SOFA

WEST
T he S anTa F e ne w Me xi can • www. S anTaF e ne wMe xi can. coM
SanTa Fe 2011
SculpTure objecTS & FuncTi onal arT
SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011 3
4 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
COVER PHOTO
Sakiyama Takayuki Chôtô Listening to the Waves, 2010
stoneware with sand 10.5 x 18.125 x 16.5”
Joan B Mirviss, Ltd., New York
Photo: Richard Goodbody
COVER DESIGN
Deborah Villa
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
Robin Martin
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Ginny Sohn
MANAGING EDITOR
Rob Dean
EDITORIAL
Magazine editor Inez Russell
986-3093, irussell@sfnewmexican.com
Magazine art director Deborah Villa
986-3027, dvilla@sfnewmexican.com
Director of photography Clyde Mueller
ADVERTISING
Advertising director Tamara Hand, 986-3007
Advertising layout Christine Huffman
DESIGNERS
Elspeth Hilbert, Scott Fowler, Dale Deforest,
Bill Jacobi, Enrique Figueredo
ADVERTISING SALES
Michael Brendel, 995-3825
Gary Brouse, 995-3861
Belinda Hoschar, 995-3844
Cristina Iverson, 995-3830
Alex J. Martinez, 995-3841
Jan Montoya, 995-3838
Art Trujillo, 995-3820
Rick Wiegers, 995-3840
COMMERCIAL PRINT SALES
Rob Newlin, 505-670-1315
printsales@sfnewmexican.com
SYSTEMS
Technology director Michael Campbell
PRODUCTION
Operations director Al Waldron
Assistant production director Tim Cramer
Prepress manager Dan Gomez
Press manager Larry Quintana
Packaging manager Brian Schultz
WEB
Digital development Henry M. Lopez
www.santafenewmexican.com
ADDRESS
Office: 202 E. Marcy St.
Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday
Advertising information: 505-986-3082
Delivery: 505-984-0363, 800-873-3372
For copies, please call Reggie Perez, 428-7645,
or email rperez@sfnewmexican.com
|-
\||
P U B L I S H E D AU G. ,
-'|- || ´
´'|||'|| ||´| |''´|' '-| -||
'''||
|- cc cc- c' c·c-· ·· ·c · -c'-c·c ·· |-
· ·c- ·c ··-·’ c -c·
J |-cc·- ·-· 'c·c·c· ·-·|-· c-· · -·' ·c
·- c.-··c ·c· ·cc '' .·· c' cc···· c··-c
'c··c |-
`c·- ·· · -|· .-c' --·· '-c··- '-·c c-.·
cc··-· ·c --··
. '··-···c·' |zz '' ·c·c · ·- '·-· '·c· |·c.-
´·c ·c ·- |· |· c· c.'
.. .·-- ''c· cc ·-··- ·c c '·' ·c '- `-cc
`-· c' -·· -|·
. -'' ·- -|·c·
Fujitsuka Shosei, Fire, 2011
Hobichiku and rattan
11” x 11” x 44” high
TAI Gallery, Santa Fe
6 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
108 EAST SAN FRANCI SCO STREET SANTA FE, NEW MEXI CO 87501 505.984.2232
WWW.TOMTAYLORBUCKLES.COM
ARTISTS’ RECEPTION HONORING PAT PRUITT AND CHRIS PRUITT
THURSDAY, AUGUST 18, 5:008:00PM
New Mexico residents from the Laguna Pueblo, Pat and Chris
are award-winning artists creating contemporary, sophisticated designs
inspired by their native Pueblo/Apache culture.
JOIN US IN LA FONDA ON THE PLAZA
Charles Steffen spent most of his
life sketching the things he saw in his
Chicago neighborhood. His subjects
were those he knew best: his mother,
the woman who cashed his Social
Security checks, flowers and plants
from his yard. Much of his work was
drawn from memory.
Steffen studied art at the Illinois
Institute of Technology, but after a
mental breakdown, he spent the next
15 years at the state hospital, where he
underwent treatments for schizophrenia,
including electroshock.
But Steffen never stopped making
art, creating one or two drawings with
pencil or colored pencil every day,
sometimes using everyday products
around the house, such as brown paper
bags. Before he died in 1995, Steffen
considered throwing away his drawing
and photographs — more than 2,000 —
but instead placed them with a nephew
who showed interest in his work.
Some of Steffen’s work will be a part
of the Sculpture Objects & Functional
Art West: Santa Fe 2011’s Intuit Show
of Folk and Outsider Art, Thursday-
Sunday (Aug. 4-7) at the Santa Fe
Communi ty Conventi on Center.
Steffen’s work was also featured at
Chicago’s Intuit: The Center for Intuitive
and Outsider Art, and is represented at
SOFA by Russell Bowman Art Advisory
in Chicago, which specializes in modern,
contemporary and self-taught art.
The combining of art from an
outsider’s point of view promises to
bring a unique slant to the show, said
Mark Lyman, SOFA president. The
Intuit presentation will add leading
dealers and galleries of outsider art – an
umbrella term that encompasses self-
taught art, art brut, ethnographic art,
nontraditional folk art and visionary art
– to the already diverse mix.
The nonprofit Intuit center was
invited to SOFA Chicago last year to
rave reviews. The collaboration, which
enhanced sales of outsider art, piqued
the interest of new buyers and brought
welcome attention to the Intuit center.
At least seven galleries representing
outsider art will be a part of the 35
dealers —including several international
dealers — confirmed for the show.
“We think Santa Fe is an ideal venue
for Intuit,” said Donna Davies, a SOFA
sales executive and former Santa Fe
resident who worked at the Gerald Peters
Gallery. “Folk art is not new to Santa Fe,
especially with the Hispanic and Native
American influences, where there is
typically a lot of self-taught artists.
Aesthetically it’s the same concept, so
we think it’s the perfect mix.”
The gallery-presented, international
art exposition dedicated to bridging the
worlds of design, decorative and fine art
is now in its third year in Santa Fe. The
show continues to expand and enhance
its experience for the audience, said
Lyman. It’s also moved from July to
August in hopes of building on the
12,000 in attendance last year as part of
Santa Fe’s busy summer season.
“It’s really the high time in Santa
Fe,” Lyman said. “The opera is in full
swing and people are getting ready for
Indian Market. It’s the best time to be
in Santa Fe.”
The show’s lecture series will also
include a question-and-answer session
at 12:30 p.m. Saturday (Aug. 6)
between Santa Fean Eugenie Johnson,
a regarded collector of outsider and
folk art, and Cleo Wilson, executive
director of the Intuit center. The lecture
series is open to anyone who buys a
general admission ticket.
Both folk art and outsider art are
general terms for work done by
nonacademically trained artists, said
Bowman, who also will represent more
than a half-dozen outsider artists
at SOFA West. But while folk art is
thought of in terms of 19th-century
artists of certain communities — like
Amish quilts, for example — outsider
art is more of a 20th-century term
for those artists viewed as outside
the community. Many of the artists
OUTSIDE IN
SOFA returns for third year with eclectic mix
BY BEN SWAN
Visitors view contemporary ceramics in the CLARK+DELVECCHIOGallery booth last year.
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
RANDY FRANKLIN
Karl Mullen, Untitled, 2010
Walnut oil, raw powder pigment and pastels on paper 30” x 22”
Yard Dog Art Gallery, Austin
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
may have been confined in prisons or insane
asylums.
“Some consider it the art of the insane,” he
said, “but that is not always true.” The term is
more broadly applied to include those self-
taught artists who were never institutionalized.
Typically, those labeled as outsider artists
have little or no contact with the mainstream
art world or art institutions; often their work
isn’t discovered until after their deaths. The
art itself can illustrate extreme mental states,
unconventional ideas or even elaborate
fantasy worlds.
Bowman will also present more than seven
outsider artists at the show, including some
with Southwest influences. Joseph Yoakum,
known for his imaginary landscape works,
claimed to be born on a Navajo reservation,
served in World War I and traveled with a
circus. Charlie Willeto, who died in 1964, was
a Navajo medicine man. His unusual take
on visionary wooden carvings, which appear
to be inspired from many sources, brought
widespread recognition.
Some of the other galleries presenting
outsider artists include the Packer Schopf
Gallery of Chicago, who will present the
Cowboy Constructions of Harry Young;
and the Judy A Saslow Gallery of Chicago
with work by Henry Darger. The Galerie
Bonheur of St. Louis, Mo., which represents
international folk and outsider art with an
emphasis on the Caribbean, Central and
South American countries, will offer a mix of
painting, woodcarving and textiles.
Outsider artists are simply trying to make
order out of chaos, something that motivates
many traditional artists, said Intuit’s Wilson,
who is also a founding member of the center.
“It can be intense,” she said. “The artists are
compelled to create, not for the market, but
for themselves. Often they’ll use every bit
of paper to tell their story. People are always
trying to figure out why we are here — some
do it through art, others through service.
They are trying to find different ways to
answer those questions.”
The Intuit center was created a decade
ago by a group of eight who were concerned
that much of the art was being ignored by
major museums, Wilson said. The center, the
only nonprofit group in the U.S. dedicated
to outsider art, works to promote public
awareness, understanding and appreciation
of the art through education, exhibition,
collecting and publishing.
While the art might be different than what
many people consider Southwest-inspired
art, Wilson said a Santa Fe audience is likely
to be more open-minded. People always have
strong feelings about the art, she said, and it’s
not always easily accessible.
“It’s a dynami c fi el d,” Wi l son sai d.
“Sometimes it’s funny commentary, and there
is a lot of religious visions where they are just
preaching.”
Having so many galleries representing
nontraditional folk and outsider art offers
people a chance to talk about the genre.
That’s part of the unique flavor of SOFA.
“Santa Fe has always been a mecca for artists,”
Wilson said. “This will be the perfect audience;
they will get it quicker.”
Unlike the more urban and large-scale
experience of SOFA’s Chicago and New
York shows, the Santa Fe show allows a more
intimate experience, Lyman said, noting the
center’s pleasant courtyard and the SOFA
café that offers spirits, sandwiches and light
supper. The show has found its own pace, he
said, drawing a diversity of galleries from local,
regional, national and international markets.
“I think the sophistication of galleries in the
show is very strong,” he said. “The other thing
is that more Santa Feans are embracing the
show. Santa Fe has galleries and a market in
place already, but the venue is strong enough
to bring in collectors who are interested in art
and Santa Fe. The show has been finding its
own voice.”
Davies, who organized the galleries for
the show, said she worked to make sure local
galleries had more of a presence this year.
Aside from increasing the number of galleries,
the diversity of the galleries will be welcoming
to visitors, who will find everything from
large-scale bronze sculptures and furniture to
paintings and jewelry.
“I wanted it to be a multidimensional fair,”
she said. “That was my focus. There is a
range of media as well as form that you will
see at the fair. There should be something for
everybody, something that’s unique, and that’s
what these dealers are looking for.”
But an art show is not just the place to buy
work, Lyman noted. It’s the perfect place for
people to engage with the artist or dealer.
“It doesn’t have to be tied to making an
acquisition,” Lyman said. “It should be about
a new experience and sometimes these things
are not easy to understand intellectually.
Find out as much as you can. It’s important
to open up that dialogue. And then it might
make sense to own the art, especially if you
understand and have the insight.”
DETAILS
SOFA West: Santa Fe 2011 runs Thursday-
Sunday (Aug. 4-7), with opening night
events Wednesday (Aug. 3) starting at
5 p.m., all at the Santa Fe Community
Convention Center, 201 W. Marcy St.
Starting at 5 p.m., the preview is for
Museum of New Mexico Foundation
members, with VIP cardholders allowed
to enter at 6:30 p.m. The public preview
begins at 7 p.m., with $50 tickets
available at the door starting at 5 p.m.
General admission hours are noon-6 p.m.
Thursday-Sunday. Tickets are $15 for one-
day admission and $25 for a four-day pass.
More information at www.sofaexpo.com.
Duane Reed Gallery travels from St. Louis to participate in SOFA West: Santa Fe.
A visitor examines work in the Jane Sauer Gallery booth.
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
Charles Steffen, Portrait of an Old Woman, 1992
Colored pencil on brown paper bag 17” x 12”
Russell Bowman Art Advisory, Chicago
Bill Traylor, Red Dog, 1939-42
Pencil, poster paint on found cardboard 18” x 31”
Carl Hammer Gallery, Chicago
Michel Nedjar, Untitled Darius 1996
Mixed media on paper 30” x 41”
Judy A Saslow Gallery, Chicago
Amos Ferguson, Family Supper, 1960s
Enamel on paper board 26” x 30”
Galerie Bonheur, St Louis
SOFA SANTA FE
Just what is First Look at SOFA?
“First Look is a lovely cocktail party where the
purpose is to look at art,” explained Jane Sauer
of Jane Sauer Gallery on Canyon Road. “On
every side are art dealers and artists eager to
tell you the work’s concept, what it’s made of
and how it was made.”
SOFA stands for Sculpture Objects &
Functional Art, and this is Santa Fe’s third year
hosting SOFA. First Look is its gala opening.
When Santa Fe Convention Center’s doors
swing out to reveal SOFA West at 5 p.m.
today (Aug. 3), Museum of New Mexico
Foundation members will have a First Look.
Five hundred fifty Foundation Circle and
Business Council members will view art, speak
with artists and purchase works displayed in
35 spectacular booths — before anyone else
is allowed in.
The museum foundation is a private,
nonprofit partner to the Museum of New
Mexico, which includes the Museum of Art,
Museum of International Folk Art, History
Museum/Palace of the Governors, Museum
of Indian Arts & Culture/ Laboratory of
Anthropology and the state monuments.
Even before the first SOFA West opened
in 2009, organizers brainstormed with the
foundation about how the two groups might
be involved. SOFA’s VIP events coordinator
Ginger Piotter says SOFA works with
museums at all three of its locations to engage
their upper-level members, because they are
collectors and SOFA provides them with new
opportunities for collecting.
Foundation Circle and Business Council
members pay annual fees ranging from
$1,500-$10,000 for individuals and $500-
$25,000 for businesses. Ann Scheflen, the
foundation director of development and
membership, said, “First Look is a perfect
way to thank them for their significant
contributions.
“One would have to travel broadly to see
these current works from all over the world,”
Scheflen said. “The foundation is pleased to
collaborate with SOFA because our museums
are of international caliber and so is this show.”
“SOFA is like many galleries wrapped into
one,” said Jake Rodar of Reynolds Insurance.
“It’s a collection of amazing, contemporary
international art work accessible in our own
town.” Reynolds Insurance is a foundation
Business Council member and will provide
EARLY ACCESS
Upper-level foundation members get inside first
BY KAREN MEADOWS
financial support for First Look in 2011, as it
did in 2010. Rodar says Reynolds became
involved because the company insures a
great deal of fine art, and its clients are SOFA
enthusiasts.
“SOFA has done a lot for Santa Fe,” Joan
Dayton said. “It’s a chance for Santa Feans to
see what’s going on around the world in art.”
Dayton has been a Foundation Circle member
for 18 years and is on its board of trustees.
“Our members consider First Look at
SOFA a tremendous perk,” she said. “We
get to be there before the throngs for a live
opening night. It’s even better than a gallery
or museum opening because you can get
right next to the art, and interact with artists
and gallery owners.”
All agree that the works at SOFA are
museum-quality. Gallery owner Jane Sauer
added, “Most of the artists are involved with
less traditional materials that stimulate the
senses in a different way from paintings,
drawings or photography. Expect to have
questions and be surprised and learn.” Sauer
will have a booth at 2011 SOFA West, as she
does annually at SOFA in Chicago, New
York and Santa Fe. She is also a foundation
Business Council member.
Sauer says the artists showing at SOFA
have mastered their media and techniques,
and have gone beyond.
Santa Fean Geoffrey Gorman is one artist
Sauer’s gallery will feature at SOFA. He uses
found objects like sticks and bolts, rusted car
parts and mountain bike tires to create playful
animal sculptures. Gorman’s dogs, rabbits and
New Mexico birds are poised in suspension,
and look at you with expressive faces. Metal
bits, kitchen utensils, tools and fishing tackle
adorn some of the animals like fetishes or
milagros.
Other artists Sauer will highlight include
Santa Fean Roberto Cardinale, a former
foundation director who hand carves and
paints images of historic New Mexico
churches; Russian-trained porcelain sculptor
Irina Zaytceva; glass and bronze sculptor
Chuck Savoie; and wood sculptor Randall
Rosenthal.
“Feel really free to go up to anyone and
say, ‘Tell me about this,’” encouraged Sauer.
“Whether you’re just curious or you adore it
or you want to buy it, they’re happy to explain
it to you.”
DETAILS
At 6:30 p.m. tonight, VIP cardholders can
join SOFA opening night at the Santa Fe
Community Convention Center, 201 W.
Marcy St. At 7 p.m., members of the public
can purchase $50 tickets to come in.
For a First Look at 5 p.m., Ann Scheflen
says she’ll sign up new Circle or Business
Council members as late as 4:45 p.m.
today. Contact her at 505-982-6366,
www.museumfoundation.org.
Geoffrey Gorman, Mystax
Mixed media 23” x 14” x 8”
Jane Sauer Gallery, Santa Fe
Nuala O’Donovan, Pinecone Heart
Porcelain 30 x 30 x 35 cm
Flow Gallery, London
SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011 11
12 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011 13
1512 Pacheco St
Santa Fe, NM 87505
505-982-8632
victoriaprice.com
p
h
o
t
o
s
:
E
r
i
c
S
w
a
n
s
o
n
/
S
a
n
t
a
F
e
C
a
t
a
l
o
g
u
e
Spot-on Design
Modern Home Lifestyle Store
& Interior Design Services
PRI CE
a r t & d e s i g n
VI CTORI A
Washington D.C. • Manchester, VT • Kansas City, MO
Henley, UK • Manchester, VT • San Francisco, CA - opening fall 2011
328 S. Guadalupe St., Santa Fe, NM 87501
www.peruvianconnection.com
Artisan apparel
for nomads and romantics
SOFA WEST SANTA FE SOFA WEST SANTA FE
Coronado
VI P L OUNGE
O’ Keef f e
L ECT URES
MAI N
ENTRANCE
COURT YARD
S
O
F
A
F
a
ir
n
o
t
a
c
c
e
s
s
ib
le
th
r
o
u
g
h
th
is
e
n
tr
a
n
c
e
u
s
e
th
e
e
n
tr
a
n
c
e
o
f
f
o
f
M
a
r
c
y
s
tr
e
e
t
L
I
N
C
O
L
N
MAR CY
F E DE R AL
TI CKETS
I NTUI T
SPOTLI GHT
SOFA
CAF E
RESOURCES
SOFA WEST ENTRANCE
ENTER CONVENTI ON CENTER HERE
601
501 505
605
303 305
201 205
101
607
203
609
301
105 107
406
304
206
600
302
108
604
106
204
100
602 606
500
407 405 403
401
400
300
200 202
Kear ney
SHOW OFFI CE
& PRESS ROOM
VI SI TOR
CENTER
Exhibiting Galleries
222 Shelby Street Gallery . . . . . . . .305
Blue Rain Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301
Bullseye Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .302
Carl Hammer Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . .202
Charon Kransen Arts . . . . . . . . . . . .405
Clark + Del Vecchio . . . . . . . . . . . .304
Dai Ichi Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .605
Darrell Bell Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . .203
David Richard Contemporary . . . . . .201
Douglas Dawson Gallery . . . . . . . . .300
Eight Modern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .602
Elliott Arts West . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .403
Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500
Galerie Bonheur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204
Garde Rail Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107
Habatat Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .600
Jane Sauer Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . .406
Jerry Szor Contemporary Jewelry . .606
Joan B Mirviss LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . .401
Judy A Saslow Gallery . . . . . . . . . .200
Landfall Press Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . .400
llyn strong gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108
Maria Elena Kravetz . . . . . . . . . . . .604
Mindy Solomon Gallery . . . . . . . . . .501
New Mexico Museum of Art
Special Exhibit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .609
Oliver & Espig Jewelers . . . . . . . . . .601
Packer Schopf Gallery . . . . . . . . . .101
Russell Bowman Art Advisory . . . . .100
Sherrie Gallerie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .407
SWAIA @ SOFA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205
TAI Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303
The Ames Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Thomas R Riley Galleries . . . . . . . . .206
William Zimmer Gallery . . . . . . . . . .505
Yard Dog Art Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . .105
ZeST Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607
Sculpture Objects &
Functional Art Fair +
NEW! The Intuit Show
of Folk and Outsider Art
August 4-7, 2011
Santa Fe Convention Center
Opening Night Wednesday, August 3
Special thanks to:
Fair Map
Resources
Cerami cs: Art & Percepti on/Techni cal
Gl ass Al l i ance New Mexi co
Intui t: The Center for Intui ti ve and Outsi der Art
Penl and School of Arts
Pi l chuck Gl ass School
Santa Fean Magazi ne
Soci ety of North Ameri can Gol dsmi ths
Studi o Art Qui l t Associ ates
On the Avenue Marketi ng
LUIS SÁNCHEZ SATURNO
Lina Ongaro, from Italy, looks at a piece by Lino Tagliapietra at Santa
Fe’s Holsten Galleries booth at the opening of SOFA West: Santa Fe
last year.
16 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
120 East Marcy Street | Santa Fe, New Mexico
505.982.6244 phone | www.owingsgallery.com
Monday through Saturday, 10 to 5
The Owings Gallery
ed mell | New Work 2011
August 12 through September 10th
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
There’s more to Sofa West: Santa Fe 2011 than the
eclectic mix of contemporary art from around the
world. It’s also a time to immerse yourself in art, culture
and learning — thanks to the special events that are
a staple of the Sculpture Objects & Functional Art
West: Santa Fe 2011.
Events for the public include a private backstage
tour of the Santa Fe Opera, a full schedule of talks,
tours and in-booth events aimed at connecting the
audience with the show’s diverse range of art, said
Ginger SOFA, who handles SWAY special events and
VIP programming.
“We like to work with organizations in the community
to provide a mutally beneficial experience,” she said.
“It’s a way of having SOFA West attendees who might
not know Santa Fe take a part in the culturally and
historically rich” aspects of the area.
The New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe also
will present a small exhibition at SOFA previewing the
museum’s show, Kimono: Karen LaMonte and Prints of
the Floating World. The show, which runs though Nov.
6, juxtaposes LaMonte’s life-sized, cast-glass sculpture
of a kimono with figurative woodblock prints.
Several invitation-only affairs, including a design
reception sponsored by Trend Magazine, and a
International Folk Art Museum reception welcoming
SOFA’s spotlight on The Intuit Show of Folk &
Outsider Art, also are on tap.
The special events and programs help to give
SOFA participants a sense of place, said Mark Lyman,
SOFA president and director.
“There are special VIP experiences to visit people’s
homes, and go behind-the-scenes in the museum,”
he said. “The study trips and talks open to the
general public offer unique experiences. There are
many different levels for people to personalize that
experience.”
The private backstage tour of the Santa Fe Opera
offers people a unique perspective on how an opera
production comes together. The tour was popular last
year, Piotter said. “It’s a wonderful place to visit and is
highly regarded in the community.”
The Friday (Aug. 5) behind-the-scenes tour
includes the opera’s costume and props shop. Opera
staff will be on-hand for questions, including David
Zimmerman, the Wig/Makeup Department Head for
the Santa Fe and Dallas operas.
Zimmerman will talk about the effect of makeup
and hair on transitioning a character from young to
old, light-skinned to tan and thin to fat. Piotter said
Zimmerman’s in-depth talk will cover what is a very
crucial facet of the opera.
The lecture series features renowned curators,
collectors, critics, artists and dealers. The talks are
complimentary with admission to the fair; seating is on
a first-come basis.
One panel discussion in the series, The Language
of Glass, brings together artists with international
reputations as well as a connection to Santa Fe.
Presented by Pilchuck Glass School of Seattle and
moderated by its executive director, James Baker,
the panel will discuss the role of glass as an artistic
medium.
“Glass as a material for creative expression is
relatively new to the region and is increasingly
gaining popularity among collectors and the public,”
Baker said. “Collectors are developing a greater
understanding of the aesthetic qualities of glass.”
Other talks of note include a discussion by Chicago
gallery owner Douglas Dawson of how to determine
authenticity and why it’s important in contemporary,
tribal and found art; a talk by Santa Fe’s Blue Rain
Gallery on the increasing blending of the Native
American and contemporary art collecting fields and
a discussion with sculptor Ted Larsen and independent
curator, critic and writer John O’Hern, former director
of the Arnot Art Museum in Elmira, N.Y., and current
Santa Fe resident.
A RICHER EXPERIENCE
Special events serve up ‘a sense of place’
BY BEN SWAN
KEN HOWARD
Magic Flute, 2010
Santa Fe Opera
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
Sean O’Neil
Blown engraved and kiln formed glass
Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe
SPECIAL EVENTS
9:15 a.m.-noon, Friday (Aug. 5) Behind the SEEN: Backstage at the
Santa Fe Opera, plus exclusive wigs and makeup presentation. Transportation
provided; tickets $25 per person. Contact Julie Oimoen, 847-913-7830, or email
Julie@theartfaircompany.com.
6-8 p.m. Friday (Aug. 5) Canyon Road Gallery Night, . Refreshments will
be served and galleries open late to give SOFA visitors a chance to see galleries
on Canyon Road after the fair closes.
SPECIAL INBOOTH EVENTS
2 p.m. Thursday (Aug. 4) Lisa Smith, Treasures Within. Smith shares her
personal aesthetic and discusses the spirituality of her hand-built ceramic figures.
Thomas R. Riley Galleries, Booth 206
4 p.m. Thursday (Aug. 4) Doug Randall: Modern Mosaics. Randall discusses
the maturity of his process and the evocative imagery he creates. Thomas R. Riley
Galleries, Booth 206
2:30 p.m. Friday (Aug. 5) The Other African Art: The “New” World of
African Ceramics. Gallery owner Douglas Dawson explores the issues of collecting,
including market, prices, authenticity and the delight of exploring the new world
of clay. Complimentary catalogs will be distributed to attendees. Douglas Dawson
Gallery, Booth 300
3 p.m. Friday (Aug. 5) Adam Aaronson: The Landscape Revisited. Artist
Aaronson will talk about the relationship between his glasswork and Carol Naylor’s
textiles, their inspiration and the process behind the work. ZeST Gallery, Booth
607
5 p.m. Saturday (Aug. 6) Yvonna Demczynska: Contemporary Irish Crafts.
Gallery director Demczynska discusses the inspiration for contemporary crafts, in
particular the landscapes and shores of Ireland in the work of three Irish artists.
Flow Gallery, Booth 500
LECTURE SERIES
12:30 p.m. Thursday (Aug. 4) Elevating Glass Collecting in the Southwest,
Blue Rain Gallery. Owners Leroy and Tammy Garcia discuss the gallery’s evolution
from contemporary Native American to contemporary and its role in expanding
glass art collecting in the Southwest. Artists Tammy Garcia and Shelly Muzylowski
Allen discuss their personal evolution as artists in working with glass.
3 p.m. Thursday (Aug. 4) Collectors’ Notes: Japanese Prints of the Floating
World. Collector Lee Dirks and Japanese print expert, author and gallerist Joan
Mirviss explore the history, art and connoisseurship of Japanese woodblock prints
from the Edo period (1616-1868). The discussion will be moderated by Laura
Addison, the curator of the New Mexico Museum of Art exhibition, Kimono:
Karen LaMonte and Prints of the Floating World.
12:30 p.m. Friday (Aug. 5) Is this Real? Seeking Authenticity. Chicago
gallery owner Douglas Dawson, a specialist in ancient and historic art from Africa,
Asia and the Americas, discusses how to determine authenticity and its importance
in contemporary art, tribal and found art.
3:30 p.m. Friday (Aug. 5) Art & Non-Art Materials, Ted Larsen in
Conversation with John O’Hern. Artist Larsen, represented by Santa Fe’s Eight
Modern, talks with O’Hern, an independent curator, critic and writer.
12:30 p.m. Saturday (Aug. 6) What is Outsider Art? A question-and-
answer session between Santa Fe resident and collector Eugenie Johnson and Cleo
Wilson, director of Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Chicago.
3:30 p.m. Saturday (Aug. 6) The Language of Glass. A panel discussion
moderated by Seattle-based Pilchuck Glass School’s executive director, James
Baker. Panelists include artist James Drake and artist John Torreano.
3 p.m. Sunday (Aug. 7) Stimulus/Response: What are you looking at? Artist
Rick Beck, represented by Thomas R. Riley Galleries, Cleveland, discusses the
evolution of his large-scale glass sculpture and the concepts, artists and artistic
movements that have been seminal in the development of the works.
Bottle, Zande Culture, Democratic Republic of Congo, late 19th century
earthenware 15” x 9”
Douglas Dawson, Chicago
SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011 19
BELLAS ARTES 653 Canyon Road Santa Fe, NM 87501
505.983.2745 bc@bellasartesgallery.com www.bellasartes gallery.com
OLGA de AMARAL
VII PUEBLOS VII POLICROMOS
AUGUST 5 to SEPTEMBER 10, 2011
Opening Friday August 5
th
5 - 7 PM
Pueblo I 2010 fber, acrylic paint, gold leaf 53” x 22”
20 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
Opening Night Reception: August 5, 5-8PM
205 Canyon Road • 505.955.1500
www.greenbergfneart.com
The Figurative Abstractions
Mark Yale Harris
Opening Night Reception: August 5, 5-8PM
223 Canyon Road • 505.820.9229
www.elyseefneart.com
Shadow Sculptures
Randy Cooper
GREENBERG
FINE ART
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
Santa Feans can travel the world, art wise, by perusing
the 300 international artists exhibiting this week at
SOFA West.
Out of 27 participating galleries, 20 — including four
from Santa Fe — will be showing artists who live
outside the United States. There will also be a gallery
from Argentina, one from Canada and two from
England represented.
“This year there’s a surge in Japanese and Danish
ceramics. Joan B. Mirviss, Ltd. will focus on master
Japanese potter Sakiyama Takayuki. Mindy Solomon
is bringing contemporary South Korean ceramist Kang
Hyo Lee,” said SOFA sales executive Donna Davies.
“The Douglas Dawson Gallery, Chicago, will show
an all African mixture of ceramics, sculptural vessels
and prehistoric work,” she said.
London’s Flow Gallery is featuring several Irish
artists who find inspiration in nature. “We’re bringing
the sculptural ceramics of Ireland’s Nuala O’Donovan
along with Joe Hogan who uses willow he grows
himself. He’s one of the best respected basket makers
in Europe and collects old bog woods,” Flow Gallery
owner Yvonne Demczynska said.
“The thistle inspires O’ Donovan’s porcelain
sculptures. She loves working in patterns. The forms
are constructed over a period of months or even
years. She responds to the geometry of nature,”
Demczynska said.
“There will be three jewelers who all use different
materials - gold, silver, found objects and stones.
Some of their inspiration comes from artifacts,
seascapes, urchins and shells,” she said.
“We’ll be showing Rosa Nguyan, Vietnamese
ceramist and glass maker. Some of her work is seed
pod-like,” Demczynska said.
“Danish artist Hans-Henning Pedersen, whose
wooden vessels are made from beech and ash found
locally on the island of Bornholm, turns the wood
when it’s green and almost paper thin. It dries out
over several months and assumes unpredictable,
asymmetrical forms,” she said.
London’s ZeST Gallery will feature work by
Adam Aaronson and Carol Naylor in The Landscape
Revisited.
“Carol Naylor’s stunning embroidered canvases
use the threaded needle in place of the paintbrush
and pencil to produce abstracted scenes imbued with
movement and undulation created by the tension and
fret of the stitching,” ZeSt Gallery Manager Corinne
Alexander said via email.
“AdamAaronson’s glass forms and vessels transcend
ordinary expectations of the medium to celebrate the
natural flow and force of molten glass, demonstrated
by his organic shapes,” she said.
Canada’s Darrell Bell Gallery is bringing Joe Fafard’s
large scale cast bronze sculpture, Colombe — 6’ x 8.5’
x 3’ — and Victor Cicansky’s bronze Apple Pedestal
Table I — 28” x 22” x 22”, among other works.
Fafard and Cicansky, who became well known in the
1960s, were reportedly influenced by the California
funk art movement and sometimes bring a sense of
playfulness to their work.
“Joe Fafard’s work with animals has always been
about honoring them; recognizing that our cultures
have been built on the backs of animals. The ‘presence
of spirit’ of the animal is present in all of Joe’s work,”
owner Darrell Bell said via email.
British textile artist Kay Sekimachi will be at the Jane
Sauer Gallery. “There’s a revolution, a transformation
in textiles. Instead of being on a loom making table
runners or bedspreads being woven, they’re making
work more sculptural,” Jane Sauer said.
“We’re calling the exhibit, Kay’s Treasures — she’s
in her 80s and will be at the exhibit. She works with
the skeletons of leaves and puts them together as a
basket. She makes others out of wasp nests. Kay uses
organic colors — smoky grays and warm browns,
almonds and cinnabars,” Sauer said.
“Australian artist Noel Hart’s work is very colorful.
He lives near the Great Barrier Reef where there are
lots of parrots and exotic birds. He has an aviary and
his work is about birds; the flight of birds or in honor
of discoveries regarding birds,” Sauer said.
Santa Fe’s Tai Gallery represents 40 different
bamboo artists. “Most of our artists are in their 70s
and 80s. In the last 100 years many found they didn’t
want to make functional objects but wanted to create
unique, one of a kind vessels and sculptures,” David
Halpern said.
“Some of the bamboo is dyed or lacquered. There’s
a type of bamboo sometimes used that’s come out
of rafters in old Japanese farmhouses. The kitchen
smoke makes a dark patina on it. It’s highly prized and,
when the farmhouse is torn down, it’s only given to the
finest craftsmen,” Halpern said.
222 Shelby St. will show Italian artist Nino Caruso’s
modern pieces formed with New Mexico clay. “He’s
85 years old and a very important artist. Caruso is
coming to the show and will give a special talk at the
222 Shelby booth,” Davies said
Clark + Del Vecchio will exhibit Akio Takamori’s
ceramic vessels — some of which are large scale with
erotic images — and Danish potter Bodil Manz, who
creates translucent cylinders of egg shell porcelain.
A WORLD OF ART
International influence adds spice to fair
BY FLO BARNES
Victor Cicansky, Apple Pedestal Table, 2010
Cast bronze, patina, acrylic 28” x 22” x 22”
Darrell Bell Gallery, Saskatoon
Carol Naylor, Fields Unfolding 1
Freehand machine embroidery
32” x 21”
ZeST Contemporary Glass Gallery, London
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
“Since 1853, when Japan was opened to trade and
political and cultural interactions with the West,
Japanese culture has greatly influenced artistic
practice beyond its own borders ... Impressionists and
post-impressionists such as Eduoard Manet, Edgar
Degas, Mary Cassatt, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and
Vincent van Gogh all integrated lessons learned from
(Japanese) woodblock prints into their work.”
Laura Addison, New Mexico Museum of Art
curator of 20th-century contemporary art, wrote
that explanation for the exhibition, Kimono: Karen
LaMonte and Prints of the Floating
World. Timed to coincide with SOFA
West this summer, Kimono includes
nearly one dozen figurative Japanese
woodblock prints dating from the
1700s. Addison curated both the
museum exhibition and a selection
of woodblock print landscapes for
SOFA by famed 19th-century artists
Hiroshige and his chief student
Hiroshige II. They will be exhibited in
the Museum of New Mexico’s booth
at SOFA West.
Addison will moderate a discussion
on Japanese woodblock prints at 3
p.m. Thursday (Aug. 4) with Santa
Fe collector Lee Dirks and author,
expert and dealer Joan Mirviss.
Japanese woodblock prints, said
Dirks, “are a window on Japanese
culture, mores and everyday life,
especially during the time when it
was closed to all foreigners.”
Dirks became interested in Japanese art while
serving in Japan with the U.S. Air Force in the late
1950s. On a lieutenant’s pay with three small children,
Dirks was limited in his purchases, but he bought
one print that is still a favorite, and became a lifelong
collector of Japanese woodblock prints.
Their appeal is universal. Dirks owns prints from
One Hundred Famous Views of Edo (early Tokyo), a
series that inspired a number of Western artists. He
says architect Frank Lloyd Wright and author James
Michener were “obsessed with the Japanese aesthetic”
and Claude Monet collected more than 200 Japanese
woodblock prints by the great masters.
Dirks believes Santa Fe has a particular connection
with Japanese woodblock prints. In Tokyo 12 years
ago, he discovered a print by leading Japanese artist
Kiyoshi Saito (1907-1997) entitled 1955: Inn at Santa Fe.
Looking closely, he realized the “Inn” was the Santuario
de Chimayó. Saito received a U.S. State Department
grant in the mid-1950s to come to America; and
Dirks suspects that Saito visited Santa Fe because of
Gustave Baumann.
Baumann (1881-1971) lived more than 50 years in
Santa Fe and was known internationally for his intricate
woodblock prints. “You have to believe they had some
contact,” Dirks said.
Recently Dirks bought a 1980 Toshi Yoshida (1911-
1995) print of Native American vendors in front of
the Palace of the Governors. He
speculates that Yoshida, too, visited
Santa Fe —since every Japanese
woodblock artist of that time knew
of Saito, if not of Baumann.
Joan Mirviss’ gallery is integral
to the presence of Japanese art at
SOFA. “There has been a long-
standing representation of work by
Japanese artists at SOFA,” Mirviss
said. “In my area of specialization,
ceramics, the Japanese have far
outpaced their foreign colleagues
for decades and have and continue
to strongly influence ceramists from
around the world.”
She says SOFA will provide
a uni que oppor t uni t y f or
knowledgeable contemporary clay
collectors and enthusiasts to study
and admire a broad spectrum of
Japanese ceramics.
Mirviss’ SOFA West booth will
feature two acclaimed Japanese ceramists. “Sakiyama
Takayuki specializes in sculptural vessels that echo the
rhythm, texture and movement of the sandy shores
beneath his seacoast home,” Mirviss said. And Kato
Yasukage is a 14th-generation potter “working in the
difficult areas of centuries-old oribe copper-green
glaze and creamy white feldspathic shino glaze.”
Four other booths at SOFA West 2011 also will
display Japanese art: Clark & Del Vecchio of Santa
Fe, ceramic masterworks by Akio Takamori; Dai Ichi
Arts of New York, Shiro Shimizu’s glazed porcelain
and glass sculpture; David Richard Contemporary of
Santa Fe, Harue Shimomoto’s fused glasswork hanging
sculptures; and TAI Gallery of Santa Fe, Shosei
Fujitsuka’s bamboo baskets and sculptures.
EAST MEETS WEST
Japanese works underscore global connections
BY KAREN MEADOWS
Fujitsuka Shosei, Fire, 2011
Hobichiku and rattan
11” x 11” x 44” high
TAI Gallery, Santa Fe
RICHARD GOODBODY
Kato Yasukage, Stoneware vessel with oribe green-copper glaze, 2010
Joan B. Mirviss LTD., New York
“In my area of
specialization,
ceramics, the
Japanese have
far outpaced their
foreign colleagues
for decades and
have and continue
to strongly influence
ceramists from
around the world.”
JOAN MIRVISS
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
NISHIHARA KATSUMI
TAKAYUKI Sakiyama, Elliptical twisting open sculpture with carved surface, 2011
8 3/4” x 9 1/2” x 14 1/4”
Joan B. Mirviss LTD., New York
Torii Ippo, Sea Roar, 2004
Madake bamboo and rattan, 20” x 13” x 16.5”
TAI Gallery, Santa Fe
SOFA WEST SANTA FE
SHELBY ST.
SANTA FE
BLUE RAIN CONTEMPORARY
SANTA FE
BULLSEYE GALLERY
PORTLAND, ORE.
CHARON KRANSEN ARTS
NEW YORK CITY
CLARK DEL VECCHIO
SANTA FE
DAI ICHI ARTS
NEW YORK CITY
DARRELL BELL GALLERY
SASKATOON, CANADA
DAVID RICHARD CONTEMPORARY
SANTA FE
DOUGLAS DAWSON GALLERY
CHICAGO
EIGHT MODERN
SANTA FE
ELLIOTT ARTS WEST
SANTA FE
FLOW GALLERY
LONDON, UK
HABATAT GALLERIES
ROYAL OAK, MICH.
LANDFALL PRESS
SANTA FE
LLYN STRONG GALLERY
GREENVILLE, S.C.
MINDY SOLOMON GALLERY
ST. PETERSBURG, FLA.
JANE SAUER GALLERY
SANTA FE
JERRY SZOR CONTEMPORARY
JEWELRY
DALLAS
JOAN B MIRVISS LTD
NEW YORK CITY
MARIA ELENA KRAVETZ
CORDOBA, ARGENTINA
OLIVER ESPIG JEWELERS
SANTA BARBARA, CALIF.
THE INTERNATIONAL SCULPTURE OBJECTS FUNCTIONAL ART FAIRS
SHERRIE GALLERIE
COLUMBUS, OHIO
SWAIASOFA:
CONTEMPORARY METAL
SANTA FE
TAI GALLERY
SANTA FE
THOMAS R. RILEY GALLERIES
CLEVELAND, OHIO
WILLIAM ZIMMER GALLERY
MENDOCINO, CALIF.
ZEST CONTEMPORARY GALLERY
LONDON, UK
INTUIT: RUSSELL BOWMAN ART
ADVISORY CHICAGO
PACKER SCHOPF CHICAGO
YARD DOG AUSTIN
GARDE RAIL AUSTIN
GALERIE BONHEUR ST. LOUIS
GILLEY’S GALLERY
BATON ROUGE, LOUISIANA
PARTI CI PATI NG GALLERI ES
SAVE THE DATES
SOFA CHICAGO2011
INTUIT SHOW OF FOLK
& OUTSIDER ART
Nov. 4-6, 2011
OPENING NIGHT PREVIEW:
Nov. 3
SOFA NEWYORK 2012
April 20-23, 2012
OPENING NIGHT PREVIEW:
April 19
DETAILS
web: sofaexpo.com
email: info@sofaexpo.com
telephone: 312-587-7632
or 800-563-SOFA (7632)
ROBERT NICHOLS GALLERY
SANtA Fe
Historic, Classic, and Innovative Native American Pottery

Six

: Namingha, Dillingham, Lasiloo, Nipshank, Romero, Begaye
friday, august 5, 5 – 8 p.m.
through Wednesday, August 10
419 Canyon Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 | 505.982.2145 | www.robertnicholsgallery.com | gallery@robertnicholsgallery.com
SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011 25
26 SOFA WEST SANTA FE 2011
Coming into focus - Summer, 2011
.com
435 South Guadalupe Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 Tel: 505 982-8111 Fax: 505 982-8160
www.zanebennettgallery.com Monday–Saturday 10–5, Sunday Noon–4, or by appointment
Railyard Arts District Walk last Friday of every month
C O N T E MP O R A R Y A R T
ZANEBENNETT