DRAFT
PAPER.



Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool,
Second
Life


The
ABC
of
shopping
in
Second
Life?
Issues
of
identity
and
culture
 or
 A
Literacy
Academic
goes
shopping
in
Second
Life
 
 Introduction
 
 In
preparing
for
this
session
today
I
have
undergone
a
process
that
might
be
referred
to
 as
 ‘blinging
 up
 my
 avatar’.
 Less
 than
 a
 week
 ago
 my
 avatar
 was
 wandering
 around
 the
 University
 of
 Sheffield
 Education
 Second
 Life
 space
 in
 its
 (I
 now
 realize)
 pitiful
 looking
 ‘system’
 shoes,
 hair,
 skin
 and
 clothes.
 DrJoolz
 had
 skulked
 around
 in
 the
 safety
 of
 education
 spaces
 where
 people
 have
 been
 very
 circumspect
 and
 quiet
 about
 her/my1
 lack
of
fashion/cultural
awareness.

Here
in
The
School
of
Education
and
in
infolit
iSchool
 I
have
attended
regular
meetings
and
treated
the
space
as
if
it
were
some
kind
of
Skype
 facility
‐
working
with
colleagues
to
plan
a
funded
seminar
series
and
conference.

I
had
 vaguely
 noticed
 that
 others
 at
 these
 meetings,
 more
 experienced
 at
 SL
 than
 I
 am,
 somehow
 looked
 better
 than
 my
 own
 avatar.
 
 I
 was
 not
 really
 clear
 about
 what
 it
 was
 that
looked
so
‘system’
about
DrJoolz;
indeed
it
was
just
this
week
that
I
discovered
this
 look
had
a
linguistic
‘hook’,
with
the
term
system
being
used
adjectivally.
The
term
seems
 to
belong
to
the
same
paradigm
as
‘insitutionalised’
but
actually
identifies
not
just
a
lack
 of
individual
style
but
also
the
idea
that
one
is
not
an
insider,
someone
who
is
not
in
fact
 institutionalized,
but
is
someone
who
has
not
moved
beyond
the
basics
and
still
retains
 the
standard
issue.

 
 So,
fitting
in
to
the
community
is
to
some
extent,
about
looking
the
part
–
you
show
you
 are
an
insider
by
your
physical
appearance.
To
shed
your
first
caterpillar
skin
is
to
show
 that
you
have
been
about
in
the
world
a
bit
and
have
investigated
the
options.
You
have
 to
 earn
 your
 wings
 by
 getting
 out
 there
 and
 involving
 yourself
 in
 the
 capital
 exchange.
 Writing
 for
 educators,
 introducing
 them
 to
 Second
 Life,
 Savin‐Baden
 et
 al
 (2009)
 describe
the
newbie
experience
in
this
way:
 
 You
notice
that
your
avatar’s
appearance
is
like
a
huge
badge
that
says
 ‘I
 don’t
 know
 what
 I’m
 doing’;
 you
 become
 slightly
 envious
 of
 those
 around
 you
 with
 a
 more
 individual
 appearance
 and
 begin
 to
 wonder
 how
they
acquired
their
impressive
hair
and
clothes.
This
leads
to
an
 extended
 period
 of
 playing
 with
 your
 avatar’s
 ‘appearance’
 settings,
 which
 ends
 with
 it
 looking
 slightly
 less
 ‘default’
 but
 still
 fairly
 unpleasing.
 (Savin‐Baden,
et
al,
2009:
3)
 


























































 1
Readers
may
have
already
noticed
my
pronoun
problem
emerging
here.
Last
week
it
was
 definitely
‘my
avatar’
…
and
this
week..
self‐consciously,
it
is
becoming
‘I’
and
‘me’.

 
 1



one
starts
to
get
some
kind
of
sense
of
the
 cultural
values
and
rituals.

However
as
will
be
appreciated
from
how
much
of
a
novice
I
 am.
and
would
 like
 to
 interview
 others
 who
 inhabit
 more
 diverse
 communities
 than
 the
 ones
 I
 have
 found
myself
in.
 Whilst
 I
 have
 selected
things
that
are
in
some
way
close
to
what
I
would
wear
in
Real
Life.
 and
 that
 different
 ways
 of
 behaving
 are
 expected
 in
 its
 different
domains.
From
the
formal
educational
institution

spaces
 of
 Lancaster
 and
 Sheffield
 and
 a
 very
 few
 other
 universities
 in
 the
 Uk
 and
 the
 states.


 
 
 Literacy

 
 I
 have
 begun
 looking
 at
 Second
 Life
 shopping
 practices
 through
 the
 lens
 of
 literacy.
eyes.
is
much
more
youthful
looking
on
my
avatar
than
on
the
 RL
me.
 
 I
 am
 drawing
 from
 personal
 observations
 at
 this
 point
and
need
to
live
a
bit
more
to
be
able
to
think
of
this
as
an
ethnography.

 
 A
 strange
 thing
 has
 happened.DRAFT
PAPER.
There
 seems
 to
 have
 been
 some
 kind
 of
 accommodation
 process
 happening
 and
 I
 have
 gradually
 started
 acclimatizing
 to
 the
 new
 cultural
 spaces
 in
 SL.
 since
 when
one
starts
to
go
shopping
in
the
space.
moreover
it
seems
to
me
to
be
 fundamentally
about
capital
exchange.
 I
 am
 aware
 that
I
have
mixed
in
very
discrete
circles.
 I
 have
 a
 limited
 cultural
 experience.
 I
 am
 sharing
 with
 you
 my
 feelings
 and
 observations
 on
 these
 early
 explorations
 of
 Second
 Life.
I
have
also
 been
influenced
by
what
is
available
in‐world
and
by
what
the
few
others

I
have
seen
are
 like
‐
(my
SL
skin
for
example.
clothes
and
a
series
of
miscellaneous
 freebie
 items
 ‐
 like
 cocktails.
And
with
all
this
I
have
become
further
aware
that
Second
Life
is
not
just
 one
 cultural
 space
 but
 many.
to
discover
that
on
 
 2
 .
 selecting
 and
 buying
 merchandise.
hair.
Second
Life
 
So
this
week
I
have
started
shopping
‐
indeed
I
have
hardly
stopped.
 the
 odd
 T‐shirt
 and
 random
 pieces
 of
 furniture.
 I
 feel
 confused
 by
 the
 world
 and
 I
 have
 to
 confess
 that
 I
 bought
 things
 in
 shops
 I
 was
 kindly
 taken
 to
 by
 Sheila
 Yoshikawa
 and
 have
 not
 yet
 found
 my
 own
 personal
geography
in
the
world.
 which
 is
 that
 in
 getting
 involved
 in
 shopping
 activities
 I
 have
 started
 to
 think
 about
 my
 avatar
 as
 a
 presentation
 of
 self
 within
 the
 world.
 the
 act
 of
 evaluating
 goods.
 money
 and
 thought.
 salsa
 dance
 moves.
frankly
I
don’t
think
a
closer
match
would
ever
be
marketable
in
SL
or
RL).

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
 However.

It
is
fascinating
for
example.
 My
 engagement
 with
 shopping
 activities.
 represents
 an
 investment
 of
 time.
 
 But
 I
 have
 also
 dipped
 my
 toe
 in
 the
 water
 of
 the
 Second
 Life
 culture.
and
I
have
managed
 to
gain
not
just
my
new
skin.

 Second
Life
is
literacy
saturated
and
literacy
dependent.
fingernails.


Pay.
 cultures
 and
 social
 position.
 social
 aspects
 are
 irrefutably
 part
 of
 literacy
 practices.
Open.
 
 So
 a
 simple
quick
look
at
the
language
of
the
commands
one
of
the
key
social
functions
within
 the
Virtual
World
is
concerned
with
acquisition
of
goods
‐
alongside
sitting
down!

 
 In
 order
 to
 function
 in‐world
 one
 needs
 to
 be
 skilled
 in
 a
 range
 of
 literacy
 practices.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
Second
Life
 the
 ‘right
 click’
 facility.
 and
 readers
 bring
 to
 those
 texts
 and
 contexts.
 That
 is
 to
 say.

 
 
 
 Within
 this
 paradigm
 of
 basic
 actions
 .
 menus.
 the
 mechanics
 of
 manouevring
 are
 of
 course
 hugely
 important
 and
 these
 are
 sometimes
 managed
 by
 selecting
 from
 textual
 options
 that
 appear
 in
 multiple
 formats.
 Paying
 and
 taking
 are
 on
 the
 premier
 list.
 Touch.

 
 I
see
the
production
and
consumption
of
texts
as
social.
but
there
are
even
more
literacy
practices
specifically
in
relation
 to
Second
Life
shopping
.
 Of
 course
 all
 these
 manouevring
 skills
 come
 into
 play

 when
one
is
shopping.
that
is.
Edit.DRAFT
PAPER.
 Create.

 
 
So
in
the
next
few
minutes
I
will
just
briefly
outline
where
I
am
coming
from
in
terms
of
 literacy
theory.
 one
 is
 offered
 a
 dial
 of
 options
 that
 includes:
 Sit
 Here.
 and
 meaning
 is
 not
 just
 mediated
 straightforwardly
by
textual
codes
(alphabetised
representation
etc).
 meanings
 derived
 from
 their
 own
 experiences.
texts
are
produced
out
of
 particular
 contexts.
but
are
shaped
by
 
 3
 .
 particularly
 thinking
 about
 the
 question
‘What
literacy
skills
and
knowledge
do
you
need
to
go
shopping
in
Second
Life?’
 and
then
finally
I
make
a
few
observations
about
what
I
think
will
be
interesting
areas
to
 explore
using
an
ethnographic
approach
to
look
at
literacy
and
shopping
in
Second
Life.
 icons
 and
 lists
 of
 words.
and
Take.
I
then
share
some
of
the
observations
I
have
made
about
digital
literacy
 practices
 as
 they
 relate
 to
 shopping
 in
 Second
 Life.
 from
 maps
 and
 dials.
 many
 of
 these
 are
 subsumed
 within
 managing
 the
 technology.



who

describe
literacy
as
a
 social
practice
and
argue
that

‘Literacy
is
primarily
something
people
do.
 associated
with
theorists
like
Barton
and
Hamilton
(1998).
aural.
 Van
 Leeuwen
 and
 Jewitt.
 context
 and
 meaning.
 
 
 4
 .
 talk
 and
 interaction.
 multiliteracies
 takes
 into
 account
 a
 full
 range
 of
 modalities
as
contributing
to
meaning‐making
so
that
visual.

Texts
are
socio‐cultural
constructs.
 
(Lankshear
and
Knobel.
 tools
 and
 spaces.
‘Literacy
bits’
do
not
exist
apart
from
the
social
practices
 in
which
they
are
embedded
and
in
which
they
are
acquired.

In
emphasising
these
points.
would
 therefore
 treat
 Second
 Life
 as
 a
 text
 in
 itself.DRAFT
PAPER.
Second
Life
 socio‐cultural
matters.
they
 are
 involved
 in
 social
 acts
 –
 making
 friends.
2006:13)
 
 When
you
think
about
the
uses
of
literacy
in
Second
Life
this
kind
of
argument
is
difficult
 to
dispute
where
readers
and
writers
of
texts
are
primarily
trying
to
do
something.
 asking
 for
 help.
teaching.
 discussing
 meanings
 inscribed
 within
 individual
entries
on
the
site.
it
is
an
activity
 located
in
the
space
between
thought
and
text’
argue
Barton
and
Hamilton
(1998:
3).

 
 The
 work
 of
 the
 New
 London
 Group
 in
 conceptualising
 ‘‘multiliteracies’’
 is
 now
 well
 established
 (Cope
 &
 Kalantzis.
Shifts.
blogs
and
discussion
boards
/impact
on
meanings.
 selling.
 like
 values
 and
 gestures.
 Literacy
 researchers
 drawing
on
these
ideas
of
literacy
as
a
social
practice.
as
 well
as
the
way
in
which
other
functionalities
of
the
eBay
software/
such
as
the
ratings
 system.
 presenting.
 action
 and
 objects.
to
the
escalation
of
the
use
of
different
modalities
 within
 single
 texts
 (Kress.
 
 One
 needs
 to
 decode
 cultural
 and
 social
 context
 clues
 as
 Lankshear
 and
 Knobel
 argue:

 
 From
 a
 sociocultural
 perspective
 it
 is
 impossible
 to
 separate
 out
 from
 text‐ mediated
social
practices
the
bits
concerned
with
reading
or
writing
(or
any
 other
sense
of
literacy)
and
to
treat
them
independently
of
all
the
non‐print
 bits.
and
spatial
patterns
 are
accepted
as
being
as
meaningful
as
the
linguistic
mode.
 2010.
their
relationship
with
each
other
and
the
site
generally.
indeed
a
broadening
 of
 the
 meaning
 of
 the
 word
 ‘literacy’.
 my
work
within
what
has
become
known
as
the
paradigm
of
the
‘New
Literacy
Studies’.

 
 Being
 literate
 therefore
 involves
 an
 understanding
 not
 just
 of
 how
 to
 decode
 alphabetically.
 2000).
 explaining.
reporting
and
so
on.
 have
 been
 partly
 due.
 They
 are
 all
 non‐subtractable
 parts
 of
 integrated
wholes.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
 2001).
ond
of
texts
as
multimodal.
 since
 the
 proliferation
 of
 screen‐based
and
other
digital
texts.
 but
 also
 involves
 being
 aware
 of
 all
 kinds
 of
 social
 ‘stuff’
 that
 surround
 texts.


 It
 is
 a
 programme
 on
 the
 Internet.
 begins
 the
 process
 where
 potential
 residents
 start
 to
 make
 a
 transition
between
thinking
about
avatars
and
thinking
about
the
self.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
A
key
area
it
sells
is
the
shopping
malls:

 Shopping
in
Second
Life
 Shop
'til
you
Drop
 Change
your
shoes
or
outfit
as
often
as
you
change
your
mind.
how
 power
is
inscribed
into
texts
and
who
might
be
affected
by
this.
 alphabetized
 text.
Second
Life
 I
 also
 draw
 on
 the
 work
 of
 critical
 literacy
 theorists.
 For
 those
 to
 whom
 such
 a
 phrase
 might
 appeal.
That
 is
 to
 say.
And
it's
always
in
your
size.
 we
need
to
think
about
how
the
text
might
have
benefits
for
some
and
not
others.
is
one
that
seems
 very
clear.
following
on
from
such
ads
is
the
invitation
to
‘Join
Now>>
Its
fast
Free
and
 simple’.
 on
 the
 web.
who
describes
how

in
‘Reading
the
word’

we
are

also

‘Reading
the
world’.
the
selection
is
as
endless
as
your
 imagination.
 Thus
 when
 we
 interact
 in
 Second
 Life.
or
role‐play
a
fantasy
character
 with
your
friends.
Here.

 
 
 5
 .
 sound.
 beginning
 with
 the
 writings
 of
 Freire.
 it
 provides
 video
 material
and
advertisements
for
joining.
 Second
 Life
 is
 literacy
 saturated
 and
 literacy
 dependent.
 Fundamentally
 the
 programme
 is
 made
 up
 of
 html
 text
 and
 the
 cultural
 practices
 take
 place
 via
 this
 (largely
 invisible)
 medium.
Maybe
 today
you'll
be
a
robot
or
a
tiny
rabbit.
 The
 transformative
qualities
of
the
world.
 and
 so
 on.
 as
 well
 as
 outside.DRAFT
PAPER.

 The
 creation
 of
 content
 is
 all
 textual
 whether
 it
 is
 the
 words
 exchanged
 among
 interactants.

 
 Shopping
in
Second
Life
 
 The
 Second
 Life
 website
 introduces
 Second
 Life
 to
 newcomers.
or
whether
it
is
the
creation
of
3D‐like
virtual
objects
or
the
use
of
gestures
 enacted
via
avatars.


 
 
 As
 I
 mention
 above.
 moreover
 residents
 within
 the
 Virtual
 World
 interact
 through
 multiple
 textual
 modes
 ‐
 visuals.
 that
 text
 is
 never
 ideologically
 neutral.

The
information
 given
 describes
 how
 one
 can
 buy
 goods
 within
 world.
 Second
 Life
 is
 able
 to
 make
 claims
 that
 Real
 World
 shopping
 Malls
 cannot.
 but
 it
 is
 also
 a
 set
 of
 everyday
 cultural
 practices.
coupled
with
the
pronoun
‘You’
where
the
reader
 is
 directly
 addressed.

 The
notion
that
being
involved
in
Second
Life
also
involves
shopping.

 
 It
draws
on
everyday
fantasies
and
everyday
idiom
‘shop
till
you
drop’
which
women
in
 particular
 are
 likely
 to
 
 identify
 with.


 It
 did
 not
 seem
 quite
 so
 lucky
 to
 me
 as
 she
 had
 to
 move
 around
 with
 that
 beast
attached
to
her.
 the
 first
 skills
 required
 involve
the
following:
 
 
 • Registering
on
the
website:

 • Having
an
email
account
 • Deciding
on
an
avatar
username
 
 Secondly
in
order
to
make
the
trip
shopping.
 one
 of
 the
 common
 errors
 for
 newbies
occurs
in
the
unpacking
of
goods.
validate
the
account
(or
similar)
 • Locate
a
shop
 • Understand
how
to
teleport
 • Understand
how
to
walk
around
the
environment
 • Work
out
how
to
discover
the
cost
if
it
is
not
displayed
 • Know
 how
 to
 make
 the
 exchange
 ‐
 clicking
 on
 an
 item.DRAFT
PAPER.
I
did
see
and
take
a
snapshot
of
someone
with
 a
polar
bear
attached
to
her
body
a
couple
of
days
ago
…
she
had
just
won
the
item
on
a
 lucky
 chair.
Second
Life
 
 The
skills
 In
 thinking
 about
 participation
 requirements
 for
 second
 life.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
 selecting
 buy
 etc
 • Knowing
 that
 items
 will
 appear
 in
 the
 inventory
 and
 locating
 the
 inventory
 • Knowing
how
to
access
items
from
your
inventory
‐
either
dragging
the
 package
and
opening.

 
 
 
 
 
 6
 .
or
right
clicking
and
‘wearing’
 
 As
 can
 be
 seen
 by
 my
 one
 and
 only
 visual
 for
 this
 talk.
one
needs
to

 
 • Set
up
a
paypal
account.


 skin.
that
in
purchasing
an
item
 it
 is
 not
 transferred
 to
 the
 buyer
 intact.

The
mysterious
word
‘prim’
seems
to
be
used
everywhere
and
so
I
needed
 to
look
elsewhere
on
the
web
for
an
explanation
of
the
term.
often
very
powerful
sounding.
The
assumptions
we
hold
in
RL
about
what
one
can
buy
and
what
is
given
are
 challenged.
This
is
a
kind
of
subversion
of
the
 capitalist
principle
within
the
world
where
one
can
‘pay’
zero
Lindens
for
an
item.

Clearly.
there
is
the
growing
realization
that
in
recent
years
 much
of
these
things
have
been
commodified
in
the
Real
world
too.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
 as
 a
 folder
 in
 the
 inventory.
 The
 purchase
 of
 one
 cardigan
 recently.
for
example
the
salsa
 moves
 I
 managed
 to
 buy.
 manifest
 with
a
folder
containing
four
items.
 It
 appears.
Firstly
that
some
transactions
that
 appear
to
be
like
buying.
although
in
saying
this.
while
this
is
to
 some
‘just
a
game’.
 there
 is
 a
 series
 of
 icons
 which
 need
 to
 be
 deciphered.
this
is
also
a
business
enterprise
and
so
as
with
other
web
2.
referring
too
in‐world
(the
Lindens)
and
 out
of
world
authorities
(the
law)
as
a
back
up
to
the
warnings.
Second
Life
 It
is
probably
now
a
familiar
procedure
to
most
people
here.

because
the
virtual
world
is
textual.
this
means
 that
complex
instructions
and
regulations
sometimes
accompany
purchases.DRAFT
PAPER.
 eyes
 and
so
on.

Here
we
see
 
 7
 .

 
 
 
 In
addition
to
all
this
are
issues
around
theft.

 Moreover.
 facial
 expressions.0
spaces
 copyright
theft
is
an
important
concern.
The
use
of
 legal
language.

 
 Some
items
are
available
for
purchase
which
I
had
not
considered.
are
in
fact
not
buying
at
all.

I
needed
to
decide
which
of
these
items
were
indeed
 the
cardigan.

 
 There
are
additional
areas
one
needs
to
think
about.
and
 because

one
can
copy
and
replicate
digital
text
with
varying
degrees
of
ease.
 fingernails
 (in
 varying
 lengths).
Using
 the
 option
 to
 ‘buy’
 allows
 residents
 to
 make
 the
 transaction
 to
 happen
 and
 so
 individuals
can
take
advantage
of
this
kind
of
affordance
in
their
own
way.
 when
 one
 manages
 to
 locate
 the
 folder
 in
 the
 inventory.



Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
1977).
Secondly.
 
 Such
 adaptation
 of
 affordance
 use
 is
 common
 across
 web
 2.
shop
owners
can
use
this
way
of
giving
 goods
away
in
order
to
court
later
custom
and
to
acquire
interest
in
their
shops.
 
 Such
 research
 whicvh
 moves
 across
 online
 and
 offline
 spaces
 might
 need
a
connected
ethnographic
exploration
‐
not
just
virtual
but
in
RL
spaces
too
(Fields
 and
kafai.
Second
Life
 the
 exploitation
 of
 a
 particular
 affordance
 that
 has
 developed
 over
 time.

Kenway
and
Bullen
(2003)
talk
about
issues
of
 globalization
 in
 what
 they
 refer
 to
 as
 the
 age
 of
 desire.
 I
 would
 want
 to
 explore
 these
 ideas
 further
 in
 relation
 to
 shopping
 in
 SL.
with
an
awareness
of
‘being
watched’
 in
a
manner
evocative
of
Foucault’s
panopticon
(Foucault.

 This
 will
 require
 a
 longer
 period
 of
 time
 to
 allow
 an
 ethnographic
 exploration
 to
 discover
if
there
are
any
kinds
of
parallel
in
SL.
 eBayers
 also
 need
 to
 read
 critically.
are
the
ways
in
which
the
Second
Life
space
is
 used
 by
 RL
 advertisers.
 
 To
 take
 on
 board
 the
 ideas
 of
 critical
 digital
 literacy.
 a
 bottle
 of
 Jack
 Daniels
 and
 sundry
 other
 branded
 items
 just
 today.
 This
 is
 a
 space
 where
traders
form
a
self
monitoring
community.
I
looked
at
reputation
and
the
way
in
which
 that
 was
 configured
 both
 through
 official
 and
 unofficial
 online
 spaces.

 
 
 Further
Research
Considerations
 
 As
a
newcomer
to
shopping
in
SL
I
am
interested
in
exploring
much
more.
 Cross
 referencing.
 an
 understanding
 of
 ‘community’
 rules
 and
 the
 ability
 to
 discern
 and
 put
 into
 practice
 cultural
 and
 social
 knowledge
 of
 eBay.
my
previous
 work
in
looking
eBay
(2008)
enabled
me
to
think
about
how
the
Discourses
of
the
site
 shaped
the
ways
in
which
people
behaved.
 beyond
 what
 was
 initially
 envisaged.

I
am
aware
 of
 work
 by
 Catherine
 Beavis
 looking
 at
 the
 advertising
 of
 McDonalds
 in
 a
 MMOG
 but
 I
 think
there
is
more
to
be
explored
here.

 
 8
 .
eBay
and
YouTube.DRAFT
PAPER.
involved
not
just
in
particular
isolated
transactions.0
 spaces
like
Flickr.
 but
 with
 an
 understanding
 that
 individual
 exchanges
 contribute
 to
 an
 accumulated
 biography
 of
 themselves
 that
 can
 be
 referred
 to
 later.
I
argued
that
in
eBay

need
to
conduct
 relationships
as
buyers
and
sellers.
 I
 was
 also
 interested
in
how
people
bolstered
their
reputation
as
buyers
or
sellers
through
the
way
 they
linked
to
other
sites
on
the
Internet
‐
such
as
through
their
blogs
and
Flickr
spaces.
2008)
.
There
is
some
sense
in
 which
Second
Life
operates
in
this
way.

 
 Not
covered
in
this
brief
consideration.
 for
 example
 I
 purchased
 ‘free’
 some
 Pringles.
 The
 hidden
 exchange
 of
 capital
 involving
out
of
world
merchandise
is
clearly
an
area
worthy
of
exploration.


Second
Life
 
 I
 joked
 earlier
 about
 the
 appearance
 of
 my
 avatar.
M.
Policies
and
Practices.DRAFT
PAPER.

 
 A
range
of
literacy
skills
that
are:

 
 Functional
 Critical
 Social
 New/
Digital
 Multimodal
 everyday
 
 
 
References
 
 
 Cope.
(2000)
(Eds.

 
 I
would
also
be
interested
in
exploring
what
kinds
of
traces
we
leave
behind
when
we
 involve
ourselves
in
SL
purchasing
and
whether
the
digital
footprints
we
leave
remain
 in‐world
or
find
their
way
outside.
 
 In
 buying
 the
 dreams
 that
 the
 Second
 Life
business
espouses
in
its
ads.
 I
 have
 argued
 that
 the
 literacy
 skills
 required
 in
 order
 to
 participate
 successfully
 as
 a
 buyer
 or
 seller
 are
 complex.
and
Kalantzis.
the
cultural
exchange
of
goods
and
work.

 
 Fields.
 New
York:
Peter
Lang.
C.
 but
 the
 in‐world
 glamour
 and
 adherence
 to
 stereotypical
 notions
 of
 westernized
 beauty
 seem
 to
 go
 largely
 unchallenged.

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
(Pp227
‐
248).
(2008)
`Pay
and
Display:
The
Digital
Literacies
of
Online
Shoppers´.
Certainly
there
is
an
area
here
 for
further
thinking
around
how
to
participate
in
such
spaces
as
a
feminist
and
whether
 one
can
or
should
resist
the
Discourses
which
position
men
and
women
is
specific
ways
 as
 currently
 seem
 to
 be
 so
 prevalent
 
 in‐world.
are
we
adding
to
inequalities
in
out
of
world
spaces.
J.)
Multi‐literacies.
B.
M.
(Eds.)
Digital
Literacies:
Concepts.

 
 Davies.
(2009)
‘A
connective
ethnography
of
peer
knowledge
sharing
and
 
 9
 .

 
 
 Conclusions
 
 Drawing
 on
 the
 notion
 that
 literacy
 is
 a
 social
 practice.
Y.

 Second
Life
text
production
and
consumption
practices
require
a
set
of
complex
literacy
 skills.
A
and
Kafai.
Literacy
Learning
and
the
Design
 of
Social
Futures.
and
Knobel.
London:
Routledge.
In
 Lankshear.


White.
 
 Street.
Second
Life
 diffusion
in
a
tween
virtual
world’.
M.
(2006).
S.
 
 Savin‐Baden.
 
 Van
Leeuwen.
M.
 Columbia
University.
Poulton.
Vol5:2
77‐
87.
Teachers
College.
 
 
 10
 .
Tombs.
‘What’s
“new”
in
New
Literacy
Studies?
Critical
Approaches
to
literacy
 in
theory
and
practice’.
L. 
 
 
Kress.
In
Computer‐Supported
Collaborative
Learning.

London:
Routledge.
E.
(2001).
4:47– 68
 
 Kenway.
T.
J.
D..

Dr
Julia
Davies
The
University
of
Sheffield

March
18th
2010
 
ESRC
Festival
of
Social
Science:
Infolit
iSchool.
In
Current
Issues
on
Comparative
Education.
(2010).Multimodality:
A
social
semiotic
aproach
to
contemporary
 communication.
(2003).

 
 Lankshear.DRAFT
PAPER.
and
Bullen.
(2003)
Globalising The Young In The Age Of Desire: Some Educational Issues.
C.
London:
Sage.
Berkshire:
Open
University
Press/
McGrawHill.
(2009)
Getting
 Started
with
Second
Life
JISC.
C.
Woodham.
Handbook
of
visual
analysis.
G.New
Literacies:
Everyday
practices
and
Classroom
 Learning.T.
Kavia.
C.
and
Knobel.
&
Jewitt.
B.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful