The Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook

2006
This annual edition ranks design firms and contractors participating in ENR's survey in almost fifty separate market sectors, giving them an opportunity to demonstrate their particular areas of expertise. The Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook & Directory provides market analysis and rankings of the largest U.S.-based architectural and engineering firms in the eight major industry sectors listed below. This sourcebook also ranks design firms in almost 50 specific project types such as healthcare, highways and pharmaceuticals. Dozens of tables are included. The publication also includes a directory containing the address, the name of the president or CEO and the telephone number for each of the Top 500 Design firms. Email addresses are not available. Feature stories: Overview: Designers Ponder the Perils of Prosperity General Building: Amid Rising Energy and Labor Costs Building Market Grows at Rapid Pace Transportation: Federal Funds Fuel Robust Sector But Soaring Materials Costs Loom Manufacturing/Industrial Process: Owners Seek Lean, Flexible Facilities in Consumer Demand-Driven Sector Petroleum: Climbing Prices and Spiking Demand Set Stage for Boom To Barrel Ahead Power: Fuel Diversity Tops Industry Agenda in the Push To Reduce Emissions Environmental: Infrastructure Needs Spur Growth as Market Evolves Telecommunications: Growth Restores Market Optimism as Need for Networks Explodes

Top 500 Design Firms
By Gary Tulacz

Designers Ponder the Perils of Prosperity

T
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The U.S. economy is strong and so is the construction market. No one knows this more than designers who are at the leading edge of the boom. But just as the recent recession brought new issues and concerns to

The Top

500

the design profession, so has prosperity. A lack of people to do the work, the drive for greater efficiencies in light of technological developments and the personnel squeeze, and new and subtle threats in the future have many thinking hard about where the design profession is headed. From a pure numbers standpoint, the ENR Top 500 Design Firms had a huge year in 2005. Total design revenue for the Top 500 rose to $59.25 billion in 2005, up 11.8% from $52.99 billion in 2004. The domestic growth was even larger, with the Top 500 registering a 12.6% growth rate, to $47.40 billion in design revenue from projects in the U.S., over 2004’s figure of $42.10 billion. The Top 500 also saw an 8.9% growth in revenue from projects outside the U.S., to $11.85 billion, up from $10.89 billion in 2004. For most firms, this prosperity is continuing and there aren’t major signs of a let-down any time soon. If anything, there may be a continuing ramp-up in work. “It’s not exactly news that most of the markets are expanding,” says Lee McIntyre, president and COO of CH2M Hill Cos. “It’s a target-rich environment,” adds Steve Wirtel, partner with Carollo Engineers. “The problem is to find enough people to do the work.” With the tight market for people, design fees are rising. “After 30 years in this industry, I’ve finally seen the laws of supply and demand actually working,” says Bob Giorgio, president of CDI Business Solutions Group. He says engineering firms in the industry are becoming more savvy in their pricing and that clients, while not generous, are recognizing that squeezing fees isn’t necessarily in their best interest. “After all, you aren’t seeing any more of those reverse auctions that everyone was in a panic about a couple years ago,” he says. One thing the active market has done is rekindle enthusiasm for mergers and acquisitions. Among the major acquisitions during the past year was ENSR International by AECOM in September 2005 and Blasland Bouck & Lee Inc. by Arcadis, also in September. And many firms remain in the market for acquiJuly 2006 enr.com

DESIGN
FIRMS
sitions. However, some are taking a very cautious approach. “We are very careful in who we acquire,” says McIntyre. “We want to make sure the firm we acquire matches our corporate culture.” He says that CH2M Hill is not looking to acquire services or for geographic reach as much as simply looking to add talent. HDR is one firm that is acquiring small firms to fill in specific needs, but is relying on internal growth to build size. “Size is important for firms such as ours,” says Dennis Hirschbrunner, director of marketing. For example, he notes that in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the federal government sought out firms to mobilize large numbers of engineers to address recovery needs quickly. “If you can’t mobilize those numbers, they are not going to call you,” he says. One interesting move this past year was the merger of SchenkelShultz and CSO Architects. “We worked together on the Midfield Terminal at Indianapolis International Airport,” says Tom Chandler, CEO of SchenkelShultz. Finding common interests and cultures, the firms decided to merge. But it was not a typical acquisition. “While we are now one company, we both maintained our equity positions in our firms. It’s more like a partnership than a merger,” he says. Conceding to Concessions The final enactment of the federal Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users has led to more sighs of relief among designers than celebration. “In the past, when a highway bill passed, the industry would feel that happy days are here again,” says Ben Watts, CEO of Carter & Burgess. “But with this new SAFETEA-LU Act, we generally

just feel like it’s time to get back to work.” Bruce Johinke, director of global markets at Parsons Brinckerhoff, agrees. “I don’t think [SAFETEA-LU] will open the floodgates,” he says. “It’s more business as usual. But if it hadn’t passed, we would all be feeling it right now.” The passage of SAFTEA-LU now is allowing state departments of transportation to define their programs. “Now they know what they are getting, but also what they can’t afford,” says Johinke. This is why more DOTs are now looking to alternate sources of funding for major needed projects, he says. This development is making public-private partnerships more attractive. For firms involved in designing buildings, the market remains bullish although some see softness in a few sectors. “We think the condo market reached its peak about the middle of last year,” says Carl Roehling, CEO of SmithGroup. “I think it is nearing the saturation point.” Mindshift One of the most talked-about issues this year is the emergence of building information modeling systems. With BIM, owners are shortening schedules, reducing costs and avoiding post-design snags. The technology allows designers to integrate project information from across the disciplines, build a model and then share information in a seamless environment. “BIM is a real mindshift,” says Charles Dalluge, executive vice president of Leo A Daly. “Every line on the screen means something and any change will have an impact on other elements of the design that have to be documented and communicated.” BIM systems allow these changes to be reflected. “Everyone has to be very knowledgeable in the system, but once everyone is on board with it, it’s a very powerful tool,” he says. The technology promises to revolutionize the way design is done throughout the industry. It has been successful in high-profile, complicated projects but is still being honed as a mainstream tool. BIM is particularly gaining favor among designers in the automotive and manufac-

The Top 100 ‘Pure’ Designers
RANK FIRM TYPE OF FIRM RANK FIRM TYPE OF FIRM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP. THE LOUIS BERGER GROUP CDI BUSINESS SOLUTIONS ARCADIS PBS&J ERM HOLDINGS LTD. HNTB COS. GENSLER HOK CARTER & BURGESS INC. KIMLEY-HORN AND ASSOCIATES INC. MUSTANG ENGINEERING MICHAEL BAKER CORP. TRC COS. INC. MALCOLM PIRNIE INC. BUREAU VERITAS SARGENT & LUNDY LLC FUGRO INC. THE KLEINFELDER GROUP INC. ENGLOBAL CORP. GANNETT FLEMING BROWN AND CALDWELL DEWBERRY TERRACON SKIDMORE OWINGS & MERRILL LLP HKS INC. PROFESSIONAL SERVICE INDUS. (PSI) STV GROUP INC. TRANSCORE STANTEC INC. ATC GROUP SERVICES INC. BURNS AND ROE PERKINS+WILL RTKL ASSOCIATES INC. LEO A DALY ENVIRON EDAW STANLEY CONSULTANTS INC. HATCH MOTT MACDONALD RBF CONSULTING EDWARDS AND KELCEY INC. WILBUR SMITH ASSOCIATES SMITHGROUP INC. GOLDER ASSOCIATES INC. TRANSYSTEMS CORP. CAROLLO ENGINEERS PC DAVID EVANS AND ASSOCIATES INC.

EA EA EC E EA ENV EA A AE EA E E EA E E E EA E E EC EA ENV EA E AE AE E EA EC EA E EC A AE AE ENV ALP EA E E EA E AE E EA E EA

51 CALLISON 52 T.Y. LIN INTERNATIONAL 53 VHB/VANASSE HANGEN BRUSTLIN INC. 54 KCI TECHNOLOGIES INC. 55 CANNON DESIGN 56 SCHOOR DEPALMA INC. 57 LANGAN ENG'G AND ENVIRONMENTAL SVCS. 58 PSOMAS 59 GEOSYNTEC CONSULTANTS 60 REYNOLDS, SMITH AND HILLS INC. 61 ECS 62 GREENMAN-PEDERSEN INC. 63 ASCG INC. 64 WOOLPERT INC. 65 RMT INC. 66 PERKINS EASTMAN 67 GRESHAM, SMITH AND PARTNERS 68 DLZ CORP. 69 CLOUGH HARBOUR & ASSOCIATES LLP 70 KOHN PEDERSEN FOX ASSOCIATES PC 71 GHAFARI ASSOCIATES LLC 72 SHORT ELLIOT HENDRICKSON INC. 73 ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA PARTNERSHIP 74 VOLLMER ASSOCIATES LLP 75 RUMMEL KLEPPER & KAHL LLP 76 HAYES, SEAY, MATTERN & MATTERN INC. 77 BURGESS & NIPLE INC. 78 GEOMATRIX CONSULTANTS INC. 79 LFR INC. 80 CUH2A 81 PAULUS, SOKOLOWSKI & SARTOR LLC 82 KENNEDY/JENKS CONSULTANTS 83 UTILITY ENGINEERING CORP. 84 HALEY & ALDRICH INC. 85 S&ME INC. 86 STS CONSULTANTS LTD. 87 GREENHORNE & O'MARA 88 KLING 89 JORDAN, JONES & GOULDING 90 THORNTON-TOMASETTI INC. 91 R.W. BECK INC. 92 DLR GROUP 93 VOLKERT & ASSOCIATES INC. 94 THE WILLDAN GROUP OF COS. 95 MOFFATT & NICHOL 96 KPFF CONSULTING ENGINEERS 97 WISS, JANNEY, ELSTNER ASSOCIATES INC. 98 PENNONI ASSOCIATES INC. 99 SSOE INC.

A E E E AE E E E ENV EA E E EA EAP ENV A AE EA E A AE EA AP E E AE EA E ENV AE EA EA EA ENV E E E AE E EA E AE E E E E EA E AE A

DELTA ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS INC. ENV ARUP HAZEN AND SAWYER PC E

E 100 WIMBERLY ALLISON TONG & GOO

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Top 500 Design Firms

The 2006 Top 500 at a Glance
Volume
DOMESTIC $BIL. % CHG. INTERNATIONAL $BIL. % CHG. TOTAL $BIL. % CHG.

Market Analysis
TYPE OF WORK BUILDING MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIAL REVENUE $MIL. 13,589.7 1,263.2 2,907.8 8,017.1 3,807.3 4,166.4 12,043.4 6,747.8 3,549.6 941.9 2,217.2 PERCENT OF TOTAL 22.9 2.1 4.9 13.5 6.4 7.0 20.3 11.4 6.0 1.6 3.7

REVENUE

47.4 +12.6

11.9

+8.9

59.3 +11.8

Profitability
NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING PROFIT LOSS AVERAGE % OF PROFIT LOSS

PETROLEUM WATER SEWER/WASTE TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS WASTE POWER TELECOMMUNICATIONS OTHER

DOMESTIC INTERNATIONAL

449 130

16 32

7.5 6.9

NA NA

Professional Staff
NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING DOMESTIC INTL. AVERAGE % OF DOMESTIC INTL.

International Regions
NUMBER OF FIRMS REVENUE $MIL. PERCENT OF TOTAL

INCREASE DECREASE SAME

357 35 95

69 4 63

12.2 15.3 NA

27.3 26 NA CANADA LATIN AMERICA

102 119 92 125 102 142 61 1

1,857.9 719.4 257.4 4,078.9 1,423.2 2,895.1 619.5 1.0

15.7 6.1 2.2 34.4 12.0 24.4 5.2 0.0

Backlog
NUMBER OF FIRMS REPORTING AVERAGE %

CARRIBEAN ISLANDS EUROPE MIDDLE EAST ASIA/AUSTRALIA AFRICA ARCTIC/ANTARCTIC 341 34 84 16.3 10.5 NA

HIGHER LOWER SAME

turing sector, where owners increasingly want projects fasttracked to meet demand in growing consumer markets. Help Wanted To meet the increasing demands brought about by a strong market and shrinking work force, firms increasingly are looking to outsource basic design to design centers in places like India. “We are constantly getting brochures from Indian firms saying, ‘We will do your drafting for you,’” says Jerry Eick, managing principal at HMC Architects. While some firms are comfortable with offshoring on a limited basis, many see the outsourcing trend as ominous. “It’s a reflection that there is more work than people to do it,” says Wetzel. “But it also is a reflection that design is treated as a commodity here in the U.S.” Arup America’s building sector leader, Mahadev Raman, says “the price differential between U.S. and Indian design work is roughly six-to-one, which makes such proposals for outsourcing hard to resist in a competitive market.” In an informal email poll by ENR of the most significant issues facing Top 500 Design Firms, the one most cited by far was the lack of trained personnel. A comment by Mike Patton,
8 ENR S OURCEBOOK July 2006 enr.com

senior vice president of ENGlobal, is typical: “We have 2,000 employees, but we could use about 200 more.” This situation has led to a major renewal among design firms to recruit and retain people. The labor shortage has some firms altering human resources policies. “In the past, we may have looked for a person from the county or area around the local office that needed that person,” says Dalluge. “Now, we are in a continuous recruitment mode. If we find a good candidate in North Dakota who is willing to relocate, we want that person,” he says. Some are eyeing college campuses. “We’re increasing our internship program dramatically this year,” says Roehling of SmithGroup. “Once a young person sees the work environment and the quality of projects we work on, we’re confident they will want to work with us.” Booming markets, a lack of labor and pressure to reduce costs and schedules are factors affecting the future of the design business. Some worry that it is becoming one more price-driven element in the overall construction process. But CH2M Hill’s McIntyre disagrees. “Design is not a commodity,” he says. “For any project to be successful, you need the best design people possible for the job. That is not being a commodity. That is being a professional.”

Prosperity Reigns

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

D
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Design firms based in the U.S. enjoyed a banner year in 2005. As a group, the ENR Top 500 Design Firms generated design revenue of $59.25 billion in 2005, up 11.8% from 2004’s level. And the bounty was shared very widely. Of the 478 design firms on the Top 500 that submitted data both last year and this year, 404 enjoyed increased revenue over 2004 levels, while only 71 saw declines, with the remaining three basically flat. Overall, the gains for this group were not just widespread, but significant. Over half of the Top 500 enjoyed double-digit revenue growth.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

1 URS, San Francisco, Calif.† 3 AECOM TECHNOLOGY CORP., Los Angeles, Calif.† 4 JACOBS, Pasadena, Calif. 2 FLUOR CORP., Aliso Viejo, Calif.† 5 CH2M HILL COS., Englewood, Colo.† 7 KBR, Houston, Texas† 6 BECHTEL, San Francisco, Calif.† 8 TETRA TECH INC., Pasadena, Calif.† 9 PARSONS, Pasadena, Calif.† 10 PARSONS BRINCKERHOFF INC., New York, N.Y.† 12 AMEC AMERICAS, Washington, D.C.† 15 MWH, Broomfield, Colo.† 11 EARTH TECH INC., Long Beach, Calif. 16 THE LOUIS BERGER GROUP, East Orange, N.J.† 13 BLACK & VEATCH, Overland Park, Kan. 17 THE SHAW GROUP INC., Baton Rouge, La.† 19 HDR, Omaha, Neb.† 18 FOSTER WHEELER LTD., Clinton, N.J.† 22 CDI BUSINESS SOLUTIONS, Philadelphia, Pa.† 26 ARCADIS, Highlands Ranch, Colo.† 14 ABB LUMMUS GLOBAL, Bloomfield, N.J.† 21 PBS&J, Tampa, Fla. 20 CDM, Cambridge, Mass.† 25 ERM HOLDINGS LTD., Exton, Pa.† 23 HNTB COS., Kansas City, Mo.†

EAC EA EAC EC E EC EC E EC EAC EC EC EC EA EC EC EA EC EC E EC EA EC ENV EA

3,303.0 2,588.0 2,487.5 2,103.6 2,047.8 1,733.8 1,576.0 1,207.0 1,119.8 946.5 834.0 798.6 794.0 779.7 775.2 707.2 670.3 621.0 584.0 560.0 554.1 521.0 515.0 487.2 483.6

313.8 664.0 723.5 1,289.5 249.9 1,517.0 770.0 10.0 196.6 361.6 514.0 290.8 274.0 628.1 194.3 161.8 5.6 467.0 232.0 3.0 551.4 0.0 58.0 242.7 1.3

16 21 14 1 0 6 1 15 16 11 13 0 8 0 2 0 20 0 14 1 0 10 2 0 8

3 0 5 0 10 0 0 5 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 1 0 0 2 0 0

6 3 1 4 6 0 18 2 0 10 9 3 4 2 43 31 5 27 16 0 0 0 1 0 0

4 7 1 0 15 2 0 35 3 3 3 38 22 11 23 1 15 0 1 6 0 14 23 0 2

5 13 2 0 18 0 0 4 2 2 3 41 22 12 22 2 15 0 1 5 0 16 45 5 1

10 0 46 81 9 78 45 4 9 2 22 0 0 0 3 40 0 69 42 0 100 0 2 0 0

32 46 19 0 17 3 8 2 29 68 9 0 18 67 2 1 44 0 16 8 0 60 5 0 88

22 10 11 9 20 0 26 26 21 1 15 18 26 8 2 24 0 0 0 71 0 0 19 95 0

0 0 1 3 5 0 1 7 15 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0

10

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Across Markets
HOW TO USE THE TABLES
COMPANIES are ranked according to revenue for design services performed in 2005 in $ millions (*). Those with subsidiaries are indicated by (†). For information on subsidiaries and where each firm worked outside of the U.S., see http://www.enr.com. **=Firms not ranked last year. Some markets may not add up to 100% due to omission of “other” miscellaneous market category and rounding. NA=Not available. KEY TO TYPE OF FIRM: A=architect; E=engineer; EC=engineer-contractor; AE=

sion lines, substations, cogeneration plants, etc.
WATER SUPPLY=dams, reservoirs, transmission pipelines, distribution mains, irrigation canals, desalination and potability treatment plants, pumping stations, etc. SEWERAGE/SOLID WASTE=sanitary and storm sewers, treatment plants, pumping plants, incinerators, industrial waste facilities, etc. INDUSTRIAL PROCESS=pulp and paper mills, steel mills, nonferrous metal refineries, pharmaceutical plants, chemical plants, food and other processing plants, etc. PETROLEUM=refineries, petrochemical plants, offshore facilities, pipelines, etc. TRANSPORTATION=airports, bridges, roads, canals, locks, dredging, marine facilities,

architect-engineer; EA=engineer-architect; ENV=environmental; GE=geotechnical engineer; L=landscape architect; P=planner; O=other. Other combinations possible. Firms classified themselves.
GENERAL BUILDING=commercial buildings, offices, stores, educational facilities,

piers, railroads, tunnels, etc.
HAZARDOUS WASTE=chemical and nuclear waste treatment, asbestos and lead

government buildings, hospitals, medical facilities, hotels, apartments, housing, etc.
MANUFACTURING=auto, electronic assembly, textile plants, etc. POWER=thermal and hydroelectric powerplants, waste-to-energy plants, transmis-

abatement, etc.
TELECOMMUNICATIONS=transmission lines and cabling, towers and antennae, data

centers, etc.

RANK 2006 2005 FIRM

TYPE OF FIRM

2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL

MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE

TELECOMM.

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50

27 VECO CORP., Anchorage, Alaska† 31 GENSLER, San Francisco, Calif.† 28 HOK, St. Louis, Mo.† 24 MACTEC INC., Alpharetta, Ga.† 40 WORLEYPARSONS CORP., Houston, Texas 29 CARTER & BURGESS INC., Fort Worth, Texas 32 WASHINGTON GROUP INTERNATIONAL, Boise, Idaho† 37 KIMLEY-HORN AND ASSOCIATES INC., Raleigh, N.C. 33 MUSTANG ENGINEERING, Houston, Texas† 35 BURNS & MCDONNELL, Kansas City, Mo. 38 AKER KVAERNER, Houston, Texas† 30 MICHAEL BAKER CORP., Moon Township, Pa.† 34 TRC COS. INC., Windsor, Conn.† 36 MALCOLM PIRNIE INC., White Plains, N.Y. 41 BUREAU VERITAS, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.† 43 SARGENT & LUNDY LLC, Chicago, Ill.† 44 FUGRO INC., Houston, Texas† 51 THE KLEINFELDER GROUP INC., San Diego, Calif.† 46 WESTON SOLUTIONS INC., West Chester, Pa.† 58 ENGLOBAL CORP., Houston, Texas† 42 GANNETT FLEMING, Harrisburg, Pa.† 39 BE&K INC., Birmingham, Ala.† 47 BROWN AND CALDWELL, Walnut Creek, Calif.† 45 DEWBERRY, Fairfax, Va.† 52 TERRACON, Lenexa, Kan.†

EC A AE EAC EA EA EC E E EC EC EA E E E EA E E ENV EC EA EC ENV EA E

440.8 406.4 396.2 394.8 391.7 364.0 359.4 350.7 350.0 340.0 330.5 325.3 305.9 283.9 283.0 282.1 272.2 252.6 240.0 233.6 231.8 231.0 230.0 230.0 228.0

127.0 35.9 147.5 0.0 170.0 0.0 57.0 0.1 120.0 13.4 70.9 3.8 1.8 3.7 0.0 10.4 55.0 0.0 3.4 6.9 0.5 24.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

0 89 93 21 0 38 1 46 0 2 0 8 10 0 26 0 14 24 0 0 12 0 0 36 51

0 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 0 10 0 4

0 0 0 2 48 1 36 0 0 33 0 0 24 0 2

0 0 0 1 0 6 4 7 0 4 0 30 1 42 3 0 1 5 19 0 18 0 15 16 1

0 0 0 3 0 11 0 0 0 7 0 6 1 42 2 0 1 6 4 0 2 0 53 6 3

100 0 0 9 52 1 12 0 100 17 100 2 16 0 1 0 75 5 0 97 0 68 0 0 4

0 11 7 20 0 43 26 47 0 18 0 44 23 0 16 0 5 16 0 0 52 0 0 37 11

0 0 0 26 0 0 21 0 0 13 0 7 13 16 27 0 0 37 77 0 8 0 26 1 22

0 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 22 0 2 4

0 100 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 3 2 10 0 0 3

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

51

49 SKIDMORE OWINGS & MERRILL LLP, New York, N.Y.

AE CM AE E EC EA EC EA ENV E EC A AE EC AE ENV ALP EA E E EA E AE AE E EA E EA

223.0 220.8 219.8 218.2 217.6 215.9 192.8 191.6 191.0 190.6 189.5 182.8 173.3 172.1 162.1 156.3 155.5 152.7 152.0 151.6 149.6 140.4 131.7 130.9 130.7 126.8 121.6 120.5 117.5 116.9 116.5 114.0 111.1 109.0 104.7 104.1 102.4 102.1 98.5 98.5 97.7 97.2 97.0 95.9 95.8 93.0 92.3 92.1 91.9 91.6

90.0 0.0 13.9 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 46.0 0.0 97.0 21.9 43.6 16.1 1.7 50.1 65.8 32.5 22.8 0.3 1.6 12.9 1.0 5.0 6.4 0.9 0.0 0.0 8.2 10.6 3.6 31.0 41.4 0.0 0.0 38.9 8.4 0.0 4.3 1.8 0.0 7.1 0.0 9.4 0.0 2.4 0.0 0.0 3.2 2.0

91 9 100 57 0 17 0 11 0 13 3 100 97 0 100 0 23 9 4 42 10 1 100 92 7 0 0 3 0 64 0 100 13 27 18 6 100 53 44 34 51 0 15 0 78 6 27 52 0 56

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 11 5 0 0 7 2 4 1 0 1 27 0

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 79 0 0 6 0 0 1 39 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 2 5 2 0 0 75 0 7 0 0 10 2

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 18 0 1 8 0 0 0 0 0 5 8 15 14 1 0 0 0 5 0 46 12 0 0 36 0 3 0 1 11 0 4 3 9 11 2 0 0 1 1 21 3 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 19 3 2 0 0 0 17 0 0 0 7 20 12 0 3 0 0 18 0 54 13 0 0 64 0 1 0 2 6 0 9 1 10 17 28 2 0 3 1 13 10 6 0

0 0 0 4 92 0 0 11 3 26 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 41 0 0 21 6 0 3 0 17 0 1 0 0 27 0

9 1 0 14 5 83 100 39 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 35 50 27 74 94 0 6 9 100 0 69 0 26 0 0 84 57 54 16 0 18 11 10 20 1 75 0 10 74 38 7 0 7

0 0 0 21 0 0 0 0 93 49 9 0 0 9 0 95 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 4 7 20 0 65 0 0 2 0 0 0 30 0

0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 7 0 1 0 0 0 7 2 1 0 0 0 35

52 466 AUSTIN INDUSTRIES, Dallas, Texas† 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 56 HKS INC., Dallas, Texas 50 PROFESSIONAL SERVICE INDUS. (PSI), Oakbrook Terrace, Ill. 54 S&B HOLDINGS LTD. AND AFFILIATES, Houston, Texas† 48 STV GROUP INC., New York, N.Y.† 53 TRANSCORE, Hummelstown, Pa. 62 STANTEC INC., Phoenix, Ariz.† 59 CONESTOGA-ROVERS & ASSOC., Niagara Falls, N.Y.† 57 ATC GROUP SERVICES INC., Woburn, Mass.† 60 BURNS AND ROE, Oradell, N.J.† 64 PERKINS+WILL, Atlanta, Ga.† 72 RTKL ASSOCIATES INC., Baltimore, Md.† 63 GENERAL PHYSICS CORP., Elkridge, Md.† 55 LEO A DALY, Omaha, Neb.† 71 ENVIRON, Arlington, Va.† 67 EDAW, San Francisco, Calif.† 74 STANLEY CONSULTANTS INC., Muscatine, Iowa 73 HATCH MOTT MACDONALD, Millburn, N.J.† 69 RBF CONSULTING, Irvine, Calif. 68 EDWARDS AND KELCEY INC., Morristown, N.J.† 70 WILBUR SMITH ASSOCIATES, Columbia, S.C. 76 SMITHGROUP INC., Detroit, Mich.† 65 HEERY INTERNATIONAL INC., Atlanta, Ga.† 78 GOLDER ASSOCIATES INC., Atlanta, Ga. 88 TRANSYSTEMS CORP., Kansas City, Mo.† 84 CAROLLO ENGINEERS PC, Phoenix, Ariz. 85 DAVID EVANS AND ASSOCIATES INC., Portland, Ore.† 77 ARUP, New York, N.Y.† 80 HAZEN AND SAWYER PC, New York, N.Y. 86 T.Y. LIN INTERNATIONAL, San Francisco, Calif.† 90 VHB/VANASSE HANGEN BRUSTLIN INC., Watertown, Mass. 91 CORRPRO COS. INC., Medina, Ohio†

81 DELTA ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS INC., St. Paul, Minn.† ENV E E A E E E EC AE E EAC E E ENV EA EA E E EA EAP ENV EC

82 113 CALLISON, Seattle, Wash. 83 84

85 101 KCI TECHNOLOGIES INC., Hunt Valley, Md.† 86

87 102 CANNON DESIGN, Grand Island, N.Y. 88 89 92 SCHOOR DEPALMA INC., Manalapan, N.J. 89 THE BENHAM COS. LLC, Oklahoma City, Okla.†

90 110 LANGAN ENG’G AND ENVIRO. SVCS., Elmwood Park, N.J. 91 121 PSOMAS, Los Angeles, Calif.† 92 105 GEOSYNTEC CONSULTANTS, Atlanta, Ga.† 93 94 96 REYNOLDS, SMITH AND HILLS INC., Jacksonville, Fla.† 97 POWER ENGINEERS INC., Hailey, Idaho† 98 GREENMAN-PEDERSEN INC., Babylon, N.Y.† 94 ASCG INC., Anchorage, Alaska†

95 107 ECS, Chantilly, Va.† 96 97

98 109 WOOLPERT INC., Dayton, Ohio† 99 103 RMT INC., Madison, Wis.† 100 104 SYSKA HENNESSY GROUP INC., New York, N.Y.†

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

101

79 ECOLOGY & ENVIRONMENT INC., Lancaster, N.Y.†

ENV A AE EA E A AE EA AP E EC E E AE EA E ENV AE EA ENV EA EA ENV E E E AE E EA E AE E E E E EA E EC AE A E EC E AE EP A E ENV A AE

91.4 91.0 90.5 90.0 89.8 88.0 86.7 85.3 84.0 81.6 81.0 80.0 79.9 79.3 78.7 78.5 76.5 76.2 75.9 75.7 75.5 74.8 74.5 73.6 73.3 73.1 73.0 71.5 70.0 68.7 68.0 67.8 67.6 67.1 67.1 66.7 66.5 66.2 65.9 65.9 65.8 65.5 65.0 64.9 64.7 64.7 64.2 64.1 64.0 62.9

21.6 8.0 0.3 3.0 0.0 48.0 2.5 0.0 2.3 2.7 20.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.3 4.5 0.0 3.7 0.0 1.2 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.5 0.0 7.0 1.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 6.1 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 45.6 0.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

0 100 52 9 38 85 6 6 92 0 16 8 0 47 20 2 0 100 68 0 1 0 34 47 29 46 92 1 97 0 100 5 23 0 88 79 23 3 25 100 0 0 4 98 80 100 48 2 100 55

0 0 1 0 5 0 87 0 0 5 5 0 0 2 0 5 13 0 0 0 4 0 0 5 5 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 36 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

5 0 0 3 2 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 8 0 4 0 0 95 4 1 9 0 0 3 0 71 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

3 0 8 6 2 0 0 11 3 10 0 0 3 3 16 4 1 0 1 0 32 0 1 3 8 5 0 24 0 16 0 3 23 17 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 27 0 2 0 5 0 0 10

8 0 1 30 5 0 0 15 0 20 0 12 6 34 16 1 0 0 4 71 34 0 2 2 10 0 0 52 0 12 0 2 23 0 0 1 6 0 1 0 0 0 31 0 1 0 8 6 0 6

19 0 2 13 8 0 0 0 0 14 79 0 1 0 0 23 13 0 14 0 3 4 2 3 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 33 0 0 100 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

5 0 29 37 22 15 7 53 0 7 0 62 89 7 41 7 10 0 0 0 15 0 4 11 21 49 0 9 3 0 0 88 31 81 11 14 24 97 4 0 0 0 0 2 16 0 23 2 0 30

51 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 0 43 0 0 0 0 5 50 26 0 5 29 11 0 53 25 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 32 0 0 0 0 90 0 0

0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

102 126 PERKINS EASTMAN, New York, N.Y.† 103 93 GRESHAM, SMITH AND PARTNERS, Nashville, Tenn. 104 114 DLZ CORP., Columbus, Ohio† 105 111 CLOUGH HARBOUR & ASSOCIATES LLP, Albany, N.Y.† 106 108 KOHN PEDERSEN FOX ASSOCIATES PC, New York, N.Y.† 107 123 GHAFARI ASSOCIATES LLC, Dearborn, Mich.† 108 99 SHORT ELLIOT HENDRICKSON INC., Minneapolis, Minn.†

109 122 ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA PARTNERSHIP, Portland, Ore. 110 106 O’BRIEN & GERE, Syracuse, N.Y.† 111 137 DAY & ZIMMERMANN GROUP, Philadelphia, Pa.† 112 117 VOLLMER ASSOCIATES LLP, New York, N.Y. 113 129 RUMMEL KLEPPER & KAHL LLP, Baltimore, Md. 114 135 HAYES, SEAY, MATTERN & MATTERN INC., Roanoke, Va.† 115 112 BURGESS & NIPLE INC., Columbus, Ohio† 116 134 GEOMATRIX CONSULTANTS INC., Oakland, Calif.† 117 131 LFR INC., Emeryville, Calif. 118 162 CUH2A, Princeton, N.J. 119 120 PAULUS, SOKOLOWSKI & SARTOR LLC, Warren, N.J.† 120 125 SCS ENGINEERS, Long Beach, Calif. 121 133 KENNEDY/JENKS CONSULTANTS, San Francisco, Calif. 122 100 UTILITY ENGINEERING CORP., Denver, Colo. 123 116 HALEY & ALDRICH INC., Boston, Mass.† 124 136 S&ME INC., Raleigh, N.C. 125 147 STS CONSULTANTS LTD., Vernon Hills, Ill. 126 124 GREENHORNE & O’MARA, Laurel, Md. 127 118 KLING, Philadelphia, Pa.† 128 119 JORDAN, JONES & GOULDING, Norcross, Ga. 129 144 THORNTON-TOMASETTI INC., New York, N.Y. 130 95 R.W. BECK INC., Seattle, Wash.

131 132 DLR GROUP, Omaha, Neb. 132 143 VOLKERT & ASSOCIATES INC., Mobile, Ala. 133 153 THE WILLDAN GROUP OF COS., Anaheim, Calif.† 134 165 MOFFATT & NICHOL, Long Beach, Calif. 135 142 KPFF CONSULTING ENGINEERS, Seattle, Wash. 136 130 WISS, JANNEY, ELSTNER ASSOCIATES INC., Northbrook, Ill.† 137 158 PENNONI ASSOCIATES INC., Philadelphia, Pa. 138 336 GRANITE CONSTRUCTION INC., Watsonville, Calif.† 139 156 SSOE INC., Toledo, Ohio 140 127 WIMBERLY ALLISON TONG & GOO, Honolulu, Hawaii 141 159 AEPCO INC., Rockville, Md. 142 171 UNIVERSAL ENSCO INC., Houston, Texas† 143 145 WOODARD & CURRAN, Portland, Maine 144 149 HARLEY ELLIS DEVEREAUX, Southfield, Mich.† 145 163 WILSONMILLER INC., Naples, Fla. 146 138 HAMMEL GREEN AND ABRAHAMSON INC., Minneapolis, Minn. 147 151 THE BURKE GROUP, Rosemont, Ill.† 148 140 THE RETEC GROUP, Concord, Mass.† 149 154 HMC ARCHITECTS, Ontario, Calif.† 150 177 HUITT-ZOLLARS INC., Dallas, Texas

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

151 166 CORGAN ASSOCIATES, Dallas, Texas 152 187 THE LPA GROUP INC., Columbia, S.C. 153 115 HILLIER ARCHITECTURE, Princeton, N.J. 154 195 ATWELL-HICKS, Ann Arbor, Mich. 155 146 BOYLE ENGINEERING CORP., Newport Beach, Calif. 156 155 JOHNSON, MIRMIRAN & THOMPSON, Sparks, Md.† 157 308 ARQUITECTONICA, Miami, Fla. 158 180 FOTH & VAN DYKE, Green Bay, Wis.† 159 170 TBE GROUP INC., Clearwater, Fla. 160 196 WOOD RODGERS INC., Sacramento, Calif. 161 152 GZA GEOENVIRONMENTAL INC., Norwood, Mass.† 162 190 TENG AFFILIATED COS., Chicago, Ill. 163 183 L. ROBERT KIMBALL & ASSOCIATES INC., Ebensburg, Pa. 164 139 PARAMETRIX, Sumner, Wash. 165 231 GULF INTERSTATE ENGINEERING CO., Houston, Texas† 166 150 WADE-TRIM GROUP, Detroit, Mich.† 167 161 AFFILIATED ENGINEERS INC., Madison, Wis.†

A EAP A E EA E A E E E EC EA AE EA EA E E

62.4 62.4 62.3 62.3 62.0 61.9 61.2 60.3 59.4 59.4 59.4 59.3 58.8 58.7 58.5 58.5 58.1 56.9 56.7 55.6 54.9 54.6 54.4 53.8 53.8 52.7 52.5 52.3 52.1 52.0 51.5 51.3 51.0 51.0 50.9 50.9 50.5 50.5 50.2 50.1 50.0 50.0 50.0 49.9 49.1 49.0 48.9 48.9 48.8 48.6

0.3 3.4 4.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 18.9 0.0 0.3 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 18.2 0.0 0.0 17.4 0.0 6.9 0.0 3.6 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.2 3.1 0.0 4.5 0.0 0.1 0.0 1.5 0.5 0.2 3.6 0.0 0.3 0.0 7.5 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0

44 2 100 84 3 1 100 0 2 0 8 32 38 4 0 0 83 100 0 100 13 86 60 0 45 6 0 0 0 38 93 8 33 19 18 98 80 98 0 85 0 100 57 7 86 7 5 0 19 33

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 2 0 0 7 77 7 0 0 14 7 5 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 81 0 5 0 0 18 0 0 0 93 0 1 0 0 0 2 8 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 2 0 0 10 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 38 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 4 0 8 0 0 0 0 22 0 2 2 9 19 0 0 0 3 0 7 3 0 4 0 4 0 22 0 0 0 12 28 2 0 2 0 17 3

0 0 0 1 33 5 0 5 6 0 5 0 1 18 0 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 5 0 0 0 5 0 1 6 25 0 1 5 0 78 0 0 0 4 25 0 2 5 0 19 2

0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 100 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 2 19 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 43 60 0 2 0 0 15 96 0 0 0 0 77 2 0 1 5

44 98 0 0 14 94 0 3 75 6 11 33 21 36 0 26 0 0 0 0 23 14 22 1 12 66 100 0 0 33 3 7 20 0 5 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 14 26 12 3 68 100 40 2

0 0 0 9 0 0 0 0 4 0 54 0 6 11 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 11 26 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0 0 5 0 0 32

12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 20 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

168 232 THOMPSON VENTULETT STAINBACK & ASSOCIATES, Atlanta, Ga.† A 169 201 ENERCON SERVICES INC., Tulsa, Okla. 170 191 BURT HILL, Butler, Pa. 171 184 JONES & STOKES ASSOCIATES INC., Sacramento, Calif. 172 174 WEIDLINGER ASSOCIATES, New York, N.Y.† 173 206 UNIVERSAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES, Orlando, Fla. 174 247 BARR ENGINEERING CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 175 228 PAPE-DAWSON ENGINEERS INC., San Antonio, Texas EA AE ENV E GE E E

176 148 WILSON & CO., ENGINEERS & ARCHITECTS, Albuquerque, N.M. EA 177 169 MCCORMICK TAYLOR, Philadelphia, Pa. 178 157 BIBB AND ASSOCIATES INC., Lenexa, Kan. 179 ** M+W ZANDER US OPERATIONS INC., Plano, Texas† E E EA GE E E EA E EA E E AE E AE EC A E EA E EA EA E EA EA

180 194 QORE PROPERTY SCIENCES, Duluth, Ga. 181 226 FLACK + KURTZ, New York, N.Y. 182 179 G. C. WALLACE COS., Las Vegas, Nev.† 183 173 BARGE WAGGONER SUMNER & CANNON INC., Nashville, Tenn. 184 222 CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS INC., Pittsburgh, Pa. 185 213 MIDDOUGH CONSULTING, Cleveland, Ohio† 186 189 MARTIN ASSOCIATES GROUP INC., Los Angeles, Calif.† 187 220 SMITH SECKMAN REID INC., Nashville, Tenn.† 188 172 ELLERBE BECKET, Minneapolis, Minn.† 189 141 GREELEY AND HANSEN LLC, Chicago, Ill. 190 181 EWINGCOLE, Philadelphia, Pa. 191 302 BRINDERSON, Westminster, Calif. 192 182 SASAKI ASSOCIATES INC., Watertown, Mass. 193 234 OLSSON ASSOCIATES, Lincoln, Neb. 194 198 HALFF ASSOCIATES INC., Dallas, Texas 195 223 WALTER P. MOORE, Houston, Texas 196 216 WINK COS. LLC, Baton Rouge, La.† 197 210 AYRES ASSOCIATES, Eau Claire, Wis. 198 188 H.W. LOCHNER INC., Chicago, Ill.† 199 185 WHITMAN REQUARDT AND ASSOCIATES LLP, Baltimore, Md. 200 193 MERRICK & CO., Aurora, Colo.

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

201 204 BONESTROO ROSENE ANDERLIK & ASSOC., St. Paul, Minn.† 202 197 MULVANNYG2 ARCHITECTURE, Bellevue, Wash. 204 167 FLAD & ASSOCIATES, Madison, Wis.† 205 200 NOLTE ASSOCIATES INC., Sacramento, Calif.† 206 208 VANDERWEIL ENGINEERS, Boston, Mass.† 207 235 EVANS MECHWART HAMBLETON & TILTON, Columbus, Ohio 208 225 PAGESOUTHERLANDPAGE, Houston, Texas 209 233 CRB CONSULTING ENGINEERS INC., Kansas City, Mo. 210 217 SIMPSON GUMPERTZ & HEGER INC., Waltham, Mass. 211 202 BIRDSALL SERVICES GROUP INC., Sea Girt, N.J.† 212 229 TLC ENGINEERING FOR ARCHITECTURE, Orlando, Fla. 213 276 PBK ARCHITECTS, Houston, Texas 214 290 SCHENKELSHULTZ, Fort Wayne, Ind.† 215 212 GAI CONSULTANTS INC., Homestead, Pa. 216 207 HANSON PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INC., Springfield, Ill.† 217 237 GEI CONSULTANTS INC., Winchester, Mass.† 218 218 FREESE AND NICHOLS INC., Fort Worth, Texas 219 246 ALBERT-GARAUDY CONSULTING ENGINEERS, Metairie, La. 220 199 C&S ENGINEERS INC., Syracuse, N.Y. 221 238 BSA LIFESTRUCTURES, Indianapolis, Ind.† 222 224 NTDSTICHLER ARCHITECTURE, San Diego, Calif. 223 203 WALKER PARKING CONSULTANTS, Chicago, Ill. 224 164 EA ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND TECH. INC., Hunt Valley, Md. 225 253 NINYO & MOORE, San Diego, Calif. 226 261 PATRICK ENGINEERING INC., Lisle, Ill.† 227 296 T&M ASSOCIATES, Middletown, N.J.† 228 284 BURY+PARTNERS-HOLDINGS INC., Austin, Texas† 229 221 BRAUN INTERTEC CORP., Minneapolis, Minn.† 230 227 SHEPLEY BULFINCH RICHARDSON AND ABBOTT, Boston, Mass. 231 178 EINHORN YAFFEE PRESCOTT, Albany, N.Y. 232 239 STRAND ASSOCIATES INC., Madison, Wis. 233 82 A. EPSTEIN AND SONS INTERNATIONAL INC., Chicago, Ill.† 234 175 KAPLAN MCLAUGHLIN DIAZ, San Francisco, Calif.† 235 254 PERKOWITZ+RUTH ARCHITECTS, Long Beach, Calif.† 236 186 CSA GROUP, San Juan, P.R. 237 260 DYER RIDDLE MILLS & PRECOURT INC., Orlando, Fla. 238 168 HLW INTERNATIONAL LLP, New York, N.Y.† 239 245 CRAWFORD, MURPHY & TILLY INC., Springfield, Ill. 240 350 LS3P ASSOCIATES LTD., Charleston, S.C. 241 ** CHONG PARTNERS ARCHITECTURE, San Francisco, Calif.

EA A

48.2 47.9 47.6 47.5 47.2 47.0 46.8 46.7 46.6 46.5 46.5 46.4 46.3 46.2 46.2 46.2 45.9 45.2 45.0 44.8 44.7 44.4 44.2 43.8 43.5 43.1 43.0 42.9 42.8 42.8 42.7 42.7 42.0 42.0 42.0 41.6 41.4 41.3 41.2 41.1 40.9 40.8 40.7 40.5 40.5 40.4 40.3 39.9 39.9 39.7

0.0 6.6 10.1 2.1 1.0 0.9 0.0 8.7 5.5 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 01.0 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.5 1.7 4.6 0.0 4.5 7.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 3.9 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 0.9 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

13 100 100 100 73 79 77 97 1 78 40 93 100 86 7 26 7 9 0 21 100 100 0 0 18 7 19 94 57 100 100 3 100 100 100 16 0 100 0 100 100 2 2 20 100 17 6 0 100 96

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 53 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6 3 27 0 0 3 0 0 0 6 3 56 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

27 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 5 1 52 56 0 2 0 0 0 2 14 1 6 4 4 0 0 11 0 0 0 49 1 0 10 0 0 0 0 10 0 6 2 10 0 1

16 0 0 0 20 0 11 0 0 1 18 0 0 0 3 2 0 17 0 12 0 0 0 21 11 5 18 2 11 0 0 30 0 0 0 0 1 0 8 0 0 0 13 15 0 11 10 8 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 96 4 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 100 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 13 0 5 0 0 4 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 20 0 0 0

27 0 0 0 7 0 10 0 0 9 9 7 0 14 53 55 5 13 0 40 0 0 0 8 18 27 39 0 15 0 0 32 0 0 0 24 40 0 68 0 0 0 35 35 0 50 10 70 0 1

8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 7 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 55 17 0 5 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 0 0 0 10 37 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 6 10 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

203 249 SMALLWOOD REYNOLDS STEWART STEWART & ASSOC., Atlanta, Ga.† A AE E E E AE EA E E E A A E EA E EA E EA AE AE EA ENV GE EA E E GE A AE E AE A A EA E AE E A A AE EA E A EAP E EA AE AE

242 321 PRO2SERVE PROFESSIONAL PROJ. SVCS., Oak Ridge, Tenn. 243 241 OTAK INC., Lake Oswego, Ore.† 244 205 MACKAY & SOMPS CIVIL ENGINEERS INC., Pleasanton, Calif. 245 300 COOPER CARRY, Atlanta, Ga.† 246 192 MAGUIRE GROUP INC., Foxborough, Mass. 247 271 FUSS & O’NEILL INC., Manchester, Conn.† 248 258 NEEL-SCHAFFER INC., Jackson, Miss.† 249 214 SHW GROUP LLP, Dallas, Texas† 250 211 FANNING/HOWEY ASSOCIATES INC., Celina, Ohio

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

251 248 GREENBERGFARROW, Atlanta, Ga. 252 262 JCJ ARCHITECTURE, Hartford, Conn.† 253 279 NTH CONSULTANTS LTD., Detroit, Mich. 254 311 EYP MISSION CRITICAL FACILITIES, New York, N.Y. 255 438 OPUS GROUP, Minnetonka, Minn.† 256 274 AMBITECH ENGINEERING CORP., Downers Grove, Ill. 257 298 MCKIM & CREED PA, Wilmington, N.C. 258 289 PATE ENGINEERS INC., Houston, Texas 259 294 BELT COLLINS, Honolulu, Hawaii 260 252 BUCHART-HORN INC./BASCO ASSOCIATES, York, Pa.† 261 273 PATTON HARRIS RUST & ASSOCIATES, Chantilly, Va. 262 256 FISHBECK THOMPSON CARR & HUBER, Grand Rapids, Mich. 263 243 DURRANT, Dubuque, Iowa† 264 267 SWANKE HAYDEN CONNELL ARCHITECTS, New York, N.Y.† 265 250 BOSWELL ENGINEERING, South Hackensack, N.J.† 266 265 ENSAFE INC., Memphis, Tenn.† 267 160 CONVERSE CONSULTANTS, Monrovia, Calif.† 268 ** BBG-BBGM, New York, N.Y.†

AE A E EA AE EA E E L EA E EA AE A E ENV GE A AE EA E E GE A A ALP A EA E AE EA E E A E A AE E GE E AE A E A E AE E ENV AE E

39.2 39.2 39.0 39.0 39.0 38.9 38.6 38.5 38.4 38.3 38.1 38.1 38.0 38.0 37.9 37.9 37.5 37.0 37.0 37.0 36.9 36.7 36.6 36.5 36.3 36.3 36.2 36.2 36.1 36.1 36.1 36.1 36.0 35.9 35.9 35.8 35.7 35.6 35.6 35.5 35.5 35.1 35.0 35.0 35.0 34.9 34.9 34.9 34.8 34.7

0.0 0.2 0.0 7.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 26.3 4.3 0.0 0.0 4.0 18.8 0.0 2.0 0.0 9.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 20.1 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 15.8 0.8 0.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.6 0.8 1.0 0.0 0.2 1.7 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.5 0.0 0.0 0.9 1.4

100 100 24 21 100 0 18 0 86 20 45 35 100 100 0 0 29 100 57 19 0 85 70 100 100 100 65 10 9 52 2 76 0 97 9 100 80 50 55 100 100 59 20 100 43 78 93 4 100 23

0 0 14 5 0 6 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 10 0 9 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 22 0 0 0 0

0 0 8 0 0 0 9 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 5 0 0 0 3 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 6

0 0 4 0 0 0 11 7 3 12 16 10 0 0 2 0 8 0 0 9 17 2 5 0 0 0 0 9 11 5 1 0 30 0 29 0 0 6 20 0 0 15 24 0 3 0 2 14 0 11

0 0 36 0 0 0 25 17 3 29 9 11 0 0 9 0 10 0 1 11 35 1 8 0 0 0 0 3 10 5 1 0 40 0 24 0 2 5 1 0 0 19 31 0 3 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 83 0 0 0 2 1 8 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 11 78 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 15

0 0 10 0 0 0 15 22 5 30 10 21 0 0 87 0 9 0 43 57 48 9 11 0 0 0 35 70 40 5 6 4 30 0 19 0 10 15 14 0 0 8 12 0 43 0 3 9 0 25

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 14 0 0 1 21 41 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 8 10 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 10 8 0 0 0 1 0 9 0 0 0 0 14

0 0 0 74 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 6 0 0 0 0 8 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

269 244 PGAL, Houston, Texas 270 292 MS CONSULTANTS INC., Columbus, Ohio 271 257 BROWN & GAY ENGINEERS INC., Houston, Texas 272 281 TMAD TAYLOR & GAINES, Pasadena, Calif. 273 314 LEIGHTON GROUP INC., Irvine, Calif.† 274 303 ELKUS MANFREDI ARCHITECTS, Boston, Mass. 275 404 JMA ARCHITECTURE STUDIOS, Las Vegas, Nev. 276 285 EDSA, Fort Lauderdale, Fla.† 277 269 FENTRESS BRADBURN ARCHITECTS, Denver, Colo. 278 266 MEAD & HUNT INC., Madison, Wis. 279 295 SHANNON & WILSON INC., Seattle, Wash. 280 277 TAIT & ASSOCIATES INC., Santa Ana, Calif.† 281 358 WALDEMAR S. NELSON AND CO. INC., New Orleans, La. 282 293 SCHIRMER ENGINEERING CORP., Deerfield, Ill. 283 263 LJA ENGINEERING & SURVEYING INC., Houston, Texas 284 458 DAVIS BRODY BOND LLP, New York, N.Y. 285 264 JONES, EDMUNDS & ASSOCIATES INC., Gainesville, Fla.† 286 286 NADEL ARCHITECTS INC., Los Angeles, Calif. 287 326 CLARK-NEXSEN PC, Norfolk, Va. 288 282 FROEHLING & ROBERTSON INC., Richmond, Va.† 289 301 SCHNABEL ENGINEERING INC., Glen Allen, Va.† 290 324 BOWMAN CONSULTING, Chantilly, Va.† 291 242 OWP/P, Chicago, Ill.† 292 318 CPH ENGINEERS INC., Sanford, Fla. 293 270 REMINGTON & VERNICK ENGINEERS INC., Haddonfield, N.J.† 294 331 CUNINGHAM GROUP ARCHITECTURE PA, Minneapolis, Minn. 295 342 RABA-KISTNER CONSULTANTS INC., San Antonio, Texas† 296 341 ALBERT KAHN ASSOCIATES INC., Detroit, Mich.† 297 ** MANHARD CONSULTING LTD., Vernon Hills, Ill.

298 343 SWCA INC., Phoenix, Ariz. 299 307 TRO/THE RITCHIE ORGANIZATION, Newton, Mass. 300 299 GEOENGINEERS INC., Redmond, Wash.

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Top 500

The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

301 380 WARE MALCOMB, Irvine, Calif. 302 329 MCDONOUGH ASSOCIATES INC., Chicago, Ill. 303 403 V3 COS. LTD., Woodridge, Ill.† 304 316 WESTON & SAMPSON ENGINEERS INC., Peabody, Mass.† 305 327 GRAEF ANHALT SCHLOEMER & ASSOC. INC., Milwaukee, Wis. 306 251 HARDESTY & HANOVER LLP, New York, N.Y. 307 236 GOULD EVANS, Kansas City, Mo. 308 333 LOIEDERMAN SOLTESZ ASSOCIATES INC., Rockville, Md. 309 439 WDG ARCHITECTURE, Washington, D.C.† 310 280 NILES BOLTON ASSOCIATES INC., Atlanta, Ga.† 311 305 BOLTON & MENK INC., Mankato, Minn. 312 268 ERDMAN, ANTHONY AND ASSOCIATES INC., Rochester, N.Y. 313 332 HARRIS GROUP INC., Seattle, Wash. 314 382 SEBESTA BLOMBERG, Roseville, Minn. 315 408 TKDA, St. Paul, Minn. 316 353 GEOCON, San Diego, Calif.† 317 283 THE RJA GROUP INC., Chicago, Ill.† 318 297 DUFRESNE-HENRY INC., N. Springfield, Vt. 319 383 M-E ENGINEERS INC., Wheat Ridge, Colo.† 320 367 URBAN ENGINEERS INC., Philadelphia, Pa.† 321 304 ORBITAL ENGINEERING INC., Pittsburgh, Pa. 322 322 WINZLER & KELLY CONSULTING ENGINEERS, Eureka, Calif. 323 328 TIMMONS GROUP, Richmond, Va. 324 349 ULTEIG ENGINEERS INC., Fargo, N.D. 325 384 BERMELLO AJAMIL AND PARTNERS INC., Miami, Fla. 326 396 WHR ARCHITECTS INC., Houston, Texas† 327 325 MBH ARCHITECTS, Alameda, Calif. 328 309 KARLSBERGER COS., Columbus, Ohio† 329 372 MORRISON-MAIERLE INC., Helena, Mont.† 330 315 MASER CONSULTING PA, Red Bank, N.J. 331 275 VOA ASSOCIATES INC., Chicago, Ill. 332 370 BERGMANN ASSOCIATES INC., Rochester, N.Y. 333 373 THE SCHNEIDER CORP., Indianapolis, Ind. 334 291 FAY SPOFFORD & THORNDIKE, Burlington, Mass. 335 338 BEYER BLINDER BELLE ARCHITECTS & PLNRS., New York, N.Y. 336 ** GLOBAL PERFORMANCE, Greenville, S.C.† ** CLARK GROUP, Bethesda, Md.†

A EA E E E E A E A A E E EA E EA GE E E E E E E E E AE A A A E E ALP EA EA E A EC EA EC E E AE E ENV E EC E EA A EA E

34.7 34.6 34.5 34.3 34.2 34.2 34.1 34.0 33.8 33.4 33.3 33.2 33.0 32.9 32.8 32.8 32.8 32.7 32.6 32.4 32.3 32.2 32.2 32.2 32.0 32.0 31.7 31.7 31.7 31.5 31.5 31.5 31.3 31.3 31.3 31.2 31.2 31.0 31.0 30.8 30.8 30.8 30.8 30.8 30.6 30.6 30.5 30.4 30.4 30.2

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.6 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 5.7 0.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 3.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 5.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.0

92 3 39 0 38 0 95 100 100 100 0 14 0 58 15 91 86 6 100 8 2 29 75 16 54 23 100 100 30 61 100 33 12 15 91 0 23 87 0 71 100 0 20 100 5 0 22 100 26 0

8 0 1 0 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 19 36 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 3 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 2 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 13 3 0 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

0 9 2 29 8 0 0 0 0 0 20 1 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 2 3 5 0 0 0 0 20 3 0 0 0 19 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 2 20 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

0 5 1 55 3 0 0 0 0 0 14 1 5 0 6 0 0 25 0 0 0 27 2 7 0 0 0 0 5 6 0 2 16 26 0 0 14 0 20 5 0 2 5 0 0 0 16 0 0 9

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 54 6 0 0 4 0 0 5 77 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 0 1 0 2 0 0 15 0 69 0 11 0 0 0

0 80 26 6 35 100 0 0 0 0 29 74 2 0 58 0 6 34 0 85 2 7 4 25 46 0 0 0 28 15 0 53 6 41 4 0 51 10 17 22 0 97 20 0 0 100 30 0 74 53

0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 0 0 2 0 27 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 0 0 0 2 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 11

337 337 AMERICAN CONSULTING INC., Indianapolis, Ind. 338 339 259 R.D. ZANDE & ASSOCIATES INC., Columbus, Ohio† 340 340 BKF ENGINEERS, Redwood City, Calif. 341 414 RNL, Denver, Colo.† 342 255 ALFRED BENESCH & CO., Chicago, Ill. 343 323 APEX ENVIRONMENTAL INC., Rockville, Md. 344 362 KJWW ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS, Rock Island, Ill. 345 278 O’NEAL INC., Greenville, S.C.† 346 355 SRF CONSULTING GROUP INC., Plymouth, Minn. 347 306 GEORGE BUTLER ASSOCIATES INC., Lenexa, Kan. 348 209 POLSHEK PARTNERSHIP ARCHITECTS LLP, New York, N.Y. 349 312 THE RBA GROUP, Morristown, N.J. 350 420 KADRMAS, LEE & JACKSON INC., Bismarck, N.D.†

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The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

351

** ENGLAND-THIMS & MILLER INC., Jacksonville, Fla.†

E EA EA E ENV E EA EA E AE A E A E EA E EAP A A E AE A AE E AE EA A A E E E E EAP E A A GE E E A E AE E E E E AE E AE E

30.1 30.1 30.1 30.1 30.0 30.0 29.9 29.8 29.7 29.6 29.5 29.2 29.1 29.0 29.0 28.8 28.8 28.7 28.6 28.5 28.5 28.5 28.5 28.3 28.0 28.0 27.9 27.7 27.7 27.6 27.5 27.4 27.3 27.2 27.2 27.1 27.1 27.0 26.9 26.9 26.8 26.8 26.7 26.7 26.6 26.4 26.0 26.0 26.0 25.8

0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.1 0.0 7.7 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 0.5 7.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 5.3 0.0 6.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 1.5 0.0 0.6 0.0 2.4 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0

82 64 18 92 38 0 17 12 90 97 97 0 100 17 9 0 18 51 100 74 93 100 70 4 100 66 100 100 5 19 24 0 16 6 100 100 74 40 98 100 93 93 0 11 1 0 100 22 96 10

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 0 0 0 0 1

0 10 0 0 13 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 39 5 37 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 7 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 0 10 0 0 35 0 17 0 14 26 0 0 2 15 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 11 0 7 0 0

1 0 0 0 5 7 4 7 2 0 0 70 0 17 13 1 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 7 0 10 0 0 11 9 3 0 14 26 0 0 2 15 0 0 0 0 9 0 6 23 0 20 0 0

0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 14 6 24 0 0 0 0 14

18 10 58 8 23 52 66 38 6 0 3 20 0 48 56 34 7 0 0 10 0 0 0 86 0 9 0 0 50 71 23 100 31 35 0 0 8 30 0 0 6 0 0 80 0 24 0 50 4 19

0 14 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 38 0 14 1 0 0 0 0

0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0

352 387 BL COS. INC., Meriden, Conn.† 353 287 URBITRAN GROUP, New York, N.Y.† 354 431 MAGNUSSON KLEMENCIC ASSOCIATES INC., Seattle, Wash. 355 366 AKRF INC., New York, N.Y. 356 397 CHIANG, PATEL & YERBY INC., Dallas, Texas† 357 348 BUCHER, WILLIS & RATLIFF CORP., Kansas City, Mo. 358 313 HOWARD R. GREEN CO., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 359 393 HALL & FOREMAN INC., Irvine, Calif. 360 378 CTA ARCHITECTS ENGINEERS, Billings, Mont. 361 335 SOLOMON CORDWELL BUENZ, Chicago, Ill. 362 368 HUBBELL, ROTH & CLARK INC., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 363 464 PEI COBB FREED & PARTNERS ARCHITECTS, New York, N.Y.† 364 376 KEITH AND SCHNARS PA, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 365 330 DAVIS & FLOYD INC., Greenwood, S.C. 366 346 KISINGER CAMPO & ASSOCIATES CORP., Tampa, Fla.† 367 ** QUAD KNOPF INC., Visalia, Calif.

368 339 WALLACE ROBERTS & TODD LLC, Philadelphia, Pa. 369 272 RAFAEL VINOLY ARCHITECTS PC, New York, N.Y. 370 317 PROJECT DESIGN CONSULTANTS, San Diego, Calif. 371 433 BRPH COS. INC., Melbourne, Fla.† 372 ** CO ARCHITECTS, Los Angeles, Calif.

373 319 EI ASSOCIATES, Cedar Knolls, N.J. 374 354 MARK THOMAS & CO. INC., San Jose, Calif. 375 360 BALLINGER, Philadelphia, Pa. 376 320 FARNSWORTH GROUP INC., Bloomington, Ill. 377 427 RBB ARCHITECTS INC., Los Angeles, Calif. 378 344 MORRIS ARCHITECTS, Houston, Texas 379 356 BARTLETT AND WEST ENGINEERS INC., Topeka, Kan. 380 437 R.W. ARMSTRONG & ASSOCIATES INC., Indianapolis, Ind. 381 365 BOHANNAN HUSTON INC., Albuquerque, N.M. 382 310 HPA INC., New York, N.Y. 383 359 POGGEMEYER DESIGN GROUP INC., Bowling Green, Ohio† 384 401 J-U-B ENGINEERS INC., Boise, Idaho 385 441 KKE ARCHITECTS INC., Minneapolis, Minn. 386 453 LOONEY RICKS KISS ARCHITECTS INC., Memphis, Tenn. 387 371 EARTH SYSTEMS INC., San Luis Obispo, Calif.† 388 364 HERBERT ROWLAND & GRUBIC INC., Harrisburg, Pa. 389 357 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS DESIGN INC., Chicago, Ill. 390 391 PAYETTE, Boston, Mass. 391 411 CEI ENGINEERING ASSOCIATES INC., Bentonville, Ark. 392 410 THE S/L/A/M COLLABORATIVE INC., Glastonbury, Conn.† 393 451 HULL & ASSOCIATES INC., Dublin, Ohio 394 352 BERGER/ABAM ENGINEERS INC., Federal Way, Wash.† 395 423 MARSHALL MILLER & ASSOCIATES INC., Bluefield, Va. 396 351 BAXTER & WOODMAN INC., Crystal Lake, Ill.† 397 413 ASTORINO, Pittsburgh, Pa. 398 361 DELON HAMPTON & ASSOC., Washington, D.C. 399 345 ODELL ASSOCIATES INC., Charlotte, N.C.† 400 386 TAYLOR WISEMAN & TAYLOR, Mt. Laurel, N.J.

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The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

401 461 KRAZAN & ASSOCIATES INC., Clovis, Calif.† 402 381 SHIVE-HATTERY INC., Cedar Rapids, Iowa 403 394 SOIL AND MATERIALS ENGINEERS INC., Plymouth, Mich. 404 415 RUGGERI-JENSEN-AZAR & ASSOCIATES, Pleasanton, Calif. 405 375 CTL/THOMPSON INC., Denver, Colo.† 406 374 ON-BOARD ENGINEERING CORP., East Windsor, N.J.† 407 429 RDG PLANNING & DESIGN, Des Moines, Iowa† 408 406 CENTURY ENGINEERING INC., Towson, Md. 409 399 WIGHT & CO., Darien, Ill. 410 ** CUBELLIS ASSOCIATES INC., Boston, Mass.†

E EA E E GE EC AP E AE AE EA E A A A E EA EA EA E A AE AE GE E E AE E E

25.8 25.8 25.7 25.6 25.5 25.5 25.5 25.4 25.4 25.4 25.1 25.0 25.0 25.0 25.0 24.9 24.8 24.8 24.5 24.5 24.5 24.1 24.1 24.0 24.0 23.9 23.8 23.7 23.6 23.6 23.6 23.5 23.5 23.5 23.3 23.3 23.3 23.2 23.0 23.0 23.0 22.8 22.7 22.5 22.5 22.3 22.3 22.2 22.0 21.9

0.0 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

77 64 49 95 88 14 84 33 79 99 41 0 96 100 26 18 5 22 47 31 100 25 95 44 0 38 97 9 42 28 29 75 100 0 100 100 100 100 35 0 100 0 99 10 31 78 1 8 100 53

4 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 3 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 23 28 0 0 0 1 31 27 1 7 0 25 0 12 11 12 0 3 0 11 4 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 3 0 3

1 1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 41 0 0 0 7 45 9 1 10 0 22 0 6 24 13 0 2 0 2 7 2 0 82 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 7 8 0 6

2 6 4 0 0 69 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 74 0 0 0 3 0 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 100 0 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

6 11 17 5 11 14 1 60 11 0 19 10 4 0 0 73 16 9 2 23 0 9 0 36 31 38 0 84 42 32 29 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 0 0 0 43 53 22 91 58 0 38

8 1 15 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 21 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0

1 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 23 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

411 412 PARKHILL SMITH & COOPER INC., Lubbock, Texas 412 395 TIGHE & BOND INC., Westfield, Mass. 413 ** FXFOWLE ARCHITECTS PC, New York, N.Y.

414 388 MCG ARCHITECTURE, Pasadena, Calif. 415 419 TSOI/KOBUS & ASSOCIATES INC., Cambridge, Mass. 416 405 CHAS. H. SELLS INC., Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 417 407 GRW ENGINEERS INC., Lexington, Ky.† 418 400 H2M GRP./HOLZMACHER MCLENDON & MURRELL, Melville, N.Y.† 419 363 C.H. GUERNSEY & CO., Oklahoma City, Okla. 420 392 PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS PA, Wichita, Kan. 421 ** LORD, AECK & SARGENT, Atlanta, Ga. ** NORTHWEST ARCHITECTURAL CO. PS, Seattle, Wash.† ** NODARSE & ASSOCIATES INC., Winter Park, Fla. 422 398 MCMAHON GROUP, Neenah, Wis.† 423 424

425 377 DANNENBAUM ENGINEERING CORP., Houston, Texas 426 481 SMITH ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS INC., McHenry, Ill. 427 417 HIGHLAND ASSOC. LTD. ARCH. ENG’G INTR. DES., Clarks Summit, Pa. 428 409 HAKS ENGINEERS AND LAND SURVEYORS PC, New York, N.Y. 429 418 DOWL ENGINEERS, Anchorage, Alaska

430 385 TECTONIC ENG’G & SURVEYING CONSULTANTS, Mountainville, N.Y. E 431 445 MUESER RUTLEDGE CONSULTING ENGINEERS, New York, N.Y. 432 479 GEOTEK INC., Las Vegas, Nev. 433 379 DEKKER/PERICH/SABATINI LTD., Albuquerque, N.M.† 434 428 STEARNS & WHELER LLC, Cazenovia, N.Y.† 435 369 H+L ARCHITECTURE, Denver, Colo. 436 460 STUDIOS ARCHITECTURE, San Francisco, Calif. 437 435 BSW INTERNATIONAL INC., Tulsa, Okla. 438 449 FKP ARCHITECTS INC., Houston, Texas† 439 465 GPD GROUP, Akron, Ohio 440 496 FAGEN INC., Granite Falls, Minn. 441 ** VITETTA ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS, Philadelphia, Pa. GE GE A E A A AE A AE EC AE E AE E GE

442 499 W.H. LINDER & ASSOCIATES INC., Metairie, La. 443 440 SMMA/SYMMES MAINI & MCKEE ASSOCS., Cambridge, Mass. 444 477 BOWYER SINGLETON & ASSOCIATES INC., Orlando, Fla. 445 ** THE MANNIK & SMITH GROUP INC., Maumee, Ohio

446 497 GLATTING JACKSON KERCHER ANGLIN LOPEZ RINEHART, Orlando, Fla. PL 447 ** QK4, Louisville, Ky. EA E A AE

448 454 KIRKHAM MICHAEL, Omaha, Neb. 449 ** CARRIER JOHNSON, San Diego, Calif.

450 422 USKH INC., Anchorage, Alaska

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The Top 500 Design Firms
RANK 2006 2005 FIRM TYPE OF FIRM 2005 REVENUE TOTAL INTERNATIONAL MARKETS (% OF 2005 REVENUE) GEN. WATER SEWER/ INDUS./ HAZ. BLDG. MFG. POWER SUPPLY WASTE PETRO. TRANSP. WASTE TELECOMM.

451 416 EPPSTEIN UHEN ARCHITECTS INC., Milwaukee, Wis. 452 474 FEHR & PEERS, Walnut Creek, Calif. 453 450 THE HASKELL CO., Jacksonville, Fla. 454 459 DEGENKOLB ENGINEERS, San Francisco, Calif. 455 456 CASCO DIVERSIFIED, St. Louis, Mo.† 456 457 ** BHDP ARCHITECTURE, Cincinnati, Ohio ** H.F. LENZ CO., Johnstown, Pa.

A E EC E AE A E E E E AO E A A AE E E A E ENV E EA A E AE E E E E

21.8 21.7 21.7 21.7 21.6 21.5 21.3 21.2 21.2 21.1 21.1 20.9 20.9 20.8 20.8 20.8 20.7 20.6 20.6 20.6 20.6 20.4 20.2 20.2 20.1 20.1 20.0 20.0 20.0 19.9 19.9 19.8 19.8 19.7 19.6 19.5 19.5 19.5 19.5 19.4 19.4 19.4 19.3 19.3 19.2 19.2 19.1 19.0 19.0 18.9

0.0 0.0 0.2 0.5 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.9 0.0 6.1 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.1 4.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.2 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 19.2 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.4

99 0 33 94 99 94 71 3 100 54 100 0 100 100 100 0 47 100 8 0 85 3 77 73 100 100 0 21 92 14 0 33 3 0 66 100 100 100 0 1 45 0 13 35 7 35 92 95 0 59

0 0 22 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 10 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 0 20 0 9 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 12 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

0 0 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 0 12 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 21 0 13 0 5 20 0 3 0 0 0 0 4 1 26 10 9 0 3 0 0 0 3

0 0 5 0 0 0 1 17 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 15 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 6 21 0 20 0 5 18 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 2 42 9 0 71 2 0 0 0 7

1 0 24 0 1 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 3 0 0 79 0 12 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 97 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0

0 100 10 0 0 0 2 1 0 6 0 100 0 0 0 98 19 0 58 9 12 0 19 2 0 0 41 36 2 18 100 32 26 100 12 0 0 0 0 93 35 2 22 35 13 24 8 5 0 12

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 24 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

458 491 DRAPER ADEN ASSOCIATES INC., Blacksburg, Va. 459 460 ** GRG INC., Maitland, Fla. ** THE CHAZEN COS., Poughkeepsie, N.Y.†

461 483 FRCH DESIGN WORLDWIDE, Cincinnati, Ohio 462 390 MODJESKI AND MASTERS INC., Harrisburg, Pa. 463 488 LANGDON WILSON ARCH. PLNG. INT’RS, Los Angeles, Calif. 464 334 MARNELL CORRAO ASSOC., Las Vegas, Nev.† 465 447 TMP ASSOCIATES INC., Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 466 442 AMERICAN CONSULTING ENGINEERS, Lexington, Ky.† 467 480 H.C. NUTTING CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 468 389 STEFFIAN BRADLEY ARCHITECTS, Boston, Mass.† 469 484 GARVER ENGINEERS, Little Rock, Ark. 470 ** C.H. FENSTERMAKER & ASSOCIATES INC., Lafayette, La. 471 495 R.A. SMITH & ASSOCIATES INC., Brookfield, Wis.† 472 432 FRU-CON ENGINEERING INC., Ballwin, Mo. 473 467 URBAHN ARCHITECTS, New York, N.Y. 474 ** COFFMAN ENGINEERS INC., Seattle, Wash.† 475 436 FLETCHER-THOMPSON, Shelton, Conn.† 476 ** CRITERIUM ENGINEERS, Portland, Maine

477 498 HOLE MONTES INC., Naples, Fla. 478 471 ORCHARD, HILTZ & MCCLIMENT INC., Livonia, Mich.† 479 480 ** SPARLING, Seattle, Wash.

** HUSSEY, GAY, BELL & DE YOUNG - A BELL CO., Savannah, Ga.† EA E E E E E A EA AE E E EA E E EA ENV EA E AE EC

481 426 LICHTENSTEIN CONSULTING ENGINEERS, Paramus, N.J. 482 493 TRIAD ENGINEERING INC., St. Albans, W.Va. 483 484 485 486 487 ** MATRIX DESIGN GROUP INC., Colorado Springs, Colo.† ** SAI CONSULTING ENGINEERS INC., Pittsburgh, Pa. ** RETTEW ASSOCIATES INC., Lancaster, Pa.† ** THE LAWRENCE GROUP, St. Louis, Mo.† ** CLC ASSOCIATES, Greenwood Village, Colo.

488 473 WESTLAKE REED LESKOSKY, Cleveland, Ohio† 489 ** C&I ENGINEERING, Louisville, Ky.

490 430 MULKEY ENGINEERS & CONSULTANTS, Raleigh, N.C. 491 462 WHITNEY BAILEY COX & MAGNANI LLC, Baltimore, Md. 492 455 B.P. BARBER & ASSOCIATES INC., Columbia, S.C. 493 ** W.K. DICKSON & CO. INC., Charlotte, N.C. 494 448 LJB INC., Dayton, Ohio† 495 446 BRYAN A. STIRRAT & ASSOCIATES, Diamond Bar, Calif.† 496 497 498 ** CMA ARCHITECTS & ENGINEERS LLP, Guaynabo, P.R. ** TRC WORLD ENGINEERING INC., Brentwood, Tenn.† ** MOODY NOLAN INC., Columbus, Ohio

499 468 SEGA INC., Stilwell, Kan.

0 100 0 0

500 476 DIVERSIFIED TECHNOLOGY CONSULTANTS, North Haven, Conn. E

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Where To Find the Top 500
FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK

A
ABB Lummus Global AECOM Technology Corp. AEPCO Inc. Affiliated Engineers Inc. Aker Kvaerner Albert-Garaudy Consulting Engineers AKRF Inc. Ambitech Engineering Corp. AMEC Americas American Consulting Engineers American Consulting Inc. Apex Environmental Inc. ARCADIS R.W. Armstrong & Associates Inc. Arquitectonica Arup ASCG Inc. Astorino ATC Group Services Inc. Atwell-Hicks Austin Industries Ayres Associates 21 2 141 167 36 219 355 256 11 466 337 343 20 380 157 80 97 397 60 154 52 197

Boyle Engineering Corp. Braun Intertec Corp. BBG-BBGM Brinderson Brown and Caldwell Brown & Gay Engineers Inc. BRPH Cos. Inc. BSA LifeStructures BSW International Inc. Buchart-Horn Inc./BASCO Associates Bucher, Willis & Ratliff Corp. Burgess & Niple Inc. The Burke Group Burns & McDonnell Burns and Roe Burt Hill Bury+Partners-Holdings Inc. George Butler Associates Inc.

155 229 268 191 48 271 371 221 437 260 357 115 147 35 61 170 228 347

D
Leo A Daly Dannenbaum Engineering Corp. Davis & Floyd Inc. Davis Brody Bond LLP Day & Zimmermann Group Degenkolb Engineers Dekker/Perich/Sabatini Ltd. Delta Environmental Consultants Inc. Dewberry W.K. Dickson & Co. Inc. Diversified Technology Consultants DLR Group DLZ Corp. DOWL Engineers Draper Aden Associates Inc. Dufresne-Henry Inc. Durrant Dyer Riddle Mills & Precourt Inc. 65 425 365 284 111 454 433 79 49 493 500 131 104 429 458 318 263 237

C.H. Fenstermaker & Associates Inc. Fentress Bradburn Architects Fishbeck Thompson Carr & Huber FKP Architects Inc. Flack + Kurtz Flad & Associates Fletcher-Thompson Fluor Corp. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Foth & Van Dyke FxFowle Architects PC FRCH Design Worldwide Freese and Nichols Inc. Froehling & Robertson Inc. Fru-Con Engineering Inc. Fugro Inc. Fuss & O’Neill Inc.

470 277 262 438 181 204 475 4 18 158 413 461 218 288 472 42 247

C
C&I Engineering C&S Engineers Inc. Callison Cannon Design Carollo Engineers PC Carrier Johnson Carter & Burgess Inc. CASCO Diversified CDI Business Solutions CDM CEI Engineering Associates Inc. Century Engineering Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. The Chazen Cos. Chiang, Patel & Yerby Inc. Chong Partners Architecture Civil & Environmental Consultants Inc. Clark Group Clark-Nexsen PC CLC Associates Clough Harbour & Associates LLP CMA Architects & Engineers LLP CO Architects Coffman Engineers Inc. Converse Consultants Cooper Carry Corgan Associates Corrpro Cos. Inc. CPH Engineers Inc. Conestoga-Rovers & Assoc. Crawford, Murphy & Tilly Inc. CRB Consulting Engineers Inc. Criterium Engineers CSA Group CTA Architects Engineers CTL/Thompson Inc. Cubellis Associates Inc. CUH2A Cuningham Group Architecture PA 489 220 82 87 77 449 31 455 19 23 391 408 5 460 356 241 184 338 287 487 105 496 372 474 267 245 151 86 292 59 239 209 476 236 360 405 410 118 294

G
GAI Consultants Inc. Gannett Fleming Garver Engineers GEI Consultants Inc. General Physics Corp. Gensler Geocon GeoEngineers Inc. Geomatrix Consultants Inc. GeoSyntec Consultants GeoTek Inc. Ghafari Associates LLC Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart Global Performance Golder Associates Inc. Gould Evans GPD Group Graef Anhalt Schloemer & Assoc. Inc. Granite Construction Inc. Greeley and Hansen LLC Howard R. Green Co. GreenbergFarrow Greenhorne & O’Mara Greenman-Pedersen Inc. Gresham, Smith and Partners GRG Inc. GRW Engineers Inc. C. H. Guernsey & Co. Gulf Interstate Engineering Co. GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc. 215 46 469 217 64 27 316 300 116 92 432 107 446 336 75 307 439 305 138 189 358 251 126 96 103 459 417 419 165 161

E
EA Engineering Science and Tech. Inc. Earth Systems Inc. Earth Tech Inc. Ecology & Environment Inc. ECS EDAW EDSA Edwards and Kelcey Inc. EI Associates Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Elkus Manfredi Architects Ellerbe Becket Enercon Services Inc. England-Thims & Miller Inc. ENGlobal Corp. EnSafe Inc. ENVIRON Environmental Systems Design Inc. Eppstein Uhen Architects Inc. A. Epstein and Sons International Inc. Erdman, Anthony and Associates Inc. ERM Holdings Ltd. David Evans and Associates Inc. Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton EwingCole EYP Mission Critical Facilities 224 387 13 101 95 67 276 71 373 231 274 188 169 351 45 266 66 389 451 233 312 24 78 207 190 254

B
Michael Baker Corp. Ballinger B.P. Barber & Associates Inc. Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon Inc. Barr Engineering Co. Bartlett and West Engineers Inc. Baxter & Woodman Inc. BE&K Inc. Bechtel R.W. Beck Inc. Belt Collins Alfred Benesch & Co. The Benham Cos. LLC The Louis Berger Group BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. Bergmann Associates Inc. Bermello Ajamil and Partners Inc. Bureau Veritas Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners BHDP Architecture Bibb and Associates Inc. Birdsall Services Group Inc. BKF Engineers BL Cos. Inc. Black & Veatch Bohannan Huston Inc. Bolton & Menk Inc. Bonestroo Rosene Anderlik & Associates Boswell Engineering Bowman Consulting Bowyer Singleton & Associates Inc. 37 375 492 183 174 379 396 47 7 130 259 342 89 14 394 332 325 40 335 456 178 211 340 352 15 381 311 201 265 290 444

HI
H+L Architecture H2M Grp./Holzmacher McLendon & Murrell HAKS Engineers and Land Surveyors PC Haley & Aldrich Inc. 435 418 428 123

F
Fagen Inc. Fanning/Howey Associates Inc. Farnsworth Group Inc. Fay Spofford & Thorndike Fehr & Peers 440 250 376 334 452

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Top 500

Where To Find the Top 500
FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK

Halff Associates Inc. 194 Hall & Foreman Inc. 359 Hammel Green and Abrahamson Inc. 146 Delon Hampton & Assoc. 398 HPA Inc. 382 Hanson Professional Services Inc. 216 Hardesty & Hanover LLP 306 Harley Ellis Devereaux 144 Harris Group Inc. 313 The Haskell Co. 453 Hatch Mott MacDonald 69 Hayes, Seay, Mattern & Mattern Inc. 114 Hazen and Sawyer PC 81 HDR 17 Heery International Inc. 74 Herbert Rowland & Grubic Inc. 388 Hussey, Gay, Bell & De Young - A Bell Co. 480 Highland Associates Ltd. Architecture Engineering Interior Design 427 Hillier Architecture 153 HKS Inc. 53 HLW International LLP 238 HMC Architects 149 HNTB Cos. 25 HOK 28 Hole Montes Inc. 477 Hubbell, Roth & Clark Inc. 362 Huitt-Zollars Inc. 150 Hull & Associates Inc. 393

Kling Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC KPFF Consulting Engineers Krazan & Associates Inc.

127 106 135 401

MulvannyG2 Architecture Mustang Engineering MWH

202 34 12

Q
Qk4 QORE Property Sciences Quad Knopf Inc. 447 180 367

N L
Langan Engineering and Environmental Services 90 Langdon Wilson Arch. Plng. Int’rs 463 The Lawrence Group 486 Leighton Group Inc. 273 H.F. Lenz Co. 457 LFR Inc. 117 Lichtenstein Consulting Engineers 481 T.Y. Lin International 83 W. H. Linder & Associates Inc. 442 LJA Engineering & Surveying Inc. 283 LJB Inc. 494 H.W. Lochner Inc. 198 Loiederman Soltesz Associates Inc. 308 Looney Ricks Kiss Architects Inc. 386 Lord, Aeck & Sargent 421 The LPA Group Inc. 152 LS3P Associates Ltd. 240 Nadel Architects Inc. Neel-Schaffer Inc. Waldemar S. Nelson and Co. Inc. Niles Bolton Associates Inc. Ninyo & Moore Nodarse & Associates Inc. Nolte Associates Inc. Northwest Architectural Co. PS NTDSTICHLER Architecture NTH Consultants Ltd. H.C. Nutting Co. 286 248 281 310 225 424 205 423 222 253 467

R
Raba-Kistner Consultants Inc. The RBA Group RBB Architects Inc. RBF Consulting RDG Planning & Design Remington & Vernick Engineers Inc. The RETEC Group Rettew Associates Inc. Reynolds, Smith and Hills Inc. The RJA Group Inc. RMT Inc. RNL RTKL Associates Inc. Ruggeri-Jensen-Azar & Associates Rummel Klepper & Kahl LLP 295 349 377 70 407 293 148 485 93 317 99 341 63 404 113

O
O’Brien & Gere Odell Associates Inc. Olsson Associates On-Board Engineering Corp. O’Neal Inc. Opus Group Orbital Engineering Inc. Orchard, Hiltz & McCliment Inc. Otak Inc. OWP/P 110 399 193 406 345 255 321 478 243 291

S
S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates S&ME Inc. The S/L/A/M Collaborative Inc. SAI Consulting Engineers Inc. Sargent & Lundy LLC Sasaki Associates Inc. SchenkelShultz Schirmer Engineering Corp. Schnabel Engineering Inc. The Schneider Corp. Schoor DePalma Inc. SCS Engineers Sebesta Blomberg Sega Inc. Chas. H. Sells Inc. Shannon & Wilson Inc. The Shaw Group Inc. Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott Shive-Hattery Inc. Short Elliot Hendrickson Inc. SHW Group LLP Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP Smallwood Reynolds Stewart Stewart & Assoc. Smith Engineering Consultants Inc. Smith Seckman Reid Inc. R.A. Smith & Associates Inc. Wilbur Smith Associates SmithGroup Inc. SMMA/Symmes Maini & McKee Associates Soil and Materials Engineers Inc. Solomon Cordwell Buenz Sparling SRF Consulting Group Inc. SSOE Inc. 55 124 392 484 41 192 214 282 289 333 88 120 314 499 416 279 16 230 402 108 249 210 51 203 426 187 471 72 73 443 403 361 479 346 139

M
M+W Zander US Operations Inc. MacKay & Somps Civil Engineers Inc. MACTEC Inc. Magnusson Klemencic Associates Inc. Maguire Group Inc. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Manhard Consulting Ltd. The Mannik & Smith Group Inc. Marnell Corrao Assoc. Martin Associates Group Inc. Maser Consulting PA Matrix Design Group Inc. MBH Architects McCormick Taylor McDonough Associates Inc. MCG Architecture McKim & Creed PA McMahon Group M-E Engineers Inc. Mead & Hunt Inc. Merrick & Co. Middough Consulting Marshall Miller & Associates Inc. Modjeski and Masters Inc. Moffatt & Nichol Moody Nolan Inc. Walter P. Moore Morris Architects Morrison-Maierle Inc. MS Consultants Inc. Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers Mulkey Engineers & Consultants 179 244 29 354 246 39 297 445 464 186 330 483 327 177 302 414 257 422 319 278 200 185 395 462 134 498 195 378 329 270 431 490

P
PageSoutherlandPage Pape-Dawson Engineers Inc. Parametrix Parkhill Smith & Cooper Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Parsons Pate Engineers Inc. Patrick Engineering Inc. Patton Harris Rust & Associates Paulus, Sokolowski & Sartor LLC Payette PBK Architects PBS&J Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects Pennoni Associates Inc. Perkins+Will Perkins Eastman Perkowitz+Ruth Architects PGAL Poggemeyer Design Group Inc. Polshek Partnership Architects LLP POWER Engineers Inc. Pro2Serve Professional Project Services Professional Engineering Consultants PA Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Project Design Consultants Psomas 208 175 164 411 10 9 258 226 261 119 390 213 22 363 137 62 102 235 269 383 348 94 242 420 54 370 91

J
Jacobs JCJ Architecture JMA Architecture Studios Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson Jones & Stokes Associates Inc. Jones, Edmunds & Associates Inc. Jordan, Jones & Goulding J-U-B Engineers Inc. 3 252 275 156 171 285 128 384

K
Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson Inc. Albert Kahn Associates Inc. Kaplan McLaughlin Diaz Karlsberger Cos. KBR KCI Technologies Inc. Keith and Schnars PA Kennedy/Jenks Consultants L. Robert Kimball & Associates Inc. Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Kirkham Michael Kisinger Campo & Associates Corp. KJWW Engineering Consultants KKE Architects Inc. The Kleinfelder Group Inc. 350 296 234 328 6 85 364 121 163 33 448 366 344 385 43

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Top 500

Where To Find the Top 500
FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK FIRM RANK

Stanley Consultants Inc. Stantec Inc. Stearns & Wheler LLC Steffian Bradley Architects Bryan A. Stirrat & Associates Strand Associates Inc. STS Consultants Ltd. Studios Architecture STV Group Inc. Swanke Hayden Connell Architects SWCA Inc. Syska Hennessy Group Inc.

68 58 434 468 495 232 125 436 56 264 298 100

T
T&M Associates Tait & Associates Inc. Taylor Wiseman & Taylor TBE Group Inc. Tectonic Engineering & Surveying Consultants Teng Affiliated Cos. Terracon Tetra Tech Inc. Mark Thomas & Co. Inc. Thompson Ventulett Stainback & 227 280 400 159 430 162 50 8 374

Associates Thornton-Tomasetti Inc. Tighe & Bond Inc. Timmons Group TLC Engineering for Architecture TMAD Taylor & Gaines TMP Associates Inc. TKDA TransCore TranSystems Corp. TRC Cos. Inc. TRC World Engineering Inc. Triad Engineering Inc. TRO/The Ritchie Organization Tsoi/Kobus & Associates Inc.

168 129 412 323 212 272 465 315 57 76 38 497 482 299 415

V
V3 Cos. Ltd. Vanderweil Engineers VECO Corp. VHB/Vanasse Hangen Brustlin Inc. Rafael Vinoly Architects PC VITETTA Architects & Engineers VOA Associates Inc. Volkert & Associates Inc. Vollmer Associates LLP 303 206 26 84 369 441 331 132 112

WXY
Wade-Trim Group Walker Parking Consultants G.C. Wallace Cos. Wallace Roberts & Todd LLC Ware Malcomb Washington Group International WHR Architects Inc. WDG Architecture Weidlinger Associates Westlake Reed Leskosky Weston & Sampson Engineers Inc. Weston Solutions Inc. Whitman Requardt and Associates LLP 166 223 182 368 301 32 326 309 172 488 304 44 199

Whitney Bailey Cox & Magnani LLC 491 Wight & Co. 409 The Willdan Group of Cos. 133 Wilson & Co., Engineers & Architects 176 WilsonMiller Inc. 145 Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo 140 Wink Cos. LLC 196 Winzler & Kelly Consulting Engrs. 322 Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc. 136 Wood Rodgers Inc. 160 Woodard & Curran 143 Woolpert Inc. 98 WorleyParsons Corp. 30

Z
R.D. Zande & Associates Inc. Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership 339 109

U
Ulteig Engineers Inc. Universal Engineering Sciences Universal Ensco Inc. Urbahn Architects Urban Engineers Inc. Urbitran Group URS USKH Inc. Utility Engineering Corp. 324 173 142 473 320 353 1 450 122

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General Building
By Carrie McGourty

Amid Rising Energy and Labor Costs Building Market Grows at Rapid Pace
Growth in health care and education drives unprecedented boom

F

ueled by a boom in building and a strengthening economy, there are ample work opportunities for designers in the general building market. But despite the hot market, rising energy and labor costs present challenges as designers aim for more energy-efficient and sustainable designs, industry executives say. Historically low interest rates, a growing economy and a population on the rise are contributing to growth for firms in nearly every market sector, says Patrick MacLeamy, CEO of HOK, St. Louis, Mo. “The market is white hot,” he says. “In all my experience I’ve never seen a market place like this. I don’t

know of anybody who doesn’t have as much work as they need.” The health care industry is driving much of the growth, executives say. That is due partly to the retirement of baby boomers, whose aging population will demand more medical attention in the future. Consolidations, seismic upgrades, renovations and a demand for new facilities such as the $257-million Sutter Healthcare Center in Sacramento, designed by San Francisco-based Kaplan McLaughlin Diaz, are keeping the sector active. “It’s a market that we see a lot of potential in,” says Ken Lockwood, vice president of corporate finance and investor relations at Fluor Corp., Irving, Texas.

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Lockwood says some universities also are investing heavily in expansions of their medical facilities, including Ohio State University, Columbus. HOK was hired to develop a 500,000sq-ft south campus master plan for the University Medical Center. This $700-million project will include redevelopment of the James Cancer Hospital. Scheduled for completion in 2011, the

project also includes a growth strategy for six programs—cancer, critical care, heart, neuroscience, imaging and transplant. Class Is In Education in general is a big business for design firms this year. The success of the bond programs in major cities and states have provided tremendous capital for investment and building, says Paul Steinke, executive vice president for DMJM H&N, an architectural and engineering branch of AECOM. “For us, education was the fastest growing market,” Steinke says. “They’re also projecting an additional two million students entering college within the next few years, and I don’t think the current college infrastructure is prepared to support it. So there’s another market where I think the need far exceeds the finance capabilities.” Universities also are investing heavily in research and technology facilities, many times partnering with private firms. “Universities are growing their research capabilities quickly,” says Carl Roehling, president and CEO of Detriot-based SmithGroup. “A lot of this research is multi-disciplinary, which should be an advantage to larger organizations because architectural engineering firms can combine their disciplines and expertise to address these new buildings.” SmithGroup recently finished work on an $85-million research laboratory for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Molecular Foundry. The 97,500-sq-ft, six-story research laboratory is dedicated to nanotechnology and is one of five new

The Top 50 in General Building
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 AECOM Technology Corp. URS HOK Gensler Jacobs HKS Inc. Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP Tetra Tech Inc. Perkins+Will Parsons RTKL Associates Inc. Leo A Daly Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. HDR SmithGroup Inc. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Heery International Inc. Terracon Callison AMEC Americas Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Cannon Design KBR Perkins Eastman MACTEC Inc. Dewberry CDI Business Solutions Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership CUH2A Arup ECS Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC Bureau Veritas DLR Group Thornton-Tomasetti Inc. Kling Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo Hammel Green and Abrahamson Inc. HMC Architects Harley Ellis Devereaux RBF Consulting Hillier Architecture The Kleinfelder Group Inc. Earth Tech Inc. Arquitectonica KPFF Consulting Engineers Thompson Ventulett Stainback & Associates Burt Hill Schoor DePalma Inc. $ MIL. 548.5 521.0 366.5 361.5 348.3 219.8 203.0 183.0 182.3 178.2 168.0 162.1 159.6 138.0 134.7 131.2 124.2 120.5 115.6 114.0 106.0 105.5 102.4 98.8 91.0 83.4 83.0 80.0 77.0 76.2 75.3 75.2 75.0 74.4 68.0 67.6 67.0 65.9 64.7 64.0 63.8 63.7 62.3 61.3 61.0 60.9 59.0 56.9 55.4 54.6

The Top 25 in Retail
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Builders Group Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Callison Architecture Inc. KBR Gensler Carter & Burgess Inc. MulvannyG2 Architecture Terracon GreenbergFarrow Perkowitz + Ruth Architects Huitt-Zollars Inc. RTKL Associates Inc. CEI Engineering Associates Inc. BSW International Inc. MCG Architecture URS Corp. CASCO Diversified MBH Architects Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Nadel Architects Inc. AMEC Americas PBS&J FRCH Design Worldwide Tait & Associates Inc. CLC Associates $ MIL. 100.0 87.6 82.0 66.7 52.1 40.5 39.8 36.0 33.4 33.2 31.3 25.2 22.6 22.4 21.0 20.3 19.9 18.5 18.2 17.0 17.0 15.8 15.5 15.0 14.5

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM GENERAL BUILDING AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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The Top 10 in Entertainment
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Gensler AECOM Technology Corp. JCJ Architecture Marnell Corrao Associate RTKL Associates Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Leo A Daly AMEC Americas URS Corp. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) $ MIL. 26.3 21.0 20.4 12.4 11.4 11.4 11.2 11.0 10.0 8.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Sports
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 HOK URS Corp. HKS Inc. HNTB Cos. Thornton-Tomasetti Inc. Ellerbe Becket Walter P. Moore Hastings & Chivetta Architects Inc. Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC Tetra Tech, Inc. $ MIL. 90.6 30.0 23.5 13.3 13.0 9.6 8.0 7.1 6.0 6.0

Nanoscale Science Research Centers to be built by the U.S. Dept. of Energy’s Office of Science. It also is a model for sustainable design. In the residential market, design firms are seeing an increase in urban high-rise residential buildings, spurred by the wave of baby boomers looking to retire and live in cities rather than in the suburbs, and a steady stream of young professionals who want an urban lifestyle. With soaring property values and a shortage of apartments, buildings are literally going up. In the commercial sector, Roehling says mixed-use urban development projects are a surprising trend that combine the multiple uses of residential, office and retail space. Corporate headquarters and office buildings are being designed as campusstyle environments where multiple structures surround a quad area for workers to socialize, Steinke says. One example is the $100-million, 310,000-sq-ft RAND headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif., designed by DMJM. A diverse mix of big projects such as the $109-million renovation to Camp Randall Stadium in Madison, Wisc., designed by Berners-Schober Associates, Green Bay, proliferated across the sector. In the hotels market, “building is absolutely booming,” says Ethan Nelson, vice president of architecture at Las Vegas-based Paul Steelman Design Group. Competition between casinos in Las Vegas is driving a group of enormous, fast-track projects. Steelman is designing the Montreux casino complex, a $1.9-bil-

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 11 in Religious and Cultural
RANK* FIRM 1 $ MIL. 74.5 63.8 40.7 32.1 24.5 22.9 22.4 19.9 18.7 18.1 17.5 17.2 17.1 17.1 16.4 15.0 14.8 14.7 12.6 12.3 11.5 10.8 10.7 10.2 9.0 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 10 URS Corp. Davis Brody Bond LLP Hammel Green and Abrahamson Inc. Polshek Partnership Architects LLP Gannett Fleming Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP EwingCole SmithGroup Inc. Fentress Bradburn Architects Ltd. Dewberry HOK $ MIL. 15.0 12.8 12.3 8.0 6.3 6.2 6.1 5.9 5.1 5.0 5.0

The Top 25 in Multi-Unit Residential
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 URS Corp. Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. WilsonMiller Inc. Bowman Consulting Manhard Consulting Ltd. Niles Bolton Associates Inc. Hall & Foreman Inc. PBS&J JMA Architecture Studios Perkins Eastman Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. The Benham Cos. LLC Schoor DePalma Inc. Project Design Consultants RTKL Associates Inc. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Parsons Solomon Cordwell Buenz Terracon Burt Hill Maser Consulting PA Nadel Architects Inc. Smallwood Reynolds Stewart Stewart & Assoc. Inc. DeStefano and Partners Ltd. Morris Architects

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Correctional Facilities
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AECOM Technology Corp. Jacobs Hammel Green and Abrahamson Inc. Dewberry Parsons Tetra Tech, Inc. HDR DLR Group HOK Heery International Inc. $ MIL. 75.8 60.1 32.7 26.3 23.2 18.0 17.2 15.8 15.6 12.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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General Building

lion project that will replace the New Frontier casino. The project includes a 104,000-sq-ft casino, 2,750-room hotel, shopping mall, restaurants and bars and a 465-ft observation wheel. It is scheduled to open by 2009. Casino destinations such as Las Vegas increasingly are becoming family-oriented markets,

which is fueling the construction for spas, hotels and restaurants alongside gambling venues, Nelson explains. But amid the abundance, rising energy costs and dwindling labor resources are shaping the pattern of business for design firms. The recent focus on immigration highlights the industry’s

The Top 25 in Health Care
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Jacobs HDR HKS Inc. Perkins+Will HOK RTKL Associates Inc. Parsons Cannon Design Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership AECOM Technology Corp. SmithGroup Inc. BSA LifeStructures Gresham, Smith and Partners TRO/The Ritchie Organization Perkins Eastman Chong Partners Architecture PageSoutherlandPage URS Corp. RBB Architects Inc Syska Hennessy Group Inc. Karlsberger Cos. Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott Ellerbe Becket Harley Ellis Devereaux Heery International Inc. $ MIL. 105.3 90.0 89.7 71.5 67.4 49.6 48.7 46.1 42.8 42.2 40.6 37.8 37.3 32.4 31.6 31.4 29.9 26.5 25.9 25.5 24.1 22.6 22.4 21.6 21.5

The Top 25 in Commercial Offices
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Gensler HOK Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP AECOM Technology Corp. Perkins+Will Tetra Tech, Inc. URS Corp. Thornton-Tomasetti Inc. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC HKS Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. SmithGroup Inc. KBR Parsons Heery International Inc. HLW International LLP Carter & Burgess Inc. RTKL Associates Inc. Terracon Weidlinger Associates Syska Hennessy Group Inc. Leo A Daly Callison Architecture Inc. S&ME Inc. $ MIL. 247.2 103.6 76.0 62.1 51.0 37.0 36.5 34.8 30.5 30.0 29.9 26.4 23.9 22.7 22.1 21.5 19.7 18.7 18.0 17.5 17.5 15.5 15.4 15.0 15.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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General Building

growing labor shortage, a major hurdle for accurate design budgets and project completion, designers say. Firms increasingly are hard pressed to hire subcontractors as the building boom saps up the available pool of skilled craftsman, management and design professionals. High costs for materials such as steel, cement, lumber, gypsum and copper products are additional market hurdles, but many say the cost of energy is the single biggest factor influencing the building market, and will be the main driver of the market’s future. Petroleum-based construction materials are rising in cost as crude oil hovers around $70 per barrel and designers are being forced to consider the life-cycle cost of a building. As

a result, design firms are being tasked by owners to create environmentally sustainable, green designs as building certification schemes gain momentum in the construction industry. “Green building will finally be so important that it will be the difference between the firms that prosper and grow and those who will struggle for their future,” MacLeamy says. The challenge to go green is convincing owners to invest upfront on designs that will pay off later. “Over the life cycle of a building, those energy costs end up being more than the initial investment, so it’s something on everybody’s mind when you look at a new building design,” Steinke says.

The Top 10 in Distribution And Warehouses
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Carter & Burgess Inc. URS Corp. The Facility Group Leo A Daly Professional Service Indus. (PSI) AMEC Americas Terracon Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. ATC Associates Inc. Michael Baker Corp. $ MIL. 27.6 18.5 14.3 11.2 10.0 10.0 9.4 8.2 7.5 6.0

The Top 10 in Hotels, Motels And Convention Centers
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo HKS Inc. AECOM Technology Corp. Thompson Ventulett Stainback & Assocs. BBG-BBGM Gensler URS Corp. HOK Hnedak Bobo Group Leo A Daly $ MIL. 65.9 46.2 34.1 27.9 24.5 20.5 15.0 14.8 13.7 13.5

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 25 in Education
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Corp. Jacobs Tetra Tech, Inc. HMC Architects Cannon Design SHW Group LLP Heery International Inc. STV Group Inc. Fanning/Howey Associates Inc. DLR Group NTDSTICHLER Architecture Perkins+Will Schenkel & Shultz Inc. SmithGroup Inc. Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership Parsons Leo A Daly Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP TMP Associates Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. HOK Paulus Sokolowski & Sartor LLC Carter & Burgess Inc. Burt Hill $ MIL. 163.1 109.5 85.1 61.0 42.2 41.0 39.9 38.9 36.7 36.2 35.9 34.1 29.1 27.6 26.5 23.7 22.5 19.2 19.0 18.9 18.9 18.7 18.5 18.3 18.0

The Top 25 in Government Offices
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 21 23 24 25 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Corp. Jacobs Parsons CUH2A HOK Earth Tech Inc. Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP Heery International Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. SmithGroup Inc. Leo A Daly Hayes Seay Mattern & Mattern Inc. Merrick & Co. MACTEC Inc. Weidlinger Associates Tetra Tech, Inc. Davis Brody Bond LLP Fluor Corp. Dewberry Day & Zimmermann Group Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Ellerbe Becket HDR Black & Veatch $ MIL. 150.2 127.5 90.4 44.9 32.9 31.6 29.0 26.0 23.0 21.1 19.6 19.2 16.0 15.8 15.4 14.6 14.0 14.0 13.6 13.2 13.0 13.0 12.7 12.2 12.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Transportation
By Housley Carr

Federal Funds Fuel Robust Sector But Soaring Materials Costs Loom
State and local governments’ means will determine outlook
he transportation design and construction market remains relatively strong, bolstered by last year’s enactment of the federal surface transportation bill and a good economy. But while the sector may be “healthy,” “robust” and “almost recession-proof,” in the words of some top engineering-firm executives, there also are concerns that government funding for highway, bridge, mass transit and other transportation projects may lag due to taxpayer resistance and that soaring material costs may sap the sector’s energy. The federal transportation law—officially, the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users, but generally called SAFETEA-LU—provides state departments of transportation and other agencies with a degree of long-term funding certainty that they had lacked over the past few years. SAFETEA-LU gives the sector “a great foundation,” says Fred Warner, chief executive of AECOM’s American trans-

T

portation businesses. “It doesn’t provide a tremendous amount of growth, only about 3%,” in terms of the dollars available, he says. Most of that is eaten up by higher costs for asphalt, steel and other materials. But the law does make it easier for state DOTs to plan the development of multiyear projects, several of which had been delayed the past two or three years over funding doubts, Warner says. A big question now is whether state and local governments will step up and develop aggressive transportation programs of their own to supplement federal monies. Jurisdictions with such programs “will be where we will see most of the growth,” he says. New York, for example, is in the first year of a five-year, $35.9-billion transportation plan, half of which is earmarked for state DOT projects. The other half will go to transit projects by New York City ’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority. The New York DOT jobs run the gamut from highway

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Transportation

widenings to repaving projects and new bridges. Two of MTA’s projects are particularly noteworthy—the long-planned Second Avenue subway line in Manhattan, which will be completed in 2012, and a new link between the Long Island Railroad system and Grand Central Station. Other states with big transportation spending plans include

The Top 50 in Transportation
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. The Louis Berger Group Jacobs HNTB Cos. CH2M HILL Cos. Parsons PBS&J HDR TransCore STV Group Inc. Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. Earth Tech Inc. Michael Baker Corp. Wilbur Smith Associates TranSystems Corp. Gannett Fleming Bechtel Edwards and Kelcey Inc. CDI Business Solutions Washington Group International T.Y. Lin International Dewberry David Evans and Associates Inc. MACTEC Inc. Stantec Inc. Hatch Mott MacDonald Reynolds, Smith and Hills Inc. AMEC Americas Rummel Klepper & Kahl LLP TRC Cos. Inc. Greenman-Pedersen Inc. Granite Construction Inc. VHB/Vanasse Hangen Brustlin Inc. Burns & McDonnell The LPA Group Inc. Volkert & Associates Inc. Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson KCI Technologies Inc. Moffatt & Nichol Stanley Consultants Inc. McCormick Taylor Vollmer Associates LLP H.W. Lochner Inc. ARCADIS Short Elliot Hendrickson Inc. Gensler TBE Group Inc. $ MIL. 1,182.7 1,067.3 645.0 524.6 478.3 427.5 350.6 325.7 311.5 295.1 192.8 179.2 165.8 158.3 144.0 142.8 131.8 126.8 120.6 119.0 110.1 96.0 94.0 93.2 84.4 83.1 79.4 75.4 75.3 73.1 73.0 71.5 69.3 68.5 64.1 62.6 62.5 60.9 59.6 57.9 56.0 54.5 53.7 52.5 50.0 48.9 47.0 45.1 44.9 44.4

Washington, Texas, Florida, Arizona and other fast-growing states whose booming tax revenues are supporting expanded highway-building budgets. Support is there, along with innovative financing. Washington voters last November rejected a referendum to repeal the state’s newly enacted gasoline tax increase. And Texas is pressing for public-private partnerships for new toll roads. Big projects include the DMJM Harrisdesigned, $1.4-billion, 90-mile Texas State Highway to link San Antonio and Austin. The pressure is on for new sources of project financing in many states. “No single revenue stream could be counted on to adequately address both state and local needs and all modes of transportation,” says a recent report by Idaho’s Forum on Transportation Infrastructure (FTI), a broad-based group formed by the Idaho Transportation Board to explore long-term transportation funding sources. “Multiple sources would be necessary to even come close to meeting funding requirements,” it said. According to FTI, revenue streams offering the most promise include “raising the motor fuel tax, increasing vehicle registration fees, assessing impact fees at all levels of government, eliminating or replacing the revenue impact of alternative fuels exemptions, indexing fuel taxes and transportationrelated fees, and other revenue-generating methods.” Funding for transportation projects, as always, is key, says Gannett Fleming chairman and CEO Ronald Drnevich, who

The Top 26 in Bridges
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 URS Corp. AECOM Technology Corp. HNTB Cos. Jacobs The Louis Berger Group CH2M HILL Cos. T.Y. Lin International HDR Greenman-Pedersen Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Michael Baker Corp. PBS&J Parsons Hardesty & Hanover LLP STV Group Inc. Gannett Fleming David Evans and Associates Inc. MACTEC Inc. Lichtenstein Consulting Engineers Wilbur Smith Associates Dewberry H.W. Lochner Inc. Earth Tech Inc. Vollmer Associates LLP Alfred Benesch & Co. $ MIL. 183.6 123.0 85.2 79.8 77.5 70.4 54.8 53.3 51.4 50.5 47.0 46.7 40.8 34.2 32.3 23.0 19.0 18.7 18.6 17.3 17.0 17.0 16.0 15.0 15.0

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM TRANSPORTATION AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Transportation

like many in the transportation sector worries that taxpayers want new and rebuilt infrastructure but seem unaware of its high cost and are unwilling to foot the bill. “The fact is that the transportation infrastructure in this country continues to deteriorate and is in need of more funding,” says Drnevich, adding that proposals to cut state gas taxes—ostensibly to help consumers with their day-to-day bills— would be counterproductive because they would hurt the economy, not help it. His preference would be a federal gas tax increase, although he acknowledges that such a move is unlikely in the current tax-cutting climate. Drnevich and other transportation engineering and con-

struction executives also are concerned that the federal Highway Trust Fund is being depleted by spending that outpaces incoming fuel-tax revenue by several billion dollars a year, and that the fund will have a negative balance by fiscal year 2010. Cautious Optimism Jay Lyman, senior vice president at David Evans and Associates (DEA), Portland, Ore., has some long-term worries, too, but says that, for now, his firm is enjoying “the strongest backlog we’ve ever seen, largely due to the levels of state transportation funding we have been seeing in the Pacific Northwest.” Washington’s fuel tax, for example, is helping to provide tens of millions of dollars in early funding for the Columbia River Crossing, says Lyman. DEA is part of a team working on that project, a long-term effort by the Washington and Oregon DOTs and others to improve the Interstate 5 crossing between Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash., and I-5 interchanges within two miles of the river. The project, whose initial cost estimates are still being developed, is expected to continue through the early years of the next decade. DEA also is involved in a project to extend Portland’s successful light-rail system to Oregon’s booming Clackamas County. The design of the 6.5-mile, eight-station extension is expected to be completed later this year, with a construction start to follow in early 2007. The extension is expected to be operational by late 2009. Despite the firm’s good times, Lyman is concerned whether

The Top 25 in Highways
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Corp. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. The Louis Berger Group Jacobs HNTB Cos. HDR PBS&J CH2M HILL Cos. Parsons Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. Wilbur Smith Associates Gannett Fleming Earth Tech Inc. Edwards and Kelcey Inc. Rummel Klepper & Kahl LLP Stantec Inc. Dewberry AMEC Americas Michael Baker Corp. Stanley Consultants Inc. Granite Construction Inc. STV Group Inc. Johnson Mirmiran & Thompson $ MIL. 391.0 365.1 328.5 272.5 242.6 226.3 195.7 193.4 162.6 143.9 134.3 112.5 101.2 75.4 72.0 71.0 66.3 65.0 63.4 58.0 56.3 53.7 52.4 52.0 50.9

The Top 25 in Airports
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Corp. Jacobs The Louis Berger Group HNTB Cos. CH2M HILL Cos. Burns & McDonnell Gensler PBS&J Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Parsons Carter & Burgess Inc. Corgan Associates Inc. HOK Reynolds Smith and Hills Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. The LPA Group Inc. Mead & Hunt Inc. Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP Earth Tech Inc. CDM Edwards and Kelcey Inc. Fentress Bradburn Architects Ltd. Michael Baker Corp. R.W. Armstrong & Associates Inc. $ MIL. 202.9 184.5 78.5 72.2 67.3 66.2 42.4 41.8 38.3 31.5 30.9 29.8 27.7 25.1 25.0 21.0 20.4 20.3 20.0 18.0 17.5 15.2 14.8 14.8 14.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Transportation

future state funding will keep pace with transportation needs. He praises the landmark Oregon Transportation Investment Act, whose first two phases have provided Oregon DOT with bond-based funding for more than 100 highway and bridge projects, but he notes that the act’s programs will be winding down over the next few years. As expected, population growth in the Southeast, Southwest and other areas is creating transportation design and construction opportunities. For instance, Stantec recently started work on a multimillion-dollar contract for the design, program management and construction management of the eastern portion of New Model Colony Backbone Infrastructure Facilities project in Ontario, Calif. The job includes building 34 miles of new arterial streets to serve a 3,500-acre section of a “new town” project, plus water and recycled-water mains, sewers and storm drains. Fast-growing cities in the Sunbelt also are planning light-rail and other transit projects. The $1.3-billion Valley Metro Rail system now under construction in Arizona, for example, will run 20 miles and link Phoenix, Tempe and Mesa by December 2008. The line will connect with a new, $380-million “automated people mover” that the area’s Sky Harbor International Airport is planning. The airport received Federal Aviation Administration approval for the project this spring. People movers aren’t the only things being planned at airports. “Airport work has been strong,” says Michael Kennedy, president of CH2M Hill’s Transportation Business Group. He cites several factors as the sector’s main drivers, including the realignment and consolidation of military bases, low-cost airlines’ need for new gates, required security projects and general upgrades such as runway expansions. such projects are spread across the U.S. This spring, CH2M Hill was one of 20 companies selected to share up to $15 billion in contracts under the U.S. Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence’s Heavy Engineering Repair and Construction program. The HERC contract is an “indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity” award designed to meet the long-term construction goals for the Air Force, Dept. of Defense and other federal agencies. It will involve military base work in the U.S. and at several other sites abroad. Cruise business growth is fueling cruise-port expansion projects in many cities, Kennedy says. CH2M Hill has been involved in several projects at the Texas Cruise Ship Terminals in Galveston, home port to both Carnival and Royal Caribbean cruise lines. Container terminals are providing significant work as almost every container port in the U.S. struggles to increase capacity to handle booming imports, say Kennedy and other transportation engineering executives. Much of the post-9/11 security work at ports already has been completed, they say. Now, many port owners are involved in projects to make facilities more efficient, and to squeeze more capacity out of the same amount of precious dockside land.
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The Top 10 in Marine and Port Facilities
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AECOM Technology Corp. URS Corp. CH2M HILL Cos. The Louis Berger Group Moffatt & Nichol HPA Inc. Jacobs Parsons BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. Tetra Tech Inc. $ MIL. 64.6 57.3 51.4 49.5 47.8 27.4 16.1 13.4 12.4 12.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 20 in Mass Transit and Rail
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 AECOM Technology Corp. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. URS Corp. Parsons STV Group Inc. Bechtel Jacobs Washington Group International The Louis Berger Group HNTB Cos. HDR Hatch Mott MacDonald Earth Tech Inc. PBS&J Gannett Fleming Edwards and Kelcey Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. Wilson & Co. Inc., Engineers & Architects Vanasse Hangen Brustlin Inc. David Evans and Associates Inc. $ MIL. 401.2 233.2 118.1 96.7 95.0 82.0 61.3 53.0 52.9 48.6 42.8 37.3 37.0 25.3 22.1 20.1 13.7 13.2 11.8 10.8

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

Manufacturing/Industrial Process
By Tom Nicholson

Owners Seek Lean, Flexible Facilities In Consumer Demand-Driven Sector
Designers embrace new computer technology to keep pace

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esigners of manufacturing plants and industrial process facilities are awash in opportunities as the construction industry continues to gain steam. The need for new plants, retrofits, expansions and consolidations is blossoming across most manufacturing sectors. When time to market is vital to owners vying for a share in competitive consumer product markets, designers are challenged to cut costs and schedules as they design facilities for optimal efficiency and flexibility. In the need for speed, owners in nearly every corner of the market are looking to computer-aided design to shorten schedules and trim costs. As a result, designers increasingly are turning to technology like 3D modeling, laser scanning and building information modeling (BIM), which produces a consistent digital representation of a project for design decision making, document production and construction planning and performance. With a project-wide, coordinated BIM platform, designers can more easily zero-in on structural and equipment interferences in the design process, saving time and money, industry sources say. “We’re doing a significant amount of work for most major
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auto manufacturers,” says Mike Ryan, vice president at Dearborn, Mich.-based Ghafari Associates LLC. “The work covers a broad spectrum of assembly and component plants and it’s a given that we’re using 3D-design technology and BIM.” Keenly attuned to the mercurial demand fluctuations of the auto market, automakers want new models to hit the street as quickly as possible, and they have to have their new plant or retrofit projects move just as fast. “3D and BIM technology are key enablers in being able to launch new products with a high degree of certainty.” Ryan says. “Technology certainly helps [clients] sleep better at night.” Owners demand 3D design and BIM capabilities not only to trim schedules, but to avoid design glitches that need fixing later. “The more you can do in 3D the more you can reduce field rework,” says Don Olson, vice president in the Chemicals Business Group at Denver-based CH2M Hill Lockwood Greene. “Customers are moving away from 2D design and these days virtually everything is done in 3D.” Laser scanning technology is a boon on retrofit projects as it streamlines the complexities of design within existing plants. “We see laser scanning being used more on retrofit projects and

The Top 25 in Manufacturing
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 CH2M HILL Cos. Jacobs URS General Physics Corp. Ghafari Associates LLC Tetra Tech Inc. Foth & Van Dyke M+W Zander US Operations Inc. CDI Business Solutions TRC Cos. Inc. Parsons RMT Inc. Golder Associates Inc. SSOE Inc. Pro2Serve Professional Proj. Svcs. Burns & McDonnell MACTEC Inc. AMEC Americas Bureau Veritas Sebesta Blomberg The Benham Cos. LLC LFR Inc. CDM Corrpro Cos. Inc. O’Neal Inc. $ MIL. 204.5 117.3 93.1 83.0 75.6 62.0 42.3 40.1 37.0 30.3 25.2 24.8 23.9 23.8 21.6 18.7 14.5 14.0 12.5 11.9 10.6 10.0 10.0 8.8 8.0

3D technology more in a brownfield scenario,” Ryan says. Atlanta-based Golder Associates, which has a niche providing support services to designers throughout the manufacturing sector, is a typical example of firms’ increasing reliance on technology. Computer networking allows the firm “to facilitate efficient execution of services,” says Brian Senefelder, manufacturing market sector leader at Golder. The firm “established a secure intranet system that links all offices and allows us to maintain communication with our clients and rapid reporting…allowing clients access to daily updates and transmittals of draft and final reports.” Getting Lean Just as the drive for efficiency is spurring new design and communications technology, the same impetus is advancing many projects throughout the manufacturing market. Makers of everything from cars to candy bars are looking to cut costs by designing plants that are flexible enough to diversify operations based on market demand, designers say. In some sectors, slowdowns are making that flexibility more important. In pharmaceuticals, “what we are seeing is a slowing down of this market due to regulatory and political issues,” says Jack Scott, COO of Pasadena-based Parsons Corp. As a result, drug manufacturers are looking to designers to help them trim operating costs through renovations and retrofits, he says. “The pharmaceuticals and biotechnology industries have been reluctant in past years to embrace the concept of lean, but to reduce costs they are embracing it now. They are beginning to understand the value of integrated design,” Scott explains. When pharmaceutical companies decide to launch new products, “in order to get to market, the challenge is to do the [plant] design before the drug is approved,” says Scott. “It can take five to 10 years for approval, while design and build can take two to

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM MANUFACTURING AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

The Top 10 in Aerospace
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Jacobs CDI Business Solutions Tetra Tech, Inc. Parsons URS Corp. Burns & McDonnell MACTEC Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. Reynolds Smith and Hills Inc. Harris Group Inc. $ MIL. 45.7 37.0 26.0 25.2 14.0 13.4 8.3 5.1 5.0 4.9

The Top 5 in Semiconductors
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 CH2M HILL Cos. M+W Zander US Operations Inc. Jacobs General Physics Corp. CDM $ MIL. 99.9 37.1 30.8 12.5 10.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Auto Plants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Ghafari Associates LLC URS Corp. Jacobs General Physics Corp. Tetra Tech, Inc. SSOE Inc. The Benham Cos. LLC O’Neal Inc. Gray Construction CH2M HILL Cos. $ MIL. 75.6 63.0 40.8 27.0 26.0 9.1 8.6 8.0 5.8 5.7

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 6 in Electronic Assembly
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 General Physics Corp. Burns & McDonnell URS Corp. Fluor Corp. Tetra Tech, Inc. Day & Zimmermann Group $ MIL. 32.5 5.3 4.5 4.5 4.0 4.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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three years.” Although the market is robust, the inherent risk is “slowing the market down,” says Scott. “It’s keeping the industry from where it could be going.” The attention to risk is diverting projects away from pharmaceutical hotspots abroad and “some pharmaceutical projects are starting to come back to the U.S.,” Scott says. “It’s easier for smaller start-up companies to begin projects here because they have their resources here.” There are various strategies within the broad-based movement to renovate facilities, but owners are becoming increasingly concerned about energy efficiency, says Olson of CH2M Hill Lockwood Greene. “That concern is being driven by the high cost of fuel,” he says. “Our people continually are being quizzed about whether they are using the most fuel-efficient systems. Flexibility is also an issue, clients want systems designed to use various fuels.” Crossing Borders In the headlong rush to cut costs, designers have to reduce their own operating costs to remain viable to owners. “We are seeing pressure from offshore engineering,” says Tim Watson COO at New York-based AMEC Americas. “Our clients are looking for lower costs, so they are asking us to use offshore services. We have design services in Santiago, Chile, and Shanghai, China. In some instances, costs are 30% less than in North America, and clients can see a net savings of 15% to 20% in the design portion.” Watson says design firms are almost compelled to use offshore services in order to compete. “Everyone is having to go that way now,” he says. “Designs are being done in India, Mex$ MIL. 536.7 326.5 183.8 160.0 156.0 135.8 133.3 121.7 101.8 78.0 76.0 64.0 64.0 44.9 32.0 30.2 30.0 27.0 23.7 23.0 22.7 22.3 22.0 21.0 20.5 RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 6 5 7 8 9 10 Jacobs Fluor Corp. AMEC Americas POWER Engineers Inc. URS Corp. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) Washington Group International The Benham Cos. LLC Fru-Con Engineering Inc. Burns & McDonnell $ MIL. 35.3 20.5 17.0 13.3 7.5 7.5 7.0 6.6 5.5 4.5

The Top 25 in Industrial Process
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Jacobs Fluor Corp. CH2M HILL Cos. URS Bechtel BE&K Inc. Aker Kvaerner S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates Parsons Foster Wheeler Ltd. AMEC Americas CDI Business Solutions Day & Zimmermann Group CRB Consulting Engineers Inc. Tetra Tech Inc. Global Performance Washington Group International MACTEC Inc. KBR Fagen Inc. Fugro Inc. General Physics Corp. Civil & Environmental Consultants Inc. O’Neal Inc. Stantec Inc.

The Top 10 in Food Processing

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 5 in Steel and Nonferrous Metal Plants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 Fluor Corp. Bechtel URS Corp. Aker Kvaerner MACTEC Inc. $ MIL. 118.7 116.0 20.7 18.2 12.5

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM INDUSTRIAL PROCESS AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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The Top 20 in Pharmaceuticals
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Jacobs Fluor Corp. Parsons CH2M HILL Cos. Aker Kvaerner CRB Consulting Engineers Inc. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Washington Group International URS Corp. CDI Business Solutions Stantec Inc. AMEC Americas Mustang Engineering O’Brien & Gere Paulus Sokolowski & Sartor LLC Tetra Tech, Inc. EwingCole VECO Corp. O’Neal Inc. T&M Associates $ MIL. 300.1 173.4 95.9 52.8 52.0 44.9 31.0 23.0 21.2 20.0 19.5 15.0 10.0 9.7 8.4 8.0 7.6 7.0 5.6 5.4

ico and Romania, all in an attempt to reduce costs.” As owners continue to invest in projects abroad and with global design sourcing on the rise, designers grapple with challenges of working internationally. “Dealing with foreign languages and metric conversion effects the design process,” says Steve Dickman, president of CH2M Hill’s pharmaceutical and biotechnology business group. “There are also intellectual property concerns when working overseas. It means in many cases that an owner is not going to take leading-edge technology. Working in foreign countries restricts who we put on projects and we often sequester our team in secure locations.” Across the Board Design firms report brisk activity in most other manufacturing markets. Many are finding work for defense-related manufacturing plants, a market anticipated to grow as the nation’s defense needs continue to ramp up. “There is a lot of activity in general,” says John Patelski, president of engineering and construction at Chicago-based A. Epstein and Sons. “And it’s going on all over the place.” Retrofits and renovations make up most of the work. “There are a lot of good facilities on the market and when [owners] make a decision to [purchase one], they need to get it online as soon as possible.” Epstein designed the conversion of a 262,000-sq-ft former Pillsbury plant in Dennison, Texas, to produce frozen Mexican foods for Ruiz Foods. It also designed a $130-million, 625,000-sq-ft pork processing plant in St. Joseph, Mo., last year for Triumph Foods. Despite the revved-up food and beverage market, owners face challenges in getting projects off the ground, says Patelski. “Costs have escalated and there’s been a shortage of labor,” he says. “Some projects are going a little slower and taking longer to get started....They are taking a careful look before making that expenditure.” Activity in the steel and non-ferrous metals sector is highlighted by an $880-million steel mill for SeverCorr under way in Jackson, Miss. “It’s the first flat-rolled mill built in the U.S. in a decade,” says Mike Wagner, vice president of marketing at SeverCorr, Columbus, Miss. A joint venture of SteelCorr and Severstal, the company tapped its pool of collective steel mill expertise to self-perform design of the mill. Also in metals, Amec performed design on several mining projects, including a $300-million gold mine in Vancouver for Teck Cominco, and a $250-million copper and gold mine in Battle Mountain, Nev., for Newmont Mining Corp., Denver. In the semiconductors sector, Texas Instrument’s 300 mmwafer fab facility under construction in Richardson, Tex., is noted for design innovations that cut the plant’s cost by 30%. CH2M Hill Industrial Design and Construction, on a team led by Austin Commercial LP, Dallas, did clean room and process design. The one-million-sq-ft, $300-million plant, incorporates a two-level design and environmental sustainability features. It is scheduled to be completed by late 2007.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 20 in Chemical Plants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 CH2M HILL Cos. S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates Jacobs URS Corp. BE&K Inc. Day & Zimmermann Group Foster Wheeler Ltd. CDI Business Solutions Bechtel KBR General Physics Corp. Fugro Inc. AMEC Americas Fluor Corp. SSOE Inc. O’Neal Inc. Tetra Tech, Inc. MACTEC Inc. Mustang Engineering Orbital Engineering Inc. $ MIL. 115.6 109.7 100.8 72.1 69.8 64.0 47.0 44.0 33.0 23.7 22.1 19.3 14.0 13.9 13.1 12.0 11.0 10.1 10.0 5.9

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 5 in Pulp and Paper Mills
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 Jacobs Aker Kvaerner BE&K Inc. AMEC Americas URS Corp. $ MIL. 100.5 63.1 62.0 25.0 22.5

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Petroleum
By Kathleen McFall

Climbing Prices and Spiking Demand Set Stage for Boom To Barrel Ahead
Renewed North Slope investments eyed to boost domestic output

H

urricanes and tsunamis, unrest and pipeline explosions in West Africa, fiscal uncertainty in Russia and Middle East geopolitical tensions continue to send jitters through the petroleum and natural gas markets. In response, oil prices hover around $70 per barrel and show no signs of backing down. Underlying fundamentals, including growing demand in China and India, reinforce the view that the situation is unlikely to change in the near term. “The oil market in particular is still tight, with spare capacity below the historic average and much uncertainty over the security of production from a number of different countries including Iran, Iraq and Nigeria,” said Chairman Lord Browne, BP Group chief executive, to shareholders, in April.

“Continued steady world oil demand growth combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity, and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006,” states a recent report from the Energy Information Administration, the forecasting arm of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. It projects that the price of West Texas Intermediate crude oil will average $64 per barrel throughout 2006. Consequently, client companies are realizing record profits. In the last quarter, for example, ExxonMobil Corp. reported over $8 billion in profits while Chevron reported an increase of 49% over the same period last year, with a profit of $4 billion. Most of these companies base their investments on about a $25 per barrel of oil threshold and when prices exceed that profits are large, executives say. In turn, these companies have enough cash flow to pump capital into domestic projects, in contrast to the recent past where massive new projects in frontier overseas oil provinces have received the lion’s share of capital. “The oil industry is a good place to be right now,” says Pete Leathard, president of VECO, Anchorage. “But we are still in competition with the rest of the world for investment dollars.” “We are in a boom now and the Gulf of Mexico offshore industry is as busy as it ever has been,” says Ken Arnold, executive president, AMEC Paragon, Houston. “There’s still a demand for hurricane repair work and rig counts are up.” Mature fields and previously uneconomic projects in the U.S. are getting second looks. “At lower prices, these fields are not very attractive, but now the economics have changed,” says Leathard. “Major oil companies are looking at fields where they can get a quick return from immediate production to take advantage of high prices.” Alaska Drilling ConocoPhillips Alaska Inc. recently announced it will spend $1 billion on the development of satellite fields near the Alpine oil field on Alaska’s North Slope over the next three years. Similarly, BP Exploration Alaska Inc. says it would invest $14 billion in Alaska over the next 14 years to increase production. From an engineering perspective, the strategy is to drill more densely, expand the boundaries of existing fields and develop satellite fields with existing infrastructure. Plus, high prices are allowing development of the previously marginally economic 25 billion barrels of heavy oil deposits on the North

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The Top 25 in Petroleum
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 23 22 24 25 Fluor Corp. KBR Jacobs Bechtel ABB Lummus Global VECO Corp. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Mustang Engineering The Shaw Group Inc. ENGlobal Corp. WorleyParsons Corp. Aker Kvaerner CDI Business Solutions Fugro Inc. URS AMEC Americas S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates Universal Ensco Inc. Gulf Interstate Engineering Co. ATC Group Services Inc. Burns & McDonnell Brinderson Albert-Garaudy Consulting Engineers TRC Cos. Inc. Wink Cos. LLC $ MIL. 1,379.6 1,330.2 616.4 556.0 554.1 440.8 350.0 330.0 284.6 225.8 202.5 197.2 184.0 180.4 177.8 111.0 77.6 65.5 58.5 50.0 47.0 45.0 45.0 37.3 36.8

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM PETROLEUM AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

Slope. Much of this heavy oil is typically located in existing fields, below the permafrost at about 2,000 ft. “We drill through it every day,” Steve Marshall, president of BP Exploration Alaska, told an industry gathering in Alaska earlier this year. Existing infrastructure, however, is not fully equipped to recover and transport the tar-like substance. Thousands of new wells, some of them lateral and some designed to inject steam to help recover the heavy oil by making it easier to move, are expected to be drilled in coming years. New investment will also go to test novel production techniques that could have applicability at other sites around the world. For instance, BP plans a $100-million low-salinity test waterflood project in the offshore North Slope Endicott field. The field produces about 10 barrels of high-saline water for every barrel of oil. Already, most of this water is re-injected to the field to sweep out more oil, but now the company will investigate the recovery potential of using cleaner water. “If we inject cleaner, low-salinity water, we get up to about a 15% additional recovery,” says Marshall. At Endicott, that is the equivalent of 30 million incremental barrels. If applied across the North Slope, it might add up to several hundred million barrels, he says. Plans call for the construction of a $100million on-site desalination plant with the demonstration being operational sometime in 2007. The company declined to provide additional details about the project. In the Pipeline But what might really jumpstart the recently moribund Alaska industry is the design and construction of the 3,600-mile natural gas pipeline connecting the roughly 26 trillion cu ft of strand-

The Top 25 in Refineries And Petrochemical Plants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Fluor Corp. Jacobs Bechtel ABB Lummus Global KBR Foster Wheeler Ltd. The Shaw Group Inc. VECO Corp. ENGlobal Corp. CDI Business Solutions URS Corp. WorleyParsons Corp., U.S. Operations Mustang Engineering S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates Burns & McDonnell Wink Cos. LLC AMEC Americas Black & Veatch BE&K Inc. Fugro Inc. C&I Engineering Washington Group International Aker Kvaerner ATC Associates Inc. MACTEC Inc. $ MIL. 1,230.4 550.7 523.0 520.5 490.4 304.0 279.4 274.0 168.9 138.0 122.7 105.8 100.0 75.6 47.0 33.3 23.0 22.7 20.9 18.0 14.0 13.0 10.8 10.0 9.1

The Top 20 in Pipelines
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 VECO Corp. Universal Ensco Inc. Gulf Interstate Engineering Co. ENGlobal Corp. Fugro Inc. URS Corp. Mustang Engineering Bechtel Fluor Corp. AMEC Americas Jacobs EN Engineering KBR Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Babcock Eagleton Inc. Hatch Mott MacDonald Michael Baker Corp. SWCA Inc. SPEC Services Inc. The Shaw Group Inc. $ MIL. 71.8 65.5 58.5 56.9 49.6 41.7 35.0 33.0 22.8 21.0 14.8 13.7 11.8 11.3 10.9 8.8 7.1 6.0 5.7 5.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Petroleum

The Top 5 in Maintenance
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 CDI Business Solutions Earth Tech Inc. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Utility Engineering Corp. Jordan Jones & Goulding $ MIL. 86.0 34.0 26.0 6.5 2.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Offshore And Underwater Facilities
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 KBR Aker Kvaerner Mustang Engineering Fluor Corp. Fugro Inc. Jacobs ABB Lummus Global Waldemar S. Nelson & Co. Inc. W. H. Linder & Associates Inc. URS Corp. $ MIL. 827.9 182.8 180.0 125.5 103.3 34.7 33.6 24.2 16.0 13.4

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

ed natural gas on the North Slope to demand centers. Optimistic estimates for the costs of the pipeline start at about $20 billion, making it potentially one of the largest energy infrastructure projects in the nation’s history. The proposed project would carry about 4.5 billion cu ft of gas per day, and is widely viewed as a potentially important supply of new domestic natural gas that could help bring prices down. The project has been mired in obstacles for many years although it is closer to an actual start date now than ever before. The most recent challenge facing the project is the demand by the major North Slope producers—ConocoPhillips, BP and ExxonMobil—for greater fiscal certainty before moving ahead with the pipeline. The producers want, among other provisions, taxes to be linked to profits rather than production volumes, says Leathard. This agreement, which would affect all parts of the industry, not just the pipeline, must be approved by the state legislature. State lawmakers are not sold on the issue, which is being championed by Gov. Frank Murkowski (R). “This is the biggest economic issue facing Alaska and it is very significant to the future of our oil industry,” says Leathard. “Without the pipeline, the oil industry will just fade away in Alaska with money going to other parts of the world.” There are other efforts under way in the country to increase domestic gas supplies because “we all know that natural gas pro-

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duction is declining in the United States,” says Joe Fossella, vice president for energy for Black & Veatch, Overland Park, Kan. For the near-term, increased imports of liquefied natural gas appear to be part of the answer to the natural gas crunch. LNG is natural gas that has been cooled below minus 260°F and condensed into a liquid. It is shipped in tankers from remote locations where supplies are located to demand centers where it is then regasified. “The process basically monetizes gas resources which were previously stranded,” says Fossella. According to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, about 40 LNG terminals are in various stages of permitting, design and construction, although the agency notes that industry analysts predict only 12 of the 40 terminals will ever be built. Six terminals are already operating on the East Coast, and in Puerto Rico and Alaska. A typical proposed plant has a send-out capacity of about 1 billion cu ft per day with a price tag of about $15 billion dollars when the field development, transport and other infrastructure costs are factored into the total, Fosella says. “These are complicated projects with each contract worth about $500 million,” he notes. Black & Veatch is leading the joint venture engineering, procurement and construction contract for Sempra LNG, a subsidiary of Sempra Energy (San Diego), for the Energia Cos-

ta Azul LNG receipt terminal near Ensenada, Mexico. The facility will provide gas to Mexico and Southern California. The large-scale receipt terminal includes unloading facilities, storage tanks and regasification facilities. Capacity will be 1 billion cu ft per day, with room for expansion. Sempra Energy is developing other LNG projects in Port Arthur, Texas, and Lake Charles, La. The Texas project is currently in the FERC review process. The Louisiana project is under construction and is scheduled for commercial operation by late 2008. The downside to the booming industry, however, is the increasing shortage of petroleum engineers. More than half of workers for oil companies and contractors will retire in the next five to ten years, and most will not be replaced, according to a recent report by Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Va. The number of petroleum engineering diplomas awarded in the United States in 2002 was one-quarter the number awarded in the 1980s, according to the report. Contractors fear that if this trend is not reversed, the boom could slow down. “The entire industry has gotten to the point where we don’t have enough engineering people to do the work,” says AMEC Paragon’s Arnold. “And worse, our clients are now hiring experienced people away from us. This is having an impact on the industry because if we can’t get the work done here, then the jobs go overseas.”

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63

Power
By Kathleen McFall

Fuel Diversity Tops Industry Agenda In the Push To Reduce Emissions
Interest renews for coal, nuclear and wind-generated energy

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or years, natural gas has been the favored type of fuel for new powerplants. Natural gas-fueled plants burn cleaner and more efficiently than fossil fuel-fired plants and require less upfront capital investment because they are simple to permit, design and construct. “In the past 15 or 20 years, we have perfected gas turbines,” says Charles Hess, chief engineer for Burns and Roe, Oradell, N.J. “But now, natural gas prices have soared past the point where these plants are economical.” High demand coupled with supply constraints pushed natural gas to over $10 per thousand cu ft (mcf) earlier this year and prices are expected to stay high. In 2002, by contrast, wellhead prices never exceeded $5 per mcf, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the forecasting arm of the U.S. Dept. of Energy. In response, the mantra of the power industry is fuel diversity. Utilities and other client companies are newly interested in the potential of coal-fired generation, nuclear power and wind energy. Each of these power sources has their challenges. For example, unlike the quick permit and construction time of under five years expected on a gas-fired plant, coal and nuclear take much longer to develop and require high amounts of upfront capital investment. Forecasts of future demand figure prominently into the planning of these projects. “The lead time for nuclear or any large centralized powerplant is long but we think the demand for power will be there for the time needed to build these plants,” says W. Barton Roe, senior vice president of Burns and Roe. Demand for electric power climbed only slightly last year but steady economic growth is expected to yield an overall rise in consumption by almost 2% in 2007, according to the latest EIA forecast. Over the longer term, the agency predicts this incremental annual increase will add up to total electricity sales of 50% higher by the year 2030. “The lower growth rate this year is misleading. After this year, growth rates pick up,” says Tancred Litterdale, EIA senior economist, citing the growing population as a primary factor, especially in warmer southern states, where demand for air con-

ditioning is particularly strong for much of the year. “Many aspects of the economy and activity in the marketplace suggest our business growth will be sustained,” says Joe Plubell, senior vice president and director of global energy for Black & Veatch, Overland Park, Kan. “It is a really exciting time to be in this business.” Hot Coal Despite a poor environmental reputation and tough scrutiny in many locales, coal plants remain attractive because of a ready and predictably priced domestic supply of the solid fuel. The new generation of coal plants is designed and constructed to minimize pollution emissions, making them more acceptable to regulators and the public. Already, sixteen coal projects are under construction in the U.S. with several more slated to start this year, says Plubell. One of the projects currently under construction is the Nebraska City Station Unit No. 2 project, located near Omaha. The 633-MW plant will use Powder River Basin coal from Wyoming and is scheduled for June 2009 commercial operation. Detailed design of the unit began in April 2005 and the site was mobilized in October 2005. Another project under way is Plum Point Energy Station, a 665-MW pulverized coal plant in northeast Arkansas. Commercial operation is scheduled to begin in the summer of 2010. Black & Veatch is part of the joint venture awarded contracts to provide design, procurement and
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The Top 25 in Power
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Black & Veatch Bechtel Sargent & Lundy LLC The Shaw Group Inc. URS WorleyParsons Corp. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Burns and Roe Washington Group International CH2M HILL Cos. Burns & McDonnell CDI Business Solutions Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Fluor Corp. AECOM Technology Corp. TRC Cos. Inc. AMEC Americas POWER Engineers Inc. Utility Engineering Corp. Stanley Consultants Inc. Bibb and Associates Inc. R.W. Beck Inc. Enercon Services Inc. Earth Tech Inc. HDR $ MIL. 333.3 287.0 282.1 219.6 193.0 188.5 166.0 150.7 128.0 122.5 111.2 96.0 92.0 84.4 78.7 74.2 72.0 71.9 71.3 59.9 48.9 48.5 46.0 34.0 32.1

construction services on the two plants. Cleaning up older coal plants also is providing a continuing source of contracting opportunities. Clean air regulations require coal plant owners either to invest in the cleanup of stack emissions from older infrastructure or to build cleaner-burning plants. “Our clients are asking themselves if it’s worth retrofitting an aging coal plant to meet clean air requirements or is it better just to build new,” says Plubell. Either way, there are new opportunities. “They are interested in using the latest technology to enhance the environmental and operational capabilities of their power generation,” he says. While coal-fired powerplants are enjoying a resurgence, continuing uncertainty about the future imposition of regulations to control carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases may ultimately dampen the trend. “Among our clients, there is an increased expectation of some sort of control program for carbon dioxide in the future,” says Don Zabilansky, president of CH2M Hill Power, Spartanburg, S.C. New Nukes Environmental concerns may give nuclear energy a boost in the push to diversify power generation portfolios away from natural gas. While tax credits, loan guarantees and other economic incentives in the 2005 Energy Policy Act are helping the nuclear industry, it is also increasingly viewed as a possible antidote to climate change because it emits no greenhouse gasses. “The public is more favorably disposed to it now,” says Roe. Twelve nuclear projects, with an average proposed size of 1,500 MW and billions of dollars in capital costs, are in various planning stages and some are preparing for the licensing process of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two of the projects are being developed by NuStart Energy, a consortium company owned by nine power companies, created in 2004 for the purpose of testing the as-of-yet-unused combined construction and operating licensing process. Burns and Roe is part of a team that was awarded a multimillion-dollar contract by NuStart to prepare the two applications to the NRC. Burns and Roe will provide architectural and engineering support for the application development. Even as client companies explore ways to diversify their fuel base, certain advantages of natural gas continue to outweigh its high price under specific circumstances. For instance, Xcel Energy, Minneapolis, is demolishing and retiring an existing coal plant and will replace it with a combined cycle natural gas plant in St. Paul, Minn., on the banks of the Mississippi River. “The coal plant is old and not worth upgrading to meet current environmental standards,” says Zabilansky. “Plus, the site is visible from a nearby bridge and a gas-fired plant is more aesthetically acceptable to the public.” Compared to the prior coal plant, the new combined cycle gas-fired generation will reduce air emissions of sulfur dioxides, nitrogen oxides and particulates by more than 90%, according to Xcel Energy. Xcel Energy awarded CH2M Hill the contract

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM POWER AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

The Top 5 in Cogeneration
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 BE&K Inc. Jacobs Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Burns and Roe ENGlobal Corp. $ MIL. 23.2 15.6 14.8 13.7 7.8

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 5 in Operations & Maintenance
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 CDI Business Solutions Earth Tech Inc. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Utility Engineering Corp. Jordan Jones & Goulding $ MIL. 86.0 34.0 26.0 6.5 2.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 5 in Hydroplants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 MWH The Louis Berger Group URS Corp. Black & Veatch Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. $ MIL. 24.7 16.5 10.7 7.5 6.8

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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for integrated engineering, procurement and construction for the High Bridge plant. Construction started in spring 2006 and commercial operation is scheduled for May 2008. “There are definitely pockets of opportunity for natural gas,” says Plubell. Black & Veatch is doing preliminary engineering work for a plant for Florida Power & Light Co., Juno Beach, which will have two 1,200-MW natural-gas fired units. The plant will be built on a 220-acre site in western Palm Beach County. Taking Off Installation of new wind energy plants continues to break records. This year, the industry is on track to install 3,000 MW, according to the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), Washington, D.C. Over 400 MW of new plants have been brought online since January, including the 150-MW Shiloh Wind Farm in Palo Alto, Calif., the 60-MW Spring Creek Wind Farm in Logan

The Top 10 in Nuclear Plants
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Bechtel The Shaw Group Inc. Enercon Services Inc. Washington Group International Burns and Roe Tetra Tech, Inc. WorleyParsons Corp., U.S. Operations CH2M HILL Cos. AMEC Americas Utility Engineering Corp. $ MIL. 197.0 46.9 46.0 32.0 30.3 22.0 15.9 14.1 14.0 11.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 20 in Fossil Fuel
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Black & Veatch WorleyParsons Corp., U.S. Operations URS Corp. The Shaw Group Inc. Foster Wheeler Ltd. Burns and Roe Fluor Corp. Washington Group International Burns & McDonnell Bechtel Utility Engineering Corp. Stanley Consultants Inc. AMEC Americas CH2M HILL Cos. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. HDR CDI Business Solutions Golder Associates Inc. General Physics Corp. MACTEC Inc. $ MIL. 173.6 167.9 160.1 159.0 122.0 106.6 82.5 73.0 68.4 65.0 53.1 37.2 29.0 28.2 20.0 16.4 10.0 7.6 5.7 5.4

County, Colo., and the 60-MW completion of the first phase of the Maple Ridge project in Martinsburg, N.Y. AWEA predicts that the industry will invest over $4 billion in wind energy this year. A challenge for wind generation is transmission as prime wind resources often are far from the demand centers. “We are getting a lot of requests for interconnections to the grid for wind projects,” says Mark Korsness, project manager for transmission for the federal Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, Ore. Similarly, the Public Utilities Commission of Minnesota recently approved Xcel Energy’s $160-million proposal to build a series of transmission lines in its region. The lines will move power generated by 450 wind turbines in Minnesota that have a generation capacity of 300 MW. Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, is project manager for one of the projects, an 87mile, 345-kV line project to connect Lakefield Junction substation in Lakefield, Minn., with Split Rock Substation near Sioux Falls, S.D. The project also includes a 115-kV line that will be tied into the 345-kV line at a new substation. Aside from wind generation, Burns & McDonnell is designer and project manager on a major transmission project in Connecticut. The $1.3-billion, 70-mile project for Northeast Utilities Service Co. and its subsidiary, Connecticut Light & Power, will connect Middletown, Conn., to Norwalk, Conn. Despite the optimistic outlook for the power sector, like almost every sector in the energy industry, power contractors are feeling the lack of qualified engineers and construction personnel. “The baby boomers are retiring and we need to fill this void with new engineers, but there are fewer people graduating with engineering degrees in the United States,” says Plubell. “The nuclear energy industry has a lot of workers in their 50s and 60s, but few in their 20s,” says Burns and Roe’s Hess. Also, specific trades, like welders, are in short supply. The global demand for power and other energy projects in fast-growing economies like China and India continues to constrain materials and equipment supplies. “We are all suffering from the availability of resources because there is a lot of work,” says Zabilansky.

The Top 10 in Transmission And Distribution
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AECOM Technology Corp. Black & Veatch POWER Engineers Inc. Burns & McDonnell Bechtel Patrick Engineering Inc. Washington Group International Stanley Consultants Inc. Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. URS Corp. $ MIL. 78.7 68.1 59.1 42.8 25.0 24.0 23.0 22.7 19.0 16.5

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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67

Environmental
By Housley Carr

Infrastructure Needs Spur Growth As Environmental Market Evolves
Emerging sustainability ethic leads private and public projects
here isn’t much working against the environmental market and construction industry in the U.S. these days, but it is a wholly different business than it was a generation ago. That is the consensus of top executives, who say that population growth and the resulting need for new or expanded water, wastewater and solid-waste infrastructure have lit a burner under the market. That is on top of the traditional need to replace or upgrade older facilities. And red hot real estate markets in some areas have ignited interest in redeveloping brownfield sites for a variety of purposes. But there also is an emerging sustainability ethic that is

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changing the approach of industrial and manufacturing firms and government. Today, waste minimalization is being built into industrial processes so that firms can reduce their impact on the environment up front rather than dealing with a cleanup afterward. And some materials previously regarded as toxic waste are being recycled, reused or sold as valuable products. “Some people have been told that the old environmental business is over,” says Rob Costello, group chief executive at AECOM Technology Corp.’s Civil Environmental Infrastructure Group, referring to the sector’s original emphasis on complying with federal regulations that were implemented during the early years of the environmental era. “The way I see it, that compliance work is still in the mix, but [the sector has] shifted to a heightened awareness of sustainability,” he says. Industrial and other companies “still are dealing with compliance issues and cleanups...but they also are working with firms like ours to find ways to improve their operations” so that their processes are as environment-friendly and as efficient as possible, he adds. According to Costello, that not only helps firms comply with federal rules, but also helps them eliminate waste and the need for future cleanups and improves financial performance. “There are some new trends,” says Gene Lupia, president of Denver-based CH2M Hill’s Environmental Service Group. “Many large chemical companies are forming strategic alliances and partnerships” with large environmental firms that can help them at all of their locations, whether in Houston or Saudi Arabia. In some cases, the environmental firms essentially manage the chemical companies’ environmental health and safety programs, he says. They also perform due diligence functions when one chemical company is buying another company’s plant or buying another company and all its plants, he adds. There is only a small pool of “five, six, seven or eight” environmental engineering giants able to compete on that playing field, says Lupia. “I know of one chemical company that picked only four firms that it wanted to respond” to its request for proposals for comprehensive environmental services, he says. Brownfield Renewal There also has been a change in the business of cleaning up brownfield sites, says Costello, Lupia and other environmental engineering and construction executives. For years, many of those sites remained untouched, frozen in time by unending litigation about which parties are responsible for the cost of ridding them of toxins. Now, all levels of government are trying to
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Environmental

break that logjam, and booming real estate markets are spurring the demand by office, condominium and other developers for quick site cleanups. For example, The Louis Berger Group, East Orange, N.J., says that it is providing environmental investigations, geotechnical engineering and other services to the town of Dover, N.J., and a developer, who plans to convert the town’s old, 75-acre landfill into a new commercial complex. Increased environmental spending by the private sector “has offset the declines [in spending] we’ve been seeing from the federal government,” says CH2M Hill’s Lupia. “There’s been a real flattening out [in the federal dollars committed to environmental work]. It’s mainly driven by the competition for resources,”

The Top 25 in Treatment and Desalination
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Tetra Tech Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. MWH Earth Tech Inc. Black & Veatch AECOM Technology Corp. CDM Malcolm Pirnie Inc. HDR Carollo Engineers PC Weston Solutions Inc. Hazen and Sawyer PC The Louis Berger Group PBS&J Gannett Fleming Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Burns and Roe Freese and Nichols Inc. Jacobs URS Corp. Jordan Jones & Goulding AMEC Americas Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Greeley and Hansen LLC Brown and Caldwell $ MIL. 305.0 246.0 193.2 157.0 129.7 123.1 100.6 93.2 68.3 53.7 45.1 36.1 32.6 32.4 28.0 25.3 15.5 15.4 14.1 14.0 13.9 12.0 11.2 11.0 11.0

The Top 25 in Water Supply
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Tetra Tech Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. MWH AECOM Technology Corp. Black & Veatch Earth Tech Inc. URS CDM Malcolm Pirnie Inc. HDR Michael Baker Corp. The Louis Berger Group PBS&J Carollo Engineers PC Weston Solutions Inc. Hazen and Sawyer PC KBR Gannett Fleming Dewberry Parsons Brown and Caldwell Stantec Inc. ARCADIS Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. AMEC Americas $ MIL. 418.0 310.7 300.7 179.1 177.8 176.0 127.8 121.0 118.0 102.0 97.6 82.4 75.0 55.9 45.1 42.4 41.8 41.6 36.7 36.4 35.0 34.1 34.0 31.9 27.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 25 in Transmission Lines and Aqueducts
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 MWH Tetra Tech Inc. URS Corp. PBS&J Black & Veatch The Louis Berger Group AECOM Technology Corp. KBR Stantec Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Boyle Engineering Corp. CDM Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Carter & Burgess Inc. Brown and Caldwell David Evans and Associates Inc. HDR Michael Baker Corp. Washington Group International ASCG Inc. RBF Consulting Parsons Earth Tech Inc. CSA Group $ MIL. 72.3 71.0 43.0 42.6 39.6 32.7 32.1 31.6 24.4 20.3 18.8 18.4 18.0 17.5 17.4 15.0 14.8 14.8 13.7 13.0 12.7 12.5 11.4 10.0 9.8

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM WATER SUPPLY AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

The Top 10 in Dams and Reservoirs
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 URS Corp. Tetra Tech, Inc. MWH AECOM Technology Corp. HDR The Louis Berger Group Parsons Gannett Fleming AMEC Americas Earth Tech Inc. $ MIL. 70.8 38.0 35.2 23.9 18.9 17.1 14.1 11.2 9.0 9.0

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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The Top 25 in Sewerage and Solid Waste
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 CH2M HILL Cos. AECOM Technology Corp. MWH CDM Black & Veatch Earth Tech Inc. URS Brown and Caldwell Malcolm Pirnie Inc. HDR The Louis Berger Group PBS&J Hazen and Sawyer PC Carollo Engineers PC Jacobs SCS Engineers Tetra Tech Inc. Greeley and Hansen LLC Carter & Burgess Inc. Jordan, Jones & Goulding Stantec Inc. Hatch Mott MacDonald ARCADIS Wade Trim Group General Physics Corp. $ MIL. 370.1 334.9 331.2 234.0 173.2 171.0 149.2 123.0 120.3 99.3 94.4 82.7 74.1 65.6 55.8 53.8 50.0 39.2 38.9 37.0 36.2 30.9 30.0 29.5 28.4

he says. Lupia points, among other things, to the high costs of the Iraq war and the government’s response to Hurricane Katrina. Some environmental projects “are being pushed to the side for now,” he notes. One positive factor is the Dept. of Defense’s ongoing Base Realignment and Closure program, under which about 25 major DOD facilities will be shut down—and another 24 radically reconfigured—over the next six years, Lupia says. All of the facilities will require some degree of environmental remedia-

The Top 25 in Wastewater Treatment
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 CH2M HILL Cos. AECOM Technology Corp. MWH CDM Earth Tech Inc. Black & Veatch Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Brown and Caldwell Carollo Engineers PC Jacobs Hazen and Sawyer PC URS Corp. HDR Jordan Jones & Goulding PBS&J General Physics Corp. The Louis Berger Group Parsons Stearns & Wheler LLC O’Brien & Gere DLZ Corp. Greeley and Hansen LLC Tetra Tech Inc. Boyle Engineering Corp. Strand Associates Inc. $ MIL. 322.5 193.8 180.8 136.0 130.0 97.7 79.9 79.0 63.1 55.8 55.7 42.3 42.1 32.0 28.9 28.4 22.0 21.6 16.2 15.3 14.0 13.6 13.0 11.3 10.4

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM SEWERAGE AND SOLID WASTE AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

The Top 25 in Sanitary And Storm Sewers
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 MWH AECOM Technology Corp. CDM Black & Veatch URS Corp. PBS&J The Louis Berger Group Brown and Caldwell Carter & Burgess Inc. Tetra Tech, Inc. Stantec Inc. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Wade-Trim Group AMEC Americas Greeley and Hansen LLC Hatch Mott MacDonald Hazen and Sawyer PC Burns & McDonnell RBF Consulting ERM Holdings Ltd. Michael Baker Corp. David Evans and Associates Inc. RJN Group Inc. Earth Tech Inc. Dewberry $ MIL. 150.4 116.3 86.0 75.5 74.5 53.8 43.1 40.0 38.0 37.0 30.5 26.4 23.8 20.0 19.9 19.8 18.1 17.5 16.4 16.3 14.3 14.2 14.1 14.0 13.7

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 15 in Solid Waste
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 SCS Engineers HDR CH2M HILL Cos. URS Corp. The Louis Berger Group Earth Tech Inc. AECOM Technology Corp. GeoSyntec Consultants Golder Associates Inc. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. The Shaw Group Inc. Bryan A. Stirrat & Associates CDM Parametrix MACTEC Inc. $ MIL. 53.8 46.7 45.8 32.4 29.3 26.0 24.8 24.3 23.2 14.0 14.0 13.6 12.0 6.9 6.4

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Environmental

The Top 25 in Hazardous Waste
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 URS ERM Holdings Ltd. Bechtel CH2M HILL Cos. ARCADIS Tetra Tech Inc. Jacobs AECOM Technology Corp. Parsons Earth Tech Inc. Weston Solutions Inc. Fluor Corp. Conestoga-Rovers & Assoc. The Shaw Group Inc. ENVIRON MWH AMEC Americas Delta Environmental Consultants Inc. MACTEC Inc. CDM ATC Group Services Inc. The Kleinfelder Group Inc. Bureau Veritas Washington Group International GeoSyntec Consultants $ MIL. 716.0 462.8 417.0 407.3 400.0 318.0 279.1 264.1 234.9 208.0 185.2 182.0 178.0 172.5 147.8 142.0 126.0 117.5 101.8 100.0 93.4 92.3 77.7 74.7 63.5

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

tion, as will some legacy BRAC facilities from earlier rounds of base closings. This spring, for example, Pasadena-based Tetra Tech was awarded $20.1 million in new, BRAC-related costplus-award-fee task orders, including remedial work at the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard in southeastern San Francisco. EPA 17 years ago had placed the shipyard on the National Priority List for cleanup. A major challenge for firms competing for clean-up work in both the public and private sectors is to develop innovative approaches that save their clients money and time. For example, ARCADIS, the Highlands Ranch, Colo.-based design and construction giant, recently snagged a contract to remediate the Kane & Lombard Superfund site in Baltimore by proposing a natural in situ approach to clean up groundwater that has been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic compounds. EPA already has approved the approach—enhanced reductive dechlorination. It calls for injecting and circulating soluble organic carbon, such as sugars, into the areas of greatest contamination. EPA says that process is much more preferable to traditional methods such as “pump and treat” because it promotes a natural biodegradation process. The resulting byproducts, such as water and carbon dioxide, pose no threat to the environment. That approach will cost only $7.3 million, versus $20 million for a traditional cleanup, ARCADIS and EPA say. Companies are complementing their expertise with acquisi-

The Top 25 in Site Assessment And Compliance
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 CH2M HILL Cos. Tetra Tech Inc. URS Corp. ERM Holdings Ltd. AECOM Technology Corp. MWH The Shaw Group Inc. AMEC Americas Weston Solutions Inc. Parsons The Kleinfelder Group Inc. MACTEC Inc. Professional Service Industries (PSI) Brown and Caldwell ATC Associates Inc. Terraco The RETEC Group Ecology & Environment Inc. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Geomatrix Consultants Inc. Black & Veatch Earth Tech Inc. EA Engineering Science and Tech. Inc. SCS Engineers Michael Baker Corp. $ MIL. 317.6 167.0 149.0 129.5 101.1 71.9 67.4 54.0 49.8 48.7 41.9 33.6 30.0 30.0 30.0 29.1 28.9 28.2 27.5 23.4 18.0 13.0 12.7 12.4 11.4

The Top 25 in Chemical And Soil Remediation
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 URS Corp. Jacobs Bechtel ERM Holdings Ltd. Earth Tech Inc. The Shaw Group Inc. Weston Solutions Inc. AECOM Technology Corp. Parsons MWH GeoSyntec Consultants The Louis Berger Group Tetra Tech, Inc. Burns & McDonnell MACTEC Inc. CDM CH2M HILL Cos. The Kleinfelder Group Inc. Brown and Caldwell AMEC Americas The RETEC Group Gannett Fleming O’Brien & Gere Ecology & Environment Inc. Malcolm Pirnie Inc. $ MIL. 330.8 209.9 203.0 178.4 116.0 97.5 97.5 91.1 73.1 70.2 49.7 47.9 46.0 45.5 43.1 43.0 40.4 32.4 30.0 27.0 26.0 16.0 14.8 14.0 13.7

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Environmental

tions. This spring, CDM, Cambridge, Mass., acquired Metrix Inc., which CDM says “focuses on site remediation, environmental management and compliance...with specialized expertise in design-build remediation programs, as well as sediment remediation and geotechnical services.” Rising Water Brownfield cleanups are attracting attention, but growing populations are spurring water supply and wastewater treatment projects. The Southern Nevada Water Authority is developing several groundwater and surface water sources to help reduce the Las Vegas region’s dependence on water from the Colorado River. New water-transmission projects also are planned. Marc Jensen, the SNWA’s director of engineering, says major planned projects include a $650-million third water intake at Lake Mead; a major groundwater development project; and an $800million, 30-mile water transmission project. “All this work follows $2 billion in projects that we have completed over the past 10 years,” Jensen says. In Brooklyn, N.Y., a $3-billion-plus upgrade to the Newtown Creek wastewater treatment plant will bring the plant into compliance with federal treatment requirements. Designed by a team led by New York City-based Hazen and Sawyer, the project is scheduled for completion by 2010. In Washington, several engineering firms are helping the King County Dept. of Natural Resources and Parks design and build the $1.5-billion Brightwater wastewater treatment plant. “In this area there is a tremendous amount of [environmental] infrastructure work” involving a broad mix of greenfield projects like Brightwater and rehabilitation and/or expansion of existing facilities, says Karl Hadler, associate at Phoenix-based Carollo Engineers, which is involved in the plant’s design. The industrial sector also is providing environmental sustainability work, including efforts to mitigate water use. One example is the $300-million Texas Instruments semiconductor manufacturing plant now nearing completion in Richardson, Texas. CH2M Hill Industrial Design and Construction did process design as part of a team led by Austin Commercial LP, Dallas. The design features an innovative system to recycle process water, which will reduce the plant’s water use by more than one-third. That and other environmentally sensitive moves are expected to earn a silver LEED rating from the U.S. Green Building Council. There remains a strong market centered around compliance with federal and state clean-air regulations. Many utilities are planning to add flue-gas-desulfurization equipment, called scrubbers, to remove sulfur dioxide, and selective-catalyticreduction equipment to remove nitrogen oxide, from coal-fired powerplant emissions. That is especially important as a new round of coal-fired powerplant construction gets under way. Dallas-based TXU plans up to 16,600 MW of new coal or lignite-fired capacity in Texas and the Mid-Atlantic states, says John Wilder, TXU’s chairman and chief executive officer.

The Top 5 in Asbestos And Lead Abatement
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 ATC Associates Inc. URS Corp. Professional Service Indus. (PSI) The Kleinfelder Group Inc. Terracon $ MIL. 40.0 20.8 16.5 10.0 9.5

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Nuclear Waste
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Bechtel Fluor Corp. URS Corp. Tetra Tech, Inc. Washington Group International Jacobs Parsons AECOM Technology Corp. CH2M HILL Cos. Weston Solutions Inc. $ MIL. 184.0 182.0 108.0 91.0 74.7 69.2 48.3 29.3 28.3 25.2

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Clean Air Compliance
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 URS Corp. Earth Tech Inc. Parsons AECOM Technology Corp. ERM Holdings Ltd. MACTEC Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. Weston Solutions Inc. The Louis Berger Group O’Brien & Gere $ MIL. 99.4 78.0 64.8 42.6 35.9 16.6 16.2 12.7 12.5 11.6

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Telecommunications
By Lia Steakley

Growth Restores Market Optimism As Need for Networks Explodes
Clamor for wireless and Wi-Fi keeps industry recovery moving

S

olid and steady is how design and construction firm executives describe the telecommunications industry’s growth rate. It’s far from the exuberant spending of the late 1990s but it isn’t the doldrums following the bursting of the dot.com bubble. Telecommunication networks and facilities are becoming critical to many firms and there is a steady stream of telecommunications projects. “The industry in general has been restored to a sensible level of pre-2000 momentum and optimism,” says Jake MacLeod, chief technology officer of Bechtel Telecommunications. “I think we all learned that the ‘new paradigm’ did not hold water and that a business concept must have a solid business plan that focuses on the fundamentals in order to succeed. The recovery continues but at a more realistic pace.”

Going Wireless Wireless carriers continue to keep firms busy as the industry digests the merger between Cingular and AT&T Wireless and readies itself for the joining of Sprint and Nextel. “A lot of the work is related to these wireless carrier mergers where the companies are inventorying assets and integrating networks,” says Jeff Akers, president of communications and information solutions for CH2M Hill Cos.’ telecommunications unit in Denver. “As they integrate networks they are upgrading a lot of cell sites for high-speed services.” Networks are being upgraded for the rollout of new technologies such as Universal Mobile Telephony Systems (UMTS) and the Federal Communications Commission’s decision to move Nextel to the 1.9-Ghz frequency range used by other wireless providers instead of the 800-Mhz radio spectrum it previously used. “The United States is actually moving ahead of Europe in terms of wireless carrier projects,” adds Akers. An active niche is network upgrades to fill in dead spots in carriers’ coverage or boost infrastructure capacity. “We’re seeing a lot of projects involving installing micro cell sites, which only have a radius of a quarter mile, on light poles and other structures located in the vicinity of cell towers to increase capacity to deliver high-speed services,” says Thomas Edward Smith, senior vice president at Edwards and Kelcey, Morristown, N.J. The continued demand for wireless carriers has some firms reducing wireline departments to accommodate growing wireless markets. Birmingham-based Northstar Communications Inc., once solely directed at the wireline market, now finds half its work in wireless. “We are concentrating on high growth

Rising Market. Communications infrastructure is in big demand.

areas such as California where the population is growing rapidly and there is a great demand for telecommunications services,” says Bill Johnson, Northstar president and CEO. A bright spot in the wireline business is projects to get small towns on the Information Super Highway. Some cities are using federal grants to get fiber-optic networks, but 14 cities in Utah are taking a different route. Through the Utopia project, the cities have raised $340 million to deploy fiber-optic network to 140,000 businesses and homes. “The Utopia project is a unique model that a lot of cities are watching carefully from the sidelines and considering duplicating the project,” says Rick Lemenr.com July 2006 ENR S OURCEBOOK 79

Telecommunications

mon, corporate sponsor for Utopia with Tetra Tech Inc., Pasadena, Calif. Technology advancements and upgrades are driving work in the data center market. Previously, data centers were built to accommodate 100 watts per sq ft, but the norm today is 150 sq ft and some clients want up to 300 watts per sq ft or more. To construct a new high-performance data center in Oregon, CH2M Hill and IDC Architects borrowed design elements used on manufacturing facilities for silicon chips in the construction of the data center, which had to accommodate heat loads in excess of 500 watts per sq ft. “We applied some design elements commonly used in semiconductor fabrication facilities, such as systems designed to move air through the building, to our data center projects,” says Tim Meier, president of IDC Architects. In the two-story facility, modules are located off a central corridor spine extending the length of the building. The corridor serves as the main distribution corridor for most of the building’s utilities and the major circulation path for people and equipment. Modules are cooled by an air-conditioning system that repeats its airflow process every 30 seconds. Opportunities are emerging in transportation and federal government. As commuters clamor for Internet access on mass transit, demand to outfit trains, buses and ferries with Wi-Fi networks grows. Parsons has already begun one Wi-Fi network transportation project in Canada and plans to embark on others in the U.S. this year. In March, the Pasadena, Calif.-based

firm partnered with VIA Rail Canada and launched the world’s largest commercial Wi-Fi network onboard trains in the Quebec City-Windsor corridor. Parsons designed and installed the network, deployed Wi-Fi at 22 mainline stations and will manage it for five years. “We’re running these as sustainable businesses. We treat each one as a sustainable business and it’s got to pay for itself,” says Keith Dunbar, senior vice president based in Parsons’ Washington, D.C., office. “The whole model of putting wireless connections on trains is a fast-growing market. We’ve found a way to do that using a sustainable business model, which has given us the market lead.” Spending on military base upgrades promises design work as the federal government last year announced plans to reconfigure 33 bases by 2011. “There are big expansions in the Southeast and that will be a big driver in the next five to eight years,” says Allen Kibler, senior vice president at MACTEC, in Atlanta. “We didn’t lose very many bases in the Southwest, we gained a lot, and that has been the main driver for us to get more into the engineering side of the wireline business.”

The Top 5 in Data Centers and Web Hotels
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 Parsons Syska Hennessy Group Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. Jacobs EYP Mission Critical Facilities $ MIL. 89.1 32.5 27.8 25.9 25.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 25 in Telecommunications
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Parsons CH2M HILL Cos. Tetra Tech Inc. Fluor Corp. BE&K Inc. MACTEC Inc. Syska Hennessy Group Inc. EYP Mission Critical Facilities Jacobs KCI Technologies Inc. Bechtel Teng Affiliated Cos. Edwards and Kelcey Inc. CDI Business Solutions Black & Veatch URS Clough Harbour & Associates LLP L. Robert Kimball & Associates Inc. General Physics Corp. Terracon Schoor DePalma Inc. Corgan Associates POWER Engineers Inc. GPD Group Dewberry $ MIL. 171.2 98.2 81.0 73.2 50.6 50.6 32.5 29.0 25.9 25.0 21.0 20.8 18.4 15.0 13.8 13.1 13.0 11.7 8.5 8.0 7.5 7.3 6.3 5.8 5.6

The Top 5 in Transmission Lines and Cables
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 Fluor Corp. BE&K Inc. Tetra Tech, Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. KCI Technologies Inc. $ MIL. 73.2 46.1 39.0 37.9 16.0

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

The Top 10 in Towers and Antennae
RANK* FIRM 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Parsons MACTEC Inc. Tetra Tech, Inc. CH2M HILL Cos. Bechtel Edwards and Kelcey Inc. URS Corp. Black & Veatch KCI Technologies Inc. Terracon $ MIL. 82.1 50.4 42.0 17.7 17.0 16.6 13.1 11.1 9.0 7.8

*BASED ON 2005 DESIGN REVENUE FROM TELECOMMUNICATIONS AS REPORTED IN ENR’S SURVEY OF LEADING CONTRACTORS AND DESIGN FIRMS.

*BASED ON SUPPLEMENTAL MARKET REVENUE DATA FROM 2005 PROVIDED BY INDUSTRY FIRMS PARTICIPATING IN ENR’S SOURCEBOOK MARKET SURVEY.

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Top 500 Directory
A

A. Epstein and Sons Int’l Inc. Michael Damore, President 600 W. Fulton Chicago IL 60661 (312) 454-9100 ABB Lummus Global Martin W. Gross, CEO 1515 Broad St. Bloomfield NJ 07003 (973) 893-1515 AECOM Technology Corp. John Dionisio, President 555 S. Flower St. #3700 Los Angeles CA 90071-2300 (213) 593-8000 AEPCO Inc. James S. Whang, President 15800 Crabbs Branch Way, #300 Rockville MD 20855 (301) 670-6770 Affiliated Engineers Inc. Jerry Schuett, Principal P.O. Box 44991 Madison WI 53744-4991 (608) 238-2616 Aker Kvaerner Inge Hanson, CEO 3600 Briar Park Dr. Houston TX 77042 (713) 988-2002 AKRF Inc. Michael Lee, CEO 440 Park Ave. South New York NY 10016 (212) 696-0670 Albert Kahn Associates Inc. Stephen Q. Whitney, President 7430 Second Ave. Detroit MI 48202-2798 (313) 202-7000 Albert-Garaudy Consulting Engineers Garth Albert, Principal 3500 N. Causeway Blvd. #600 Metairie LA 70002 (504) 846-6400 Alfred Benesch & Co. Michael N. Goodkind, President 205 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago IL 60601 (312) 565-0450 Ambitech Engineering Corp. Allan R. Koenig, President 1333 Butterfield Rd. #200 Downers Grove IL 60515 (630) 963-5800 AMEC Americas Peter Mason, Chairman 4401 I St. NW #1000 Washington DC 20005 (202) 350-5700 American Consulting Engineers James David Sigler, CEO 400 E. Vine St. #300 Lexington KY 40507 (859) 233-2100

American Consulting Inc. James A. Wurster, CEO 7260 Shadeland Station Indianapolis IN 46256-3957 (317) 547-5580 Apex Environmental Inc. Peter T. Young, President 15850 Crabbs Branch Way Rockville MD 20855 (301) 417-0200 ARCADIS Steve B. Blake, Chairman 630 Plaza Dr. # 200 Highlands Ranch CO 80129 (720) 344-3500 Arquitectonica Timothy Reedy, CEO 801 Brickell Ave. #1100 Miami FL 33131 (305) 372-1812 Arup Gregory Hodkinson, Chairman 155 Avenue of the Americas New York NY 10013 (212) 229-2669 ASCG Inc. John D. McClellan, President 3150 C St. #150 Anchorage AK 99503 (907) 339-6500 Astorino Dennis L. Astorino, CEO 227 Fort Pitt Blvd. Pittsburgh PA 15222-1500 (412) 765-1700 ATC Group Services Inc. Robert Toups, CEO 600 W. Cummings Park #5500 Woburn MA 01801 (781) 932-9400 Atwell-Hicks Robert G. Macomber, CEO 500 Avis Dr. #100 Ann Arbor MI 48108 (734) 994-4000 Austin Industries Ronald J. Gafford, President P.O. Box 1590 Dallas TX 75221 (214) 443-5500 Ayres Associates Patrick Quinn, President 3433 Oakwood Hills Pkwy. Eau Claire WI 54701 (715) 834-3161
B

Ballinger William R.Gustafson, Principal 833 Chestnut St. #1400 Philadelphia PA 19107 (215) 446-0900 Barge Waggoner Sumner & Cannon Inc. Jim Downing, CEO 211 Commerce St. #600 Nashville TN 37201 (615) 254-1500 Barr Engineering Co. Douglas E. Connell, President 4700 W. 77 St. Minneapolis MN 55435 (800) 632-BARR Bartlett and West Engineers Inc. Michael K. Dunnaway, President 1200 SW Executive Dr. Topeka KS 66615-3850 (785) 272-2252 Baxter & Woodman Inc. Darrel R. Gavle, President 8678 Ridgefield Rd. Crystal Lake IL 60012 (815) 459-1260 BBG-BBGM Peter G. Gorman, Partner 515 Madison Ave. New York NY 10022 (212) 888-7663 BE&K Inc. T. Michael Goodrich, Chairman 2000 International Park Dr. Birmingham AL 35243 (205) 972-6000 Bechtel R.P. Bechtel, Chairman P.O. Box 193965 San Francisco CA 94119-3965 (415) 768-1234 Belt Collins Anne Mapes, Chairman 2153 N. King St. #200 Honolulu HI 96819 (808) 521-5361 BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. Arnfinn Rusten, President 33301 Ninth Ave. S. #300 Federal Way WA 98003-2600 (206) 431-2300 Bergmann Associates Inc. Thomas C. Mitchell, CEO 28 E. Main St. Rochester NY 14614 (585) 232-5135 Bermello Ajamil and Partners Inc. Luis Ajamil, President 2601 S. Bayshore Dr., 10 Fl. Miami FL 33133 (305) 859-2050 Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners Frederick Bland, Managing Partner 41 E. 11 St. New York NY 10003 (212) 777-7800

BHDP Architecture Michael J. Habel, President 302 W. Third St. #500 Cincinnati OH 45202 (513) 271-1634 Bibb and Associates Inc. W. Kendall Burkhart, President 8455 Lenexa Dr. Lenexa KS 66214-1550 (913) 928-7000 Birdsall Services Group Inc. Howard C. Birdsall, CEO 2100 Highway 35, Old Mill Plaza Sea Girt NJ 08750-1001 (732) 681-1165 BKF Engineers David A. LaVelle, President 255 Shoreline Dr. Redwood City CA 94065 (650) 482-6300 BL Cos. Inc. Robert A. Landino, CEO 355 Research Pkwy. Meriden CT 06450 (203) 630-1406 Black & Veatch Len C. Rodman, Chairman 11401 Lamar Ave. Overland Park KS 66211 (913) 458-2000 Bohannan Huston Inc. Brian Burnett, President 7500 Jefferson St. NE Albuquerque NM 87109 (505) 823-1000 Bolton & Menk Inc. Jon A. Rippke, President 1960 Premier Dr. Mankato MN 56001 (507) 625-4171 Bonestroo Rosene Anderlik & Associates Jerry A. Bourdon, CEO 2335 W. Hwy 36 St. Paul MN 55113 (651) 636-4600 Boswell Engineering Stephen T. Boswell, President 330 Phillips Ave. S. Hackensack NJ 07606 (201) 641-0770 Bowman Consulting Gary P. Bowman, President 3863 Centerview Dr. Chantilly VA 20151 (703) 464-1000 Bowyer Singleton & Associates Inc. James W. Bowyer, Chairman 520 S. Magnolia Ave. Orlando FL 32801 (407) 843-5120 Boyle Engineering Corp. Phillip Petrocelli, President 1501 Quail St. Newport Beach CA 92660 (949) 476-3300
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B.P. Barber & Associates Inc. G. Keith McLeod Jr., President P.O. Box 1116 Columbia SC 29202 (803) 254-4400 Babcock Eagleton Inc. C.D. Cagle, President 3900 Essex Ln. #300 Houston TX 77027-5260 (713) 871-8787

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Top 500 Directory
Braun Intertec Corp. George D. Kluempke, CEO 11001 Hampshire Ave. S. Minneapolis MN 55438 (952) 995-2000 Brindrson Gary L. Brinderson, Chairman 5455 Garden Grove Blvd. #500 Westminster CA 92683 (714) 230-3500 Brown & Gay Engineers Inc. Richard F. Gay, President 11490 Westhemier #700 Houston TX 77077-6841 (281) 558-8700 Brown and Caldwell Craig Goehring, CEO 201 N. Civic Dr. Walnut Creek CA 94596 (925) 937-9010 BRPH Cos. Inc. Lawrence M. Shaw, Chairman 3275 Suntree Blvd. Melbourne FL 32940 (321) 254-7666 Bryan A. Stirrat & Associates Bryan A. Stirrat, President 1360 Valley Vista Dr. Diamond Bar CA 91765 (909) 860-7777 BSA LifeStructures Samuel J. Reed, President 9365 Counselors Row Indianapolis IN 46240 (317) 819-7878 BSW International Inc. Jeffrey L. Stephens, President One W. Third St. #800 Tulsa OK 74103-3520 (918) 582-8771 Buchart-Horn Inc./ BASCO Associates Paul E. McNamme, President 445 W. Philadelphia St. York PA 17404 (717) 852-1400 Bucher, Willis & Ratliff Corp. Larry G. White, President 903 E. 104 St. #900 Kansas City MO 64131-3451 (816) 363-2696 Builders Group George J. Figliola, President 50 Broad St., 6 Fl. New York NY (212) 635-0760 Bureau Veritas Dickerson Wright, CEO 11860 W. State Rd. 84 #1 Ft. Lauderdale FL 33325 (954) 236-8100 Burgess & Niple Inc. Ronald R. Schultz, Chairman 5085 Reed Rd. Columbus OH 43220 (614) 459-2050 Burns & McDonnell Greg Graves, President 9400 Ward Pkwy. Kansas City MO 64114 (816) 333-9400 Burns and Roe K. Keith Roe, Chairman 800 Kinderkamack Rd. Oradell NJ 07649 (201) 265-2000 Burt Hill Peter Moriarty, CEO 101 E. Diamond St., 400 Morgan Ctr. Butler PA 16001 (724) 285-4761 Bury+Partners-Holdings Inc. Paul J. Bury III, President 3345 Bee Caves Rd. #200 Austin TX 78746 (512) 328-0011
C

CASCO Diversified James C. Alberts, President 10877 Watson Rd. St. Louis MO 63127 (314) 821-1100 CDI Business Solutions Robert J. Giorgio, President 1717 Arch St., 35 Fl. Philadelphia PA 19103 (215) 569-2200 CDM Thomas D. Furman Jr., Chairman 50 Hampshire St. Cambridge MA 02139 (617) 452-6000 CEI Engineering Associates Inc. Jeffrey D. Geurian, CEO 3317 SW I St. Bentonville AR 72712 (479) 273-9472 Century Engineering Inc. Francis X. Smyth, CEO 32 West Rd. Towson MD 21204 (410) 823-8070 CH2M HILL Cos. Ralph R. Peterson, CEO 9191 S. Jamaica St. Englewood CO 80112 (888) CH2M-HILL Chas. H. Sells Inc. Steven W. Smith, President 555 Pleasantville Rd., P.O. Box 2650 Briarcliff Manor NY10510 (914) 747-1120 Chiang, Patel & Yerby Inc. W. Walter Chiang, Chairman 1820 Regal Row #200 Dallas TX 75235 (214) 638-0500 Chong Partners Architecture Gordon Chong, President 405 Howard St, 5 Fl. San Francisco CA 94105 (415) 433-0120 Civil & Environmental Consultants Inc. Gregory Quatchak, CEO 333 Baldwin Rd. Pittsburgh PA 15205-9702 (412) 429-2324 Clark Group Dan Montgomery, President 7500 Old Georgetown Rd. Bethesda MD 20814 (301) 272-8100 Clark-Nexsen PC Kenneth A. Stepka, CEO 6160 Kempville Cir. #200A Norfolk VA 23502 (757) 455-5800 CLC Associates Steven E. Wilson, Chairman 8480 E. Orchard Rd. #2000 Greenwood Village CO 80111 (303) 770-5600

Clough, Harbour & Associates LLP Raymond J. Kinley Jr., CEO III Winners Cir. Albany NY 12205 (518) 453-4500 CMA Architects & Engineers LLP Jordi Bofill, Managing Partner 1509 F.D. Roosevelt Ave. Guaynabo PR 00922-1490 (787) 792-1509 CO Architects Peter Stazicker, Senior Principal 5055 Wilshire Blvd., 9 Fl. Los Angeles CA 90036 (323) 525-0500 Coffman Engineers Inc. Dave Coffman, President 1601 Fifth Ave. #900 Seattle WA 98101 (206) 623-0717 Conestoga-Rovers & Assoc. Ed Roberts, President 2055 Niagara Falls Blvd. Niagara Falls NY 14304 (716) 297-2160 Converse Consultants Hashmi Quazi, Chairman 222 E. Huntington Dr. #211 Monrovia CA 91016 (626) 930-1200 Cooper Carry Kevin R. Cantley, President 3520 Piedmont Rd. NE Atlanta GA 30305 (404) 237-2000 Corgan Associates David J. Lind, President 501 Elm St. #500 Dallas TX 75202 (214) 748-2000 Corrpro Cos. Inc. Jim A. Johnson, Chairman 1090 Enterprise Dr. Medina OH 44256 (330) 723-5082 CPH Engineers Inc. Kamran Khosravani, CEO 500 W. Fulton St., P.O. Box 2808 Sanford FL 32772-2808 (407) 322-6841 Crawford, Murphy & Tilly Inc. Brian R. Whiston, Chairman 2750 W. Washington St. Springfield IL 62702 (217) 787-8050 CRB Consulting Engineers Inc. Doyle Clark, President 7410 NW Tiffany Springs Pkwy #100 Kansas City MO 64153 (816) 880-9800 Criterium Engineers H. Alan Mooney, President 22 Monument Sq. Portland ME 04101 (207) 828-1969

C&I Engineering James W. Kerr, Executive Director 1930 Bishop Ln. #800 Louisville KY 40218 (502) 451-4977 C&S Engineers Inc. Orrin B. MacMurrary, President 499 Col. Eileen Collins Blvd. Syracuse NY 13212 (315) 455-2000 C. H. Guernsey & Co. Pat Carroll, CEO 5555 North Grand Blvd. Oklahoma City OK 73112 (405) 416-8100 C.H. Fenstermaker & Associates Inc. William H. Fenstermaker, Chairman 135 Regency Sq. Lafayette LA 70508 (337) 237-2200 Callison Bill Karst, CEO 1420 Fifth Ave. #2400 Seattle WA 98101 (206) 623-4646 Cannon Design Gary R. Miller, CEO 2170 Whitehaven Rd. Grand Island NY 14072 (716) 773-6800 Carollo Engineers PC Gary C. Deis, Partner 3033 N. 44 St. #101 Phoenix AZ 85018 (602) 263-9500 Carrier Johnson Gordon R. Carrier, Design Principal 1301 Third Ave. San Diego CA 92101 (619) 239-2353 Carter & Burgess Inc. Ben G. Watts, President 777 Main St. Fort Worth TX 76102 (800) 624-7959

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CSA Group Jesus J. Suarez, CEO Mercantil Plaza, Mezzanine Suite San Juan PR 00918 (787) 641-6800 CTA Architects Engineers Gene Kolstad, Chairman 13 N. 23 St. Billings MT 59101 (406) 248-7455 CTL/Thompson Inc. Ronald McOmber, CEO 1971 W. 12 Ave. Denver CO 80204 (303) 825-0777 Cubellis Associates Inc. Len Cubellis, CEO 711 Atlantic Ave. Boston MA 02111 (617) 338-0009 CUH2A Scott Butler, President CN-5380 Princeton NJ 08543-5380 (609) 844-1212 Cuningham Group Architecture PA John W. Cuningham, CEO 201 Main St. SE #325 Minneapolis MN 55414 (612) 379-3400
D

Dekker/Perich/Sabatini Ltd. Steven J. Perich, President 6801 Jefferson NE #100 Albuquerque NM 87109 (505) 761-9700 Delon Hampton & Associates Jeffrey L. Humber Jr., CEO 800 K St. NW #720 North Lobby Washington DC 20001 (202) 898-1999 Delta Environmental Consultants Inc. Paul R. Goudreault, President 5910 Rice Creek Pkwy. #100 St. Paul MN 55126 (800) 477-7411 Dewberry Ronald L. Ewing, CEO 8401 Arlington Blvd. Fairfax VA 22031 (703) 849-0100 Diversified Technology Consultants Murali Atluru, CEO 556 Washington Ave. North Haven CT 06473 (203) 239-4200 DLR Group Dale D. Hallock, Managing Principal 400 Essex Court, Regency Park Omaha NE 68114 (402) 393-4100 DLZ Corp. V. V. Rajadhyaksha, Chairman 6121 Huntley Rd. Columbus OH 43229 (614) 888-0040 DOWL Engineers Stewart G. Osgood, President 4040 B St. Anchorage AK 99503 (907) 562-2000 Draper Aden Associates Inc. William A. Aden, President 2206 S. Main St. Blacksburg VA 24060 (540) 552-0444 Dufresne-Henry Inc. Richard K. Allen, President 54 Route 106 N. Springfield VT 05150 (802) 886-2261 Durrant Gordon E. Mills, CEO 700 Locust St. #942, P.O. Box 509 Dubuque IA 52004-0909 (563) 583-9131 Dyer Riddle Mills & Precourt Inc. Wayne D. Chalifoux, President 1505 E. Colonial Dr. Orlando FL 32803 (407) 896-0594
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Earth Systems Inc. Michael V. Smith, President 895 Aerovista Pl. #100 San Luis Obispo CA 93401 (805) 781-0112 Earth Tech Inc. Alan Krusi, CEO 300 Oceangate #700 Long Beach CA 90802 (562) 951-2000 Ecology & Environment Inc. Gerhard J. Neumaier, President 368 Pleasant View Dr. Lancaster NY 14086 (716) 684-8060 ECS Henry L. Lucas, PE, President 14026 Thunderbolt Pl. #300 Chantilly VA 20151 (703) 810-1305 EDAW Joseph E. Brown, President 150 Chestnut St. San Francisco CA 94111 (415) 433-1484 EDSA Joseph Lalli, President 1512 E. Broward Blvd. #110 Fort Lauderdale FL 33301 (954) 524-3330 Edwards and Kelcey Inc. Kevin J. McMahon, Chairman 299 Madison Ave. Morristown NJ 07962 (973) 267-0555 EI Associates Guy P. Cipriano, President 8 Ridgedale Ave. Cedar Knolls NJ 07927 (973) 775-7777 Einhorn Yaffee Prescott Tom Birdsey, CEO 412 Broadway Albany NY 12207 (518) 431-3300 Elkus Manfredi Architects Howard F. Elkus, Co-CEO 300 A St. Boston MA 02210 (617) 426-1300 Ellerbe Becket Rick Lincicome, CEO 800 LaSalle Ave. Minneapolis MN 55402 (612) 376-2000 EN Engineering Joseph J. Posewick, President 7135 Janes Ave. Woodridge IL 60517 (630) 353-4000 Enercon Services Inc. J. D. Richardson, President 5100 E. Skelly Dr. #450 Tulsa OK 74135 (918) 665-7693 England-Thims & Miller Inc. Douglas C. Miller, CEO 14775 St. Augustine Rd.

Jacksonville FL 32258 (904) 642-8990 ENGlobal Corp. Michael L. Burrow, CEO 654 N. Sam Houston Pkwy. East #400 Houston TX 77060-5914 (281) 878-1000 EnSafe Inc. Phillip G. Coop, President 5724 Summer Trees Dr. Memphis TN 38134 (901) 372-7962 ENVIRON Joseph H. Highland, CEO 4350 North Fairfax Dr. #300 Arlington VA 22203 (703) 516-2300 Environmental Systems Design Inc. Hem C. Gupta, CEO 175 W. Jackson Rd. #1400 Chicago IL 60604 (312) 372-1200 Eppstein Uhen Architects Inc. Greg Uhen, President 333 E. Chicago St. Milwaukee WI 53202 (414) 271-5350 Erdman Anthony and Associates Inc. Russell J. Bullock, CEO 2165 Brighton Henrietta Town Line Rd. Rochester NY 14623 (585) 427-8888 ERM Holdings Ltd. Peter Regan, CEO 350 Eagleview Blvd. #200 Exton PA 19341 44 20 7465 7200 Evans Mechwart Hambleton & Tilton Gregory B. Comfort, CEO 5500 New Albany Rd. Columbus OH 43054 (614) 775-4500 EwingCole James A.Wilson, Chairman 100 N. 6 St. Philadelphia PA19106-1590 (215) 923-2020 EYP Mission Critical Facilities Peter Gross, CEO 440 Park Ave. S., 16 Fl. New York NY 10016 (212) 277-0099
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Dannenbaum Engineering Corp. James D. Dannenbaum, President 3100 W. Alabama Houston TX 77098 (713) 520-9570 David Evans and Associates Inc. David F. Evans, Chairman 2100 SW River Pkwy. Portland OR 97201 (503) 223-6663 Davis & Floyd Inc. El Davis Jr., Chairman P.O. Drawer 428 Greenwood SC 29648 (864) 229-5211 Davis Brody Bond LLP J. Max Bond Jr., Partners 315 Hudson St. New York NY 10013 (212) 633-4700 Day & Zimmermann Group Hal Yoh III, Chairman 1818 Market St. Philadelphia PA 19103 (215) 299-8000 DeStefano and Partners Ltd. James R. DeStefano, CEO 445 E. Illinois St. #250 Chicago IL 60611 (312) 836-4321 Degenkolb Engineers Chris D. Poland, President 225 Bush St. #1000 San Francisco CA 94104 (415) 392-6952

EA Engineering Science and Technology Inc. Loren D. Jensen, CEO 11019 McCormick Rd. Hunt Valley MD 21031 (410) 584-7000

The Facility Group Robert L. Moultrie, Chairman 2233 Lake Park Dr. Smyrna GA 30080 (770) 437-2700 Fagen Inc. Roland Fagen, CEO 501 West Hwy 212 Granite Falls MN 56241 (320) 564-3324
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Fanning/Howey Associates Inc. Daniel R. Mader, President 1200 Irmscher Blvd. Celina OH 45822 (419) 586-2292 Farnsworth Group Inc. Karen M. Jensen, Principal 2709 McGraw Dr. Bloomington IL 61704 (309) 663-8435 Fay Spofford & Thorndike Dean L. Groves, President 5 Burlington Woods Burlington MA 01803 (781) 221-1000 Fehr & Peers Matt Henry, President One Walnut Creek Ctr. 100 Pringle Ave. #600 Walnut Creek CA 94596 (925) 930-7100 Fentress Bradburn Architects Curtis Worth Fentress, President 421 Broadway Denver CO 80203 (303) 722-5000 Fishbeck Thompson Carr & Huber James D. Townley, President 1515 Arboretum Dr. SE Grand Rapids MI 49546 (616) 575-3824 KP Architects Inc. John S. Crane, President 8 Greenway Plaza #300 Houston TX 77046 (713) 621-2100 Flack+Kurtz Randy Meyers, CEO 475 Fifth Ave. New York NY 10017 (212) 532-9600 Flad & Associates William J. Bula, CEO 644 Science Dr., P.O. Box 44977 Madison WI 53744-4977 (608) 238-2661 Fletcher-Thompson James A. Beaudin, President Three Corporate Dr. #500 Shelton CT 06484 (203) 225-6500 Fluor Corp. Alan L. Boeckmann, Chairman One Enterprise Dr. Aliso Viejo CA 92656-2606 (949) 349-2000 Foster Wheeler Ltd. Raymond J. Milchovich, Chairman Perryville Corporate Park Clinton NJ 08809-4000 (908) 730-4000 Foth & Van Dyke Tim J. Weyenberg, President 2737 S. Ridge Rd. Green Bay WI 54304 (920) 497-2500 FRCH Design Worldwide James R. Tippmann, CEO 311 Elm St. #600 Cincinnati OH 45202 (513) 241-3000 Freese and Nichols Inc. Robert F. Pence, President 4055 International Plaza #200 Fort Worth TX 76109 (817) 735-7300 Froehling & Robertson Inc. Samuel S. Proctor, CEO 3015 Dumbarton Rd. Richmond VA 23228 (804) 264-2701 Fru-Con Engineering Inc. Greg Holthous, President 15933 Clayton Rd. Ballwin MO 63011 (636) 391-6700 Fugro Inc. Klass Wester, President 6100 Hillcfroft Houston TX 77081 (713) 778-5500 Fuss & O’Neill Inc. Jeffrey P. Heidtman, CEO 146 Hartford Rd. Manchester CT 06040 (860) 646-2469 FxFowle Architects PC Dan Kaplan, Principal 22 W. 19 St. New York NY 10011 (212) 627-1700
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Gensler M. Arthur Gensler Jr., Chairman 2 Harrison St. #400 San Francisco CA 94105 (415) 433-3700 Geocon Michael S. Chapin, President 6960 Flanders Dr. San Diego CA 92121 (858) 558-6900 GeoEngineers Inc. James A. Miller, CEO 8410 154 Ave. NE Redmond WA 98052 (425) 861-6000 Geomatrix Consultants Inc. Anthony Daus, President 2101 Webster St., 12 Fl. Oakland CA 94612 (510) 663-4100 George Butler Associates Inc. Michael L. Smith, President 9801 Renner Blvd. Lenexa KS 66219-9745 (913) 492-0400 GeoSyntec Consultants Rudolph Bonaparte, President 2002 Summit Blvd. NE #885 Atlanta GA 30319 (404) 267-1101 GeoTek Inc. Ryne C. Stoker, President 6835 Escondido St., Ste. A Las Vegas NV 89119 (702) 897-1424 Ghafari Associates LLC Kouhaila G. Hammer, President 17101 Michigan Ave. Dearborn MI 48126 (313) 441-3000 Glatting Jackson Kercher Anglin Lopez Rinehart William C. Kercher Jr., Chairman 33 E. Pine St. Orlando FL 32801 (407) 843-6552 Global Performance Dennis Braasch, President 7005 Pelham Rd., Ste. A Greenville SC 29615 (864) 288-3009 Golder Associates Inc. Steven R. Thompson, President 3730 Chamblee Tucker Rd. Atlanta GA 30341 (770) 496-1893 Gould Evans Robert E. Gould, Principal 4041 Mill St. Kansas City MO 64111 (816) 931-6655 GPD Group David B. Granger, Pres. 520 S. Main St. #2531 Akron OH 44311-1010 (330) 572-2100

Graef Anhalt Schloemer & Associates Inc. Richard M. Bub, CEO 125 S. 84 St. Milwaukee WI 53214 (414) 259-1500 Granite Construction Inc. William G. Dorey, President 585 W. Beach St. Watsonville CA 95076 (831) 724-1011 Greeley and Hansen LLC Thomas J. Sullivan, Managing Principal 100 S. Wacker Dr. #1400 Chicago IL 60606 (312) 558-9000 GreenbergFarrow Esmail Ghadrdan, President 1755 The Exchange Atlanta GA 30339 (770) 303-1033 Greenhorne & O’Mara John J. Healey, Chairman 6110 Frost Pl. Laurel MD 20707 (301) 982-2800 Greenman-Pedersen Inc. Steven B. Greenman, President 325 W. Main St. Babylon NY 11702 (631) 587-5060 Gresham, Smith and Partners James W. Bearden, CEO 1400 Nashville City Ctr. 511 Union St. Nashville TN 37219 (615) 770-8100 GRG Inc. William C. Beckman, President 2601 Westhall Ln. Maitland FL 32751 (407) 660-0088 GRW Engineers Inc. Ron D. Gilkerson, President 801 Corporate Dr. Lexington KY 40503 (858) 223-3999 Gulf Interstate Engineering Co. H.D. Evans, President 16010 Barkers Point Ln. Houston TX 77079-9000 (713) 850-3400 GZA GeoEnvironmental Inc. William R. Beloff, President One Edgewater Dr. Norwood MA 02062 (781) 278-3700
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G. C. Wallace Cos. James A. Duddlesten, President 1555 S. Rainbow Blvd. Las Vegas NV 89146 (702) 804-2000 GAI Consultants Inc. Gary M. DeJidas, President 385 E. Waterfront Dr. Homestead PA 15120-5005 (412) 476-2000 Gannett Fleming Ronald J. Drnevich, Chairman P.O. Box 67100 Harrisburg PA 17106-7100 (717) 763-7211 Garver Engineers Wm. Brock Johnson, President 1010 Battery St., P.O. Box 50 Little Rock AR 72203-0050 (501) 376-3633 GEI Consultants Inc. Francis D. Leathers, President 1021 Main St. Winchester MA 01890-1970 (781) 721-4000 General Physics Corp. Scott N. Greenburg, CEO 6095 Marshalee Dr. #300 Elkridge MD 21075 (410) 379-3600

H.C. Nutting Co. Jack Scott, CEO 611 Lunken Park Dr. Cincinnati OH 45226 (513) 321-5816 H.F. Lenz Co. Richard A. Madzar, CEO 1407 Scalp Ave. Johnstown PA 15904-3314 (814) 269-9300

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H.W. Lochner Inc. Harry W. Lochner Jr., Chairman 20 N. Wacker Dr. #1200 Chicago IL 60606 (312) 372-7346 H+L Architecture Rob Davidson, Principal 1621 18 St. #110 Denver CO 80202 (303) 295-1792 H2M Grp./Holzmacher, McLendon & Murrell John J. Molloy, CEO 575 Broad Hollow Rd. Melville NY 11747 (631) 756-8000 HAKS Engineers and Land Surveyors PC Husam Ahmad, President 161 Maiden Ln., 5 Fl. New York NY 10038 (212) 747-1997 Haley & Aldrich Inc. Bruce F. Beverly, CEO 465 Medford St. #2200 Boston MA 02129 (617) 886-7400 Halff Associates Inc. Martin Molloy, President 8616 Northwest Plaza Dr. Dallas TX 75225 (214) 346-6200 Hall & Foreman Inc. John C. Hogan, CEO 420 Exchange #100 Irvine CA 92602 (714) 665-4500 Hammel Green and Abrahamson Inc. Daniel Avchen, CEO 701 Washington Ave. N. Minneapolis MN 55401 (612) 758-4000 Hanson Professional Services Inc. Sergio A. Pecori, President 1525 S. Sixth St. Springfield IL 62703 (217) 788-2450 Hardesty & Hanover LLP Charles J. Gozdziewski, Partner 1501 Broadway, 3 Fl. New York NY 10036 (212) 944-1150 Harley Ellis Devereaux Dennis M. King, Principal 26913 Northwestern Hwy. #200 Southfield MI 48034 (248) 262-1500 Harris Group Inc. James A. Gabriel, CEO 200 W Thomas St. #200 Seattle WA 98119 (206) 494-9400 Hastings & Chivetta Architects Inc. Christopher Chivetta, President 700 Corporate Park Dr. #400 St. Louis MO 63105 (314) 863-5717

Hatch Mott MacDonald Peter J. Wickens, President 27 Bleeker St. Millburn NJ 07041 (973) 379-3400 Hayes, Seay, Mattern & Mattern Inc. Cecil G. Doyle, CEO 109 Norfolk Ave. Roanoke VA 24011 (540) 857-3100 Hazen and Sawyer PC James W. Fagan, President 498 Seventh Ave. New York NY 10018 (212) 539-7000 HDR Richard R. Bell, CEO 8404 Indian Hills Dr. Omaha NE 68114-4098 (402) 399-1000 Heery International Inc. James J. Moynihan, President 999 Peachtree St. NE Atlanta GA 30309-3953 (404) 881-9880 Herbert Rowland & Grubic Inc. Robert C. Grubic, President 369 E. Park Dr. Harrisburg PA 7111 (717) 564-1121 Highland Associates Ltd. Architecture Engineering Interior Design Dominic Provini, Principal 102 Highland Ave. Clarks Summit PA 18411 (570) 586-4334 Hillier Architecture J. Robert Hillier, Chairman 500 Alexander Park Princeton NJ 08540 (609) 452-8888 HKS Inc. H. Ralph Hawkins, President 1919 McKinney Ave. Dallas TX 75201-1753 (214) 969-5599 HLW International LLP Pat Kinzler, COO 115 Fifth Ave. New York NY 10003 (212) 353-4600 HMC Architects Randal L. Peterson, President 3270 Inland Empire Blvd. Ontario CA 91764 (909) 989-9979 Hnedak Bobo Group Gregory O. Hnedak, CEO 104 S. Front St. Memphis TN 38103 (901) 525-2557 HNTB Cos. Paul A. Yarossi, President 715 Kirk Dr. Kansas City MO 64105 (816) 472-1201

HOK Patrick McLeamy, CEO 211 N. Broadway #700 St. Louis MO 63102 (314) 421-2000 Hole Montes Inc. Thomas M. Traylor, President 950 Encore Way Naples FL 34110 (239) 254-2000 Howard R.Green Co. Ralph J. Russell, President P.O. Box 9009, 8710 Earhart Ln. SW Cedar Rapids IA 52490-9009 (319) 841-4000 HPA Inc. John Wotton, President 22 Cortlandt St. New York NY 10007 (212) 608-3990 Hubbell, Roth & Clark Inc. George E. Hubbell, President P.O. Box 824 Bloomfield Hills MI 48303-0824 (248) 454-6300 Huitt-Zollars Inc. Robert L. Zollars, President 3131 McKinney Ave., 6 Fl. Dallas TX 75204 (214) 303-0923 Hull & Associates Inc. Craig A. Kasper, VP 6397 Emerald Pkwy. #200 Dublin OH 43016 (614) 793-8777 Hussey, Gay, Bell & De Young A Bell Co. Gus H. Bell, President 329 Commercial Dr. Savannah GA 31406 (912) 354-4626
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Jones, Edmunds & Associates Inc. Richard H. Jones, President 730 NE Waldo Rd. Gainesville FL 32641 (352) 377-5821 Jordan Jones & Goulding Don Allen, CEO 6801 Governors Lake Pkwy., Bldg. 200 Norcross GA 30071 (770) 455-8555 J-U-B Engineers Inc. George L. Wagner, President 250 S. Beechwood Ave. #201 Boise ID 83709 (208) 376-7330
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Kadrmas, Lee & Jackson Inc. Niles Hushka, CEO P.O. Box 1157 Bismarck ND 58502-1157 (701) 355-8400 Kaplan McLaughlin Diaz Roy S. Latka, President 222 Vallejo St. San Francisco CA 94111 (415) 398-5191 Karlsberger Cos. Richard Barger, CEO 99 E. Main St. Columbus OH 43215-5115 (614) 461-9500 KBR William P. Utt, President 4100 Clinton Dr. Houston TX 77020-6237 (713) 753-3011 KCI Technologies Inc. Terry F. Neimeyer, Chairman 10 N. Park Dr. Hunt Valley MD 21030-1846 (410) 316-7800 Keith and Schnars PA Tanzer H. Kalayci, CEO 6500 N. Andrews Ave. Fort Lauderdale FL 33309 (954) 776-1616 Kennedy/Jenks Consultants David D. Kennedy, President 622 Folsom St. San Francisco CA 94107 (415) 243-2150 Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc. Mark S. Wilson, President P.O. Box 33068 Raleigh NC 27636 (919) 677-2000 Kirkham Michael Dale E Miller, President 12700 W. Dodge Rd. Omaha NE 68154-8030 (402) 393-5630 Kisinger Campo & Associates Corp. Joaquin M. Campo, CEO 2203 N. Lois Ave. #1200 Tampa FL 33607 (813) 871-5331

Jacobs Noel G. Watson, CEO P.O. Box 7084 Pasadena CA 91109-7084 (626) 578-3500 JCJ Architecture James E. LaPoste, CEO 38 Prospect St. Hartford CT 06103 (860) 247-9226 JMA Architecture Studios Thomas J. Schoeman, CEO 10150 Covington Cross Dr. Las Vegas NV 89144 (702) 731-2033 Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson Fred F. Mirmiran, President 72 Loveton Cir. Sparks MD 21152 (410) 329-3100 Jones & Stokes Associates Inc. John W. Cowdery, President 2600 V St. Sacramento CA 95818 (916) 737-3000

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KJWW Engineering Consultants Paul D. Van Duyne, President 623 26 Ave. Rock Island IL 61201 (309) 788-0673 KE Architects Inc. Gregory G. Hollenkamp, President 300 First Ave. North Minneapolis MN 55401 (612) 339-4200 Kling Robert G. Thompson, CEO 2301 Chestnut St. Philadelphia PA19103 (215) 569-2900 Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates PC Lee A. Polisano, President 111 W. 57 St. New York NY 10019 (212) 977-6500 KPFF Consulting Engineers Jeff W. Asher, Chairman 1601 Fifth #1600 Seattle WA 98101 (206) 622-5822 Krazan & Associates Inc. August Hioco, President 215 W. Dakota Ave. Clovis CA 93612 (559) 348-2200
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Lichtenstein Consulting Engineers David M. Moskowitz, President 45 Eisenhower Dr. Paramus NJ 07652 (201) 368-0400 LJA Engineering & Surveying Inc. Calvin T. Ladner, President 2929 Briarpark Dr. #600 Houston TX 77042 (713) 953-5200 LJB Inc. Mark W. Thompson, President 3100 Research Blvd., P.O. Box 20246 Dayton OH 45420-0246 (937) 259-5000 Loiederman Soltesz Associates Inc. James A. Soltesz, President 1390 Piccard Dr. #100 Rockville MD 20850 (301) 948-2750 Looney Ricks Kiss Architects Inc. Frank Ricks, President 175 Toyota Plaza #600 Memphis TN 38103 (901) 521-1440 Lord, Aeck & Sargent Antonin Aeck, President 1201 Peachtree St. #300 Atlanta GA 30361 (404) 253-1400 LS3P Associates Ltd. Thompson E. Penney, President 205 1/2 King St. Charleston SC 29401 (843) 577-4444
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Malcolm Pirnie Inc. Jerry Frieling, Chairman 104 Corporate Park Dr. White Plains NY 10604 (914) 694-2100 Manhard Consulting Ltd. Donald Manhard Jr., President 900 Woodlands Pkwy. Vernon Hills IL 60061 (847) 634-5550 Mark Thomas & Co. Inc. Richard K. Tanaka, President 1960 Zanker Rd. San Jose CA 95112 (408) 453-5373 Marnell Corrao Assoc. Anthony A. Marnell II, Chairman 222 Via Marnell Way Las Vegas NV 89119 (702) 739-2000 Marshall Miller & Associates Inc. Marshall S. Miller, CEO P.O. Box 848 Bluefield VA 24605 (276) 322-5467 Martin Associates Group Inc. John A. Martin, CEO 1212 S. Flower St. Los Angeles CA 90015 (213) 483-6490 Maser Consulting PA Richard M. Maser, President One River Centre-Building Two 331 Newman Springs Rd. Red Bank NJ 07701 (732) 383-1950 Matrix Design Group Inc. Daniel J. Schneff, CEO 2925 Professional Pl. #202 Colorado Springs CO 80921 (719) 575-0100 MBH Architects Dennis Heath, Founding Principal 1115 Atlantic Ave. Alameda CA 94501 (510) 865-8663 McCormick Taylor Thomas A. Caramanico, President Two Commerce Square 2001 Market St., 10 Fl. Philadelphia PA 19103 (215) 592-4200 McDonough Associates Inc. James J. McDonough, President 130 E. Randolph St. #1000 Chicago IL 60601-6214 (312) 946-8600 MCG Architecture Frederick J. Gaylord, CEO 1055 E. Colorado Blvd. #400 Pasadena CA 91106 (626) 793-9119 McKim & Creed PA Michael W. Creed, President 243 N. Front St. Wilmington NC 28401 (910) 343-1048

McMahon Group Denny J. Lamers, President P.O. Box 1025 Neenah WI 54956 (920) 751-4200 M-E Engineers Inc. Allen Tochihara, CEO 10055 W. 43 Ave. Wheat Ridge CO 80033 (303) 421-6655 Mead & Hunt Inc. Rajan Sheth, President 6501 Watts Rd. Madison WI 53719 (608) 273-6380 Merrick & Co. Ralph W. Christie Jr., President 2450 S. Peoria St. Aurora CO 80014 (303) 751-0741 Michael Baker Corp. Donald P. Fusilli Jr., President Airside Business Park, 100 Airside Dr. Moon Twp. PA 15108 (412) 269-6300 Middough Consulting Ronald R. Ledin, President 1901 E. 13 St. Cleveland OH 44114 (216) 367-6000 Modjeski and Masters Inc. Dr. John M. Kulicki, President P.O. Box 2345 Harrisburg PA 17105 (717) 790-9565 Moffatt & Nichol Robert D. Nichol, President 320 Golden Shore #300 Long Beach CA 90802 (562) 590-6500 Moody Nolan Inc. Curtis J. Moody, President 300 Spruce St. #300 Columbus OH 43215-1112 (614) 461-4664 Morris Architects Chris A. Hudson, President 1001 Fannin #300 Houston TX 77002 (713) 622-1180 Morrison-Maierle Inc. James A. Maierle, President P.O. Box 6147 Helena MT 59601-6147 (406) 442-3050 MS Consultants Inc. Thomas F. Mosure, President 2221 Schrock Rd. Columbus OH 43229-1547 (614) 898-7100 Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers George Tamaro, President 14 Penn Plaza, 225 W. 34 St. New York NY 10122 (917) 339-9300

L. Robert Kimball & Associates Inc. R. Jeffrey Kimball, President 615 W. Highland Ave. Ebensburg PA 15931 (814) 472-7700 Langan Engineering and Environmental Services David Gockel, President River Drive Center 1 Elmwood Park NJ 07407 (201) 794-6900 Langdon Wilson Architecture Planning Interiors Asad M. Khan, Senior Managing Partner 1055 Wilshire Blvd. #1500 Los Angeles CA 90017 (213) 250-1186 Leighton Group Inc. Terrance M. Brennan, President 17781 Cowan #100 Irvine CA 92614-6009 (949) 477-4040 Leo A Daly Leo A. Daly, Chairman 8600 Indian Hills Dr. Omaha NE 68114-4039 (402) 391-8111 LFR Inc. Frank Lorincz, CEO 1900 Powell St., 12 Fl. Emeryville CA 94608 (510) 652-4500

M+W Zander US Operations Inc. Mike Bove, President 1001 Klein Rd. #400 Plano TX 75074 (415) 442-1881 MacKay & Somps Civil Engineers Inc. Terence C. Selna, President 5142 Franklin Dr., Ste. C Pleasanton CA 94588 (925) 416-1790 MACTEC Inc. Bruce C. Coles, Chairman 1105 Sanctuary Pkwy. #300 Alpharetta GA 30004 (770) 360-0600 Magnusson Klemencic Associates Inc. Jon D. Magnusson, Chairman 1301 Fifth Ave. #3200 Seattle WA 98101-2699 (206) 292-1200 Maguire Group Inc. Richard J. Repeta, President 33 Commercial St. #1 Foxborough MA 02035 (508) 543-1700

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Mulkey Engineers & Consultants Babara H. Mulkey, President P.O. Box 33127 Raleigh NC 27636 (919) 836-4800 MulvannyG2 Architecture Mitch Smith, Senior Partner 1110 112 Ave. NE #537 Bellevue WA 98004 (425) 463-2000 Mustang Engineering Steve Knowles, President 16001 Park Ten Pl. Houston TX 77084 (713) 215-8000 MWH Robert Uhler, CEO 380 Interlocken Crescent #200 Broomfield CO 80021 (303) 533-1900
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O’Brien & Gere Terry L. Brown, CEO 5000 Brittonfield Pkwy. Syracuse NY 13057 (315) 437-6100 Odell Associates Inc. Robert G. Griffin, Chairman 800 W. Hill St., 3 Fl. Charlotte NC 28208 (704) 414-1000 Olsson Associates Roger K. Severin, CEO 1111 Lincoln Mall Lincoln NE 68508 (402) 474-6311 On-Board Engineering Corp. Robert J. Wilson, CEO 50 Millstone Rd., Bldg. 300 #110 East Windsor NJ 08520 (609) 945-8000 O’Neal Inc. Kevin Bean, President 10 Falcon Crest Dr. Greenville SC 29607 (864) 298-2000 Opus Group Mark Rauenhorst, CEO 10350 Bren Rd. West Minnetonka MN 55343 (952) 656-4444 Orbital Engineering Inc. Robert J. Lewis, President 1344 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh PA 15219 (412) 261-9100 Orchard, Hiltz & McCliment Inc. Russell A. Gronevelt, President 34000 Plymouth Rd. Livonia MI 48150 (734) 522-6711 Otak Inc. Nawzad Othman, CEO 17355 SW Boones Ferry Rd Lake Oswego OR 97035 (503) 635-3618 OWP/P John Syvertsen, President 111 W. Washington Chicago IL 60602 (312) 332-9600
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Parkhill Smith & Cooper Inc. C. Clayton Yeager, President 4222 85 St. Lubbock TX 79423 (806) 473-2200 Parsons James F. McNulty, Chairman 100 W. Walnut St. Pasadena CA 91124 (626) 440-2000 Parsons Brinckerhoff Inc. Thomas J. O’Neill, President One Penn Plaza New York NY 10119 (212) 465-5000 Pate Engineers Inc. Gerry E. Pate, President 13333 Northwest Fwy. #300 Houston TX 77040 (713) 462-3178 Patrick Engineering Inc. Daniel P. Dietzler, President 4970 Varsity Dr. Lisle IL 60532-4101 (630) 795-7200 Patton Harris Rust & Associates Jeffrey E. Frank, President 14532 Lee Rd. Chantilly VA 20151-1679 (800) 550-7472 Paulus, Sokolowski & Sartor LLC Anthony J. Sartor, CEO 67A Mountain Blvd. Ext. Warren NJ 07059 (732) 560-9700 Payette James H. Collins Jr., President 285 Summer St. Boston MA 02210 (617) 895-1000 PBK Architects Daniel L. Boggio, President 11 Greenway Plaza #2210 Houston TX 77046 (800) 938-7272 PBS&J John B. Zumwalt III, Chairman 5300 W. Cypress St. #200 Tampa FL 33607 (813) 282-7275 Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects Henry N. Cobb, Partner 88 Pine St. New York NY 10005 (212) 751-3122 Pennoni Associates Inc. Anthony S. Bartolomeo, CEO 3001 Market St., 2 Fl. Philadelphia PA 19104 (215) 222-3000 Perkins Eastman L. Bradford Perkins, President 115 Fifth Ave. New York NY 10003 (212) 353-7200

Perkins+Will Philip C. Harrison, President 1382 Peachtree St. NE Atlanta GA 30309 (404) 873-2300 Perkowitz+Ruth Architects Simon Perkowitz, President 111 W. Ocean Blvd., 21 Fl. Long Beach CA 90802 (562) 628-8000 PGAL Jeff Gerber, President 5555 San Felipe #1000 Houston TX 77056 (713) 622-1444 Poggemeyer Design Group Inc. Jack A. Jones, Principal Owner 1168 N. Main St. Bowling Green OH 43402 (419) 352-7537 Polshek Partnership Architects LLP Joseph Fleischer, Partner 320 W. 13 St. New York NY 10014 (212) 807-7171 POWER Engineers Inc. Jack Hand, President P.O. Box 1066 Hailey ID 83333 (208) 788-3456 Pro2Serve Professional Project Services L. Barry Goss, President 545 Oak RidgeTpke. Oak Ridge TN 37830 (865) 220-4300 Professional Engineering Consultants PA Dale E. Maltbie, President 303 S. Topeka Wichita KS 67202 (316) 262-2691 Professional Service Industries (PSI) Murray R. Savage, CEO 1901 S. Meyers Rd. #400 Oakbrook Terrace IL 60181 (630) 691-1490 Project Design Consultants Gregory M. Shields, Principal 701 B St. #800 San Diego CA 92101 (619) 235-6471 Psomas Blake Murillo, CEO 11444 W. Olympic Blvd. #750 Los Angeles CA 90064-1549 (310) 954-3700
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Nadel Architects Inc. Herbert Nadel, CEO 1990 S. Bundy Dr., 4 Fl. Los Angeles CA 90025 (310) 826-2100 Neel-Schaffer Inc. W. Hibbett Neel, President P.O. Box 22625 Jackson MS 39225-2625 (601) 948-3071 Niles Bolton Associates Inc. G. Niles Bolton, CEO 3060 Peachtree Rd. NW #600 Atlanta GA 30305 (404) 365-7600 Ninyo & Moore Avram Ninyo, Principal Engineer 5710 Ruffin Rd. San Diego CA 92123 (858) 576-1000 Nodarse & Associates Inc. Leila Nodarse, President 1675 Lee Rd. Winter Park FL 32789 (800) 457-4745 Nolte Associates Inc. George S. Nolte Jr., President 2495 Natomas Park Dr., 4 Fl. Sacramento CA 95833 (916) 641-9100 Northwest Architectural Co. PS Bruce E. Blackmer, President 2201 Sixth Ave. #1405 Seattle WA 98121 (206) 441-4522 NTDSTICHLER Architecture Jon A. Baker, President 9655 Granite Ridge Dr. #400 San Diego CA 92123-2676 (858) 565-4440 NTH Consultants Ltd. Keith M. Swaffar, President 480 Ford Field, 2000 Brush St. Detroit MI 48226 (313) 237-3900

PageSoutherlandPage John Cryer III, Principal 1100 Louisiana #1 Houston TX 77002 (713) 871-8484 Pape-Dawson Engineers Inc. Samuel G. Dawson, CEO 555 E. Ramsey San Antonio TX 78216 (210) 375-9000 Parametrix Gerry Jones, President 1231 Fryar Ave., P.O. Box 460 Sumner WA 98390-1516 (253) 863-5128

Qk4 Wendell P. Wright, CEO 815 W. Market St. Louisville KY 40202 (502) 585-2222

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Top 500 Directory
QORE Property Sciences Rick Heckel, President 11420 Johns Creek Pkwy. Duluth GA 30097 (770) 476-3555 Quad Knopf Inc. Michael D. Knopf, President 5110 W. Cypress Ave. Visalia CA 93277 (559) 733-0440
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Rettew Associates Inc. George W. Rettew, CEO 3020 Columbia Ave. Lancaster PA 17603 (717) 394-3721 Reynolds, Smith and Hills Inc. Leerie T. Jenkins Jr., Chairman 10748 Deerwood Park Blvd. S. Jacksonville FL 32256 (904) 256-2500 RJN Group Inc. Alan J. Hollenbeck, President 200 W. Front St. Wheaton IL 60187 (630) 682-4700 RMT Inc. Stephen D. Johannsen, President 744 Heartland Trail Madison WI 53717 (608) 831-4444 RNL H. Joshua Gould, CEO 1515 Arapahoe St. Tower 3 #700 Denver CO 80202 (303) 295-1717 RTKL Associates Inc. David C. Hudson, CEO 901 S. Bond St. Baltimore MD 21231 (410) 537-6000 Ruggeri-Jensen-Azar & Associates Piero P. Ruggeri, President 4690 Chabot Dr. #200 Pleasanton CA 94588 (925) 227-9100 Rummel Klepper & Kahl LLP Stephen G. Zentz, Partner 81 Mosher St. Baltimore MD 21217 (410) 728-2900
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Sasaki Associates Inc. James A. Sukeforth, Principal 64 Pleasant St. Watertown MA 02472 (617) 926-3300 SchenkelShultz Michael S. Gouloff, Chairman 111 E. Wayne St. #555 Fort Wayne IN 46802 (407) 872-3322 Schirmer Engineering Corp. Carl F. Baldassarra, President 707 Lake Cook Rd. Deerfield IL 60015 (847) 272-8340 Schnabel Engineering Inc. Gordon Matheson, President 1054 Technology Park Dr. Glen Allen VA 23059 (804) 264-3222 Schoor DePalma Inc. Stephen P. DePalma, Chairman 200 State Hwy. Nine Manalapan NJ 07726 (732) 577-9000 SCS Engineers James J. Walsh, President 3900 Kilroy Airport Way #100 Long Beach CA 90806-6816 (562) 426-9544 Sebesta Blomberg James J. Sebesta, CEO 2381 Rosegate Roseville MN 55113 (651) 634-0775 Sega Inc. John W. Brown Jr., President 16041 Foster Stilwell KS 66085-1000 (913) 681-2881 Shannon & Wilson Inc. Gerard J. Buechel, President 400 N. 34 St. #100 Seattle WA 98103 (206) 632-8020 Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott Carole C. Wedge, President 2 Seaport Lane Boston MA 02210 (617) 423-1700 Shive-Hattery Inc. Thomas M. Hayden, Chairman P.O. Box 1599 Cedar Rapids IA 52406-1599 (319) 364-0227 Short Elliot Hendrickson Inc. David J. Pillatzke, President N. Sixth St. Butler Square Bldg. #710C Minneapolis MN 55403 (612) 758-6700 SHW Group LLP Gary Keep, CEO 4000 McEwen Rd. North

Dallas TX 75244 (972) 701-0700 Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc. Glenn R. Bell, CEO 41 Seyon St., Bldg. 1 #500 Waltham MA 02453 (781) 907-9000 Skidmore Owings & Merrill LLP G. Haney, Partner 14 Wall St. New York NY 10005 (212) 298-9300 Smallwood Reynolds Stewart Stewart & Assoc. Howard H. Stewart, President One Piedmont Ctr. 3565 Piedmont Rd. NE #303 Atlanta GA 30305 (404) 233-5453 Smith Engineering Consultants Inc. Robert J. Wegener, President 4500 Prime Pkwy. McHenry IL 60050 (815) 385-1778 Smith Seckman Reid Inc. Rob Barrick, CEO 2995 Sidco Dr. Nashville TN 37204 (615) 383-1113 SmithGroup Inc. Carl Roehling, President 500 Griswold #1700 Detroit MI 48226 (313) 983-3600 SMMA/Symmes Maini & McKee Assocs. Michael K. Powers, President 1000 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge MA 02138 (617) 547-5400 Soil and Materials Engineers Inc. Mark K. Kramer, President 43980 Plymouth Oaks Blvd. Plymouth MI 48170-9837 (734) 454-9900 Solomon Cordwell Buenz John Lahey, Managing Principal 625 N. Michigan Ave. #800 Chicago IL 60611 (312) 896-1100 Sparling James R. Duncan, Chairman 720 Olive Way #1400 Seattle WA 98101 (206) 667-0555 SPEC Services Inc. Kim R. Henry, President 17101 Bushard St. Fountain Valley CA 92708-2833 (714) 963-8077 SRF Consulting Group Inc. Randall Geerdes, CEO One Carlson Pkwy. North Plymouth MN 55447 (763) 475-0010

R.A. Smith & Associates Inc. Richard A. Smith, President 16745 W. Bluemound Rd. #200 Brookfield WI 53005-5938 (262) 786-1777 R.D. Zande & Associates Inc. Matt B. Tin, President 1550 Lake Shore Dr. #100 Columbus OH 43204 (614) 486-4383 R.W. Armstrong & Associates Inc. James A. Wade, CEO Union Sq., 300 S. Meridian St. Indianapolis IN 46225 (317) 786-0461 R.W. Beck Inc. Russell J. Stepp, CEO 1001 Fourth Ave. #2500 Seattle WA 98154 (206) 695-4700 Raba-Kistner Consultants Inc. Carl F. Raba Jr., Chairman P.O. Box 690287 San Antonio TX 78269-0287 (210) 699-9090 Rafael Vinoly Architects PC Rafael Vinoly, President 50 Van Dam St. New York NY 10013 (212) 924-5060 RBB Architects Inc. Joseph A. Balbona, CEO 10980 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles CA 90024 (310) 473-3555 RBF Consulting Robert W. Bein, Chairman 14725 Alton Pkwy. Irvine CA 92618-2027 (949) 472-3505 RDG Planning & Design Philip A. Hodgin, Principal 301 Grand Ave. Des Moines IA 50309 (515) 288-3141 Remington & Vernick Engineers Inc. Edward Vernick, President 232 Kings Hwy. East Haddonfield NJ 08033 (856) 795-9595

S&B Holdings Ltd. and Affiliates W. A. Brookshire, Chairman P.O. Box 266245 Houston TX 77207 (713) 645-4141 S&ME Inc. John R. Browning, President 3109 Spring Forest Rd. Raleigh NC 27616 (919) 872-2660 SAI Consulting Engineers Inc. Donald V. Gennuso, CEO 1400 Penn Ave. #101 Pittsburgh PA 15222-4332 (412) 392-8750 Sargent & Lundy LLC Bud Wendorf, Chairman 55 E. Monroe St. Chicago IL 60603 (312) 269-2000

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SSOE Inc. Tony D. Damon, CEO 1001 Madison Ave. Toledo OH 43624 (419) 255-3830 Stanley Consultants Inc. Gregs G. Thomopulos, President 225 Iowa Ave. Muscatine IA 52761 (563) 264-6600 Stantec Inc. Anthony P. Francheschini, President 8211 S. 48 St. Phoenix AZ 85044 (602) 438-2200 Stearns & Wheler LLC Gerald C. Hook, President One Remington Park Dr. Cazenovia NY 13035 (315) 655-8161 Steffian Bradley Architects Kurt A. Rockstroh, President 100 Summer St. Boston MA 02110 (617) 305-7100 Strand Associates Inc. Theodore L. Richards, CEO 910 W. Wingra Dr. Madison WI 53715 (608) 251-4843 STS Consultants Ltd. Thomas W. Wolf, CEO 750 Corporate Woods Pkwy. Vernon Hills IL 60061 (847) 279-2500 Studios Architecture Todd DeGarmo, CEO 99 Green St. San Francisco CA 94111 (415) 398-7575 STV Group Inc. Dominick M. Servedio, Chairman 225 Park Ave. South New York NY 10003 (212) 777-4400 Swanke Hayden Connell Architects Richard S. Hayden, Managing Principal 295 Lafayette St. New York NY 10012 (212) 226-9696 SWCA Inc. John Thomas, CEO 2120 N. Central #130 Phoenix AZ 85004 (602) 274-3831 Syska Hennessy Group Inc. John Magliano, Chairman 11 W. 42 St. New York NY 10036 (212) 556-3333
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T.Y. Lin International John G. Haussmann, President 2 Harrison St. #500 San Francisco CA 94105 (415) 291-3700 Tait & Associates Inc. Thomas F. Tait, CEO 701 N. Parkcenter Dr. Santa Ana CA 92705 (714) 560-8200 Taylor Wiseman & Taylor James M. Stevens, President 124 Gaither Dr. #150 Mt. Laurel NJ 08054 (856) 235-7200 TBE Group Inc. Patrick L. Beyer, President 380 Park Place Blvd. #300 Clearwater FL 33759 (727) 531-3505 Tectonic Engineering & Surveying Consultants Donald A. Benvie, President 70 Pleasant Hill Rd. Mountainville NY 10953 (845) 534-5959 Teng Affiliated Cos. Ivan J. Dvorak, President 205 N. Michigan Ave. Chicago IL 60601 (312) 616-0000 Terracon David R. Gaboury, CEO 16000 College Blvd. Lenexa KS 66219 (913) 599-6886 Tetra Tech Inc. Dan Batrack, CEO 3475 E. Foothill Blvd. Pasadena CA 91107 (626) 351-4664 The Benham Cos. LLC Lance Benham, CEO 9400 N. Broadway #300 Oklahoma City OK 73114-7401 (405) 478-5353 The Burke Group Christopher B. Burke, Chairman 9575 W. Higgins Rd. #600 Rosemont IL 60018 (847) 823-0500 The Chazen Cos. Richard Chazen, Principals 21 Fox St. Poughkeepsie NY 12601 (845) 454-3980 The Haskell Co. Steven T. Halverson, President 111 Riverside Ave. Jacksonville FL 32202 (904) 791-4500 The Kleinfelder Group Inc. Gerald J. Salontai, President 5015 Shoreham Pl. San Diego CA 92122 (858) 320-2000

The Lawrence Group Stephen A. Smith, President 319 N. 4 St. #1000 St. Louis MO 63102 (314) 231-5700 x341 The Louis Berger Group Nicholas Masucci, President 100 Halsted St. East Orange NJ 07018 (973) 678-1960 The LPA Group Inc. R. Glen Lott, Chairman P.O. Box 5805 Columbia SC 29250 (803) 254-2211 The Mannik & Smith Group Inc. C. Michael Smith, President 1800 Indian Wood Cir. Maumee OH 435537 (419) 891-2222 The RBA Group William Garro, President One Evergreen Pl. Morristown NJ 07962-1927 (973) 898-0300 The RETEC Group Ben Genes, CEO 300 Baker Ave. #302 Concord MA 01742 (978) 371-1422 The RJA Group Inc. Martin H. Reiss, President 600 W. Fulton St. #500 Chicago IL 60661 (888) 831-4752 The S/L/A/M Collaborative Inc. James M. McManus, President 80 Glastonbury Blvd. Glastonbury CT 06033-4415 (860) 657-8077 The Schneider Corp. Edward P. Jolliffe, President 8901 Otis Ave. Indianapolis IN 46216-1037 (317) 826-7100 The Shaw Group Inc. J.M. Bernhard Jr., Chairman 4171 Essen Ln. Baton Rouge LA 70809 (225) 932-2500 The Willdan Group of Cos. Dan W. Heil, CEO 2401 E Katella Ave. #300 Anaheim CA 92806 (714) 940-6300 Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates Roger L. Neuenschwander, President 2700 Promenade Two 1230 Peachtree St. NE Atlanta GA 30309 (404) 888-6600

Thornton-Tomasetti Inc. Daniel A. Cuoco, President 51 Madison Ave. New York NY 10010 (917) 661-7800 Tighe & Bond Inc. David E. Pinsky, President 53 Southampton Rd. Westfield MA 01085 (413) 562-1600 Timmons Group David E. Lucado, President 1001 Boulders Pkwy. Richmond VA 23225 (804) 200-6500 TKDA Richard N. Sobiech, President 444 Cedar St. #1500 St. Paul MN 55101-2110 (651) 292-4400 TLC Engineering For Architecture Debra A. Lupton, CEO 1717 S. Orange Ave. #300 Orlando FL 32806 (407) 841-9050 TMAD Taylor & Gaines Zareh Astourian, CEO 320 N. Halstead St., 2 Fl. Pasadena CA 91107 (626) 351-8881 TMP Associates Inc. John J. Castellana, President 1191 W. Square Lake Rd. Bloomfield Hills MI 48302 (248) 338-4561 TransCore John M. Worthington, President 8158 Adams Dr. Hummelstown PA 17036 (717) 561-2400 TranSystems Corp. Brian G. Larson, President 2400 Pershing Rd. #400 Kansas City MO 64108 (816) 329-8700 TRC Cos. Inc. Christopher P. Vincze, CEO 21 Griffin Rd. North Windsor CT 06095 (860) 298-9692 TRC World Engineering Inc. Surendra Ramanna, Chairman 217 Ward Cir. Brentwood TN 37027 (615) 661-7979 Triad Engineering Inc. Randy L. Moulton, President P.O. Box 1435 St. Albans W.Va. 25177 (304) 755-0721 TRO/The Ritchie Organization Robert W. Hoye, President 80 Bridge St. Newton MA 02458 (617) 969-9400 x469

T&M Associates Kevin F. Toolan, President Eleven Tindall Rd. Middletown NJ 07748 (732) 671-6400

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Top 500 Directory
Tsoi/Kobus & Associates Inc. Richard L. Kobus, Senior Principal. One Brattle Sq., P.O. Box 9114 Cambridge MA 02238-9114 (617) 475-4000
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Philadelphia PA 19106 (215) 922-8080 Urbitran Group Michael Horodniceanu, President 71 W. 23 St. New York NY 10010 (212) 366-6200 URS Martin M. Koffel, CEO 600 Montgomery St., 26 Fl. San Francisco CA 94111-2728 (415) 774-2700 USKH Inc. Leo von Scheben, CEO 2515 A St. Anchorage AK 99503 (907) 276-4245 Utility Engineering Corp. John Zachry, CEO 1515 Arapahoe St., Tower 1 #800 Denver CO 80202 (303) 928-4400
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Vanderweil Engineers Gary Vanderweil, Chairman 274 Summer St. Boston MA 02210 (617) 423-7423 VECO Corp. Bill Allen, CEO 949 E. 36 Ave. #500 Anchorage AK 99508 (907) 762-1505 VHB/Vanasse Hangen Brustlin Inc. Robert S. Brustlin, President 101 Walnut St. Watertown MA 02472 (617) 924-1770 VITETTA Architects & Engineers Alan P. Hoffmann, President 4747 S. Broad St. Philadelphia PA 19112 (215) 218-4747 VOA Associates Inc. Michael A. Toolis, CEO 224 S. Michigan Ave. #1400 Chicago IL 60604 (312) 554-1400 Volkert & Associates Inc. Thomas Keith King, CEO P.O. Box 7434

Mobile AL 36609 (251) 342-1070 Vollmer Associates LLP Gerald V. Nielsten, Partner 50 W. 23 St. New York NY 10010 (212) 366-5600
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Ulteig Engineers Inc. Gerald P. Floden, President 3350 38 Ave. S Fargo ND 58104-7079 (701) 237-3211 Universal Engineering Sciences Seymour D. Israel, Chairman 3532 Maggie Blvd. Orlando FL 32811 (407) 423-0504 Universal Ensco Inc. Wiley Hatcher, Chairman 4848 Loop Central Dr. Houston TX 77081 (713) 977-7770 Urbahn Architects Martin D. Stein, President 49 W. 37 St., 6 Fl. New York NY 10018 (212) 239-0220 Urban Engineers Inc. Edward M. D’Alba, President 530 Walnut St., 14 Fl.

W. H. Linder & Associates Inc. Lawrence J. Cacioppo, President 3330 W. Esplanade Ave. South #300 Metairie LA 70002 (504) 835-2577 W.K. Dickson & Co. Inc. David L. Peeler, President 616 Colonnade Dr. Charlotte NC 28205 (704) 334-5348 Wade Trim Group Douglas M. Watson, President 500 Griswold #2500 Detroit MI 48226 (313) 961-3650 Waldemar S. Nelson and Co. Inc. Charles Nelson, Chairman 1200 St. Charles Ave. New Orleans LA 70130-4334 (504) 523-5281

V3 Cos. Ltd. Robin L. Petroelje, President 7325 Janes Ave. Woodridge IL 60517 (630) 724-9200

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Walker Parking Consultants John K. Bushman, President 505 Davis Rd. Chicago IL 60123 (847) 697-2640 Wallace Roberts & Todd LLC Paul Rookwood, Managing Principal 1700 Market St., 28 Fl. Philadelphia PA 19103 (800) 978-4450 Walter P. Moore Raymond F. Messer, President 3131 Eastside, 2 Fl. Houston TX 77098 (713) 630-7300 Ware Malcomb Lawrence R. Armstrong, CEO 10 Edeleman Irvine CA 92618 (949) 660-9128 Washington Group International Stephen G. Hanks, President P.O. Box 73 Boise ID 83729 (208) 386-5000 WDG Architecture C.R. George Dove, Principal 1025 Connecticut Ave., NW #300 Washington DC 20036-5424 (202) 857-8300 Weidlinger Associates Raymond Daddazio, President 375 Hudson St. New York NY 10014 (212) 367-3000 Westlake Reed Leskosky Paul E. Westlake Jr., Managing Principal 925 Euclid Ave. #1900 Cleveland OH 44115 (216) 522-1350 Weston & Sampson Engineers Inc. Michael J. Scipione, President 5 Centennial Dr. Peabody MA 01960 (978) 532-1900 Weston Solutions Inc. Patrick G. McCann, President 1400 Weston Way West Chester PA 19380 (610) 701-3000 Whitman Requardt and Associates LLP Joseph S. Makar, Administrative Partner 801 S. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21231 (410) 235-3450 Whitney Bailey Cox & Magnani LLC David G. Mongan, President 849 Fairmont Ave. #100 Baltimore MD 21286 (410) 512-4500

WHR Architects Inc. David H. Watkins, President 1111 Louisiana, 26 Fl. Houston TX 77002 (713) 665-5665 Wight & Co. Mark T. Wight, Chairman 2500 N. Frontage Rd. Darien IL 60561 (630) 969-7000 Wilbur Smith Associates M. Stevenson Smith, CEO Wilbur Smith Towers 1301 Gervais St. Columbia SC 29201-3356 (803) 758-4500 Wilson & Co., Engineers & Architects James G. Gibbs, President 4900 Lang Ave. NE Albuquerque NM 87109 (505) 348-4000 WilsonMiller Inc. Alan D. Reynolds, CEO 3200 Bailey Ln. #200 Naples FL 34105-8507 (239) 649-4040 Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo Ronald J. Holecek, President 700 Bishop St. #1800

Honolulu HI 96813 (808) 521-8888 Wink Cos. LLC Larry D. Wink, President 8641 United Plaza Blvd. #204 Baton Rouge LA 70809 (225) 932-6000 Winzler & Kelly Consulting Engineers Iver A. Skavdal, President 633 Third St. Eureka CA 95501-0417 (707) 443-8326 Wiss Janney Elstner Associates Inc. William J. Nugent, President 330 Pfingsten Rd. Northbrook IL 60062 (847) 272-7400 Wood Rodgers Inc. Rich Wood, President 3301 C St., Bldg. 100-B Sacramento CA 95816 (916) 341-7760 Woodard & Curran Albert R. Curran, CEO 41 Hutchins Dr. Portland ME 04102 (207) 774-2112

Woolpert Inc. Rex W. Cowden, CEO 409 E. Monument Ave. Dayton OH 45402 (937) 461-5660 WorleyParsons Corp. William Hall, CEO 5 Greenway Plaza Houston TX 77046 (713) 407-5000
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Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership Robert G. Packard III, Managing Partner 320 SW Oak #500 Portland OR 97204 (503) 224-3860

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ENR’s Complete Top List and Sourcebook Series:
Page images of all stories and data related to Top Lists and Sourcebooks published in ENR Available at The McGraw-Hill Information Center (click here) ENR Top Lists – 2006
Top 500 Design Firms – April 24 Top 400 Contractors – May 22 Top 100 Construction Management For Fee, Top 100 Construction Management-at-Risk, Top 100 DesignBuild Firms, Top 40 Program Management Firms – June 12 Top 200 Environmental Engineering Firms – July 3 Top 200 International Design Firms – July 24 Top 225 International Contractors – August 21/28 Top 600 Specialty Contractors – October 16

ENR Top Lists – 2004
Top 500 (U.S.) Design Firms – April 19 Top 400 (U.S.) Contractors – May 17 Top 100 Construction Managers, Design-Builders, & Program Managers – June 14 Top 200 Environmental Engineering Firms – July 5 Top 200 International Design Firms – July 26 Top 225 International Contractors – August 23 Top 600 Specialty Contractors – October 18

ENR SOURCEBOOKS – 2004
Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook – June 28 Top 400 Contractors Sourcebook – September 27 Top Owners Sourcebook – November 8 2004 Global Construction Sourcebook – December 2004 Construction Facts – December 2004

ENR Sourcebooks – 2006
Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook – June 26 Top 400 Contractors Sourcebook – September 18 Top Owners Sourcebook – November 13 Global Construction Sourcebook – December 18

ENR Top Lists – 2003 ENR Top Lists – 2005
Top 500 (U.S.) Design Firms – April 18 Top 400 (U.S.) Contractors – May 16 Top 100 Construction Managers, Design-Builders, & Program Managers – June 13 Top 200 Environmental Engineering Firms – July 4 Top 200 International Design Firms – July 25 Top 225 International Contractors – August 22/29 Top 600 Specialty Contractors – October 17 Top 500 Design Firms – April 21 Top 400 Contractors – May 19 Top 100 Construction Managers, Design-Builders, & Program Managers – June 16 Top 200 Environmental Engineering Firms – June 2 Top 200 International Design Firms – July 28 Top 225 International Contractors – August 25 Top 600 Specialty Contractors – October 20

ENR SOURCEBOOKS – 2003 ENR SOURCEBOOKS – 2005
Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook – June 20 Top 400 Contractors Sourcebook – September 19 Top Owners Sourcebook – November 14 2005 Global Construction Sourcebook – December 12 Top 500 Design Firms Sourcebook – June 2003 Top 400 Contractors Sourcebook – September 2003 Top Owners Sourcebook – November 10 Construction Facts – November 2003 2003 Global Construction Sourcebook – January 5, 2004

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