (x + y. b) = (xa − yb. y) + (a. Its proof is straightforward but nevertheless a good exercise. y).1. (c. One reason to believe that the definitions of these binary operations are “good” is that C is an extension of R. ·) is a field. we will see three more ways of thinking about complex numbers. 0). 1) · (0.5) (1. y) ∈ C \ {(0. Theorem 1. y) ∈ C : (x. y) + (−x. b). d) ∈ C : (x. Then. b) · (c. What we are stating here can be compressed in the language of algebra: equations (1.8)–(1. d) ∀ (x. b) ∈ C : (x. xb + ya) . 0)}. (a. b) ∈ C ∀ (x. b) + (c. y) + (a.11) (1. (C. So we can think of the real numbers being embedded in C as those complex numbers whose second coordinate is zero.12) ∀ (x. equipped with the addition (x. +) is an Abelian group with unit element (0. b) + (c. b) = (a.7) (1. b). (a. (a. b). y) + (0. y) · (a. b) = (a. 0) = (x · y. 0) and (x.12) that (C \ {(0. (c. y) · (c.2) (1. (c. (a. 0) Remark. b) · (x. y). y) ∈ C : (x. C = {(x. b) · (c.) The definition of our multiplication implies the innocent looking statement (0. y) ∀ (x. +. b) + (c.6) (1. y). (x. d) = (x. The following basic theorem states the algebraic structure that we established with our definitions. y) · ∀ (x. 0) · (y. y). that is. y). y) · (a. y) −y x x2 +y 2 . (a. −y) = (0.13) . y) ∀ (x. b) ∈ C : (x. y) ∈ C : (x. 0). y) + (a. (a. that is: ∀ (x.8) (1. y) · (a. d) = (x. b) ∈ C (1. b) ∈ C : (x. (a.2)– (1. (If you don’t know what these terms mean—don’t worry. in the next section.CHAPTER 1. b) + (x.6) say that (C. 0) = (x. y + b) and the multiplication (x.9) (1. x2 +y 2 ∀ (x. y).4) (1. d) = (1. y) = (ax. y) + (a. equations (1. ·) is an abelian group with unit element (1. ay) (1. y) · (a. COMPLEX NUMBERS 2 interpret this formal definition into more useful and easier to work with algebraic language. 1) = (−1. 0) + (y. d) ∀ (x. y) : x. 0)} : (x. y) + (a. b) = (x + a.3) (1. in the sense that the complex numbers of the form (x. y ∈ R} . d) ∈ C : (x. y) · (1. 0) · (x. This identity together with the fact that (a. 0). The complex numbers can be defined as pairs of real numbers. 0) ∀ (x. 0) .10) (1. b) ∈ C : (x. d) = (x. we will not have to deal with them. b) + (x. y). y) · (a. 0) = (x. y) · (a. d) ∈ C : (x.

The addition that we defined for complex numbers resembles vector addition. It is not just that the polynomial z 2 + 1 has roots. The latter implies that we can write (x.2 From Algebra to Geometry and Back Although we just introduced a new way of writing complex numbers.7) Every non-constant polynomial of degree d has d roots (counting multiplicity) in C. and certainly not one that agrees with our definition of the product of two complex numbers. Any vector in R2 is defined by its two coordinates. it is also determined by its length and the angle it encloses with. In fact. 0) and (0. and an argument of z = x + iy is a number φ ∈ R such that and y = r sin φ . with the real coefficients x and y. we will call the x-axis the real axis and the y-axis the imaginary axis. 3 If we think—in the spirit of our remark on the embedding of R in C—of (x.CHAPTER 1.2. can be thought of as the real number 1. say i. The number x is called the real part and y the imaginary part1 of the complex number x + iy. The proof of this theorem requires some important machinery. When plotting these vectors in the plane R2 . 1) .13) then reads i2 = −1 . 1) a special name. so we defer its proof and an extended discussion of it to Chapter 5. . let’s define these concepts thoroughly. (see Theorem 5. imagined. much more can now be said with the introduction of the square root of −1. 0). 0) · (1. y) as a linear combination of (1. 0) as the real numbers x and y. (1. then this means that we can write any complex number (x. then the complex number that we used to call (x. This algebraic way of thinking about complex numbers has a name: a complex number written in the form x + iy where x and y are both real numbers is in rectangular form. say. COMPLEX NUMBERS allows an alternative notation for complex numbers. y)-notation. So if we give (0. let’s for a moment return to the (x. but every polynomial has roots in C: Theorem 1. The identity (1. 0) + (0. The name has historical reasons: people thought of complex numbers as unreal. 1. the positive real axis. x + iy . 0) + (y. y) = (x. The absolute value (sometimes also called the modulus) r = |z| ∈ R of z = x + iy is r = |z| := x = r cos φ 1 x2 + y 2 . y) can be written as x · 1 + y · i. in turn. y) = (x.1 are coherent with the usual real arithmetic rules if we think of complex numbers as given in the form x + iy. The analogy stops at multiplication: there is no “usual” multiplication of two vectors in R2 that gives another vector. often denoted as Re(x + iy) = x and Im(x + iy) = y. We invite the reader to check that the definitions of our binary operations and Theorem 1. 1). 0) · (0. It suggests that one can think of a complex number as a two-dimensional real vector. or in short. 0) and (y. On the other hand.

the number 1 = 1 + 0i lies on the x-axis. Let’s say we have two complex numbers. z2 ∈ C be two complex numbers. and so has argument 0. 4π. and x2 + iy2 with absolute value r2 and argument φ2 .2). z2 ) = (x1 − x2 )2 + (y1 − y2 )2 . thought of as vectors in R2 . It is very useful to keep this geometric interpretation in mind when thinking about the absolute value of the difference of two complex numbers. this is also equal to z2 − z1 . the vector from z2 to z1 . For instance. and every number φ is an argument. Let z1 = x1 +iy1 and z2 = x2 +iy2 . A given complex number z = x + iy has infinitely many possible arguments. or 2π ∗ k for any integer k. From geometry we know that d(z1 . The absolute value of the difference of two vectors has a nice geometric interpretation: Proposition 1. we can write . Let z1 . for any complex number z. but we could just as well say it has argument 2π. This means. the arguments of z all differ by a multiple of 2π.3.1: Addition of complex numbers. The number 0 = 0 + 0i has modulus 0. z2 ) denote the distance between (the endpoints of ) the two vectors in R2 (see Figure 1. and let d(z1 . COMPLEX NUMBERS z1 +/ z2 WW 4 // z1 // DD // // / z2 WWWWW kk WWWWW /// WW Figure 1. −2π. Then d(z1 . Proof.2: Geometry behind the “distance” between two complex numbers. just as we saw for the example z = 1. z1 j z1 − z2 jjjjj DD44 j jjjj jjjj jjj z2 WWWWW kkj WWWWW WW Figure 1.CHAPTER 1. Aside from the exceptional case of 0. The first hint that the absolute value and argument of a complex number are useful concepts is the fact that they allow us to give a geometric interpretation for the multiplication of two complex numbers. Since (x1 − x2 )2 = (x2 − x1 )2 and (y1 − y2 )2 = (y2 − y1 )2 . This is the definition of |z1 − z2 |. That |z1 − z2 | = |z2 − z1 | simply says that the vector from z1 to z2 has the same length as its inverse. x1 + iy1 with absolute value r1 and argument φ1 . z2 ) = |z1 − z2 | = |z2 − z1 |.

MMM .. we are multiplying the lengths of the two vectors representing our two complex numbers... 2 ffM. So the absolute value of the product is r1 r2 and (one of) its argument is φ1 + φ2 .... z ... .... . . . . ... .... φ1 + φ2. . .. . . . .. .... . .. we make use of some classic trigonometric identities: (x1 + iy1 )(x2 + iy2 ) = (r1 cos φ1 ) + i(r1 sin φ1 ) (r2 cos φ2 ) + i(r2 sin φ2 ) = r1 r2 (cos φ1 cos φ2 − sin φ1 sin φ2 ) + i(cos φ1 sin φ2 + sin φ1 cos φ2 ) = (r1 r2 cos φ1 cos φ2 − r1 r2 sin φ1 sin φ2 ) + i(r1 r2 cos φ1 sin φ2 + r1 r2 sin φ1 cos φ2 ) = r1 r2 cos(φ1 + φ2 ) + i sin(φ1 + φ2 ) ... .... .. .. φ2 .2 . Geometrically. .. .... . and adding their angles measured with respect to the positive x-axis. FF ..... COMPLEX NUMBERS 5 x1 + iy1 = (r1 cos φ1 ) + i(r1 sin φ1 ) and x2 + iy2 = (r2 cos φ2 ) + i(r2 sin φ2 ) To compute the product....CHAPTER 1.. . z1 ... ..

.. . φ ... MMM .

.

M. . 1 . .. . . . .

.

3 Peter Hilton (Invited address. rr . For any φ. r . We will later see in Chapter 3 that it has an intimate connection to the complex exponential function. (a) eiφ1 eiφ2 = ei(φ1 +φ2 ) (b) 1/eiφ = e−iφ (c) ei(φ+2π) = eiφ (d) eiφ = 1 One should convince oneself that there is no problem with the fact that there are many possible arguments for complex numbers. Hudson River Undergraduate Mathematics Conference 2000) 2 . . etc. In view of the above calculation.. . . rr . At this point. (and because “Mathematics is for lazy people”3 ) we introduce a shortcut notation and define eiφ = cos φ + i sin φ .4. bytes. we motivate this maybe strange-seeming definition by collecting some of its properties.3: Multiplication of complex numbers. ink. The reader is encouraged to prove them. this exponential notation is indeed purely a notation. For now. as both cosine and sine are periodic functions with period 2π. rrrrr . r . . To save space. . xx rrr z1 z2 Figure 1.. .rrr . φ2 ∈ R. .. it should come as no surprise that we will have to deal with quantities of the form cos φ + i sin φ (where φ is some real number) quite a bit. φ1 . Lemma 1.

.5.14) The square of the absolute value has the nice property |x + iy|2 = x2 + y 2 = (x + iy)(x − iy) . (1.CHAPTER 1.4: Five ways of thinking about a complex number z ∈ C. conjugating z means reflecting the vector corresponding to z with respect to the real axis.3 Geometric Properties From very basic geometric properties of triangles. and translating between them is an essential ingredient in complex analysis. With this notation. in polar form. For any z. we get the inequalities −|z| ≤ Re z ≤ |z| and − |z| ≤ Im z ≤ |z| . y) Geometric: z y x Figure 1. Each of these five ways is useful in different situations. The following collects some basic properties of the conjugate. and geometrically using Cartesian coordinates or polar coordinates. z1 . We denote the conjugate by x + iy = x − iy . COMPLEX NUMBERS 6 rectangular x + iy cartesian exponential reiθ polar r θ z Algebraic: Formal (x. in rectangular form. We now have five different ways of thinking about a complex number: the formal definition. the sentence “The complex number x+iy has absolute value r and argument φ” now becomes the identity x + iy = reiφ . Geometrically. The left-hand side is often called the rectangular form. z2 ∈ C. (e) d dφ eiφ = i eiφ . Their easy proofs are left for the exercises. This is one of many reasons to give the process of passing from x + iy to x − iy a special name: x − iy is called the (complex) conjugate of x + iy. the right-hand side the polar form of this complex number. Lemma 1. The five ways and their corresponding notation are listed in Figure 1. 1.4.

For z1 .6. z2 . To prove it algebraically.CHAPTER 1.5: |z1 + z2 |2 = (z1 + z2 ) (z1 + z2 ) = (z1 + z2 ) (z1 + z2 ) = z1 z1 + z1 z2 + z2 z1 + z2 z2 = |z1 |2 + 2 Re (z1 z2 ) + |z2 |2 . · · · ∈ C. which is equivalent to our claim. you should be able to come up with a geometric proof of this inequality. By drawing a picture in the complex plane. z |z| A famous geometric inequality (which holds for vectors in Rn ) is the triangle inequality |z1 + z2 | ≤ |z1 | + |z2 | . COMPLEX NUMBERS (a) z1 ± z2 = z1 ± z2 (b) z1 · z2 = z1 · z2 (c) z1 z2 7 = z1 z2 (d) z = z (e) |z| = |z| (f) |z|2 = zz (g) Re z = (h) Im z = 1 2 1 2i (z + z) (z − z) (i) eiφ = e−iφ . we have the following identities: . For future reference we list several variants of the triangle inequality: Lemma 1. Finally by (1. From part (f) we have a neat formula for the inverse of a non-zero complex number: z −1 = z 1 = 2.14) |z1 + z2 |2 ≤ |z1 |2 + 2 |z1 z2 | + |z2 |2 = |z1 |2 + z1 z2 + z1 z2 + |z2 |2 = |z1 |2 + 2 |z1 | |z2 | + |z2 |2 = |z1 |2 + 2 |z1 | |z2 | + |z2 |2 = (|z1 | + |z2 |)2 . we make extensive use of Lemma 1.

COMPLEX NUMBERS (a) The triangle inequality: |±z1 ± z2 | ≤ |z1 | + |z2 |. Example 1. using the fact that |±z| = |z|. Notice that this does not include the circle itself.7. A set is open if all its points are interior points. That is. we will need the following theorems only at a limited number of places in the remainder of the book. can be identified with the points in the Euclidean plane R2 . For R > 0 and z0 ∈ C. and the last follows by induction. They are also closed! . We need some terminology for talking about subsets of C. The idea is that if you don’t move too far from an interior point of E then you remain in E. (b) The reverse triangle inequality: |±z1 ± z2 | ≥ |z1 | − |z2 |. C and the empty set ∅ are open. but at a boundary point you can make an arbitrarily small move and get to a point inside E and you can also make an arbitrarily small move and get to a point outside E.9. w ∈ C. Definition 1. and is written Dr (a). (d) A point d is an isolated point of E if it lies in E and some open disk centered at d contains no point of E other than d. that is. which were initially defined algebraically.8. {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | ≤ R} is closed. the reader who is willing to accept the topological arguments in later proofs on faith may skip the theorems in this section.CHAPTER 1. 1.10. Dr (a) = {z ∈ C : |z − a| < r}. Recall that if z. (c) A point c is an accumulation point of E if every open disk centered at c contains a point of E different from c.2 we saw that the complex numbers C. this is the circle with center a and radius r. The first inequality is just a rewrite of the original triangle inequality. While the definitions are essential and will be used frequently. {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R} and {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | > R} are open. A set is closed if it contains all its boundary points. So if we fix a complex number a and a positive real number r then the set of z satisfying |z − a| = r is the set of points at distance r from a. Definition 1. then |z − w| is the distance between z and w as points in the plane. The reverse triangle inequality is proved in Exercise 22. (a) A point a is an interior point of E if some open disk with center a lies in E. n n 8 (c) The triangle inequality for sums: k=1 zk ≤ k=1 |zk |. Example 1.4 Elementary Topology of the Plane In Section 1. The inside of this circle is called the open disk with center a and radius r. In this section we collect some definitions and results concerning the topology of the plane. Suppose E is any subset of C. (b) A point b is a boundary point of E if every open disk centered at b contains a point in E and also a point that is not in E.

12. The closure of E. a set is connected if it is “in one piece.13. if G is a connected open subset of C then any two points of G may be connected by a curve in G. On the other hand. that is. in the plane there is a vast variety of connected subsets. The idea of separation is that the two open sets A and B ensure that X and Y cannot just “stick together. On the other hand.CHAPTER 1. 2] on the real axis are separated: There are infinitely many choices for A and B that work. Theorem 1. is the set of all boundary points of E. Two sets X. Definition 1. which is [0. It is a customary and practical abuse of notation to use the same letter for the curve and its parametrization. However. in fact. The boundary of a set E. the curve does not cross itself. If W is a subset of C that has the property that any two points in W can be connected by a curve in W then W is connected. is not connected. One type of connected set that we will use frequently is a curve. but its proof requires more preparation in topology: Proposition 1. A curve is closed if γ(a) = γ(b) and is a simple closed curve if γ(s) = γ(t) implies s = a and t = b or s = b and t = a. The path γ is smooth if γ is differentiable.14.” In the reals a set is connected if and only if it is an interval. We emphasize that a curve must have a parametrization. One notion that is somewhat subtle in the complex domain is the idea of connectedness. we can connect any two points of G by a chain of horizontal and vertical segments lying in G. We say that the curve is parametrized by γ. written ∂E.16. COMPLEX NUMBERS 9 Definition 1. G is a closed disk and ∂G is a circle. b] → C. Intuitively. 2] \ {1}. and ∂G = {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | = R} . so there is little reason to discuss the matter. x(t) and y(t). b] is a closed interval in R. it is hard to use the definition to show that a set is connected. is the set of points in E together with all boundary points of E. the intervals X = [0. and setting γ(t) = x(t) + y(t)i. 1) and Y = (1. A set W ⊆ C is connected if it is impossible to find two separated non-empty sets whose union is equal to W . Hence their union.15. Y ⊆ C are separated if there are disjoint open sets A and B so that X ⊆ A and Y ⊆ B. Example 1. since we have to rule out any possible separation. A path or curve in C is the image of a continuous function γ : [a. A region is a connected open set. The following seems intuitively clear.” It is usually easy to check that a set is not connected. b]. The next theorem gives an easy way to check whether an open set is connected. Definition 1. so a definition is necessary. If G is the open disk {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R} then G = {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | ≤ R} That is. For example. one choice is A = D1 (0) (the open disk with center 0 and radius 1) and B = D1 (2) (the open disk with center 2 and radius 1). Since we may regard C as identified with R2 . Any curve is connected. written E. a path can be specified by giving two continuous real-valued functions of a real variable.11. . and that the parametrization must be defined and continuous on a closed and bounded interval [a. where [a. The interior of E is the set of all interior points of E. and also gives a very useful property of open connected sets.

zn so that. so D ⊆ B. For example. and then adding at most two segments in D that connect a to z. zk and zk+1 are the endpoints of a horizontal or vertical segment which lies entirely in G. A more extreme example. and this contradicts Proposition 1. circles are connected but there is no way to connect two distinct points of a circle by a chain of segments which are subsets of the circle. and this is impossible.15. Now let G0 = G \ {0}.16 is not generally true if G is not open. For example. Suppose a is in A.17 (Extreme-Value Theorem). Any continuous real-valued function defined on a closed and bounded subset of Rn has a minimum value and a maximum value. If z0 could be connected to any point in D by a chain of segments in G then. so we have shown that A is open. but now you may need more than two segments to connect points. which is impossible. is the “topologist’s sine curve. . That is. . Hence z0 cannot connect to any point of D by a chain of segments in G. . Since a ∈ G there is an open disk D with center a that is contained in G. so it determines a curve. . let G be the open disk with center 0 and radius 2. G = A. and B is the set of points in G that are not in A. so z0 can be connected to any point of G by a sequence of segments in G. Then any two points in G can be connected by a chain of at most 2 segments in G.16. and so B must be empty. Proof of Theorem 1. that any two points of G may be connected by a path that lies in G. Now suppose that G is a connected open set. Choose a point z0 ∈ G and define two sets: A is the set of all points a so that there is a chain of segments in G connecting z0 to a.) As an example.CHAPTER 1. Suppose. The reader may skip the following proof. and they are separated by A and B. Since b ∈ G there is an open disk D centered at b that lies in G.” which is a connected set S ⊂ C that contains points that cannot be connected by a curve of any sort inside S. so G is connected. Warning: The second part of Theorem 1. But z0 is in A so A is not empty. If G is not connected then we can write it as a union of two non-empty separated subsets X and Y . Now G is the disjoint union of the two open sets A and B. discussed in topology texts. So there are disjoint open sets A and B so that X ⊆ A and Y ⊆ B. Let γ be a path in G that connects a to b. Since X and Y are disjoint we can find a ∈ X and b ∈ G. z1 . (It is not hard to parametrize such a chain. If these are both non-empty then they form a separation of G. we could connect z0 to b. first. Since z0 could be any point in G. for each k. It is included to illustrate some common techniques in dealing with connected sets. this finishes the proof. you need three segments to connect −1 to 1 since you cannot go through 0.5 Theorems from Calculus Here are a few theorems from real calculus that we will make use of in the course of the text. this is the punctured disk obtained by removing the center from G. So we have shown that B is open. Then G is open and it is connected. Then Xγ = X ∩ γ and Yγ = Y ∩ γ are disjoint and non-empty. Theorem 1. 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 10 A chain of segments in G means the following: there are points z0 . extending this chain by at most two more segments. each point of D is in A. But this means that γ is not connected. . We can connect z0 to any point z in D by following a chain of segments from z0 to a. That is. their union is γ. Now suppose b is in B.

For functions of several variables we can perform differentiation operations. Finally. Find the real and imaginary parts of each of the following: (a) z−a z+a (a ∈ R). b a f (x) dx (b) If F is any antiderivative of f (that is. If f is continuous on the rectangle given by a ≤ b d d b x ≤ b and c ≤ y ≤ d then the iterated integrals a c f (x. y) dy dx and c a f (x. The most important of all calculus theorems combines differentiation and integration (in two ways): Theorem 1. see http://www-groups. or integration operations.html. (b) w − z. if we have sufficient continuity: ∂ f ∂ f Theorem 1.22 (Leibniz’s4 Rule). Then ∂x d dx d d f (x. y0 ). y) dy = c c ∂f (x.19 (Fundamental Theorem of Calculus).dcs. Suppose f : [a. x + ∆x ∈ I. (c) z 3 . ∂x Exercises 1. 2. y) dy . If the mixed partials ∂x∂y and ∂y∂x are defined on an open set G and are continuous at a point (x0 . F ′ = f ) then = F (b) − F (a). (e) z 2 + z + i. y) dx dy are equal. COMPLEX NUMBERS 11 Theorem 1.18 (Mean-Value Theorem). we can apply differentiation and integration with respect to different variables in either order: Theorem 1. Suppose I ⊆ R is an interval. For more information about Leibnitz. Compute: (a) z + 3w. in any order. (d) Re(w2 + w).ac.21 (Equality of iterated integrals).20 (Equality of mixed partials). Suppose f is continuous on the rectangle R given by a ≤ x ≤ b and c ≤ y ≤ d. y0 ) in G then they are equal at (x0 . . Then (a) If F is defined by F (x) = x a f (t) dt then F is differentiable and F ′ (x) = f (x). Then there is 0 < a < 1 such that f (x + ∆x) − f (x) = f ′ (x + a∆x) . f : I → R is differentiable. ∆x Many of the most important results of analysis concern combinations of limit operations. b] → R is continuous. and x. 4 Named after Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646–1716).st-and.uk/∼history/Biographies/Leibnitz. and suppose the partial derivative ∂f exists and is continuous on R. 2 2 Theorem 1.CHAPTER 1. Let z = 1 + 2i and w = 2 − i.

. Find the absolute value and conjugate of each of the following: (a) −2 + i. the roots of the equation az 2 + bz + c = 0. √ (g) 5 − i. 5. (d) −i. where a. c ∈ C. (d) (1 + i)6 . Write in polar form: (a) 2i. √ b2 are −b± 2a −4ac as long as a = 0. (h) 1−i √ 3 4 (e) (2 − i)2 . 6. Write in both polar and rectangular form: (a) 2i (b) eln(5) i (c) e1+iπ/2 (d) d φ+iφ dφ e 7. Prove the quadratic formula works for complex numbers. 2+3i (b) (2 + i)(4 + 3i). That is. (c) −ei250π . Put your answers in standard form. (d) 2e4πi . (c) √3−i . (b) 1 + i. √ 3 −1+i 3 . (f) |3 − 4i|. (c) −3 + √ 3i. Write in rectangular form: √ (a) 2 ei3π/4 . 8. 3. COMPLEX NUMBERS (b) (c) 3+5i 7i+1 . 4. regardless of whether the discriminant is negative. 2 12 (d) in for any n ∈ Z. (b) 34 eiπ/2 . Use the quadratic formula to solve the following equations. b.CHAPTER 1. prove.

16. (b) {z ∈ C : |z − 1 + i| ≤ 2} . 19. COMPLEX NUMBERS (a) z 2 + 25 = 0. Sketch the following sets in the complex plane: (a) {z ∈ C : |z − 1 + i| = 2} . (d) z 6 − z 3 − 2 = 0. Find all solutions to the following equations: (a) z 6 = 1. When solutions exist. . = z. (c) {z ∈ C : Re(z + 2 − 2i) = 3} . 15. Show that |z| = 1 if and only if 12. 13 9. Prove Theorem 1. 10. (b) 2z 2 + 2z + 5 = 0. Fix A ∈ C and B ∈ R. (e) z 2 = 2z. 13. Show that (a) z is a real number if and only if z = z. (d) z 2 − z = 1.1. Find all solutions of the equation z 2 + 2z + (1 − i) = 0. Show that if z1 z2 = 0 then z1 = 0 or z2 = 0. Use Lemma 1. (c) 5z 2 + 4z + 1 = 0. 11. 20. Show the equation 2|z| = |z + i| describes a circle. 18. (a) cos 3θ = cos3 θ − 3 cos θ sin2 θ. 14. show the solution set is a circle. (b) z is either real or purely imaginary if and only if (z)2 = z 2 . (b) z 4 = −16.4.4 to derive the triple angle formulas: (b) sin 3θ = 3 cos2 θ sin θ − sin3 θ.5. Prove Lemma 1. Show that the equation |z 2 | + Re(Az) + B = 0 has a solution if and only if |A2 | ≥ 4B. (e) {z ∈ C : |z| = |z + 1|} . (d) {z ∈ C : |z − i| + |z + i| = 3} . 17. Prove Lemma 1. 1 z (c) z 6 = −9.CHAPTER 1.

The set E in the previous exercise can be written in three different ways as the union of two disjoint nonempty separated subsets. Prove that (a) p(z) = p (z). and in each case say briefly why the subsets are separated. then ∂A ⊂ B. Let G be the annulus determined by the conditions 2 < |z| < 3. Show that if A ⊂ B and B is closed. (b) Determine the interior points of E. d . What are the boundaries of the sets in the previous exercise? 26. (d) Determine the isolated points of E. (c) Determine the boundary points of E. 27. if A ⊂ B and A is open. 22. interchange the order of ∂x integrations. closed. y) − f (a. (c) 0 < |z − 1| < 2. Prove Leibniz’s Rule: Define F (x) = c f (x. 31. COMPLEX NUMBERS 21. 28. show A is contained in the interior of B. y) as the integral of ∂f . Use the previous exercise to show that 1 z 2 −1 14 ≤ 1 3 for every z on the circle z = 2eiθ . Show that the union of two regions with nonempty intersection is itself a region. 25. being careful to indicate exactly the points that are in E. The set E is the set of points z in C satisfying either z is real and −2 < z < −1. y) dy.CHAPTER 1. (e) |z − 1| + |z + 1| < 3. and then differentiate using the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. 23. Find the maximum number of horizontal and vertical segments in G needed to connect two points of G. This is a connected open set. 29. (a) |z + 3| < 2. or |z| < 1. Similarly. (a) Sketch the set E. Describe them. bounded. 30. (b) p(z) = 0 if and only if p (z) = 0. (b) |Im z| < 1. Suppose p is a polynomial with real coefficients. Sketch the following sets and determine whether they are open. get an expression for F (x) − F (a) as an iterated integral by writing f (x. (d) |z − 1| + |z + 1| = 2. 24. Prove the reverse triangle inequality |z1 − z2 | ≥ |z1 | − |z2 |. or z = 1 or z = 2. or neither. connected.

y) = y 2 − ix. So far there is nothing that makes complex functions any more special than. f (x. This means that each element z ∈ G gets mapped to exactly one complex number. say. Then w0 is the limit of f as z approaches z0 . On the other hand. So in mathematics. The former three could be z defined on all of C. whereas for the latter we have to exclude the origin z = 0. we could construct some functions which make use of a certain representation of z.Chapter 2 Differentiation Mathematical study and research are very suggestive of mountaineering. we can construct many familiar looking functions from the standard calculus repertoire. it may be found hard to realise the great initial difficulty of making a little step which now seems so natural and obvious. Suppose f is a complex function with domain G and z0 is an accumulation point of G. Whymper made several efforts before he climbed the Matterhorn in the 1860’s and even then it cost the life of four of his party. Louis Joel Mordell (1888–1972) 2. Maybe the fundamental principle of analysis is that of a limit. or f (z) = 1 . any tourist can be hauled up for a small cost. Suppose there is a complex number w0 such that for every ǫ > 0. f (z) = 2z + i. and it may not be surprising if such a step has been found and lost again.1 First Steps A (complex) function f is a mapping from a subset G ⊆ C to C (in this situation we will write f : G → C and call G the domain of f ). In fact. but for sake of simplicity we only state it for those functions. and perhaps does not appreciate the difficulty of the original ascent. Just as in the real case. f (z) = z 3 . Now. The philosophy of the following definition is not restricted to complex functions. or f (r. however. functions from Rm to Rn .1. f (x. we can find δ > 0 so that for all z ∈ G satisfying 0 < |z − z0 | < δ we have |f (z) − w0 | < ǫ. y) = x − 2iy. for example. the definition does not require 15 . in short lim f (z) = w0 . z→z0 This definition is the same as is found in most calculus texts. called the image of z and usually denoted by f (z). Definition 2. φ) = 2rei(φ+π) . such as f (z) = z (the identity map). The reason we require that z0 is an accumulation point of the domain is just that we need to be sure that there are points z of the domain which are arbitrarily close to z0 .

we can write z = x ∈ R. Suppose G0 ⊆ G. x→0 x x→0 x z→0 z lim In the second case. If limz→z0 f (z) and limz→z0 g(z) exist. if z0 is in the domain of f . the proofs of these rules are everything but trivial and make for nice exercises. then: (a) lim f (z) + c lim g(z) = lim (f (z) + c g(z)) z→z0 z→z0 z→z0 (b) lim f (z) · lim g(z) = lim (f (z) · g(z)) z→z0 z→z0 z→z0 (c) lim f (z)/ lim g(z) = lim (f (z)/g(z)) . Because the definition of the limit is somewhat elaborate. as above. That is why we require 0 < |z − z0 |. the following fundamental definition looks almost trivial. Definition 2. Lemma 2. z→0 z y→0 iy y→0 iy lim So we get a different “limit” depending on the direction from which we approach 0.3. the definition explicitly ignores the value of f (z0 ). Suppose limz→z0 f (z) exists and has the value w0 . z ¯ Example 2. If z0 is in the domain of the function and either z0 is an isolated point of the domain or z→z0 lim f (z) = f (z0 ) then f is continuous at z0 . f is continuous on G ⊆ C if f is continuous at every z ∈ G. The definition of limit in the complex domain has to be treated with a little more care than its real companion. . Lemma 2. we try to compute this “limit” as z → 0 on the real and on the imaginary axis. z→0 z To see this. z0 ∈ C. and hence x z x = lim = lim = 1 . More generally. DIFFERENTIATION 16 that z0 is in the domain of f and. lim does not exist. In the first case. z On the other hand.4. and suppose z0 is an accumulation point of G0 .2. we write z = iy where y ∈ R. The following is a easy consequence of the definition. Suppose f is a complex function. Just as in the real case the limit w0 is unique if it exists. and then −iy z iy = lim = lim = −1 . It is often useful to investigate limits by restricting the way the point z “approaches” z0 . this is illustrated by the following example. Let f and g be complex functions and c.CHAPTER 2.5. z→z0 z→z0 z→z0 In the last identity we also require that limz→z0 g(z) = 0.2 ¯ then implies that limz→0 z does not exist. Lemma 2. the following “usual” limit rules are valid for complex functions. If f0 is the restriction of f to G0 then limz→z0 f0 (z) exists and has the value w0 .

z → 0. say. This lemma implies that direct substitution is allowed when f is continuous at the limit point. The difference quotient limit which defines f ′ (z0 ) can be rewritten as f ′ (z0 ) = lim h→0 f (z0 + h) − f (z0 ) . we have an additional dimension to play with. Suppose f : G → C is a complex function and z0 is an interior point of G. that is. If f is differentiable for all points in an open disk centered at z0 then f is called holomorphic at z0 ... On the real line there are only two directions to approach 0—from the left or from the right (or some combination of those two). The fact that the notions of differentiability and holomorphicity are actually different is seen in the following examples. that if f is continuous at w0 then limw→w0 f (w) = f (w0 ).8. z→z0 lim f (g(z)) = f z→z0 lim g(z) . 2.7. The function f is holomorphic on the open set G ⊆ C if it is differentiable (and hence holomorphic) at every point in G.CHAPTER 2.6. Note that h is not a real number but can rather approach zero from anywhere in the complex plane. In the complex plane.. In particular.. z→z0 lim 3 z 3 − z0 f (z) − f (z0 ) = lim z→z0 z − z0 z − z0 2 (z 2 + zz0 + z0 )(z − z0 ) z→z0 z − z0 2 2 2 = lim z + zz0 + z0 = 3z0 . z − z0 provided this limit exists. holomorphic in C: For any z0 ∈ C. one reason is that when trying to compute a limit of a function as. In other words. Definition 2.” We will repeatedly notice this kind of behavior. This means that the statement “A complex function has a limit. f is called differentiable at z0 . In this case. = lim z→z0 .2 Differentiability and Holomorphicity ¯ The fact that limits such as limz→0 z do not exist points to something special about complex z numbers which has no parallel in the reals—we can express a function in a very compact way in one variable. Example 2.” This difference becomes apparent most baldly when studying derivatives. we can “take the limit inside” a continuous function: 17 Lemma 2. we have to allow z to approach the point 0 in any way. Functions which are differentiable (and hence holomorphic) in the whole complex plane C are called entire. yet it shows some peculiar behavior “in the limit.” is in many senses stronger than the statement “A real function has a limit. h This equivalent definition is sometimes easier to handle. DIFFERENTIATION Just as in the real case. The function f (z) = z 3 is entire. The derivative of f at z0 is defined as f ′ (z0 ) = lim z→z0 f (z) − f (z0 ) . If f is continuous at an accumulation point w0 and limz→z0 g(z) = w0 then limz→z0 f (g(z)) = f (w0 ).

= reiφ 2 If z0 = 0 then the limit of the right-hand side as z → z0 does not exist since r → 0 and we get different answers for horizontal approach (φ = 0) and for vertical approach (φ = π/2). z→0 z→0 z z2 = 0.) Lemma 2. . z(t) = z0 + 1 eit . one should convince oneself that the following rules follow mostly from properties of the limit. The basic properties for derivatives are similar to those we know from real calculus.10. f is not holomorphic at 0): Let’s write z = z0 + reiφ . which approaches z0 as t → ∞. Hence z→0 lim z2 = lim |z|e−3iφ = lim |z| = 0 . Suppose f and g are differentiable at z ∈ C. as discussed earlier. In fact. and h is differentiable at g(z). n ∈ Z. and that c ∈ C.CHAPTER 2. Then 2 z0 + reiφ − z0 2 z0 + re−iφ − z0 2 z 2 − z0 2 = = z − z0 z0 + reiφ − z0 reiφ 2 + 2z re−iφ + r 2 e−2iφ − z 2 z0 0 0 = reiφ 2z0 re−iφ + r 2 e−2iφ = 2z0 e−2iφ + re−3iφ . (a) f (z) + c g(z) (b) f (z) · g(z) (c) f (z)/g(z) (d) z n ′ ′ ′ ′ = f ′ (z) + c g′ (z) = f ′ (z)g(z) + f (z)g ′ (z) = f ′ (z)g(z) − f (z)g ′ (z) g(z)2 = nz n−1 ′ (e) h(g(z)) = h′ (g(z))g ′ (z) . if z0 = 0 then the right-hand side equals re−3iφ = |z|e−3iφ . DIFFERENTIATION 18 Example 2.) t On the other hand.11. The function f (z) = z is nowhere differentiable: lim z − z0 z − z0 z = lim = lim z − z0 z→z0 z − z0 z→0 z z→z0 does not exist. The function f (z) = z 2 is differentiable at 0 and nowhere else (in particular. (The ‘chain rule’ needs a little care to be worked out.9. (A more entertaining way to see this is to use. for example. z→0 z lim which implies that Example 2. In the third identity we have to be aware of division by zero.

so the above equation yields f (y) = f (x). by Lemma 2. . y ∈ I.6 we have: g′ (z0 ) = 1 1 . If f is differentiable at g(z0 ). is to show that if a function has zero derivative everywhere on an interval then it must be constant.18. = ′ f (g(z)) − f (g(z0 )) f (g(z0 ) lim g(z) − g(z0 ) g(z)→g(z0 ) 2. If f : G → H is a bijection then g is the inverse of f if for all z ∈ H. Proof. y ∈ I. Since this is true for any x. f (g(z)) = z. we consider functions which have a derivative of 0. DIFFERENTIATION 19 We end this section with yet another differentiation rule.13. this rule is only defined for functions which are bijections. If f : I → R is a real-valued function with f ′ (x) defined and equal to 0 for all x ∈ I. then there is a constant c ∈ R such that f (x) = c for all x ∈ I. there exists a z ∈ G such that f (z) = w). The proof is easy: The Mean-Value Theorem says that for any x. that for inverse functions. One of the first applications of the Mean-Value Theorem for real-valued functions.CHAPTER 2. f (y) − f (x) = f ′ (x + a(y − x))(y − x) for some 0 < a < 1. z→z0 f (g(z)) − f (g(z0 )) z→z0 f (g(z)) − f (g(z0 )) z − z0 g(z) − g(z0 ) 1 . and z0 ∈ H.3 Constant Functions As an example application of the definition of the derivative of a complex function. Suppose G and H are open sets in C. f ′ (g(z0 )) = 0. f must be constant. f (g(z)) − f (g(z0 )) g(z) − g(z0 ) 1 f ′ (g(z0 )) . Theorem 1. f : G → H is a bijection. Lemma 2. we obtain: g′ (z0 ) = g(z)→g(z0 ) lim Finally.12. A function f : G → H is one-to-one if for every image w ∈ H there is a unique z ∈ G such that f (z) = w. If we know that f ′ is always zero then we know that f ′ (x + a(y − x)) = 0. and g is continuous at z0 then g is differentiable at z0 with g ′ (z0 ) = Proof. The function is onto if every w ∈ H has a preimage z ∈ G (that is. A bijection is a function which is both one-to-one and onto. as the denominator of this last term is continuous at z0 . As in the real case. We have: g′ (z0 ) = lim 1 g(z) − g(z0 ) g(z) − g(z0 ) = lim = lim . g : H → G is the inverse function of f . Lemma 2. z→z0 Because g(z) → g(z0 ) as z → z0 .

there is no notion of ‘the’ derivative of a function. Then. so for z ∈ H we have ux (z) = Re(f ′ (z)) = 0. we now have a new concept of derivative. if x and y are two points in G which can be connected by horizontal and vertical segments. The second key feature is that the interval I is connected. which by definition cannot depend on the way in which we approach . Since both the real and imaginary parts of f are constant on H. We will show that f is constant along horizontal segments and along vertical segments in G.13 required two key features of the function f . DIFFERENTIATION 20 There is a complex version of the Mean-Value Theorem. −1 if Re z < 0. It is certainly important for the domain to be connected in both the real and complex cases.14. proving the theorem. we have that f (x) = f (y). y) : C → R. The first is that f be differentiable everywhere in its domain. we can construct functions which have zero derivative ‘almost’ everywhere but which have infinitely many values in their range. To see that f is constant along horizontal segments. we can consider u(z) to be just a function of x. Recall that a region of C is an open connected subset. For instance. Proof.4 The Cauchy–Riemann Equations When considering real-valued functions f (x. y) and fy (x. if f is not differentiable everywhere. Lemma 2. u(z) is constant on H. We can argue the same way to see that the imaginary part v(z) of f (z) is constant on H. y) (and also directional derivatives) which depend on the way in which we approach a point (x. Consider the real part u(z) of the function f . by Lemma 2. the real part of z = x + iy0 . If the domain of f is a region G ⊆ C and f ′ (z) = 0 for all z in G then f is a constant. Since H is a horizontal segment. we instead only have partial derivatives fx (x. For such functions. since vx (z) = Im(f ′ (z)) = 0. interchanging the roles of the real and imaginary parts. y) : R2 → R of two variables. But any two points of a region may be connected by finitely many such segments by Theorem 1. we will use a different argument to prove that complex functions with derivative that are always 0 must be constant. so we’re done. there is some value y0 ∈ R so that the imaginary part of any z ∈ H is Im(z) = y0 . This same argument works for vertical segments. There are a number of surprising applications of this basic theorem. f ′ (z) = 0. both of which are somewhat obviously necessary. 2. f ′ (z). f itself is constant on H. suppose that H is a horizontal line segment in G. Theorem 2. then f ′ (z) = 0 for all z in the domain of f but f is not constant.16. Instead. This may seem like a silly example. y) ∈ R2 . see Exercises 14 and 15 for a start. In fact. Thus. but we defer its statement to another course. but it illustrates a pitfall to proving a function is constant that we must be careful of. Since Im(z) is constant on H. so f has the same value at any two points of G.13.CHAPTER 2. if we define f (z) = 1 if Re z > 0. By assumption. For a complex-valued function f (z) = f (x.

y0 ) = 0 and an analogous identity for v. y0 ) = vyx (x0 . (even though the equations first appeared in the work of Jean le Rond d’Alembert and Euler): Theorem 2.dcs. As stated. That is. 2 For more information about Riemann.ac.st-and.ac. later we will prove that f = u + iv is holomorphic in an open set G if and only if u and v have continuous partials that satisfy (2.1) then f is differentiable at z0 . (a) and (b) are not quite converse statements. y0 ) uy (x0 .html. In both cases (a) and (b). we will later show that if f is holomorphic at z0 = x0 + iy0 then u and v have continuous partials (of any order) at z0 . that is. It is logical. Then fx = ux + ivx and −ify = −i(uy + ivy ) = vy − iuy . Then the partial derivatives of f satisfy ∂f ∂f (z0 ) = −i (z0 ) . 1. y0 ) = vxy (x0 .uk/∼history/Biographies/Cauchy. y) ∈ C. ∂x Remarks.html. then.1) ∂x ∂y (b) Suppose f is a complex function such that the partial derivatives fx and fy exist in an open disk centered at z0 and are continuous at z0 .uk/∼history/Biographies/Riemann. y0 ) = vy (x0 . we write f (z) = f (x. hence we will show that the real and imaginary part of a function which is holomorphic on an open set are harmonic on that set. that there should be a relationship between the complex derivative f ′ (z) and the partial derivatives ∂f (z) and ∂f (z) (defined exactly as in the real-valued ∂x ∂y case).CHAPTER 2. y0 ) + uyy (x0 . (a) Suppose f is differentiable at z0 = x0 + iy0 . 1 . see http://www-groups. to write the function f in terms of its real and imaginary parts. (2. Functions with continuous second partials satisfying this partial differential equation on a region G ⊂ C (though not necessarily (2. y0 ) = −uyy (x0 . If these partial derivatives satisfy (2. 3. That is. if f is holomorphic in an open set G then the partials of any order of u and v exist. However. The relationship between the complex derivative and partial derivatives is very strong and is a powerful computational tool. For more information about Cauchy. It is described by the Cauchy–Riemann Equations. y0 ) . we will study such functions in Chapter 6. y0 ) .15. uxx (x0 .2) and their second partials are also continuous then we obtain uxx (x0 .dcs. y) + iv(x. y) where u is the real part of f and v is the imaginary part. y0 ) = −vx (x0 . If u and v satisfy (2. (2.st-and. see http://www-groups. Again.2)) are called harmonic on G.1) equivalently as the following pair of equations: ux (x0 . DIFFERENTIATION 21 a point (x.2) 2. and often convenient. named after Augustin Louis Cauchy (1789–1857)1 and Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann (1826–1866)2 . as we will see later.2) in G. Using this terminology we can rewrite the equation (2. y) = u(x. It is traditional. f ′ is given by f ′ (z0 ) = ∂f (z0 ) .

∆z→0 ∆z ∆x lim (2. by definition. “all we need to do” is prove that f ′ (z0 ) = fx (z0 ). Thus we have shown that f ′ (z0 ) = fx (z0 ) = −ify (z0 ). fx (z0 ) = lim f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) ∆x→0 ∆x . i (b) To prove the statement in (b).15. y0 ) then f ′ (z0 ) = lim ∆z→0 22 f (z0 + ∆z) − f (z0 ) . The second term in (2. In the first case we have ∆z = ∆x and f ′ (z0 ) = lim ∆x→0 f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) ∂f f (x0 + ∆x. Now we subtract our two rearrangements and take a limit: f (z0 + ∆z) − f (z0 ) − fx (z0 ) ∆z→0 ∆z ∆y f (z0 + ∆x + i∆y) − f (z0 + ∆x) − fy (z0 ) = lim ∆z→0 ∆z ∆y ∆x f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) + lim − fx (z0 ) . ∆z As we saw in the last section we must get the same result if we restrict ∆z to be on the real axis and if we restrict it to be on the imaginary axis.1) in the last step to convert ifx to i(−ify ) = fy . ∆z ∆y ∆z ∆x Now we rearrange fx (z0 ): fx (z0 ) = i∆y + ∆x ∆y ∆x ∆z · fx (z0 ) = · fx (z0 ) = · ifx (z0 ) + · fx (z0 ) ∆z ∆z ∆z ∆z ∆x ∆y · fy (z0 ) + · fx (z0 ) . ∆x→0 ∆x ∆x ∂x In the second case we have ∆z = i∆y and f ′ (z0 ) = lim ∂f 1 f (x0 . (a) If f is differentiable at z0 = (x0 .3) We need to show that these limits are both 0. The fractions ∆x/∆z and ∆y/∆z are bounded by 1 in modulus so we just need to see that the limits of the expressions in parentheses are 0. y0 ) f (z0 + i∆y) − f (z0 ) = lim = −i (x0 . We first rearrange a difference quotient for f ′ (z0 ). DIFFERENTIATION Proof of Theorem 2. = ∆z ∆z where we used equation (2. writing ∆z = ∆x + i∆y: f (z0 + ∆z) − f (z0 + ∆x) + f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) f (z0 + ∆z) − f (z0 ) = ∆z ∆z f (z0 + ∆x + i∆y) − f (z0 + ∆x) f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) + = ∆z ∆z ∆y f (z0 + ∆x + i∆y) − f (z0 + ∆x) ∆x f (z0 + ∆x) − f (z0 ) = · + · . y0 ) − f (x0 . y0 ). y0 + ∆y) − f (x0 . y0 ) = lim = (x0 . assuming the Cauchy–Riemann equations and continuity of the partials.CHAPTER 2.3) has a limit of 0 since. y0 ) ∆y→0 i i∆y→0 i∆y ∆y ∂y (using 1 = −i).

y) are continuous (respectively differentiable) does it follow that f (z) = u(x. 9. y0 + b∆y) − (uy (x0 . b < 1. y0 + a∆y) − vy (x0 . y0 ). Prove Lemma 2. ∆y Using these expressions.CHAPTER 2. y0 + b∆y) . where a. When 10.4 by using the formula for f ′ given in Theorem 2. b. y0 ) = uy (x0 + ∆x. and both change as ∆z → 0. y0 + ∆y) − v(x0 + ∆x. c. y0 )) . . Evaluate the following limits or explain why they don’t exist. y) is continuous (resp. Prove Lemma 2. y0 + a∆y) − uy (x0 . Prove Lemma 2. provide a counterexample. (a) lim (b) iz 3 −1 . Prove that if f (z) is given by a polynomial in z then f is entire. 2. 8. the two differences in parentheses have zero limit as ∆z → 0 because uy and vy are continuous at (x0 . y) and v(x. y0 )) = (uy (x0 + ∆x. y0 + a∆y) ∆y v(x0 + ∆x. What can you say if f (z) is given by a polynomial in x = Re z and y = Im z? 11. y0 ) = vy (x0 + ∆x. y0 + ∆y) − u(x0 + ∆x. with 0 < a. y) + iv(x. y0 + a∆y) + ivy (x0 + ∆x. 4. Finally. 3.11. y0 ) + ivy (x0 . Exercises 1. 7. the real mean-value theorem.15. Apply the definition of the derivative to give a direct proof that f ′ (z) = − z12 when f (z) = z . Prove Lemma 2. z→i z+i z→1−i lim x + i(2x + y).6. so that u(x0 + ∆x. Show that if f is differentiable at z then f is continuous at z. If u(x. DIFFERENTIATION 23 and taking the limit as ∆z → 0 is the same as taking the limit as ∆x → 0. d ∈ C and ad − bc = 0.3) we apply Theorem 1.18. Find the derivative of the function T (z) := is T ′ (z) = 0? az+b cz+d . we have f (z0 + ∆x + i∆y) − f (z0 + ∆x) − fy (z0 ) ∆y = uy (x0 + ∆x. We can’t do this for the first expression since both ∆x and ∆y are involved. 1 5. For the first term in (2. differentiable)? If not.4. to the real and imaginary parts of f . Use the definition of limit to show that limz→z0 (az + b) = az0 + b. 6. This gives us real numbers a and b. y0 )) + i (vy (x0 + ∆x.

DIFFERENTIATION 24 12.CHAPTER 2. Find v given u: (a) u = x2 + y 2 (b) u = cosh y sin x (d) u = (c) u = 2x2 + x + 1 − 2y 2 x x2 +y 2   xy(x + iy) f (z) = x2 + y 2  0 if z = 0.) 15. then f is constant in G. (e) f (z) = cos x cosh y − i sin x sinh y. (i) f (z) = ix+1 y . (d) f (z) = ex e−iy . (a) f (z) = e−x e−iy . 13. Prove: If f (z) and f (z) are both holomorphic in the region G ⊆ C then f (z) is constant in G. Suppose that f = u + iv is holomorphic. Why doesn’t this contradict Theorem 2.) Show that f satisfies the Cauchy–Riemann equations at the origin z = 0. Prove: If f is holomorphic in the region G ⊆ C and always real valued. with real and imaginary parts u(z) and v(z) satisfying u(z)v(z) = 3 for all z. (l) f (z) = z 2 − z 2 . if z = 0. Where are the following functions differentiable? Where are they holomorphic? Determine their derivatives at points where they are differentiable. (c) f (z) = x2 + iy 2 . 16. (As always. Is x x2 +y 2 harmonic on C? What about x2 ? x2 +y 2 . Suppose f (z) is entire. (g) f (z) = |z|2 = x2 + y 2 . (h) f (z) = z Im z. (b) f (z) = 2x + ixy 2 .15 (b)? 14. (f) f (z) = Im z. Show that f is constant. z = x + iy. 18. (Hint: Use the Cauchy–Riemann equations to show that f ′ = 0. 17. Consider the function (j) f (z) = 4(Re z)(Im z) − i(z)2 . yet f is not differentiable at the origin. (k) f (z) = 2xy − i(x + y)2 .

CHAPTER 2. DIFFERENTIATION 19. . (a) Show that u is harmonic if and only if a = −c. 25 (b) If u is harmonic then show that it is the real part of a function of the form f (z) = Az 2 . The general real homogeneous quadratic function of (x. b and c. y) = ax2 + bxy + cy 2 . where A is a complex constant. where a. y) is u(x. Give a formula for A in terms of the constants a. b and c are real constants.

this is equivalent to (az1 + b)(cz2 + d) = (az2 + b)(cz1 + d) . is the o following. c c az1 + b az2 + b = . Bell 3. c. d ∈ C. One property of M¨bius transformations. cz + d where a. If ad − bc = 0 then f is called a M¨bius1 transformation. A linear fractional transformation is a function of the form f (z) = az + b . M¨bius transformations are bijections. For more information about M¨bius. Note that f : C \ {− d } → C \ { a }. see o o http://www-groups. cz1 + d cz2 + d As the denominators are nonzero.1. Definition 3. 26 . o o Proof. that is.Chapter 3 Examples of Functions Obvious is the most dangerous word in mathematics. T. Notice that the inverse of a M¨bius transformation is another M¨bius transformation.2.html.1 M¨bius Transformations o The first class of functions that we will discuss in some detail are built from linear polynomials. In fact.st-and. o Exercise 10 of the previous chapter states that any polynomial (in z) is an entire function. which is quite special for complex functions. az+b From this fact we can conclude that a linear fractional transformation f (z) = cz+d is holomorphic d in C \ − c (unless c = 0. b. Lemma 3. if f (z) = az+b then the inverse o cz+d function of f is given by dz − b . E. in which case f is entire). 1 Named after August Ferdinand M¨bius (1790–1868). Suppose f (z1 ) = f (z2 ).dcs. f −1 (z) = −cz + a Remark.uk/∼history/Biographies/Mobius.ac.

d d + a . which means that f is one-to-one. Suppose f (z) = az+b cz+d is a linear fractional transformation.CHAPTER 3. Simplify. so by the 1 last proposition.1) Circle case: Given a circle centered at z0 with radius r.3. c if c = 0 then f (z) = bc − ad 1 c2 z + d c In particular. Just like f . If c = 0 then f (z) = a b z+ . Special cases of M¨bius transformations are translations f (z) = z + b. f −1 is one-to-one.4. and ino 1 versions f (z) = z . let α = a + bi. M¨bius transformations map circles and lines into circles and lines. zz − z0 z − zz0 + z0 z0 = r 2 . we can modify its defining equation |z − z0 | = r as follows: (z − z0 )(z − z0 ) = r 2 |z − z0 |2 = r 2 |z|2 − z0 z − zz0 + |z0 |2 − r 2 = 0 . 27 Since ad − bc = 0 this implies that z1 = z2 . The formula for f −1 : C \ { a } → C \ {− d } can be checked easily. Proof. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS which can be rearranged to (ad − bc)(z1 − z2 ) = 0 . Translations and dilations certainly map circles and lines into circles and lines. En route to an example of such. Before going on we find a standard form for the equation of a straight line. With the last result at hand. we understand them all. every linear fractional transformation is a composition of translations. dilations f (z) = az. we introduce some terminology. The next result says that if we understand those three special transformations. Proposition 3. Starting with ax + by = c (where z = x + iy). Then αz = ax + by + i(ay − bx) so αz + αz = αz + αz = 2 Re(αz) = 2ax + 2by. which implies that c c f is onto. Aside from being prime examples of one-to-one functions. or Re(αz) = c. we can tackle the promised theorem about the following geometric property of M¨bius transformations. (3. M¨bius transformations possess faso cinating geometric properties. Hence our standard equation for a line becomes αz + αz = 2c. o Proof. we only have to prove the theorem for the inversion f (z) = z . dilations. o Theorem 3. and inversions.

Otherwise |z0 |2 − r 2 is non-zero so we can divide our equation by it. which is of the form (3. where w = z . with center w0 and radius s. This is the equation of a circle in terms of w. w0 = 2 |z0 | − r 2 1 |z0 |2 |z0 |2 − r 2 r2 s = |w0 | − = − = . If c = 0. |z0 |2 . Line case: We start with the equation of a line in the form (3.) Now if r happens to be equal to |z0 |2 then this equation becomes 1 − z0 w − z0 w = 0. We obtain z0 z0 1 |w|2 − w− w+ = 0. so we have a straight line in terms of w. (To get the second line we multiply by |w|2 = ww and simplify.1) with α = z0 .CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 1 Now we want to transform this into an equation in terms of w. 4c2 and radius There is one fact about M¨bius transformations that is very helpful to understanding their o geometry. so we make this substitution in our equation: 1 z 28 for 1 w 2 − z0 1 1 − z0 + |z0 |2 − r 2 = 0 w w 1 − z0 w − z0 w + |w|2 |z0 |2 − r 2 = 0 .1) in terms of w. 1 as above. We get z0 w + z0 w = 2cww . this describes a line in the form (3. 2 2 2 2 2 |z0 | − r |z0 | − r |z0 | − r 2 We define z0 . In fact. |z0 |2 − r 2 (|z0 |2 − r 2 )2 (|z0 |2 − r 2 )2 (|z0 |2 − r 2 )2 2 2 Then we can rewrite our equation as |w|2 − w0 w − w0 w + |w0 |2 − s2 = 0 ww − w0 w − ww0 + w0 w0 = s2 (w − w0 )(w − w0 ) = s2 |w − w0 |2 = s2 . Otherwise we can divide by 2c: ww − w− z0 2c z0 z0 w− w=0 2c 2c z0 |z0 |2 w− − =0 2c 4c2 z0 w− 2c This is the equation of a circle with center z0 2c 2 = |z0 | 2|c| .1) and rewrite it in terms of w. If we solve w = 1 z we get z = w . it is much more generally useful: . by substituting z = w and simplifying.

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29

Lemma 3.5. Suppose f is holomorphic at a with f ′ (a) = 0 and suppose γ1 and γ2 are two smooth curves which pass through a, making an angle of θ with each other. Then f transforms γ1 and γ2 into smooth curves which meet at f (a), and the transformed curves make an angle of θ with each other. In brief, an holomorphic function with non-zero derivative preserves angles. Functions which preserve angles in this way are also called conformal. Proof. For k = 1, 2 we write γk parametrically, as zk (t) = xk (t) + iyk (t), so that zk (0) = a. The ′ complex number zk (0), considered as a vector, is the tangent vector to γk at the point a. Then f transforms the curve γk to the curve f (γk ), parameterized as f (zk (t)). If we differentiate f (zk (t)) at t = 0 and use the chain rule we see that the tangent vector to the transformed curve at the ′ ′ ′ ′ point f (a) is f ′ (a)zk (0). Since f ′ (a) = 0 the transformation from z1 (0) and z2 (0) to f ′ (a)z1 (0) and ′ (a)z ′ (0) is a dilation. A dilation is the composition of a scale change and a rotation and both of f 2 these preserve the angles between vectors.

3.2

Infinity and the Cross Ratio

Infinity is not a number—this is true whether we use the complex numbers or stay in the reals. However, for many purposes we can work with infinity in the complexes much more naturally and simply than in the reals. In the complex sense there is only one infinity, written ∞. In the real sense there is also a “negative infinity”, but −∞ = ∞ in the complex sense. In order to deal correctly with infinity we have to realize that we are always talking about a limit, and complex numbers have infinite limits if they can become larger in magnitude than any preassigned limit. For completeness we repeat the usual definitions: Definition 3.6. Suppose G is a set of complex numbers and f is a function from G to C. (a) lim f (z) = ∞ means that for every M > 0 we can find δ > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying
z→z0

0 < |z − z0 | < δ, we have |f (z)| > M .
z→∞

(b) lim f (z) = L means that for every ǫ > 0 we can find N > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying |z| > N , we have |f (z) − L| < ǫ.
z→∞

(c) lim f (z) = ∞ means that for every M > 0 we can find N > 0 so that, for all z ∈ G satisfying |z| > N we have |f (z)| > M . In the first definition we require that z0 is an accumulation point of G while in the second and third we require that ∞ is an “extended accumulation point” of G, in the sense that for every B > 0 there is some z ∈ G with |z| > B. The usual rules for working with infinite limits are still valid in the complex numbers. In fact, it is a good idea to make infinity an honorary complex number so that we can more easily manipulate infinite limits. We then define algebraic rules for dealing with our new point, ∞, based on the usual laws of limits. For example, if lim f (z) = ∞ and lim g(z) = a is finite then the usual “limit of
z→z0 z→z0

CHAPTER 3. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS

30

ˆ We do this by defining a new set, C:

sum = sum of limits” rule gives lim (f (z) + g(z)) = ∞. This leads us to want the rule ∞ + a = ∞.
z→z0

ˆ Definition 3.7. The extended complex plane is the set C := C ∪ {∞}, together with the following algebraic properties: For any a ∈ C, (1) (2) (3) ∞+a=a+∞=∞ if a = 0 then ∞ · a = a · ∞ = ∞ · ∞ = ∞ if a = 0 then a a = 0 and = ∞ ∞ 0

The extended complex plane is also called the Riemann sphere (or, in a more advanced course, the complex projective line, denoted CP1 ). If a calculation involving infinity is not covered by the rules above then we must investigate the limit more carefully. For example, it may seem strange that ∞ + ∞ is not defined, but if we take the limit of z + (−z) = 0 as z → ∞ we will get 0, but the individual limits of z and −z are both ∞. 1 Now we reconsider M¨bius transformations with infinity in mind. For example, f (z) = z is o now defined for z = 0 and z = ∞, with f (0) = ∞ and f (∞) = 0, so the proper domain for ˆ f (z) is actually C. Let’s consider the other basic types of M¨bius transformations. A translation o f (z) = z + b is now defined for z = ∞, with f (∞) = ∞ + b = ∞, and a dilation f (z) = az (with a = 0) is also defined for z = ∞, with f (∞) = a · ∞ = ∞. Since every M¨bius transformation o 1 can be expressed as a composition of translations, dilations and the inversion f (z) = z we see that ˆ ˆ every M¨bius transformation may be interpreted as a transformation of C onto C. The general o case is summarized below: Lemma 3.8. Let f be the M¨bius transformation o f (z) = az + b . cz + d

ˆ Then f is defined for all z ∈ C. If c = 0 then f (∞) = ∞, and, otherwise, f (∞) = a c and f − d c = ∞.

1 With this interpretation in mind we can add some insight to Theorem 3.4. Recall that f (z) = z transforms circles that pass through the origin to straight lines, but the point z = 0 must be excluded from the circle. However, now we can put it back, so f transforms circles that pass through the origin to straight lines plus ∞. If we remember that ∞ corresponds to being arbitrarily far away from the origin we can visualize a line plus infinity as a circle passing through ∞. If we make ˆ this a definition then Theorem 3.4 can be expressed very simply: any M¨bius transformation of C o

transforms circles to circles. For example, the transformation f (z) = z+i z−i

transforms −i to 0, i to ∞, and 1 to i. The three points −i, i and 1 determine a circle—the unit circle |z| = 1—and the three image points 0, ∞ and i also determine a circle—the imaginary axis

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31

plus the point at infinity. Hence f transforms the unit circle onto the imaginary axis plus the point at infinity. ˆ This example relied on the idea that three distinct points in C determine uniquely a circle passing through them. If the three points are on a straight line or if one of the points is ∞ then ˆ the circle is a straight line plus ∞. Conversely, if we know where three distinct points in C are transformed by a M¨bius transformation then we should be able to figure out everything about the o transformation. There is a computational device that makes this easier to see. ˆ Definition 3.9. If z, z1 , z2 , and z3 are any four points in C with z1 , z2 , and z3 distinct, then their cross-ratio is defined by (z − z1 )(z2 − z3 ) . [z, z1 , z2 , z3 ] = (z − z3 )(z2 − z1 )

Here if z = z3 , the result is infinity, and if one of z, z1 , z2 , or z3 is infinity, then the two terms on the right containing it are canceled. Lemma 3.10. If f is defined by f (z) = [z, z1 , z2 , z3 ] then f is a M¨bius transformation which o satisfies f (z1 ) = 0, f (z2 ) = 1, f (z3 ) = ∞ .

Moreover, if g is any M¨bius transformation which transforms z1 , z2 and z3 as above then g(z) = o f (z) for all z. Proof. Everything should be clear except the final uniqueness statement. By Lemma 3.2 the inverse f −1 is a M¨bius transformation and, by Exercise 7 in this chapter, the composition h = g ◦ f −1 o is a M¨bius transformation. Notice that h(0) = g(f −1 (0)) = g(z1 ) = 0. Similarly, h(1) = 1 and o h(∞) = ∞. If we write h(z) = az+b then cz+d b =⇒ b = 0 d a ∞ = h(∞) = =⇒ c = 0 c a+b a+0 a 1 = h(1) = = = =⇒ a = d , c+d 0+d d 0 = h(0) = so h(z) = az+b = az+0 = a z = z. But since h(z) = z for all z we have h(f (z)) = f (z) and so cz+d 0+d d g(z) = g ◦ (f −1 ◦ f )(z) = (g ◦ f −1 ) ◦ f (z) = h(f (z)) = f (z). ˆ So if we want to map three given points of C to 0, 1 and ∞ by a M¨bius transformation then o the cross-ratio gives us the only way to do it. What if we have three points z1 , z2 and z3 and we want to map them to three other points, w1 , w2 and w3 ? ˆ Theorem 3.11. Suppose z1 , z2 and z3 are distinct points in C and w1 , w2 and w3 are distinct ˆ Then there is a unique M¨bius transformation h satisfying h(z1 ) = w1 , h(z2 ) = w2 points in C. o and h(z3 ) = w3 . Proof. Let h = g −1 ◦ f where f (z) = [z, z1 , z2 , z3 ] and g(w) = [w, w1 , w2 , w3 ]. Uniqueness follows as in the proof of Lemma 3.10. This theorem gives an explicit way to determine h from the points zj and wj but, in practice, it is often easier to determine h directly from the conditions f (zk ) = wk (by solving for a, b, c and d).

we will be less concerned with actual complex numbers x + iy and more with their coordinates. y x . the point at infinity – in R3 . Proof. It also provides a way of ‘seeing’ that a line in the extended complex plane is really a circle. o To begin.CHAPTER 3. z) − (0. q. To describe stereographic projection. y. y. as the z-coordinate of P is strictly less than 1.3 Stereographic Projection The addition of ∞ to the complex plane C gives the plane a very useful structure. as the unit sphere. Plugging this value of t into the formula for r yields φ as stated. ˆ ˆ Definition 3. Consider the unit sphere S2 := {(x. 0) ∈ R3 }. Proposition 3. It is easy to check that φ ◦ φ−1 and φ−1 ◦ φ are now both the identity. 1) + t[(x. for t ∈ ∞. Define φ(P ) := Q.12. 0)|x2 + y 2 = 1}. −1). Let N denote the North Pole (0. the line ←P N follows. The latter two equations yield p2 + q 2 = 1 − z2 1+z x2 + y 2 . 1 + t(z − 1)). the straight line N P through N and P is given by. 1 When r(t) hits C. corresponding to the equator on the sphere and the unit circle on the complex plane. z) ∈ S2 − {N }. so it must be that t = 1−z . 1) = ∞ and φ−1 (∞) = (0. y x The equation φ(P ) = Q tells us that 1−z = p and 1−z = q. Then the sphere and the complex plane intersect in the set {(x. y. and solve for a point P = (x. ty. .0 . 0. and then plugging this into the identities x = p(1 − z) and y = q(1 − z) proves the desired formula. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 32 3. 2 . To see the formula for the inverse map φ−1 . 0. y. z)}. and of visualizing M¨bius functions. y. z) ∈ S2 so that φ(P ) = Q. 2 p2 + q 2 + 1 p + q 2 + 1 p + q 2 + 1 . 0) = 2p 2q p2 + q 2 − 1 . = = 2 2 (1 − z) (1 − z) 1−z 1+z Solving p2 + q 2 = 1−z for z. and let S denote the South Pole (0. 1) of S2 . 1). q. we solve 3 equations for 3 unknowns. we leave these as exercises. Q. r(t) = N + t(P − N ) = (0. 0. Thus. z) = with inverse map φ−1 (p. 0.13. y. 0. . The stereographic projection of S2 to C from N is the map φ S2 → C defined as → 2 − {N }. For any point P ∈ S intersects C in exactly one point. That φ is a bijection follows from the existence of the inverse function. y. and is left as an ← → exercise. C = {(x. z) ∈ R3 |x2 + y 2 + z 2 = 1}. This structure is revealed by a famous function called stereographic projection. 1−z 1−z where we declare φ(0. 0) ∈ C. For P = (x. 1)] = (tx. we begin with a point Q = (p. Stereographic projection also gives us a way of visualizing the extended complex plane – that is. the third coordinate is 0. We also declare that φ(N ) = ∞ ∈ C. This proves the proposition. think of C as the xy-plane in R3 = {(x. 0. The point P satisfies the equation x2 + y 2 + z 2 = 0. y. The map φ is the bijection φ(x.

It is an exercise to verify that every circle in the pq-plane arises in this manner. in that each moves points ‘along’ perpendicular sets of circles. where for a circle γ ⊂ S2 we have that ∞ ∈ φ(γ) – that is. q. then there is a unique real number k so that the plane P is given by P = {(x. z0 ). y0 . A circle in S2 is the intersection of S2 with some plane P . how other basic M¨bius functions behave. though beyond the scope of these notes. this is a straight line in the pq-plane. z) ∈ R3 |(x. The stereographic projection φ takes the set of circles in S2 bijectively to the set ˆ of circles in C. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS We use the formulas above to prove the following. or the empty set in the pq-plane. Consider the circle of intersection P ∩ S2 . We may also assume without loss of generality that 0 ≤ k ≤ 1. z0 ) = k} = {(x. apply f to the point that results. y/(1 − z)) which we now regard as the complex number y x +i . We encourage the reader to verify this to themselves. y0 . respectively. Translations can also be visualized via how they move points ‘along’ sets of circles. z0 ) with −(x0 .CHAPTER 3. y0 . Using the equations from Proposition 3. can be seen to be a rotation of S2 . point. Only the first case corresponds to a circle in S2 . z) ∈ R3 |xx0 + yy0 + zz0 = k}. every line in the pq-plane can be obtained in this way. It is particularly nice to think about the basic M¨bius transformations via their effect on the o Riemann sphere. Notice that z0 = k if and only if N ∈ P . y. z) = (x/(1 − z). We will describe inversion. Without loss of generality. or negative. 0). and if k > 1 then P ∩ S2 = ∅. We give the hint that a real dilation is in some sense ‘dual’ to a rotation. a rotation f (z) = eiθ z. y. We now use stereographic projection to take another look at f (z) = 1/z. Proof. 1−z 1−z . z0 ) ∈ S2 by possibly changing k. These three cases happen when k < 1. y0 . 0. z) on S2 . we can assume that (x0 . called the Riemann sphere. We want to know what this function does to the sphere S2 . (z0 − k)2 Depending on whether the right hand side of this equation is positive. z) · (x0 . y0 . 0) satisfies the defining equation for P . and then pull this point back to S2 by φ−1 . z0 ) to P . It is worth thinking about. which is if and only if the image under φ is a straight line. then completing the square yields p+ x0 z0 − k 2 + q+ y0 z0 − k 2 = 1 − k2 . and k > 1. We can now think of the extended complex plane as a sphere in R3 .13 for φ−1 (p. y. o composed with φ−1 . We know φ(x. 33 Theorem 3. If z0 − k = 0. φ(γ) is a line in C – if and only if N ∈ γ. We will take an (x. A point (p. q. q. For instance. y. If we have a normal vector (x0 . If z0 − k = 0. we see that (z0 − k)p2 + (2x0 )p + (z0 − k)q 2 + (2y0 )q = z0 + k. k = 1. and consider the harder problems of visualizing a real dilation f (z) = rz or a translation. y. 0) in the complex plane lies on the image of this circle under φ if and only if φ−1 (p. since if k < 0 we can replace (x0 . this is the equation of a circle. project it to the plane by stereographic projection φ. f (z) = z + b.14. Moreover. respectively.

This definition seems a bit arbitrary. 3. 1+z 1+z We know from a previous calculation that p2 + q 2 = (1 + z)/(1 − z). In light of this definition. the larger their distance to the origin. It is certainly not the (finite) distance function induced by R3 . In fact. and our circle is now passing through N . the circle has finite length. This gives f = = Rather than plug this result into the formulas for φ−1 . The answer is clearly (x. y/(1− z)). We now have a second argument that f (z) = 1/z takes circles and lines to circles and lines. Its first justification is that all exponential rules which we are used to from real numbers carry over to the complex case. Then 1/z rotates the sphere which certainly takes circles to circles. This is a rotation around the x-axis by 180 degrees. A circle or line in C is taken to a circle on S2 by φ−1 . This is because 0 goes to (0. They mainly follow from Lemma 1. as we borrow the concept of a (real) power series to define the real exponential function. to say the least. we once more borrow concepts from calculus. In the regular sphere. We end by mentioning that there is in fact a way of putting the complex metric on S2 . one of the promises of these lecture notes is to introduce complex power series as late as possible.4 Exponential and Trigonometric Functions To define the complex exponential function. −y. namely the real exponential function2 and the real sine and cosine. The (complex) exponential function is defined for z = x + iy as exp(z) = ex (cos y + i sin y) = ex eiy . Our preferred way to do this is through a power series: ex = k≥0 xk /k!. z) = (x/(1− z). Indeed. We can also say that the circles that go to lines under f (z) = 1/z are the circles though 0. the reader might think we should have simply defined the complex exponential function through a complex power series. the origin in the complex plane corresponds to the South Pole S of S2 . Now 180 rotation about the x-axis takes the south pole to the north pole. z) to (x. We agree with those readers who think that we are “cheating” at this point. 0.4 and are collected in the following. Thus we have shown that the effect of f (z) = 1/z on S2 is to take (x. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS We use 34 p − qi 1 = 2 . . y. it has infinite length. But we know that φ will take this circle to a line in C. and to each other! In this light. however. we can just ask what triple of numbers will go to this particular pair using the formulas φ(x. We have to be able to get arbitrarily far away from the origin in C. so the complex distance function has to increase greatly with the z coordinate. −1) under φ−1 so a circle through 0 in C goes to a circle through the south pole in S2 . −z). and—in addition—finally make sense of the notation eit = cos t + i sin t. this is possible (and an elegant definition).CHAPTER 3. Now φ takes circles back to circles and lines. The ˆ closer points are to the North Pole N (corresponding to ∞ in C). a ‘line’ in the Riemann sphere S2 corresponds to a circle in S2 through N . −y. y.15. 2 It is a nontrivial question how to define the real exponential function. but as a line on the Riemann sphere with the complex metric. Definition 3. p + qi p + q2 x y +i 1−z 1−z x y −i 1−z 1−z 1−z 1+z −y x +i . −z).

The trigonometric functions—sine.—have their complex analogues.16. but we invite the reader to meditate on its proof.CHAPTER 3. note that the last identity also says that exp is entire. For all z. In fact. 1. cotangent. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS Lemma 3. we can define them as merely being special combinations of the exponential function. . 2. Remarks. The third identity is a very special one and has no counterpart for the real exponential function. We should make sure that the complex exponential function specializes to the real exponential function for real arguments: if z = x ∈ R then exp(x) = ex (cos 0 + i sin 0) = ex . Finally. MM MM MMM MM MMM MM MM M1 qqq 11 qq 11 qq 11 qq qq 11 qqq q 11 qq 11 11 11 // 5π 6 π 3 0 −π 3 − 5π 6 −1 0 1 2 exp Figure 3. It says that the complex exponential function is periodic with period 2πi. z1 . tangent.15 is reasonable. one can get another strong reason why Definition 3. however. When proving this identity through the Cauchy–Riemann equations for the exponential function. (a) exp (z1 ) exp (z2 ) = exp (z1 + z2 ) (b) 1 exp(z) 35 = exp (−z) (c) exp (z + 2πi) = exp (z) (d) |exp (z)| = exp (Re z) (e) exp(z) = 0 (f) d dz exp (z) = exp (z) . z2 ∈ C. they don’t play the same prominent role as in the real case. This has many interesting consequences.1: Image properties of the exponential function. one that may not seem too pleasant at first sight is the fact that the complex exponential function is not one-to-one. The last identity is not only remarkable. etc. cosine.

z1 . We end this section with a remark on hyperbolic trig functions. They still satisfy the identities you already know. Because exp is entire. As with the exponential function. they are also special combinations of the exponential function. sin(iy) as y → ±∞.18. sinh z exp(2z) − 1 As such. 1 (exp(z) − exp(−z)) 2 sinh z exp(2z) − 1 tanh z = = cosh z exp(2z) + 1 sinh z = cosh z = 1 (exp(z) + exp(−z)) 2 cosh z exp(2z) + 1 coth z = = . 2i 2 respectively. sin z exp(2iz) − 1 36 Note that to write tangent and cotangent in terms of the exponential function. sin z exp(2iz) − 1 = −i cos z exp(2iz) + 1 and cot z = cos z exp(2iz) + 1 =i . sin(z + 2π) = sin z sin(−z) = − sin z cos(−z) = cos z cos(z + 2π) = cos z cot(z + π) = cot z cos(z + π/2) = − sin z cos (z1 + z2 ) = cos z1 cos z2 − sin z1 sin z2 cos′ z = − sin z . EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS Definition 3. we used the fact that exp(z) exp(−z) = exp(0) = 1. .17. so are sin and cos.CHAPTER 3. for example. 2i 2i A similar calculation holds for the cosine. and cotangent are defined as in the real case: Definition 3. Lemma 3. including d d sinh z = cosh z cosh z = sinh z.19. tan(z + π) = tan z sin(z + π/2) = cos z sin (z1 + z2 ) = sin z1 cos z2 + cos z1 sin z2 cos z + sin z = 1 sin′ z = cos z 2 2 cos2 z − sin2 z = cos(2z) Finally. the complex sine and cosine are not bounded—consider. the following properties follow mostly from Lemma 3. cosine. tangent. The (complex) sine and cosine are defined as 1 1 (exp(iz) − exp(−iz)) and cos z = (exp(iz) + exp(−iz)) . they are now related to the trigonometric functions via the following useful identities: sinh(iz) = i sin z and cosh(iz) = cos z . The tangent and cotangent are defined as sin z = tan z = respectively. we should first make sure that we’re not redefining the real sine and cosine: if z = x ∈ R then 1 1 sin z = (exp(ix) − exp(−ix)) = (cos x + i sin x − (cos(−x) + i sin(−x))) = sin x . one word of caution: unlike in the real case. Not too surprisingly. z2 ∈ C. For all z.16. d dz Moreover. The hyperbolic sine.

’ Even worse. As we will see shortly. So what about the other equation Log(exp z) = z? Let’s try the principal logarithm: Suppose z = x + iy.5 The Logarithm and Complex Exponentials The complex logarithm is the first function we’ll encounter that is of a somewhat tricky nature. the evaluation of any branch of the logarithm at z can only differ from Log z by a multiple of 2πi. log is. Even better. etc. we get something that’s not a function. 2π). Any function Log : C \ {0} → C which satisfies exp(Log z) = z is a branch of the logarithm. yet it satisfies exp(log z) = z .20. Definition 3. not a function. We invite the reader to check this thoroughly. It is motivated as being the inverse function to the exponential function. Let Arg z denote that argument of z which is in (−π. On the other hand. as we saw. then Log(exp z) = Log ex eiy = ln ex eiy + i Arg ex eiy = ln ex + i Arg eiy = x + i Arg eiy . or in [0. π]. . and suppose that Log z = u(z) + iv(z). A reasonable definition of a logarithm function Log would hence be to set Log z = ln |z| + i Arg z where Arg z gives the argument for the complex number z according to some convention—for example. one should note how the periodicity of the exponential function takes care of the multi-valuedness of our ‘logarithm’ log. the reason for this is once more the periodicity of the exponential function. we’re looking for a function Log such that exp(Log z) = z = Log(exp z) . EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 37 3. Then for the first equation to hold. this is too much to hope for. Let’s write.CHAPTER 3. and hence we can’t even consider it to be our sought-after inverse of the exponential function. and eiv = eiφ ⇐⇒ v = φ+2πk for some k ∈ Z. π] (the principal argument of z). as usual. we could just use a different argument convention and get another reasonable ‘logarithm. z = r eiφ . eu = r = |z| ⇐⇒ u = ln |z| (where ln denotes the real natural logarithm. The paragraph preceding this definition ensures that the principal logarithm is indeed a branch of the logarithm. that is. in particular we need to demand that z = 0). of course. that is. we could agree that the argument is always in (−π. by defining the multi-valued map arg z = {φ : φ is a possible argument of z} and defining the multi-valued logarithm as log z = ln |z| + i arg z . Then the principal logarithm is defined as Log z = ln |z| + i Arg z . we need exp(Log z) = eu eiv = r eiφ = z . in particular. The problem is that we need to stick to this convention. Let’s try to make things well defined.

It now makes sense to talk about the exponential function with base e. z Proof. and is defined as ax := exp(x Log a) . exp(Log z) z We finish this section by defining complex exponentials. We apply Lemma 2. f (z) = exp(z) and g : C \ {0} → G. π]. but we need to be careful about the domains of these functions. When we write ax we are referring to the principal value unless otherwise stated.dcs.html. for example. we obtain ez = exp(z Log e) = exp (z (ln |e| + i Arg e)) = exp (z ln e) = exp (z) . see http://www-groups. the natural definition ab = exp(b log a) (which is a concept borrowed from calculus) would in general yield more than one value (Exercise 42). we can now make a similar remark about the complex exponential function. many) y-values for which Log(exp z) = z. Theorem 3. With our definition of ax . so that we get actual inverse functions. To end our discussion of the logarithm on a happy note. so it is not always useful. we prove that any branch of the logarithm has the same derivative. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 38 The right-hand side is equal to z = x + iy only if y ∈ (−π. you might want to think about what it looks like if Log = Log). For a complex number a ∈ C. The principal value of ax at x (unfortunately) uses the same notation. through a power series) and the function f (x) = ex where e is Euler’s3 number and can be defined. The idea is to apply Lemma 2. For more information about Euler. 3 .ac. the exponential function with base a is the multivalued function ax := exp(b log a). A word of caution: this only works out this nicely because we have now carefully defined ax for complex numbers.21. Different definitions will make it so that ez = exp(z)! Named after Leonard Euler (1707–1783). In calculus one proves the equivalence of the real exponential function (as given. for example. We turn instead to the principal logarithm: Definition 3. one just has to be cautious about where each logarithm is holomorphic. g(z) = Log: if Log is continuous at z then Log′ z = 1 exp′ (Log z) = 1 1 = . as 1 n e = limn→∞ 1 + n . For two complex numbers a and b. Suppose Log is a branch of the logarithm.22. Because e is a positive real number and hence Arg e = 0.st-and.12 to exp and Log.CHAPTER 3. Then Log is differentiable wherever it is continuous and 1 Log′ z = .uk/∼history/Biographies/Euler. The same happens with any other branch of the logarithm Log—there will always be some (in fact. Suppose Log maps C \ {0} to G (this is typically a half-open strip.12 with f : G → C \ {0} .

9. (Hint: Consider the function 1+f (z) and use Exercise 5 and a variation of 1−f (z) Exercise 14 in Chapter 2. (Here ◦ denotes composition and · denotes matrix multiplication. In each case. Find M¨bius transformations satisfying each of the following. Let f (z) = z+2 . plus ∞. (e) The circle with radius 1 centered at 1. 1+z 1−z maps the unit circle (minus the point z = 1) 6. o 3.) . Suppose that f is holomorphic on the region G and f (G) is a subset of the unit circle. Prove that any M¨bius transformation different from the identity map can have at most two o fixed points. Prove Proposition 3. o Show that TA ◦TB = TA·B . Suppose A = a b is a 2 × 2 matrix of complex numbers whose determinant ad − bc is c d az+b non-zero.CHAPTER 3. cz+d (b) 1 → 0. (a) The x-axis. 10. 1 → 1. Using the cross-ratio. 5. 2.) 2z 8.) 4. one showing the following six sets in the z plane and the other showing their images in the w plane. Let C be the circle with center 0 and radius 1. Find a M¨bius transformation which transforms o C onto C and transforms 0 to 1 . 3 → ∞. Label the sets. Then we can define a corresponding M¨bius transformation TA by TA (z) = cz+d .) (c) 0 → i. Show that f is constant. Show that if f (z) = az+b cz+d is a M¨bius transformation then f −1 (z) = o dz−b −cz+a . Show that the M¨bius transformation f (z) = o onto the imaginary axis. plus ∞. ∞ and −1 − i. 1 + i → 1. 11.) 7. ±2. (c) The line x = y. 2 → ∞. (d) The circle with radius 2 centered at 0. find two different M¨bius transformations that transform C onto the real axis plus o infinity. Show that the derivative of a M¨bius transformation is never zero. Let C be the circle with center 1 + i and radius 1. with different choices of zk . EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 39 Exercises 1. 2 → 1. Draw two graphs. remember that M¨bius transformations preserve angles.3. plus ∞. Write your answers in standard o form. (You should only need to calculate the images of 0. (Use the cross-ratio. as az+b . 2 (a) 1 → 0. ∞ → −i. (Use the cross-ratio.) o (b) The y-axis. (f) The circle with radius 1 centered at −1. (A fixed point of a function f is a number z such that f (z) = z. find the image of the center of the circle.

23. and the unit circle to itself. ˆ 14. consider all circles in S 2 centered on the NS axis. Suppose z1 . and all circles through both N and S. Describe the effect of the basic M¨bius transformations rotation. Find the image under the stereographic projection φ of the following points: (0. Consider the plane P determined by x + y − z = 0.13 is a bijection by verifying that that φ ◦ φ−1 and φ−1 ◦ φ are the identity. 1. (b) f maps 1 → 1. 0). 0. (0. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 12. 0). 13. 20. −i 2a 16. z2 and z3 if and only if [z. z−i z+i . 1 → ∞. Prove that the stereographic projection of Proposition 3. z 2 −1 2z+1 . and translation o on the Riemann sphere. (c) f maps x-axis to y = x. z2 . y) is the determinant of the matrix . −1 → i. z3 ] is real or infinite. 40 (b) The quadrant x > 0. 1. 0. and radius ˆ 17. What is a unit normal vector to P ? Compute the image of P ∩ S 2 under the stereographic projection φ. v = v(x. Find the M¨bius transformation f : o (a) f maps 0 → 1. Prove that the zeros of sin z are all real-valued. 22. y). 1). 25. ∞ → 0. Show that the image of the line y = a under inversion is the circle with center 1 2a . Show that if f = u + iv is holomorphic then the Jacobian equals |f ′ (z)|2 . consider two families of circles through N. Prove that sin(x+iy) = sin x cosh y+i cos x sinh y. The Jacobian of a transformation u = u(x. y-axis to y = −x. and cos(x+iy) = cos x cosh y−i sin x sinh y. real dilation. 21. y > 0 under w = (c) The strip 0 < x < 1 under w = ∂u ∂x ∂v ∂x ∂u ∂y ∂v ∂y z z−1 . Prove that sin(z) = sin(z) and cos(z) = cos(z). 26. 24. For translation. 0). Describe the images of the following sets under the exponential function exp(z): . (1. Find the fixed points in C of f (z) = 15. 0. z1 . Show that z is on the circle passing through z1 . −1). 19. Prove that every circle in the extended complex plane is the image of some circle in S 2 under the stereographic projection φ. −i → −1. 18. z2 and z3 are distinct points in C.CHAPTER 3. (1. ‘orthogonal’ to and ‘perpendicular’ to the translation. Describe the image of the region under the transformation: (a) The disk |z| < 1 under w = iz−i z+1 . hint: for the first two. (0.

27. Let z = x + iy and show that (b) |cos z|2 = cos2 x + sinh2 y = cosh2 y − sin2 x. Prove Lemma 3. 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π. (a) |sin z|2 = sin2 x + sinh2 y = cosh2 y − cos2 x. (b) cos z = cos x cosh y − i sin x sinh y. Show that tan(iz) = i tanh z. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS (a) the line segment defined by z = iy. Let z = x + iy and show that (a) sin z = sin x cosh y + i cos x sinh y. (b) (−1)i . Is arg(z) = − arg(z) true for the multiple-valued argument? What about Arg(z) = − Arg(z) for the principal branch? . 35. 29.16. Determine the image of the strip {z ∈ C : −π/2 < Re z < π/2} under the function f (z) = sin z. (d) If |y| ≥ 1 then |cot z|2 ≤ 31.18. 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π}. Find the principal values of (a) log i. Evaluate the value(s) of the following expressions. 32. (c) log(1 + i). 0 ≤ y ≤ 2π. 34. 41 (b) the line segment defined by z = 1 + iy. 28. giving your answers in the form x + iy. sinh2 y+1 sinh2 y =1+ 1 sinh2 y ≤1+ 1 sinh2 1 ≤ 2.CHAPTER 3. 30. (c) If cos x = 0 then |cot z|2 = cosh2 y−1 cosh2 y (c) the rectangle {z = x + iy ∈ C : 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. (a) eiπ (b) eπ (c) ii (d) esin i (e) exp(Log(3 + 4i)) √ (f) 1 + i √ (g) 31 − i (h) i+1 √ 2 4 33. ≤ 1. Prove Lemma 3.

(e) cos z = 0.CHAPTER 3. (c) exp(z) = πi. (c) Let T be the figure formed by the horizontal segment from 0 to 2. Fix c ∈ C \ {0}.) 37. If you run into a logarithm. Find the derivative of f (z) = z c . y = t). (b) Show that the image of a ray starting at the origin is a ray starting at the origin. To do this you should find an equation (at least parametrically) for the image (you can start with the parametric form x = t. and then the vertical segment from 2i to 0. (a) z 2 . Prove that exp(b log a) is single-valued if and only if b is an integer. the circular arc from 2 to 2i. and explain what happens in the limits as t → ∞ and t → −∞. (d) Is the right angle at the origin in part (c) preserved? Is something wrong here? . For this problem. (f) iz−3 . 41. (Note that this means that complex exponentials don’t clash with monomials z n . Is there a difference between the set of all values of log z 2 and the set of all values of 2 log z? (Try some fixed numbers for z. Find the image of the annulus 1 < |z| < e under the principal value of the logarithm. (d) sin z = cosh 4. (e) (z − 3)i . 44. (c) Log(z − 2i + 1) where Log(z) = ln |z| + i Arg(z) with 0 ≤ Arg(z) < 2π. 38. (g) exp(iz) = exp(iz). EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS 42 36. 40. 42. Describe the image under exp of the line with equation y = x. Show that |az | = aRe z if a is a positive real constant. (f) sinh z = 0. Find all solutions to the following equations: (a) Log(z) = π i. 39. z 3 +1 (d) exp(z). 2 (b) Log(z) = 3π 2 i. (b) sin z . (a) Show that the image of a circle centered at the origin is a circle centered at the origin. use the principal value (unless stated otherwise). f (z) = z 2 . For each of the following functions. (h) z 1/2 = 1 + i. plot it reasonably carefully. determine all complex numbers for which the function is holomorphic.) What can you say if b is rational? 43. Draw T and f (T ).

2.) 43 45. 2 + 2i and 2i.) . v) equation for the image curve.CHAPTER 3. Draw f (Q) and identify the types of image curves corresponding to the segments from 2 to 2 + 2i and from 2 + 2i to 2i. let f (z) = z 2 . Eliminate the parameter in u + iv = f (z(t)) to get a (u. Let Q be the square with vertices at 0. (Hint: You can write the vertical segment parametrically as z(t) = 2 + it. They are not parts of either straight lines or circles. EXAMPLES OF FUNCTIONS (Hint: Use polar coordinates. As in the previous problem.

Chapter 4 Integration Everybody knows that mathematics is about miracles. In this case we simply define c1 f= γ a f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt + c2 c1 f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt + · · · + b cn f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt . bearing in mind that practically all can be extended to piecewise smooth curves. Definition 4. c1 ]. Suppose this curve is parametrized by γ(t). 44 . . complex integration is not really anything different from real integration. which is based on (4.1) For a function which takes complex numbers as arguments. . For a continuous complex-valued function φ : [a. If one meditates about the substitution rule for real integrals. In what follows. [c1 . At first sight. we define b b b φ(t) dt = a a Re φ(t) dt + i a Im φ(t) dt . [cn . those curves γ whose parametrization γ(t). a ≤ t ≤ b. the following definition. b] ⊂ R → C. Roger Howe 4. a ≤ t ≤ b. (4. is only piecewise differentiable. b]. Then we define the integral of f on γ as b f= γ γ f (z) dz = a f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt . that is. Suppose γ is a smooth curve parametrized by γ(t).1 Definition and Basic Properties We begin integration by focusing on ‘1-dimensional’ integrals over lines. . only mathematicians have a name for them: theorems. We delay discussion of antiderivatives until Chapter 5. say γ(t) is differentiable on the intervals [a. This definition can be naturally extended to piecewise smooth curves. [cn−1 . we’ll usually state our results for smooth curves. . we integrate over a curve γ (instead of a real interval). a ≤ t ≤ b. c2 ].1. and f is a complex function which is continuous on γ. cn ].1) should come as no surprise.

and hence 1 f= γ 0 (t − it)2 (1 + i) dt = (1 + i) 1 0 t2 − 2it2 − t2 dt = −2i(1 + i)/3 = 2 (1 − i) . As our first example of the application of this definition we will compute the integral of the function f (z) = z 2 = x2 − y 2 − i(2xy) over several curves from the point z = 0 to the point z = 1 + i. (a) Let γ be the line segment from z = 0 to z = 1 + i. and c ∈ C. A parametrization of this curve is γ(t) = t + it2 . Proposition 4. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. We have γ ′ (t) = 1 + i and f (γ(t)) = (t − it)2 . Parameterizations are γ1 (t) = t. The definition of length is with respect to any parametrization of γ because. The length of a smooth curve γ is b length(γ) := a γ ′ (t) dt for any parametrization γ(t). To state some of its properties. Suppose γ is a smooth curve. of γ.2. Hence 1 f= γ γ1 f+ γ2 f= 0 t2 · 1 dt + 1 0 (1 − it)2 i dt = 1 +i 3 1 0 1 − 2it − t2 dt 1 1 1 = + i 1 − 2i − 3 2 3 4 2 = + i. the length of a curve is independent of the parametrization. 1 0 f= γ 0 t2 − t4 − 2it3 (1 + 2it) dt = t2 + 3t4 − 2it5 dt = 1 1 1 14 i + 3 − 2i = − . as we will see.CHAPTER 4. INTEGRATION 45 Example 4. most of which follow from their real siblings in a straightforward way. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. (a) γ (f + cg) = γ f +c γ g. a ≤ t ≤ b. 3 (b) Let γ be the arc of the parabola y = x2 from z = 0 to z = 1 + i. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 and γ2 (t) = 1 + it.4. f and g are complex functions which are continuous on γ. A parametrization of this curve is γ(t) = t + it. . 3 5 6 15 3 (c) Let γ be the union of the two line segments γ1 from z = 0 to z = 1 and γ2 from z = 1 to z = 1 + i.3. Now we have γ ′ (t) = 1 + 2it and f (γ(t)) = t2 − t2 whence 1 2 − i 2t · t2 = t2 − t4 − 2it3 . Definition 4. We invite the reader to use some familiar curves to see that this definition gives what one would expect to be the length of a curve. we first define the useful concept of the length of a curve. 3 3 The complex integral has some standard properties. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1.

define the curve −γ through −γ(t) = γ(a + b − t). a ≤ t ≤ b.CHAPTER 4. If γ1 has domain [a1 . (a) This follows directly from the definition of the integral and the properties of real integrals. INTEGRATION 46 (b) If γ is parametrized by γ(t). (d) γ f ≤ maxz∈γ |f (z)| · length(γ) . The curve −γ defined in (b) is the curve that we obtain by traveling through γ in the opposite direction. The fact that γ1 (b1 ) = γ2 (a2 ) is necessary to make sure that this parameterization is piecewise smooth. Then −γ f = − γ f . Now we break the integral over γ1 γ2 into two pieces and apply the simple change of variables s = t − b1 + a2 : f= γ1 γ2 b1 +b2 −a2 a1 b1 f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt b1 +b2 −a2 b1 = a1 b1 f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt + ′ f (γ1 (t))γ1 (t) dt + ′ f (γ1 (t))γ1 (t) dt + f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt ′ f (γ2 (t − b1 + a2 ))γ2 (t − b1 + a2 ) dt = a1 b1 b1 +b2 −a2 b1 b2 a2 = a1 ′ f (γ2 (s))γ2 (s) ds = γ1 f+ γ2 f. and then continuing on γ2 to its end. . b1 ] and γ2 has domain [a2 . (b) This follows with an easy real change of variables s = a + b − t: b f= −γ a a f (γ(a + b − t)) (γ(a + b − t))′ dt = − f (γ(s)) γ ′ (s) ds = − b a b a f (γ(a + b − t)) γ ′ (a + b − t) dt f. γ = b f (γ(s)) γ ′ (s) ds = − (c) We need a suitable parameterization γ(t) for γ1 γ2 . Proof. Then γ1 γ2 f = γ1 f + γ2 f . γ2 (t − b1 + a2 ) for b1 ≤ t ≤ b1 + b2 − a2 . b2 ] then we can use γ(t) = γ1 (t) for a1 ≤ t ≤ b1 . a ≤ t ≤ b. (c) If γ1 and γ2 are curves so that γ2 starts where γ1 ends then define the curve γ1 γ2 by following γ1 to its end.

0 ≤ t ≤ 1. 1) = γ1 (t) . 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 is closed. parametrized by γ0 (t).1: This square and the circle are (C \ {0})-homotopic. let φ = Arg f = e−iφ γ b γ γ 47 f . s) = h(1. which is continuously transformed from γ0 to γ1 . INTEGRATION (d) To prove (d). Here is the theorem on which most of what will follow is based.CHAPTER 4. It is based on the following concept. s). in symbols γ0 ∼G γ1 .e. for any parametrization γ(t). we have that γ(a) = γ(b). h(0. s) . . Figure 4. A curve γ ⊂ C is closed if its endpoints coincide. if there is a continuous function h : [0. a ≤ t ≤ b. h(t. 0) = γ0 (t) . 4. respectively. 1]2 → G such that h(t. i. The function h(t. The last condition simply says that each of the curves h(t.5. Suppose γ0 and γ1 are closed curves in the open set G ⊆ C.1. Definition 4. s) is called a homotopy and represents a curve for each fixed s. Then γ0 is G-homotopic to γ1 . Then b a b a b f = Re e−iφ f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt |f (γ(t))| γ ′ (t) dt z∈γ b = a Re f (γ(t))e−iφ γ ′ (t) dt ≤ f (γ(t))e−iφ γ ′ (t) dt = a ≤ max |f (γ(t))| a≤t≤b a γ ′ (t) dt = max |f (z)| · length(γ) . 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 and γ1 (t).2 Cauchy’s Theorem We now turn to the central theorem of complex analysis. An example is depicted in Figure 4.

dcs. 3 For more information about Edouard Jean-Baptiste Goursat (1858–1936). see http://www-groups. Suppose G ⊆ C is open. that is.ac.dcs. see http://www-groups. a condition which was first removed by Goursat3 . The fact that an integral over a point is zero has the following immediate consequence. since Cauchy assumed that the derivative of f was continuous. Figure 4.2: This ellipse is (C \ R)-contractible. see http://www-groups.st-and.6 (Cauchy’s Theorem).ac. f is holomorphic in G. . Corollary 4.uk/∼history/Biographies/Gauss. 2. f is holomorphic in G.uk/∼history/Biographies/Weierstrass. Cauchy’s theorem is often called the Cauchy–Goursat Theorem. Then f = 0. Remarks. In all the examples and exercises that we’ll have to deal with here. Weierstraß2 his in 1842. Then f= γ0 γ1 f. the homotopies will be ‘nice enough’ to satisfy the condition of this theorem. and γ0 ∼G γ1 via a homotopy with continuous second partials. 2 For more information about Karl Theodor Wilhelm Weierstraß (1815–1897). It is assumed that Johann Carl Friedrich Gauß (1777–1855)1 knew a version of this theorem in 1811 but only published it in 1831. then the proof becomes too advanced for the scope of these notes.2 for an example). An important special case is the one where a curve γ is G-homotopic to a point.uk/∼history/Biographies/Goursat. 1. The condition on the smoothness of the homotopy can be omitted.7.ac. however.st-and. INTEGRATION 48 Theorem 4. Cauchy published his version in 1825. γ 1 For more information about Gauß.8. Suppose G ⊆ C is open.html.dcs. a constant curve (see Figure 4.st-and. Corollary 4. If f is entire and γ is any smooth closed curve then f = 0.CHAPTER 4. In this case we simply say γ is G-contractible. and γ ∼G 0 via a homotopy with continuous second partials. γ The fact that any closed curve is C-contractible (Exercise 18a) yields the following special case of the previous special-case corollary.html. in symbols γ ∼G 0.html.

Proof of Theorem 4.9 (Cauchy’s Integral Formula for a Circle). Cauchy’s Theorem can be derived ‘from scratch’. s)) ∂h ∂t dt. Suppose h is the given homotopy from γ0 to γ1 . and hence the statement of the theorem follows with I(0) = I(1). Theorem 4. INTEGRATION 49 There are many proofs of Cauchy’s Theorem. s)) (1. s) − f (h(0. dx ∂s ∂s 4. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. and does not require any other major theorems. and equality of mixed partials. s)) dt ∂s 0 ∂t f ′ (h(t. By the product rule. We note that with more work. s) = 0 . By Leibniz’s Rule.CHAPTER 4. s)) dt ∂s ∂t ∂s∂t 0 1 ∂h ∂h ∂2h f ′ (h(t. Consider the derivative of I. Consider the function I(s) = γs f as a function in s (so I(0) = γ0 f and I(1) = γ0 f ). s)) 0 ∂h dt = ∂t 1 0 ∂ ∂s f (h(t. A particularly nice one follows from the complex Green’s Theorem. the chain rule.3 Cauchy’s Integral Formula Cauchy’s Theorem 4. s)) (0. Let CR be the counterclockwise circle with radius R centered at w and suppose f is holomorphic at each point of the closed disk D bounded by CR . we have: ∂h ∂h d I(s) = f (h(1. Then f (z) 1 dz . We will use the (real) Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. f (w) = 2πi CR z − w . d I(s) = ds = = ∂2h ∂h ∂h + f (h(t. We will show that I is constant with respect to s.6.6 yields almost immediately the following helpful result. s). d d I(s) = ds ds 1 f (h(t. let γs be the curve parametrized by h(t. s)) 1 Finally. s)) + f (h(t. For 0 ≤ s ≤ 1. by the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (applied separately to the real and imaginary parts of the above integral). s)) dt ∂t ∂s ∂t∂s 0 1 ∂ ∂h f (h(t.

we say a simple closed curve γ is positively oriented if it is parameterized so that the inside is on the left of γ. This is a useful theorem by itself. smooth. and—because f is continuous at w—this means we can make |f (z) − f (w)| as small as we like. simple.10 (Cauchy’s Integral Formula). In that case the theorem remains true. in many cases in which a point w is inside a simple closed curve γ we can see a homotopy from γ to a small circle around w so that the homotopy misses w and remains in the region where f is holomorphic. On the right-hand side. we can now take r as small as we want. and Theorem 4. which is what we claimed. In fact. All we need is to find a homotopy in G \ {w} between γ and a small circle with center at w. For a circle this corresponds to a counterclockwise orientation. f (w) = 2πi γ z − w We have already indicated how to prove this. in fact. not just at the center of CR . by combining Cauchy’s theorem and the special case. In all practical cases we can see immediately how to construct such a homotopy. Hence the left-hand side has no choice but to be zero. Here’s the general form: Theorem 4. gives CR f (z) dz = z−w Cr f (z) dz z−w Now by Exercise 15. it will be important to have Cauchy’s integral formula when w is anywhere inside CR .9 then applies to evaluate the integral. Theorem 4.9. and γ is a positively oriented. since. Cr 1 dz = 2πi . So Cauchy’s Theorem 4.CHAPTER 4. the integral of f (z)/(z − w) around γ is the same as the integral of f (z)/(z − w) around a small circle centered at w. by Cauchy’s theorem. In general. w ∈ G. z−w and we obtain with Proposition 4. it is not even clear how to make sense of the “inside” of γ in general. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G.4(d) f (z) dz − 2πif (w) = z−w 1 f (z) f (z) − f (w) dz − f (w) dz = dz z−w z−w z−w Cr Cr Cr f (z) − f (w) |f (z) − f (w)| ≤ max length (Cr ) = max 2πr z∈Cr z∈Cr z−w r z∈Cr CR = 2π max |f (z) − f (w)| .6. closed. but it can be made more generally useful. The justification for this is one of the first substantial theorems ever proved in topology. In this discussion we need to be sure that the orientation of the curve γ and the circle match. but it is not at all clear how to do so in complete generality. INTEGRATION 50 Proof. and the function f (z)/(z − w) is holomorphic in an open set containing D \ {w}. For example. All circles Cr with center w and radius r are homotopic in D \ {w}. G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. Then f (z) 1 dz . We can state it as follows: .

1. where the integral is literally the mean of the values of f along the circle of radius r: 1 2π 2π 0 f w + reiθ dθ = 1 2πr 2π 0 f w + reiθ r dθ = lim 1 ∆θ→0 2πr 2π f (w + reiθ )(r∆θ) θ=0 where in the final sum the step size is ∆θ. Even better. but not Gauss-Jordan elimination). which is often called a mean-value theorem. simply by taking real and imaginary parts on both sides.10 gives (if the conditions are met) f (w) = 1 2πi 2π 0 f w + reit 1 ireit dt = it − w w + re 2π 2π 0 f w + reit dt . parametrized by.11 (Jordan Curve Theorem). we automatically get similar formulas for the real and imaginary part of f . This is called a mean value theorem because it is stating that f (w) is equal to an integral. If γ is a positively oriented. Let’s summarize them in the following statement. 0 ≤ θ ≤ 2π. f (w) = 2π 0 Furthermore. Corollary 4. INTEGRATION 51 Theorem 4.” is surprisingly difficult to prove. 4 . say. although “intuitively obvious. Then 2π 1 f w + reiθ dθ . simple. u(w) = 1 2π 2π 0 2π 0 u w + reiθ dθ and v(w) = 1 2π v w + reiθ dθ . Use the definition of length to find the length of the following curves: (a) γ(t) = 3t + i for −1 ≤ t ≤ 1 For more information on C. γs is inside γ and outside of D. Suppose f is holomorphic on and inside the circle z = w + reiθ .org/wiki/Camille Jordan . for 0 < s < 1.” If you want to explore this kind of mathematics you should take a course in topology. if f = u + iv. The usual statement of the Jordan curve theorem does not contain the homotopy information. This theorem. The Jordan Curve Theorem is named after French mathematician Camille Jordan (1838-1922)4 (the Jordan of Jordan normal form and Jordan matrix. we have borrowed this from a companion theorem to the Jordan curve theorem which is sometimes called the “annulus theorem.wikipedia. If a closed disk D centered at w lies inside γ then there is a homotopy γs from γ to the positively oriented boundary of D. Theorem 4. A nice special case of Cauchy’s formula is obtained when γ is a circle centered at w.12.CHAPTER 4. see http://en. 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. closed curve in C then C \ γ consists of two connected open sets. Jordan. These identities have the flavor of mean values. the inside and the outside of γ. z = w + reit . and. Remarks. Exercises 1.

by writing z and z as x ± iy. (c) 1/z 4 . |z|2 where γ is the line segment from 2 to 3 + i. Use γ(t) = a + reit . (b) The circle |z| = 3. and remember that the principal branch is √ 1 defined by z 2 = reiθ/2 if z = reiθ for −π ≤ θ ≤ π.2. and γ(1) = 6 + 2i. Evaluate 1 γ z (c) γ(t) = i sin(t) for −π ≤ t ≤ π 2. (b) z 2 − 2z + 3. 1 14. and satisfies Im γ(t) > 0.CHAPTER 4. Evaluate γ (a) γ is the line segment form 0 to 1 − i. γ z dz and γ z dz along each of the following paths. 7. 12. γ y dz. 4. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. Evaluate the integrals γ x dz. t2 ) for 0 ≤ t ≤ 2 3. (c) γ is the counterclockwise circle |z − a| = r. Find γ γ γ γ (c) The parabola y = x2 from x = 0 to x = 1. z γ(0) = −4 + i. e3z dz for each of the following paths: (a) The straight line segment from 1 to i. Integrate the function f (z) = z over the three curves given in Example 4. Show that 2π ikθ dθ 0 e is 1 if k = 0 and 0 otherwise. (d) xy. z where γ is the semicircle from 1 through i to −1. Evaluate 8. dz where γ(t) = sin t + i cos t. Evaluate γ z 2 dz where γ is the unit circle and z 2 is the principal branch. Compute 10. INTEGRATION (b) γ(t) = eit for 0 ≤ t ≤ π 52 (d) γ(t) = (t. 5. You can use the parameterization γ(θ) = eiθ for −π ≤ θ ≤ π. Find γ sin z where γ is parametrized by γ(t). and satisfies γ(0) = i and γ(1) = π. (b) γ is the counterclockwise circle |z| = 1. z 2 dz where γ is the parabola with parametric equation γ(t) = t+it2 . 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. Integrate the following functions over the circle |z| = 2. 11. Compute 9. Compute γ z + 1 where γ is parametrized by γ(t). ez where γ is the line segment from 0 to z0 . 6. 1 2π 1 13. 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. . Note that you can get the second two integrals very easily after you calculate the first two. oriented counterclockwise: (a) z + z. 0 ≤ t ≤ 1.

What should you do if m < 0? What if m = 0?) 21. Let γr be the circle centered at 2i with radius r.) 22. Compute z2 dz . d] → [a. a ≤ t ≤ b and σ(t). f is independent of the parametrization of γ. γ z−w 16. (Hint: Follow the counterclockwise unit circle through m complete cycles γz (for m > 0). Suppose p is a polynomial and γ is a closed smooth path in C. oriented counterclockwise. (a) Prove that any closed curve is C-contractible. Generalizing these. Compute the real integral 0 2π dθ 2 + sin θ by writing the sine function in terms of the exponential function and making the substitution z = eiθ to turn the real into a complex integral. Show that d c f (σ(t))σ ′ (t) dt = a γ b f (γ(t))γ ′ (t) dt . Exercise 19 excluded n = −1 for a very good reason: Exercises 3 and 15 (with w = 0) give counterexamples. (In other words. oriented counterclockwise.) 18. σ = γ ◦ τ . [If n is negative. b] be the map which “takes γ to σ. Show that γ z n dz = 0 for any closed smooth γ and any integer n = −1. assume that γ does not pass through the origin. since otherwise the integral is not defined. 24. +1 γr (This integral depends on r. c ≤ t ≤ d. and let τ : [c. Show that F (z) = F (z) = arctan z? i 2 Log(z + i) − i 2 Log(z − i) is a primitive of 1 1+z 2 for Re(z) > 0. Prove that ∼G is an equivalence relation. our definition of the integral 17. You can parameterize this curve as z(t) = w + reit for 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. Use the definition of an integral to show that dz = 2πi . if m is any integer then find a closed curve γ so that −1 dz = 2mπi. Let γ be the circle with radius r centered at w. γ 23. 19. Show that p = 0.] 20. INTEGRATION 53 15. Suppose a smooth curve is parametrized by both γ(t).CHAPTER 4.” that is. (b) Prove that any two closed curves are C-homotopic. Is .

10 by evaluating g(0) and g(1).) 29. − 2z − 8 (z − 4)(z + 2) z+2 z−4 Which of these forms corresponds to the Cauchy integral formula for the curve γ3 ?) 33. Find z2 |z+1|=2 4−z 2 .10. 1] → C. w ∈ G. Let γr be the counterclockwise circle with center at 0 and radius r.22 (Leibniz’s rule) and then find a primitive for (b) Prove Theorem 4.CHAPTER 4. closed. This exercise gives an alternative proof of Cauchy’s integral formula (Theorem 4. (Hint: In one case γr is contractible in C \ {a}. Let f and g be holomorphic in G. Let γr be the counterclockwise circle with center at 0 and radius r. simple. g(t) = γ f (w+t(z−w)) z−w dz.10). INTEGRATION 54 25. Find γr z−a . dz 30. Then γ f g ′ = f (γ(b))g(γ(b)) − f (γ(a))g(γ(a)) − f ′g .) 32. and f (z) = g(z) for all z ∈ γ. which does not depend on Cauchy’s Theorem 4. Suppose f and g are holomorphic on the region G. G-contractible curve. Find γr z 2 −2z−8 for r = 1. You should get different answers for r < |a| and r > |a|. Show that g′ = 0. Prove the following integration by parts statement. In the other you can combine Exercises 15 and 29. Now use Exercise 30. Explain geometrically why γ0 and γ1 are homotopic in C \ {a} . Use the Cauchy integral formula to evaluate the integral in Exercise 31 when r = 3. r = 3 and r = 5. (Hint: Since z 2 − 2z − 8 = (z − 4)(z + 2) you can find a partial fraction 1 A B decomposition of the form z 2 −2z−8 = z−4 + z+2 . Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G. Prove Corollary 4. 27. What is 35. (z + t(w − z)).7 using Theorem 4. Evaluate ez |z|=2 z(z−3) and ez |z|=4 z(z−3) . smooth.6. (Hint: ∂f ∂t Use Theorem 1. . (a) Consider the function g : [0. Suppose a is a complex number and γ0 and γ1 are two counterclockwise circles (traversed just once) so that a is inside both of them. G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. Prove that f (z) = g(z) for all z inside γ. and γ is a positively oriented. smooth. and suppose γ ⊂ G is a smooth curve from a to b. (Hint: The integrand can be written in each of following ways: z2 1 1/(z − 4) 1/(z + 2) 1 = = = . γ 26.) dz 31. γ is a closed. 28. |z|=1 sin z z ? 34.

1.. (z − w)3 This innocent-looking theorem has a very powerful consequence: just from knowing that f is holomorphic we know of the existence of f ′′ . 1 f (w + ∆w) − f (w) = ∆w ∆w 1 = 2πi 1 2πi γ f (z) 1 dz − 2πi γ z − (w + ∆w) f (z) dz . We will study the following difference quotient.2. Then f ′ (w) = and f ′′ (w) = 1 2πi 1 πi f (z) dz (z − w)2 γ γ f (z) dz .10). G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. Theorem 5. which we can rewrite as follows by Theorem 4. that is. f ′′′ . gives the following statement. w ∈ G. which has no analog whatsoever in the reals. smooth. etc.10. Richard Askey 5.Chapter 5 Consequences of Cauchy’s Theorem If things are nice there is probably a good reason why they are nice: and if you do not know at least one reason for this good fortune. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G.1 Extensions of Cauchy’s Formula We now derive formulas for f ′ and f ′′ which resemble Cauchy’s formula (Theorem 4. Repeating this argument for f ′ . Proof of Theorem 5. Corollary 5. and γ is a positively oriented. If f is differentiable in the region G then f is infinitely differentiable in G. (z − w − ∆w)(z − w) γ f (z) dz z−w 55 .10). then for f ′′ . f ′ is also holomorphic in G. closed. then you still have work to do. simple.1. The idea of the proof is very similar to the proof of Cauchy’s integral formula (Theorem 4.

2 2 (z − w − ∆w)(z − w) (|z − w| − |∆w|)|z − w| (δ − |∆w|)N 2 which certainly stays bounded as ∆w → 0.1 suggests that there are similar formulas for the higher derivatives of f . CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM Hence we will have to show that the following expression gets arbitrarily small as ∆w → 0: f (w + ∆w) − f (w) 1 − ∆w 2πi γ 56 f (z) 1 dz = (z − w)2 2πi f (z) f (z) − dz (z − w − ∆w)(z − w) (z − w)2 γ f (z) 1 dz . The proof of the formula for f ′′ is very similar and will be left for the exercises (see Exercise 2). − 1) |z|=2 we first split up the integration path as illustrated in Figure 5. these new integrals we know .1 can also be used to compute certain integrals. Example 5. it suffices to show that the integrand stays bounded as ∆w → 0 (because γ and hence length(γ) are fixed). by Proposition 4. we will obtain such a result much more easily. However.4. |z|=1 d sin(z) dz = 2πi sin(z) z2 dz = 2πi cos(0) = 2πi . Remarks. the two contributions along the new path will cancel each other. there is some positive δ so that the open disk of radius δ around w does not intersect γ. and theoretically one could obtain them one by one with the methods of the proof of Theorem 5.CHAPTER 5. |z − w| ≥ δ for all z on γ. that is. If we integrate on these two new closed paths (γ1 and γ2 ) counterclockwise. 2. Let M = maxz∈γ |f (z)| and N = maxz∈γ |z − w|.3. so we save the derivation of formulas for higher derivatives of f for later (see Corollary 8.1. once we start studying power series for holomorphic functions. We give some examples of this application next. z=0 Example 5. To compute the integral z 2 (z dz . By the reverse triangle inequality we have for all z∈γ |f (z)| M f (z) ≤ ≤ . for which two singularities where inside the integration path. This is in fact true.6). Theorem 5.1: Introduce an additional path which separates 0 and 1.4(d). = ∆w 2πi γ (z − w − ∆w)(z − w)2 This can be made arbitrarily small if we can show that the integral stays bounded as ∆w → 0. Theorem 5. each of which has only one singularity inside the integration path. The effect is that we transformed an integral. 1. into a sum of two integrals. In fact. Since γ is a closed set.

CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 57 2 1 0 1 Figure 5. . a polynomial of degree d looks almost like a constant times z d .6. Suppose p(z) is a polynomial of degree d with leading coefficient ad .4 how to deal with. The first application is understanding the roots of polynomials. Lemma 5. which is generally quite useful. As a preparation we prove the following inequality.5. It simply says that for large enough z. |z|=1 cos(z) d2 dz = πi 2 cos(z) z3 dz z=0 = πi (− cos(0)) = −πi .1: Example 5. z 2 (z dz = − 1) = γ1 |z|=2 γ1 z 2 (z 1 z−1 z2 dz + − 1) dz + γ2 γ2 z 2 (z 1 z2 dz − 1) = 2πi d 1 1 + 2πi 2 dz z − 1 z=0 1 1 = 2πi − + 2πi (−1)2 = 0. z−1 dz Example 5. We shall look at a few applications along these lines in this section.CHAPTER 5. 5. but this will be a recurring theme throughout the rest of the book.2 Taking Cauchy’s Formula to the Limit Many beautiful applications of Cauchy’s formula arise from considerations of the limiting behavior of the formula as the curve gets arbitrarily large. Then there is real number R0 so that 1 |ad | |z|d ≤ |p(z)| ≤ 2 |ad | |z|d 2 for all z satisfying |z| ≥ R0 .

it has been remarked that the Fundamental Theorem of Algrebra is neither fundamental to algebra nor even a theorem of algebra. 2. On the other hand. A compact reformulation of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra is to say that C is algebraically closed. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM Proof. Then Cauchy’s formula gives us 1 1 = p(0) 2πi CR 1/p(z) dz z where CR is the circle of radius R around the origin. to z−a (which is again a polynomial by the division algorithm). + + ··· + + 2 d−1 ad z ad z ad z ad z d 1 2 58 Then the sum inside the last factor has limit 1 as z → ∞ so its modulus is between large enough z. that is. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra refers to Algebra in the sense that it existed in 1799. Hence. which had a flaw.6 we have |z p(z)| ≥ 2 |ad | |z|d+1 for all large z. Proof. (see also Exercise 10). 1 p(0) = 0. etc.4(d) and the formula for the circumference of a circle we see that the integral can be bounded as 2 1 dz 1 2 · (2πR) = ≤ · d+1 2πi CR zp(z) 2π |ad | R |ad | Rd and this has limit 0 as R → ∞. we have shown that impossible. p(z) = 0 for all z ∈ C. Notice that the value of the integral does not depend on R. (∗) p(0) R→∞ 2πi CR z p(z) 1 But now we can see that the limit of the integral is 0: By Lemma 5.7 (Fundamental Theorem of Algebra1 ). all proofs use some analysis (such as the intermediate-value theorem).CHAPTER 5. Every non-constant polynomial has a root in C. Thus. as we can apply the corollary.’ There are proofs of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra which do not use complex analysis. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra was first proved by Gauß (in his doctoral dissertation in 1799. and we can factor out ad z d : |p(z)| = ad z d + ad−1 z d−1 + ad−2 z d−2 + · · · + a1 z + a0 = |ad | |z|d 1 + a1 a0 ad−1 ad−2 . where d is the degree of p(z) and ad is the leading coefficient of p(z). 1. Since p(z) has degree d its leading coefficient ad is not zero. although its statement had been assumed to be correct long before Gauß’s time. using Proposition 4. 1 . not to modern algebra. 2 It is amusing that such an important algebraic result can be proved ‘purely analytically. plugging into (∗). 2 Suppose (by way of contradiction) that p does not have any roots. and later three additional rigorous proofs). and 2 for all Theorem 5. so we have dz 1 1 = lim . Thus. But. R is not algebraically closed. This statement implies that any polynomial p can be factored into linear terms of p(z) the form z − a where a is a root of p. after getting a root a. which is Remarks.

Now apply Corollary 5.8. that is. that is. f is also bounded (Exercise 9). p(z) = 0 for all z ∈ C. The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra states that p must have one (in fact. followed by the circular arc T of radius R in the upper half plane from R to −R. We shall integrate the function f (z) = z2 1 1/(z + i) g(z) 1 = = . 4 This theorem is for historical reasons erroneously attributed to Liouville.1 is the following.14. which is close to Gauß’s original proof: Another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra. z−i i+i 2i Since g(z) is holomorphic inside and on σ and i is inside σ. Gauß may well have known about it before Cauchy. As one more example of this theme of getting results from Cauchy’s formula by taking the limit as a path goes to infinity. Example 5. and hence. Now we apply Proposition 4. Let σ be the counterclockwise semicircle formed by the segment S of the real axis from −R to R. remembering that CR has circumference 2πR and |z − w| = R for all z on CR : f ′ (w) = 1 2πi M . Given any w ∈ C. But f → 0 as |z| becomes large as a consequence of Lemma 5. we compute an improper integral.6. by Theorem 2. Suppose (by way of contradiction) that p does not have any roots. Proof. see http://www-groups. which contradicts our assumptions.9 to deduce that f is constant. Then. the func1 tion f (z) = p(z) is entire. we apply Theorem 5. where g(z) = +1 z−i z−i z+i dz 1 = +1 2πi g(z) 1 1 dz = g(i) = = . because p is entire.1 with the circle CR of radius R centered at w. we can apply Cauchy’s formula: 1 2πi z2 σ σ 3 For more information about Joseph Liouville (1809–1882).st-and. f is constant. p has no roots in R.9 (Liouville’s3 Theorem4 ). CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM 59 Example 5. Every bounded entire function is constant. Note that we can choose any R because f is entire. Hence p is constant. A powerful consequence of (the first half of) Theorem 5. Suppose |f (z)| ≤ M for all z ∈ C. . as we are allowed to make R as large as we want. Corollary 5.uk/∼history/Biographies/Liouville.4 (d).10. This implies that f ′ = 0. 4) roots in C: √ √ √ √ p(x) = (x2 + 1)(2x2 + 3) = (x + i)(x − i)( 2x + 3i)( 2x − 3i). It was published earlier by Cauchy. where R > 1.html.CHAPTER 5.dcs. As an example of the usefulness of Liouville’s theorem we give another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra.ac. in fact. The polynomial p(x) = 2x4 + 5x2 + 3 is such that all of its coefficients are real. ≤ R CR 1 f (z) f (z) |f (z)| 1 |f (z)| · 2πR = max max dz ≤ 2πR = max 2 2 2 z∈γ (z − w) 2π z∈γR (z − w) 2π z∈γR R R The right-hand side can be made arbitrarily small. However.

there are complex versions of the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus. if F is holomorphic on G and F ′ (z) = f (z) for all z ∈ G. . However. the Fundamental Theorems of Calculus makes a number of important claims: that continuous functions are integrable. −R ≤ t ≤ R.11.CHAPTER 5. and has derivative f (z) = 2z. Making these observations in the limit of the formula (∗∗) as R → ∞ now produces ∞ −∞ t2 dt = π. Let G be a region of C. That is. we need to think about integrals over arbitrary curves in 2-dimensional regions.13. an antiderivative of f is a function with F ′ = f . see Exercise 13. +1 Of course this integral can be evaluated almost as easily using standard formulas from calculus. the interior of γ in C is also completely contained in G. z 2 + 1 ≥ 1 |z|2 2 for large enough z by Lemma 5. The difference between the real case and the complex case is that for the complex case. and that antiderivatives provide easy ways to compute values of definite integrals. On the other hand.3 Antiderivatives We begin this section with a familiar definition from real calculus: Definition 5. just a slight modification of this example leads to an improper integral which is far beyond the scope of basic calculus. +1 2i (∗∗) Now this formula holds for all R > 1. A region G ⊂ C is simply connected if every simply closed curve in G is Gcontractible. To state the first Fundamental Theorem. F : G → C. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM and so S 60 z2 dz + +1 T z2 dz = +1 σ z2 dz 1 = 2πi · = π. 2+1 2 S z −R 1 + t As R → ∞ this approaches an improper integral. For any functions f. then F is an antiderivative of f on G.6. their antiderivatives are continuous and differentiable.4(d): z2 2 2 dz ≤ 2 · πR = +1 R R T and this has limit 0 as R → ∞. We have already seen that F (z) = z 2 is entire. so we can bound the integral over T using Proposition 4. First. so we can take the limit as R → ∞. obtaining R dz dt = . In short. also known as a primitive of f on G. 5. we need some topological definitions: Definition 5. Thus. Example 5. Just like in the real case.12. we can parameterize the integral over S using z = t. for any simple closed curve γ ⊂ G. F is an antiderivative of f on any region G.

CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM Loosely, simply connected means G has no ‘holes’.

61

Theorem 5.14. [The First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus] Suppose G ⊆ C is a simplyconnected region, and fix some basepoint z0 ∈ G. For each point z ∈ G, let γz denote a smooth curve in G from z0 to z. Let f : G → C be a holomorphic function. Then the function F (z) : G → C defined by F (z) :=
γz

f

is holomorphic on G with F ′ (z) = f (z). In short, every holomorphic function on a simply-connected region has a primitive. Proof. We leave this to the exercises, Exercise 14. Theorem 5.15. [The Second Fundamental Theorem of Calculus] Suppose G ⊆ C is a simply connected region. Let γ ⊂ G be a smooth curve with parametrization γ(t), a ≤ t ≤ b. If f : G → C is holomorphic on G and F is any primitive of f on G, then f = F (γ(b)) − F (γ(a)) .

γ

Remarks. 1. Actually, more is true. The assumptions that G is simply connected and f is holomorphic are both unnecessary. Proof. The antiderivative F prescribed by the First Fundamental Theorem of Calculus satisfies the ˜ ˜ desired equation by definition. For any other antiderivative F of f , we have that F ′ (z) = F ′ (z) for ˜ , so the function H(z) := F (z) − F (z) is holomorphic with derivative 0, so is constant. Thus, ˜ z∈F ˜ F (z) = F (z) + c for some constant c ∈ C. Then ˜ ˜ F (γ(b)) − F (γ(a)) = F (γ(b)) − F (γ(a)) = as desired. There are many interesting consequences of the Fundamental Theorems. One consequence comes from the proof of Theorem 5.14: we will not really need the fact that every closed curve in G is contractible, just that every closed curve gives a zero integral for f . This fact can be exploited to give a sort of converse statement to Corollary 4.7. Corollary 5.16 (Morera’s5 Theorem). Suppose f is continuous in the region G and f =0
γ

f,
γ

for all smooth closed paths γ ⊂ G. Then f is holomorphic in G.
5 For more information about Giancinto Morera (1856–1907), see http://www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk/∼history/Biographies/Morera.html.

CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM Proof. As in the proof of Theorem 5.14, we fix an z0 ∈ G and define F (z) =
γz

62

f,

where γz is any smooth curve in G from z0 to z. As above, this is a well-defined function because all closed paths give a zero integral for f ; and exactly as in Exercise 14 we can show that F is a primitive for f in G. Because F is holomorphic on G, Corollary 5.2 gives that f is also holomorphic on G. We now mention two interesting corollaries of the Second Fundamental Theorem. Corollary 5.17. If f is holomorphic on G, then an antiderivative of f exists on G, and independent of the path γ ⊂ G between γ(a) and γ(b).
γ

f is

If f is holomorphic on G, we say γ f is path-independent. Example 4.2 shows that a path-independent integral is quite special; it also says that the function z 2 does not have an antiderivative in, for example, the region {z ∈ C : |z| < 2}. (Actually, the function z 2 does not have an antiderivative in any nonempty region—prove it!) In the special case that γ is closed (that is, γ(a) = γ(b)), we immediately get the following nice consequence (which also follows from Cauchy’s Integral Formula). Corollary 5.18. Suppose G ⊆ C is open, γ is a smooth closed curve in G, and f is holomorphic on G and has an antiderivative on G. Then f = 0.
γ

Exercises
1. Compute the following integrals, where C is the boundary of the square with corners at ±4 ± 4i: (a)
C

(b)
C

(c)
C

(d)
C

ez dz. z3 ez dz. (z − πi)2 sin(2z) dz. (z − π)2 ez cos(z) dz. (z − π)3

2. Prove the formula for f ′′ in Theorem 5.1. 3. Integrate the following functions over the circle |z| = 3, oriented counterclockwise: (b) (a) Log(z − 4i).
1 1. z− 2

CHAPTER 5. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i)
1 . z 2 −4 exp z z3 . cos z 2 . z iz−3 . sin z . 1 (z 2 + 2 )2 exp z (z−w)2 , where 1 . (z+4)(z 2 +1)

63

w is any fixed complex number with |w| = 3.

4. Evaluate

e2z dz |z|=3 (z−1)2 (z−2) . γ

5. Prove that

z exp z 2 dz = 0 for any closed curve γ.

6. Show that exp(sin z) has an antiderivative on C. 7. Find a (maximal size) set on which f (z) = exp compare with the real function f (x) = e1/x ?)
1 z

has an antiderivative. (How does this

8. Compute the following integrals; use the principal value of z i . (Hint: one of these integrals is considerably easier than the other.) (a)
γ1

z i dz where γ1 (t) = eit , − π ≤ t ≤ π . 2 2 z i dz where γ2 (t) = eit ,
π 2

(b)
γ2

≤t≤

3π 2 .

9. Suppose f is continuous on C and limz→∞ f (z) = 0. Show that f is bounded. (Hint: From the definition of limit at infinity (with ǫ = 1) there is R > 0 so that |f (z) − 0| = |f | (z) < 1 if |z| > R. Is f bounded for |z| ≤ R?) 10. Let p be a polynomial of degree n > 0. Prove that there exist complex numbers c, z1 , z2 , . . . , zk and positive integers j1 , . . . , jk such that p(z) = c (z − z1 )j1 (z − z2 )j2 · · · (z − zk )jk , where j1 + · · · + jk = n. 11. Show that a polynomial of odd degree with real coefficients must have a real zero. (Hint: Exercise 21b in Chapter 1.) 12. Suppose f is entire and there exist constants a, b such that |f (z)| ≤ a|z| + b for all z ∈ C. Prove that f is a linear polynomial (that is, of degree ≤ 1). 13. In this problem F (z) =
eiz z 2 +1

and R > 1. Modify the example at the end of Section 5.2:

(a) Show that σ F (z) dz = π if σ is the counterclockwise semicircle formed by the segment e S of the real axis from −R to R, followed by the circular arc T of radius R in the upper half plane from R to −R.

Prove Corollary 5. γ (c) Use the fact that f is continuous to show that for any fixed z ∈ C and any ǫ > 0.18. that −∞ cos(t) dt = π . (a) Use Cauchy’s Theorem to show that. show that F (z ′ ) − F (z) = f. the value of F (z) is independent of the choice of γz .17. CONSEQUENCES OF CAUCHY’S THEOREM (b) Show that eiz ≤ 1 for z in the upper half plane. . ∆z (d) Conclude that F ′ (z) = f (z). as follows. Prove Theorem 5. (c) Show that limR→∞ T 2 |z|2 64 for z F (z) dz = 0. for a given z ∈ G.CHAPTER 5. 15. e t2 +1 14. 16. Prove Corollary 5. (b) Fix z. Again using Cauchy’s Theorem. by parameterizing the integral over S in terms of t and just considering the ∞ real part. and conclude that |F (z)| ≤ large enough. e (d) Conclude. and hence limR→∞ S F (z) dz = π . there is a ∆z ∈ C such that F (z) − F (z + ∆z) − f (z) < ǫ.14. z ′ ∈ G such that the straight line γ connecting z to z ′ is contained in G.

Recall from Section 2. Proposition 6. The proof that v satisfies the Laplace equation is completely analogous.dcs.2. by Corollary 5.ac.15.Chapter 6 Harmonic Functions The shortest route between two truths in the real domain passes through the complex domain.st-and.1 Definition and Basic Properties We will now spend a chapter on certain functions defined on subsets of the complex plane which are real valued. Hence uxx + uyy = (ux )x + (uy )y = (vy )x + (−vx )y = vyx − vxy = 0 in G.2. First. In particular. Proof. There are (at least) two reasons why harmonic functions are part of the study of complex analysis.uk/∼history/Biographies/Laplace. The main motivation for studying them is that the partial differential equation they satisfy is very common in the physical sciences. 1 For more information about Pierre-Simon Laplace (1749–1827). and they can be found in the next two theorems. 65 . Suppose f = u + iv is holomorphic in the region G.4 the definition of a harmonic function: Definition 6. By Theorem 2. J. u and v have continuous second partials. and hence so are u and v. Let G ⊆ C be a region. f is infinitely differentiable.html.1. see http://www-groups. A function u : G → R is harmonic in G if it has continuous second partials in G and satisfies the Laplace1 equation uxx + uyy = 0 in G. Hadamard 6. Note that in the last step we used the fact that v has continuous second partials. u and v satisfy the Cauchy–Riemann equations and u x = vy uy = −vx in G. Then u and v are harmonic in G.

2 shouts for a converse theorem. Then there exists a harmonic function v such that f = u + iv is holomorphic in G. and u = a + c. In that spirit. g = h′ = ax + ibx = ax − iay . Moreover. the two theorems we’ve just proved allow for a powerful interplay between harmonic and holomorphic functions. again because u is harmonic. we can use Theorem 5. so that we obtain ux = ax or u(x. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 66 Proposition 6. y) + c(x).CHAPTER 6. y) = a(x. Suppose u is harmonic on the simply connected region G. (The second equation follows with the Cauchy–Riemann equations. and then to construct an antiderivative of g. functions which are harmonic in a region G but not the real part (say) of an holomorphic function in G (Exercise 3).14 to obtain a primitive h of g on G.) But the real part of g is ux .15 such a function f = u + iv must satisfy f ′ = ux + ivx = ux − iuy . by Theorem 2. again using Theorem 2. Hence c has to be constant. But then f =h−c is a function holomorphic in G whose real part is u. We will explicitly construct the holomorphic function f (and thus v = Im f ). We do obtain a converse of Proposition 6. Namely. which one might appreciate better when looking back at the simple definition of harmonic functions. Theorem 6. The plan is to prove that g is holomorphic. On the other hand. Remark. Proof. which will be almost the function f that we’re after. (The second equation follows with the Cauchy–Riemann equations. let g = ux − iuy .3. To prove that g is holomorphic. It is. however. y) = a(x. and c depends only on x. we use Theorem 2. Now that we know that g is holomorphic in G.) It is also worth mentioning that the proof shows that if u is harmonic in G then ux is the real part of a function holomorphic in G regardless whether G is simply connected or not. . As one might imagine. Re g = ux and Im g = −uy have continuous partials. y) + c(y) for some function c which only depends on y.15: first because u is harmonic. Remark. There are. The function v is called a harmonic conjugate of u. (Note that for the application of this theorem we need the fact that G is simply connected. a very strong result. the following theorem might appear not too surprising. First. as promised.) Suppose we decompose h into its real and imaginary parts as h = a + ib. it should not be surprising that the function g which we first constructed is the derivative of the sought-after function f .2 if we restrict ourselves to simply connected regions.15. however. they satisfy the Cauchy–Riemann equations: (Re g)x = uxx = −uyy = (Im g)y and (Re g)y = uxy = uyx = − (Im g)x . Then. In hindsight. comparing the imaginary parts of g and h′ yields −uy = −ay or u(x.

5 with this r: u(w) = 1 2π 2π 0 u w + reit dt . Because z0 ∈ D. we showed that u is infinitely differentiable at z0 . Proof. The definition of a strong relative minimum is completely analogous. and {z ∈ C : |z − w| ≤ r} ⊂ G. so by the last theorem. Theorem 6. Fix z0 ∈ G and r > 0 such that the disk D = {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < r} 67 is contained in G.5 states that harmonic functions have the mean-value property. we apply Theorem 6. Suppose |z0 − w| = r. then it does not have a strong relative maximum or minimum in G. The disk D = {z ∈ C : |z − w| ≤ r} is simply connected.10. This is the first in a series of proofs which uses the fact that the property of being harmonic is a local property—it is a property at each point of a certain region. .4. Theorem 6. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS Corollary 6.CHAPTER 6. f is infinitely differentiable on D. Remark. Theorem 4. so by Theorem 6.2.2 Mean-Value and Maximum/Minimum Principle The following identity is the harmonic analog of Cauchy’s integral formula. Then u(w) = 1 2π 2π 0 u w + reit dt . The function u : G ⊂ C → R has a strong relative maximum at w if there exists a disk D = {z ∈ C : |z − w| < R} ⊂ G such that u(z) ≤ u(w) for all z ∈ D and u(z0 ) < u(w) for some z0 ∈ D. A harmonic function is infinitely differentiable. D is simply connected. Assume (by way of contradiction) that w is a strong local maximum of u in G. Proof. Suppose u is harmonic in G. The following result is a fairly straightforward consequence of this property. 6. Note that we did not construct a function f which is holomorphic in G but we only constructed such a function on the disk D.6. and because z0 was chosen arbitrarily. Now we apply Corollary 4. The statement follows by taking the real part on both sides.3 there is a function f holomorphic on D such that u = Re f on D. we proved the statement. Then there is a disk in G centered at w containing a point z0 with u(z0 ) < u(w). and hence so is its real part u. If u is harmonic in the region G.12 to f : f (w) = 1 2π 2π 0 f w + reit dt . Suppose u is harmonic in the region G. Theorem 6.5. By Corollary 5. there exists a function f holomorphic in D such that u = Re f on D. Proof. This f might very well differ from one disk to the next.

11 implies that if u is harmonic in the closure of the bounded region G then max u(z) = max u(z) z∈G z∈∂G and min u(z) = min u(z) .CHAPTER 6. Suppose u is harmonic in the closure of the bounded region G. Hence u(w) < 1 2π t0 t1 2π u(w) dt + 0 t0 u(w) dt + t1 u(w) dt = u(w) . because some of the function values we’re integrating are smaller than u(w). A look into the (not so distant) future. for the middle integral we get a strict inequality.6. . We will see in Corollary 8. The same argument works if we assume that u has a relative minimum. Now we split up the mean-value integral: u(w) = 1 2π 1 = 2π 2π 0 t0 0 u w + reit dt u w + reit dt + t1 t0 u w + reit dt + 2π t1 u w + reit dt All the integrands can be bounded by u(w).1: Proof of Theorem 6.11 says that if u is harmonic in the region G. a contradiction. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS 68 Figure 6. in the sense that there exists a disk D = {z ∈ C : |z − w| < R} ⊂ G such that all z ∈ D satisfy u(z) ≤ u(w). which we just showed cannot exist. such that u w + reit < u(w). If u is zero on ∂G then u is zero in G. there is a whole interval of parameters. z∈G z∈∂G (Here ∂G denotes the boundary of G. this cannot hold. Corollary 8. Corollary 8. say t0 ≤ t < t1 . But in this case there’s actually a short cut: if u has a strong relative minimum then the harmonic function −u has a strong relative maximum. Intuitively. Corollary 6.7. Because u(z0 ) < u(w) and u is continuous. suppose that z0 = w + reit0 for 0 ≤ t0 < 2π.) We’ll exploit this fact in the next two corollaries. A special yet important case of the above maximum/minimum principle is obtained when considering bounded regions. To make this into a thorough argument. contradicting the mean-value property. then it does not have a weak relative maximum or minimum in G.11 a variation of this theorem for a weak relative maximum w.

z∈G z∈∂G z∈∂G so u has to be zero in G. see e http://www-groups. 4. Let u(x. we just remark that Corollary 6. however. All of this is beyond the scope of these notes.ac.html. (b) Prove that u is not the real part of a function which is holomorphic in C \ {0}. Then u − v is also harmonic in G ∪ ∂G (Exercise 2) and u − v is zero on ∂G. and c ∈ R. 3 For more information about Sim´on Denis Poisson (1781–1840).uk/∼history/Biographies/Poisson. Corollary 6. that this result is of a completely theoretical nature: it says nothing about how to extend a function given on the boundary of a region to the full region.html.st-and. 3. 2 . (a) Show that u is harmonic on C.dcs. 5. Is it possible to find a real function v so that x3 + y 3 + iv is holomorphic? For more information about Johann Peter Gustav Dirichlet (1805–1859). y) = ex sin y. Now apply the previous corollary. Suppose u and v are harmonic in G ∪ ∂G and they agree on ∂G. HARMONIC FUNCTIONS Proof. One should remark.dcs. (a) Show that u is harmonic in C \ {0}. (b) Find an entire function f such that Re(f ) = u. The last corollary states that if we know a harmonic function on the boundary of some region then we know it inside the region. If two harmonic functions agree on the boundary of a bounded region then they agree in the region. for other regions one needs to find a conformal map to the unit disk. There is a fairly simple formula (involving the so-called Poisson3 kernel) if the region in question is a disk.8 says that the solution to the Dirichlet problem is unique. By the remark we just made u(z) ≤ max u(z) = max u(z) = max 0 = 0 z∈G z∈∂G z∈∂G 69 and u(z) ≥ min u(z) = min u(z) = min 0 = 0 .8. This problem is called the Dirichlet2 problem and has a solution for all simply-connected regions. Show that all partial derivatives of a harmonic function are harmonic. 2. y) = ln x2 + y 2 .st-and. Suppose u and v are harmonic. see http://www-groups. Prove that u + cv is also harmonic. Proof. Consider u(z) = u(x.ac. Exercises 1.CHAPTER 6.uk/∼history/Biographies/Dirichlet.

n→∞ If no such a exists then the sequence (an ) is divergent. n n n n N Example 7. there is an integer N such that for all n ≥ N . choose n ≥ N such that an = −1. The sequence (an = in ) diverges: Given a ∈ C. we have |an − a| < ǫ.1 Sequences and Completeness As in the real case (and there will be no surprises in this chapter of the nature ‘real versus complex’). Then for any n ≥ N . Definition 7. 2 . (This is always possible since a4k+2 = i4k+2 = −1 for any k ≥ 0. in symbols lim an = a .) Then |a − an | = |a − 1| ≥ 1 > 70 1 . choose n ≥ N such that an = 1. limn→∞ in n = 0: Given ǫ > 0.3. then for any N . Then the sequence (an ) is convergent and a is its limit.2.1. (an )n≥1 . a (complex) sequence is a function from the positive (sometimes the nonnegative) integers to the complex numbers.) Then |a − an | = |a + 1| ≥ 1 > 1 . Example 7. |i|n 1 1 in in = −0 = = ≤ < ǫ. then for any N .1. Suppose (an ) is a sequence and a ∈ C such that for all ǫ > 0. Sinai Robins 7. We consider two cases: If Re a ≥ 0. choose N > 1/ǫ.Chapter 7 Power Series It is a pain to think about convergence but sometimes you really have to. say. Its values are usually denoted by an (as opposed to. (This is always possible since a4k = i4k = 1 for any k > 0. choose ǫ = 1/2. a(n)) and we commonly denote the sequence by (an )∞ . 2 If Re a < 0. or simply (an ). The notion of convergence of a sequence n=1 is based on the following sibling of Definition 2.

Lemma 7.4. However. and C is complete. If f is continuous at a then n→∞ lim f (an ) = f (a) if n→∞ lim an = a . or C) is complete if.5. Notice that the Monotone Sequence Property implies the Least Upper Bound Property.4.6. or least upper bound. Q. each of Z. In the quotient law we have to make sure we do not divide by zero. so L = 0 since 1 − r = 0 . In this sense we can use the sequence to define a real number. From L = rL we get (1 − r)L = 0. Definition 7. using the laws of limits. If 0 ≤ r < 1 then limn→∞ r n = 0: First. We will assume that the reals are complete as an axiom. If the limit is L then. Example 7.CHAPTER 7. we get L = limn→∞ r n = limn→∞ r n+1 = r limn→∞ r n = rL. where we require that an be in the domain of f . R. For example. In other words. the rational numbers are not complete: we can take a Cauchy sequence of rational numbers getting √ arbitrarily close to 2. POWER SERIES The following limit laws are the relatives of the identities stated in Lemma 2. in many cases. there is some a ∈ X such that limn→∞ an = a. for any Cauchy sequence (an ) in X. n→∞ n→∞ n→∞ 71 (b) lim an · lim bn = lim (an · bn ) . determine that a sequence converges without knowing the value of the limit. We say a metric space X (which for us means Z. which is not a rational number. n→∞ n→∞ n→∞ (c) limn→∞ an = lim n→∞ limn→∞ bn an bn . It is the completeness of the reals that allows us to know sequences converge without knowing their limits. There are many equivalent ways of formulating the completeness property for the reals. including: Axiom (Monotone Sequence Property). the sequence converges because it is decreasing and bounded below by 0. which states that every non-empty set of real numbers with an upper bound in fact has a supremum. Remember that a sequence is monotone if it is either non-decreasing (xn+1 ≥ xn ) or nonincreasing (xn+1 ≤ xn ). Any bounded monotone sequence converges. R. Let (an ) and (bn ) be convergent sequences and c ∈ C. (a) lim an + c lim bn = lim (an + c bn ) . A Cauchy sequence is a sequence (an ) such that n→∞ lim |an+1 − an | = 0. completeness means Cauchy sequences are guaranteed to converge. The most important property of the real number system is that we can.

wikipedia. b ∈ C. If x is any real number then there is an integer N which is greater than x. Lemma 7. The first of these can be established by calculus methods (like L’Hospital’s rule. It is interesting to see that the Archimedean principle underlies the construction of an infinite decimal expansion for any real number. both of them can be proved by more elementary considerations. limn→∞ Note this lemma also works for a. However. there are some convergence features which take on special appearances for series. a series converges to the limit (or sum) a by definition if n n→∞ lim an = lim n→∞ bk = a . here k=1 k=0 (bk ) is the sequence of terms of the series.8.org/wiki/Euxodus.2 Series A series is a sequence (an ) whose members are of the form an = n bk (or an = n bk ). We close this discussion of limits with a pair of standard limits. Notice that this was already used in Example 7.CHAPTER 7. This essentially says that there are no infinities in the reals.org/wiki/Archimedes. 7.7 (Archimedean1 Property). k=1 To express this in terms of Definition 7. (a) Exponentials beat polynomials: for any polynomial p(n) and any b ∈ R with |b| > 1. For more on Euxodus. see http://en. an n! = 0. If we wanted to be lazy we would define convergence of a series simply by refering to convergence of the partial sums of the series – after all.2. we just defined series through sequences. limn→∞ p(n) = 0. ∞ k=1 bk In the case of a convergent series. while the monotone sequence property shows that any such infinite decimal expansion actually converges to a real number.wikipedia. for any ǫ > 0 we have to find an N such that for all n≥N n k=1 bk − a < ǫ . The an = n bk (or an = n bk ) are the partial k=0 k=1 sums of the series. although it is often listed as a separate axiom: Theorem 7. POWER SERIES 72 The following is a consequence of the Monotone Sequence Property (via the Least Upper Bound Property). by treating n as the variable). For starters. so we should mention them here explicitly. bn (b) Factorials beat exponentials: for any a ∈ R. see http://en. For a proof see Exercise 5. 1 For more on Archimedes. . Archimedes attributes this property to Euxodus. we usually express its limit as a = or a = k≥1 bk .1.

and is called the Test for Divergence: Lemma 7. We have already used the simple fact that convergence of a sequence (an ) is equivalent to the convergence of (an−1 ).9. 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 + + + .. but the converse is false: 1 Example 7. and this observation immediately yields: Lemma 7..12 (Test for Divergenge). From this we conclude: Lemma 7. and both of these sequences have the same limit. If limn→∞ bn = 0.11.10. + 1 + + + + . then we have L=1+ = > = = 1 1 1 + + + ... 2 2 3 4 2 2 3 4 1 1 L + L = L. If k≥1 bk converges then limn→∞ bn = 0.. A common mistake is to try to use the converse of this lemma.. Using this terminology. The partial sums of a series form a nondecreasing sequence if the terms of the series are nonnegative.CHAPTER 7. then k≥1 bk diverges. Most of the time we need to use the completeness property to check convergence of a series.. k=1 ∞ we can rephrase Lemma 7. 2 4 6 2 4 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 + + + + . POWER SERIES 73 Example 7. The harmonic series k≥1 k diverges (even though the limit of the general term is 0): If we assume the series converges. so we can write ∞ bk = ∞... 1− n+1 1− A series where most of the terms cancel like this is called a telescoping series.10 to say: k=1 bk converges in the reals if and only if it is finite. 2 2 . ∞ k=1 bk converges if and only if the partial If bk are nonnegative real numbers and the partial sums of the series ∞ bk are unbounded k=1 then the partial sums “converge” to infinity. The contrapositive of this lemma is often used... 3 5 2 4 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 + + + .. If an is the nth partial sum of the series k≥1 bk then an = an−1 + bn . + + + + .. + + + + . and it is fortunate that the monotone sequence property has a very convenient translation into the language of series of real numbers. say to L. If bk are nonnegative real numbers then sums are bounded. Occasionally we can find the limit of a sequence by manipulating the partial sums: 1 = lim k(k + 1) n→∞ = lim n→∞ n k=1 k≥1 1 1 − k k+1 1 2 + = lim = lim n→∞ n→∞ 1 1 1 1 1 1 − − − + + ··· + 2 3 3 4 n n+1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 − + − + − + ··· + − 2 2 3 3 4 n n+1 1 = 1.13..

Suppose f is a non-increasing. there is a small detail to be checked here. so the general term satisfies 1 1 1 1 − = ≤ .CHAPTER 7. See Exercise 14. or 0 if ck > 0. If a series converges absolutely then it converges. A and B. Proof. but not absolutely: This k series does not converge absolutely.9. since we are effectively ignoring half the partial sums of the original series. k 2 3 4 5 6 = 1− 1 2 + 1 1 − 3 4 + 1 1 − 5 6 + .” Some variants of the comparison test will appear when we look at power series. Then ∞ 1 f (t) dt ≤ ∞ k=1 f (k) ≤ f (1) + ∞ f (t) dt 1 . In case ck is complex.16 (Integral Test). Since ck = c+ − c− we see that k≥1 ck converges to k k k P − N. both k≥1 ak and k≥1 bk converge to real numbers.. or 0 if k ck < 0. ∞). The alternating harmonic series k≥1 (−1) converges.15. For the rest of this book we shall be concerned almost exclusively with series which converge absolutely. But now we have L > L. Define c+ to be ck if ck ≥ 0. One handy test is the following: Lemma 7. positive function defined on [1. we need a proof: Theorem 7. but the converse is false: Example 7.14. say. k+1 k≥1 (Technically. POWER SERIES 74 1 1 Here the inequality comes from k > k+1 applied to each term in the first sum in parentheses. But then k≥1 ck converges to A + iB. Hence checking convergence of a series is usually a matter of verifying that a series of nonnegative reals is finite..) The reader can verify the inequality 2k(2k−1) ≥ k(k + 1) for k > 1.. To see that it does converge. Then k≥1 |ak | ≤ k≥1 |ck | < ∞ and k≥1 |bk | ≤ k≥1 |ck | < ∞. Then ck ≥ 0 and k≥1 c− ≤ k≥1 |ck | < ∞ k k so k≥1 c− converges. Another common mistake is to try to use the converse of this theorem. 2k − 1 2k 2k(2k − 1) k(k + 1) so the series converges by comparison with the telescoping series of Example 7. which is impossible. Then c+ ≥ 0 and k≥1 c+ ≤ k≥1 |ck | < ∞ so k≥1 c+ converges.” but this definition does not say anything about convergence of the series k≥1 ck . let P be its limit. let N be its limit. rewrite it as follows: 1 1 1 1 1 (−1)k+1 = 1 − + − + − + . There is one notion of convergence that’s special to series: we say that k≥1 ck converges absolutely if k≥1 |ck | < ∞. define c− to be −ck if ck ≤ 0. k k k − Similarly. this is often called a “comparison test. By what we just proved. Be careful: We are defining the phrase “converges absolutely. First consider the case when the terms ck are real. according to the previous example. write ck = ak +ibk where ak and bk are real.. We have already used the technique of comparing a series to a series which is known to converge.

the Root Test. What’s the big deal about uniform versus pointwise convergence? It is easiest to describe the difference with the use of quantifiers. N may well depend on z. Example 7. Proposition 7. namely ∀ denoting “for all” and ∃ denoting “there is. In the first case. . as well as three related tests from calculus: the Limit Comparison Test. when testing the convergence of a series we have: the Test for Divergence. the Comparison Test.” Pointwise convergence on G means (∀ ǫ > 0) (∀ z ∈ G) (∃ N : n ≥ N ⇒ |fn (z) − f (z)| < ǫ) . k + 1] is bounded between f (k) and f (k + 1). 7. POWER SERIES 75 This is immediate from a picture: the integral of f (t) on the interval [k. . Adding the pieces gives the inequalities above for the N th partial sum versus the integrals from 1 to N and from 1 to N + 1. Then f is continuous on G. Suppose (fn ) and f are functions defined on G ⊆ C. and the inequality persists in the limit.3 Sequences and Series of Functions The fun starts when one studies sequences (fn ) of functions fn . z→z0 n→∞ We will need similar interchanges of limits constantly. . And this can make all the difference . but this notion of convergence does not really catch the spirit of the function as a whole. whereas uniform convergence on G translates into (∀ ǫ > 0) (∃ N : (∀ z ∈ G) n ≥ N ⇒ |fn (z) − f (z)| < ǫ) . 1 k≥1 k p converges if p > 1 and diverges if p ≤ 1. and the Integral Test. converges at all z in some subset G ⊆ C then we say that (fn ) converges pointwise on G. If for all ǫ > 0 there is an N such that for all z ∈ G and for all n ≥ N we have |fn (z) − f (z)| < ǫ then (fn ) converges uniformly in G to f . If a sequence of functions. So far nothing new.CHAPTER 7. The first example illustrating this difference says in essence that if we have a sequence of functions (fn ) which converges uniformly on G then for all z0 ∈ G n→∞ z→z0 lim lim fn (z) = lim lim fn (z) . Suppose (fn ) is a sequence of continuous functions on the region G converging uniformly to f on G.19. and the Ratio Test. To summarize. (fn ). in the second case we need to find an N which works for all z ∈ G. We say that such a sequence converges at z0 if the sequence (of complex numbers) (fn (z0 )) converges. No big deal—we only exchanged two of the quantifiers.17.18. Definition 7.

The next theorem should come as no surprise. If a sequence gn converges to a function g then we can usually apply these tests to fn = g − gn . POWER SERIES 76 Proof.4(d). we give two practical tests: one arguing for uniformity and the other against. there is an N such that for all z ∈ G and all n ≥ N |fn (z) − f (z)| < ǫ . and we can make maxz∈γ |fn (z) − f (z)| as small as we like. This means that given (the same) ǫ > 0. By uniform convergence. and r n → 0 if r < 1. . Lemma 7. its consequences (which we will only see in the next chapter) are wide ranging. however. so z n → 0 uniformly ¯ r (0) if r < 1. we will prove that f is continuous at z0 . there is a δ > 0 such that whenever |z − z0 | < δ we have |fn (z) − fn (z0 )| < ǫ . we can estimate fn − f = γ γ γ fn − f ≤ max |fn (z) − f (z)| length(γ) . ¯ For example. that is. f is continuous at z0 .21.CHAPTER 7. given ǫ > 0. Proposition 7. we can ask about integration of series of functions. Since uniform convergence is often of critical importance. Once we know the above result about continuity. Proof. They are formulated for sequences that converge to 0. Let z0 ∈ G. |z n | ≤ r n if z is in the closed disk Dr (0). If fn is a sequence of functions which converges uniformly to 0 on a set G and zn is any sequence in G then the sequence fn (zn ) converges to 0. in D Lemma 7.22. 3 All that’s left is putting those two inequalities together: by the triangle inequality |f (z) − f (z0 )| = |f (z) − fn (z) + fn (z) − fn (z0 ) + fn (z0 ) − f (z0 )| < ǫ. z∈γ But fn → f uniformly on γ. If fn is a sequence of functions and Mn is a sequence of constants so that Mn converges to 0 and |fn (z)| ≤ Mn for all z in the set G fn converges uniformly to 0 on G. Then n→∞ γ ≤ |f (z) − fn (z)| + |fn (z) − fn (z0 )| + |fn (z0 ) − f (z0 )| lim fn = γ f.20. By Proposition 4. 3 Now we make use of the continuity of the fn ’s. which does converge to 0. Suppose fn are continuous on the smooth curve γ and converge uniformly on γ to f .

To visualize this. let 1 zn = exp(− n ). For example.19 that the convergence must not be uniform. Consider the sequence of functions (fn ) defined by fn (x) := sinn (x). the sequence (fn (x)) converges to 1 if x = π/2 or to 0 if x = π/2. For each fixed z we have k≥1 |fk (z)| ≤ k≥1 Mk < ∞. Example 7. so k≥1 fk (z) converges. Therefore z n does not converge uniformly to 0 on D1 (0). |fk (z)| ≤ Mk for all z ∈ G.24. Proof. Then k≥1 fk converges absolutely and uniformly in G. It follows that.for instance. and k≥1 Mk converges. although this example holds for complex-defined functions. let fn (z) = z n and let G be the open unit disk D1 (0). Since k≥1 Mk converges there is N so that Mk = k>n ∞ k=1 n Mk − Mk < ǫ k=1 for all n > N . POWER SERIES 77 This is most often used to prove non-uniform convergence. Away from x = π/2. and so z n → 0. Here we also have a notion of absolute convergence (which can be combined with uniform convergence). call the limit f (z). Then |z| < 1 if z is in G. often called the Weierstraß M -test. we can already f (x) := 0 if x = π/2 see by Proposition 7. we restrict our attention to the real axis (using x instead of z). on the interval [0. as x gets closer and closer to π/2. π]. For simplicity and so we can draw the appropriate pictures. Non-uniform convergence is illustrated by the fact that.1. so |z|n → 0. Suppose (fk ) are continuous on the region G. To see that fn converges uniformly to f . . However.CHAPTER 7. All of these notions for sequences of functions go verbatim for series of functions. the functions f take longer and longer to get to 0. Proposition 7. Then zn is in G but fn (zn ) = e−1 so fn (zn ) does not converge to 0. On this interval. suppose ǫ > 0. consider Figure 7. Because the functions fn are all continuous but f is not. There is an important result about series of functions. This defines a function f on G. π]. with fn (x) = 1 if and only if x = π/2. Thus. We end this section by noting that everything we’ve developed here could have been done in greater generality . the sequence (fn ) converges pointwise to the function f defined by 1 if x = π/2 . A good example of the difference between pointwise convergence and uniform convergence can be seen in the following example. for all n and all x we have 0 ≤ fn (x) ≤ 1. if n ≥ N then n f (z) − fk (z) = k=1 k>n fn (z) ≤ k>n |fn (z)| ≤ Mk < ǫ k>n and this satisfies the definition of uniform convergence. Then. for any fixed x ∈ [0. for any z in G.23. for functions from Rn or Cn to Rm or Cm . pointwise convergence to f is seen by the fact that the functions fn are getting closer and closer to 0.

POWER SERIES 78 Figure 7. It remains to show that for those z the limit function is 1/(1 − z). n→∞ 1 − z 1−z By comparing a general power series to a geometric series we can give a complete description of its region of convergence.23. showing the difference between pointwise and uniform convergence. But this is straightforward: the partial sums of this series can be written as n 1 − r n+1 . Hence. Theorem 7. . The geometric series k≥0 z converges absolutely for |z| < 1 to the function 1/(1 − z). The fundamental example of a power series is the geometric series. Since r can be chosen arbitrarily close to 1. which follows by n z k = lim k≥0 n→∞ z k = lim k=0 1 1 − z n+1 = .4 Region of Convergence For the remainder of this chapter (indeed. Fix an r < 1. for which all ck = 1. Hence the uniform convergence on D of the geometric series will follow if we can show that k≥0 r k converges. these lecture notes) we concentrate on some very special series of functions.27. satisfying the following.23 with fk (z) = z k and Mk = r k .CHAPTER 7. or ∞. By this we mean that R is a nonnegative real number. we have absolute convergence for |z| < 1. 7. by Proposition 7. k Lemma 7.25. We will use Proposition 7. Any power series k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has a radius of convergence R. A power series centered at z0 is a series of functions of the form k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k . and let D = { z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r }. The convergence is uniform on any set of the form { z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r } for any r < 1. Definition 7. the geometric series converges absolutely and uniformly on any set of the form {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} with r < 1. Proof.1: The graph of the functions fn (x) := sinn (x). r k = 1 + r + · · · + r n−1 + r n = 1−r k=0 whose limit as n → ∞ exists because r < 1.26.

let m0 be the midpoint of the segment [a0 . First we establish three facts about these sets.19. but interchanging r and t.20 implies for power series. Now if z ∈ Dr (z0 ) we have k ≤ |c | r k and ck (z − z0 ) k |ck | r k = |ck | tk r t k k≥0 k≥0 ≤ M k≥0 r t k =M k≥0 r t k = M < ∞. It is immediate from (∗) or (∗∗) that a0 < b0 . To prove this. note that k≥0 ck tk converges so ck tk → 0 as k → ∞. and k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k diverges on the complement of Dr (z0 ) . ¯ this sequence is bounded. Proof of Theorem 7. assume that ck r k is bounded. Define C to be the set of positive real numbers for which the series k≥0 ck tk converges. γ k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k dz = γ k≥0 ck k≥0 γ In particular. (b) If |z − z0 | > R then the sequence of terms ck (z − z0 )k is unbounded. contradicting the assumption that t is in D. k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k does The open disk DR (z0 ) in which the power series converges absolutely is the region of convergence. We shall define sequences an in C and bn in D which “zero in” on R.29. Suppose the power series a smooth curve in DR (z0 ). In particular. Then k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has radius of convergence R and γ is ck (z − z0 )k dz .CHAPTER 7. Corollary 7. and define D to be the set of positive real numbers for which it diverges. we might as well state what Proposition 7.28. Corollary 7. This shows that r ∈ C. Clearly every positive real number is in either C or D. so |ck | r k ≤ M for some constant M . and if R = 0 then DR (z0 ) is the empty set. if γ is closed then (z − z0 )k dz = 0. Suppose the power series k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has radius of convergence R. and these sets are disjoint. so |ck | tk ≤ M for some constant M .) By way of Proposition 7. which converges since 0 ≤ r < t. (∗) If t ∈ C and r < t then r ∈ C. (∗ ∗ ∗) There is an extended real number R. and uniform and absolute convergence on Dr (z0 ) follows from the Weierstraß M -test. so that 0 < r < R implies r ∈ C and R < r < ∞ implies r ∈ D. shows that k k≥0 ck t converges. To prove this. But now exactly the same argument as in (∗). so m0 = (a0 + b0 )/2. b0 ]. satisfying 0 ≤ R ≤ ∞. this theorem immediately implies the following. First. so we assume neither is empty and we start with a0 in C and b0 in D. so not converge. 1 − r/t At the last step we recognized the geometric series. (∗∗) If t ∈ D and r > t then r ∈ D. POWER SERIES 79 ¯ (a) If r < R then k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k converges absolutely and uniformly on the closed disk Dr (z0 ) of radius r centered at z0 . and k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k converges absolutely and uniformly ¯ on Dr (z0 ). Then the series represents a function which is continuous on DR (z0 ). Notice that R = 0 works if C is empty. While we’re at it. for |z − z0 | ≥ r. If m0 lies in C then . (If R = ∞ then DR (z0 ) is the entire complex plane. and so ¯ 0 ≤ r/t < 1.that is.27. and R = ∞ works if D is empty.

Thus R verifies the statement (∗ ∗ ∗). complex-valued f (z). Warning: Neither Theorem 7.27 nor Corollary 7.CHAPTER 7. real-valued function ex has an expansion as the power series k≥0 x . so part (b) of 7. so r is in D by (∗∗). To prove Theorem 7. Then t ∈ D by (∗ ∗ ∗). so r is in C by (∗). The question still remains whether f (z) = g(z) or not. Corollary 7.30. in fact. f (z) exp(z) Thus. a similar k! expression holds for the complex-defined. dz g(z) This means that f (z) = f (−z)g(z) = c for some constant c ∈ C. Consider the function f (z) = exp(z). Let g(z) = g′ (z) = d dz zk = k! d xk = dz k! xk−1 = (k − 1)! xk k≥0 k! . and these limits are the same since limn→∞ (bn − an ) = limn→∞ (b0 − a0 )/2n = 0. Note that. POWER SERIES 80 we define a1 = m0 and b1 = b0 . It is worth mentioning the following corollary.27 follows from (∗∗). Moreover. We define R to be this limit. Example 7. so g(z) = f (z) as desired.27. a1 is in C. a1 and b1 are closer together than a0 and b0 . and b1 is in D.30 says anything about convergence on the circle |z − z0 | = R . . so part (a) of 7. b1 − a1 = (b0 − a0 )/2. first note that 1 1 = = exp(−z) = f (−z). Evaluating at z = 0. in either case. In fact. we have a0 ≤ a1 < b1 ≤ b0 . first assume r < R and choose t so that r < t < R. On the other hand.31. g(z) has the correct derivative. if r = |z − z0 | > R then choose t so that R < t < r. which reduces the calculation of the radius of convergence to examining the limiting behavior of the terms of the series. Similarly. You may recall from calculus that the realk defined. since an converges to R. b1 ]. We repeat this procedure to define a2 and b2 within the interval [a1 . we see c = 1.27 follows from (∗). If 0 < r < R then r < an for all sufficiently large n. Then k≥0 k≥0 k≥1 k≥0 xk = g(z). the function f (−z)g(z) has 0 derivative: d [f (−z)g(z)] = −f ′ (−z)g(z) + f (−z)g ′ (z) = −f (−z)g(z) + f (−z)g(z) = 0. Summarizing. we have an ≤ an+1 an < bn bn ≥ bn+1 an ∈ C bn ∈ D bn − an = (b0 − a0 )/2n The sequences an and bn are monotone and bounded (by a0 and b0 ) so they have limits. k! Thus. and so on. To see that f (z) = g(z). |ck | r k → 0 for 0 ≤ r < R but |ck | r k is unbounded for r > R. but if m0 lies in D then we define a1 = a0 and b1 = m0 . if R < r then bn < r for all sufficiently large n. Then t ∈ C by (∗ ∗ ∗).

k odd l≥0 i2l+2 z 2l+1 2i2l+1 z 2l+1 (2l + 1)! l≥0 (2l + 1)! (−1)l+1 (2l + 1)! z 2l+1 z3 z5 z7 + − + . The radius of convergence is R = ∞. We leave it as an exercise to determine a formula for multiplying power series together.32. or multiply power series by polynomials. consider f (z) = sin(z). we may multiply power series together on their common region of convergence. In fact.CHAPTER 7. the power series converges absolutely for all x. We may rearrange the terms of a series in the case that the series converges absolutely.. as the next example demonstrates. We may also multiply series by constants. the ”disk of radius infinity” about the origin (the center of the series). POWER SERIES We use the Ratio Test to determine the radius of convergence. The region of convergence is all of C. We can use the power series expansion for exp(z) to find a power series expansion of the trigonometric functions. We have seen that we may differentiate and integrate power series. 3! 5! 7! = z− Note that we are allowed to rearrange the terms of the two added sums because the corresponding series have infinite radius of convergence. Since xk+1 x |x| k! = · k = →0 (k + 1)! x k+1 k+1 81 as k → ∞. For instance. .. Then f (z) = sin z = = = = = = = l≥0 1 iz e − e−iz 2i  1  2i 1 2i 1 2i 1 2i k≥0 (iz)k k! − (−iz)k k≥0 k!   k≥0 1 (iz)k − (−1)k (iz)k k! 2ik z k k! k≥0. Thus. we may add two power series together on a common region of convergence and rearrange their sum to collect coefficients of the same degree together. Example 7.. That absolute convergence is both necessary and sufficient for rearrangement is left as an exercise. We may add constants and polynomials to power series. There are many operations we may perform on series.

6. 9. Derive the Archimedean Property from the monotone sequence property. Suppose an ≤ bn ≤ cn for all n and limn→∞ an = L = limn→∞ cn . 2n2 +1 1 n . 2. Prove Lemma 7. Prove that Z is complete. Use the fact that R is complete to prove that C is complete. (c) cos n. find the limit. 5. For each of the sequences.CHAPTER 7. If the sequence converges. This is called the Squeeze Theorem. (a) (b) (c) (d) n≥1 n≥1 n n≥1 1+i √ 3 n 1 n i 1+2i √ 5 n 1 n≥1 n3 +in 4.8. . prove convergence/divergence. Let (an ) be a sequence. Prove: (a) lim an = a n→∞ =⇒ ⇐⇒ n→∞ lim |an | = |a|. lim |an | = 0. (d) 2 − (e) sin 3. (b) lim an = 0 n→∞ n→∞ 7. 10. Determine whether each of the following series converges or diverges. Prove that if a sequence has more than one accumulation point then the sequence diverges. Prove: (cn ) converges if and only if (Re cn ) and (Im cn ) converge. 8. Find sup Re e2πit : t ∈ Q \ Z . 12. Prove that limn→∞ bn = L. (a) an = eiπn/4 . Prove Lemma 7. Show that the limit of a convergent sequence is unique.4. 13. A point a is an accumulation point of the sequence if: for every ǫ > 0 and every N ∈ N there exists some n > N such that |an − a| < ǫ. in2 . and is useful in testing a sequence for convergence. (b) (−1)n n . 11. POWER SERIES 82 Exercises 1.

1 1+nz 21. Where do the following sequences converge pointwise? Do they converge uniformly on this domain? (a) (nz n ) . (b) Find limn→∞ 1 0 fn (x) dx. Prove that the series k≥1 bk converges if and only if limn→∞ 1 2k ∞ k=n bk = 0. Treat x = 0 as a special case. defined on {z ∈ C : Re z ≥ 0}. Find a power series representation about the origin of each of the following functions. (a) Show that k≥1 21 = 1. . 16. 19. not x. Find a power series (and determine its radius of convergence) of the following functions. (a) Show that limn→∞ fn (x) = 0 for all x ≥ 0. for x > 0 you can use L’Hospital’s rule—but remember that n is the variable. if the two series converge then they have the same limit. 1 3− z . 23.20? 22. (Hint: the answer is not 0. Also. 20. (b) (c) zn n for n > 0. Prove Lemma 7. Prove that absolute convergence is a sufficient and necessary condition to be able to arbitrarily rearrange the terms of a series without changing the sum.22. Prove Lemma 7. 15. (b) Show that (c) Show that k k≥1 k 2 +1 k k≥1 k 3 +1 as a difference of powers of 1 2k .) diverges. (Hint: compare the general term to converges. Moreover. 24. 2 z2 (4−z)2 for |z| < 4 25. Derive a formula for the product of two power series. (Hint: compare the general term k≥0 z k 17. Let fn (x) = n2 xe−nx .) to k12 . and show that ∞ cn converges if and only if n=0 ∞ k=0 (c2k + c2k+1 ) converges.) (c) Why doesn’t your answer to part (b) violate Proposition 7. One way to do this is to write k 2 so that you get a telescoping series. (a) (b) (c) 1 1+4z . POWER SERIES 83 14. (a) cos z .CHAPTER 7. for |z| = 1. give an example where cn does not converge to 0 and one series diverges while the other converges. Suppose that the terms cn converge to zero. Discuss the convergence of 18.21.

zk + 1 k≥0 ck (b) k≥0 (c) k≥0 1 29. k2 1 on {z : |z| ≥ 2}. Use the Weierstraß M -test to show that each of the following series converges uniformly on the given domain: (a) k≥1 zk ¯ on D1 (0). 30. 2 (b) k≥0 (c) k≥0 (d) k≥1 (−1)k k(k+1) z .) (z − z0 )k . (b) Log z. 27. n ∈ Z. and compute their radius of convergence: (a) 1 z. z k! . 28. zk zk ¯ on Dr (0). (b) Suppose that the sequence ck does not converge to 0 and show that the radius of convergence of k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k is at most 1. POWER SERIES (b) cos(z 2 ) (c) z 2 sin z (d) (sin z)2 84 26. where 0 ≤ r < 1. Show that L is the radius of convergence of (Use the natural interpretations if L = 0 or L = ∞. kn z k . k zk . a ∈ C. Find the power series centered at 1 for the following functions.CHAPTER 7. (e) k≥1 (f) k≥0 . kk cos(k)z k . (a) k≥0 ak z k . (a) Suppose that the sequence ck is bounded and show that the radius of convergence of k k≥0 ck (z − z0 ) is at least 1. Find the radius of convergence for each of the following series. Suppose L = limk→∞ |ck |1/k exists.

not a power series) representing each of the following series. 31. (a) Show that the maximum of fn (t) is (c) Show that ∞ 0 fn (t) dt 1 n. POWER SERIES (g) k≥0 85 4k (z − 2)k .CHAPTER 7. (b) Show that fn (t) converges uniformly to 0 as n → ∞. (a) k≥0 z 2k k! k(z − 1)k−1 k(k − 1)z k (b) k≥1 (c) k≥2 1 32.e. Find a function in “closed form” (i. Define the functions fn (t) = n e−t/n for n > 0 and 0 ≤ t < ∞. (d) Why doesn’t this contradict the theorem that “the integral of a uniform limit is the limit of the integrals”? does not converge to 0 as n → ∞ .

2. and consider some of the consequences of this: Theorem 8. N.e. The next result says that we can simply differentiate the series “term by term.29 γ k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k dz = 0 .Chapter 8 Taylor and Laurent Series We think in generalities. the two cornerstone theorems of this section are that any power series represents a holomorphic function. Then k≥1 f ′ (z) = k ck (z − z0 )k−1 . and the radius of convergence of this power series is also R.16).28 says that f is continuous. but we live in details. Whitehead 8.” Theorem 8. Now that we know that power series are holomorphic (i. On the other hand. We begin by showing a power series represents a holomorphic function. Then f is holo- Proof. Suppose f (z) = morphic in {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R}. 86 . A.. k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has radius of convergence R. we have by Corollary 7. any holomorphic function can be represented by a power series. Corollary 7.1.1 Power Series and Holomorphic Functions We will see in this section that power series and holomorphic functions are intimately related. Now apply Morera’s theorem (Corollary 5. Given any closed curve γ ⊂ {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R}. differentiable) on their regions of convergence we can ask how to find their derivatives. In fact. and conversely. A special case of the last result concerns power series with infinite radius of convergence: those represent entire functions. Suppose f (z) = k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has radius of convergence R.

Applying the same theorem to f ′ gives f ′′ (z) = k(k − 1)ck (z − z0 )k−2 k≥2 and f ′′ (z0 ) = 2c2 . Theorem 8. k! Proof. For starters. Then ck = f (k) (z0 ) . and it cannot be larger than R by comparison to the series for f (z). TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 87 Proof.3. f ′′′′ (z0 ). It follows immediately that the coefficients of a power series are unique: ′ Corollary 8. Corollary 8.1 again.2 gives f ′ (z0 ) = c1 . so that we are free to interchange integral and infinite sum. We can play the same game for f ′′′ (z0 ). The various derivatives of a power series can also be seen as ingredients of the series itself. Suppose f (z) = k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k has a positive radius of convergence. If k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k and k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k are two power series which both converge to the same function f (z) on an open disk centered at a then ck = c′ for all k.1. Note that the power series of f converges uniformly on γ. then to f ′′ .ac. Let f (z) = k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k . Naturally. Let γ be any simple closed curve in {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R}. . And then we use Theorem 5. Since we know that f is holomorphic in its region of convergence we can use Theorem 5.dcs. since the coefficients for (z − z0 )f ′ (z) are bigger than the corresponding ones for f (z). and so on. but applied to the function (z − z0 )k . The last statement of the theorem is easy to show: the radius of convergence R of f ′ (z) is at least R (since we have shown that the series converges whenever |z − z0 | < R).4 (Uniqueness of power series). the last theorem can be repeatedly applied to f ′ .uk/∼history/Biographies/Taylor.html. etc.CHAPTER 8. k 1 For more information about Brook Taylor (1685–1731). f (z0 ) = c0 . Taylor’s formulas show that the coefficients of any power series which converges to f on an open disk D centered at z0 can be determined from the the function f restricted to D. Here are the details: f ′ (z) = 1 2πi γ f (w) dw (w − z)2 k≥0 ck (w 1 = 2πi = k≥0 γ ck · ck · 1 2πi − z0 )k dw (w − z)2 γ (w − z0 )k dw (w − z)2 w=z = k≥0 d (w − z0 )k dw = k≥0 k ck (z − z0 )k−1 .st-and. This is the statement of the following Taylor1 series expansion. see http://www-groups.

that a holomorphic function can be represented by a power series. Corollary 8. G-contractible curve such that w is inside γ. and suppose that |z| < r. (w − z0 )k+1 Γr γ If we compare the coefficients of the power series obtained in Theorem 8.10). wk+1 Now. f (z) = ck (z − z0 )k with ck = 2πi γ (w − z0 )k+1 k≥0 Here γ is any positively oriented. Suppose f is a function which is holomorphic in D = {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R}. and we can apply Cauchy’s Theorem 4. g(z) = 1 2πi g(w) dw . closed. smooth.5 with those in Corollary 8. Then by Cauchy’s integral formula (Theorem 4. and its implications. The only difference of this right-hand side to the statement of the theorem are the curves we’re integrating over. Suppose f is holomorphic on the region G. Then f can be represented in D as a power series centered at z0 (with a radius of convergence at least R): f (w) 1 dw . Then f (k) (w) = k! 2πi f (z) dz . closed. Hence Proposition 7.6. smooth curve in D for which z0 is inside γ. simple. Let g(z) = f (z + z0 ).10). we apply an easy change of variables to obtain f (z) = k≥0 1 2πi Γr f (w) dw (z − z0 )k . Theorem 8. However.26). and γ is a positively oriented. (z − w)k+1 γ . Proof. Theorem 4.1 (which in itself extended Cauchy’s integral formula. since f (z) = g(z − z0 ). (w − z0 )k+1 where Γr is a circle centered at z0 with radius r. w−z γr The factor 1/(w − z) in this integral can be extended into a geometric series (note that w ∈ γr and z so w < 1) 1 1 1 z k 1 = z = w−z w 1− w w w k≥0 which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γr (by Lemma 7. Γr ∼G\{z0 } γ.20 applies: g(z) = 1 2πi γr 1 g(w) dw = w−z 2πi g(w) γr 1 w k≥0 z w k dw = k≥0 1 2πi γr g(w) dw z k .5. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 88 We now turn to the second cornerstone result. w ∈ G. denote the circle centered at the origin with radius r by γr . simple. Fix r < R. so g is a function holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z| < R}.CHAPTER 8.6: f (w) dw = (w − z0 )k+1 f (w) dw . we arrive at the long-promised extension of Theorem 5.3.

k+1 k+1 k+1 (z − w) 2π z∈γ (z − w) 2π r r γ The statement now follows since r can be chosen arbitrarily close to R. Then k!M . The first case clearly gives us f (z) = 0 for all z in D = Dr (a). and c0 = f (0) is zero since a is a zero of f . Notice that f (z) = cm (z − a)m + cm+1 (z − a)m+1 + · · · = (z − a)m (cm + cm+1 (z − a) + · · · ) = (z − a)m k≥0 ck+m (z − a)k . So now consider the second case.4(d) gives an inequality which is often called Cauchy’s Estimate: Corollary 8. . Suppose f is holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z − w| < R} and |f | ≤ M . satisfying f (z) = (z − a)m g(z) for all z in G. if so. with g(a) = 0 The integer m in the second case is uniquely determined by f and a and is called the multiplicity of the zero at a. and g(z) is a polynomial which does not have a zero at a. f (z) = 0 for all z in D). That is. Let γ be a circle centered at w with radius r < R.2 Classification of Zeros and the Identity Principle Basic algebra shows that if a polynomial p(z) of positive degree d has a a zero at a (in other words. (b) or: there is a positive integer m and a holomorphic function g. Rk Proof.CHAPTER 8.6 combined with our often-used Proposition 4. continuing in this way we see that we can factor p(z) as p(z) = (z − a)m g(z) where m is a positive integer. so f (z) = k≥0 ck (z − a)k . TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 89 Corollary 8. Then there are exactly two possibilities: (a) Either: f is identically zero on some open disk D centered at a (that is. we can factor out another factor of z − a. if p(a) = 0) then p(z) has z − a as a factor. p(z) = (z − a)q(z) where q(z) is a polynomial of degree d − 1. (b) or there is some positive integer m so that ck = 0 for all k < m but cm = 0.4(d): f (k) (w) ≤ f (k) (w) = k! 2πi f (z) k! M k!M f (z) k! length(γ) ≤ dz ≤ max 2πr = k . The integer m is called the multiplicity of the zero a of p(z). and we can estimate using Proposition 4.7.6 applies. Proof. 8. defined on G. Suppose f is an holomorphic function defined on an open set G and suppose f has a zero at a point a in G. We have a power series expansion for f (z) in some disk Dr (a) of radius r around a.8 (Classification of Zeros). There are now exactly two possibilities: (a) Either ck = 0 for all k. Almost exactly the same thing happens for holomorphic functions: Theorem 8. not bigger than d. We can then ask whether q(z) itself has a zero at a and. Then Corollary 8.

since if z ∈ D \ {b} then h(z) = 0. (b) or there is an open disk D centered at b so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D \ {b}. we must have Y = ∅ and X = G. Now we finish the proof using the definition of connectedness. which is unique. suppose that h(b) = 0. Then. Using the identity principle. We start by defining h = f − g. we apply Theorem 8. so b satisfies the second condition. there is an open disk D centered at b so that φ(z) = 0 for all z in D. since φ is continuous. Then h is holomorphic on G. either h(z) = 0 for all z in some open disk D centered at b. Clearly m is unique. and b ∈ Y if b satisfies the second condition. Then. Since a is in X. Then h(z) = (z − b)m φ(z) = 0 for all z in D except z = b. so b satisfies the first condition. which is sometimes also called the uniqueness theorem. where φ is holomorphic and φ(b) = 0. Finally. so h(z) = 0. so h(zk ) = 0. Proof. If b ∈ Y and D is an open disk centered at b as in the second condition then D ⊆ Y .CHAPTER 8. this is a contradiction.8 to obtain the following result. so b satisfies the second condition. Since zk = w. by the classification of zeros. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES Then we can define a function g on G by   k≥0 ck+m (z − a)k  g(z) =  f (z)  (z − a)m 90 if |z − a| < r if z ∈ G \ {a} According to our calculations above.9 (Identity Principle). To see this. or h(z) = (z − b)m φ(z) for all z in G. X and Y are disjoint open sets whose union is G. Suppose f and g are holomorphic in the region G and f (zk ) = g(zk ) at a sequence which converges to w ∈ G with zk = w for all k. by continuity. and we will be finished if we can deduce that h is identically zero on G. and we saw that this means z satisfies the second condition. and let D be an open disk centered at w so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D except z = b. suppose w ∈ Y . . since the sequence zk converges to w. there is an open disk D centered at b so that h(z) = 0 for all z ∈ D. Now notice the following: If b is in G then exactly one of the following occurs: (a) Either there is an open disk D centered at b so that h(z) = 0 for all z in D. To see this. If b ∈ X and D is an open disk centered at b as in the first condition then it is clear that D ⊆ X. so that b ∈ X if b satisfies the first condition above. and g is holomorphic at other points of G by the second definition. Theorem 8. Y ⊆ G. Now define two sets X. But. To start using the intimate connection of holomorphic functions and power series. we can prove yet another important property of holomorphic functions. If h(b) = 0 then. the two definitions give the same value when both are applicable. since it is defined in terms of the power series expansion of f at a. But X = G implies that every z in G satisfies the first condition above. so one of them must be empty. we check that our original point w lies in X. there is some k so that zk is in D. g(a) = cm = 0. The function g is holomorphic at a by the first definition. Finally. Then f (z) = g(z) for all z in G. h(zn ) = 0.

which shows that h must be identically zero in D.5 gives a powerful way of describing holomorphic functions. by the identity principle. So we assume f (a) = 0.11. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 91 Theorem 8.10 can be used to give a proof of the analogous theorem for harmonic functions. we should not be too surprised to find the following result whose proof we leave for the exercises. and we have h(a) = Log(g(a)) = Log(1) = 0 and Re h(z) = Re Log(g(z)) = ln(|g(z)|) ≤ ln(1) = 0. Then |f | does not attain a weak relative maximum in G. Since g(a) = 1 we can find.12 (Minimum-Modulus Theorem). however. not as general 1 as it could be. Hence g(z) = eh(z) must be equal to e0 = 1 for all z in D. Then |f | does not attain a weak relative minimum at a in G unless f (a) = 0. we can now state the following central definition. such as: If G is a bounded region and f is holomorphic in the closure of G. .CHAPTER 8. Theorem 6. Thus the function h = Log ◦g is defined and holomorphic on D. Corollary 8. k∈Z k≥0 k≥1 Here ak ∈ C are terms indexed by the integers. then it does not have a weak relative maximum or minimum in G. A double series converges if and only if both of its defining series do. It is. using continuity. It is natural. Absolute and uniform convergence are defined analogously. by the identity principle. to think about representing exp z as exp 1 z = k≥0 1 k! 1 z k = k≥0 1 −k z . then the maximum of |f | is attained on the boundary of G.3 Laurent Series Theorem 8. Suppose f is holomorphic and not constant in the region G. 8. and we have the condition |g(z)| ≤ |g(a)| = 1 for all z in D0 . There are many reformulations of this theorem. k! a “power series” with negative exponents. we introduce the concept of a double series ak = ak + a−k . and so f (z) = f (a)g(z) must have the constant value f (a) for all z in D. Equipped with this. In this case we can define an holomorphic function g(z) = f (z)/f (a). so f is identically zero. in the process strengthening that theorem to cover weak maxima and weak minima. Since the last corollary also covers minima of harmonic functions.10 (Maximum-Modulus Theorem). Proof. To make sense of expressions like the above. for example. Suppose f is holomorphic and not constant in the region G. Hence. We now refer to Exercise 27. If f (a) = 0 then f (z) = 0 for all z in D0 . f (z) has the constant value f (a) for all z in G. Theorem 8. If u is harmonic in the region G. a smaller open disk D centered at a so that g(z) has positive real part for all z in D. Corollary 8. Suppose there is a point a in G and an open disk D0 centered at a so that |f (a)| ≥ |f (z)| for all z in D0 .6.

The factor 1/(w − z) in z this integral can be expanded into a geometric series (note that w ∈ γ2 and so w < 1) 1 1 1 = w−z w 1− z w = 1 w k≥0 z w k . For the convergence of our Laurent series.5. w−z (8. whence the Laurent series converges on the annulus {z ∈ C : R1 < |z − z0 | < R2 } (if R1 < R2 ).dcs. k∈Z ck 1 z 92 (z − z0 )k . (w − z0 )k+1 Here γ is any circle in A centered at z0 .1).16. Proof.html. respectively. so g is a function holomorphic in {z ∈ C : R1 < |z| < R2 }. we can apply Cauchy’s integral formula (Theorem 4. Theorem 8. we need to combine those two notions. in {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | > R1 }. Suppose f is a function which is holomorphic in A = {z ∈ C : R1 < |z − z0 | < R2 }.13.6 we can replace the circle in the formula for the Laurent series by any closed. centered at We should pause for a minute and ask for which z such a Laurent series can possibly converge.15. Theorem 8. The second we can view as a “power series in 1 1 1 z−z0 . and let γ1 and γ2 be positively oriented circles centered at 0 with radii r1 and r2 .uk/∼history/Biographies/Laurent Pierre. Any power series is a Laurent series (with ck = 0 for k < 0).1) For the integral over γ2 we play exactly the same game as in Theorem 8. it converges in {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R2 }.” it will converge for |z−z0 | < |R1 | for some R1 .CHAPTER 8.st-and. Let g(z) = f (z + z0 ). Theorem 7.10) to the path γ2 − γ1 : g(z) = 1 2πi γ2 −γ1 g(w) 1 dw = w−z 2πi γ2 g(w) 1 dw − w−z 2πi γ1 g(w) dw . Example 8. by Cauchy’s Theorem 4. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES Definition 8. Fix R1 < r1 < |z| < r2 < R2 . . Then f can be represented in A as a Laurent series centered at z0 : f (z) = k∈Z ck (z − z0 )k with ck = 1 2πi γ f (w) dw . A Laurent2 series centered at z0 is a double series of the form Example 8.1 says that the Laurent series represents a function which is holomorphic on {z ∈ C : R1 < |z − z0 | < R2 }. 2 For more information about Pierre Alphonse Laurent (1813–1854). By introducing an “extra piece” (see Figure 8. that is. k∈Z k≥0 k≥1 The first of the series on the right-hand side is a power series with some radius of convergence R2 .14. The fact that we can conversely represent any function holomorphic in such an annulus by a Laurent series is the substance of the next theorem.27 implies that the convergence is uniform on a set of the form {z ∈ C : r1 ≤ |z − z0 | ≤ r2 } for any R1 < r1 < r2 < R2 . The series which started this section is the Laurent series of exp 0.ac. that is. Naturally. smooth path that is A-homotopic to the circle. Remark. Even better. By definition ck (z − z0 )k = ck (z − z0 )k + c−k (z − z0 )−k . see http://www-groups.

CHAPTER 8.6). now we expand the factor 1/(w − z) into the following geometric series (note that w ∈ γ1 and so w < 1) z 1 1 1 =− w−z z 1− g(w) dw = − w−z 1 z w z k w z =− 1 z k≥0 w z k . Hence Proposition 7. wk+1 k≥0 γ2 k≤−1 γ1 We can now change both integration paths to a circle γ centered at 0 with a radius between R1 and R2 (by Cauchy’s Theorem 4. .20 applies: g(w) γ1 γ1 k≥0 dw = − k≥0 γ1 g(w)wk dw z −k−1 = − k≤−1 γ1 g(w) dw z k .20 applies: γ2 g(w) dw = w−z g(w) γ2 1 w k≥0 z w k dw = k≥0 γ2 g(w) dw z k . which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γ2 (by Lemma 7. wk+1 k∈Z γ The statement follows now with f (z) = g(z − z0 ) and an easy change of variables.26). wk+1 Putting everything back into (8. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 93 Figure 8.26).1: Proof of Theorem 8.1) gives g(z) = 1 2πi g(w) dw z k + wk+1 g(w) dw z k . wk+1 The integral over γ1 is computed in a similar fashion. which finally gives g(z) = 1 2πi g(w) dw z k .16. Again Proposition 7. which converges uniformly in the variable w ∈ γ1 (by Lemma 7.

7 to prove the following: Suppose fn are holomorphic on the region G and converge uniformly to f on G. what it says is simply the following: if we expand a function (that is holomorphic in some annulus) into a Laurent series. . TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 94 We finish this chapter with a consequence of the above theorem: because the coefficients of a Laurent series are given by integrals. 1+z 2 1 ez +1 . 1 z 2k+1 . Then f is holomorphic in G. 7. √ 1 + z.16 using the power series of exp z centered at 0. z0 = 1. the coefficients of the corresponding Laurent series are uniquely determined. Use the previous exercise and Corollary 8. z0 = 0. determine where the series converges absolutely/uniformly: (a) k≥2 k(k − 1) z k−2 . 5. 2. z0 = i. Find the power series centered at 1 for exp z. (a) f (z) = (b) f (z) = (c) f (z) = (d) f (z) = 1 .CHAPTER 8. (This result is called the Weierstraß convergence theorem. Find the terms through third order and the radius of convergence of the power series for each following functions. Exercises 1. we immediately obtain the following: Corollary 8. find a power series for arctan(z). Prove Lemma 3. Prove the minimum-modulus theorem (Corollary 8. This result seems a bit artificial.) 8. 9. By integrating a series for radius of convergence? 1 1+z 2 term by term.12). centered at z0 . the kth derivatives (k) fn converge (pointwise) to f (k) . What functions are represented by the series in the previous exercise? 3.17.1: Suppose fn are holomorphic on the region G and converge uniformly to f on G. Prove the following generalization of Theorem 8. What is its 6. 4. there is only one possible outcome. For each of the following series. z0 = 0 (use the principal branch). Do not find the general form for the coefficients. For a given function in a given region of convergence. 2 ez . Then for any k ∈ N. (2k + 1)! 1 z−3 k (b) k≥0 (c) k≥0 .

TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES 95 10. Find the first 4 non-zero terms in the power series expansion of tan z centered at the origin. 1 (c) f (z) = cos(z) − 1 + 2 sin2 (z). using the minimum-modulus theorem (Corollary 8. then use the minimum-modulus theorem to deduce that the polynomial has a zero. 23. z0 = 0. Find a Laurent series for 1 (z−1)(z+1) centered at z = 1 and specify the region in which it 1 z(z−2)2 z−2 z+1 centered at z = 2 and specify the region in which it converges. and determine their multiplicities: (a) (1 + z 2 )4 . where k is any integer. 18. (Hint: Use Lemma 5. (b) Show that ez cos(z) = z−1 z−2 1 2 e(1+i)z + e(1−i)z .6 to show that a polynomial does not achieve its minimum modulus on a large circle. (c) Find the power series expansion for ez cos(z) centered at 0. Give another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5.7). centered at z = −1 and specify the region in which it converges.CHAPTER 8. if z = 0 21. Find a Laurent series for 14. 11. if z = 0. Find the zeros of the following. What is the radius of convergence? 17. 20. Prove: If f is entire and Im(f ) is constant on the unit disc {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} then f is constant. where f (z) = z 2 − 2. 1 sin z 15. and f ′ (z0 ) = 0. 22. Find the maximum and minimum of |f (z)| on the unit disc {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1}. (b) f (z) = sin(z) − tan(z). where a is any constant. (a) Find the Laurent series for (b) Prove that f (z) = is entire. 13. 16.12). Suppose that f is holomorphic. 19. z0 = 0. Find a Laurent series for converges. Find the Laurent series for sec z centered at the origin. (a) Find the power series representation for eaz centered at 0. Find the multiplicities of the zeros: (a) f (z) = ez − 1. z0 = 2kπi. 24. f (z0 ) = 0. cos z−1 z2 1 −2 cos z z2 centered at z = 0. Show that = 1 k≥0 (z−1)k for |z − 1| > 1. . Find the first five terms in the Laurent series for centered at z = 0. Show that f has a zero of multiplicity 1 at z0 .) 12.

and suppose f (a) = 0. Suppose the radius of convergence of each of the following? (a) k≥0 k≥0 ck z k k≥0 ck z k? is R. (Hint: Ratio test) k . inside the circle γ.16. (c) 1 + ez . Hint: Use Theorem 8. k2 ck z k . Why is Re G(a) > 0? (c) Why is there a positive constant δ so that Re G(z) > 0 for all z in the open disk Dδ (a)? (d) Write z = a + reiθ for 0 < r < δ. Suppose |cn | ≥ 2n for all n. but which are defined on the three domains |z| < 1. k≥0 (b) (c) k≥0 ck z k+5 . at a. 28. 3k ck z k . Suppose f is holomorphic and not identically zero on an open disk D centered at a. and g(a) = 0? (b) Write g(a) in polar form as g(a) = c eiα and define G(z) = e−iα g(z). and 2 < |z|. TAYLOR AND LAURENT SERIES (b) sin2 z. centered at 0. and that it has multiplicity 1. 96 1 25. k≥0 (d) (e) k≥0 c2 z k . Find the three Laurent series of f (z) = (1−z)(z+2) . (d) z 3 cos z.CHAPTER 8. 26. (e) Find a value of θ so that f (z) has positive real part. respectively. Suppose that f (z) has exactly one zero. g is holomorphic. What is the radius of convergence of ck z 2k . Follow the following outline to show that Re f (z) > 0 for some z in D. Show that f (z) = r m eimθ eiα G(z). 1 < |z| < 2. ′ (z) 1 Show that a = 2πi γ zf(z) dz. What can you say about the radius of convergence of 29. (a) Why can you write f (z) = (z − a)m g(z) where m > 0. f 27.

z14 . The function 1 z4 has a pole at 0. but it did not bother Newton—the moon is far enough. The function sin z z has a removable singularity at 0. If f is holomorphic in the punctured disk {z ∈ C : 0 < |z − z0 | < R} for some R > 0 but not at z = z0 then z0 is an isolated singularity of f .3.2. z4 97 z→0 . as for z = 0 (−1)k z 2k+1 = (2k + 1)! (−1)k z 2k .1. Example 9. Definition 9. and exp 1 ? All of them are not defined at z z 0. but the singularities are of a very different nature. as lim 1 = ∞. Edward Witten 9. Example 9. which are classified as follows. For complex functions there are three types of singularities.Chapter 9 Isolated Singularities and the Residue Theorem 1/r2 has a nasty singularity at r = 0.1 Classification of Singularities What is the difference between the functions sin z . (b) a pole if lim |f (z)| = ∞. z→z0 (c) essential if z0 is neither removable nor a pole. (2k + 1)! 1 sin z = z z k≥0 k≥0 and the power series on the right-hand side represents an entire function (you may meditate on the fact why it has to be entire). The singularity z0 is called (a) removable if there is a function g holomorphic in {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R} such that f = g in {z ∈ C : 0 < |z − z0 | < R}.

and 1 = 0. exp z approaches 0 as z approaches 0 from the 1 negative real axis. On the other hand. We will make use of the notions of zeros and poles of certain orders quite extensively in this chapter. we start with the following results. The function exp z does not have a removable singularity (consider. z→z0 z→z0 z→z0 ˆ DR (z0 ) = DR (z0 ) \ {z0 }. Hence limz→0 exp z = ∞. suppose that lim (z − z0 ) f (z) = 0. Then we can make use of the fact that g is continuous at z0 : lim (z − z0 ) f (z) = lim (z − z0 ) g(z) = g(z0 ) lim (z − z0 ) = 0 . z To get a feel for the different types of singularities. and f is holomorphic on the punctured disk z→z0 g(z) = (z − z0 )2 f (z) if z = z0 . Then define Conversely. for example. This is very similar to the game we played with zeros in Chapter 8: f has a zero of order (or multiplicity) m at z0 if we can write f (z) = (z − z0 )m h(z). z→z0 Remark. lim z→z0 f (z) .5. the open disk with radius R centered at z0 such that f = g for z = z0 . Then (a) z0 is removable if and only if lim (z − z0 ) f (z) = 0. for z = z0 . Proposition 9.4. (b) Suppose that z0 is a pole of f . and g is holomorphic on DR (z0 ). that is. where h is holomorphic and not zero at z0 . 1 1 limx→0+ exp x = ∞). The smallest possible n in (b) is the order of the pole. Clearly g is holomorphic for z = z0 . Hence we can factor (z − z0 )2 from the series. and it is also differentiable at z0 . Suppose z0 is a isolated singularity of f . ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 98 1 Example 9. so it has a power series expansion g(z) = k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k with c0 = c1 = 0. (a) Suppose z0 is removable. Then there is some R > 0 so that |f (z)| > 1 in the punctured ˆ disk DR (z0 ). Hence. We will see in the proof that “near h(z) the pole z0 ” we can write f (z) as (z−z0 )n for some function h which is holomorphic (and not zero) at z0 . 0 if z = z0 . exp 1 has an essential singularity at 0. since we can calculate g′ (z0 ) = lim (z − z0 )2 f (z) g(z) − g(z0 ) = lim = lim (z − z0 )f (z) = 0 z→z0 z→z0 z − z0 z − z0 z→z0 So g is holomorphic in DR (z0 ) with g(z0 ) = 0 and g′ (z0 ) = 0. so g(z) = (z − z0 )2 k≥0 ck+2 (z − z0 )k = (z − z0 )2 f (z). z→z0 (b) if z0 is a pole then lim (z − z0 )n+1 f (z) = 0 for some positive integer n. Proof. and this series defines an holomorphic function in DR (z0 ). f (z) = k≥0 ck+2 (z − z0 )k .CHAPTER 9.

the Casorati-Weierstraß theorem says that the image of any punctured disc centered at an essential singularity is dense in C. Theorem 9. Suppose (by way of contradiction) that there is a w ∈ C and an ǫ > 0 such that for all z in the punctured disc D (centered at z0 ) 1 (f (z)−w) |w − f (z)| ≥ ǫ . see http://www-groups.uk/∼history/Biographies/Picard Emile. f (z) − w lim But this implies that f has a pole or a removable singularity at z0 . and so z→z0 Then the function g(z) = z→z0 lim (z − z0 )g(z) = lim (The previous proposition tells us that g has a removable singularity at z0 .dcs. Not only does the next theorem make up for this but it also nicely illustrates the strangeness of essential singularities.) Hence z→z0 z − z0 = 0. For more information about Felice Casorati (1835–1890). then g is holomorphic in DR (z0 ) (as in part (a)). g(z) = (z − z0 )n φ(z) where φ is holomorphic in DR (z0 ) and φ(z0 ) = 0.ac. To appreciate the following result. stays bounded as z → z0 .uk/∼history/Biographies/Casorati. (It is worth meditating about coming up with examples of functions which do not miss any point in C and functions which miss exactly one point. if we define g(z) by g(z) = 1 f (z) 99 0 if z = z0 .CHAPTER 9. see http://www-groups. In the language of topology. There is a much stronger theorem. It is due to Charles Emile Picard (1856–1941)2 and says that the image of any punctured disc centered at an essential singularity misses at most one point of C. that is. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM So. z→z0 z→z0 The reader might have noticed that the previous proposition did not include any result on essential singularities. we suggest meditating about its statement for a couple of minutes over a good cup of coffee.st-and. 2. By the classification of zeros. In fact. and which implies the Casorati-Weierstraß theorem.html. Remarks. which is beyond the scope of this book. n φ(z) g(z) (z − z0 ) (z − z0 )n But then. z − z0 . 2 For more information about Picard. Try it!) Proof. 1.ac.dcs.html.6 (Casorati1 -Weierstraß). z→z0 lim (z − z0 )n+1 f (z) = lim (z − z0 )h(z) = h(z0 ) lim (z − z0 ) = 0 . for any w ∈ C and any ǫ > 0 there exists z ∈ D such that |w − f (z)| < ǫ. then any w ∈ C is arbitrarily close to a point in f (D). φ(z) = 0 for all z in DR (z0 ) since g(z) = 0 1 ˆ for z ∈ DR (z0 ).st-and. ˆ if z ∈ DR (z0 ). which is a contradiction. If z0 is an essential singularity of f and D = {z ∈ C : 0 < |z − z0 | < R} for some R > 0. since h is continuous at z0 . 1 f (z) − w = ∞. Hence h = φ is an holomorphic function in DR (z0 ) and f (z) = 1 1 h(z) = = .

Suppose z0 is an isolated singularity of f with Laurent series f (z) = k∈Z ck (z − z0 )k (valid in {z ∈ C : 0 < |z − z0 | < R} for some R > 0). Then the Laurent series of g in this region is a power series. Then (a) z0 is removable if and only if there are no negative exponents (that is. if the Laurent series of f at z0 has only nonnegative powers. and g is holomorphic on {z ∈ C : |z − z0 | < R} such that f = g in {z ∈ C : 0 < |z − z0 | < R}. the Laurent series is a power series). By part (a).7. we can use it to define a function which is holomorphic at z0 . Proof.1 is not always handy. Then by Proposition 9. . (a) Suppose z0 is removable.17 (uniqueness theorem for Laurent series) it has to coincide with the Laurent series of f . Proposition 9. f (z) = k≥0 k≥0 ck (z − z0 )k . where c−n = 0. (c) z0 is essential if and only if there are infinitely many negative exponents. and by Corollary 8. Conversely. (b) z0 is a pole if and only if there are finitely many negative exponents. (z − z0 )n (c) This follows by definition: an essential singularity is neither removable nor a pole.5. we can hence expand (z − z0 )n f (z) = that is. suppose that f (z) = k≥−n ck (z − z0 )k = (z − z0 )−n k≥−n ck (z − z0 )k+n = (z − z0 )−n k≥0 ck−n (z − z0 )k . ck (z − z0 )k−n = k≥−n ck (z − z0 )k .CHAPTER 9. Conversely. (b) Suppose z0 is a pole of order n. The following classifies singularities according to their Laurent series. z→z0 lim |f (z)| = lim z→z0 g(z) = ∞. Define g(z) = k≥0 ck−n (z − z0 )k . the function (z − z0 )n f (z) has a removable singularity at z0 . Then since g(z0 ) = c−n = 0. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 100 Definition 9.

one with positive.9 (Residue Theorem). c−1 is the only term of the series which survives: f= γ k∈Z ck γ (z − z0 )k dz = 2πi c−1 . Now connect the circles with negative orientation with γ. The following two lemmas start the range of tricks one can use when computing residues. Each of these pairs cancel each other when we integrate over them. closed. which lies in the domain of the Laurent series of f at z0 with domain a punctured disk {z|0 < |z − z0 | < R} for some radius R > 0. Then c−1 is the residue of f at z0 . The integrals inside the summation are easy: for nonnegative powers k the integral γ (z − z0 )k is 0 (because (z − z0 )k is entire). Definition 9. Computing integrals is as easy (or hard!) as computing residues. except for isolated singularities. But this means that we can replace γ by the positively oriented circles. The following theorem generalizes the discussion at the beginning of this section. Proof. for k = −1. simple. simple.8. and the same holds for k ≤ −2 (because (z − z0 )k has a primitive 1 on C \ {z0 }.20—we can integrate term by term: f= γ γ k∈Z ck (z − z0 )k dz = ck k∈Z γ (z − z0 )k dz . ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 101 9. Then f = 2πi γ k Resz=zk (f (z)) . Because γw all the other terms give a zero integral. closed. smooth path around z0 .2 Residues Suppose z0 is an isolated singularity of f . we can use Exercise 15 of Chapter 4.CHAPTER 9. This gives a curve which is contractible in the region of holomorphicity of f . Then—essentially by Proposition 7.1. z = z0 ). where the sum is taken over all singularities zk inside γ. Finally. smooth. Theorem 9. G-contractible curve which avoids the singularities of f . and one with negative orientation. now all we need to do is described at the beginning of this section. denoted by Resz=z0 (f (z)) or Res(f (z). Suppose z0 is an isolated singularity of f with Laurent series k∈Z ck (z − z0 )k in a punctured disk about z0 . or alternatively because applying the change of variables w = z−z0 yields the integral −k−2 dw. . Suppose f is holomorphic in the region G. γ is a positively oriented. Draw two circles around each isolated singularity inside γ.16 gives the same identity.) Reason enough to give the c−1 -coefficient of a Laurent series a special name. where −k − 2 ≥ 0). (One might also notice that Theorem 8. as pictured in Figure 9. and γ is a positively oriented.

which by as always.1: Proof of Theorem 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 102 Figure 9.10. Hence f (z) f (z) = . Then f has a pole of order 1 at z0 and g Resz=z0 f (z) g(z) = f (z0 ) . Lemma 9. g(z) (z − z0 )h(z) and the function f h is holomorphic at z0 . note that h(z0 ) = c1 = 0. the one for g has by assumption no constant term: g(z) = ck (z − z0 )k = (z − z0 ) ck (z − z0 )k−1 .9. But h(z0 ). But this constant term is computed. k≥1 k≥1 The series on the right represents an holomorphic function. which is a zero of g of multiplicity 1. and f (z0 ) = 0. . is the constant term of h or the second term of g. Then Resz=z0 (f (z)) = dn−1 1 lim (z − z0 )n f (z) . call it h. (n − 1)! z→z0 dz n−1 f (z0 ) h(z0 ) .CHAPTER 9. Suppose z0 is a pole of f of order n.3) equals g ′ (z0 ). g ′ (z0 ) Proof. Lemma 9.11. Suppose f and g are holomorphic in a region containing z0 . Even more. in turn. the residue of f h f g equals the constant term of the power series of (that’s how we get the (−1)st term of f g ). The functions f and g have power series centered at z0 . by Taylor’s formula (Corollary 8.

Naturally. .3 Argument Principle and Rouch´’s Theorem e There are many situations where we want to restrict ourselves to functions which are holomorphic in some region except possibly for poles. . and f has the (finitely many) zeros z1 .CHAPTER 9. . . we can combine the expressions we got for zeros and poles. Then the logarithmic derivative of their product behaves very nicely: (f g)′ f ′ g + f g′ f ′ g′ = = + . We invite the reader to prove that if p1 . It has some remarkable properties. Differentiating Log f (where Log is a branch of the ′ logarithm) gives f . . fg fg f g We can apply this fact to the following situation: Suppose that f is holomorphic on the region G. . nj . 9. In this section. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM Proof. . we will study these functions. respectively.1) − − ··· − f (z) z − p1 z − p2 z − pk g(z) where g is a function without poles in G. mk . . Suppose we have a differentiable function f . and we can use Taylor’s formula (Corollary 8. one of which we would like to discuss here. . . We know by Proposition 9.. Then we can express f as f (z) = (z − z1 )n1 · · · (z − zj )nj g(z) . respectively. . Let’s compute the logarithmic derivative of f and play the same remarkable cancellation game as above: n1 (z − z1 )n1 −1 (z − z2 )n2 · · · (z − zj )nj g(z) + · · · + (z − z1 )n1 · · · (z − zj )nj g ′ (z) f ′ (z) = f (z) (z − z1 )n1 · · · (z − zj )nj g(z) n2 nj g′ (z) n1 + + .3) to compute c−1 . Let’s say we have two functions f and g holomorphic in some region. then the logarithmic derivative of f can be expressed as m1 g′ (z) m2 mk f ′ (z) + =− . pk are all the poles of f in G with order m1 . (9. . = z − z1 z − z2 z − zj g(z) Something similar happens to the poles of f . especially with respect to their zeros and poles. . . + . But then (z − z0 )n f (z) = k≥−n ck (z − z0 )k+n represents a power series. where g is also holomorphic in G and never zero. which—as the reader might have guessed already—can be thought of as siblings. which is one good reason why this quotient is called the logarithmic derivative f of f . which is the starting point of the following theorem. .. Such functions are called meromorphic.7 that the Laurent series at z0 looks like f (z) = k≥−n 103 ck (z − z0 )k . . zj of order n1 . .

γ) − P (f.uk/∼history/Biographies/Rouche. so that these are the only zeros and poles in G. and γ is e a positively oriented. γ g As a nice application of the argument principle.) In fact.4 To see this.7) asserts that p has five roots in C. γ) . γ) = Z(f. Suppose f and g are holomorphic in a region G.7 (to Cauchy’s g Theorem 4. closed. f (z) z − z1 z − zj z − p1 z − pk g(z) where g is a function which is holomorphic in G (in particular. . 4 The fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5. let f (z) = z 5 and g(z) = z 4 + z 3 + z 2 + z + 1. As an illustration. smooth.12 (Argument Principle). What’s special about the statement of Example 9. if necessary. . It allows us to locate the zeros of a function fairly precisely. Denote by Z(f. we may shrink G. Then f′ 1 = Z(f. Suppose the zeros of f inside γ are z1 .ac. . and the poles inside γ are p1 . we present a famous theorem due to Eugene Rouch´ (1832–1910)3 . we prove: Example 9. . (Although for this p it’s not hard to find one root—and therefore all of them. which does not pass through any zero or pole of f . . |f (z)| > |g(z)|. γ) .6) gives that g′ = 0. smooth. . respectively. . Our discussion before the statement of the theorem yielded that the logarithmic derivative of f can be expressed as n1 nj m1 mk g′ (z) f ′ (z) = + ··· + − − ··· − + . Suppose f is meromorphic in the region G and γ is a positively oriented. without poles) and never zero. G-contractible curve such that for all z ∈ γ. see e http://www-groups. nj . . e Theorem 9. (You may meditate about the fact why there can only be finitely many zeros and poles inside γ. . 2πi γ f Proof. again counted according to order. . closed. and let γ denote 3 For more information about Rouch´. Note also that there is no general formula for computing roots of a polynomial of degree 5. simple. the integral is easy: f′ = n1 f dz + · · · + nj z − z1 dz − m1 z − zj γ γ γ γ = 2πi (n1 + · · · + nj − m1 − · · · − mk ) + ′ γ g′ dz − · · · − mk z − p1 .14. Then Z(f + g. This theorem is of surprising practicality. g is holomorphic in G (recall that g is never zero in G). . γ dz + z − pk γ g′ g g Finally.st-and. Thanks to Exercise 15 of Chapter 4.html. γ) the number of zeros of f inside γ—counted according to multiplicity—and by P (f.CHAPTER 9. . mk . respectively. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 104 Theorem 9. G-contractible curve.dcs.13 (Rouch´’s Theorem). γ) the number of poles of f inside γ. pk with order m1 . All the roots of the polynomial p(z) = z 5 + z 4 + z 3 + z 2 + z + 1 have absolute value less than two. zj of multiplicity n1 . simple. . . .) . . so that Corollary 4.14 is that they all have absolute value < 2.

105 So g and f satisfy the condition of the Theorem 9. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM the circle centered at the origin with radius 2. Suppose f is a non-constant entire function.13. whence Z(p. Find the poles of the following. and determine their orders: (a) (z 2 + 1)−3 (z − 1)−4 . Suppose that f (z) has a zero of multiplicity m at a. 2. γ) =  + g  2πi γ f + g 2πi γ f 1 + g 2πi γ f 1+ f f 1 = Z(f. Explain why at a. But f has just a root of order 5 at the origin.6 for f 1 . γ) = Z(f. Its derivative is g f g 1+ f is a well defined holomorphic function . Proof of Theorem 9. Prove that any complex number is arbitrarily close to a number in f (C). 4. which implies by Corollary 5. which means that the function 1 + g f ′ evaluated on γ stays away from the nonpositive real axis.1). use Theorem 9. But then Log 1 + 1+ on γ.13.) z . (d) (e) 1 1−ez . 5. γ) = Z(f + g. Prove (9. Show that if f has an essential singularity at z0 then also has an essential singularity at z0 . γ) = 5 . g f < 1 on γ. γ) + 2πi We are assuming that g f 1+ 1 γ g f g +f ′ . (Hint: If f is not a polynomial. Then for z ∈ γ |g(z)| ≤ |z|4 + |z|3 + |z|2 + |z| + 1 = 16 + 8 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 31 < 32 = |z|5 = |f (z)| . 1 f 1 f (z) has a pole of order m (b) z cot(z). z 1−ez .12)   ′ ′ g g f 1+ f 1+ f  1 (f + g)′ 1 1 f′ = = Z(f + g.CHAPTER 9.18 that 1+ γ g f g +f ′ 1 2πi 1 = 0. (c) z −5 sin(z). Exercises 1. 3. By our analysis in the beginning of this section and by the argument principle (Theorem 9.

. Evaluate the following integrals for γ(t) = 3 eit . and choose as γ a circle which is large enough to make the condition of Rouch´’s theorem work. G-contractible curve. zj and p1 . (a) γ cot z dz z 3 cos γ 3 z (b) (c) γ dz dz (z + 4)(z 2 + 1) z 2 exp 1 z (d) γ dz (e) γ exp z dz sinh z iz+4 dz (z 2 + 16)2 exp z γ (z+1)34 (f) γ 11. Find the number of zeros of (a) 3 exp z − z in {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} . Suppose f is meromorphic in the region G. counted according to multiplicity. Suppose f has a simple pole (i. Denote the zeros and poles of f inside γ by z1 . . where γ is the circle |z + 2| = 2. 1 3 f′ g = f γ j m=1 k g(zm ) − g(pn ) . Give another proof of the fundamental theorem of algebra (Theorem 5. . using Rouch´’s e Theorem 9. a pole of order 1) at z0 and g is holomorphic at z0 . (a) Find a Laurent series for it converges. g is holomorphic in G.) 9. .7). . . 8. 10. and γ is a positively oriented.6 e to g(z). centered at z = 2 and specify the region in which where γ is the positively oriented circle centered at 2 of radius 1. (b) Find dz. let f (z) = an z n and g(z) = an−1 z n−1 + an−2 z n−2 + · · · + a1 z + 1. 1 (z 2 −4)(z−2) exp z − z in {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ 1} . . 0 ≤ t ≤ 2π. which does not pass through any zero or pole of f . 12. (Hint: If p(z) = an z n + an−1 z n−1 + · · · + a1 z + 1.. pk . ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 106 6. . You might want to first apply Lemma 5. positively oriented.CHAPTER 9. Prove that 1 2πi 7. Prove that Resz=z0 f (z)g(z) = g(z0 ) · Resz=z0 f (z) . (a) Find the power series of exp z centered at z = −1.13. (b) Compute dz γ (z 2 −4)(z−2) . simple. respectively.e. closed. n=1 (b) (c) z 4 − 5z + 1 in {z ∈ C : 1 ≤ |z| ≤ 2} . .

(b) csc(z). |b| < R. dz γR (1+z 2 )2 (b) Prove that limR→∞ =0. ∞ dx −∞ (1+x2 )2 (c) Combine (a) and (b) to evaluate the real integral . Suppose f is entire. Suppose f has an isolated singularity at z0 . 17. R]. where γ is the circle |z| = 1. 15. γ (z − a)(z − b) and use this to give an alternate proof of Liouville’s Theorem 5. and ΓR be the closed curve composed of γR and the line segment [−R. Let γ be the circle centered at 0 with radius R. b ∈ C with |a|. (Hint: Show that if f is bounded then the above integral goes to zero as R increases. let γR be the half circle defined by γR (t) = Reit . (a) Compute dz ΓR (1+z 2 )2 . z3 + z dz z 2 sin z (c) γ (d) γ . z2 + z 1 107 (d) e1− z . (e) e4z − 1 .9. Given R > 0. Find the residue of each function at 0: (a) z −3 cos(z). sin2 z dz . (b) Find Resz=z0 (f ′ ). (c) z 2 + 4z + 5 . and a. where γ is the circle |z + 1 − i| = 1. 16. where γ is the circle |z| = 2.) .CHAPTER 9. 0 ≤ t ≤ π. +4 14. ISOLATED SINGULARITIES AND THE RESIDUE THEOREM 13. Evaluate f (z) dz . (a) Show that f ′ also has an isolated singularity at z0 . Use residues to evaluate the following: (a) γ z4 (b) γ dz . where γ is the circle |z − i| = 2. z(z 2 + z − 2) ez dz .

this chapter is just a collection of exercises. We hope the π cot(πz) . 1. All of the following ‘problems’ are of a discrete mathematical nature. Compute the residues at all the singularities of f .) (b) Show that limN →∞ γN f = 0.Chapter 10 Discrete Applications of the Residue Theorem All means (even continuous) sanctify the discrete end. | cot(πz)| < 2. Doron Zeilberger On the surface. π z 2 sin(πz) 1 k∈Z\{0} k 2 . and we invite the reader to solve them using continuous methods—namely. k2 108 . z2 2. Use the Residue Theorem 9. (a) Show that for all z ∈ γN . 10. 3. we evaluate—as an example—the sums k≥1 idea how to compute such sums in general will become clear. On the other hand.9. It might be that there is no other result which so intimately combines discrete and continuous mathematics as does the Residue Theorem 9. 5. which is one reason why we lead the reader through each of the following ones step by step. Let N be a positive integer and γN be the rectangular curve from N +1/2−iN to N +1/2+iN to −N − 1/2 + iN to −N − 1/2 − iN back to N + 1/2 − iN . complex integration. Evaluate 1 k≥1 k 2 .1 Infinite Sums 1 k2 In this exercise. Repeat the exercise with the function f (z) = to arrive at an evaluation of k≥1 (−1)k . just in a different format.9 to arrive at an identity for 4. these sections should really be thought of as a continuation of the lecture notes. Consider the function f (z) = and k≥1 (−1)k k2 . They are more involved than any of the ones we’ve given so far at the end of each chapter. (Use Exercise 30 in Chapter 3.

Find a simple closed curve γ surrounding the origin such that (1 + w)2 x w k k≥0 converges uniformly on γ (as a function in w). Evaluate 1 k≥1 k 4 109 and k≥1 (−1)k . y ∈ C and n ∈ N. k 1 − 4x 1 2πi (1 + w)2k dw . n k n−k The binomial theorem says that for x.9 to evaluate the integral. fn = fn−1 + fn−2 Let F (z) = 1 2 for n ≥ 2. k=0 k x y For more information about Leonardo Pisano Fibonacci (1170–1250). 2. 10. wk w k≥0 k≥0 γ use 2. and use the Residue Theorem 9.3 Fibonacci Numbers The Fibonacci2 numbers are a sequence of integers defined recursively as: f0 = 1. (x + y)n = n .) 6. . to interchange summation and integral. Evaluate this sum. you may use the fact that 1/ sin2 z = 1 + cot2 z.ac. k≥0 fn z n. Convince yourself that 2k k 1 x = k 2πi (1 + w)2k k dw x .2 Binomial Coefficients The binomial coefficient n is a natural candidate for being explored analytically. f1 = 1.uk/∼history/Biographies/Fibonacci. wk+1 1. As an example.dcs. as the binomial k theorem1 tells us that n is the coefficient of z k in (1 + z)n .CHAPTER 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM (Hint: To bound this function. see http://www-groups. k4 10. Suppose |x| < 1/4.st-and.html. Convince yourself that 2k k = γ where γ is any simple closed curve such that 0 is inside γ. 3. we outline a proof of k the identity (for −1/4 < x < 1/4) k≥0 2k k 1 x =√ .

t ∩Z a = t − a t a + 1.9 to derive an identity for N (t). loosely speaking. 10. Verify that Resz=0 1 z n+1 (1−z−z 2 ) = fn . n ≥ 0. Here. Generalize to other recurrence relations. f (z) = a ) (1 − z b ) z t+1 (1 − z 1. Consider the function 1 . (a) Verify that for b = 1. ma + n = t} = # {m ∈ Z : m ≥ 0. Use the Residue Theorem 9.st-and. Use the following three steps to simplify this identity to N (t) = t − ab b−1 t a − a−1 t b + 1. n) ∈ Z : m. Compute the residues at all non-zero poles of f . The fractional part is then {x} = x − ⌊x⌋. and show that this integral vanishes as R → ∞.uk/∼history/Biographies/Frobenius.) 4. (Hint: Integrate z n+1 (1−z−z 2 ) around a circle with center 0 and radius R.dcs. Show that F has a positive radius of convergence. Use the Residue Theorem 9. the greatest integer function of x. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM 1. 110 1 2. and show that this integral vanishes as R → ∞. 1 4.) 3. where N (t) = # {(m. 4 this means that the integers don’t have any common factor 5 The fractional part of a real number x is. ma + nb = t} . is the greatest integer not exceeding x. we will solve and extend a classical problem of Ferdinand Georg Frobenius (1849– 1917)3 .CHAPTER 10. n ≥ 0. 6 This means that a−1 is an integer such that a−1 a = 1 + kb for some k ∈ Z. Verify that Resz=0 (f ) = N (t). . N (t) = # {(m. For more information about Frobenius. the “part after the decimal point. and b−1 b ≡ 1 (mod a). (Hint: Integrate f around a circle with center 0 and radius R. and a−1 a ≡ 1 (mod b)6 . ma ≤ t} =# 3 0. n) ∈ Z : m. denoted by ⌊x⌋.html.9 to derive an identity for fn . 3. Show that the recurrence relation among the fn implies that F (z) = 1−z−z 2 . Suppose a and b are relatively prime4 positive integers. 2. see http://www-groups. (Hint: Write down the power series of zF (z) and z 2 F (z) and rearrange both so that you can easily add.4 The ‘Coin-Exchange Problem’ In this exercise. and t is a positive integer. {x} denotes the fractional part5 of x.” More thoroughly.) 5.ac.

an ). . It is well known (probably at least since the 1880’s. In the late 19th century.CHAPTER 10. mn such that n t= j=1 m j aj . . We call this largest integer the Frobenius number g(a1 . z 3 For more information about Sylvester. Given two positive. is due to Popoviciu. . The formula in 4. . 10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM (b) Use this together with the identity found in 3. . prove that. let’s call an integer t representable if there exist nonnegative integers m1 . can only be found in the most recent literature. . (a) Compute the residues for the poles of f inside γR .html. there is no known closed formula for g(a1 . For n > 2. . . Choose an ǫ > 0 such that the rectangular path γR from 1 − ǫ − iR to 1 − ǫ + iR to −ǫ + iR to −ǫ − iR back to 1 − ǫ − iR does not pass through any of the poles of f . when James Joseph Sylvester (1814–1897)7 studied the Frobenius problem) that g(a1 . 6. Given relatively prime positive integers a1 . and N (t) > k for all t > (k + 1)ab − a − b.st-and.5 Dedekind sums This exercise outlines yet another nontraditional application of the Residue Theorem 9. . to obtain 1 a (c) Verify that a−1 k=1 a−1 k=1 111 1 (1 − 1 e2πik/a )e2πikt/a =− t a + 1 1 − . The notion of an integer being representable k times and the respective formula obtained in 6. Historical remark. . . an .9. Hint: use the periodicity of the cotangent and the fact that cot z = 7 1 1 − z + higher-order terms .ac. 2 2a a−1 (1 − e2πikb/a )e2πikt/a = k=1 1 (1 − −1 e2πik/a )e2πikb t/a . and N (t) > 0 for all t > ab − a − b. .uk/∼history/Biographies/Sylvester. relatively prime integers a and b. . N ((k + 1)ab − a − b) = k. We verified this result in 5. . an ). if k is a nonnegative integer.dcs. . let f (z) = cot(πaz) cot(πbz) cot(πz) . . 5. a2 ) = a1 a2 − a1 − a2 . Frobenius raised the problem of finding the largest integer which is not representable. . Prove that N (ab − a − b) = 0. see http://www-groups. More generally. 1.

2) is the most important and famous identity of the Dedekind sum. b) = 4b b−1 cot k=1 πka b cot πk b . see http://www-groups.ac. The proof that is outlined here is due to Hans Rademacher (1892–1969)9 .1) Use the Residue Theorem 9.st-and.html.html. It first appeared in the study of the Dedekind η-function η(z) = exp πiz (1 − exp(2πikz)) 12 k≥1 1 b a + + b ab a . see http://www-groups.uk/∼history/Biographies/Dedekind. Define 1 s(a.1) is called a Dedekind8 sum.2)? Historical remark.dcs. For more information about Julius Wilhelm Richard Dedekind (1831–1916). 8 .9 to show that 1 1 s(a. b) + s(b. The reciprocity law (10.st-and. a) = − + 4 12 3.CHAPTER 10.1) and (10. DISCRETE APPLICATIONS OF THE RESIDUE THEOREM (b) Prove that limR→∞ γR 112 f = −2i and deduce that for any R > 0 γR f = −2i . number theory. The sum (10.2) in the 1870’s and has since intrigued mathematicians from such different areas as topology. 9 For more information about Rademacher.dcs. Can you generalize (10.uk/∼history/Biographies/Rademacher. 2.ac. (10. and discrete geometry. (10.

1 1( 2 − 1) + 11 ( 2 + 9) 11 (d) 8. . (a) −1 + i (b) 34i (c) −1 π 10. k ∈ Z. −1 if n = 2 + 4k. nowhere holomorphic (l) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative 2(z − z) 113 . 1. . −2 − i √ (b) 5 5. . (a) 5. 3 13. 8i π 4. k = 0. nowhere holomorphic (d) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic (e) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative − sin x cosh y − i cos x sinh y (f) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic (g) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0. (b) 25 − 25 i (c) 1 (d) 1 if n = 4k. k ∈ Z. nowhere holomorphic (i) differentiable at i with derivative i. k = 0. 2. 5 − 10i √ √ 3 i (c) 10 . . z = ei 4 − 1 and z = ei π 5π 4 −1 Chapter 2 2. (a) z = ei 3 k . nowhere holomorphic (j) differentiable on {x + iy ∈ C : x = y} with derivative 2x − 2ix.Solutions to Selected Exercises Chapter 1 19 8 2. 1. k ∈ Z. (a) 0 (b) 1 + i 12. i if n = 1 + 4k. −i if n = 3 + 4k. (a) differentiable and holomorphic in C with derivative −e−x e−iy (b) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic (c) differentiable on {x + iy ∈ C : x = y} with derivative 2x. √ 3. k ∈ Z. 5 π π (b) z = 2ei 4 + 2 k . (a) 2ei 2 √ iπ (b) 2e 4 √ 5π (c) 2 3ei 6 5. nowhere holomorphic (k) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0. nowhere holomorphic (h) differentiable at 0 with derivative 0.

SOLUTIONS TO SELECTED EXERCISES Chapter 3 37. (a) z = i (b) There is no solution. (a) differentiable at 0. k ∈ Z 2 (d) z = π + 2πk ± 4i. y = 2} (d) nowhere differentiable or holomorphic (e) differentiable and holomorphic on C \ {x + iy ∈ C : x ≤ 3. − πi for r = 3. k ∈ Z (h) z = 2i 41. (a) 8πi (b) 0 (c) 0 (d) 0 21. Chapter 7 2. y = 0} (f) differentiable and holomorphic in C (i. entire) 38. 2πi for r > |a| 31 0 for r = 1. (a) divergent (b) convergent (limit 0) (c) divergent i (d) convergent (limit 2 − 2 ) (e) convergent (limit 0) 114 . 0 2π 23. C \ (−∞. Any simply connected set which does not contain the origin. for example. (a) 0 (b) 2πi (c) 0 (d) πi (e) 0 (f) 0 7.e. e−i 3 (c) differentiable and holomorphic on C \ {x + iy ∈ C : x ≥ −1. k ∈ Z 2 (e) z = π + πk. 0 for r = 5 3 Chapter 5 3. k ∈ Z 2 (f) z = πki. √3 30 0 for r < |a|. −2πi 4. nowhere holomorphic π π (b) differentiable and holomorphic on C \ −1. f ′ (z) = c z c−1 Chapter 4 3. k ∈ Z (g) z = πk. (c) z = ln π + i π + 2πk . ei 3 . 0].

and 0 if |a| > 1. and the minimum is 1 (attained at z = ±1). (a) 2πi (b) 27πi 4 (c) − 2πi 7 1 (d) πi 3 (e) 2πi (f) 0 11. k k k≥0 (−1) (z − 1) (−1)k−1 (z − 1)k k≥1 k 115 − 2| > 2. . (a) {z ∈ C : |z| < 1}. (a) 0 (b) 1 (c) 4 (−1)k (2k)! k −k−3 . converging for |z k≥0 (−2) (z − 2) −3(z + 1)−1 + 1. (a) (b) 30. converging for z = −1.SOLUTIONS TO SELECTED EXERCISES 24. k≥0 k! (z − 1) 10. (c) π 2 (−1)k k≥−2 4k+3 (z − 2)k . 13. converging for |z − 1| > 2. (a) ∞ if |a| < 1. sin z = z −1 + 6 z + 360 z 3 + . . 12. (a) One Laurent series is (b) − πi 8 10. One Laurent series is k≥0 (−2)k (z − 1)−k−2 . {z ∈ C : r ≤ |z − 3| ≤ R} for any 1 < r ≤ R e k 3. {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} for any r (c) {z ∈ C : |z − 3| > 1}. One Laurent series is 14. (a) k≥0 e1 (z + 1)k k! (b) e2πi 33! 16. 1 if |a| = 1. {z ∈ C : |z| ≤ r} for any r < 1 (b) C. 20. The maximum is 3 (attained at z = ±i). (a) k≥0 Chapter 9 7. (a) k≥0 (−4)k z k 1 (b) k≥0 3·6k z k 27. . converging for 0 < |z − 2| < 4. z 2k−2 9. One Laurent series is 1 7 1 15. (b) 1 (c) 1 (careful reasoning!) (d) 1 (careful reasoning!) Chapter 8 1.

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