A Fantasy Oriental skirmish game for 32mm minatures

Quick Start rules
www.bushido-thegame.com
Concepts art
Frostudios
www.frostudios.com
Studio painter
Luke Wilson
www.facebook.com/pages/
atacams-Minature-Miracles
Graphic design
Rule book: Joakim Bjelkås
Website : Rouge Marechal
Background
Henrik Örnebring
Alasdair Cunningham
Sales
shop.bushido-thegame.com
Original Sculpting
Oliver Nkweti Leftte
David Ayarl
Zak Valentin
Alan Carasco
Vladd Junger
James van Schaik
Israel Gonzalez
Adam Grabowski
A game by GCT studios ltd
Playtesters
Henrik Örnebring
Alasdair Cunningham
Des Brendan
Ben Nathan
Aaron Boyhaan
“The cowboy”
Odin Mentlak
Carlos Pinnelo
Rouge Marechal
“Lucky”
“Kye Pie”
“The Rev Black”
To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our
own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy
is provided by the enemy himself.
Sun Tzu
The Art of War
“Do you think we lost them?” said Kenko, looking
over his shoulder. He could see nothing but forest.
He wiped sweat from the corner of his eyes with his
sleeve.
Yumi stopped, too. “Probably not,” she said. “But
we might have bought ourselves some time.” The two
young monks stood still, alert. They looked and listened, not only
for what was there but for what was not there, as their master had
taught them.
“Where is Master Ekusa?” said Kenko.
“What?” said Yumi, incredulous. “He was right here!”
“How can he disappear like that? And with the turtle, too?” said
Kenko.
“He was right here,” Yumi repeated, still not quite believing that
Master Ekusa was gone.
They looked at each other and then up at the green forest canopy.
As one, they leapt, touched a branch, leapt again, kicked a trunk,
grabbed a bamboo stalk, dancing higher and higher up toward the
treetops. Ki enveloped their bodies. They felt the life force fow
between them and the trees. Yumi reached the top a fraction of a
heartbeat before Kenko. She smiled.
But it was Kenko who saw the master. “There he is!” he said,
pointing to a clearing about 200 steps away. Master Ekusa sat there,
still perched atop his turtle, meditating. How he moved 200 steps in
the blink of an eye without them even noticing, they had no idea.
They made their way to the clearing.
“Ah, you are fnally here,” said Master Ekusa, smiling. “This is
the place. I have found it.” He sounded happy. He was beaming, as
if he had found a great treasure or a long-lost son.
“Is this where we have been going? Is this where we are going
to build the new temple?” said Kenko. He wanted to scream at the
master. They are still after us! We can’t just stay here and build a
temple, no matter how enlightened you are!
“Oh, no,” said the master, still smiling. “The site of the new
temple is very far from here.”
Yumi was the frst to notice that the forest had fallen silent.
“Master,“ she whispered. “You said this is the place. The place
of what?”
“Our last stand,” said Master Ekusa. He never stopped smiling.
The edge of the clearing exploded when a huge Oni stormed
out of the forest swinging what appeared to be an ancient Ro-Kan
Temple Bell.
Kenko looked at the Oni and a great anger flled his body. Take
stance, he thought. I am ready.
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Welcome to Bushido!
Bushido is a game of savage battles, of cunning stratagems and last-
ditch defences, and where debts of honour are paid in blood. In
Bushido, the fate of the world hangs not on armies but on individual
heroes, men and women of extraordinary capacity, attuned to
the all-permeating life force known as Ki. This force is the very
fabric of the universe, and those with the appropriate training or
natural talent can tap into this energy source and gain seemingly
superhuman powers. In the world of Bushido, the delicate tapestry
of Ki – and thus the universe itself –is threatened by the forces of
imbalance, and it is up to you to protect it – or help rip it apart. In a
game of Bushido, nothing less than the universe itself is at stake. Are
you ready for the challenge of the Way of the Warrior?
Bushido Basics
Bushido is an oriental fantasy tabletop miniature battle game for two
players. Each player commands a force of no more than a handful
of individuals, represented by 32mm metal miniatures. These forces
meet on the battlefeld and the commanders (the players, that is)
try to outwit, outfght and outlive the opposing force and fulfl their
battle objectives while denying the enemy theirs. If you have played
tabletop miniature games before, Bushido falls into the ‘skirmish
game’ category: all miniatures represent individuals and your force
consists of a small group of unique characters rather than a big
faceless army.
A game of Bushido is fast-moving, fexible and flled with
strategizing, counter-strategizing and counter-counter-strategizing.
Your tactical acumen is important, but as dice add an element of
randomness, so too is your ability to think on your feet. A typical
game of Bushido takes between one and two hours to play – more if
you are new to the game, less if you are a seasoned veteran.
Getting ready for Bushido
For a game of Bushido, each player will need:
• A copy of these rules.
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• A set of Bushido miniatures representing their force. These
miniatures may or may not be painted but it is well known that
painted miniatures fght better.
• A tape measure, in order to measure the movement of the
miniatures. Bushido uses inches as the unit of measurement in
this game.
• A bunch of six-sided dice in two different colours, about six of one
colour six of another. The examples in these rules use white dice
to signify Attack dice and black dice to signify Defence dice, but
the exact colour choice is up to the players. Just make sure both
players agree on which colour represents which type of dice.
• A set of markers (10-20) to keep track of the Ki energy of each
model in your force. Game stores often sell markers for this type of
purpose, but you can use pennies, buttons or markers from some
other game instead.
For the game, you will also need:
• A play area in which to move around the miniatures. An area of
about 2' by 2' is usually suffcient, though commonly you need
a bit more space than this to accommodate dice, cards, snacks,
drinks, etc. A normal-size kitchen table usually works well as a
play area.
• Some stuff to put on the play area to represent terrain features.
Most tabletop gamers build and paint their own terrain features
but you can use any kind of handy object you like, as long as both
players agree on what that object represents.
The Profle Cards
All models in Bushido are represented by a profle card. The profle
cards contain all the information that will be used in a game
specifc to that model. You also use the profle card to keep track
of the wounds sustained by your model – each model can only take
so many wounds before it is considered out of action and removed
from the game. You sometimes also need to keep track of other
things on the profle card, for example if the model has a trait that is
only useable once per game it is good to mark that ability when used
so that you do not use it again later by mistake. Most games stores
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sell standard-size transparent plastic card sleeves. We recommend
that you invest in some of those (they are pretty cheap) and put your
cards in them when you play. That way you can use a marker pen
to indicate wounds, use of abilities, etc. on the transparent sleeves
and then just wipe the sleeves clean after the game, keeping your
profle cards pristine.
To the right, you will see a sample profle card followed by a
list of what the terms and the symbols on the card means. Do not
worry if the explanations introduce new technical terms we have not
explained yet, we will get to those things later.
1. Name: The name of the individual that the model represents.
2. Statistics: The White number is the models base characteristic
value, some models have a smaller number in Black above the
White number; this signifes that the model may increase that
stat by one for the duration of a single dice roll or stat use by
spending the Ki required (i.e. the number in Black).
3. CP: Combat Pool. This is the number of dice the model uses
when in Melee. This number normally ranges from 1 (for an
unskilled fghter) to 6 (for a totally kick-ass warrior dude).
4. RCP: Ranged Combat Pool. This is the number of dice the
model uses when making a ranged weapon attack.
5. M: The distance the model can move in inches.
6. Ki: The two numbers represent how attuned the model is to the
life force of Ki. The frst number tells you the amount of Ki this
model generates during the Ki Phase. The second number tells
you the maximum it can have at any one time. Commonly you
place markers on the profle card to indicate how much Ki that
model has access to, and remove markers when you use Ki.
7. Wounds: The amount of wounds a model can take before it is
considered out of action and removed from the table.
8. Traits: Each model has a number of traits that describe how it
behaves in the game and whether it has any special advantages
or disadvantage. If a trait appears in red letters, this indicates
that it is a disadvantageous trait. Otherwise (i.e. if it appears in
black) it is considered an advantageous trait.
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Front
Back
9. Ki Feats: A brief description of the feat including its name and
cost are displayed on the front of the card and a full description
of the feats effects are on the reverse.
10. Weapons grid: Most models in Bushido are armed in some
way. The weapons grid tells you about the armaments used
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by the model. There are two categories of weapons: Melee
weapons and Ranged weapons. A model may have one or
more triggers: special effects that may occur when the weapon
is used some weapons also have weapon traits, which are
displayed here. Triggers only take effect if you equal or exceed
the trigger value, but weapon traits are always in effect.
11. Rice: The cost in rice to recruit this model into your force. If
you just use the starter sets when playing you do not have to
care about this number as the starter sets are balanced against
each other. If you ever want to tweak or build your own force,
you need to keep the Rice cost in mind, however.
12. Unique effect: Any special rules that apply to this model not
covered under any of the other headings.
13. Faction symbol: This symbol tells you what Bushido game
faction the model belongs to. Your force can only consist of
models that belong to the same faction.
Factions
In the world of Bushido, there are (at present) four factions fghting
for supremacy. Some of these forces are committed to keeping the
delicate balance of the Ki forces permeating the universe, whereas
other forces wish to upset and even destroy the Ki balance of the
universe in order to achieve their own nefarious purposes. In any
given battle, a Bushido player takes on the part of one of these four
factions.
The Prefecture of Ryu: The Dragon Clan won the rights
to colonize the Westward Isles in a series of duels with their
rivals, the Shiho Clan. However, the promise of sole settlement
rights died with the Emperor. His vessel expired and his heir was
too young and inexperienced to be concerned with petty disputes
at the fringes of his lands. The newly formed Prefecture of Ryu
found themselves yet again in confict with their old enemies, the
Shiho Clan. Now, the Prefecture’s grasp of power is weakened
due to the recent Tsunami. Their forces are in disarray and they
are fghting on all fronts in the aftermath of the disaster. But still
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the men and women of the Dragon are ready to take their place at
Destiny’s table, uniting the human world by defending it against
all threats.
The Cult of Yurei: In the shadows and dark corners of
the world, the worshippers of Yurei are gathering force.
The many members of this Cult may not even be aware that they
are serving the same dark masters, but serve them they do – the
Yurei Bargain, which in its various forms allows control over life
and death, has proven a temptation to many different people who
would otherwise have nothing in common. In the Cult of Yurei,
you may think yourself the master of your own Fate but you are
always advancing the unfathomable goals of dark unseen masters.
Even a puppet master has someone pulling his strings…
The Temple of Ro-Kan: The serene martial artists of the
Temple of Ro-Kan have long viewed themselves as above
all mortal and mundane conficts. Now, following the Savage
Wave and the rise of the Cult of Yurei, the monks of Ro-Kan are
being dragged into the clandestine war of universal balance – a
war in which they may reluctantly turn out to be key players. The
monks follow an age-old path and know the secrets of Ki better
than any others, but they are few and divided – will they be able to
unite and join forces before it is too late?
The Savage Wave: They take the form of evil creatures of
myth and folklore. From where they come or why, no-one
knows, but one thing is for certain: the wave crushes everything
in its path. The Oni and Bakemono demon-creatures that make
up the bulk of the Savage Wave appear bent on the destruction
of humankind and all that is holy, but they are not mindless, As
many opponents have found out at great pain, the Savage Wave is
cunning and organized, and it operates according to its own weird
and unknowable logic. Some mad hermits and outcast scholars
whisper that this is not the frst Savage Wave, and that the demon-
creatures have been in our world before.
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Game Mechanics and Concepts
In Bushido, you move the models of your force around the play area
in order to get into a position where you can fulfl your strategic
objectives and attack and kill the models of your opponent’s force. As
in all tabletop miniature games, there are some basic concepts and
mechanics for moving models and interacting with other models.
We will introduce these key concepts here and explain the various
actions models can take, and then go on to explain combat.
These mechanics and concepts are at the heart of Bushido;
nevertheless, any effects and rules written on a model’s Profle Card
take precedence over all general game rules.
• Rolling dice: When you roll dice in Bushido, a · is always a failure.
All dice that come up · when you roll are discarded and are never
counted for the purposes of achieving or not achieving any type of
game effect. If all the dice you roll come up · you are assumed to
have rolled a result of “0” for the purposes of calculating game effects.
When you roll more than one die, any additional dice that come
up ! adds +1 to the fnal result. Note that when in combat, only
dice of the same colour (i.e. either Attack or Defence dice) are
eligible for this modifer.
• Base to Base: Some actions require the model to be in Base to Base
contact (abbreviated BtB) with another model (friend or enemy). This
simply means that the base of the model needs to touch the base of
the other model (or the terrain feature) that it wishes to affect. It may
be that the dynamic pose of a model prevents you from placing it in
such a way that it is in Base to Base contact, in which case you can
place a marker of some type next to your model to indicate that it is,
in fact, in Base to Base contact with the other model. The important
thing is that it is clear and transparent to your opponent that your
model is in Base to Base contact even if it appears not to be.
If two models are separated by a narrow (1/2" or less) terrain
feature, have Line of Sight (see below) on each other, are in Base
to Base with the terrain feature, they are also considered to be in
Base to Base contact.
• Facing: The facing of a model is determined by the direction the
model is facing. If necessary, the players should clarify the facing
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of each model before the start of play by clearly marking facing on
the models base, using a dot, for example.
• Line of Sight: For a model to be able to carry out certain actions
Line of Sight (abbreviated LoS) is required. A model can draw
LoS from 90 degrees from either side of the facing point (see
Facing). This is a fancy way of saying that you can draw LoS from
the front-facing 180 degrees of your model’s base.
LoS is determined by drawing an imaginary line from the
centre of the active model’s base to the centre point of the targeted
model’s base (or to any given point on the table, if you ever need
to draw line of sight to an object, a terrain feature, etc). If this
imaginary line is not obstructed by any terrain feature or any other
model (friend or foe), LoS is considered to be established. If no
such imaginary line can be drawn, but the target model is visible,
then LoS is still established but the targeted model is considered
to be in cover (this is so that you can still draw LoS to a model that
is half-hidden by a wall or hedge, for example).
• Zone of Control: In Bushido, every model (unless modifed
by a Trait or Effect) has a Zone of Control (abbreviated ZoC)
extending 1" from the edge of the front-facing 180 degrees of
the model’s base (see Facing and Line of
Sight). That is, the ZoC does not extend
where the model cannot draw LoS.
Models may not freely move within the
ZoC of enemy models. When a model
enters an enemy model’s ZoC, the
model must either (1) stop at the edge
of the model’s ZoC, or (2) move into
Base to Base contact with that model.
If a model is already in an enemy
models ZoC when it begins its action,
it must either (1) move
directly away from the
model, or (2) move into
contact with the model
whose ZoC it is in.
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Taking Actions
All models in Bushido can take two actions in a game turn. (We will
explain exactly what constitutes a game turn later.) When a model
is activated it may attempt a Simple action or a Complex action. A
Complex action will count as both of that model’s actions in that
turn. This means that in any given game turn, any model can do
either two Simple actions or one Complex action. There are also
actions that are designated ‘Free’. Taking a Free action does not count
towards your two-action allowance. The text on the Profle Card
will tell you whether a particular free action requires the controller
of the model, to be the Active Player.
When a model activates and performs a Simple action, turn the
profle card 90 degrees to mark that it has taken one of its allowed
actions (this is another reason for having a big play area – you can
then easily place the profle cards next to the battlefeld so that you
and your opponent can easily see which models have taken actions
and which have not). When a model has taken a Simple action and
its profle card is turned 90 degrees, it is considered Tired. When a
model has taken a Complex action, or when it takes a second Simple
action, turn the card 180 degrees When the model has taken two
Simple actions or one complex action and its card is turned 180
degrees, it is considered Exhausted. An exhausted model cannot
activate again until the next turn. A model that has taken no actions
yet in a turn is considered Rested.
Being Tired or Exhausted may infict
a penalty on the model (see
Combat section). However,
the tired and exhausted states
only take effect after the action
that you have declared has been
resolved (this means that you can
always take an action without
suffering the associated
penalties of the state you
just entered by taking that
action).
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Simple Actions:
• Aim: The model picks a model to which it can draw LoS, if this
models next action is a ranged attack against the selected model,
it benefts from an Aim Bonus.
• Climb/Swim: The model may move half its Move Statistic on its
profle card in inches in any direction. Some terrain features may
require a Target Test to Swim or Climb through.
• Disengage: The model attempts to move away from opponents it
is in base to base with. Resolve as you would a Melee combat but
the model attempting this action must place all dice in Defence,
if it succeeds in defending then it may move up to its normal move
characteristic in any direction following the normal rules.
• Ki feat: The model attempts a simple Ki feat.
• Melee Attack: The model may attempt to move into BtB contact
with an enemy model using its base Move statistic, and then
make a Melee attack, initiating a Melee Combat. Before Melee
Combat begins, the targeted model must be turned so that it has
LoS to its attacker. If the model is already in BtB contact with an
enemy model, it may make a Melee attack; this initiates a new
Melee Combat exchange. In this latter case, the model may also
move freely around the enemy model it is fghting, as long as 1) it
remains in BtB contact with it, and 2) it does not pass through any
other enemy ZoCs while moving in this way.
• Ranged Attack: The model makes a ranged attack. To make a
Ranged Attack the model must meet the following requirements:
1. The model must be capable of making a ranged attack
2. There must be a valid target, i.e. an enemy model, within the
model’s Line of Sight.
3. The model is not in an enemy models Zone of Control,
or in Base to Base contact with an enemy model.
If these requirements are met, follow the Ranged Combat section
to resolve the attack. Before or after having made a Ranged attack,
the model may freely move up to its base Move statistic, though
if it does, its Ranged attack will be at a penalty (see the section on
Ranged Combat).
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• Reload: The model may remove a Reload Counter from its Profle
Card.
• Run: The model may move in a straight line up to 1.5 times its Move
statistic (e.g. a model with Move 4 may take a Simple action and
Run 6” in a straight line). If this model makes any opposed melee or
ranged attack roll this turn it will suffer -1 to its combat pool.
• Stand up: A Prone model may stand up (or remove its prone
marker, depending on how you have chosen to indicate that a
model has been knocked down).
• Walk: The model may move a distance in inches equal to its Move
statistic, in any direction.
Complex Actions:
• Charge: The model must move double its Base Move statistic
in a straight line, towards an enemy model in LoS. If this move
brings the model into BtB contact with the enemy model a Melee
Combat is initiated. Before Melee Combat begins, the targeted
model must be turned so that it has LoS to its attacker. In the
frst Melee Combat exchange only, the Charging model gains a
+1 Strength bonus. If the model does not have enough Move to
reach its target, it must still move its full Charge Move towards its
intended target and then stop.
• Ki feat: The model attempts a complex Ki feat.
• Focus: The model gains a number of Ki tokens equal to its frst
Ki Value.
• Special Actions: Special actions are either Simple or Complex,
so they are not an entirely different type of action. They are
designated ‘special’ because they require a specifc trait; only
models that have these traits are allowed to take these ‘special’
actions. The ability to take Special actions will be indicated on the
Profle Card of the model.
• Command (X/Y): The model spends a simple action, and may
activate up to X number of models of the category Y to perform a
simple action. For example, a model with the trait Command (2/
Ashigaru) may use a simple action to immediately activate up to 2
different Ashigaru models.
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• Heal (X): The model may spend a simple action and recovers X
Wounds, or to heal X Wounds of a friendly model in BtB contact.
• Mark Target: The model may perform a simple action and
designate an enemy model within its LoS. Allied models targeting
that model with a Ranged Attack in the same turn add an
additional die to their Ranged Combat Pool for that Attack.
• Order (X/Y/Z): The model spends a complex action and may
then immediately change the states of X models of the category Y
that are within Z inches of the model from Tired to Rested status
or from Exhausted to Tired. For example, a model with the trait
(Order 2 Bakemono/6) may spend a complex action to change the
states of up to two Bakemono within 6 inches from Exhausted to
Tired or from Tired to Rested.
States
A model may through game effects enter into a number of different
states. Some of these states are permanent, others are not. Below is
an explanation of the different states.
• Exhausted: Once a model has used both its actions, it is considered
Exhausted. If the model is attacked in Melee it can still defend
itself but it does so with a -1 penalty to its Combat Pool (see the
section on Melee Combat).
• Frightened: Some models have the Fear trait. When such a
model targets an enemy model with a Melee attack (through a
Melee attack action or a Charge action), the enemy model must
take a Fear test, which is a Targeted Ki test (the Target being the
Fear value of the model with the Fear trait). If it fails this Test, it
becomes Frightened. A model wishing to engage an enemy model
with Fear in Melee combat (through a Melee attack action or a
Charge action) must also take a Fear test and becomes Frightened
if it fails. Its declared action is also wasted and it is not allowed to
initiate Melee combat with the Fear-causing model.
While Frightened, a model must place more dice in Defence
than in Attack, and may not voluntarily move into BtB contact with
enemy models. The Ki costs of all its Feats and other effects are
also are increased by one. During the End phase, a model under
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the effects of Fear may attempt to make a new Fear Test using the
same Target value. If this Test is successful then the model is no
longer Frightened. It may, however, become Frightened again if it
fails another Fear test.
• Prone: Some game effects will cause a model to become prone.
The model is placed on its side, or a Prone marker is placed next
to the model. Models that are prone may not perform any other
action than Stand Up. A prone model has no ZoC.
• Rested: The Rested state is the ‘natural’ state of any model; a
model is considered Rested if it has taken no actions, nor been
forced to take any actions, in any given turn.
• Surprised: If a model is targeted by a game effect (most commonly
an attack) originating from outside its LoS it is considered
Surprised, but only for the resolution of that action. Models that
are surprised cannot use Ki Feats and suffer minuses in Combat
and to their Missile Defence pool, as indicated in the Ranged
Combat/Melee Combat sections. A model cannot be surprised by
another model that starts its action in BtB contact with it.
• Stunned: If a model that is rested is stunned then it becomes tired.
If a Tired model is Stunned then it is Exhausted. If an Exhausted
model is stunned then it suffers an additional -1 to all dice pools
until the end of the turn.
• Tired: After a model has performed a single simple action it is
considered Tired.
Taking Tests
Some actions may require the model to take a test in order to see
whether the intended action succeeds or fails (regardless of which,
the action is still considered ‘spent’, though). If an action does not
state a test is require it is automatically successful. There are two
kinds of tests in Bushido: Target Tests and Opposed Tests.
• Target Tests: Target Tests are indicated by the statistic used for
the test, followed by the number which indicates the diffculty of
the test. For example, a model may be required to take a Move (5)
Test or a Ki (4) Test. The player rolls the number of dice indicated
by their statistic (in the frst case, 4 dice if the model has Move 4;
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in the second, 2 dice if the model has Ki 2). If the highest-scoring
die is equal to or exceeds the Test diffculty, the Test succeeds.
Otherwise they have failed the action. The dice roll for the Test
may be modifed, if indicated by the rules or by a models’ Profle
Card. Any effects that will modify this result must be declared
before the dice are rolled.
• Opposed Tests: The model attempting to perform the action
that requires the Opposed Test rolls as many dice as indicated by
the statistic needed for the Test (same as for Target Tests). The
opposing model may in some cases use the same statistic, in other
cases a different statistic or a set number of dice – this is indicated
elsewhere in the rules or on the Profle Card.
Modifers may be applied to either models roll, and/or to the
number of dice used. If an effect or modifer causes a player to
have no dice left to roll then that player still rolls a single dice,
but the opponent gains an extra die for every die the opponent
would have had below one (for example, if a game effect causes
one model to end up having to roll -2 dice, that player still rolls one
die but his/her opponent gets to roll 3 extra dice).
Once both players have determined the number of dice will use
and any modifers, they roll their respective dice simultaneously.
Any effects that will modify this result must be declared before
the dice are rolled. Each player then takes the highest result
and compares it with the opposing players’ highest result. The
successful player’s models action is resolved.
If the dice’ results are equal, the players then compare the
number of dice they each rolled. If one player rolled more dice,
then their model’s action is successful. If the players are rolling
the same numbers of dice then compare the second highest result
rolled, then the third highest, and so on… If the tie still cannot be
broken then the base value of the models statistics used determines
the winner; highest base statistic wins. If the results are still the
same and the tie still cannot be broken, both players have to re-roll
their dice.
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Combat
Combat is at the heart of any tabletop miniature game. In Bushido,
individual models clash in desperate combat in a system that
allows players many different tactical options. There are two forms
of combat, Melee combat and Ranged combat. In Melee combat
models make Melee attacks, in Ranged combat models make
Ranged attacks.
Melee combat and Melee attacks
In Melee combat, players try to outwit each other and gain the
tactical advantage by allocating Combat Pool dice either to Attack
or Defense – the trouble is, of course, that you have to allocate your
dice without knowing how the opponent is going to allocate his or
hers. Focusing on Attack leaves you vulnerable to counter-attack.
Focusing on Defense deprives you of the opportunity to strike your
opponent and gain a tactical advantage.
Melee combat occurs when an action results in a Melee attack
against an enemy model. The model that initiated the exchange is
assumed to have the initiative and is termed the Active model.
When making Melee attacks, you use the model’s Combat
Pool (CP) statistic. The CP indicates how many dice the model
has available to allocate to either Attack or Defense. Adding or
subtracting dice, as indicated in the table to the right, may modify
the Combat Pool of either participant in a combat.
All these modifers are cumulative. If the modifers bring down
the CP below 1, then the player will still roll 1 die. However, the
opponent gets a number of extra dice to his/her CP equal to the
number the other player’s CP goes below one. For example, if one
player’s CP drops down to -2 due to modifers, then that player still
rolls 1 die, but his opponent gets 3 extra dice to roll for his/her CP.
Once the players have calculated the number of dice in their
combat pool they must both secretly decide how to allocate the
dice between Attack and Defense. This is why you need different-
coloured dice; one colour represents Attack and one colour
represents Defense. For example, a model with a CP of 3 may roll
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either 3 Attack dice; 2 Attack dice and 1 Defense die; 1 Attack die
and 2 Defense dice; or 3 Defence dice.
When both players have selected how many Attack dice and how
many Defense dice they will roll, both then simultaneously roll all
their dice. The active player compares his highest Attack die with
the highest Defense die of the opponent. If the Attack die is higher
than the Defense die, the model’s Melee Attack is successful and
you go on to calculate the success level and roll for Wounds.
Success Level and Wounds
The Success Level (SL) is the difference between the active player’s
highest Attack die and the highest Defense die of the opponent.
For example, if your highest Attack die is a ·, and your opponent’s
highest Defense die is a W, then the Success Level of your Attack
is 3 (5–2=2).
The Success Level indicates in which column of the Wound
Chart the result of the Wound roll should be read. If the Success
Condition CP
Exhausted -1
Surprised -1
Outnumbered -1
(-1 per additional
opponent.)
Prone -1
Frightened -1
ExPlanation
The model being attacked is
Exhausted when the attack begins.
The attack on the model originates
from outside that model’s LoS.
There is more than one (otherwise
unengaged) enemy model in BtB
with the model.
The model is attacked after it has
been knocked to the ground by a
game effect.
The model suffers the effects of
Fear.
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Level of the attack rises above 6 (through modifers or game effects),
then add +1 to the damage roll for each step it has risen above 6.
When you have determined the Success Level of an attack, make
a Damage roll. The Damage roll is made with a single d6, and is
modifed by any Strength bonus, Trigger affects (see Weapon Grid),
Traits or Ki Feats as relevant and indicated by the rules or on a
Profle Card. Any modifcations or combination of modifcations
and game effects cannot reduce the result below the “1” row .The
fnal result is cross-referenced with the Success Level column in
order to determine the amount of Wounds caused by the Attack.
Many models have special Attack Triggers that may occur if a
Melee/Ranged is successful. If the SL of the strike equals or exceeds
the Value of the Attack Trigger, apply effects of triggers before rolling
on the Wound Chart. Some models have Negative Triggers (marked
in red, rather than black, text on the Profle Card). These work in the
same way as normal Triggers but are rather activated if and when the
opponent’s SL equals or exceeds the Trigger Value. Some models
have Defense Triggers (in white), which are activated if a model
successfully defends against an attack, achieving the required SL to
trigger it. If the SL of the strike is equal to or greater than 6, and the
Wound Roll is an unmodifed 6, then a Critical Strike has occurred
thE Wound Chart
Wound roll Success Level
(1D6 + modifers) (SL)
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0 1 1 1 1 2 3
2 0 1 1 1 2 3 4
3 0 1 1 2 3 4 5
4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6
5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
7 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
8 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
10 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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and the wounded model is immediately removed from the table and
cannot be returned by any game effect.
If the attack was unsuccessful, or if the successful strike did not
reduce the opponent’s Wounds to zero, then if the targeted model is
able, the opponent compares his/her highest Attack die to the active
player’s highest Defense die to determine whether the opponent’s
Attack was successful. The SL, Wound roll and Wound result are
then determined as above. It is possible that both the active player
and the opponent suffer Wounds in a Melee exchange.
After both models have resolved their attacks the Melee combat
is considered over and both players tire their respective model’s
Profle card a model must participate in a Melee Combat, i.e. it
must use one of its Simple actions.
Melee Combat: Example
Carlos moves Yoshio, armed with a Yari into BtB contact with
Gordon’s Kairai Puppet using a Melee Attack action (simple).
Carlos is the active player and so Yoshio has the Initiative. Yoshio
has a CP statistic of 3 and the Kairai Puppet has a CP statistic of 2.
Both players consult the Close Combat Modifers Table and see that
neither model’s Combat Pool is altered.
As Yoshio has the Initiative. Carlos decides to try and fnish the
Kairai Puppet quickly and elects to use all his 3 dice as Attack dice
(he makes this choice in secret by holding 3 white dice in his hand)
Gordon is a little more cautious and decides on 1 Attack dice and
1 Defense dice. He makes the choice in secret by holding 1 white
and 1 black die in his hand.
Both players then roll their dice with the following results:
Carlos Gordon
·:· ·Æ
As the Yoshio has the Initiative Carlos compares the highest Attack
die · with Gordon’s highest Defense dice Æ. As Carlos’s result is
higher, he has scored a hit. Next he rolls on the Wound Chart.
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As Yoshio’s attack succeeded with a difference of 1 (5–4=1),
Carlos will read his Wound roll result in the “1” column. He rolls a
die and adds his Strength bonus, which is 0 (if Yoshio had charged
the Kairai Puppet, using a Complex action, rather than using a
Melee attack, a simple action, Yoshio would have had a Strength
bonus of +1). Carlos rolls · and consults the Wound Chart: Yoshio
has inficted 2 Wounds on Gordon’s Kairai Puppet. As the Kairai
Puppet has the Toughness (1) Trait, this is reduced to 1 Wound.
Gordon marks the damage on the Kairai Puppet’s damage chart
on its Profle Card, and as the damage was not enough to kill the
Kairai Puppet, and Gordon’s Kairai Puppet rolled at least one Attack
dice, the attack of the Kairai Puppet on Yoshio is now resolved.
Gordon’s highest (and only) Attack die came up a ·, and as
Carlos allocated no Defense dice, he is assumed to have rolled a
[0]. The Kairai Puppet succeeds with a difference of 3 (3–0=3) and
Gordon will thus read his Wound roll result in the “3” column. He
rolls a die, adding no Strength bonus as he has none, and rolls a !!
Consulting the table, Gordon sees that the Kairai Puppet inficts 5
Wounds on Yoshio.
Luckily Yoshio has the Armour (1) trait on his Profle Card,
which means that the damage is reduced to 4 Wounds. Yoshio is
wounded but not dead.
The Melee Combat exchange is
now over. Both players now turn
their respective Profle Cards 90
degrees to indicate that both
models are Tired (Yoshio from
taking a Melee attack action, the
Puppet from defending itself
in a Melee Combat). Both
participating models are still
standing (for now) and can
take a further Simple action
in this turn. It is now Gordon’s
turn to activate a model and
play continues.
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Ranged combat and ranged attacks:
Only models with an RCP statistic may make Ranged attacks,
unless allowed to do so by the text on their profle card or by some
other game effect. If a model is eligible to make a Ranged attack, it
may do so if and only if there is a valid target, i.e. an enemy model,
within the model’s LoS, and the model making the Attack is not in
an enemy models Zone of Control, or in Base to Base contact with
an enemy model.
The player of the targeted model may nominate a different
model as the target if the following criteria are met: (1) the LoS of
the model making the Ranged attack crosses an enemies models
base or its ZoC, (2) this enemy model also has LoS to the model
making the ranged attack. Any models that meet these criteria
may then be nominated as the target instead of the original target
selected by the active player.
The active player then measures the range and both players
calculate the number of dice they will use for Attack and Defence
rolls respectively (RCP dice are always Attack dice, there is no
need to select an Attack/Defence dice combination when making
a Ranged attack). The active player simply uses the RCP dice, and
the passive player uses a set number of dice for Defence based on
the range, as indicated in the table below:
rangE Short MEdiuM long
Defence dice 1 2 3
Both players then modify their dice according to the Range Combat
Modifer Table below:
attaCkEr ModifiEr
Aimed +1
Will move -1
Defender in cover -1
dEfEndEr ModifiEr
Large -1
Small +1
Tiny +2
Surprised -1
Prone -1
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The Ranged Combat test that follows is thus a normal opposed test.
Rolling for Wounds follows the same rules and uses the same table
as for Melee Combat,
Some weapons have the Ammo trait. If this is the case, remove
an Ammo marker from their profle card when the attack is declared
(the Ammo marker is thus lost regardless of whether the attack hits
or not).
Ranged Combat: Example
Carlos’ Minuro Arquebusier is ready for action. He has one of
Gordon’s Kairai Puppets within his LoS. None of Gordon’s other
models are in BtB with the Ashigaru. Minuro thus is eligible to
make a Ranged Attack.
Gordon frst checks if there is another of his models who could
be nominated as the target instead of the Kairai Puppet. He fnds
that Carlos’ LoS does not cross any other of his models, and the
Kairai Puppet is not in BtB contact with any other of his models.
Too bad, the Kairai Puppet is going to get it.
Minuro has a RCP statistic of 3. Carlos measures the range. The
Kairai Puppet is 10” away which puts it further away than the 6”
Short range of the Arquebus, but it is well within the 12” Medium
range. As Minuro fres at Medium range, the Kairai Puppet gets 2
Defense dice.
Minuro’s previous Action was an Aim action (indicated by
having placed an Aim marker on his Profle Card) and Minuro thus
benefts from a +1 modifer to his RCP, bringing the total number of
Attack dice rolled (remember, all RCP dice are always Attack dice)
to 4. The Kairai Puppet is not of unusual size and neither in cover,
surprised nor prone, so no further modifers apply.
Both players roll the dice.
Carlos Gordon
!!·. WW
Minuro’s Ranged Attack succeeds with a difference of 4 (7 – 3 = 4).
Carlos’ fnal Attack roll result is 7 and not 6, Because Carlos rolled
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more than one ! on his Attack roll, he gets to add 1 to the fnal
Attack roll result for each additional ! he rolls beyond the frst.
Carlos will thus read his Wound Chart result in the “4” column. He
rolls a die and adds the +2 Strength bonus of the Arquebus weapon.
His Wound roll comes up ., to which he adds 2 for a fnal result of
4, which means he inficts 4 Wounds on the Kairai Puppet. Again,
as the Kairai Puppet has Toughness (1), this is reduced to 3 Wounds.
Not quite enough to take the kill the Kairai Puppet.
Ki Feats and Ki Generation
Most models in Bushido are able to manipulate the natural energy
around them. This energy is called Ki. All models manipulate this
energy in their own unique way.
Each Ki Phase (see the Game Turns and Phases section) all
models will generate a number of Ki markers equal to the frst Ki
statistic printed on their Profle Card. These Ki markers are placed
on the models Profle Card. A model may not have more Ki markers
on its card than the second Ki value. If a model somehow generates
Ki above the second Ki value these addition markers are forfeited
and cannot be regained. When models are required to make Ki rolls
for whatever reason then it is the frst Ki statistic that determines
the number of dice to be used. When a model preforms any action
that requires Ki to be spent, the required numbers of markers are
removed from the model’s Profle Card. For purposes of game
effects any actions that require the expenditure of Ki markers are
considered Ki Feats.
The cost for each Ki Feat is indicated in the description of that
Feat. If a model has insuffcient Ki markers on its Profle Card then
it is unable to perform that feat. Unless a Ki feat is preceded with
this symbol it will cost an additional Ki token if used while in
BtB contact with an enemy model.
Feats can be used at different times and situations, these are
classifed the same as other actions and are as follows;
• Free: Free feats do not cause the model to tire or exhaust and
can be used at any time – even outside of the model’s normal
activation.
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• Free Active: Free Active feats do not cause the model to become
Tired or Exhausted, but can only be used when this model’s
controller is the active player.
• Simple: A Simple feat requires a Simple action. The model
performing a Simple Ki Feat may also move up to its Move statistic
in inches before or after resolving the feat if that model spends an
additional Ki marker.
• Complex: A Complex feat requires a Complex action and thus
causes the model doing it to become exhausted.
Ki Feats are further classifed by whom they affect:
• Personal: This Feat affects the user only.
• Target: This Feat affects a specifc target nominated by the player
controlling the model performing the Feat.
• Aura: This Feat affects an area that may be either set or variable.
The area is expressed as a 360 degree radius measured from the
centre of the model’s base. Unless stated Auras ignore LoS rules
and obstacles; any model (enemy and/or allied, depending on
what it says in the Feat description) within the Aura are affected.
• Special: The effect of the Feat is unique in some way and is
further described on the model’s Profle Card.
Starting the Game
Before the game begins players need to agree on how much Rice
they will have to spend on building their forces. The cost of all
models in the force cannot exceed this limit. All models in a force
must have the same faction symbol on their cards or have a game
effect that allows them to be used together.
Before the game, a Scenario needs to be agreed upon. The
Scenario will decide what objectives the players will need to achieve
in order to win the game. New Scenarios will be regularly available
on the GCT Studios Website, see http://www.bushido-thegame.com.
The Scenario also outlines what, if any, special features should be
present on the gaming table, and also how to deploy the forces on to
the table. Once Rice cost maximum, force building and Scenario
selection have been completed, the game starts.
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Game Turns and Phases
A game of Bushido proceeds in turns. A turn is completed when all
models of both players are exhausted. During a turn, players take
turns to activate models: player 1 activates a model of his/her choice
and performs an Action with it (Simple or Complex), and when that
action is completed and resolved, player 2 activates a model of his/
her choice and performs an Action with it. Thus play proceeds until
all models on both sides have taken all the actions they can take.
Each game turn is divided into four phases – the description in
the preceding paragraph applies specifcally to the third phase. The
four phases are the Ki phase, the Tactical phase, the Action phase
and the End phase:
1. Ki phase
• All models are restored from Exhaustion to Rested by turning
their Profle Cards to their original position.
• All models receive new Ki markers. All models receive a number
of Ki tokens equal to the frst number of their Ki statistic.
2. Tactical phase
• The players make an Opposed Test to determine who has the
Tactical advantage in the turn. The Opposed Test is taken with
a single die for each player. Certain Traits may allow a player to
roll more dice or reroll dice for this Opposed Test. The winner
of the Tactical advantage roll may decide whether s/he or his/her
opponent will activate a model frst.
3. Action phase
• Calculate the number of Pass tokens. Each player counts the
number of models in their force still on the battlefeld. The
player with the fewest models receives a number of Pass tokens
equal to the numbers difference between the two forces (e.g.
Carlos has 4 models left in his force, Gordon has 3. Gordon
will receive 1 Pass token). When a player with one or more Pass
tokens is the Active player, s/he may decide to spend a Pass token
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instead of taking an action with one of his/her models, the other
player then becomes the Active Player
• The player who was given the frst activation in the Tactical
phase activates one model and performs an action with it. This
player is considered to be the Active player. The action is then
resolved.
• The other player then activates one model and performs an
action with it. This player is now considered to be the Active
player. The action is then resolved.
• Repeat these two last steps until all models have completed all of
their actions.
• If one player completes all actions of all his/her models, the
opponent is then free to complete all his/her models’ remaining
actions.
4. End phase
• All Wounding effects are resolved.
• All other effects are resolved.
• All upkeep costs are paid (some Ki Feats require players to pay a
number of Ki markers each turn to keep powering the Feat; this
is referred to as an upkeep cost).
• Check if the game time limit (normally 6 turns) or if victory
conditions are met. If so, calculate victory points. If not, proceed
to the next turn (which begins with a Ki phase, followed by a
Tactical phase, and so on).
Traits
Models in Bushido commonly have one or more Traits. These
Traits are listed on the model’s Profle Card. In some cases Traits
are considered to belong to the Weapon the model is carrying rather
than to the model itself, these are so-called Weapon Traits and they
are listed on the Weapons Grid on the Profle Card.
Traits can be either positive (i.e. they create an effect or add a
modifer that is benefcial to the model) or negative (i.e. they create
an effect or add a modifer that is detrimental to the model). Positive
Traits are noted in Black and negative Traits in Red.
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You will see in the following pages that some Traits have an X,
Y and possibly a Z value associated with their description. X, Y and
Z substitute for the actual numerical values listed on the model’s
Profle Card.
Example 1: The Ashigaru armed with a Yari has the Armour (1)
Trait, so when this model suffers Wound damage, 1 is reduced from
the amount to be marked on its card. The Samurai also has the
Armour Trait but his Trait is Armour (2) meaning the damage is
reduced by 2.
Example 2: The Child Monk has the Trait Believer (Monks/4/1).
This means that any model who is a Monk within 4” of the Child
monk may reduce the cost of their Ki Feats by 1.
What follows is a list of the traits available to models in
Bushido.
Aggressive Stance (X): This model may force an opponent to put
X dice in Defence.
Armour (X): The model reduces any Wounds suffered by X.
Ashigaru: This model is considered as an Ashigaru for the
purposes of game effects.
Assault Fire: This model may make a Ranged attack at the
beginning of their move before a Melee or Charge action. The
model loses a die from its RCP (because it is moving) and CP for
this and any following actions in the same activation. The target
of the Ranged attack must be the same as the target of the Melee/
Charge action.
Assassin: If this model successfully hits an opponent who is
surprised, it may roll two dice and choose the highest when rolling
on the Wound Chart.
Attack into Defence: After all CP dice have been rolled in an
exchange, this model may elect to make its highest Attack die a
Defense die instead. The model must be the Active model in order
to use this ability.
Attack Multiple Opponents: This model may split their CP and
initiate a Melee combat with any number of opponents in BtB
contact, splitting the CP between opponents however the player
decides.
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Automatic Disengage: This model may freely disengage without
making a test.
Aware: This model’s ZoC is 360 degrees rather than the normal
180. This also applies when determining LoS.
Bakemono: This model is considered a Bakemono for the
purposes of game effects.
Believer (X/Y/Z): If any model of the category X is within Y" of
this model, then the other model may reduce the cost of its Ki
Feats by Z. The cost of a Ki Feat cannot be reduced below 1.
Berserk: This model gains the following Traits: Fearless,
Impetuous, Insignifcant, Last Stand and STR +1 (cumulative with
other bonuses). Any Melee Combat in which a Berserk model is
involved the controlling player must place all dice in Attack.
Bodyguard (X/Y): This model may switch positions with another
model of the category X, if within Y", and if this model is not in
BtB with an enemy model, has actions remaining, and X is the
target of an opponent’s action (i.e. this Trait takes effect while the
model possessing it is non-active).
Bravery: This model may re-roll a failed Fear test. The second roll
must be used.
Brutal Blow: This model may add +1 to its highest attack dice if it
is the active model
Brutal: In Melee, if this model’s highest Attack dice is equal to
the Defender’s highest Defence die, then the Melee attack is
successful.
Camoufage (X/Y): This model cannot be targeted by opponents
models when in Terrain type X, unless the model starts its
activation within Y" of the model targeting it.
Cannot be knocked down: The model can never be knocked
prone by any game effect.
Channel (X/Y): This model may give Ki markers from its Profle
Card to X models within Y". This trait may only be used the model
is active. This model may distribute its Ki markers entirely freely; it
is not required to keep any Ki markers on its own Profle Card.
Combined activation (X): The active player may simultaneously
declare Actions for models with combined activationX when they
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are the Active player. The controlling player chooses in which
order the actions are resolved. No more than four models may be
activated.
Co-ordinated Attack (X): The model gains an additional combat
pool dice if fghting in the same Melee combat as another allied
model this Trait
Co-ordinated Ranged Attack (X): When this model makes a
Ranged attack against a model that has already been the target of
a Ranged attack this turn from an allied model of the type X, this
model adds a die to its RCP.
Counter Attack: If this model places all its CP dice in Defence
and then successfully defends, it may convert its second highest
Defence die to an Attack die.
Cowardly (X): A model with this ability must make a Ki Target
Test with a target of X when declaring a Melee or Charge action.
If the test fails, the model is not allowed to make a Melee attack or
Charge, but the action is considered wasted. If the test is successful
the model may act normally. When this model is the target of any
Melee attack it needs to pass a Ki Target Test with a target of X. If
this test fails then this model acquires the Retreat trait until the
end of the turn.
Defect Missile (X): The models gains an additional X dice for its
missile defence pool.
Defence into Attack: This model may convert its highest Defence
die into an Attack die with the same result after all dice have been
rolled.
Devastating Charge: The model gains an additional die to its
CP for the duration of its activation if it takes a successful Charge
action.
Disengage (X): This model may add X dice to its Defence dice
when declaring a Disengage action.
Disturb Flow (X/Y/Z): If a model of category X is within Z" of this
model then all Ki Feat costs of that model is increased by 1.
Elusive: This model may ignore ZoCs of all enemy models.
Fear (X): When this model targets another model with an action
that would bring it into BtB contact with that other model, the
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targeted model must make a Fear test against the Target number
of X. The model uses its Ki stat for this test. If the targeted model
is successful, it suffers no negative effects, if it fails then it is
frightened. If a model targets a model with Fear then it must pass
a Target test against a target of X in order to be able to carry out
the action. If it fails then the action does not take place but is still
considered spent. A model with the Fear trait never itself has to
make Fear tests against models with a Fear value lower than X.
The effects of Fear are detailed on page 15.
Fearful: This model must re-roll successful Fear tests.
Fearless: This model is unaffected by Fear.
Feeble Mind: This model has to roll one die less when taking
opposed Ki tests.
Hatred (X): This model must attempt to target models of type X if
they are within LoS, with a charge or Melee action.
Horde (X): This model may become a member of a Horde
together with other models with the trait Horde (X).
Impenetrable Defence: Any model in Melee combat with this
model must always ignore the highest of its Attack dice.
Impetuous: This model must always activate frst in the turn and
move towards the nearest visible enemy. All Impetuous models must
have performed at least a Simple action before any non-Impetuous
models in the same force are allowed to take any actions.
Improved Disengage: If this model was the Active model, it may
choose to Disengage after the resolution of a Melee combat in
which it successfully defends (i.e. it does not have to declare that it
is disengaging until after the Combat Pool Rolls have been made).
Insignifcant: This model does not have a ZoC and cannot contest
or manipulate Scenario Objectives. It may however carry objects,
but even if it does it does not count as controlling the carried
object.
Intangible: This model ignores ZoCs, other models and terrain
when moving, but it may not end its move occupying the same
space as a terrain feature or other model.
Jump Up: The model may stand up (from Prone position) as a free
action when activated.
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Large: Large models suffer a -1 to their missile defence pool
Last Stand: If this model is reduced to 0 Wounds, it may still
continue to take actions until the end of the turn. At the end of the
turn, the model is removed from the game as normal.
Leap: This model may ignore terrain obstacles of a height up to
equal its Move statistic. The model can move over such obstacles
with no penalty.
Leadership: Allied models within X may use this models Ki value
for fear tests
Leech (X): When active this model may remove Ki makers from
allied models within X and place them in his Ki pool.
Mindless: This model may only be activated by the use of the
Command Trait of another allied model.
Monk: This model is considered a monk for the purposes of game
effects.
Not Outnumbered (X): This model cannot be outnumbered
by less than or equal to X models (i.e. a model with Not Out-
numbered (3) only counts as Outnumbered if it is in BtB with
4 enemy models, and only one of these models inficts an Out-
numbered penalty.
Oni: This model is considered an Oni for the purposes of game
effects. Whenever making an Opposed or Target Ki test all Oni are
assumed to have a Ki of 2.
Parry: If this model is in Melee combat and the opponent’s highest
Attack die is equal to this model’s highest Defence die, the attack fails.
If the Attacking model has the Brutal trait, both Traits are ignored.
Precision Shot: Any target of Ranged Combat attacks by this
model loses a die from their Missile Defence Pool.
Recruit (X): This model may only be in a force if model X is also.
Regenerate (X): This Model recovers X hit points in the End
phase of every turn. Regenerate cannot return a model that has
been removed from the game.
Retreat: This model must always attempt a Disengage action if it
starts its activation in contact with an opponent.
Rise Again: If this model is reduced to 0 wounds, place it prone
were it is, Exhaust it and remove all its Wound markers.
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Self Sacrifce (X/Y): This model may receive Wounds that would
have been inficted on X if within Y". This model is then removed
from the battlefeld, even if it has Wounds remaining.
Shield (X): The model adds X dice to its Missile Defence Pool.
Sixth Sense: This model never considered surprised. This trait
ignores the effects of the Camoufage Trait.
Slow: This model never has the initiative, unless its opponent in
Melee combat also has Slow, is prone, or is surprised. Slow models
may not take Run actions.
Small: Small models gain +1 to their missile defence pool
Soulless: This model automatically succeeds all opposed Ki rolls.
It cannot affect or contest Ki zones and Scenario Objectives.
Steadfast: This model may freely choose how to place CP dice
when frightened.
Strong Mind: This model gains an additional die when taking
Opposed Ki tests.
Stubborn: This model may never attempt a Disengage action from
combat.
Stupid(X): When this model is the active model it must pass a
target test with the value of X before it may perform any actions, if
this test fails the model forfeits its action.
Tactician (X): The presence of a model with Tactician (X) in your
force allows you to roll X extra dice for all Tactical rolls, as long as
that model is on the board. If you control more than one model
with Tactician (X), you may only beneft from the Trait of the
model with the highest X score currently on the board.
Taunt (X): This model may force an opponent in Melee with this
model to put X dice in Attack.
Toughness (X): This model reduces any Wounds taken by X.
Unblock able Strike: When active this model’s opponents must
ignore their highest Defence dice.
Uncoordinated Attack (X): Allied models in the same Melee
combat as this model loses X dice from their CP.
Unsteady (X): This model suffers a penalty of X to its Move
statistic when crossing diffcult terrain.
35
Untrained: During Melee combat, the highest result of this
model’s Attack/Defense dice (as appropriate) is reduced by 1 for
every 1 rolled.
Walk on Water: This model ignores linear terrain when moving.
Weak (X): If this model is hit by an attack or effect that causes
Wounds, it takes an extra X Wounds.
Weapon Traits
Ammo (X): When this model performs a Ranged attack,
mark an Ammo box. If a model has no unmarked Ammo boxes left
it can no longer perform Ranged attack actions, with that weapon.
Armour Piercing: Wounds from Melee/Missile attacks
caused by a weapon with this Trait are not affected by the Armour
trait.
Charge Reception (X): Models with this weapon trait trigger
an effect when charged. This is detailed on the models profle
card.
Charging Strength (X): This model adds X to its Strength
bonus for its frst attack immediately following a Charge action
taken by this model.
Cumbersome: The model carrying a weapon with this Trait
loses a die from its CP if it does not have the initiative in the
melee. It may not walk in the same activation in which it makes a
Ranged attack with this weapon
First Strike: The model carrying a weapon with this trait
always has the initiative in the frst Melee combat with a new
opponent, if unengaged. If two models have this ability then both
cancel each other out.
Poison (X/Y): If a successful attack with this weapon causes
Wounds, then another X Wounds are inficted, ignoring Armour,
during the End phase for Y turns.
Reach (X): This model’s ZoC is extended an additional X.
Reload (X): After a model carrying this weapon uses it to
make a Ranged attack, place X Reload counters on this model’s
Profle Card. The model cannot make another Missile Attack
action as long as it has Reload counters on its card.
36
Scenario: The Idols
• Background: Three powerful Ki Idols have mysteriously risen
from the ground in the battle area. Those versed in the ways of
Ki have determined that by turning these idols in a particular
way, the forces of Ki will be aligned in the favour of the force
doing the turning. Two forces have converged on the area in
order to make sure that they gain the favour of Ki rather than
their opponents.
• Setup: Use any terrain elements you have available and set up
a 4' by 4' table by agreement with your opponent. Place three
tokens along the centre line of the board, the frst in the middle
and the other two 8" on either side of the centre token. These
tokens should have a facing marked on them, and set so that they
are not facing either player’s table edge when play starts. These
tokens represent the three Idols.
The players make a Tactical roll and the winner selects the
table edge he wishes to deploy on. The loser must then deploy
his/her entire force in the opposite deployment zone, at least
12" from the centre line. When the loser of the Tactical roll has
deployed his/her force then the winner deploys his/her entire
force on the other table edge, again at least 12" from the centre
line.
• Instructions: Players are attempting to turn the idols to face
their table edge. In order to turn an Idol a model must be in BtB
contact when it is activated and then perform a Simple action.
An Idol can only be turned 90 degrees with any action. A model
in BtB with an enemy model cannot turn an Idol. The game lasts
for 6 Turns. After the last turn, calculate Victory Points to see
which player has triumphed.
• Victory Points: At the end of the game, each player gains 1
Victory Point for each Idol facing his/her own table edge.
The player with the most Victory Points wins.
The Wound CharT
Wound roll Success Level
(1D6 + modifers) (SL)
0 1 2 3 4 5 6
1 0 1 1 1 1 2 3
2 0 1 1 1 2 3 4
3 0 1 1 2 3 4 5
4 1 1 2 3 4 5 6
5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
6 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
7 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
8 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
9 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
10 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Melee Modifiers
Condition CP
Exhausted -1
Surprised -1
Outnumbered -1
(-1 per additional opponent.)
Prone -1
Frightened -1
rAnGed Modifiers
AttACker Modifier
Aimed +1
Will move -1
Defender in cover -1
defender Modifier
Large -1
Small +1
Tiny +2
Surprised -1
Prone -1
GAMe Turns
ki PhAse
• All models are restored from
Exhaustion to Rested.
• All models receive new Ki
markers.
tACtiCAl PhAse
• Determine Tactical advantage.
ACtion PhAse
• Calculate the number
of Pass tokens.
• Model activation.
• If one player completes all
actions of all his/her models,
the opponent is then free to
complete all his/her models’
remaining actions.
end PhAse
• All Wounding effects
are resolved.
• All other effects are resolved.
• All upkeep costs are paid.
• Check if the game time limit or if
victory conditions are met.

A game by GCT studios ltd
Concepts art Frostudios www.frostudios.com Studio painter Luke Wilson www.facebook.com/pages/ atacams-Minature-Miracles Graphic design Rule book: Joakim Bjelkås Website : Rouge Marechal Background Henrik Örnebring Alasdair Cunningham Sales shop.bushido-thegame.com Original Sculpting Oliver Nkweti Lefitte David Ayarl Zak Valentin Alan Carasco Vladd Junger James van Schaik Israel Gonzalez Adam Grabowski Playtesters Henrik Örnebring Alasdair Cunningham Des Brendan Ben Nathan Aaron Boyhaan “The cowboy” Odin Mentlak Carlos Pinnelo Rouge Marechal “Lucky” “Kye Pie” “The Rev Black”

www.bushido-thegame.com

To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself. Sun Tzu The Art of War

“Do you think we lost them?” said Kenko, looking over his shoulder. He could see nothing but forest. He wiped sweat from the corner of his eyes with his sleeve. Yumi stopped, too. “Probably not,” she said. “But we might have bought ourselves some time.” The two young monks stood still, alert. They looked and listened, not only for what was there but for what was not there, as their master had taught them. “Where is Master Ekusa?” said Kenko. “What?” said Yumi, incredulous. “He was right here!” “How can he disappear like that? And with the turtle, too?” said Kenko. “He was right here,” Yumi repeated, still not quite believing that Master Ekusa was gone. They looked at each other and then up at the green forest canopy. As one, they leapt, touched a branch, leapt again, kicked a trunk, grabbed a bamboo stalk, dancing higher and higher up toward the treetops. Ki enveloped their bodies. They felt the life force flow between them and the trees. Yumi reached the top a fraction of a heartbeat before Kenko. She smiled. But it was Kenko who saw the master. “There he is!” he said, pointing to a clearing about 200 steps away. Master Ekusa sat there, still perched atop his turtle, meditating. How he moved 200 steps in the blink of an eye without them even noticing, they had no idea. They made their way to the clearing. “Ah, you are finally here,” said Master Ekusa, smiling. “This is the place. I have found it.” He sounded happy. He was beaming, as if he had found a great treasure or a long-lost son. “Is this where we have been going? Is this where we are going to build the new temple?” said Kenko. He wanted to scream at the master. They are still after us! We can’t just stay here and build a temple, no matter how enlightened you are! “Oh, no,” said the master, still smiling. “The site of the new temple is very far from here.” Yumi was the first to notice that the forest had fallen silent.

Kenko looked at the Oni and a great anger filled his body. “You said this is the place. . I am ready. He never stopped smiling.” said Master Ekusa. he thought.“ she whispered. Take stance. The place of what?” “Our last stand.“Master. The edge of the clearing exploded when a huge Oni stormed out of the forest swinging what appeared to be an ancient Ro-Kan Temple Bell.

men and women of extraordinary capacity. In the world of Bushido. A typical game of Bushido takes between one and two hours to play – more if you are new to the game. In Bushido. so too is your ability to think on your feet. A game of Bushido is fast-moving. counter-strategizing and counter-counter-strategizing. the fate of the world hangs not on armies but on individual heroes. Are you ready for the challenge of the Way of the Warrior? Bushido Basics Bushido is an oriental fantasy tabletop miniature battle game for two players. Bushido falls into the ‘skirmish game’ category: all miniatures represent individuals and your force consists of a small group of unique characters rather than a big faceless army. the delicate tapestry of Ki – and thus the universe itself –is threatened by the forces of imbalance. nothing less than the universe itself is at stake. less if you are a seasoned veteran. and it is up to you to protect it – or help rip it apart. that is) try to outwit. outfight and outlive the opposing force and fulfil their battle objectives while denying the enemy theirs. 4 . If you have played tabletop miniature games before. In a game of Bushido. but as dice add an element of randomness. each player will need: • A copy of these rules. Each player commands a force of no more than a handful of individuals. attuned to the all-permeating life force known as Ki. and where debts of honour are paid in blood.Welcome to Bushido! Bushido is a game of savage battles. This force is the very fabric of the universe. Getting ready for Bushido For a game of Bushido. of cunning stratagems and lastditch defences. Your tactical acumen is important. These forces meet on the battlefield and the commanders (the players. flexible and filled with strategizing. represented by 32mm metal miniatures. and those with the appropriate training or natural talent can tap into this energy source and gain seemingly superhuman powers.

for example if the model has a trait that is only useable once per game it is good to mark that ability when used so that you do not use it again later by mistake. in order to measure the movement of the miniatures. The Profile Cards All models in Bushido are represented by a profile card. The profile cards contain all the information that will be used in a game specific to that model. • A bunch of six-sided dice in two different colours. • A tape measure. The examples in these rules use white dice to signify Attack dice and black dice to signify Defence dice. you will also need: • A play area in which to move around the miniatures. cards. though commonly you need a bit more space than this to accommodate dice. Most games stores 5 . buttons or markers from some other game instead.• A set of Bushido miniatures representing their force. Just make sure both players agree on which colour represents which type of dice. as long as both players agree on what that object represents. You also use the profile card to keep track of the wounds sustained by your model – each model can only take so many wounds before it is considered out of action and removed from the game. but you can use pennies. Most tabletop gamers build and paint their own terrain features but you can use any kind of handy object you like. These miniatures may or may not be painted but it is well known that painted miniatures fight better. but the exact colour choice is up to the players. An area of about 2' by 2' is usually sufficient. Bushido uses inches as the unit of measurement in this game. • A set of markers (10-20) to keep track of the Ki energy of each model in your force. For the game. snacks. A normal-size kitchen table usually works well as a play area. drinks. • Some stuff to put on the play area to represent terrain features. Game stores often sell markers for this type of purpose. about six of one colour six of another. You sometimes also need to keep track of other things on the profile card. etc.

Commonly you place markers on the profile card to indicate how much Ki that model has access to. 3. Do not worry if the explanations introduce new technical terms we have not explained yet. keeping your profile cards pristine. Wounds: The amount of wounds a model can take before it is considered out of action and removed from the table. If a trait appears in red letters. 7. M: The distance the model can move in inches. this indicates that it is a disadvantageous trait. Name: The name of the individual that the model represents. 2. That way you can use a marker pen to indicate wounds.e. 6 . To the right. RCP: Ranged Combat Pool.e. if it appears in black) it is considered an advantageous trait. 8. some models have a smaller number in Black above the White number. and remove markers when you use Ki. We recommend that you invest in some of those (they are pretty cheap) and put your cards in them when you play. Traits: Each model has a number of traits that describe how it behaves in the game and whether it has any special advantages or disadvantage. 1. This is the number of dice the model uses when making a ranged weapon attack. use of abilities. 4. Otherwise (i.sell standard-size transparent plastic card sleeves. The first number tells you the amount of Ki this model generates during the Ki Phase. The second number tells you the maximum it can have at any one time. 6. 5. This number normally ranges from 1 (for an unskilled fighter) to 6 (for a totally kick-ass warrior dude). we will get to those things later. CP: Combat Pool. Ki: The two numbers represent how attuned the model is to the life force of Ki. Statistics: The White number is the models base characteristic value. this signifies that the model may increase that stat by one for the duration of a single dice roll or stat use by spending the Ki required (i. etc. on the transparent sleeves and then just wipe the sleeves clean after the game. you will see a sample profile card followed by a list of what the terms and the symbols on the card means. the number in Black). This is the number of dice the model uses when in Melee.

The weapons grid tells you about the armaments used 7 . Ki Feats: A brief description of the feat including its name and cost are displayed on the front of the card and a full description of the feats effects are on the reverse. 10. Weapons grid: Most models in Bushido are armed in some way.Front 1 2 3 4 5 6 12 7 8 13 9 10 11 Back 9.

there are (at present) four factions fighting for supremacy. the Prefecture’s grasp of power is weakened due to the recent Tsunami. the Shiho Clan. If you just use the starter sets when playing you do not have to care about this number as the starter sets are balanced against each other. Some of these forces are committed to keeping the delicate balance of the Ki forces permeating the universe. If you ever want to tweak or build your own force. However. the promise of sole settlement rights died with the Emperor. Unique effect: Any special rules that apply to this model not covered under any of the other headings. 11. a Bushido player takes on the part of one of these four factions. you need to keep the Rice cost in mind. Their forces are in disarray and they are fighting on all fronts in the aftermath of the disaster. however. which are displayed here. But still 8 . the Shiho Clan. but weapon traits are always in effect. Rice: The cost in rice to recruit this model into your force. Faction symbol: This symbol tells you what Bushido game faction the model belongs to. 13. There are two categories of weapons: Melee weapons and Ranged weapons. Now. Your force can only consist of models that belong to the same faction. Triggers only take effect if you equal or exceed the trigger value. The Prefecture of Ryu: The Dragon Clan won the rights to colonize the Westward Isles in a series of duels with their rivals. whereas other forces wish to upset and even destroy the Ki balance of the universe in order to achieve their own nefarious purposes. His vessel expired and his heir was too young and inexperienced to be concerned with petty disputes at the fringes of his lands.by the model. Factions In the world of Bushido. A model may have one or more triggers: special effects that may occur when the weapon is used some weapons also have weapon traits. 12. The newly formed Prefecture of Ryu found themselves yet again in conflict with their old enemies. In any given battle.

uniting the human world by defending it against all threats. The monks follow an age-old path and know the secrets of Ki better than any others. you may think yourself the master of your own Fate but you are always advancing the unfathomable goals of dark unseen masters.the men and women of the Dragon are ready to take their place at Destiny’s table. The many members of this Cult may not even be aware that they are serving the same dark masters. The Oni and Bakemono demon-creatures that make up the bulk of the Savage Wave appear bent on the destruction of humankind and all that is holy. following the Savage Wave and the rise of the Cult of Yurei. but they are few and divided – will they be able to unite and join forces before it is too late? The Savage Wave: They take the form of evil creatures of myth and folklore. The Cult of Yurei: In the shadows and dark corners of the world. the worshippers of Yurei are gathering force. the Savage Wave is cunning and organized. and it operates according to its own weird and unknowable logic. Even a puppet master has someone pulling his strings… The Temple of Ro-Kan: The serene martial artists of the Temple of Ro-Kan have long viewed themselves as above all mortal and mundane conflicts. but serve them they do – the Yurei Bargain. and that the demoncreatures have been in our world before. From where they come or why. Now. As many opponents have found out at great pain. but one thing is for certain: the wave crushes everything in its path. but they are not mindless. In the Cult of Yurei. 9 . no-one knows. Some mad hermits and outcast scholars whisper that this is not the first Savage Wave. has proven a temptation to many different people who would otherwise have nothing in common. the monks of Ro-Kan are being dragged into the clandestine war of universal balance – a war in which they may reluctantly turn out to be key players. which in its various forms allows control over life and death.

they are also considered to be in Base to Base contact. in fact. either Attack or Defence dice) are eligible for this modifier. As in all tabletop miniature games. a  is always a failure. • Facing: The facing of a model is determined by the direction the model is facing. These mechanics and concepts are at the heart of Bushido. • Base to Base: Some actions require the model to be in Base to Base contact (abbreviated BtB) with another model (friend or enemy). you move the models of your force around the play area in order to get into a position where you can fulfil your strategic objectives and attack and kill the models of your opponent’s force. and then go on to explain combat. We will introduce these key concepts here and explain the various actions models can take.e. This simply means that the base of the model needs to touch the base of the other model (or the terrain feature) that it wishes to affect. in Base to Base contact with the other model. in which case you can place a marker of some type next to your model to indicate that it is. • Rolling dice: When you roll dice in Bushido.Game Mechanics and Concepts In Bushido. If all the dice you roll come up  you are assumed to have rolled a result of “0” for the purposes of calculating game effects. nevertheless. The important thing is that it is clear and transparent to your opponent that your model is in Base to Base contact even if it appears not to be. If two models are separated by a narrow (1/2" or less) terrain feature. It may be that the dynamic pose of a model prevents you from placing it in such a way that it is in Base to Base contact. any additional dice that come up  adds +1 to the final result. When you roll more than one die. All dice that come up  when you roll are discarded and are never counted for the purposes of achieving or not achieving any type of game effect. If necessary. are in Base to Base with the terrain feature. have Line of Sight (see below) on each other. any effects and rules written on a model’s Profile Card take precedence over all general game rules. there are some basic concepts and mechanics for moving models and interacting with other models. Note that when in combat. only dice of the same colour (i. the players should clarify the facing 10 .

it must either (1) move directly away from the model. When a model enters an enemy model’s ZoC. A model can draw LoS from 90 degrees from either side of the facing point (see Facing). or (2) move into contact with the model whose ZoC it is in. using a dot. for example. every model (unless modified by a Trait or Effect) has a Zone of Control (abbreviated ZoC) extending 1" from the edge of the front-facing 180 degrees of the model’s base (see Facing and Line of Sight). 11 . for example). • Line of Sight: For a model to be able to carry out certain actions Line of Sight (abbreviated LoS) is required. • Zone of Control: In Bushido.of each model before the start of play by clearly marking facing on the models base. then LoS is still established but the targeted model is considered to be in cover (this is so that you can still draw LoS to a model that is half-hidden by a wall or hedge. but the target model is visible. Models may not freely move within the ZoC of enemy models. LoS is considered to be established. the ZoC does not extend where the model cannot draw LoS. If this imaginary line is not obstructed by any terrain feature or any other model (friend or foe). LoS is determined by drawing an imaginary line from the centre of the active model’s base to the centre point of the targeted model’s base (or to any given point on the table. This is a fancy way of saying that you can draw LoS from the front-facing 180 degrees of your model’s base. That is. If no such imaginary line can be drawn. etc). the model must either (1) stop at the edge of the model’s ZoC. If a model is already in an enemy models ZoC when it begins its action. if you ever need to draw line of sight to an object. a terrain feature. or (2) move into Base to Base contact with that model.

This means that in any given game turn. When a model activates and performs a Simple action. (We will explain exactly what constitutes a game turn later.Taking Actions All models in Bushido can take two actions in a game turn. Being Tired or Exhausted may inflict a penalty on the model (see Combat section). When a model has taken a Simple action and its profile card is turned 90 degrees. it is considered Tired. turn the card 180 degrees When the model has taken two Simple actions or one complex action and its card is turned 180 degrees. A Complex action will count as both of that model’s actions in that turn. turn the profile card 90 degrees to mark that it has taken one of its allowed actions (this is another reason for having a big play area – you can then easily place the profile cards next to the battlefield so that you and your opponent can easily see which models have taken actions and which have not). 12 .) When a model is activated it may attempt a Simple action or a Complex action. it is considered Exhausted. or when it takes a second Simple action. However. An exhausted model cannot activate again until the next turn. to be the Active Player. the tired and exhausted states only take effect after the action that you have declared has been resolved (this means that you can always take an action without suffering the associated penalties of the state you just entered by taking that action). any model can do either two Simple actions or one Complex action. A model that has taken no actions yet in a turn is considered Rested. Taking a Free action does not count towards your two-action allowance. The text on the Profile Card will tell you whether a particular free action requires the controller of the model. There are also actions that are designated ‘Free’. When a model has taken a Complex action.

If the model is already in BtB contact with an enemy model. and 2) it does not pass through any other enemy ZoCs while moving in this way. follow the Ranged Combat section to resolve the attack. though if it does. In this latter case. Before or after having made a Ranged attack. Resolve as you would a Melee combat but the model attempting this action must place all dice in Defence. and then make a Melee attack. • Melee Attack: The model may attempt to move into BtB contact with an enemy model using its base Move statistic. To make a Ranged Attack the model must meet the following requirements: 1. Some terrain features may require a Target Test to Swim or Climb through. 3. the targeted model must be turned so that it has LoS to its attacker. • Climb/Swim: The model may move half its Move Statistic on its profile card in inches in any direction. if it succeeds in defending then it may move up to its normal move characteristic in any direction following the normal rules. The model is not in an enemy models Zone of Control. as long as 1) it remains in BtB contact with it. There must be a valid target. it may make a Melee attack. an enemy model. the model may freely move up to its base Move statistic. Before Melee Combat begins. its Ranged attack will be at a penalty (see the section on Ranged Combat).Simple Actions: • Aim: The model picks a model to which it can draw LoS. • Disengage: The model attempts to move away from opponents it is in base to base with. If these requirements are met. i. if this models next action is a ranged attack against the selected model. the model may also move freely around the enemy model it is fighting. this initiates a new Melee Combat exchange. The model must be capable of making a ranged attack 2. • Ki feat: The model attempts a simple Ki feat. • Ranged Attack: The model makes a ranged attack. it benefits from an Aim Bonus.e. 13 . initiating a Melee Combat. within the model’s Line of Sight. or in Base to Base contact with an enemy model.

• Command (X/Y): The model spends a simple action. the targeted model must be turned so that it has LoS to its attacker. in any direction. • Walk: The model may move a distance in inches equal to its Move statistic. • Run: The model may move in a straight line up to 1. If the model does not have enough Move to reach its target. and may activate up to X number of models of the category Y to perform a simple action. They are designated ‘special’ because they require a specific trait. • Special Actions: Special actions are either Simple or Complex. Before Melee Combat begins. only models that have these traits are allowed to take these ‘special’ actions.5 times its Move statistic (e. • Focus: The model gains a number of Ki tokens equal to its first Ki Value. a model with the trait Command (2/ Ashigaru) may use a simple action to immediately activate up to 2 different Ashigaru models. a model with Move 4 may take a Simple action and Run 6” in a straight line).g. towards an enemy model in LoS. If this move brings the model into BtB contact with the enemy model a Melee Combat is initiated. • Stand up: A Prone model may stand up (or remove its prone marker. depending on how you have chosen to indicate that a model has been knocked down). • Ki feat: The model attempts a complex Ki feat. In the first Melee Combat exchange only. Complex Actions: • Charge: The model must move double its Base Move statistic in a straight line. The ability to take Special actions will be indicated on the Profile Card of the model. For example. If this model makes any opposed melee or ranged attack roll this turn it will suffer -1 to its combat pool. so they are not an entirely different type of action. the Charging model gains a +1 Strength bonus. 14 .• Reload: The model may remove a Reload Counter from its Profile Card. it must still move its full Charge Move towards its intended target and then stop.

• Heal (X): The model may spend a simple action and recovers X Wounds. • Exhausted: Once a model has used both its actions. or to heal X Wounds of a friendly model in BtB contact. For example. a model with the trait (Order 2 Bakemono/6) may spend a complex action to change the states of up to two Bakemono within 6 inches from Exhausted to Tired or from Tired to Rested. Its declared action is also wasted and it is not allowed to initiate Melee combat with the Fear-causing model. a model under 15 . The Ki costs of all its Feats and other effects are also are increased by one. • Frightened: Some models have the Fear trait. others are not. States A model may through game effects enter into a number of different states. If the model is attacked in Melee it can still defend itself but it does so with a -1 penalty to its Combat Pool (see the section on Melee Combat). and may not voluntarily move into BtB contact with enemy models. A model wishing to engage an enemy model with Fear in Melee combat (through a Melee attack action or a Charge action) must also take a Fear test and becomes Frightened if it fails. • Mark Target: The model may perform a simple action and designate an enemy model within its LoS. it is considered Exhausted. it becomes Frightened. During the End phase. a model must place more dice in Defence than in Attack. • Order (X/Y/Z): The model spends a complex action and may then immediately change the states of X models of the category Y that are within Z inches of the model from Tired to Rested status or from Exhausted to Tired. While Frightened. Some of these states are permanent. Allied models targeting that model with a Ranged Attack in the same turn add an additional die to their Ranged Combat Pool for that Attack. Below is an explanation of the different states. If it fails this Test. the enemy model must take a Fear test. When such a model targets an enemy model with a Melee attack (through a Melee attack action or a Charge action). which is a Targeted Ki test (the Target being the Fear value of the model with the Fear trait).

• Target Tests: Target Tests are indicated by the statistic used for the test. The model is placed on its side. followed by the number which indicates the difficulty of the test. • Prone: Some game effects will cause a model to become prone. A prone model has no ZoC. If an Exhausted model is stunned then it suffers an additional -1 to all dice pools until the end of the turn. but only for the resolution of that action. the action is still considered ‘spent’.the effects of Fear may attempt to make a new Fear Test using the same Target value. in any given turn. Models that are prone may not perform any other action than Stand Up. 16 . Taking Tests Some actions may require the model to take a test in order to see whether the intended action succeeds or fails (regardless of which. however. as indicated in the Ranged Combat/Melee Combat sections. a model may be required to take a Move (5) Test or a Ki (4) Test. a model is considered Rested if it has taken no actions. If this Test is successful then the model is no longer Frightened. 4 dice if the model has Move 4. Models that are surprised cannot use Ki Feats and suffer minuses in Combat and to their Missile Defence pool. If an action does not state a test is require it is automatically successful. • Tired: After a model has performed a single simple action it is considered Tired. nor been forced to take any actions. • Surprised: If a model is targeted by a game effect (most commonly an attack) originating from outside its LoS it is considered Surprised. There are two kinds of tests in Bushido: Target Tests and Opposed Tests. If a Tired model is Stunned then it is Exhausted. • Rested: The Rested state is the ‘natural’ state of any model. For example. A model cannot be surprised by another model that starts its action in BtB contact with it. The player rolls the number of dice indicated by their statistic (in the first case. or a Prone marker is placed next to the model. • Stunned: If a model that is rested is stunned then it becomes tired. become Frightened again if it fails another Fear test. though). It may.

If the dice’ results are equal. The dice roll for the Test may be modified. and/or to the number of dice used. The successful player’s models action is resolved. and so on… If the tie still cannot be broken then the base value of the models statistics used determines the winner. Otherwise they have failed the action. if indicated by the rules or by a models’ Profile Card. If an effect or modifier causes a player to have no dice left to roll then that player still rolls a single dice. If one player rolled more dice. If the results are still the same and the tie still cannot be broken. The opposing model may in some cases use the same statistic. they roll their respective dice simultaneously. 17 . Any effects that will modify this result must be declared before the dice are rolled. 2 dice if the model has Ki 2). If the highest-scoring die is equal to or exceeds the Test difficulty. Once both players have determined the number of dice will use and any modifiers. in other cases a different statistic or a set number of dice – this is indicated elsewhere in the rules or on the Profile Card. Modifiers may be applied to either models roll. then their model’s action is successful. • Opposed Tests: The model attempting to perform the action that requires the Opposed Test rolls as many dice as indicated by the statistic needed for the Test (same as for Target Tests). Each player then takes the highest result and compares it with the opposing players’ highest result. the players then compare the number of dice they each rolled. but the opponent gains an extra die for every die the opponent would have had below one (for example. Any effects that will modify this result must be declared before the dice are rolled. the Test succeeds. If the players are rolling the same numbers of dice then compare the second highest result rolled. if a game effect causes one model to end up having to roll -2 dice. highest base statistic wins. both players have to re-roll their dice. that player still rolls one die but his/her opponent gets to roll 3 extra dice).in the second. then the third highest.

a model with a CP of 3 may roll 18 . All these modifiers are cumulative. Focusing on Attack leaves you vulnerable to counter-attack. then that player still rolls 1 die. Melee combat and Ranged combat. When making Melee attacks. individual models clash in desperate combat in a system that allows players many different tactical options. This is why you need differentcoloured dice. There are two forms of combat. If the modifiers bring down the CP below 1. one colour represents Attack and one colour represents Defense. you use the model’s Combat Pool (CP) statistic. The model that initiated the exchange is assumed to have the initiative and is termed the Active model. In Melee combat models make Melee attacks. in Ranged combat models make Ranged attacks. Melee combat occurs when an action results in a Melee attack against an enemy model. if one player’s CP drops down to -2 due to modifiers. In Bushido. the opponent gets a number of extra dice to his/her CP equal to the number the other player’s CP goes below one. then the player will still roll 1 die. For example. Adding or subtracting dice. The CP indicates how many dice the model has available to allocate to either Attack or Defense. of course.Combat Combat is at the heart of any tabletop miniature game. Focusing on Defense deprives you of the opportunity to strike your opponent and gain a tactical advantage. as indicated in the table to the right. that you have to allocate your dice without knowing how the opponent is going to allocate his or hers. Melee combat and Melee attacks In Melee combat. may modify the Combat Pool of either participant in a combat. Once the players have calculated the number of dice in their combat pool they must both secretly decide how to allocate the dice between Attack and Defense. For example. but his opponent gets 3 extra dice to roll for his/her CP. players try to outwit each other and gain the tactical advantage by allocating Combat Pool dice either to Attack or Defense – the trouble is. However.

Success Level and Wounds The Success Level (SL) is the difference between the active player’s highest Attack die and the highest Defense die of the opponent. The attack on the model originates from outside that model’s LoS. if your highest Attack die is a . and your opponent’s highest Defense die is a . When both players have selected how many Attack dice and how many Defense dice they will roll. the model’s Melee Attack is successful and you go on to calculate the success level and roll for Wounds.Condition Exhausted Surprised Outnumbered (-1 per additional opponent. then the Success Level of your Attack is 3 (5–2=2).) Prone CP -1 -1 -1 ExPlanation The model being attacked is Exhausted when the attack begins. If the Success 19 . or 3 Defence dice. The Success Level indicates in which column of the Wound Chart the result of the Wound roll should be read. For example. 1 Attack die and 2 Defense dice. If the Attack die is higher than the Defense die. The active player compares his highest Attack die with the highest Defense die of the opponent. both then simultaneously roll all their dice. There is more than one (otherwise unengaged) enemy model in BtB with the model. 2 Attack dice and 1 Defense die. The model is attacked after it has been knocked to the ground by a game effect. The model suffers the effects of Fear. -1 Frightened -1 either 3 Attack dice.

Some models have Defense Triggers (in white). If the SL of the strike is equal to or greater than 6. Any modifications or combination of modifications and game effects cannot reduce the result below the “1” row . which are activated if a model successfully defends against an attack. make a Damage roll. Traits or Ki Feats as relevant and indicated by the rules or on a Profile Card. Trigger affects (see Weapon Grid). and the Wound Roll is an unmodified 6. achieving the required SL to trigger it. then a Critical Strike has occurred thE Wound Chart Wound roll (1D6 + modifiers) 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 3 0 1 4 1 1 5 1 2 6 2 3 7 3 4 8 4 5 9 5 6 10 6 7 20 Success Level (SL) 2 3 4 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 5 4 5 6 5 6 7 6 7 8 7 8 9 8 9 10 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 . If the SL of the strike equals or exceeds the Value of the Attack Trigger.Level of the attack rises above 6 (through modifiers or game effects). These work in the same way as normal Triggers but are rather activated if and when the opponent’s SL equals or exceeds the Trigger Value. Many models have special Attack Triggers that may occur if a Melee/Ranged is successful. and is modified by any Strength bonus. text on the Profile Card). then add +1 to the damage roll for each step it has risen above 6. When you have determined the Success Level of an attack. Some models have Negative Triggers (marked in red. apply effects of triggers before rolling on the Wound Chart. The Damage roll is made with a single d6.The final result is cross-referenced with the Success Level column in order to determine the amount of Wounds caused by the Attack. rather than black.

As Yoshio has the Initiative.and the wounded model is immediately removed from the table and cannot be returned by any game effect. Melee Combat: Example Carlos moves Yoshio. Carlos decides to try and finish the Kairai Puppet quickly and elects to use all his 3 dice as Attack dice (he makes this choice in secret by holding 3 white dice in his hand) Gordon is a little more cautious and decides on 1 Attack dice and 1 Defense dice. armed with a Yari into BtB contact with Gordon’s Kairai Puppet using a Melee Attack action (simple). It is possible that both the active player and the opponent suffer Wounds in a Melee exchange. the opponent compares his/her highest Attack die to the active player’s highest Defense die to determine whether the opponent’s Attack was successful. i. or if the successful strike did not reduce the opponent’s Wounds to zero. Wound roll and Wound result are then determined as above. After both models have resolved their attacks the Melee combat is considered over and both players tire their respective model’s Profile card a model must participate in a Melee Combat. Yoshio has a CP statistic of 3 and the Kairai Puppet has a CP statistic of 2. Next he rolls on the Wound Chart. The SL. Both players then roll their dice with the following results: Carlos Gordon   As the Yoshio has the Initiative Carlos compares the highest Attack die  with Gordon’s highest Defense dice . He makes the choice in secret by holding 1 white and 1 black die in his hand. then if the targeted model is able. Carlos is the active player and so Yoshio has the Initiative. it must use one of its Simple actions.e. If the attack was unsuccessful. 21 . he has scored a hit. As Carlos’s result is higher. Both players consult the Close Combat Modifiers Table and see that neither model’s Combat Pool is altered.

Gordon’s highest (and only) Attack die came up a .As Yoshio’s attack succeeded with a difference of 1 (5–4=1). the attack of the Kairai Puppet on Yoshio is now resolved. Gordon sees that the Kairai Puppet inflicts 5 Wounds on Yoshio. He rolls a die. using a Complex action. rather than using a Melee attack. adding no Strength bonus as he has none. He rolls a die and adds his Strength bonus. a simple action. The Melee Combat exchange is now over. the Puppet from defending itself in a Melee Combat). he is assumed to have rolled a [0]. It is now Gordon’s turn to activate a model and play continues. As the Kairai Puppet has the Toughness (1) Trait. The Kairai Puppet succeeds with a difference of 3 (3–0=3) and Gordon will thus read his Wound roll result in the “3” column. this is reduced to 1 Wound. Carlos rolls  and consults the Wound Chart: Yoshio has inflicted 2 Wounds on Gordon’s Kairai Puppet. Both participating models are still standing (for now) and can take a further Simple action in this turn. Gordon marks the damage on the Kairai Puppet’s damage chart on its Profile Card. Luckily Yoshio has the Armour (1) trait on his Profile Card. and as the damage was not enough to kill the Kairai Puppet. Yoshio is wounded but not dead. Both players now turn their respective Profile Cards 90 degrees to indicate that both models are Tired (Yoshio from taking a Melee attack action. Yoshio would have had a Strength bonus of +1). 22 . and rolls a ! Consulting the table. which means that the damage is reduced to 4 Wounds. and as Carlos allocated no Defense dice. which is 0 (if Yoshio had charged the Kairai Puppet. and Gordon’s Kairai Puppet rolled at least one Attack dice. Carlos will read his Wound roll result in the “1” column.

If a model is eligible to make a Ranged attack. and the model making the Attack is not in an enemy models Zone of Control. it may do so if and only if there is a valid target. or in Base to Base contact with an enemy model. an enemy model.e. The active player then measures the range and both players calculate the number of dice they will use for Attack and Defence rolls respectively (RCP dice are always Attack dice. (2) this enemy model also has LoS to the model making the ranged attack. unless allowed to do so by the text on their profile card or by some other game effect. Any models that meet these criteria may then be nominated as the target instead of the original target selected by the active player. there is no need to select an Attack/Defence dice combination when making a Ranged attack). i. and the passive player uses a set number of dice for Defence based on the range. The player of the targeted model may nominate a different model as the target if the following criteria are met: (1) the LoS of the model making the Ranged attack crosses an enemies models base or its ZoC. as indicated in the table below: rangE Defence dice Short 1 MEdiuM 2 long 3 Both players then modify their dice according to the Range Combat Modifier Table below: attaCkEr ModifiEr Aimed +1 Will move -1 Defender in cover -1 dEfEndEr Large Small Tiny Surprised Prone ModifiEr -1 +1 +2 -1 -1 23 .Ranged combat and ranged attacks: Only models with an RCP statistic may make Ranged attacks. The active player simply uses the RCP dice. within the model’s LoS.

Carlos’ final Attack roll result is 7 and not 6. bringing the total number of Attack dice rolled (remember. Some weapons have the Ammo trait. Minuro’s previous Action was an Aim action (indicated by having placed an Aim marker on his Profile Card) and Minuro thus benefits from a +1 modifier to his RCP. He has one of Gordon’s Kairai Puppets within his LoS. Carlos measures the range. the Kairai Puppet gets 2 Defense dice. He finds that Carlos’ LoS does not cross any other of his models. Too bad. remove an Ammo marker from their profile card when the attack is declared (the Ammo marker is thus lost regardless of whether the attack hits or not). Carlos Gordon  24  Minuro’s Ranged Attack succeeds with a difference of 4 (7 – 3 = 4). but it is well within the 12” Medium range. None of Gordon’s other models are in BtB with the Ashigaru. Because Carlos rolled . Minuro thus is eligible to make a Ranged Attack. so no further modifiers apply.The Ranged Combat test that follows is thus a normal opposed test. the Kairai Puppet is going to get it. The Kairai Puppet is not of unusual size and neither in cover. As Minuro fires at Medium range. Both players roll the dice. If this is the case. Gordon first checks if there is another of his models who could be nominated as the target instead of the Kairai Puppet. and the Kairai Puppet is not in BtB contact with any other of his models. Minuro has a RCP statistic of 3. Ranged Combat: Example Carlos’ Minuro Arquebusier is ready for action. Rolling for Wounds follows the same rules and uses the same table as for Melee Combat. The Kairai Puppet is 10” away which puts it further away than the 6” Short range of the Arquebus. surprised nor prone. all RCP dice are always Attack dice) to 4.

Again. These Ki markers are placed on the models Profile Card. When models are required to make Ki rolls for whatever reason then it is the first Ki statistic that determines the number of dice to be used. this is reduced to 3 Wounds. Ki Feats and Ki Generation Most models in Bushido are able to manipulate the natural energy around them. This energy is called Ki. He rolls a die and adds the +2 Strength bonus of the Arquebus weapon. Unless a Ki feat is preceded with this symbol it will cost an additional Ki token if used while in BtB contact with an enemy model. • Free: Free feats do not cause the model to tire or exhaust and can be used at any time – even outside of the model’s normal activation. which means he inflicts 4 Wounds on the Kairai Puppet. he gets to add 1 to the final Attack roll result for each additional  he rolls beyond the first. All models manipulate this energy in their own unique way. If a model has insufficient Ki markers on its Profile Card then it is unable to perform that feat. the required numbers of markers are removed from the model’s Profile Card. these are classified the same as other actions and are as follows. Each Ki Phase (see the Game Turns and Phases section) all models will generate a number of Ki markers equal to the first Ki statistic printed on their Profile Card. When a model preforms any action that requires Ki to be spent. If a model somehow generates Ki above the second Ki value these addition markers are forfeited and cannot be regained.more than one  on his Attack roll. His Wound roll comes up . The cost for each Ki Feat is indicated in the description of that Feat. For purposes of game effects any actions that require the expenditure of Ki markers are considered Ki Feats. A model may not have more Ki markers on its card than the second Ki value. 25 . to which he adds 2 for a final result of 4. as the Kairai Puppet has Toughness (1). Feats can be used at different times and situations. Not quite enough to take the kill the Kairai Puppet. Carlos will thus read his Wound Chart result in the “4” column.

Before the game.bushido-thegame. see http://www. The Scenario will decide what objectives the players will need to achieve in order to win the game. • Complex: A Complex feat requires a Complex action and thus causes the model doing it to become exhausted. Starting the Game Before the game begins players need to agree on how much Rice they will have to spend on building their forces. force building and Scenario selection have been completed. special features should be present on the gaming table. The Scenario also outlines what. if any. • Simple: A Simple feat requires a Simple action. Unless stated Auras ignore LoS rules and obstacles. • Special: The effect of the Feat is unique in some way and is further described on the model’s Profile Card. The area is expressed as a 360 degree radius measured from the centre of the model’s base. Ki Feats are further classified by whom they affect: • Personal: This Feat affects the user only. The cost of all models in the force cannot exceed this limit. any model (enemy and/or allied. 26 . The model performing a Simple Ki Feat may also move up to its Move statistic in inches before or after resolving the feat if that model spends an additional Ki marker. the game starts. • Target: This Feat affects a specific target nominated by the player controlling the model performing the Feat. New Scenarios will be regularly available on the GCT Studios Website. and also how to deploy the forces on to the table. a Scenario needs to be agreed upon. Once Rice cost maximum. but can only be used when this model’s controller is the active player. All models in a force must have the same faction symbol on their cards or have a game effect that allows them to be used together. • Aura: This Feat affects an area that may be either set or variable. depending on what it says in the Feat description) within the Aura are affected.• Free Active: Free Active feats do not cause the model to become Tired or Exhausted.com.

The four phases are the Ki phase.g. During a turn. player 2 activates a model of his/ her choice and performs an Action with it. Tactical phase • The players make an Opposed Test to determine who has the Tactical advantage in the turn. and when that action is completed and resolved. Gordon will receive 1 Pass token). 2. Carlos has 4 models left in his force. When a player with one or more Pass tokens is the Active player. Thus play proceeds until all models on both sides have taken all the actions they can take. Action phase • Calculate the number of Pass tokens. The player with the fewest models receives a number of Pass tokens equal to the numbers difference between the two forces (e. All models receive a number of Ki tokens equal to the first number of their Ki statistic. players take turns to activate models: player 1 activates a model of his/her choice and performs an Action with it (Simple or Complex). • All models receive new Ki markers. The Opposed Test is taken with a single die for each player. the Action phase and the End phase: 1. s/he may decide to spend a Pass token 27 . Ki phase • All models are restored from Exhaustion to Rested by turning their Profile Cards to their original position. A turn is completed when all models of both players are exhausted. The winner of the Tactical advantage roll may decide whether s/he or his/her opponent will activate a model first. 3. Certain Traits may allow a player to roll more dice or reroll dice for this Opposed Test. Each player counts the number of models in their force still on the battlefield. Each game turn is divided into four phases – the description in the preceding paragraph applies specifically to the third phase. the Tactical phase.Game Turns and Phases A game of Bushido proceeds in turns. Gordon has 3.

they create an effect or add a modifier that is detrimental to the model). Positive Traits are noted in Black and negative Traits in Red. calculate victory points. the other player then becomes the Active Player • The player who was given the first activation in the Tactical phase activates one model and performs an action with it. • If one player completes all actions of all his/her models. the opponent is then free to complete all his/her models’ remaining actions. If not. This player is now considered to be the Active player. If so.instead of taking an action with one of his/her models. In some cases Traits are considered to belong to the Weapon the model is carrying rather than to the model itself. • All upkeep costs are paid (some Ki Feats require players to pay a number of Ki markers each turn to keep powering the Feat. • The other player then activates one model and performs an action with it. This player is considered to be the Active player. The action is then resolved. • Check if the game time limit (normally 6 turns) or if victory conditions are met. These Traits are listed on the model’s Profile Card. 4. Traits Models in Bushido commonly have one or more Traits.e. they create an effect or add a modifier that is beneficial to the model) or negative (i. • Repeat these two last steps until all models have completed all of their actions. End phase • All Wounding effects are resolved. The action is then resolved. • All other effects are resolved. this is referred to as an upkeep cost). proceed to the next turn (which begins with a Ki phase. 28 . these are so-called Weapon Traits and they are listed on the Weapons Grid on the Profile Card. followed by a Tactical phase. and so on).e. Traits can be either positive (i.

Y and possibly a Z value associated with their description. Example 1: The Ashigaru armed with a Yari has the Armour (1) Trait. so when this model suffers Wound damage. Assassin: If this model successfully hits an opponent who is surprised. Ashigaru: This model is considered as an Ashigaru for the purposes of game effects. The model loses a die from its RCP (because it is moving) and CP for this and any following actions in the same activation. The target of the Ranged attack must be the same as the target of the Melee/ Charge action. Y and Z substitute for the actual numerical values listed on the model’s Profile Card. The model must be the Active model in order to use this ability. Attack into Defence: After all CP dice have been rolled in an exchange. What follows is a list of the traits available to models in Bushido. it may roll two dice and choose the highest when rolling on the Wound Chart. 29 . Example 2: The Child Monk has the Trait Believer (Monks/4/1). splitting the CP between opponents however the player decides. 1 is reduced from the amount to be marked on its card. This means that any model who is a Monk within 4” of the Child monk may reduce the cost of their Ki Feats by 1. Armour (X): The model reduces any Wounds suffered by X. Aggressive Stance (X): This model may force an opponent to put X dice in Defence. this model may elect to make its highest Attack die a Defense die instead. Attack Multiple Opponents: This model may split their CP and initiate a Melee combat with any number of opponents in BtB contact. Assault Fire: This model may make a Ranged attack at the beginning of their move before a Melee or Charge action. The Samurai also has the Armour Trait but his Trait is Armour (2) meaning the damage is reduced by 2. X.You will see in the following pages that some Traits have an X.

Berserk: This model gains the following Traits: Fearless.Automatic Disengage: This model may freely disengage without making a test. Believer (X/Y/Z): If any model of the category X is within Y" of this model. Brutal Blow: This model may add +1 to its highest attack dice if it is the active model Brutal: In Melee. if this model’s highest Attack dice is equal to the Defender’s highest Defence die. Any Melee Combat in which a Berserk model is involved the controlling player must place all dice in Attack. The second roll must be used. Bodyguard (X/Y): This model may switch positions with another model of the category X. This also applies when determining LoS. has actions remaining. it is not required to keep any Ki markers on its own Profile Card. if within Y". Aware: This model’s ZoC is 360 degrees rather than the normal 180. unless the model starts its activation within Y" of the model targeting it. Last Stand and STR +1 (cumulative with other bonuses). Insignificant. Bakemono: This model is considered a Bakemono for the purposes of game effects. Channel (X/Y): This model may give Ki markers from its Profile Card to X models within Y". Combined activation (X): The active player may simultaneously declare Actions for models with combined activationX when they 30 . Camouflage (X/Y): This model cannot be targeted by opponents models when in Terrain type X. Bravery: This model may re-roll a failed Fear test. and if this model is not in BtB with an enemy model. then the Melee attack is successful. Cannot be knocked down: The model can never be knocked prone by any game effect. This trait may only be used the model is active. this Trait takes effect while the model possessing it is non-active). and X is the target of an opponent’s action (i.e. then the other model may reduce the cost of its Ki Feats by Z. This model may distribute its Ki markers entirely freely. Impetuous. The cost of a Ki Feat cannot be reduced below 1.

When this model is the target of any Melee attack it needs to pass a Ki Target Test with a target of X. Disengage (X): This model may add X dice to its Defence dice when declaring a Disengage action. If the test fails. Fear (X): When this model targets another model with an action that would bring it into BtB contact with that other model. the 31 . Deflect Missile (X): The models gains an additional X dice for its missile defence pool. it may convert its second highest Defence die to an Attack die. the model is not allowed to make a Melee attack or Charge. Cowardly (X): A model with this ability must make a Ki Target Test with a target of X when declaring a Melee or Charge action. Disturb Flow (X/Y/Z): If a model of category X is within Z" of this model then all Ki Feat costs of that model is increased by 1. If this test fails then this model acquires the Retreat trait until the end of the turn. Defence into Attack: This model may convert its highest Defence die into an Attack die with the same result after all dice have been rolled. Co-ordinated Attack (X): The model gains an additional combat pool dice if fighting in the same Melee combat as another allied model this Trait Co-ordinated Ranged Attack (X): When this model makes a Ranged attack against a model that has already been the target of a Ranged attack this turn from an allied model of the type X. If the test is successful the model may act normally. this model adds a die to its RCP. but the action is considered wasted. The controlling player chooses in which order the actions are resolved. No more than four models may be activated. Counter Attack: If this model places all its CP dice in Defence and then successfully defends. Devastating Charge: The model gains an additional die to its CP for the duration of its activation if it takes a successful Charge action.are the Active player. Elusive: This model may ignore ZoCs of all enemy models.

it does not have to declare that it is disengaging until after the Combat Pool Rolls have been made). it suffers no negative effects. Feeble Mind: This model has to roll one die less when taking opposed Ki tests. It may however carry objects. other models and terrain when moving. it may choose to Disengage after the resolution of a Melee combat in which it successfully defends (i. Fearless: This model is unaffected by Fear. Jump Up: The model may stand up (from Prone position) as a free action when activated. but it may not end its move occupying the same space as a terrain feature or other model. Insignificant: This model does not have a ZoC and cannot contest or manipulate Scenario Objectives. Impenetrable Defence: Any model in Melee combat with this model must always ignore the highest of its Attack dice. with a charge or Melee action. Horde (X): This model may become a member of a Horde together with other models with the trait Horde (X). Impetuous: This model must always activate first in the turn and move towards the nearest visible enemy. The effects of Fear are detailed on page 15. if it fails then it is frightened. Hatred (X): This model must attempt to target models of type X if they are within LoS. but even if it does it does not count as controlling the carried object. If a model targets a model with Fear then it must pass a Target test against a target of X in order to be able to carry out the action. The model uses its Ki stat for this test. If it fails then the action does not take place but is still considered spent.e. A model with the Fear trait never itself has to make Fear tests against models with a Fear value lower than X. 32 .targeted model must make a Fear test against the Target number of X. All Impetuous models must have performed at least a Simple action before any non-Impetuous models in the same force are allowed to take any actions. Intangible: This model ignores ZoCs. Improved Disengage: If this model was the Active model. If the targeted model is successful. Fearful: This model must re-roll successful Fear tests.

both Traits are ignored. The model can move over such obstacles with no penalty. a model with Not Outnumbered (3) only counts as Outnumbered if it is in BtB with 4 enemy models. Rise Again: If this model is reduced to 0 wounds. Exhaust it and remove all its Wound markers. Whenever making an Opposed or Target Ki test all Oni are assumed to have a Ki of 2. 33 . At the end of the turn. Parry: If this model is in Melee combat and the opponent’s highest Attack die is equal to this model’s highest Defence die. Regenerate (X): This Model recovers X hit points in the End phase of every turn.Large: Large models suffer a -1 to their missile defence pool Last Stand: If this model is reduced to 0 Wounds. the attack fails. Monk: This model is considered a monk for the purposes of game effects. Leadership: Allied models within X may use this models Ki value for fear tests Leech (X): When active this model may remove Ki makers from allied models within X and place them in his Ki pool. Regenerate cannot return a model that has been removed from the game. Leap: This model may ignore terrain obstacles of a height up to equal its Move statistic. and only one of these models inflicts an Outnumbered penalty. If the Attacking model has the Brutal trait. it may still continue to take actions until the end of the turn. Precision Shot: Any target of Ranged Combat attacks by this model loses a die from their Missile Defence Pool.e. Recruit (X): This model may only be in a force if model X is also. Retreat: This model must always attempt a Disengage action if it starts its activation in contact with an opponent. Mindless: This model may only be activated by the use of the Command Trait of another allied model. Oni: This model is considered an Oni for the purposes of game effects. Not Outnumbered (X): This model cannot be outnumbered by less than or equal to X models (i. place it prone were it is. the model is removed from the game as normal.

Self Sacrifice (X/Y): This model may receive Wounds that would have been inflicted on X if within Y". unless its opponent in Melee combat also has Slow. Slow models may not take Run actions. It cannot affect or contest Ki zones and Scenario Objectives. Toughness (X): This model reduces any Wounds taken by X. Slow: This model never has the initiative. Uncoordinated Attack (X): Allied models in the same Melee combat as this model loses X dice from their CP. Shield (X): The model adds X dice to its Missile Defence Pool. If you control more than one model with Tactician (X). Tactician (X): The presence of a model with Tactician (X) in your force allows you to roll X extra dice for all Tactical rolls. This trait ignores the effects of the Camouflage Trait. Steadfast: This model may freely choose how to place CP dice when frightened. Stubborn: This model may never attempt a Disengage action from combat. 34 . Unblock able Strike: When active this model’s opponents must ignore their highest Defence dice. if this test fails the model forfeits its action. is prone. This model is then removed from the battlefield. Sixth Sense: This model never considered surprised. you may only benefit from the Trait of the model with the highest X score currently on the board. Small: Small models gain +1 to their missile defence pool Soulless: This model automatically succeeds all opposed Ki rolls. Strong Mind: This model gains an additional die when taking Opposed Ki tests. Unsteady (X): This model suffers a penalty of X to its Move statistic when crossing difficult terrain. as long as that model is on the board. even if it has Wounds remaining. or is surprised. Stupid(X): When this model is the active model it must pass a target test with the value of X before it may perform any actions. Taunt (X): This model may force an opponent in Melee with this model to put X dice in Attack.

the highest result of this model’s Attack/Defense dice (as appropriate) is reduced by 1 for every 1 rolled. mark an Ammo box. It may not walk in the same activation in which it makes a Ranged attack with this weapon First Strike: The model carrying a weapon with this trait always has the initiative in the first Melee combat with a new opponent. If two models have this ability then both cancel each other out. Charge Reception (X): Models with this weapon trait trigger an effect when charged. during the End phase for Y turns. Weak (X): If this model is hit by an attack or effect that causes Wounds. 35 . it takes an extra X Wounds. Cumbersome: The model carrying a weapon with this Trait loses a die from its CP if it does not have the initiative in the melee. place X Reload counters on this model’s Profile Card. Weapon Traits Ammo (X): When this model performs a Ranged attack. then another X Wounds are inflicted. Reach (X): This model’s ZoC is extended an additional X. Walk on Water: This model ignores linear terrain when moving. Poison (X/Y): If a successful attack with this weapon causes Wounds. ignoring Armour. Reload (X): After a model carrying this weapon uses it to make a Ranged attack. The model cannot make another Missile Attack action as long as it has Reload counters on its card. Charging Strength (X): This model adds X to its Strength bonus for its first attack immediately following a Charge action taken by this model. This is detailed on the models profile card. Armour Piercing: Wounds from Melee/Missile attacks caused by a weapon with this Trait are not affected by the Armour trait. If a model has no unmarked Ammo boxes left it can no longer perform Ranged attack actions.Untrained: During Melee combat. if unengaged. with that weapon.

Place three tokens along the centre line of the board. These tokens should have a facing marked on them. An Idol can only be turned 90 degrees with any action. at least 12" from the centre line. again at least 12" from the centre line. calculate Victory Points to see which player has triumphed. After the last turn. and set so that they are not facing either player’s table edge when play starts. A model in BtB with an enemy model cannot turn an Idol. the first in the middle and the other two 8" on either side of the centre token. • Setup: Use any terrain elements you have available and set up a 4' by 4' table by agreement with your opponent. When the loser of the Tactical roll has deployed his/her force then the winner deploys his/her entire force on the other table edge. In order to turn an Idol a model must be in BtB contact when it is activated and then perform a Simple action. Those versed in the ways of Ki have determined that by turning these idols in a particular way. Two forces have converged on the area in order to make sure that they gain the favour of Ki rather than their opponents. • Instructions: Players are attempting to turn the idols to face their table edge. the forces of Ki will be aligned in the favour of the force doing the turning. • Victory Points: At the end of the game.Scenario: The Idols • Background: Three powerful Ki Idols have mysteriously risen from the ground in the battle area. 36 . The player with the most Victory Points wins. The game lasts for 6 Turns. each player gains 1 Victory Point for each Idol facing his/her own table edge. These tokens represent the three Idols. The players make a Tactical roll and the winner selects the table edge he wishes to deploy on. The loser must then deploy his/her entire force in the opposite deployment zone.

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the opponent is then free to complete all his/her models’ remaining actions. • All other effects are resolved. • Model activation. • All models receive new Ki markers. • Check if the game time limit or if victory conditions are met.Melee Modifiers Condition CP Exhausted -1 Surprised -1 Outnumbered -1 (-1 per additional opponent. tACtiCAl PhAse • Determine Tactical advantage. • All upkeep costs are paid. The Wound CharT Wound roll (1D6 + modifiers) 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 3 0 1 4 1 1 5 1 2 6 2 3 7 3 4 8 4 5 9 5 6 10 6 7 Success Level (SL) 2 3 4 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 .) Prone -1 Frightened -1 rAnGed Modifiers AttACker Modifier Aimed +1 Will move -1 Defender in cover -1 defender Large Small Tiny Surprised Prone Modifier -1 +1 +2 -1 -1 GAMe Turns ki PhAse • All models are restored from Exhaustion to Rested. end PhAse • All Wounding effects are resolved. ACtion PhAse • Calculate the number of Pass tokens. • If one player completes all actions of all his/her models.