BY ERIN COX

Staff writer
A summer internship offers stu-
dents an opportunity to get experi-
ence in their future careers or just
learn what a certain job would consist
of while getting guidance from people
already in that profession. This sum-
mer, Alicia Hempfling chose to apply
for an internship and is now the intern
at the Van Wert County Ohio State
University Extension Office.
“I had been in 4-H forever and my
mom let me know that the Extension
Office was hiring for the internship,
so I filled out the application, had an
interview and got hired,” Hempfling
said.
Hempfling will head into her junior
year at the University of Cincinnati in
the fall as a communications major.
The internship does give Hempfling
experience in a career within her field
of study but her time spent with Van
Wert County 4-H actually brought
her to the internship.
“I did so much with 4-H through-
out the years, I wanted to come back
and help out,” Hempfling said.
After 10 years as a member in the
club, Hempfling enjoys having the
chance to get involved in 4-H and
help where needed.
“I was a camp counselor and on
junior fair board, so just being able
to get involved again is pretty fun,”
Hempfling said.
Hempfling acts as 4-H Program
Coordinator Heather Gottke’s assis-
tant and deals with all office com-
munication.
“I do whatever Heather needs me
to do and I write everything that goes
into the newspaper from our office,”
Hempfling said.
Hempfling will work at 4-H
Camp this summer and at the Van
Wert County Fair before heading
back to school but even now, her
internship consists of preparations
for these big obligations for the
extension.
The Van Wert County Foundation
funds the internship at the extension
office through a grant because of all
the extra work the summer brings
with the need to put together the
upcoming events.
A typical day for Hempfling
includes writing news releases, plan-
ning the Cloverbud camp and prepar-
ing for 4-H Camp and the Van Wert
County Fair.
“I am constantly running to
Walmart,” Hempfling said. “I am
always having to go buy supplies to
prepare for camp.”
Hempfling has helped plan a five-
hour day camp in place of the typical
overnight Cloverbud camp that has
taken place in previous years, as well
as helping create the schedule for 4-H
Camp.
With this paid internship,
Hempfling not only gets a summer
job but it also helps her work toward
receiving a public relations certifica-
tion.
The internship also comes close
to what Hempfling dreams to do as a
future career.
“I would love to work with the
youth and inner city kids in a non-
profit organization,” Hempfling said.
While working with Van Wert
County’s 4-H may not meet the inner
city detail, Hempfling does get to work
with inner city youth in Cincinnati
through a public relations position
at the University of Cincinnati for a
program called College Mentor for
Kids.
As for her internship this summer,
Hempfling said the people she works
with make the internship fun.
“It’s really laid-back and they’re
really nice,” Hempfling said. “It’s
better than other jobs I’ve had in the
past.”
The only downturn of the intern-
ship so far according to Hempfling
would be having to get up early dur-
ing the summer.
She is the daughter of Mike and
Sue Hempfling of Delphos.
FRIDAY, JULY 29, 2011
DELPHOS HERALD
THE
50¢ daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Old Spice guy beats out Fabio, p3

It’s back to work for Tiger, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Church 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
Partly cloudy
Saturday
with high in
upper 80s.
See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Boomers worry
about finances,
health costs
JENNIFER C. KERR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
“golden years” may lose
some luster for many baby
boomers worried about the
financial pressures that come
with age.
Many of the nation’s 77
million boomers are wor-
ried about being able to pay
their medical bills as they
get older, a new poll finds.
The concern is so deep that
it outpaces worries about fac-
ing a major illness or disease,
dying, or losing the ability to
do favorite activities.
Another major concern
among the boomers: losing
their financial independence.
The struggling economy,
a longer life expectancy,
ever-increasing health care
costs and challenges facing
Social Security are putting
added pressure on the boom-
ers, those born between 1946
and 1964.
According to the Associated
Press-LifeGoesStrong.com
poll, 43 percent of boomers
polled said they were “very”
or “extremely” worried about
being able to pay for their
medical costs, including long-
term care. Almost the same
number, 41 percent, said los-
ing their financial indepen-
dence was a big concern.
“I always say I am going
to work until I’m in the
ground,” said Ellie Krall of
Manalapan, N.J., one of the
boomers polled. “I don’t see
myself being able to fully
retire like people were able to
do years ago.”
Krall, 50, manager of an
orthopedic office and mother
of an 18-year-old son in col-
lege, said she’s worried about
paying for health care costs
down the road and isn’t bank-
ing on Social Security.
The oldest boomers are
turning 65 this year, but it’s
the younger ones like Krall
who might be feeling more
apprehension.
“Boomers are not all
created equal,” says Olivia
Mitchell, professor at the
Wharton School of the
University of Pennsylvania
and executive director of the
Pension Research Council.
Many older boomers still
have a defined benefit pen-
sion plan, probably some
decent retiree medical insur-
ance and Social Security, said
Mitchell, a boomer herself
who has studied pensions and
retirement extensively.
“The youngest boomers —
the people who were born in
the 60s — face more uncer-
tainty about their pensions,
their Social Security, their
housing and their medical
care,” Mitchell said.
Her advice: “Push your
retirement back two or three or
five years if you can. As long
as you are still working then
you’re not drawing down on
your nest egg,” Mitchell said
in an AP interview. “What
most people don’t realize is
how expensive it is to live in
retirement.”
Many people in their late
60s, and some into their 70s,
are still working. According to
the Bureau of Labor Statistics,
29.1 percent of people aged
65 to 69 worked at least part-
time last year. And almost
7 percent of people aged 75
or older were employed in
2010.
One significant cost facing
new retirees is health care. A
study by Fidelity Investments
estimated that a 65-year-old
couple retiring this year with
Medicare coverage would
need $230,000, on average,
to cover medical expenses in
retirement. The estimate fac-
tors in the federal program’s
premiums, co-payments and
deductibles, as well as out-of-
pocket prescription costs.
It’s My Job
Erin Cox photo
Stacy Taff photo
Alicia Hempfling works on plans for the Cloverbud Camp as part of
her duties as Van Wert County Extension intern.
VBSers experience PandaMania
Hempfling’s internship
good fit with future plans
St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Fort Jennings held its Vacation Bible School this
week. Children learned about God through games and songs like “God is wild about
us.” This year’s theme was PandaMania. Above: Children sport panda ears and sing
songs.
“I always say I
am going to work
until I’m in the
ground. I don’t see
myself being able
to fully retire like
people were able
to do years ago.”
— Ellie Krall
one of the boomers polled
City plans to clean up Dewey Street
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — In response
to a recent assault carried out
against a senior citizen by a
local man, the city is in the
process of taking action.
Margaret Ditto, 88, was
attacked by Andrew Lucas,
26, while he was staying with
friends at a rental property.
Ditto, her neighbors and the
police chief have all said the
property owner of 619 Dewey
St. has a history of renting to
problematic people, as well
as good ones like the couple
currently living on the other
side of the duplex. One city
leader wants them and the
other law-abiding citizens of
the area to know action will
be taken to address the chal-
lenges they face with bad
neighbors.
Safety Service Director
Greg Berquist said there is a
section of the Ohio Revised
Code that deals with “hous-
ing nuisance.” The city can
take the apartment out of the
landlord’s grasp, if neces-
sary.
“It’s a process and it’s
not an easy one. The city
puts the property owner at
notice and, basically, says
if they continue this course
of action, the city will take
a civil action against them
— it’s not a criminal action
— to the point where the
property can be seized if it
goes that far,” he said. “The
police department is gather-
ing information I can use to
support the letter I will be
generating to the property
owner. It’s a work in prog-
ress and this is something we
have done in the past with
other properties. On those
occasions, there were sev-
eral criminal investigations
initiated at the properties in
question and that was enough
to get the city’s attention. In
those cases, the letter got the
property owners’ attention,
so it seems to work. It seems
to resolve the issue of leas-
ing or renting to the worst of
the worst.”
The Dewey Street duplex
is owned by Gene Warnecke
and managed by his sons, Jim
and Joe.
St. John’s hosting Soccer
Alumni match
The 2011 St. John’s var-
sity girls soccer team will
be playing the Alumni in
this annual scrimmage 1
p.m. Saturday at the high
school field. All girls soccer
alumni are invited to play.
Delphos midget football
sign-ups planned
Sign-ups for the 2011
Delphos midget football sea-
son will run from 6-7 p.m.
Monday at the Stadium Park
shelterhouse. This is for
anyone between ages 9-12
not currently on a team.
You must be 9 by or
on Sept. 1 and no older
than 12. Try-outs will
be from 6-7 p.m. Aug.
8-9 near Stadium Park
Diamond 4. Contact Ron
Ebbeskotte at (419) 692-
7191 with any questions.
St. John’s cross country
practice
For any St. John’s stu-
dents entering grades 7-12
that are interested in run-
ning cross country in the
fall, the first practice will
be held 7 p.m. Monday
at the Stadium Park shel-
terhouse. Any questions,
contact Coach Steve
Hellman at 419-233-1870.
Big Green Athletic
Boosters holding scramble
The Ottoville Big Green
Athletic Boosters are spon-
soring their 10th annual
Golf Outing Aug. 13 at the
Delphos Country Club. The
4-person scramble format —
with a minimum team handi-
cap of 45 — will begin with
a shotgun start at 1 p.m.
The $260-per-team event
features 18 holes of golf and
a cart; drink tickets; dinner;
door prizes; long drive/clos-
est-to-the-pin/long putt priz-
es; a Skins game; and first-
and second-place awards.
An auction follows
featuring items from the
Ohio State University,
the Cleveland Browns,
other area courses,
Budweiser and more.
Entry deadline is
Monday. Make checks
(with team contact name
and e-mail address) payable
to: Golf Outing, PO Box
512, Ottoville, OH 45876.
“The police
department is
gathering
information I can
use to support
the letter I will be
generating to the
property owner.
It’s a work in
progress and this
is something we
have done in the
past with other
properties. ...”
— Greg Berquist,
Delphos safety
service director
See BOOMERS, page 2
Vancrest to hold
Family Night
On the second Thursday
of every month, Vancrest
of Delphos will hold
a Family Night.
The event is geared
towards those who are
caregivers of older adults.
Every month, different issues
relevant to caregivers will
be discussed and stories
shared for fellowship.
Call Amber Bidlack at
Vancrest at 419-695-2871 or
e-mail abidlack@vancrest.
com for more information.
2
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D
H
THE PROFESSIONALS
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Phone: (419) 238-9795
Fax: (419) 238-9893
Toll Free: (800) 216-0041
YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE
419-238-9795
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Authorized Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge Sales and Service
Phone: (419) 238-3944
Toll Free: (888) 590-1685
756 West Ervin Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
chuck.sperry@grevechrysler.com
www.grevechrysler.com
SERVICE
Stick with the Specialists
TM
Sales and Leasing Consultant
Chuck Sperry
JUNIOR BOWLING CAMP
$40.00 PER BOWLER (includes lunch)
www.delphosbowlingalley.com
CALL TO RESERVE A SPOT!
Delphos Recreation Center
939 E. Fifth St, Delphos 419-692-2695 (BOWL)
OPENING FOR SEASON AUG. 8 - OPEN AT 12:00
AUGUST 1,2,3, 2011
AUGUST OPEN BOWLING SPECIALS
only $2.50 A GAME
2 – The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
TODAY IN HISTORY
POLICE
REPORT
The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the news-
room of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.
CORRECTIONS
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 39
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Don Hemple,
advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Van Wert Cinemas
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CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Thursday:
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $74
million
Pick 3 Evening
8-0-0
Pick 4 Evening
5-7-2-1
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $133
million
Rolling Cash 5
02-15-25-33-36
Estimated jackpot:
$100,000
Ten OH Evening
01-03-11-12-29-31-36-37-
46-48-49-51-53-55-56-62-68-
71-79-80
Delphos weather
High temperature Thursday
in Delphos was 94 degrees,
low was 78. High a year ago
today was 80, low was 66.
Record high for today is 98,
set in 1916. Record low is 51,
set in 1928.
In Thursday’s update on
the Andy Lucas case, The
Delphos Herald erroneous-
ly reported Lucas is facing
a felonious assault charge.
Lucas is charged with
aggravated burglary. The
Allen County Grand Jury
will be presented with the
felonious assault charge in
September.
ST. RITA’S
A girl was born July 29 to
Kyle and Jennifer Beam of
Delphos.
Police probe
domestic dispute
Man charged
with driving
under suspension
Corn: $7.47
Wheat: $6.78
Beans: $13.71
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy.
A 30 percent chance of show-
ers and storms in the eve-
ning. Lows in the lower 70s.
Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
SATURDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the upper
80s. East winds around 10
mph.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
upper 60s. Southeast winds
around 10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
SUNDAY-TUESDAY:
Mostly clear. Highs in the
lower 90s. Lows in the upper
60s.
TUESDAY NIGHT:
Partly cloudy. Lows in the
upper 60s.
WEDNESDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of showers and storms.
Highs around 90.
WEDNESDAY NIGHT,
THURSDAY: Partly cloudy.
Lows around 70. Highs in the
upper 80s.
At 9:04 p.m. on Thursday,
Delphos police were called to
the 100 block of North Main
Street in reference to a domes-
tic dispute complaint.
Upon officers’ arrival,
they spoke with the subjects
involved and all parties’ sto-
ries were different.
All subjects involved
refused to pursue any type of
charges and separated for the
night.
At 7:04 p.m. on Thursday
while on routine patrol,
Delphos police came into con-
tact with Glenn Feathers, 48,
of Delphos, at which time it
was found that Feathers was
operating a motor vehicle
while having his driving privi-
leges suspended.
As a result, Feathers was
cited into Van Wert Municipal
Court on the charge.
A week later, Norway mourns
76 victims of massacre
By IAN MacDOUGALL
and BJOERN H.
AMLAND
The Associated Press
OSLO, Norway —
Norwegians began a solemn
day of memorials today for
victims of last week’s bomb
and shooting massacre, and
the first funerals for the 76
victims were being held.
“Today it is one week
since Norway was hit by
evil,” Prime Minister Jens
Stoltenberg said at a memo-
rial service in the “People’s
House” assembly hall.
“We have to live with
July 22, but together we will
make it,” he said from a stage
adorned with red roses, the
symbol of his governing
Labor Party.
In his speech, Labor Party
youth-wing leader Eskil
Pedersen said the gunman
attacked Norway’s core val-
ues, such as democracy, tol-
erance and fighting racism.
“Long before he stands
before a court we can say: he
has lost,” Pedersen said. He
vowed that the youth organi-
zation would return to Utoya
island — where the shootings
occurred — next year for its
annual summer gathering, a
tradition that stretches back
decades.
Another memorial service
was being held at a mosque
in an immigrant district of
Oslo. The confessed attacker,
a vehement anti-Muslim, was
to undergo his second round
of questioning by police
today.
Norway’s police said
today that all those killed in
the terror attacks have been
identified and that those who
had been reported missing
have been accounted for.
Stoltenberg has urged his
increasingly diverse Nordic
nation to show unity at the
services in the face of its
deadliest assault during
peacetime in a bombing in
Oslo and a shooting rampage
at a youth camp on Utoya.
Norwegian news agency
NTB said suspect Anders
Behring Breivik was picked
up at a jail today and trans-
ported to police headquarters
in Oslo for a session of ques-
tioning.
Investigators believe the
32-year-old Norwegian acted
alone, after years of meticu-
lous planning, and haven’t
found anything to support his
claims that he’s part of an
anti-Muslim militant network
plotting a series of coups
d’etat across Europe.
Breivik was questioned for
seven hours Saturday, the day
after the twin attacks target-
ing the government district of
Oslo and a youth camp of the
prime minister’s left-leaning
Labor Party on the island
northwest of the capital.
He admitted to carrying
out the attacks but has plead-
ed not guilty to terror charg-
es, saying he’s in a state of
war, according to his lawyer
and police.
Police have charged
Breivik with terrorism, which
carries a maximum sen-
tence of 21 years in prison.
However, it’s possible the
charge will change during
the investigation to crimes
against humanity, which car-
ries a 30-year prison term,
Norway’s top prosecutor
Tor-Aksel Busch told The
Associated Press.
“Such charges will be
considered when the entire
police investigation has been
finalized,” he said. “It is an
extensive investigation. We
will charge Breivik for each
individual killing.”
A formal indictment isn’t
expected until next year,
Busch said.
CDC: Strokes rise among
pregnant women, new moms
The Associated Press
Strokes have spiked in
the U.S. among pregnant
women and new mothers,
probably because more of
them are obese and suffer-
ing from high blood pressure
and heart disease, research-
ers report.
Hospitalizations for
pregnancy-related strokes
and “mini strokes” jumped
from about 4,100 in 1994-95
to around 6,300 in 2006-
07, a 54 percent increase,
researchers said, extrapolat-
ing from figures in a large
federal database.
“That is a very, very
alarm-raising statistic that
we need to take extremely
seriously,” said Dr. Olajide
Williams, a neurologist at
Columbia University and
Harlem Hospital and an
American Stroke Association
spokesman. “We need to be
more aggressive in screening
these women for these risk
factors.”
The number of strokes
is small, considering that
around 4 million babies are
born each year in the U.S.
But pregnancy raises a wom-
an’s risk of a stroke because
of all the hormone and blood
changes that occur. If she
starts out unhealthy, with a
problem like diabetes or high
blood pressure, she doubles
her risk of suffering a stroke
during or right after pregnan-
cy, said Dr. Elena Kuklina,
a stroke prevention expert
at the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention.
She led the study, pub-
lished Thursday in the
American Heart Association
journal Stroke.
Researchers used records
from a sample of hospitals in
nearly all states, covering up
to 8 million hospitalizations
each year. They looked at
the number of women having
strokes or transient ischemic
attacks — TIAs, or “mini
strokes” — while pregnant
or in the three months after
childbirth.
Rates were highest in
the South and lowest in the
Northeast.
Researchers also looked at
the prevalence of high blood
pressure and heart disease,
health problems closely relat-
ed to obesity, and concluded
that this accounted for nearly
all the rise in stroke-related
hospitalizations. Researchers
also noted that women are
having children at later ages,
and the risk of a stroke rises
with age.
Sometimes pregnant
women and new moms are
so focused on the baby’s
health that they neglect to
consider their own, Williams
said.
“They’re thinking about
the baby’s name, the spe-
cial room and what color
they’re going to paint the
room. They’re thinking about
motherhood,” Williams said.
“But an ounce of prevention
is always the best recipe for
a healthy life.”
Earlier this year, CDC
researchers using the same
hospitalization records
reported that strokes are
rising dramatically among
young and middle-aged
Americans while dropping
in older people, a sign that
the obesity epidemic may
be starting to shift the age
burden of the disease.
Boomers
(Continued from page 1)
The projection does not fac-
tor in long-term care, such as
the cost of living in a nurs-
ing home — something most
boomers in the Associated
Press-LifeGoesStrong.com poll
haven’t planned for yet.
Some 83 percent of boom-
ers polled said they do not
have long-term care insurance,
a private policy that helps pay
for nursing homes or in-home
care costs not covered by
Medicare.
Larry Plotkin, 60, of
Wheeling, Ill., doesn’t have the
insurance but says he and his
wife have thought about it.
“The problem with it is that
as you get older, the cost goes
up,” said Plotkin. “At a certain
point, it might not be worth it.”
Costs for long-term care
insurance can range from $1,000
to $8,000 a year, depending on
age, health conditions, policy
term and other factors.
“It’s a tough sell,” says Paul
Fronstin, director of health
research and education at the
nonprofit Employee Benefit
Research Institute. “Even some-
one in their 60s might look at it
and say it’s going to be 20 years
before I need long-term care, so
why buy it now.”
Boomers also didn’t fare so
well in other later-life planning,
such as legal wills and health
care proxies.
Forty-percent of the boom-
ers polled said they had a legal
will to spell out how their pos-
sessions should be distributed
after death.
Fewer boomers — 34 per-
cent — had health care prox-
ies and living wills. The living
will allows people to document
their wishes concerning medi-
cal treatment, and the proxy is a
medical power of attorney that
allows for the appointment of a
trusted person to make medical
decisions in case an individual
is unable to do so.
The AP-LifeGoesStrong.
com poll was conducted from
June 3-12 by Knowledge
Networks of Palo Alto, Calif.,
and involved online interviews
with 1,416 adults, includ-
ing 1,078 baby boomers born
between 1946 and 1964. The
margin of sampling error for
results from the full sample is
plus or minus 4.4 percentage
points; for the boomers, it is
plus or minus 3.3 percentage
points.
Knowledge Networks used
traditional telephone and mail
sampling methods to random-
ly recruit respondents. People
selected who had no Internet
access were given it for free.
Parts problem hurts Ford Focus sales
DETROIT (AP) — Ford
can’t make enough Focus
cars to keep up with rising
demand because of equip-
ment problems that have
caused a shortage of dash-
boards, two people familiar
with the situation told The
Associated Press.
Machinery that makes
the skin that covers dash-
boards at a Ford parts fac-
tory outside Detroit works
intermittently. That is forc-
ing the company to take the
unusual and costly step of
flying in parts from Europe
to keep its assembly lines
moving, the people said.
Despite those efforts, the
Focus plant near Detroit
can’t run at full speed, they
said.
The problem comes at a
time when high gas prices
and shortages of Japanese
small cars have driven
up demand for the Focus.
Dealers say they’re having
trouble getting the newly
redesigned compacts, and
they’ve been forced to
put customers on waiting
lists.
The people, who didn’t
want to be identified
because they’re not autho-
rized to speak about the
matter, said Ford is work-
ing to fix the equipment
problem at the parts plant
in Saline, Mich., but so far
the company hasn’t found a
solution.
Ford spokesman Todd
Nissen said company policy
is not to comment on inter-
nal workings at its plants.
But he said the Saline fac-
tory continues to make
dashboards for the Focus.
Despite the problem,
Ford sold more than 21,000
Focuses last month, making
it the company’s top-selling
passenger car. But its sales
were 3,500 below rival
General Motors’ Chevrolet
Cruze compact. The Cruze
is made at a factory in
Lordstown that is oper-
ating three shifts around
the clock to meet demand.
Ford’s assembly plant in
Wayne, Mich., where the
Focus is made, is running
on two shifts.
GM has been better able
to capitalize on small-car
shortages at Honda and
Toyota, which have had to
slow their factories due to
parts shortages caused by
the March earthquake in
Japan. GM and Ford have
been largely unaffected by
earthquake-related prob-
lems.
It’s unclear just how
long it will take to fix the
problem and whether Ford
will raise Focus produc-
tion. Mark Fields, Ford’s
president for the Americas,
wouldn’t comment last
week but said the Focus
plant is producing at a rate
the company expected.
“For the most part,
whenever you have a (new
model) launch there are
always some launch issues
that you deal with,” he said.
“I won’t say it’s been flaw-
less, but the good news is
there’s a lot of demand for
it and we’ll continue to get
those cars out.”
Jim Gillette, an ana-
lyst with the firm IHS
Automotive who advises
auto parts suppliers, said
the problem could hit
Ford’s bottom line because
it’s expensive to fly in the
parts. He said it is relatively
rare to have such an equip-
ment problem, and there
would be a lot of pressure
on the equipment maker to
fix it quickly.
The five-seat Focus,
which hit showrooms in
March, has a starting price
of $16,500 and can run
more than $27,000 depend-
ing on how it’s equipped.
With an automatic trans-
mission, most models get
28 miles per gallon in the
city and 38 on the highway.
Dealers report selling them
at sticker price.
Visit www.delphosherald.com
By The Associated Press
Today is Friday, July 29,
the 210th day of 2011. There
are 155 days left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On July 29, 1981, Britain’s
Prince Charles married
Lady Diana Spencer at St.
Paul’s Cathedral in London.
(However, the couple divorced
in 1996.)
On this date:
In 1588, the English
attacked the Spanish Armada
in the Battle of Gravelines,
resulting in an English vic-
tory.
The Marion Township
Trustees held their regu-
lar scheduled meeting
on Monday at the Marion
Township office with the
following members present:
Howard Violet, Jerry Gilden
and Joseph Youngpeter.
The purpose of the meet-
ing was to pay bills and con-
duct ongoing business. The
minutes of the previous meet-
ing were read and approved
as read. The trustees then
reviewed the bills and gave
approval for 20 checks total-
ing $31,404.49.
Jim and Martha Miller
were present for the public
hearing in regards to the prop-
erty at 13910 Landeck Road.
They voiced their concern of
the condition of the property
and the health hazards it is
causing. After some discus-
sion regarding this, Trustee
Gilden moved to adopt a res-
olution declaring the property
a nuisance which was sec-
onded by Trustee Youngpeter
and upon roll call on votes
were “YES.”
Douglas Degen from the
Allen County Engineer’s
Office was present in regards
to the ditching project along
Peltier Road, which Ken
Elwer spoke about at the last
meeting. The trustees want
to make sure that the town-
ship will be within legal stat-
ues if they participate. The
engineer’s office stated the
township will benefit from
this project making it OK to
participate. The trustees also
wanted to make sure that the
size of the tile is adequate for
the project and Degen said
he will check on this and
advise if anything needs to
be changed.
Trustees Gilden also check
with the prosecutor’s office
regarding the townships par-
ticipation and they saw no
problems.
Gilden made a motion for
the township to participate
contingent on the design be
approved by the Allen County
Engineer’s office and the
townships cost not to exceed
$3,395. Trustee Youngpeter
seconded the motion which
passed unanimously.
Road Foreman Elwer
reported that the road and
sign inventory has been com-
pleted for July.
Regarding the tile issue
on Bockey Road, Elwer sug-
gested running a tile from
the basin on the east side
of 11675 Bockey Road to
a 10-inch tile on the west
side of the drive. After some
discussion, the trustees asked
Elwer to talk with Steve
Buettner to see what he plans
on connecting if anything to
this improvement.
Fiscal Officer Kimmet
presented a letter for the
Allen County Health Board
requesting the trustees pres-
ents at a meeting on
Aug. 10 to discuss PODS.
The trustees asked Kimmet
to RSVP that they would
attend.
He advised the trustees
that the budget hearing on
Aug. 1 is mandatory this year
for all townships.
He gave Elwer a copy of a
letter from the Allen County
Board of Elections regarding
the Aug. 2 special election
which they will be using the
township facilities as usual
for precincts.
Police Chief Vermillion
advised that the townships
DRMO has been reissued.
Trustee Gilden and Trustee
Violet visited the property at
5670 Hartman Road regard-
ing the Nuisance issue and
reported improvement has
been made but Trustees
Violet will contact the resi-
dent advising more needs to
be done.
There being no further
business Trustee Youngpeter
made a motion to adjourn
was seconded by Trustee
Gilden and passed unani-
mously.
1
U
N
E
V
E
N
Concrete leveling of floors, sidewalks, patios,
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Knocking it out fast is a "can-do".
Ea.
We have parts, gaskets, gauges, etc.
Friday, July 29, 2011 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
St. Peter holds VBS this week
More than 70 children have enjoyed The Big Jungle Adventure: A Faith Journey
with Jesus this week at St. Peter Lutheran Church. Above: Benhi Khabeb, left, and
Kathy Verhoff teach children hand gestures for a song.
Nancy Spencer photos
Just because
you’re going away
for the summer
doesn’t mean
you have to miss
out on a single
issue of your favorite hometown paper.
All you need do is contact our customer
service department at least 10 days prior to
your departure and have your subscription
forwarded to your vacation address. It’s
simple, and it won’t cost you an extra cent
— that’s what we call really good news!
TAKE US ALONG!
SUBSCRIPTION
FORWARDING
419-695-0015
GOOD NEWS
REALLY TRAVELS
FAST!
NOW
Marion Township Trustees
YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL LOADED
WITH EXTRAS.
The way newspapers are sold may
have changed, but fact is, newspapers
are still the most “value-added” source
of information around. Where else can
you find facts, food, fashion, finance,
“funnies”, football, and of course
good old-fashioned reporting, for just
pennies a day? With something new
to greet you each day, from cover to
cover, your newspaper is really one
extraordinary buy, so pick it up and
“read all about it” daily!
Old Spice guy wins
out over Fabio
CINCINNATI (AP) — The
Old Spice Guy has won his
hunk-off with Fabio.
Former football player Isaiah
Mustafa has been lead spokes-
man for the Procter & Gamble
Co. brand of men’s body washes
and deodorants for nearly two
years, starring in a popular series
of marketing campaigns relying
heavily on YouTube, Twitter
and other social media.
Now, he has held off a play-
ful effort by the Italian model
to become “the new Old Spice
Guy.”
In a series of videos culmi-
nating Thursday, the muscular
pitchmen dueled in tongue-
in-cheek challenges from one
another and viewers. They held
staring and whistling contests,
bantered and gave advice on
writing love letters and working
out. P&G says Mustafa won
based on consumer feedback
such as “likes” and online com-
ments.
They called the competition
“Mano a Mano en El Bano”
(hand-to-hand in the bathroom).
Mustafa said he wasn’t wor-
ried, even though Fabio has been
“the epitome of the sex symbol
as a pitchman.”
“Not at all,” he told The
Associated Press. “There are so
many fans that enjoy the Old
Spice Guy, there’s not really a
calling for him to disappear.”
Even “the ferocious Ray
Lewis,” the Baltimore Ravens
football linebacker, has taken a
recent turn pitching Old Spice
products, Mustafa pointed
out.
The campaigns started with
Mustafa appearing in a shower
clad only in a towel and urging
women to look at their man, and
then back at him. Then followed
an online video series, includ-
ing one in which he suggested
President Barack Obama could
improve poll ratings among
women by opening speeches
with Mustafa’s “Hello, ladies”
greeting.
The campaigns engineered
by Portland, Ore.-based agency
Wieden+Kennedy won advertis-
ing industry awards, boosted Old
Spice sales and have been cited
by P&G CEO Bob McDonald as
a leading example of the power
of multimedia marketing.
TOLEDO (AP) — The U.S.
Census figures on Ohio house-
holds led by same-sex couples
grew by more than 50 percent
over the past decade, new num-
bers released Thursday show.
The 2010 census counted
28,600 same-sex partner house-
holds in Ohio, an increase of
nearly 10,000 from the 2000
census.
Leaders of gay rights
groups around the state said
they don’t necessarily think
more same-sex couples are
living together. Instead, they
said, more people are willing
to talk about it.
“We have numerous donors
who have been together 20
years, 50 years, 15 years,
20 years. The prevalence
of gay relationships, I don’t
see increasing,” said Jan
Cline, executive director of
the Lesbian Gay Bisexual
Transgender Community
Center of Greater Cleveland.
“But the openness that people
have in mainstream society to
declare it is becoming easier
and more comfortable for peo-
ple to do.”
Still, it’s not always easy
in Ohio, he said, pointing out
that voters statewide approved
a constitutional amendment in
2004 against gay marriage.
The biggest jumps in
same-sex households was in
the Columbus area. Franklin
County, which includes
Columbus, had 5,132 same-
sex households in 2010, a 58
percent increase.
Columbus has had a non-
discrimination ordinance for
years, and Columbus attorney
Robert Eblin said that the city
has long been seen as friendly
to gays and lesbians.
“As a gay person, I feel
welcome almost everywhere I
go in the city,” he said. “The
truth is you can go to almost
any restaurant or movie theater
or festivals, anyplace that you
can think of, with your partner
or friends and feel comfortable
and welcome.”
Eblin, 48, said the census
is just catching up with reality
in Ohio.
“The census, historically,
didn’t ask those questions,” he
said. “And I think that even
when they started asking those
questions, a lot of folks either
didn’t feel comfortable answer-
ing that they were part of a cou-
ple or weren’t aware of how to
respond to get counted.”
The head of a group that
pushed for Ohio’s constitu-
tional amendment banning
gay marriage said the numbers
were inflated.
College students room-
ing together could be count-
ed as same-sex couples, said
Phil Burress of Citizens for
Community Values. “We can’t
assume they are homosexu-
als,” he told The Cincinnati
Enquirer in an email.
Attitudes have changed in
Ohio, said Ed Mullen, execu-
tive director of Equality Ohio,
an advocacy group for gay,
bisexual and transgender peo-
ple.
“When I was a kid, if you
were a same-sex couple, you
moved to New York or San
Francisco or someplace that
you felt welcome,” he told
The Columbus Dispatch. Now
people don’t feel the need to,
he said.
Census shows jump in
Ohio same-sex couples
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Former Ohio Gov. Ted
Strickland said he has re-assem-
bled a handful of his top political
and campaign advisers to form a
strategic consulting firm.
Strickland, a Democrat
who lost his re-election
bid last year, said Midwest
Gateway Partners will special-
ize in helping Midwest busi-
nesses expand, crafting politi-
cal and advocacy campaigns
from offices in Columbus and
Washington, D.C.
The firm’s policy efforts
will be focused on health care
and energy, he said.
Strickland will be joined
at the firm by former chief
of staff John Haseley; for-
mer campaign director Aaron
Pickrell; his top energy
adviser as governor, Mark
Shanahan; and communica-
tions consultant Sandy Theis.
Steve Ricchetti, Washington-
based consultant with expe-
rience at the White House
and Democratic Senatorial
Campaign Committee, also is
on the team.
Strickland hires
key advisers for
consulting firm
BRIEFS
“The idea of my life as a fairy tale is itself a fairy tale.”
— Grace Kelly, American-born actress
and Princess consort of Monaco (1929-1982)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
4 — The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
One Year Ago
• Advantage Limo is offering free rides Friday morning to
watch the Carson & Barnes Circus set up. The shuttle service is
for the safety of everyone watching and to keep cars out of the way
during the unloading process. This five-ring circus is one of the
largest in the world. The circus is sponsored by the Delphos Canal
Commission and Museum of Postal History.
25 years Ago — 1986
• Top ticket sellers in the Little League raffle received prizes.
Winners were top seller, Jeff Wieging; second place, Brian
Laudick; and third place, Brad Holdgreve. The raffle netted about
$2,200 with over 3,000 tickets sold. The league will use the money
for a new batting cage and other new equipment. Winning a Las
Vegas weekend was Ben Neumeier.
• Delphos Country Club held its annual club championship July
26 and 27. Winners in the men’s flight were: first, Chip Keysor;
second, Scott Schimmoeller; third, Dave Kortokrax; and fourth, Scott
Markward. Ladies champion flight included: first, Beth Wannemacher;
second, Arlene Kortokrax; and third, Ruth Bruskotter.
• Mrs. Harold Beckett, regional two director and member of
Elida Garden Club, was given Outstanding Gardener Award.
Beckett also won awards on four of her entries in the slide contest.
The awards were presented at the 56th annual convention held
recently at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Cincinnati.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Five Delphos St. John’s students are listed in the thirty-
second annual Ohio Scholarship Awards Bulletin, put out by the
State Department of Education. Philip Bryan is listed as fifth in
Chemistry, and Gary Miller as honorable mention in the same
field; Carl Heitz is 19th in Latin I; and John Wiechart and Joyce
Welch are under honorable mention in Latin II.
• The Little League Reds handed the Cardinals their second
defeat of the season, 6-4, and the Pirates romped over the Braves,
20-1, in games played at the city recreation field Thursday. Bob
Spieles went all the way for the Reds, allowing four runs on five
hits. Dan Severs, who recently came to the Pirates from the Minor
League, tossed a three-hitter in his first pitching assignment.
• Mrs. Earl Dienstberger, incoming president of the Elida
Garden Club, recently called a meeting of officers in her home to
appoint committees for the coming year. New officers for the year
starting include: vice president, Mrs. Robert Murray; recording
secretary, Mrs. William Strayer; treasurer, Mrs. Howard Leis; and
corresponding secretary, Mrs. Nolan Mosier.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• Another Delphos pitcher helped the Lima American Legion
baseball team along the road to a state championship Tuesday.
Clair Ditto, son of Chief and Mrs. Glenn Ditto, was on the mound
for the Lima team against Sandusky. The Lima aggregation won
the game by a score of 12-7.
• Leslie Peltier, Delphos astronomer, continues to receive atten-
tion throughout the country for his discovery of the new Peltier’s
comet and for other discoveries he has made. A copy of an edito-
rial concerning the Delphos young man which appeared in a recent
issue of the Chicago News has been received at this office.
• After several delays, the Delphos Recreation Horseshoe
League will get underway tonight at Waterworks Park. Team Three
composed of Chas. Gould, Bill Miller, Jean Bryan, Frank Kurth
and Gene Wilcox, will play Team Four composed of John Ayers,
Arnold Hammons, Don Thitoff, Guy Tilton and Tom Swick.
SOMERVILLE, N.J. (AP)
— New Jersey Gov. Chris
Christie was released from a
hospital Thursday evening fol-
lowing emergency treatment
for asthma after having dif-
ficulty breathing.
The 48-year-old governor,
who uses an inhaler for asthma
and is overweight, was taken
to Somerset Medical Center
around 10:30 a.m. Thursday.
The blunt-talking governor,
who some Republicans have
been trying to persuade to run
for president, was headed to a
bill signing event when he felt
unwell.
Christie told reporters as he
left the hospital that he woke
up in the morning not feeling
great and his inhaler didn’t
work as well as it normally
does. He says he thought about
his kids and decided it would
be best to go to the hospital.
His wife, Mary Pat, went
to the hospital, but left after a
few hours to attend their son’s
baseball game. The Christies
have four children.
Christie said doctors per-
formed an EKG, blood work
and chest X-ray and all came
back normal.
“I’m a little tired. Other
than tired, I feel fine,” Christie
said.
Christie said he was head-
ing home to rest and see his
daughters. He canceled his
monthly “Ask the Governor”
radio show, for Thursday night.
He has no public schedule for
today, but said he planned to
be at the Statehouse on today
for staff meetings.
The last time Christie sought
emergency treatment for asth-
ma was when he was in law
school, spokesman Michael
Drewniak said.
Christie, a former federal
prosecutor who took office 18
months ago, has drawn praise
from fiscal conservatives and
complaints from unions for
efforts to trim benefits for pub-
lic employees as part of steep
budget cuts. His national profile
has risen, in part, for his frank
and sometimes confrontational
exchanges with the media.
The governor attended an
education conference and a
congressional fundraiser in
Iowa on Monday, where he
again told reporters he was not
running for president. He has
said that his four school-age
children and further goals in
his first term rule out a White
House bid, but Republicans
continue to court him.
The governor has made
headlines for his sometimes
stormy relationship with
Democratic lawmakers.
Senate President Stephen
Sweeney recently called
Christie a “bully and a punk”
after the governor cut $1.3
billion from the state budget
Democrats had sent him. But
on Thursday Sweeney issued
a statement wishing the gover-
nor a speedy recovery.
“Politics goes out the door
at a time like this, and I join
all of New Jersey in wishing
the governor well and hoping
for his swift return,” Sweeney
said.
Christie has been open about
some of his health problems.
He has long struggled with
his weight, which he said he
started putting on after high
school when he stopped play-
ing organized sports. He’s tried
dozens of diets over the years
with varying success and has
shed some pounds in recent
months.
His weight came up dur-
ing his 2009 campaign against
Democrat incumbent Jon
Corzine, who ran an ad accus-
ing Christie of “throwing his
weight around” to get out of
traffic citations while he was
U.S. attorney. Christie con-
fronted the ads head on, telling
Corzine to “man up and say
I’m fat.”
By CHARLES
BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
Demoralized House
Republicans are trying for
a third straight day to pass
a debt-ceiling bill that has
almost no chance of surviv-
ing the Senate, even as the
clock ticks closer to next
week’s deadline for avoiding
a potentially calamitous gov-
ernment default.
House Speaker John
Boehner, R-Ohio, suffered
a stinging setback Thursday
when, for a second consecu-
tive day, he had to postpone
a vote on his proposal to
extend the nation’s borrow-
ing authority while cutting
federal spending by nearly $1
trillion.
“Obviously, we didn’t
have the votes,” Rep. David
Dreier, R-Calif., said after
Boehner and the GOP leader-
ship had spent hours trying
to corral the support of rebel-
lious conservatives.
Republicans will try again
today. If they continue to fail,
then President Barack Obama
and Senate Democrats will
have extensive leverage to
shape a bill to their liking and
practically dare the House to
reject it and send the nation
into default.
If, however, Republicans
can get Boehner’s version
through the House, a rapid
and complex set of choices
will determine whether and
how a debt crisis can be avert-
ed. House Republicans will
be under tremendous pres-
sure to pass something, even
if they have to make it so
appealing to their right wing
that the nation’s independents
and centrists will laugh it off.
As Thursday’s events proved,
nothing is guaranteed.
The main area of dispute
between the two parties is
how to encourage or guaran-
tee big spending cuts in the
future without rekindling a
fiercely divisive debt-ceiling
debate such as the one now
raging.
Interviews with well-
placed insiders suggest the
following road map, assum-
ing Boehner can get his bill
out of the House:
The Democratic-controlled
Senate would kill it quickly.
The focus then would fall
on the Senate’s two lead-
ers, Democrat Harry Reid of
Nevada and Republican Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.
They must decide whether
they can reach a compromise
that can pass the Senate —
where a united GOP can kill
bills with filibusters — and
then pass the House and be
signed by Obama. The White
House would be integral to
such talks.
Republican officials
say McConnell could hold
a strong hand, despite the
House’s shaky performance.
He could argue that the
House finally passed a bill to
raise the debt ceiling, while
the Senate has done nothing
but kill that bill. If Tuesday’s
deadline passes with no reso-
lution, Republicans say, vot-
ers will blame Democrats.
Under this thinking, the
Senate would pass a mea-
sure similar to the House
bill, perhaps with minor
changes to save face and give
political cover to Democrats
who vote for it. The House
would quickly concur, with
numerous Democrats and
all but the most conserva-
tive Republicans voting aye.
Obama would have no choice
but to sign it.
Democrats say the oppo-
site is true. Obama has per-
suasively argued in recent
weeks that Republicans are
unreasonably demanding,
they say.
Democrats control the
Senate and White House.
If Republicans insist that a
partisan, House-passed bill is
the only vehicle, then public
anger will fall on them, this
thinking goes.
By CHRISTOPHER
S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON — The
economy likely grew in the
first half of the year at the
slowest pace since the reces-
sion ended, and the second
half isn’t looking much bet-
ter.
Weak consumer spend-
ing, dismal hiring and cuts in
government spending likely
held back growth in the April-
June quarter. The government
will report on second-quarter
growth today.
Economists forecast the
economy expanded at an
annual rate of 1.7 percent,
according to a FactSet survey.
That follows a 1.9 percent
growth rate in the first three
months of the year. Those
are the slowest back-to-back
quarters since the economy
began recovering from the
recession two years ago.
Even if the economy picks
up later this year, growth in
2011 will likely be slower
than the 2.9 percent expansion
last year. Economists at RBC
Capital Markets, for example,
forecast growth of 2.3 percent
this year.
Complicating an already-
weak economy is the debt cri-
sis in Washington. No matter
what lawmakers do to resolve
that crisis, their decision will
likely slow growth in the
short term. A deal to raise the
borrowing limit would likely
include long-term spending
cuts, which would withdraw
government stimulus at a
precarious time. If Congress
fails to raise borrowing limit
and the government defaults
on its debt, financial markets
could fall and interest rates
rise.
Most economists expect
growth to pick up slightly in
the second half of the year, as
the impact of high gas prices
and supply disruptions stem-
ming from Japan’s March 11
earthquake ease. But growth
won’t be strong enough to
lower the unemployment rate,
now 9.2 percent.
Gault said he expects
growth of less than 3 per-
cent in the July-September
quarter. That’s down from his
earlier forecast of 3.4 per-
cent. Economists at Goldman
Sachs and JPMorgan Chase
project third-quarter growth
of only 2.5 percent. That’s
barely enough to keep the
unemployment rate from ris-
ing.
The economy needs to
expand at a 5 percent pace
to make a significant dent in
unemployment.
Economists cite several
reasons for the disappointing
growth:
— Weak consumer spend-
ing. Held back by stagnant
wages and high unemploy-
ment, people simply aren’t
spending money. Economists
forecast that consumer spend-
ing grew in the April-June
period less than 1 percent, the
slowest pace since the reces-
sion ended. High gas prices
forced consumers to cut back
on other discretionary pur-
chases. Sales of furniture,
appliances, sporting goods
and electronics fell last month
for the third straight month,
according to the government’s
June report on retail sales.
— Cuts in government
spending. Governments at all
levels -- federal, state and local
-- are short on cash and being
forced to rein in spending.
All told, the cutbacks reduced
economic growth 1.2 percent-
age points in the January-
March quarter, the biggest hit
to the economy from reduced
government spending since
the early 1980s. While the
impact won’t be as large in
the April-June period, econo-
mists expect lower govern-
ment spending restrained
growth.
— Dismal hiring.
Employers added only 18,000
jobs in June, the second-
straight month of weak hiring
and much slower than the
average of 215,000 jobs added
each month from February
to April. And even people
with jobs aren’t getting any
raises. Adjusted for inflation,
average hourly pay fell 1.5
percent in the past year, the
Labor Department said earlier
this month.
By CHRISTOPHER
S. RUGABER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON — The
number of people seek-
ing unemployment benefits
dropped last week to the low-
est level since early April, a
sign the job market may be
healing after a recent slump.
The Labor Department said
Thursday that weekly applica-
tions fell 24,000 to a season-
ally adjusted 398,000. That’s
the first time applications
have fallen below 400,000 in
16 weeks.
The four-week average, a
less volatile measure, dropped
to 413,750, the lowest since
the week of April 23.
Stocks rose after the report
was released. But they closed
lower for the day after uncer-
tainty in Washington over the
debt crisis led to a late-after-
noon sell-off.
Economists cautioned that
the lower level of unemployment
benefit applications reflects one
week of data and doesn’t neces-
sarily signal a trend.
The drop “is clearly good
news,” said Joshua Shapiro,
an economist at MFR Inc.
Still, “we would prefer to see
further data before conclud-
ing that the earlier downtrend
in claims is being re-estab-
lished.”
Separately, the National
Association of Realtors said
more people signed contracts
to buy homes in June for the
second straight month. But the
increase was not enough to
signal a rebound in the weak
housing market.
The Realtors group said its
index of sales agreements for
previously occupied homes
rose 2.4 percent in June to
a reading of 90.9. The gain
and an 8.2 percent increase
in May did not make up for a
huge drop-off in April when
contract signings had fallen
11.3 percent.
A reading of 100 is con-
sidered healthy by econo-
mists. The last time the index
reached that level was in April
2010, the final month when
buyers could qualify for a fed-
eral tax credit.
The number of people
seeking unemployment bene-
fits remains higher than would
be expected in a healthy econ-
omy. Consumers are holding
back on spending because of
stagnant wages, high unem-
ployment, tighter credit, and
depressed home prices. That’s
restraining economic growth.
Unemployment applica-
tions had fallen in February
to 375,000, a level that signals
healthy job growth. But they
then surged to an eight-month
high of 478,000 in April and
have declined only slowly
since then.
Some of the drop likely
reflects seasonal volatility.
Applications were elevated ear-
lier this month partly because
of temporary layoffs in the
auto and other manufacturing
industries, which are ending.
Many auto companies close
their factories in early July to
prepare for new models.
The total number of people
receiving unemployment ben-
efits, meanwhile, dipped to 3.7
million. That doesn’t include
millions of people receiving
extended benefits under emer-
gency programs enacted dur-
ing the recession. All told, 7.65
million people received ben-
efits in the week ended July 9,
the latest data available.
Analysts forecast the econ-
omy grew in the April-June
quarter by an annual rate of only
1.7 percent, the second straight
quarter of anemic expansion.
The government reports on sec-
ond-quarter growth Friday.
Hiring has slowed in recent
months. The economy added
only 18,000 net jobs in June.
That’s the fewest in nine
months and below the average
of 215,000 jobs per month
that the economy added from
February through April. The
unemployment rate rose to 9.2
percent last month, the highest
level of the year.
DEAR EDITOR:
Greg Miller’s letter to the editor asked a question of how
much this school tax special election costs. After speaking with
the Allen and Van Wert county boards of elections, the answer
is around $15,000.
We could have shared this expense with other issues and
levies in our area if we waited until November but now, we
will be paying this amount ourselves. Could this extra money
be used for something more worthy, like pay to participate?
Sincerely,
Charlie Luersman
DEAR EDITOR,
The 2011 Summer Reading Program has drawn to a close
and so I am taking this opportunity to give readers an over-
view of the events and fun we had this summer at the library.
254 K-5, 90 preschoolers and 17 tweens and teens joined the
program this year. We held 38 events over the eight-week pro-
gram with a total attendance of 1,830. The K-5 graders kept
track of the minutes they read with their Reading Record and
earned attendance to the pool party for reading at least 90 min-
utes a week. The total number of minutes reported was 156,028
or about 2,600 hours.
We had many special guests to our programs: storyteller
Rita Thelan, naturalist Mark Mohr, professor and native of
China Hui Shen and the preschooler’s favorite, Llama Llama.
Families were entertained by comedian and magician Jason
Abbott. My favorite part of his show was his escape from a
strait jacket (after said strait jacket was strapped on by Mrs.
Jester – she was a good sport).
I’d like to recognize and thank the library staff for doing lots
of behind the scenes work from setting up tables and chairs, to
decorating, to working the busy counter, to planning and mak-
ing crafts. Cathy Hellman is an invaluable helper, often taking
an idea and working out the ‘how to.’ Lots of small pieces go
into making our program run smoothly and be fun.
Our volunteers were priceless: Sally Kiggins, Sharon
Closson, Sue Wildermuth, Victoria Recker, Jessica Recker,
Kathleen Wreede, Teresa Pohlman, Allison Gerberick, Madison
Spring, Claire Sensabaugh, Tyler Shaeffer, and Caleb Lucas. I
appreciate the way they do the unglamorous jobs with a smile
and a large dose of patience.
And finally, thank you to the parents for letting us borrow
your kids a little each week. I appreciate how they are always
well behaved, how well they listen, and their enthusiasm.
They are a testament to the families’ commitment in our com-
munity.
Sincerely
Denise Cressman
children’s librarian
Delphos Public Library
Debt-ceiling outcome
as unclear as ever
Economy growing at slowest pace since recession
Unemployment aid applications drop below 400K
NJ Gov. Christie
leaves hospital
1
/ccoroino to thè Tax Founoation, it took thè
avèraoè /mèrican until /pril ¹2 this yèar to
èarn ènouoh to pay 2C¹¹ incomè taxès.
This yèar, aim to bè abovè avèraoè. Start by
èvaluatino whèthèr you can bènènt írom
tax-smart invèstino stratèoiès, such as:
đƫ Tax-aovantaoèo invèstmènts ano rètirèmènt
accounts (è.o., lR/s)
đƫ529 collèoè savinos plans
đƫHoloino stocks íor thè lono tèrm
Kèèp in mino that tax implications shoulo only bè onè
consioèration whèn makino invèstmènt oècisions, not
thè orivino íactor.
Be Tax-emart
with Your Inveetmente.
CaII or vieit today to Iearn more about
theee inveeting etrategiee.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
F
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Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
LINCOLN HIGHWAY YARD SALE
DELPHOS COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
August 4-6, 2011
Place your ad in the Delphos Herald by July 26 and your location will
appear on our Delphos Community Garage Sale Map that
will be available at local businesses, the Chamber and the
Delphos Herald office starting August 3rd.
OPTION 1 - $21
*2 DAYS GARAGE
SALE AD
*LOCATED ON
GARAGE SALE MAP
OPTION 2 - $26
*3 DAYS GARAGE
SALE AD
*LOCATED ON
GARAGE SALE MAP
OPTION 3 - $30
*4 DAYS GARAGE
SALE AD
*LOCATED ON
GARAGE SALE MAP
Garage sale ad must be 40 words or less.
Send your typed or clearly written ad with payment, indicating what
days you would like it published in the paper to
COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES
C/O THE DELPHOS HERALD
405 N. MAIN ST., DELPHOS, OHIO 45833
email: sspears@delphosherald.com
Starts Saturday!
Quality Produce,
Insanely Low Prices
6 We get our produce from the Detroit Pro-
duce Terminal, the 4th largest in the U.S.
6 Our produce buyers are there 3 times
a week inspecting produce and finding
great deals.
6 The Detroit Produce Terminal only offers
a limited supply of produce, so take
advantage of the savings WHILE OUR
SUPPLIES LAST!
6 Supplies are limited and we don’t know
what we’ll get each week - this creates the
PRODUCE ADVENTURE.
Seedless
Red Grapes
Save up to $1.00 lb.
Blueberries
Save up to 60¢
On The Vine
Tomatoes
Save up to 50¢ lb.
Grape
Tomatoes
Save up to $2.98 on 2
Radishes
Save up to 60¢
Sale starts Saturday, July 30. HURRY! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!
Save up to $2.00
Whole Seedless
Watermelon
$
2
99
$
1
99
2/$
5
$
1
49
2/$
4
99
¢
lb. lb. bunch
Indiana
Cantaloupe
Save up to $1.00 on 2
2/$
5
High in
Vitamins A & C
High in
Lycopene
ea.
Save up to 70¢ lb.
California
Peaches or
Nectarines
99
¢
Homegrown!
Homegrown!
lb.
White or BiColor
Sweet Corn
Save up to $1.00 on 10
10/$
2
99
pint
Friday, July 29, 2011 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Shelterhouse at
Stadium Park
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store, North Main
Street.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St., is
open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam County
Museum is open, 202 E. Main
St. Kalida.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
7 p.m. — Delphos City
Council meets at the Delphos
Municipal Building, 608 N.
Canal St.
Delphos Parks and
Recreation board meets at the
recreation building at Stadium
Park.
Washington Township
trustees meet at the township
house.
7:30 p.m. — Spencerville
village council meets at the
mayor’s office.
Delphos Eagles Auxiliary
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 Fifth St.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
July 30
Dylan Krendl
COLUMN
Announce you or your family member’s
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
Complete the coupon below and return it to
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
additions or to delete a name from the column.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
Name
Address

Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Name Birthday
Telephone (for verification)
Check one:
º
Please add to birthday list
º
Please delete from birthday list
º
Please make change on birthday list
At the movies . . .
Van Wert Cinemas
10709 Lincoln Hwy. Van Wert
Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13) Fri.-
Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30; Sun.-Thurs.:
2:00/4:30/7:00
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part
2 (PG-13) Fri-Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30; Sun-
Thurs.: 2:00/4:30/7:00
Smurfs (PG) Fri.-Sat.: 2:00/4:15/6:30/8:45;
Sun.-Thurs.: 2:00/4:30/7:00
Captain America: The First Avenger
(PG-13) Fri.-Sat.: 2:00/4:30/7:00/9:30; Sun.-
Thurs.: 2:00/4:30/7:00
Friends with Benefits (R) Fri.-
Sat.: 2:00/4:14/6:30/8:45; Sun.-Thurs.:
2:00/4:30/7:00
Van-Del Drive-in
19986 Lincoln Hwy. Middle Point
Friday - Tuesday
Screen 1
Smurfs (PG)
Zookeeper (PG)
Screen 2
Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13)
Bridesmaids (R)
Screen 3
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part
2 (PG-13)
Captain America: The First Avenger (PG-13)
Gates open 8 p.m. Showtime at dark.
American Mall Stadium 12
2830 W. Elm St., Lima
Saturday and Sunday
Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13) 12:10/1:10/3:4
0/4:10/6:55/7:20/9:45/10:10
Crazy, Stupid, Love (PG-13) 12:50/3:35/
7:05/9:50
The Smurfs 3D (PG) 4:05 9:30
The Smurfs (PG) 1:05/7:00
Captain America: The First Avenger (PG-
13) 1:00/2:20/4:00/6:35/7:40/9:30/10:30
Captain America: The First Avenger (PG-
13) 12:30/3:30/7:10/10:00
Friends With Benefits (R) 1:15/4:30/7:15/
10:15
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part
2 (PG-13)12:20/3:20/6:45/9:35
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part
2: 3D (PG-13) 1:20/4:20/7:30/10:20
Winnie the Pooh (G) 12:35/4:55
Horrible Bosses (R) 12:25/2:45/5:10/7:35/
10:05
Transformers: Dark of the Moon 3D (PG-
13) 12:05/3:25/6:40/9:55
Eastgate Dollar Movies
2100 Harding Hwy. Lima
Saturday-Monday
Larry Crowne (PG-13) 1:15/3:15/7:20/
9:20
Mr. Popper’s Penguins (PG) 1:10/3:05/5:00/
7:15/9:15
The Hangover Part II (R) 1:00/3:10/5:10/
7:20/9:30
Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG) 1:00/3:00/5:00/7:00/9:00
Shannon Theatre
119 S. Main St. Bluffton
The Smurfs (PG) 2D show times are 7 p.m.
every evening with 1:30 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday matinees. 3D show times are 9:30
p.m. every evening with 4 p.m. Saturday and
Sunday matinees.
CAMPUS NOTE
UF names dean’s list students
The dean’s list for spring
semester at The University of
Findlay has been announced
by Daniel J. May, Ph.D., vice
president of academic affairs.
The following students have
attained a grade point average
of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale.
Elida
Kirk Boroff, Aaron Jacobs,
Dana Martin, Lindsey Reiff
and Erin Calvelage.
Cloverdale
Justin Kahle
Delphos
Jenna Faurot, Brittney
Garza, Laura German, Brittany
Miller, Lindsy Riendel, Derek
Shivley, Sarah Trentman and
Troy Warnecke.
Fort Jennings
Aaron Chandler, Joshua
Hemker and Keith Pohlman.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 12,240.11 -62.44
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,766.25 +1.46
S&P 500 INDEX 1,300.67 -4.22
AUTOZONE INC. 285.84 -3.31
BUNGE LTD 69.44 -1.55
EATON CORP. 48.02 -1.28
BP PLC ADR 45.05 +0.13
DOMINION RES INC 48.99 -0.06
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.16 -0.53
CVS CAREMARK CRP 36.42 +0.36
CITIGROUP INC 38.18 -0.08
FIRST DEFIANCE 15.02 +0.56
FST FIN BNCP 15.37 -0.39
FORD MOTOR CO 12.32 -0.05
GENERAL DYNAMICS 67.75 -0.88
GENERAL MOTORS 28.10 -0.04
GOODYEAR TIRE 15.93 -1.24
HEALTHCARE REIT 52.58 -0.33
HOME DEPOT INC. 35.15 -0.47
HONDA MOTOR CO 39.50 -0.25
HUNTGTN BKSHR 6.03 +0.04
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 65.08 -0.15
JPMORGAN CHASE 40.68 +0.01
KOHLS CORP. 55.17 +0.17
LOWES COMPANIES 21.79 -0.67
MCDONALDS CORP. 86.78 -0.31
MICROSOFT CP 27.72 +0.39
PEPSICO INC. 63.89 +0.03
PROCTER & GAMBLE 61.92 -0.28
RITE AID CORP. 1.28 +0.07
SPRINT NEXTEL 4.34 -0.82
TIME WARNER INC. 35.76 -0.49
US BANCORP 26.10 -0.12
UTD BANKSHARES 9.07 -0.26
VERIZON COMMS 35.66 -0.55
WAL-MART STORES 52.99 -0.26
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business July 28, 2011
Place a Classified Ad
TODAY!
Call 419-695-0015 ext. 122
to place your ad!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 ext. 122
6 – The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By HOWARD FENDRICH
The Associated Press
Albert Haynesworth, Chad
Ochocinco, Reggie Bush and
Kevin Kolb were on the move,
and Vince Young is now free
to search for a new
home. Johnathan
Joseph and Darren
Sproles each decided
on their new teams.
Day 3 of the com-
pressed, post-lockout
offseason was wild,
and there promised to
be more fun to come.
NFL clubs made a move a
minute Thursday, with every-
thing from contract agree-
ments to trades to cuts, that
teams were finally allowed to
start announcing at 4:01 p.m.
EDT. Among the released
players were Young by the
Titans, Nate Clements by the
49ers, and Jake Delhomme by
the Browns.
In the first dramatic exam-
ple of how the new labor
deal’s rookie salary system
will affect elite players, No.
2 overall draft pick Von
Miller got $21 million guar-
anteed over four years from
the Denver Broncos. The
No. 2 pick in 2010, Detroit
Lions defensive lineman
Ndamukong Suh, signed a
five-year deal worth $40 mil-
lion guaranteed and as much
as $68 million overall.
Broncos football chief
John Elway tweeted, “We
have agreed to terms with
our 1st round pick, LB Von
Miller. Can’t wait to get him
on the field.”
The man widely regarded
as the best available play-
er in free agency, Nnamdi
Asomugha, hasn’t picked a
team yet. But Joseph, anoth-
er top cornerback, agreed
to terms with the Houston
Texans, according to a person
with knowledge of the deal,
who spoke to The Associated
Press on condition of ano-
nymity because the
signing hadn’t been
announced.
Bill Belichick has
had success rein-
ing in outspoken,
do-it-my-way play-
ers such as receiver
Randy Moss. Now
New England’s coach gets
two more guys who fit that
description in defensive tack-
le Haynesworth and receiver
Ochocinco.
All the Patriots gave up
for Haynesworth was a 2013
fifth-round pick. By shipping
the defensive tackle to New
England, the Washington
Redskins rid themselves of
a two-year distraction and
fiasco of a free-agent signing
— Haynesworth was guaran-
teed a then-record $41 mil-
lion in the seven-year, $100
million contract he got in the
early hours of free agency in
2009. On the same day, he
infamously declared: “You’re
not going to remember Albert
Haynesworth as a bust.”
Hmmmmmm.
Haynesworth played in
only 20 games for Washington,
making 6 1/2 sacks, and was
in constant legal trouble away
from the field. Last season, he
feuded with Redskins coach
Mike Shanahan and was
suspended for the final four
games for conduct detrimen-
tal to the club.
A person with knowledge
of the Ochocinco deal told the
AP he agreed to a three-year
contract with the Patriots.
It was not known what the
Bengals received in return.
In the Kolb deal,
Philadelphia received cor-
nerback Dominique Rodgers-
Cromartie and a 2012 sec-
ond-round draft pick from
Arizona, which was in need
of a starting quarterback.
Kolb had lost the Eagles’ No.
1 QB job to Michael Vick
and wanted a chance to lead
a team.
Kolb, who turns 27 next
month, reportedly will get a
$63 million, five-year contract
with the Cardinals. Rodgers-
Cromartie, who went to the
Pro Bowl in 2009, will play
opposite four-time Pro Bowl
cornerback Asante Samuel
in Philadelphia, shoring up
a pass defense that struggled
last season.
The Dolphins completed
their trade for Bush by nego-
tiating a two-year contract for
nearly $10 million with the
running back. New Orleans
gets reserve safety Jonathon
Amaya in the swap, which
also involves an exchange of
draft picks.
In other transactions
Thursday:
— Five-time Pro Bowl kicker
David Akers agreed to a deal with
San Francisco, leaving Philadelphia
after 12 seasons. Akers told The
Associated Press on Thursday that
his contract with the 49ers is for
three years.
— Kansas City released long-
time star guard Brian Waters, who
made 149 starts in 11 seasons for
the Chiefs and went to five Pro
Bowls. Waters said he plans to con-
tinue playing.
— Chicago traded tight end Greg
Olsen to Carolina for an undisclosed
2012 draft choice. A first-round draft
pick in 2007, Olsen has 194 catches
for 1,981 yards and 20 touchdowns
in his career, but Bears offensive
coordinator Mike Martz prefers
blocking tight ends. Olsen finished
2010 with his lowest totals in recep-
tions (41) and yards (404) since he
was a rookie.
The Bears also agreed to a
five-year contract with punter Adam
Podlesh, who comes to Chicago from
Jacksonville to replace Brad Maynard,
whose contract expired after he spent
10 years at Soldier Field.
— Linebacker Clint Session left
the Colts but stayed in the AFC
South when he agreed to a five-year
deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars
worth slightly more than $29 mil-
lion, with $11.5 million in guaranteed
money.
— Dallas made official nine cuts,
many of them leaked previously.
Gone are tackle Marc Colombo,
guard Leonard Davis, receiver
Roy Williams, running back Marion
Barber, kicker Kris Brown, offensive
linemen Robert Brewster and Travis
Bright, linebacker Kelvin Smith and
receiver Troy Bergeron.
— Buffalo agreed to a four-year
contract worth about $15 million with
Brad Smith, the versatile receiver-
running back-kick returner who was
a force in the wildcat formation with
the Jets.
— Minnesota released starting
safety Madieu Williams, who spent
three seasons there but was largely
a disappointment after signing a
big-money deal to come over from
Cincinnati in 2008. He was due to
make $5.4 million this season.
The Vikings also released defen-
sive tackle Jimmy Kennedy and
receiver Freddie Brown.
— The Redskins added free-
agent defensive end Stephen
Bowen, whose agent announced the
deal on Twitter. Bowen played five
seasons with the Cowboys; he had 1
1/2 sacks in nine starts last year.
— Philadelphia put defensive
end Brandon Graham (left knee)
and offensive tackle Winston Justice
(left knee) on the physically-unable-
to-perform list. Also, wide receiver
Jeremy Maclin and cornerback
Samuel were excused from training
camp for personal reasons.
— Linebacker Justin Durant
is leaving Jacksonville for Detroit;
receiver Rashied Davis also agreed
to join the Lions after six years in
Chicago.
— New Orleans left tackle
Jermon Bushrod agreed to a two-
year deal to remain with the Saints.
He’s been a key part of Drew Brees’
pass protection.
— Daryn Colledge, the starting
left guard for the Super Bowl cham-
pion Packers, agreed to a five-year
deal with Arizona. Colledge started
76 games over five seasons for
Green Bay.
Ochocinco, Haynesworth
to Pats; Bush, Kolb traded
National League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 65 39 .625 —
Atlanta 61 45 .575 5
New York 54 51 .514 11 1/2
Florida 52 53 .495 13 1/2
Washington 49 55 .471 16
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 57 49 .538 —
Pittsburgh 54 49 .524 1 1/2
St. Louis 55 50 .524 1 1/2
Cincinnati 50 55 .476 6 1/2
Chicago 42 63 .400 14 1/2
Houston 35 70 .333 21 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 61 44 .581 —
Arizona 57 48 .543 4
Colorado 49 56 .467 12
Los Angeles 47 57 .452 13 1/2
San Diego 46 60 .434 15 1/2
Thursday’s games
Florida 5, Washington 2
N.Y. Mets 10, Cincinnati 9
Milwaukee 4, Chicago Cubs 2
San Diego 4, Arizona 3
San Francisco 4, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 5, Atlanta 2
Houston 5, St. Louis 3
Today’s games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 9-3) at Washington (Wang
0-0), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Morton 8-5) at Philadelphia
(Halladay 12-4), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 8-1) at Cincinnati
(Willis 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Florida (Hensley 1-2) at Atlanta (Beachy 3-2),
7:35 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-5) at Milwaukee (Wolf 6-8),
8:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-7) at St. Louis
(E.Jackson 0-0), 8:15 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 5-10) at San Diego
(Stauffer 6-7), 10:05 p.m.
Arizona (Collmenter 6-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly
6-10), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 2-2) at St. Louis
(Lohse 8-7), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Dickey 5-8) at Washington (Marquis
8-5), 7:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 7-4) at Philadelphia
(Cl.Lee 9-7), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-3) at Atlanta (T.Hudson
9-7), 7:10 p.m.
Houston (Happ 4-12) at Milwaukee (Gallardo
11-7), 7:10 p.m.
San Francisco (Bumgarner 6-9) at Cincinnati
(Leake 8-6), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 6-9) at San Diego (Harang
9-2), 8:35 p.m.
Arizona (Owings 4-0) at L.A. Dodgers
(Billingsley 9-8), 10:10 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
San Francisco (Zito 3-3) at Cincinnati (Cueto
6-4), 1:10 p.m.
Florida (Nolasco 7-7) at Atlanta (Hanson
11-5), 1:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 10-8) at Washington
(Zimmermann 6-9), 1:35 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 8-5) at Philadelphia
(Worley 7-1), 1:35 p.m.
Houston (Myers 3-11) at Milwaukee (Narveson
7-6), 2:10 p.m.
Colorado (Nicasio 4-3) at San Diego (Moseley
3-10), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 7-8) at L.A. Dodgers
(R.De La Rosa 4-4), 4:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 7-8) at St. Louis
(Westbrook 9-4), 8:05 p.m.
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 64 39 .621 —
New York 61 41 .598 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 54 50 .519 10 1/2
Toronto 53 52 .505 12
Baltimore 41 60 .406 22
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 55 50 .524 —
Cleveland 52 50 .510 1 1/2
Chicago 51 52 .495 3
Minnesota 49 56 .467 6
Kansas City 44 61 .419 11
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 60 46 .566 —
Los Angeles 58 48 .547 2
Oakland 47 58 .448 12 1/2
Seattle 44 60 .423 15
Thursday’s games
L.A. Angels 12, Detroit 7
Kansas City 4, Boston 3
Tampa Bay 10, Oakland 8
Toronto 8, Baltimore 5
Texas 4, Minnesota 1
Today’s games
Baltimore (Guthrie 4-14) at N.Y. Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 8-8), 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 3-11) at Cleveland
(C.Carrasco 8-8), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Chatwood 6-6) at Detroit (Porcello
10-6), 7:05 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 10-4) at Toronto (Cecil 3-4),
7:07 p.m.
Boston (Wakefield 6-3) at Chicago White Sox
(Floyd 8-9), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 6-8) at Oakland
(G.Gonzalez 9-7), 10:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Niemann 4-4) at Seattle (Bedard
4-6), 10:10 p.m.
Saturday’s games
Baltimore (Undecided) at N.Y. Yankees (Colon
7-6), 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Texas (D.Holland 9-4) at Toronto (Mills 0-0),
1:07 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 10-6) at Detroit (Below
0-1), 4:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 3-0) at Seattle (Pineda
8-7), 4:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 6-7) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova
8-4), 7:05 p.m., 2nd game
Kansas City (F.Paulino 1-4) at Cleveland
(Masterson 8-7), 7:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 10-4) at Chicago White Sox
(Humber 8-6), 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Blackburn 7-7) at Oakland
(Moscoso 3-5), 9:05 p.m.
Sunday’s games
Baltimore (Arrieta 10-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(F.Garcia 9-7), 1:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Davies 1-9) at Cleveland
(Carmona 5-10), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 14-4) at Detroit (Verlander
14-5), 1:05 p.m.
Texas (C.Wilson 10-4) at Toronto (Morrow
7-5), 1:07 p.m.
Boston (A.Miller 4-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Buehrle 8-5), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Pavano 6-7) at Oakland (McCarthy
3-5), 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 9-7) at Seattle (Vargas
6-9), 4:10 p.m.
MLB
Women’s National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
Eastern Conference
W L Pct GB
Indiana 12 6 .667 —
Connecticut 10 6 .625 1
New York 10 7 .588 1 1/2
Chicago 9 10 .474 3 1/2
Atlanta 8 9 .471 3 1/2
Washington 3 13 .188 8
Western Conference
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 11 4 .733 —
San Antonio 11 5 .688 1/2
Phoenix 10 7 .588 2
Seattle 9 7 .563 2 1/2
Los Angeles 6 10 .375 5 1/2
Tulsa 1 16 .059 11
Thursday’s games
San Antonio 102, Phoenix 91
Atlanta 89, Los Angeles 80
New York 75, Washington 71
Indiana 69, Connecticut 58
Chicago 64, Tulsa 55
Today’s games
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Seattle at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Saturday’s games
Phoenix at New York, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Seattle at Tulsa, 8 p.m.
WNBA
JACKSONVILLE, Fla.
(AP) — Tiger Woods returns
to golf under a new set of
circumstances.
He no longer
has the caddie he
employed for the
last 12 years, hav-
ing fired Steve
Williams a month
ago. He no longer
is among the top
20 in the world,
his lowest rank-
ing since Allen
Iverson was an
NBA rookie. And
he might not even
be eligible to play on the
PGA Tour after a couple of
weeks.
After missing two majors
during an 11-week break
to make sure his left leg
was fully healed, Woods
announced Thursday eve-
ning on Twitter and on his
web site that he would return
next week at the Bridgestone
Invitational.
“Feeling fit and ready to
tee it up at Firestone next
week. Excited to get back out
there!” he tweeted.
By missing three months
— but only four tournaments
he would typically play —
Woods has gone from No.
81 to No. 133 in the FedEx
Cup standings. Only the top
125 players qualify for the
opening round of the playoffs
at The Barclays, likely leav-
ing him only the Bridgestone
Invitational and the PGA
Championship next week to
make up ground. Otherwise,
he would have at least five
weeks off without being able
to play on the PGA Tour.
This was the third-longest
layoff of his career, and there
is as much uncertainty as ever
about his future. He has gone
more than 20 months without
winning, and was last seen in
golf shoes on May 12 at The
Players Championship when
he hobbled off the course
after a 6-over 42 on the front
nine and withdrew.
He already has had four
surgeries on his left knee, and
the left Achilles’
gave him just as
much trouble.
He hurt both of
them during the
third round of the
Masters, although
the injuries were
described as
“minor” when he
first mentioned the
pain in May.
Along with
his health, there
has been change off the golf
course. Woods left IMG
when the contract of long-
time agent Mark Steinberg
was not renewed. The only
endorsement deal for Woods
since he returned from a dev-
astating sex scandal was with
a Japanese company to pro-
mote a heat rub.
Then came the firing of
Williams, who caddied for
Adam Scott at the U.S. Open,
then angered his boss by
working for the Australian
again at the AT&T National
without seeking permission.
The Golf Channel report-
ed Thursday night that Bryon
Bell, a childhood friend and
president of Tiger Woods
Design, would caddie for
him at the Bridgestone
Invitational. Bell has cad-
died for Woods three times
— a win at the 1999 Buick
Invitational, a tie for second
at the Buick Invitational when
Woods gave him a chance to
help defend, and a tie for
second in 2003 at the Disney
Classic when Woods gave
Williams the week off for a
car race in New Zealand.
Steinberg declined to con-
firm Bell would be on the
bag, saying in a text message
that “no long term been dis-
cussed yet as he just decided
tonight he was fit and ready
to go next week.”
It’s back to work for Tiger
Tiger Woods
By TERESA
M. WALKER
The Associated Press
FRANKLIN, Tenn. —
Darrell Waltrip has one regret
from his Hall of Fame rac-
ing career. He never made a
bumper sticker to sum up his
domination at Bristol Motor
Speedway.
And he knows what he
would’ve put out on it.
“Follow me in Tennessee,”
Waltrip said with a laugh. “I’m
from Nashville, and people
knew me at the Fairgrounds.
But when you went to Bristol,
that was a place I wanted
everybody to follow me, and
based on all these numbers I
didn’t realize I had compiled, I
did a pretty good job of it.”
That might be an under-
statement.
Of his 84 career victories,
Waltrip won seven straight and
12 overall at Bristol, the most
by any driver at the bullring of
a track in upper East Tennessee.
The late Dale Earnhardt, Rusty
Wallace and Hall of Famer Cale
Yarborough are tied with nine
apiece.
Bristol is the half-mile
track where drivers rub and
race, bumping someone out
of the way to run to victory.
Tempers boil over so much
that Waltrip quips that drivers
have to take numbers to report
to the NASCAR hauler for
discipline.
The racing might look slow
compared to a superspeedway
such as Talladega, but Waltrip
swears Bristol is faster than it
looks.
“I owned that joint,” said
Waltrip, who was voted into
the Hall of Fame in June.
He sat down recently at his
car dealership to recall some
of his favorite memories to
help commemorate the 50th
anniversary at Bristol, where
the first race run was July
30, 1961. Waltrip ran his first
race there in 1973 in his own
car and finished 30th. His last
win came in 1992, also in his
own car.
He credits his success
at the track to his ability to
think his way through the 43
cars crammed onto it, finding
enough room between packs
to give him space to avoid
being collected in crashes. A
photographic memory also
helped on a track where the
banks on the curves are so
high that drivers can’t see that
far ahead.
Waltrip’s favorite part of
Bristol? Racing right next to
the wall after cars had worn
down a fast groove up near the
edge of the track.
“That was thrilling. It was
like a high-speed rollercoaster
ride,” he said. “The track had
some bumps in it. The car
would bounce around, and
you’d work the wheel, back in
the gas and off in the corner.
As the guys say today ... the
track had character.”
He started 52 races at
Bristol and finished in the top
five 26 times with 32 total
top-10s. There were only five
races he didn’t finish.
Waltrip attributes his suc-
cess to the lessons he learned
at other short tracks and
especially the Fairgrounds in
Nashville, another short track
with high banks that hosted
NASCAR races until 1984.
“That was a big advantage I
had then,” Waltrip said.
He already had won twice
at Bristol when the pressure
was ratcheted up in 1981 after
Hall of Famer Junior Johnson
signed him as his driver over
Earnhardt. Comparing the
pressure of being hired by
Johnson to a football player
getting the chance to play for
Bear Bryant or Joe Paterno,
Waltrip said he didn’t want to
disappoint his new boss.
He didn’t. They won their
first race together at Bristol,
the first of those seven straight,
and Waltrip learned a few new
tricks about a track he thought
he already knew well.
“There’s guys right now
that’ll tell you I’d just like to
finish seven in a row because
that’s one of the most dif-
ficult tracks there is to run,”
Waltrip said. “That’s 3,500
laps of, I won’t say perfection
because there were probably
some things that happened in
there that weren’t perfect, but
at the end of the day that’s
3,500 laps of driving at a track
that is unquestionably the most
difficult on the circuit.”
For all his success, the man
nicknamed Jaws because of
how much he talked wasn’t
very popular at times.
“I told Kurt Busch and Kyle
both we have something in
common. I’ve been booed by
the entire grandstand before,
too. The difference between
me and you, there was only
30,000 here when they booed
me, and there’s 100,000 here
when they boo you so big dif-
ference,” Waltrip said.
His strongest memory from
Bristol is the race he lost in
1984 to snap his string of
seven straight wins. The man
who can’t remember all of his
84 wins knows he should have
won that race because he had
the best car on the track.
“I may have even had a
lap on the field. I came down
in the pits for a pit stop, and
when I popped the clutch, the
gear broke. And we had to go
behind the wall and change the
gear. That was the one that got
away,” Waltrip said.
NL By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA — Tim Lincecum threw
six scoreless innings, Pablo Sandoval hit a solo
homer and San Francisco beat Philadelphia
4-1 on Thursday night in its first game with
Carlos Beltran.
The All-Star outfielder was 0 for 4 with
two strikeouts in his debut with the defending
World Series champions, who won two of three
against the major league-leading Phillies in a
rematch of the NLCS.
Lincecum (9-8) showed no negative
effects from the stomach illness that forced him
to push his start back two days. The two-time
NL Cy Young Award winner allowed three hits,
struck out six and worked around four walks.
The Phillies hadn’t lost consecutive games
since June 4. They went a club-record 45
straight games without dropping two straight.
Pirates 5, Braves 2
ATLANTA — Andrew McCutchen had
three hits, including a go-ahead double in the
fifth inning and a two-run homer in the ninth,
and Pittsburgh managed a split of the four-
game series.
McCutchen had been 1 for 11 in the
series, which included wins by the Braves in
19 and 10 innings.
McCutchen had a first-inning single before
snapping a 1-all tie with his fifth-inning double
off Derek Lowe (6-9).
Kevin Correia (12-8) gave up two runs
— one earned — nine hits and a walk in 6
1-3 innings.
Joel Hanrahan got the final four outs for
his 30th save in 31 chances.
Lowe gave up three runs, eight hits and
three walks in five innings in his first career
loss to the Pirates. The right-hander was 10-0
with a 2.64 ERA in 10 starts against Pittsburgh
before Thursday night, including 3-0 in 2010.
Astros 5, Cardinals 3
ST. LOUIS — Wandy Rodriguez pitched
seven innings and retired the last 13 batters
he faced and Jason Bourgeois hit a tiebreaking
double in the fifth inning to lead Houston.
Rodriguez (7-7) allowed one earned run
and five hits. He walked Matt Holliday with
one out in the fourth before settling into a
groove. He got David Freese to hit into a
double play to end the fourth, then pitched
four perfect innings before Sergio Escalona
and Mark Melancon finished up. Melancon got
his 10th save.
Jaime Garcia (10-5), who entered the
game with an NL-best home record of 6-1,
gave up four earned runs in six innings.
Carlos Lee hit his 10th homer of the
season for the Astros.
Mets 10, Reds 9
CINCINNATI — Lucas Duda and Jason
Bay each drove in three runs with bases-
loaded doubles and New York got its first ever
four-game sweep in Cincinnati.
Wright went 3 for 5 to extend his hitting
streak to seven games (15 for 33, .455) since
coming off the disabled list on July 22. He was
9 for 19 with five RBIs in the series.
Chris Capuano (9-10) snapped a three-
start losing streak for the Mets. He allowed
eight hits and six runs with three walks and four
strikeouts in 5 1-3 innings. Jason Isringhausen
earned his fourth save despite allowing Joey
Votto’s 16th homer of the season leading off
the ninth.
Homer Bailey (5-5) set a single-game
career high by allowing nine earned runs. The
Mets collected 12 hits with two walks and two
strikeouts against the right-hander.
Brewers 4, Cubs 2
MILWAUKEE — Ryan Braun had three
hits, including a home run, to lead Milwaukee
to its first sweep of Chicago at home since
May 2005.
The Cubs rode a three-game win streak
into Milwaukee but struggled mightily at the
plate during the series, scoring just four runs
in three games.
Shaun Marcum (10-3) pitched six innings
to win his third straight for the Brewers, giving
up two runs on seven hits. LaTroy Hawkins
and Franciso Rodriguez each pitched a score-
less inning and John Axford closed out the
game to record his 30th save in 32 chances.
Randy Wells (2-4) took the loss for the
Cubs, giving up all four runs on eight hits.
Marlins 5, Nationals 2
WASHINGTON — Mike Stanton homered
for the second straight game and five Marlins
relievers held Washington to one run over
5 1-3 innings as Florida completed a three-
game sweep.
The Marlins won their fifth straight and
improved to 14-5 since July 5.
Stanton hit his 24th homer of the season
and fourth in his last six games. He has eight
home runs and 14 RBIs in 12 career games at
Nationals Park dating to 2010.
Brian Sanches (4-1), the second Marlins
reliever, pitched 1 1-3 scoreless innings.
Padres 4, Diamondbacks 3
SAN DIEGO — Jesus Guzman had two
RBIs and rookie Luis Martinez drove in the
go-ahead run as San Diego avoided a three-
game sweep and won for the second time in
six games.
Martinez and Orlando Hudson each had
an RBI single in the sixth inning as the Padres
erased a 3-2 deficit. Daniel Hudson contributed
to Arizona’s troubles with two walks and a hit
batter in the inning.Luke Gregerson (3-3), the
first of four Padres relievers, retired the only
two batters he faced in the sixth to escape a
bases-loaded, one-out jam.
AL
DETROIT — Mark Trumbo homered and
drove in a career-high five runs to lead the Los
Angeles Angels over the Detroit Tigers 12-7
on Thursday.
Trumbo also tripled, doubled and scored
three times in the rookie’s fourth three-hit
game. Needing just a single for the cycle, he
grounded out leading off the ninth inning.
Bobby Cassevah (1-0) worked 2 1-3
scoreless innings of relief for the win.
Trumbo hit a two-run homer in the Angels’
three-run second. He tripled in the fourth and
doubled in the seventh.
Tigers manager Jim Leyland was ejected
in the third for arguing that a pitch had hit
Austin Jackson, and things got hot in the
fourth when Brad Penny argued with catcher
Victor Martinez.
Rangers 4, Twins 1
ARLINGTON, Texas — Matt Harrison
worked into the eighth inning to cap his
unbeaten July for AL West-leading Texas and
outpitched Scott Baker.
Harrison (9-7) allowed one run over 7 1-3
innings with two strikeouts and a walk. The
left-hander won all three of his decisions in his
five starts this month.
After Yoshinori Tateyama and Arthur
Rhodes retired the only batters they faced,
Neftali Feliz rebounded from his two earlier
flops in the series with a perfect ninth for his
21st save in 26 chances.
Baker (8-6) struck out four with no walks
while allowing two runs over seven innings
in his second start since returning from the
disabled list because of a right flexor strain.
The right-hander was 6-1 with a 1.50 ERA his
previous seven starts, including five scoreless
innings in his return Saturday against Detroit.
Royals 4, Red Sox 3
BOSTON — Billy Butler hit a three-run
homer and Luke Hochevar pitched seven
strong innings as Kansas City handed Josh
Beckett his first loss in over a month.
Hochevar (7-8) allowed two runs on six
hits and a walk while matching his season
high for strikeouts with six. He retired 14 of
the last 16 batters he faced and gave up just
one extra-base hit, a third inning double by
Yamaico Navarro.
Joakim Soria got his 19th save.
Beckett (9-4) gave up four runs on five hits
and three walks while striking out eight. The
Red Sox had won six of seven to move three
games ahead of New York in the AL East.
Rays 10, Athletics 8
OAKLAND, Calif. — Desmond Jennings
hit his first career home run and later added a
two-run double in a seven-run seventh inning
as Tampa Bay rallied from five runs down.
B.J. Upton and Evan Longoria also hom-
ered, helping make a winner out of right-hander
Wade Davis (8-7), who struggled early before
settling down to retire 17 straight batters.
Upton, the subject of ongoing trade rumors,
hit his team-leading 16th home run after sitting
out one game.
Conor Jackson had a two-run home run
in the first inning when the A’s hit for the cycle
with four consecutive batters.
Blue Jays 8, Orioles 5
TORONTO — Edwin Encarnacion and
Eric Thames hit back-to-back home runs,
Carlos Villanueva won for the first time in five
starts and Toronto beat Baltimore.
Encarnacion went 3 for 4 with two RBIs
and scored twice for the Blue Jays, who have
won 27 of 31 home games against the Orioles
dating to 2008.
Hall of Famer Waltrip loved dominating at Bristol
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A.C.T.S.
NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP
Rev. Linda Wannemacher-Pastor
Jaye Wannemacher-Worship Leader
Contact: 419-695-3566
Sunday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study with
worship @ ACTS Chapel-8277 German
Rd., Delphos
Thursday - 7:00 p.m. “For Such A
Time As This” All & Non Denominational
Tri-County Community Intercessory
Prayer Meeting @ Presbyterian Church
(Basement), 310 W. 2nd St. Delphos -
Everyone Welcome.
DELPHOS BAPTIST CHURCH
Pastor Terry McKissack
302 N Main, Delphos
Contact: 419-692-0061 or 419-302-6423
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Sunday School
(All Ages) , 11:00 a.m. Sunday Service,
6:00 p.m Sunday Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible Study,
Youth Study
Nursery available for all services.
FIRST UNITED PRESBYTERIAN
310 W. Second St.
419-692-5737
Pastor Harry Tolhurst
Sermon: “A Little Becomes Much”
Scripture: Romans 9:1-5
Matthew 14:13-21
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
11:00 Worship Service - Everyone
Welcome
Communion first Sunday of every
month.
Communion at Van Crest Health
Care Center - First Sunday of each
month at 2:30 p.m., Nursing Home and
assisted living.
ST. PETER LUTHERAN CHURCH
422 North Pierce St., Delphos
Phone 419-695-2616
Rev. Angela Khabeb
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service
Monday-Friday - 8:00-9:00 a.m. Kids
Free Breakfast
Wednesday-7:00 p.m. Mid-Week
Worship Service; 7:45 p.m. InReach/
OutReach Meeting
Saturday-8:00 a.m. Prayer Breakfast
FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD
“Where Jesus is Healing
Hurting Hearts!”
808 Metbliss Ave., Delphos
One block south of Stadium Park.
419-692-6741
Senior Pastor - Dan Eaton
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. - Sunday wor-
ship Celebration @10:30am with Kids
Chruch & Nursery provided; 6:00 p.m.
Youth Ministry at The ROC
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Prayer
Other ministries take place at vari-
ous times. Check out www.delphos-
firstassemblyofgod.com.
DELPHOS CHRISTIAN UNION
Pastor: Rev. Gary Fish
470 S. Franklin St., (419) 692-9940
9:30 Sunday School
10:30 Sunday morning service.
Youth ministry every Wednesday
from 6-8 p.m.
Children’s ministry every third
Saturday from 11 to 1:30.
ST. PAUL’S UNITED METHODIST
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Pastor - Rev. David Howell
Sunday - 9:00 a.m. Worship Service
Friday - 5:00 pm. Marbletown
Festival
Saturday - 9:00 a.m.-6 pm.
Marbletown Festival
DELPHOS WESLEYAN CHURCH
11720 Delphos Southworth Rd.
Delphos - Phone 419-695-1723
Pastor Wayne Prater
Sunday - 10:30 a.m. Worship; 9:15
a.m. Sunday School for all ages.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Service and
prayer meeting.
TRINITY UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
211 E. Third St., Delphos
Rev. David Howell, Pastor
Week of July 31, 2011
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
Spencerville
Rev. Ron Shifley, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Church School;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
AGAPE FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES
9250 Armstrong Road, Spencerville
Pastors Phil & Deb Lee
Sunday - 10:00 a.m. Worship ser-
vice.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible
Study
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Independent Fundamental)
Rt. 81 and Defiance Trial
Rt. 2, Box 11550
Spencerville 45887
Rev. Robert King, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday school;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 7:00 p.m.
Evening worship and Teens Alive
(grades 7-12).
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Bible ser-
vice.
Tuesday & Thursday– 7- 9 p.m.
Have you ever wanted to preach the
“Word of God?” This is your time to
do it. Come share your love of Christ
with us.
IMMANUEL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
699 Sunnydale, Elida, Ohio 454807
Pastor Gary Rode
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. traditional; 10:45
a.m. contemporary
LIGHT OF LIFE CHAPEL
4680 North Kemp Rd., Elida
Pastor Kimberly R. Pope-Seiberling
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Service; 6:30 p.m. Service.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Midweek
Service.
NEW HOPE CHRISTIAN CENTER
2240 Baty Road, Elida Ph. 339-5673
Rev. James F. Menke, Pastor
Sunday – 10 a.m. Worship.
Wednesday – 7 p.m. Evening ser-
vice.
CORNERSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH
2701 Dutch Hollow Rd. Elida
Phone: 339-3339
Rev. Frank Hartman
Sunday - 10 a.m. Sunday School (all
ages); 11 a.m. Morning Service; 6 p.m.
Evening Service.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer
Meeting.
Office Hours: Monday-Friday,
8-noon, 1-4- p.m.
ZION UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Corner of Zion Church & Conant Rd.,
Elida
Pastors: Mark and D.J. Fuerstenau
Sunday - Service - 9:00 a.m.
PIKE MENNONITE CHURCH
3995 McBride Rd., Elida
Phone 419-339-3961
LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD
Elida - Ph. 222-8054
Rev. Larry Ayers, Pastor
Service schedule: Sunday– 10 a.m.
School; 11 a.m. Morning Worship; 6
p.m. Sunday evening.
FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH
4750 East Road, Elida
Pastor - Brian McManus
Sunday – 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship, nursery avail-
able.
Wednesday – 6:30 p.m. Youth
Prayer, Bible Study; 7:00 p.m. Adult
Prayer and Bible Study; 8:00 p.m. -
Choir.
GOMER UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
7350 Gomer Road, Gomer, Ohio
419-642-2681
gomererucc@bright.net
Rev. Brian Knoderer
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship
BREAKTHROUGH
101 N. Adams St., Middle Point
Pastor Scott & Karen Fleming
Sunday – Church Service - 10 a.m,
6 p.m.
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
CALVARY EVANGELICAL CHURCH
10686 Van Wert-Decatur Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio
419-238-9426
Rev. Clark Williman. Pastor
Sunday, July 31, 2011
Sunday-8:45 a.m. Friends and
Family; 9:00 a.m. Sunday School
LIVE; 9:55 a.m. 5 til 10 meet you at
the Altar; 10:00 a.m. Worship LIVE/No
KIDMO today; 1:30 Van Crest Nursing
Home Service
Wednesday -7:00 Calvary Youth

SALEM UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
15240 Main St. Venedocia
Rev. Wendy S. Pratt, Pastor
Church Phone: 419-667-4142
Sunday - 8:30 a.m. - Adult Bell
Choir; 8:45 a.m. Jr. Choir; 9:30
a.m. - Worship; 10:45 a.m. - Sunday
school; 6:30 p.m. - Capital Funds
Committee.
Monday - 6 p.m. Senior Choir.
ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
601 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Sunday 8:30 a.m., 10:30 a.m.;
Monday 8:30 a.m.; Tuesday 7 p.m.;
Wednesday 8:30 a.m.; Thursday 8:30
a.m. - Communion Service; Friday
8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4 p.m.
VAN WERT VICTORY
CHURCH OF GOD
10698 US 127S., Van Wert
(Next to Tracy’s Auction Service)
Darryl Ramey, Lead Pastor
Chuck Brantley, Executive Pastor
Bryce Cadawallader, Youth
& Assimilations Director
Sunday - 10:00 am Worship Service
& Children’s Ministry
www.vanwertvictorychurch.com
www.acoolchurch.com
419-232-HOPE
TRINITY LUTHERAN
303 S. Adams, Middle Point
Rev. Tom Cover
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship service.
GRACE FAMILY CHURCH
634 N. Washington St., Van Wert
Pastor: Rev. Ron Prewitt
Sunday - 9:15 a.m. Morning wor-
ship with Pulpit Supply.
KINGSLEY UNITED METHODIST
15482 Mendon Rd., Van Wert
Phone: 419-965-2771
Pastor Chuck Glover
Sunday School - 9:30 a.m.; Worship
- 10:25 a.m.
Wednesday - Youth Prayer and
Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.
Adult Prayer meeting - 7:00 p.m.
Choir practice - 8:00 p.m.
TRINITY FRIENDS CHURCH
605 N. Franklin St., Van Wert 45891
Ph: (419) 238-2788
Sr. Pastor Stephen Savage
Outreach Pastor Neil Hammons
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. - Prayer time;
9:00 a.m. Worship, Sunday School,
SWAT, Nursery; Single; 10:30 a.m.
Worship, Nursery, Children’s Church,
Discipleship class; Noon - Lunch
Break; 2:00 p.m. Service for men
at Van Wert Correctional Fac.; 3:00
p.m. Service for women at Van Wert
Correctional Fac., Service at Paulding
jail
Tuesday - 1:00 p.m. - Share, Care,
Prayer Group in Fireside Room;
10-noon - Banquet Table Food
Pantry; 6:30 p.m. Quilting Friends
in Fellowship Hall; 7 p.m. B.R.E.A.L.
Women’s group in Room 108.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Small
groups, Discipleship Series in sanc-
tuary, Christian Life Club, Nursery,
Preschool; 7 p.m. R.O.C.K. Youth; 8
p.m. Worship Team rehearsal.
Thursday - 4-5:30 p.m. Banquet
Table Food Pantry.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
13887 Jennings Rd., Van Wert
Ph. 419-238-0333
Children’s Storyline: 419-238-2201
Email: fbaptvw@bright.net
Pastor Steven A. Robinson
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
for all ages; 10:30 a.m. Family Worship
Hour; 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Hour.
Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Word of Life
Student Ministries; 6:45 p.m. AWANA;
7:00 p.m. Prayer and Bible Study.
MANDALE CHURCH OF CHRIST
IN CHRISTIAN UNION
Rev. Don Rogers, Pastor
Sunday– 9:30 a.m. Sunday School
all ages. 10:30 a.m. Worship
Services; 7:00 p.m Worship.
Wednesday - 7 p.m. Prayer meet-
ing.
PENTECOSTAL WAY CHURCH
Pastors: Bill Watson
Rev. Ronald Defore
1213 Leeson Ave., Van Wert 45891
Phone (419) 238-5813
Head Usher: Ted Kelly
10:00 a.m. - Sunday School 11:10
a.m. - Worship 10:00 a.m. until 11:30
a.m. - Wednesday Morning Bible Class
6:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m. - Wednesday
Evening Prayer Meeting
7:00 p.m. - Wed. Night Bible
Study.
Thursday - Choir Rehearsal
Anchored in Jesus Prayer Line -
(419) 238-4427 or (419) 232-4379.
Emergency - (419) 993-5855
FAITH MISSIONARY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Road U, Rushmore
Pastor Robert Morrison
Sunday – 10 am Church School;
11:00 Church Service; 6:00 p.m.
Evening Service
Wednesday - 7:00 p.m. Evening
Service
ST. ANTHONY OF PADUA
CATHOLIC CHURCH
512 W. Sycamore, Col. Grove
Office 419-659-2263
Fax: 419-659-5202
Fr. Tom Oedy
Masses: Tuesday-Friday - 8:00 a.m.;
First Friday of the month - 7 p.m.;
Saturday - 4:30 p.m.; Sunday - 8:30
a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Confessions - Saturday 3:30 p.m.,
anytime by appointment.
CHURCH OF GOD
18906 Rd. 18R, Rimer
419-642-5264 Fax: 419-642-3061
Rev. Mark Walls
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service.
HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH
Rev. Robert DeSloover, Pastor
7359 St. Rt. 109 New Cleveland
Saturday Mass - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday Mass - 8:30 a.m.
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Ottoville
Rev. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday - 4 p.m.;
Sunday - 10:30 a.m.

ST. BARBARA CHURCH
160 Main St., Cloverdale 45827
419-488-2391
Fr. John Stites
Mass schedule: Saturday 5:30 p.m.,
Sunday 8:00 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH
135 N. Water St., Ft. Jennings
Rev. Joe Przybysz
Phone: 419-286-2132
Mass schedule: Saturday 5 p.m.;
Sunday 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m.
ST. MICHAEL CHURCH
Kalida
Fr. Mark Hoying
Saturday – 4:30 p.m. Mass.
Sunday – 8:00 a.m. & 10:00 a.m.
Masses.
Weekdays: Masses on Mon., Tues.,
Wed. and Friday at 8:00 am; Thurs.
7:30 p.m.
Sunday - 8:15 a.m. Worship Service;
9:15 a.m. Adult Sunday School Class;
10:30 a.m. Worship Service; 11:30 a.m.
Radio Worship on WDOH, Coffee Hour;
1:00 p.m.-4 p.m. Bridal Shower
Monday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
Tuesday- Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
SPECIAL ELECTION; 7:00 p.m. Outreach
Committee
Wednesday- Office Hours: 8:00-
Noon;
Thursday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon;
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Supper’s on Us
Friday - Office Hours: 8:00-Noon; 5:00
p.m Marbletown Festival - Marble Cake
Bake Off
Saturday - 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
Marbletown Festival; 9:00 a.m. Jr. & Sr.
Youth Meet at Garfield Park to set up
games for Marbletown Festival
MARION BAPTIST CHURCH
2998 Defiance Trail, Delphos
Pastor Jay Lobach 419-339-6319
Services: Sunday - 11:00 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.; Wednesday - 7:00 p.m.
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH
331 E. Second St., Delphos
419-695-4050
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Rev. Jacob Gordon, Asst. Pastor
Fred Lisk and Dave Ricker, Deacons
Mary Beth Will, Liturgical
Coordinator; Mrs. Trina Shultz, Pastoral
Associate. Mel Rode, Parish Council
President
Celebration of the Sacraments
Eucharist – Lord’s Day Observance;
Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 7:30, 9:15,
11:30 a.m.; Weekdays as announced on
Sunday bulletin.
Baptism – Celebrated first Sunday
of month at 1:30 p.m. Call rectory to
schedule Pre-Baptismal instructions.
Reconciliation – Tuesday and
Friday 7:30-7:50 a.m.; Saturday 3:30-
4:00 p.m. Anytime by request.
Matrimony – Arrangements must be
made through the rectory six months
in advance.
Anointing of the Sick – Communal
celebration in May and October.
Administered upon request.
ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH
Landeck - Phone: 419-692-0636
Rev. Mel Verhoff, Pastor
Administrative aide: Rita Suever
Masses: 8:30 a.m. Sunday.
Sacrament of Reconciliation:
Saturday.
Newcomers register at parish.
Marriages: Please call the parish
house six months in advance.
Baptism: Please call the parish.
ST. PATRICK’S CHURCH
500 S. Canal, Spencerville
419-647-6202
Saturday - 4:30 p.m. Reconciliation;
5 p.m. Mass, May 1 - Oct. 30. Sunday -
10:30 a.m. Mass.
SPENCERVILLE FULL GOSPEL
107 Broadway St., Spencerville
Pastor Charles Muter
Home Ph. 419-657-6019
Sunday: Morning Services - 10:00
a.m. Evening Services - 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:00 p.m. Worship ser-
vice.
AMANDA BAPTIST CHURCH
Back to Christ’s Ministry
Conant Road & SR. 117
Ph. 647-5100 - Rev. Mike Decker
Sunday – 10:30 a.m. Worship &
Fellowship. Wednesday – 6-9 p.m.
Bible Study.
SPENCERVILLE CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
317 West North St. - 419-296-2561
Pastor Tom Shobe
9:30 a.m. Sunday School; 10:30
a.m. Morning Worship; 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Service
TRINITY UNITED METHODIST
Corner of Fourth & Main, Spencerville
Phone 419-647-5321
Rev. Jan Johnson, Pastor
Sunday - 9:30 a.m. Sunday School;
10:30 a.m. Worship service.
ELIDA/LIMA/GOMER
VAN WERT COUNTY
PUTNAM COUNTY
LANDECK
DELPHOS
SPENCERVILLE
Our local churches invite you to join them for their activities and services.
L
e
h
m
a
n
n

s
We thank the sponsors of this page and ask you to please support them.
www.delphosherald.com
The Herald —7 Friday, July 29, 2011
Call it the “Rocky Mountain Time Zone syn-
drome.”
Journalists in the region know that it’s scan-
dalously rare for news events and trends that
break in the Rocky Mountain West to gain trac-
tion in the elite news outlets of the urban North-
east and the West Coast.
But the massacre at Columbine High School
on April 20, 1999 was different. The national
press came to Littleton, Colo., and stayed --
forced to wrestle with ancient questions of good
and evil, as framed in the unfathomable acts of
students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold.
Days after the bloodshed, Denver Archbish-
op Charles Chaput -- two years into his tenure
-- joined a friend at a movie theater, trying to
understand the buzz surrounding “The Matrix.”
The archbishop left deeply troubled, gripped by
the sci-fi epic’s blurring of the line between life
and death, between reality and a digital, alterna-
tive reality.
A week after another funeral for a young
Catholic who died at Columbine, the archbish-
op was summoned to testify before a U.S. Sen-
ate hearing, and the Beltway press, on a loaded
topic -- “Marketing Violence to Children.”
Chaput was not well known at that time.
This was before he was selected to serve on the
U.S. Commission on International Religious
Freedom, before he started speaking out on
national issues, before a public clash with the
New York Times, before he wrote a bestseller,
“Render Unto Caesar: Serving the Nation by
Living Our Catholic Beliefs in Political Life.”
This was years before his name began surfacing
in rumors about empty slots high in the church
hierarchy.
Now, the 66-year-old Native American has
been named as the 13th shepherd of Philadel-
phia, an ultra-Eastern archdiocese of about 1.5
million Catholics, only 30 percent of whom
regularly visit pews. This is a high-profile
throne that has, for every occupant since 1921,
led to a seat in the College of Cardinals.
As someone who has known Chaput since
the mid-1980s, when he was a pastor and cam-
pus minister, I’m convinced that anyone who
wants to understand this Capuchin Franciscan
friar’s priorities should start with Columbine.
In that early Washington visit, Chaput told
the senators it would be simplistic to blame
one movie, or Hollywood, or corporate enter-
tainment giants for what happened at Colum-
bine. At the same time, it
would be naive to ignore
the power of popular cul-
ture.
“The reasonable per-
son understands that what
we eat, drink and breathe
will make us healthy or
sick. In like manner, what
we hear and what we see
lifts us up -- or drags us
down. It forms us inside,”
explained Chaput.
The day he saw “The
Matrix,” he noted, the
“theater was filled with
teenagers. One scene left
me completely stunned: The heroes wear trench
coats, and in a violent, elegant, slow-motion
bloodbath, they cut down about a dozen people
with their guns. It occurred to me that Mr. Har-
ris and Mr. Klebold may have seen that film. If
so, it certainly didn’t deter them.”
Critics were not amused, especially when
the archbishop linked this bloodshed -- real and
imaginary -- to other hot-button issues on both
the cultural left and right.
“The problem of violence isn’t out there in
bad music and bloody films. The real problem
is in here, in us, and it won’t be fixed by v-
chips,” he said. “We’ve created a culture that
markets violence in dozens of different ways,
seven days a week. ...
When we build our ad-
vertising campaigns on
consumer selfishness
and greed, and when
money becomes the uni-
versal measure of value,
how can we be surprised
when our sense of com-
munity erodes?
“When we glorify
and multiply guns, why
are we shocked when
kids use them? When
we answer murder with
more violence in the
death penalty, we put the
state’s seal of approval on revenge. When the
most dangerous place in the country is a moth-
er’s womb, and the unborn child can have his
or her head crushed in an abortion, even in the
process of being born -- the body language of
that message is that life isn’t sacred and may
not be worth much at all.”
That’s the voice that “Whispers In The Log-
gia” blogger Rocco Palmo of Philadelphia has
called “brash, outspoken and fearless -- ener-
getic, colorful, cultured -- indeed, even hard-
core.”
That’s the voice that is leaving the Rocky
Mountain Time Zone and headed to the Phila-
delphia Main Line.
Chaput’s voice moves east
TERRY MATTINGLY
On
Religion
Chaput
8 – The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
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950 Car Care
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• automatic transmission
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816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
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419 695-0015
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND PUPPY: 8-10 mo.
old. Found on W. 2nd St.
in Delphos. Sunday or
Monday wearing a collar
and l eas h. Cal l
(419)203-3822
FOUND: HOUSE key on
blue ring on Christina St.
419-692-2637
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
ATTENTION MOMS:
Need a break, Peak Fit-
ness is having a fit camp
for kids. Aug. 1st-5th.
10:00am-noon. T-shirt and
snacks provi ded Cal l
419-695-7325
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS Inc.
– 900 Gressel Drive, Del-
phos, OH. is currently
seeking a Dispatcher /
Safety person. Interested
applicants should have ex-
perience in both areas
with a minimum of 2 years
experience. This is a full
time position. Apply in
person 10am to 3pm M-F.
PART-TIME VAN driver to
work 15-20 hours a week
transporting elderly cli -
ents. Applications avail-
able at Delphos Senior
Citizens, 301 E. Suthoff.
Valid Ohio license re -
quired. Deadline for appli-
cation August 5 Criminal
background check on final
candidate. EOE.
UNIVERSAL LETTERING
Company is expanding
into a new facility in Vision
Park (Van Wert) and will
be working on long term
government contracts.
Looking to initially hire 50
full time experienced in-
dustrial sewing machine
operators, building to over
100. Plant will be working
on contracts in the next 60
to 90 days and operators
need to be pre-qualified
prior to that time. To guar-
antee consideration in the
first wave of hiring, stop by
321 West Ervin Road, Van
Wert to fill out an applica-
tion. We will be contacting
applicants to come in for a
sewing test prior to final
hire. Universal Lettering is
also looking for experi -
enced industrial sewing
supervisors & quality con-
trol personnel with previ-
ous experience.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN pil-
low-top mattress set, can
del i ver $125. Cal l
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
1701 FT. Jennings Road
Friday July 29, 9am-7pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
Multi-family garage sale
infant (boys and girls) to
adult clothing, new Home
and Garden products,
snowblower and lots of
misc.
410 W. 2nd St.
July 28-29, 10am- 5pm
July 30, 10am- 1pm
Baby, girls, women, ma-
ternity, household, elec-
tronics, toys.
427 E. Cleveland &
407 S. Pierce
Friday & Saturday
9am-3pm
Multi-Family moving sale.
Furniture, cabinets, wall
oven, clothes, toy.
428 W. Second St.,
Delphos
Thurs.-Sat., Aug. 4-6,
9am-5pm
Multi-family sale including
retired fourth grade teach-
er ’ s col l ect i on of
teacher/parent resources,
letter trays, organizers,
scanner, copier, cabinet,
and lots of odds and ends.
6542 MIDDLE Point-Wetzel
Rd.
Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
Name-brand t oddl er,
teen-adult clothing, formal
dresses, purses, furniture,
toys, tires, misc.
7 FAMILY Garage Sale
2158 Middle Point-Wetzel
Rd. go to Van-Del, go
north, follow signs.
July 27-July 30,
9am-5pm
Men & women’s clothes,
kids clothes, games, prom
dresses, wedding decor,
Harley items, lots of misc.
7404 ST. Rt. 66 N.
Between Delphos and
Ottoville
Fri.- Sat. 9am-3pm
Lots of baby and chil-
dren’s toys and items, por-
celain dolls, home decor,
furnishings, designer
clothing. Qaulity!
MOVING SALE
603 W. 2nd
Fri. July 29, 7am-5pm
Sat. July 30, 6am-1pm
Markdown day.
Power washer, VCR,
chairs, boys clothes, la-
dies clothes, knick-knacks,
toys, holiday decor, books,
luggage carrier, and misc.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Garage Sale #2 New
Items
Friday & Sat. July 29 & 30
9am-4pm
3 1/4miles west of
Continental on St. Rt. 613.
Mostly men’s. 80% men’s
20% women’s. Marv Rau
& Keith Ketner & Dale
Spi tnal e Cl ay pi geon
throwers, antique china
cabinet, 4 gun aluminum
gun case, guns, fishing
stuff, Mikasa crystal cars,
Big little books, 1000lb
motorcycle hoist, machin-
ist tools, car ramps, 100
sets license plates 60-74.
D.U.. Sculptures, Drop
leaf table, electric lawn
mower, log splitter, 4
place kayak trailer, clothes
size’s ladies S-L, Men’s L
also stop at the Tracy’s
garage sale 2 1/2 miles
west of Continental on St.
Rt. 316. Too much to list
and worth your time to
come look.
SATURDAY ONLY 8am-?
404 W. Second Street.
Girls clothes 0-18 months,
boys clothes 0-4T, toys,
books, changing table,
walker, playpen, strollers,
sm. freezer, entertainment
center, TV stand and lots
of misc.
550

Pets & Supplies
AKC REGISTERED
MINIATURE Schnauzer
puppies for sale, black
and silver, 2 males. Con-
tact Andrea 419-692-2067
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BR Ranch. Refrigerator,
stove, microwave, W/D
and air conditioning pro-
vided. Lawn service. No
pets or smoking. $435/mo.
419-233-6886
600

Apts. for Rent
DUPLEX -1 BDRM Apt. all
new appliances, carpet,
paint, very clean. $400
plus deposit. No pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
419-692-6478
620

Duplex For Rent
3 BDRM, Washer/Dryer
Hook-up, stove, refrigera-
t or, 1 car garage.
419-233-0083, Available
August 1.
800

House For Sale
2 BDRM house close to
park. 2 car garage. 234 W.
7th Aski ng $54,000.
419-695-3594
708 WEST Bank St.
Affordable, 3 bedroom, 2
bath, (1792 sq. ft.) with
(1515 sq. ft.) garage, cen-
tral air, gas, new roof
2 0 0 9 . C o n t a c t
( 419) 495- 4256 or
(419)339-9742
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
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920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
Little Tikes playhouse $50.
Good condition. Phone
(419)692-2714
IS YOUR AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
290

Wanted to Buy
340

Garage Sales
H E A P S J O S T L E
E N T R A P U N T I E S
R E M O R A T U R N I P
X I V E S A
B A Y L I S I D S
T U T N O D K N E L T
A S H E V E O S C A R
C H E S S A Y N A N A
T E N E T L U G M G M
S S N A S P S P Y
D E B P S T
R E C I P E I T A L I C
P L A N E T E U R E K A
M I D G E S D E T E R
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Mounds
6 Push or shove
12 Lure into wrongdoing
14 Loosens
15 Shark hitchhiker
16 Rutabaga
17 VII doubled
18 NASA counterpart
19 Howl at the moon
21 Fleur-de- —
23 GI tags
26 Famous mummy
27 High sign
28 Paid homage
30 Hearth residue
31 Night before
32 “Titanic” award
33 Game with pawns
35 Rand of fiction
37 Wheel buy (2 wds.)
38 Religious principle
39 Drag along
40 Where the lion roars
41 9-digit ID
42 Deadly snake
43 Undercover agent
44 Society newbie
46 West Coast hrs.
48 Cookbook entry
51 Slanted print
55 Evening star
56 Archimedes’ shout
57 Gnatlike insects
58 Impede
DOWN
1 Boating pronoun
2 Chemical suffix
3 Banking convenience
4 Stand-in
5 Wraparound garment
6 Fiber plants
7 Disagreeable task
8 Pulls a muscle
9 Metal in pewter
10 Aloha token
11 Parapsychology topic
13 Dog trainer of note
19 Shrubbery
20 Where the Acropolis is
22 Lofty goals
24 Flee
25 Like street talk
26 Way with words
27 Bluebird’s residence
28 Hong —
29 Monorail
34 Mailing out
36 BMW driver, maybe
42 Helps with a heist
43 Fixed look
45 Touche provoker
47 Cuff link
48 45 or 78
49 Ivy Leaguer
50 No-goodnik
52 Sanction
53 1950s prez
54 Airport rental
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14
15 16
17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29
30 31 32
33 34 35 36 37
38 39 40
41 42 43
44 45 46 47
48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56
57 58
DEAR DR. GOTT: In early
March 2010, my husband broke his
ankle in three places and shattered
his heel. Despite the fact that he
is now mobile and has passed
through the worst part of recovery,
he struggles with horrid sleep
problems. Each night, he falls asleep
almost immediately but is awake
about two hours later and cannot fall
back to sleep. Needless to say, this
lack of sleep is taking its toll on him,
as during the day he is completely
drained. We have consulted our
family physician, who has tried
unsuccessfully prescribing various
sleep medications. We have also tried
melatonin, lavender, chamomile and
more. You name it, he has tried it,
to no avail. Is there anything else he
can do at this point?
I also have had sleeping problems
since his foot injury, but medication
is working for me. We were both
very much stressed after his injury
because he was nonweight-bearing
for three months and ran the risk of
actually losing his foot due to the
severity of the injury. Thank you
for any help you can provide.
DEAR READER: Given that
your husband’s sleeping difficulties
followed a serious injury, it is likely
the two are related. Stress could
certainly be to blame, including post
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),
but certain medications can also
cause unwanted sleep disturbances.
Because you don’t provide a list of
what medications he is taking (likely
an antibiotic and/or pain relievers),
I cannot determine whether this is a
possibility.
Because he has unsuccessfully
tried so many prescription and
home remedies, there is little left
to recommend. I suggest that he
review his medications with his
physician to determine if one
or more may contribute to the
problem. Beyond that, he should
learn some relaxation and stress-
dealing techniques. Meditation,
yoga, tai chi, deep breathing and
more are all beneficial to calming
both mind and body. In addition,
yoga and tai chi are gentle exercises
that may reduce his pain levels and
allow him to regain some of the leg
strength he lost during his injury
and recovery. He may also benefit
from counseling with someone who
can help him deal with aspects of
the trauma and recovery that may
still be bothering him.
Readers interested in learning
more can order my Health Report
“Sleep/Wake Disorders” by sending
a self-addressed stamped No. 10
envelope and a $2 check or money
order to Dr. Peter Gott, P.O. Box
433, Lakeville, CT 06039. Be sure
to mention the title when writing or
print an order form off my website’s
direct link at www.AskDrGottMD.
com/order_form.pdf.
Copyright 2011 UFS, Distributed by
Universal Uclick for UFS
Is stress causing sleeplessness?
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
FIND IT
FAST
in the
CLASSIFIEDS
Putnam County
Harold A. Hoersten LE, Lot 3,
Wannemacher Sub, Ottoville, and
S 13 Q NW 1.50 acre, Monterey
Township, to Todd Hoersten,
Scott Hoersten and Michael
Hoersten.
Greg E. Adams and Lynne A.
Adams, S 5 Q SW 1.999 acres,
Sugar Creek Township, S 5 Q
SW 3.003 acres, Sugar Creek
Township, and S 5 Q SW 10.44
acres, Sugar Creek Township,
to Greg E. Adams and Lynne A.
Adams.
Stephanie Heitmeyer TR,
James Niedecken TR and
Richard J. Winkleman TR, Lot
561, Ottoville, to Village of
Ottoville.
Fort Jennings State Bank, Lot
362, Lot 361, Lot 363, Columbus
Grove, to Mark A. Hempfling and
Brian J. Inkrott.
Relocation Properties
Management LLC, Lot 208,
Deters Sub, Glandorf and Lot
116, .023 acres, Glandorf, to
Christopher W. Bailey and Mandy
L. Bailey.
Christopher W. Bailey and
Mandy L. Bailey, S 25 Q NE,
parcel, Ottawa Township, S 25
Q NW, parcel, Ottawa Township,
to Relocation Properties
Management LLC.
Charles G. Dick, S 36 Q
NW, 1.381 acres, Sugar Creek
Township, S 36 Q NW 1.50 acre,
Sugar Creek Township to Angela
L. Dick nka Angela L. Downing.
Todd William Niese and Lori
Ann Niese, Lot 80, Continental,
to Kenneth R. Gordon.
Dennis Hanefeld and Kim
Hanefeld, S 29 Q NW 1.860
acres, Palmer Township to
Liebrecht Brothers Farms LLC.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q
SE 8.767 acres, Greensburg
Township to Marvin C. Bendele
TR, RAM Revocable TR.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q SE
.483 acre, Greensburg Township,
to Marvin C. Bendele, RAM
Revocable TR.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q
SE 10.079 acres, Greensburg
Township, to Marvin C. Bendele,
RAM Revocable TR.
EH Pooled 111 LP, Lot 3,
Vaughnsville, to Jay Lobach.
Richard N. Schroeder and
Susan Marie Schroeder, S 12
Q SW .955 acre, Greensburg
Township and S 12 SW .045
acre, Greensburg Township, to
Richard N. Schroeder and Susan
Marie Schroeder.
Daniel G. Vorst and Mary A.
Vorst, S 29 Q SW 2.086 acres,
Jennings Township, to ME,
Nichols Inc.
8 – The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
SPEARS
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KEVIN M. MOORE
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Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Hohlbein’s
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or 419-230-8128
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Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Lawn Care
ElwerLawnCare.com
Visit website for photos
and details of services
(419) 235-3708
! Lawn Maintenance
! Lawn Treatments
! Mulch Installation
! Shrub Trimming
! New Landscapes
! New Lawn Installs
! Retaining Walls
! Bulk Compost
! Bulk Mulch
950 Car Care
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
FLANAGAN’S
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
419-733-6309
AMISH CREW
31 years experience • reference
• Framing • Siding • Roofing
• Remodeling • Garages
Attention Farmers
• Pole Barns
• Painting • New Barns
• Repair Work
• Clean Fence Rows
• Ditch Banks
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
950 Miscellaneous
TNT
ASPHALT
PAVING &
SEAL COATING
567-825-2157
Commercial-Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
SENIOR DISCOUNTS
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina Fox
419-236-4134
www.candlesbygina.com
The world’s finest candles,
candle scents, home decor.
Ask how to earn for FREE
Service
AT YOUR
Place Your Ad Today
419 695-0015
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
005

Lost & Found
FOUND PUPPY: 8-10 mo.
old. Found on W. 2nd St.
in Delphos. Sunday or
Monday wearing a collar
and l eas h. Cal l
(419)203-3822
FOUND: HOUSE key on
blue ring on Christina St.
419-692-2637
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
ATTENTION MOMS:
Need a break, Peak Fit-
ness is having a fit camp
for kids. Aug. 1st-5th.
10:00am-noon. T-shirt and
snacks provi ded Cal l
419-695-7325
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
DANCER LOGISTICS Inc.
– 900 Gressel Drive, Del-
phos, OH. is currently
seeking a Dispatcher /
Safety person. Interested
applicants should have ex-
perience in both areas
with a minimum of 2 years
experience. This is a full
time position. Apply in
person 10am to 3pm M-F.
PART-TIME VAN driver to
work 15-20 hours a week
transporting elderly cli -
ents. Applications avail-
able at Delphos Senior
Citizens, 301 E. Suthoff.
Valid Ohio license re -
quired. Deadline for appli-
cation August 5 Criminal
background check on final
candidate. EOE.
UNIVERSAL LETTERING
Company is expanding
into a new facility in Vision
Park (Van Wert) and will
be working on long term
government contracts.
Looking to initially hire 50
full time experienced in-
dustrial sewing machine
operators, building to over
100. Plant will be working
on contracts in the next 60
to 90 days and operators
need to be pre-qualified
prior to that time. To guar-
antee consideration in the
first wave of hiring, stop by
321 West Ervin Road, Van
Wert to fill out an applica-
tion. We will be contacting
applicants to come in for a
sewing test prior to final
hire. Universal Lettering is
also looking for experi -
enced industrial sewing
supervisors & quality con-
trol personnel with previ-
ous experience.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN pil-
low-top mattress set, can
del i ver $125. Cal l
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
1701 FT. Jennings Road
Friday July 29, 9am-7pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
Multi-family garage sale
infant (boys and girls) to
adult clothing, new Home
and Garden products,
snowblower and lots of
misc.
410 W. 2nd St.
July 28-29, 10am- 5pm
July 30, 10am- 1pm
Baby, girls, women, ma-
ternity, household, elec-
tronics, toys.
427 E. Cleveland &
407 S. Pierce
Friday & Saturday
9am-3pm
Multi-Family moving sale.
Furniture, cabinets, wall
oven, clothes, toy.
428 W. Second St.,
Delphos
Thurs.-Sat., Aug. 4-6,
9am-5pm
Multi-family sale including
retired fourth grade teach-
er ’ s col l ect i on of
teacher/parent resources,
letter trays, organizers,
scanner, copier, cabinet,
and lots of odds and ends.
6542 MIDDLE Point-Wetzel
Rd.
Friday 10am-6pm
Saturday 9am-2pm
Name-brand t oddl er,
teen-adult clothing, formal
dresses, purses, furniture,
toys, tires, misc.
7 FAMILY Garage Sale
2158 Middle Point-Wetzel
Rd. go to Van-Del, go
north, follow signs.
July 27-July 30,
9am-5pm
Men & women’s clothes,
kids clothes, games, prom
dresses, wedding decor,
Harley items, lots of misc.
7404 ST. Rt. 66 N.
Between Delphos and
Ottoville
Fri.- Sat. 9am-3pm
Lots of baby and chil-
dren’s toys and items, por-
celain dolls, home decor,
furnishings, designer
clothing. Qaulity!
MOVING SALE
603 W. 2nd
Fri. July 29, 7am-5pm
Sat. July 30, 6am-1pm
Markdown day.
Power washer, VCR,
chairs, boys clothes, la-
dies clothes, knick-knacks,
toys, holiday decor, books,
luggage carrier, and misc.
PUTNAM COUNTY
Garage Sale #2 New
Items
Friday & Sat. July 29 & 30
9am-4pm
3 1/4miles west of
Continental on St. Rt. 613.
Mostly men’s. 80% men’s
20% women’s. Marv Rau
& Keith Ketner & Dale
Spi tnal e Cl ay pi geon
throwers, antique china
cabinet, 4 gun aluminum
gun case, guns, fishing
stuff, Mikasa crystal cars,
Big little books, 1000lb
motorcycle hoist, machin-
ist tools, car ramps, 100
sets license plates 60-74.
D.U.. Sculptures, Drop
leaf table, electric lawn
mower, log splitter, 4
place kayak trailer, clothes
size’s ladies S-L, Men’s L
also stop at the Tracy’s
garage sale 2 1/2 miles
west of Continental on St.
Rt. 316. Too much to list
and worth your time to
come look.
SATURDAY ONLY 8am-?
404 W. Second Street.
Girls clothes 0-18 months,
boys clothes 0-4T, toys,
books, changing table,
walker, playpen, strollers,
sm. freezer, entertainment
center, TV stand and lots
of misc.
550

Pets & Supplies
AKC REGISTERED
MINIATURE Schnauzer
puppies for sale, black
and silver, 2 males. Con-
tact Andrea 419-692-2067
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BR Ranch. Refrigerator,
stove, microwave, W/D
and air conditioning pro-
vided. Lawn service. No
pets or smoking. $435/mo.
419-233-6886
600

Apts. for Rent
DUPLEX -1 BDRM Apt. all
new appliances, carpet,
paint, very clean. $400
plus deposit. No pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
419-692-6478
620

Duplex For Rent
3 BDRM, Washer/Dryer
Hook-up, stove, refrigera-
t or, 1 car garage.
419-233-0083, Available
August 1.
800

House For Sale
2 BDRM house close to
park. 2 car garage. 234 W.
7th Aski ng $54,000.
419-695-3594
708 WEST Bank St.
Affordable, 3 bedroom, 2
bath, (1792 sq. ft.) with
(1515 sq. ft.) garage, cen-
tral air, gas, new roof
2 0 0 9 . C o n t a c t
( 419) 495- 4256 or
(419)339-9742
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
!Genuine Motorcraft
®
bulk
oil and filter change.
!Rotate and inspect four tires
!Inspect brake system
!Test battery
!Check air and cabin air filters
!Check belts and hoses
!Top off all fluids
Let Our Factory-Trained
Technicians Perform a Thorough
Inspection of
Your Vehicle, and more.
Up to five quarts of genuine Motorcraft
®
oil.
Taxes, disposal fee and diesel vehicles extra.
See Service Advisor for details.
Regular $39.95
$
29
95
$
10
00
REBATE
Expires
8-31-11
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
Little Tikes playhouse $50.
Good condition. Phone
(419)692-2714
IS YOUR AD HERE?
Call today
419-695-0015
290

Wanted to Buy
340

Garage Sales
H E A P S J O S T L E
E N T R A P U N T I E S
R E M O R A T U R N I P
X I V E S A
B A Y L I S I D S
T U T N O D K N E L T
A S H E V E O S C A R
C H E S S A Y N A N A
T E N E T L U G M G M
S S N A S P S P Y
D E B P S T
R E C I P E I T A L I C
P L A N E T E U R E K A
M I D G E S D E T E R
Answer to Puzzle
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Mounds
6 Push or shove
12 Lure into wrongdoing
14 Loosens
15 Shark hitchhiker
16 Rutabaga
17 VII doubled
18 NASA counterpart
19 Howl at the moon
21 Fleur-de- —
23 GI tags
26 Famous mummy
27 High sign
28 Paid homage
30 Hearth residue
31 Night before
32 “Titanic” award
33 Game with pawns
35 Rand of fiction
37 Wheel buy (2 wds.)
38 Religious principle
39 Drag along
40 Where the lion roars
41 9-digit ID
42 Deadly snake
43 Undercover agent
44 Society newbie
46 West Coast hrs.
48 Cookbook entry
51 Slanted print
55 Evening star
56 Archimedes’ shout
57 Gnatlike insects
58 Impede
DOWN
1 Boating pronoun
2 Chemical suffix
3 Banking convenience
4 Stand-in
5 Wraparound garment
6 Fiber plants
7 Disagreeable task
8 Pulls a muscle
9 Metal in pewter
10 Aloha token
11 Parapsychology topic
13 Dog trainer of note
19 Shrubbery
20 Where the Acropolis is
22 Lofty goals
24 Flee
25 Like street talk
26 Way with words
27 Bluebird’s residence
28 Hong —
29 Monorail
34 Mailing out
36 BMW driver, maybe
42 Helps with a heist
43 Fixed look
45 Touche provoker
47 Cuff link
48 45 or 78
49 Ivy Leaguer
50 No-goodnik
52 Sanction
53 1950s prez
54 Airport rental
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14
15 16
17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29
30 31 32
33 34 35 36 37
38 39 40
41 42 43
44 45 46 47
48 49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56
57 58
DEAR DR. GOTT: In early
March 2010, my husband broke his
ankle in three places and shattered
his heel. Despite the fact that he
is now mobile and has passed
through the worst part of recovery,
he struggles with horrid sleep
problems. Each night, he falls asleep
almost immediately but is awake
about two hours later and cannot fall
back to sleep. Needless to say, this
lack of sleep is taking its toll on him,
as during the day he is completely
drained. We have consulted our
family physician, who has tried
unsuccessfully prescribing various
sleep medications. We have also tried
melatonin, lavender, chamomile and
more. You name it, he has tried it,
to no avail. Is there anything else he
can do at this point?
I also have had sleeping problems
since his foot injury, but medication
is working for me. We were both
very much stressed after his injury
because he was nonweight-bearing
for three months and ran the risk of
actually losing his foot due to the
severity of the injury. Thank you
for any help you can provide.
DEAR READER: Given that
your husband’s sleeping difficulties
followed a serious injury, it is likely
the two are related. Stress could
certainly be to blame, including post
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD),
but certain medications can also
cause unwanted sleep disturbances.
Because you don’t provide a list of
what medications he is taking (likely
an antibiotic and/or pain relievers),
I cannot determine whether this is a
possibility.
Because he has unsuccessfully
tried so many prescription and
home remedies, there is little left
to recommend. I suggest that he
review his medications with his
physician to determine if one
or more may contribute to the
problem. Beyond that, he should
learn some relaxation and stress-
dealing techniques. Meditation,
yoga, tai chi, deep breathing and
more are all beneficial to calming
both mind and body. In addition,
yoga and tai chi are gentle exercises
that may reduce his pain levels and
allow him to regain some of the leg
strength he lost during his injury
and recovery. He may also benefit
from counseling with someone who
can help him deal with aspects of
the trauma and recovery that may
still be bothering him.
Readers interested in learning
more can order my Health Report
“Sleep/Wake Disorders” by sending
a self-addressed stamped No. 10
envelope and a $2 check or money
order to Dr. Peter Gott, P.O. Box
433, Lakeville, CT 06039. Be sure
to mention the title when writing or
print an order form off my website’s
direct link at www.AskDrGottMD.
com/order_form.pdf.
Copyright 2011 UFS, Distributed by
Universal Uclick for UFS
Is stress causing sleeplessness?
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
FIND IT
FAST
in the
CLASSIFIEDS
Putnam County
Harold A. Hoersten LE, Lot 3,
Wannemacher Sub, Ottoville, and
S 13 Q NW 1.50 acre, Monterey
Township, to Todd Hoersten,
Scott Hoersten and Michael
Hoersten.
Greg E. Adams and Lynne A.
Adams, S 5 Q SW 1.999 acres,
Sugar Creek Township, S 5 Q
SW 3.003 acres, Sugar Creek
Township, and S 5 Q SW 10.44
acres, Sugar Creek Township,
to Greg E. Adams and Lynne A.
Adams.
Stephanie Heitmeyer TR,
James Niedecken TR and
Richard J. Winkleman TR, Lot
561, Ottoville, to Village of
Ottoville.
Fort Jennings State Bank, Lot
362, Lot 361, Lot 363, Columbus
Grove, to Mark A. Hempfling and
Brian J. Inkrott.
Relocation Properties
Management LLC, Lot 208,
Deters Sub, Glandorf and Lot
116, .023 acres, Glandorf, to
Christopher W. Bailey and Mandy
L. Bailey.
Christopher W. Bailey and
Mandy L. Bailey, S 25 Q NE,
parcel, Ottawa Township, S 25
Q NW, parcel, Ottawa Township,
to Relocation Properties
Management LLC.
Charles G. Dick, S 36 Q
NW, 1.381 acres, Sugar Creek
Township, S 36 Q NW 1.50 acre,
Sugar Creek Township to Angela
L. Dick nka Angela L. Downing.
Todd William Niese and Lori
Ann Niese, Lot 80, Continental,
to Kenneth R. Gordon.
Dennis Hanefeld and Kim
Hanefeld, S 29 Q NW 1.860
acres, Palmer Township to
Liebrecht Brothers Farms LLC.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q
SE 8.767 acres, Greensburg
Township to Marvin C. Bendele
TR, RAM Revocable TR.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q SE
.483 acre, Greensburg Township,
to Marvin C. Bendele, RAM
Revocable TR.
Marvin C. Bendele, S 26 Q
SE 10.079 acres, Greensburg
Township, to Marvin C. Bendele,
RAM Revocable TR.
EH Pooled 111 LP, Lot 3,
Vaughnsville, to Jay Lobach.
Richard N. Schroeder and
Susan Marie Schroeder, S 12
Q SW .955 acre, Greensburg
Township and S 12 SW .045
acre, Greensburg Township, to
Richard N. Schroeder and Susan
Marie Schroeder.
Daniel G. Vorst and Mary A.
Vorst, S 29 Q SW 2.086 acres,
Jennings Township, to ME,
Nichols Inc.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Friday Evening July 29, 2011
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Friday, July 29, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Girlfriend has
affair, spreads STD
Dear Annie: I am a
43-year-old male and have
been in a common-law rela-
tionship with “Carol” for the
past six years. I’ve never been
married, but I proposed to
Carol. We have a daughter
together. I also have a teen-
ager from a previous relation-
ship, and Carol can’t stand
her. Carol has two boys from
a previous marriage. She
never disclosed any details,
but I found out she cheated on
her ex.
I work seven-day
shifts, so I’m home
only two weeks
every month. Last
fall, I found out
Carol was pregnant
by a man she’d
been seeing for
six months. I was
devastated that she
would betray my
trust like that. She
also contracted an
STD from the guy,
which she passed
along to me.
I supported her during her
pregnancy, but she ultimate-
ly miscarried. I have trou-
ble trusting her when I’m at
work, and I constantly phone
her to see what she’s doing.
Now she’s accusing me of
spying on her.
Should I stay in this rela-
tionship, or should I just go
my own way? -- Lost
Dear Lost: It sounds
like it’s time to leave. You
are indeed spying on Carol
because you don’t trust her,
and you have good reason.
She doesn’t seem to be show-
ing any remorse for her affair
or making any effort to regain
your trust. Since you have
a child together, please try
marriage counseling first.
Otherwise, it is time to see
a lawyer about custody and
visitation with your daughter.
Dear Annie: I am a
47-year-old woman who
is considering ending two
friendships I’ve had for 20
years.
The three of us have gone
through a lot together, includ-
ing a time of “sowing our
oats” after divorces when we
were younger. Since then,
I have entered recovery for
alcoholism and am happily
remarried. My friends also
remarried, but the two of them
have not stopped sowing their
wild oats. Our time together
often revolves around their
drama, including their latest
flings and flirtations. I have
told them I don’t condone this
behavior.
I now have a greater
respect for marriage and com-
mitment. I feel these friends
have not grown up, and I
find it difficult to be around
them. I recently arranged to
get together for support after
a personal loss. One of the
women didn’t bother to show
up or even call. The other
spent the entire dinner talking
about her latest affair.
I’ve had enough, but I am
torn due to our long history
together. I am now in a place
where honesty means every-
thing to my sobriety. And
I worry about making new
friendships that are as bind-
ing. No one else will share
the memories and history we
have. But I don’t see what they
are contributing to the friend-
ship. Should I stay through
thick and thin? Do I need
to tell them I am severing
ties, or can I simply distance
myself and hope they get the
point? -- Confused
in Illinois
Dear Confused:
People change, and
friendships ebb
and flow. This is
normal. You have
a few choices: You
can end the friend-
ships, telling them
you find it too dif-
ficult to hear their
tales of infidel-
ity. You can begin
avoiding them,
talking to them less
often and seeing them rarely,
letting the friendships fade
over time. Or, you can keep in
touch from a distance, hoping
they will eventually grow up,
too, but not seeing so much
of them that it affects your
sobriety or your patience.
Dear Annie: You’ve print-
ed a lot of letters from lonely
widows. I’m an 84- year-old
widow who also does not
like to be home alone. So,
for the past 20 years, I have
been volunteering full time
at a hospital. I go five days
a week and have accumulat-
ed 34,000 hours. This keeps
me going. I am entertained,
don’t have too much time to
be bored and help others, as
well. -- F.E.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annie’s Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
SATURDAY, JULY 30, 2011
Circumstance beyond your control
may inaugurate some changes in your
affairs in the coming months, but,
instead of fighting them, take control
so that you can be the one who guides
them to a desirable place in your life.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Sometimes you’re better at doing
things for others than you are at doing
things for yourself, and it could be one
of those times. These noble instincts
reflect the real you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Because your powers of observations
are extremely keen right now, many
things that are apparent to you could
be completely overlooked by others.
Don’t fault them for not seeing what
you see.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Although it will take asserting yourself
a bit more than usual, the possibilities
for adding to your material holdings
are exceptionally good. Take
advantage of this propitious day.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- It
behooves you to pay special attention
to your appearance and demeanor,
because for whatever reason, you will
not go unnoticed. Make a favorable,
lasting impression.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- If you’re smart, you’ll function
as the power behind the scenes. It
will be far easier to accomplish what
you want by letting others think your
success came from them.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- Your friends might be leaning on
you, so be prepared to assume some
of their burdens if you think you can
help out. Chances are they won’t
lay anything on you that you can’t
handle.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) --
There is no need to be overly concerned
about suddenly finding yourself in a
competitive development. Challenges
awaken your senses, and you’ll easily
win with grace.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Instead of instinctively falling back
on a negative behavior pattern that
has always led you down a dead end
street, take the time to profit from
your past experiences. You’ll know
what to do.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- This is a good day to go shopping,
because you tend to be extremely
keen about anything that has to do
with handling money. You’re likely
to get some better bargains for your
shekels.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If
you’re ears are ringing, it’s because
someone is telling others some nice
things about you. This person’s
comments could have a strong impact
on your popularity.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
Get an early start, because chances are
you’ll be asked to tackle something
you would normally shy away from.
However, you’re better equipped to
handle it than you think.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
People in general are likely to find
you far more appealing than they
do a friend of yours who is always
subconsciously competing against
you. This person is hurting, so be nice
to him or her.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
That’s SUCCESS.
Personal Wealth
*
Business
10 – The Herald Friday, July 29, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
AWOL soldier condemned ’09 Fort Hood shootings
By JAMIE STENGLE
Associated Press
KILLEEN, Texas — As Pfc. Naser Abdo
beseeched officials to grant him conscientious
objector status and release him from the mili-
tary, he condemned a fellow Muslim soldier
accused of shooting 13 people to death at Fort
Hood. Such acts, he wrote, “run counter to
what I believe in as a Muslim.”
Less than a year later, officials say Abdo
has admitted planning to launch another attack
on Fort Hood with a bomb in a backpack and
weapons stashed in a motel room where he was
arrested Wednesday, about 3 miles from the
Texas Army base’s main gate.
The 21-year-old’s writings, including the
essay obtained by The Associated Press in
which he deplored the 2009 shootings, portray
a devout infantry soldier struggling with his
faith while facing the prospect of deployment
and what he felt was the scorn of his peers.
“Overall, as a Muslim I feel that I will not
be able to carry out my military duties due
to my conscientious objection,” Abdo wrote
in his application for the status. “Therefore,
unless I separate myself from the military,
I would potentially be putting the soldiers I
work with in jeopardy.
“In this instance, I would be failing in my
duty to my unit, my army and my god.”
Abdo was approved as a conscientious
objector this year, but his discharge was put
on hold amid military charges that 34 images
of child pornography were found on a com-
puter he used. He went absent without leave
from Fort Campbell, Ky., during the July 4
weekend.
On July 3, Abdo tried to buy a gun at a
store near the Kentucky post, according to the
company that owns the store. Abdo told an AP
reporter a week later that he was concerned
about his safety and had considered purchasing
a gun for protection, but had not yet done so.
Police in Killeen said their break in the
case came Tuesday from Guns Galore LLC —
the same gun store where Maj. Nidal Hasan
bought a pistol used in the 2009 attack. Store
clerk Greg Ebert said Abdo arrived by taxi
and bought 6 pounds of smokeless gunpow-
der, three boxes of shotgun ammunition and a
magazine for a semi-automatic pistol.
Ebert said he called authorities because he
and his co-workers “felt uncomfortable with
his overall demeanor and the fact he didn’t
know what the hell he was buying.”
“We would probably be here today, giv-
ing you a different briefing, had he not been
stopped,” said Killeen Police Chief Dennis
Baldwin, who called the plan “a terror plot.”
According to an Army alert sent via email
and obtained by the AP, Killeen police learned
from the taxi company that Abdo had been
picked up from a local motel and also had vis-
ited an Army surplus store where he paid cash
for a uniform bearing Fort Hood unit patches.
Agents found firearms and “items that
could be identified as bomb-making compo-
nents, including gunpowder,” in Abdo’s motel
room, FBI spokesman Erik Vasys said. The
FBI planned to charge Abdo with possessing
bomb-making materials.
An Oklahoma lawyer who has represented
Abdo said Thursday he hadn’t heard him in
weeks. “I’ve been quite anxious to get in touch
with him,” said attorney James Branum.
The Army alert said Abdo “was in pos-
session of a large quantity of ammunition,
weapons and a bomb inside a backpack,” and
upon questioning admitted planning an attack
on Fort Hood.
The military’s criminal investigation divi-
sion, along with the federal Joint Terrorism
Task Force, had previously investigated Abdo
after he was flagged for making unspecified
anti-American comments while taking a lan-
guage class, according to a U.S. official briefed
on the investigation.
The official, who spoke on condition of
anonymity because the investigation is ongo-
ing, said neither the military nor the task force
discovered anything at the time to indicate
Abdo was planning an attack, the official said.
As the first anniversary of the 2009 Fort
Hood rampage approached, Abdo sent to the
AP the essay describing how he became a
“different Muslim” after going through basic
training at Fort Benning, Ga., and enduring
religious harassment.
“Often times, during basic training the train-
ees would insult Islam and insult Muslims,” he
wrote. As a result, Abdo said he grew reclusive
and stopped socializing.
Abdo grew up in Garland, a Dallas suburb
about 170 miles from Fort Hood. In his essay,
he said his mother is Christian and his father
is Muslim, and that he decided to follow Islam
when he was 17.
“Little did I know that when I first became
a Muslim that I was going to learn what Islam
meant to me and what I was willing to sacrifice
for it,” he wrote.
Americans face court date in Iran Defense sits silently at Jeffs trial
Man executed for killing woman
By STEVE KARNOWSKI
Associated Press
MINNEAPOLIS — The families of two
Americans imprisoned in Iran for nearly two
years say they’re counting on a court hearing
Sunday to end their ordeal at last.
Shane Bauer and Josh Fattal, both 29, are due
for what Iranian authorities have said will be a
final hearing in their protracted espionage case.
It’s scheduled two years to the day after they
were arrested along with another American,
Sarah Shourd, during a hike on the Iraq-Iran
border. Shourd was released last September.
Bauer’s mother, Cindy Hickey of Pine City,
Minn., said she’ll be up all night praying.
“As a mother I’m always holding out hope,
but it’s been two years. ... It’s time for this to
be heard in court and for a release to be made,”
Hickey said, adding that she’s heard “some
really positive comments coming out of Tehran”
that give her hope.
Hickey was referring to remarks by Tehran’s
chief prosecutor, Abbas Jafari Dowlatabadi,
who told Iran’s official news agency in June
that officials “are hopeful that the final decision
about the three Americans’ case will be taken”
at Sunday’s hearing. He did not hint at what the
decision might be. But the families, who have
long maintained the hikers’ innocence, took his
comments as a good sign that their ordeal will
soon be over.
“They themselves said that it will be the final
decision, at that point, and the final hearing. So I
have every belief that they will live (up) to this,
and I am more than eager to see Josh and Shane
come home,” said Josh’s mother, Laura Fattal,
of Elkins Park, Pa. She also said she sees the
hearing date — the second anniversary of their
arrest — as a good sign.
Shourd, now 32, and Bauer got engaged in
prison before she was released on what Iranian
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said were
humanitarian grounds following health issues.
She said she’s also managing to be optimistic.
“Optimism is what gets me through every day
and what gets Shane and Josh through every day
in prison,” Shourd said. “We have been told that
a final decision will be made. And our lawyer,
Masoud Shaffii, is a brave, courageous man, and
he’s read their file. He said there is absolutely
no evidence against them and he’s feeling very
upbeat and he’s very much looking forward to
this final session. And we’re all very hopeful
that this will be the end of our nightmare.”
But the families have been deeply disap-
pointed before. The mothers both said one of
their lowest points came May 11, when their
sons’ espionage trial was scheduled to resume
but was canceled at the last minute without
explanation.
“We were very, very upset about that,” Laura
Fattal said.
One of their highest points was Shourd’s
release on $500,000 bail last September. She
refused to return to Iran for trial when she was
summoned in February.
Shourd is back living in Oakland, Calif.
Bauer grew up in Onamia, Minn., and Fattal is
from suburban Philadelphia.
By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press
SAN ANGELO, Texas — Warren Jeffs’ sex-
ual assault trial got off to a frenzied start, largely
because the polygamist sect leader insisted on
representing himself, then sat mute and seem-
ingly oblivious to everything going on in court
around him.
Without any objections from Jeffs, who
declined to make an opening statement, pros-
ecutors moved at breakneck speed Thursday on
the trial’s first day, calling five witnesses. They
also told jurors they have an audio recording of
the 55-year-old defendant raping a 12-year-old
girl and DNA evidence showing he impregnated
a 15-year-old.
Jeffs is the ecclesiastical head of the
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter
Day Saints, a radical offshoot of mainstream
Mormonism that believes polygamy is the key
to exaltation in heaven. Followers see him as a
prophet who can speak for God on Earth.
His surreal, silent-treatment defense began
after Jeffs abruptly dismissed his high-powered
defense team Thursday and asked U.S. District
Judge Barbara Walther that he be allowed to
represent himself and to have more time to
prepare his case. He addressed the court for 25
minutes, launching into long and confusing dia-
tribes about how his attorneys could not present
a “pure defense.”
The judge was wary, saying, “you have
assembled one of the most impressive legal
teams this court has ever seen and perhaps ever
seen in the state of Texas ... I urge you not to
follow this course of action.”
Jeffs had been down this road before. He
fired his attorney 20 days before jury selection
began Monday, only to retain a new lawyer who
pleaded unsuccessfully for more time. He has
burned through no fewer than seven attorneys
since December, and Walther said Thursday that
“your request for additional time can only be
considered as an attempt to further delay these
proceedings and manipulate this court.”
“Mr. Jeffs, the court is not going to recess
these proceedings to let you go to law school,”
she said.
Walther allowed him to represent himself
but insisted on the trial moving forward. Jeffs
responded, “I feel this is an injustice being per-
formed” and said letting the case continue meant
not allowing “true justice to be served, which is
the purpose of the court of law in a nation that
professes true justice be served.”
Jeffs is charged with two counts of sexual
assault of a child and could face a maximum
sentence of life in prison if convicted.
The charges against him stem from a massive
police raid in April 2008 at Yearning For Zion,
a sect compound about 45 miles south of the oil
and gas town of San Angelo, where Jeffs’ trial is
taking place. More than 400 children were placed
in protective custody, and women who live on the
compound appeared on TV airwaves across the
country wearing their traditional, frontier-style
dresses and hairdos from the 19th century.
Authorities moved in after receiving an anon-
ymous call to an abuse shelter, alleging that girls
on the compound were being forced into polyga-
mist marriages. The call turned out to be a hoax,
and the children were returned to their families.
But police saw underage girls who were
clearly pregnant — prompting the charges
against Jeffs and 11 other FLDS men. All seven
sect members who have been prosecuted so
far were convicted of crimes including sexual
assault and bigamy, receiving prison sentences
of between six and 75 years.
By JESSICA GRESKO
Associated Press
SMYRNA, Del. — Delaware carried out its first execution
since 2005 early today, putting to death a man who was con-
victed of killing a woman with an ax during a burglary nearly
two decades ago.
Robert Jackson III was pronounced dead at 12:12 a.m.
after being given a lethal injection at the James T. Vaughn
Correctional Center in Smyrna.
Jackson, 38, lifted his head when asked for his last words
shortly after midnight. Searching the window between the
execution chamber and witnesses, he asked if the two children
of the victim, Elizabeth Girardi, were watching.
“Are the Girardis in there? Christopher and Claudia, if you are
in there, I’ve never faulted you for your anger. I would have been
mad myself,” he said, going on to deny he killed their mother.
He suggested that his accomplice in the burglary, Anthony
Lachette, was the killer.
“Tony’s laughing his ass off right now because you’re about
to watch an innocent man die. This isn’t justice,” he said before
putting his head back down and closing his eyes.
When the execution began, Jackson started making a snor-
ing sound, his lips sputtered and his breath began to quicken.
Prison officials closed the curtain between the execution cham-
ber and witnesses after about four minutes to check whether
he was conscious, calling out twice, “Inmate Jackson, can you
hear me?” There was no response.
When the curtain reopened a minute later, Jackson made no
more movements or sounds. From start to finish, the execution
took about 10 minutes.
A small group gathered outside the prison to protest, though
one woman came to express her support for the execution.
One of the protesters, 68-year-old Sally Milbury-Steen, said
she did not believe the death penalty is a deterrent.
Answers to Thursday’s questions:
You’re in a face-off with a skunk. He missed you
with his first 5 shots of nasty-smelling spray. Your not
out of the woods yet. Skunks have 6 shots of scent that
can spray up to 10 feet.
If you really like making movies, you should live in
Bombay, India. More than 1,000 movies are made there
every year, twice what Hollywood makes.
Today’s questions:
How long has the coffee break been around?
What are the odds you know someone, are someone
or are related to someone who is obsessed with germs?
Answers in Saturday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Ligneous: hard or “woody” in feeling, as a tumor
Wegotism: excessive use of the editorial “we”
The Outstanding National Debt as of 9:45 a.m.
today was $14,349,709,222,213.
The estimated population of the United States is
311,016,765, so each citizen’s share of this debt is
$46,138.
The National Debt has continued to increase an
average of $3.82 billion per day since Sept. 28, 2007.
US, NKorea in
2nd day of talks
By EDITH M. LEDERER
Associated Press
NEW YORK — U.S. offi-
cials were looking for con-
crete signs that nuclear-armed
North Korea is willing to take
“irreversible steps” to give up
its nuclear weapons programs
as the two sides headed into a
second day of talks today.
Ambassador Stephen
Bosworth, the Obama admin-
istration’s top envoy on North
Korean affairs, and North
Korean Vice Foreign Minister
Kim Kye Gwan remained
silent after meeting behind
closed doors on Thursday at
the U.S. Mission to the United
Nations for a total of about
five hours.
The State Department
called the talks “serious and
business-like” and said in a
statement they will resume
this morning.
The U.S. wants to deter-
mine if North Korea is ready
to fulfill its commitments
under a 2005 joint declaration
requiring the North to aban-
don all nuclear weapons pro-
grams and allow the return of
international weapons inspec-
tors. In exchange, Pyongyang
would get better relations with
its Asian neighbors, energy
assistance, and a pledge from
Washington that its troops
won’t attack the North.
The statement said that
Washington wants to see a
willingness from the North “to
take concrete and irreversible
steps.”
“They’ve been down this
road before and it’s a chance
for us to gauge their seri-
ousness,” State Department
spokesman Mark Toner said
earlier Thursday. “What we’re
looking for is a concrete indi-
cation that they’re going to
move forward.”
Bosworth greeted Kim
at the entrance to the U.S.
Mission in the shadow of the
U.N. headquarters complex
when he arrived with his del-
egation Thursday morning.
They smiled and shook hands
before a throng of photogra-
phers, cameramen and report-
ers.

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