2006 National Qualifying Exam – Chemistry Solutions

Section A (Multiple Choice) Question #
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5

Answer
B D D C E

Question # Answer
Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 B C B D E

Question #
Q11 Q12 Q13 Q14 Q15

Answer
C C A A E

Question 16
(a) [2 marks] Mg Zn Pb Cu

(b)

[1 mark] Mg

(c)

[3 marks] Pb2+ + 2e-

Reduction half equation

Pb

Oxidation half equation

Zn

Zn2+ + 2e-

Redox equation

Zn + Pb2+

Zn2+ + Pb

(d)

[1 mark] Zn

+ 2e- Full equation 2Fe(CN)63.+ 2K+ + 3X2+ K2X3[Fe(CN)6]2 (h) [1 mark] 1 x 2/3 x 1/2 = 2/6 = 1/3 .+ I3- (g) [2 marks] 2Fe(CN)64.+ 3I- 2Fe(CN)64.(e) [4 marks] Fe in K3[Fe(CN)6] (hint: CN has a charge of –1) +3 +2 Fe in K2M3[Fe(CN)6]2 +2 S in K2S2O3 +2½ S in S4O62– (f) [6 marks] Fe(CN)63.+ eFe(CN)64- Reduction half equation x2 Oxidation half equation 3I- I3.

+ S4O62- (j) [1 mark] 1/3 (from part iv) x 2/1 = 2/3 (k) [2 marks] n(S2O42-) = c(S2O42-) x v(S2O42-) = .+ 2S2O42- 3I.386 x 10-2 x 100/99.+ 2e- Full equation I3.465 x 10-3/ 0.0250 = 1.39 x 10-2 M (l) [3 marks] [ X(NO3)2 ]true = [ X(NO3)2 ]false x 100/99.386 x 10-2 = 1.+ 2e3I- Oxidation half equation 2S2O42- S4O62.(i) [4 marks] Reduction half equation I3.3 x 100/99.40 x 10-2 M .31 x 10-3 mol = 3.0231 x .31 x 10-3 mol 2+ n(X ) = 3/2 x n(S2O42-) = 3/2 x 2.465 x 10-3 mol [ X(NO3)2 ] = [ X2+ ] = n(X2+)/v(X2+) = 3.3 x 100/99.4 = 1.100 = 2.4 = 1.

96 : 16.Question 17 [2 marks] 12 6 C 14 6 C 14 7 N 15 8 O 16 8 O 19 9 F 31 15 P 195 78 Pt (a) [3 marks] (a) 4 (b) 4 4 4 4 5 (b) [3 marks] (I) H3C CH3 H3C (II) CH3 CH3 (III) H3C H3C CH3 CH3 (c) [3 marks] (I) 1 H NMR: 3 13 1 (II) H NMR: 4 C NMR: 4 (III) 1 H NMR: 1 13 C NMR: 3 13 C NMR: 2 (d) [2 marks] C:H = 83.1 g 2 units required for molecule C6H14 (f) [2 marks] H3C H3C CH3 CH3 (g) [2 marks] meta 1 H NMR: 5 13 para 1 H NMR: 3 13 C NMR: 7 C NMR: 5 .008 = 6.27 = 1 : 2.01 1.33 =3:7 C3H7 (e) [1 marks] Mass of C3H7 = 43.6 16.4 : 12.

5 marks] H3C (E) (E) CH3 H3C H3C (E) (Z) (Z) CH3 H3C (Z) (l) [3 marks] H3C (E) (Z) H3C .5 marks] E Z Z (k) [4.(h) [2 marks] Br Br (i) [1 marks] 4 (j) [1.

Question 18 (a) [3 marks] F N N F N N F F N N F F (b) /1 mark N2 < N2F2 < N2F4 (c) /1 mark N2F4 < N2F2 < N2 (d) [2 marks] 151 kJ mol–1 / 6.02 × 1023 mol–1 = 2.507 × 10–19 J / 1. reflecting the fact that there is less and less interaction between the atoms at this distance. (f) [2 marks] A bond length of 0 is impossible because of the Coulombic repulsion between the nuclei.56 eV (e) [1 mark] It will oscillate between 99 and 433 pm. so the bond energy should approach a constant as the bond length goes to zero.602 × 10–19 J eV—1 = 1. so the bond energy should go to infinity as the bond length approaches zero. (g) [2 marks] A bond length of infinity corresponds to two non-bonded atoms. .507 × 10–19 J 2.

While this could just be a coincidence. Since it absorbs the same frequencies in its IR and Raman spectra. (i) [4 marks] Y Y Y X Y Y Y Y X Y Y Y No COS No COS (j) [2 marks] TiF2 is bent. it’s more likely (and in fact true) that these are prohibited by the rule of mutual exclusion. (n) [2 marks] By the rule of mutual exclusion.5 marks were given to each for the features in (f) and (g). (e) and (f). (k) [2 marks] XeF4 doesn’t have any peaks common to both spectra. which means that it must have a COS and therefore be square planar. there are no peaks common to both spectra. with so many peaks it’s most likely that these are prohibited by the rule of mutual exclusion. . (l) [3 marks] F N N F F N N F N - F N + F (m) [2 marks] Again. N2O can’t have a COS. and ignore the dissociation energy entirely. The only isomer of the ones above which has a COS is the trans isomer. it cannot have a COS.57 eV! Sorry. While this could just be a coincidence. Since we know it’s linear. Under the circumstances 1. the atoms must be bonded in the order NNO. Unfortunately the scale is completely wrong for drawing a bond with a dissociation energy of 1. which means that it must have a COS.(h) [3 marks] Oops – the intention here was to have 1 mark for each of the features in (c).

21) (e) [4 marks] ⎛16.40 ⎞2 ⎛ 17.5 marks 0.11+ 1.4 × 10–4/1 × 10–6 = 140 (c) [2 marks] The solute emerges from the column at a time very close to the dead time (tM).4 × 10–4 molecules/nm3 0.63 −16.5 marks 0.71 × 10–3 cm .11 ⎠ ⎝ 1.06 (1.5 marks Kc (A) = [A]S/[A]M = 2 × 10–4/5 × 10–6 = 40 Kc (B) = [B]S/[B]M = 1. (b) [2 marks] 0. NB = 16⎜ ⎟ ⎟ = 3397 ⎝ 1.40) = 1.21 ⎠ NA = 3493 + 3397 = 3445 2 (f) [2 marks] H = L/N = 30.Question 19 (a) [2 marks] A large value of Kc indicates that the solute favours the stationary phase and moves slowly through the column.5 marks Mobile phase: [A] = 10/2 × 106 nm3 = 5 × 10–6 molecules/nm3 [B] = 2/2 × 106 nm3 = 1 × 10–6 molecules/nm3 Stationary phase: [A] = 10/5 × 104 nm3 = 2 × 10–4 molecules/nm3 [B] = 7/5 × 104 nm3 = 1.0 cm/3445 = 8.63 ⎞2 NA = 16⎜ = 3493. (d) [2 marks] Rs = 2(17.

06 = 1.7 ×10 –3 = 60cm (h) [2 marks] So that the ODS group is not “stripped” from the silica support as a result of the high pressures developed during HPLC.0 3.6 5.6 3.(g) [6 marks] (R s )1 = (R s )2 1.0 8.5 1.5 2.0 1. .2 21.2 12.0 6.5 N1 N2 3445 N2 ⎛ 1.0 Third half hour or between 1 and 1.0 (k) [2 marks] Peak Area 0 91.0 4.5 15.2 7.3 80.1 38.9 × 10 ⎝ 1.8 2.4 2.2 2. (i) [2 marks] Eluted first Eluted last Butan-1-ol [1 mark for the reverse order] (j) [4 marks] diethyl ether hexane Time (hour) 0 0.2 18.2 52.5 hours.9 ×103 × 8.5 ⎞2 3 N2 = 3445⎜ ⎟ = 6.06 ⎠ L = N × H = 6.5 24.2 Ibuprofen Concentration (µg mL–1) 0 14.

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