You are on page 1of 12

BY STACY TAFF

staff@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS When her
daughter was born seven
years ago, Monica Wreede
began making pretty bows
and accessories in her spare
time. Word got out quick-
ly and soon she was taking
orders and turning a hobby
into a business she could do
from home.
When Kaylin was born,
I wanted to make her all of
those hair accessories and
pretty little things, Wreede
said. I have a friend who
showed me how to fold a
bow and then I just went
from there. People saw them
and liked them, so I thought
it was something Id like to
pursue. A couple of years
later when Dylan was born,
I took a bit of a break from
hair accessories and taught
myself how to sew, which
was quite a struggle. I started
making onesies and other
clothes, then got into dresses
and things like that. Since
then, Ive been crazy busy. I
also make matching sets and
pretty much anything else my
customers can think of. If
they ask for it, Ill try.
In addition to clothing and
hair accessories, Wreede also
does footwear. Her flip-flop
orders inspired a design for
which she has a patent pend-
ing.
I started making flip-flops
that I would attach hair bows
and things to that they could
match to their outfits, she
said. Each time a customer
saw a certain accessory they
liked on the flip-flops, theyd
have to buy a whole new pair.
So I came up with this little
strap that you snap onto the
flip-flop and then I designed
the accessories to snap onto
the strap, so they only have
to buy the one pair of flip-
flops and then just change the
accessory. Im calling them
Flip-Flop Connectz. I also
make them for boys. They
1
Wednesday, august 3, 2011
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50 daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
FAA Shutdown continues after
Congress leaves, p4

Dent finally gets Hall of Fame
moment, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Business 8
Classifieds 9
TV 10
World news 11
Index
Mostly sunny
Thursday
with high in
upper 80s.
See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Voters turn down fourth levy attempt
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherad.com

LIMA Delphos City
School District voters turned
down the districts fourth
attempt in two years for new
money in Tuesdays Special
Election.
Superintendent Jeff Price,
school board member Perry
Wiltsie and Families Take
Action member the Rev.
David Howell watched the
monitor at the Allen County
Board of Elections nearly an
hour after the polls closed to
learn of the 1,498 ballots cast,
922 were against the districts
5-year. .5-percent Traditional
Income Tax.
Of the 1,053 Van Wert
County voters, 691 were
against the tax.
The board will have to
take steps to make reductions
to keep us in the black and
well move on to educating
our students the best we can
with the resources we are pro-
vided. In four weeks, well
have students in our buildings
and we get back to the busi-
ness of teaching them, Price
said. The staff will have to
pick up the ball and do the
best they can.
Price said he could not
begin to say why voters turned
the operating levy down but
hopes the reason was the
economy.
I dont think voters believe
we dont need the money and
I dont think they dont care,
Price said. I think they know
we need the money and would
like to support us but they
simply cant afford it.
Wiltsie was disappointed.
We addressed all the con-
cerns we were made aware
of, he said. I know the
economy is bad and the last
several weeks of watching the
debt ceiling crisis, Im sure it
couldnt have helped.
Rev. Howell shared
Wiltsies view.
We did everything we
could to let people know what
was at stake and how the levy
would help students at both
schools, he said. I dont
know what else we could have
done.
Price said the board will
not have anything new for
voters in November and the
board will now work toward
an operating levy renewal up
for vote in 2012.
Middle school
sets registration
The Jefferson Middle
School will register stu-
dents for the 2011-12
school year on the fol-
lowing schedule:
Families new to the
district Aug. 17
8th grade Aug. 18
7th grade Aug 19
6th grade Aug 23
Hours for registration
are 9-11 a.m. and 1-3 p.m.
School fees are due on
the date of registration.
Spaghetti supper
for scholarships
The Delphos Canal Days
Queen Pageant Spaghetti
Supper fundraiser will
be held from 2-5 p.m. on
Saturday at the American
Legion on State Street.
Tickets are $5 and are
available from Director
Kimberly Ousley, any
contestant or at the cham-
ber of commerce office.
All proceeds will go
towards the scholar-
ships the queen and
runners-up will receive.
Marbletown Cornhole
tourney set for Saturday
The Marbletown Cornhole
Tournament is planned for
2 p.m. Saturday at Garfield
Park on South Clay Street
(west of the St. Johns
Annex soccer fields).
The first 20 teams ($20 per
team) to contact Gig Kimmett
by Thursday will be accepted.
Any extra teams will
be on a waiting list.
Contact Kimmett
at (419) 695-2390 and
leave a message on his
answering machine.
CYO volleyball meeting
slated
Any girls in grades
4-6 wishing to participate
in fall Catholic Youth
Organization volleyball,
there is a registration meet-
ing 6:30-7 p.m. Aug. 14
at the St. Johns Annex.
Please bring a parent
and registration fee of $35;
shirt fee is $10.00. Checks
can be made out to CYO.
Delphos City Schools
Nancy Spencer photo
Delphos City Schools Superintendent Jeff Price texts
the disappointing results from Tuesdays Special Election
to constituents from the Allen County Board of Elections.
Allen County
Registered voters 3,861
Voter turnout 1,498

For 575
Against 922
Van Wert County
Registered voters 2,838
Voter turnout 1,053

For 362
Against 691
Results
Fighting drugs in Delphos
BY MIKE FORD
mford@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS When
neighborhood residents
believe a certain person
sells drugs from a respective
home, some may believe the
police department is compla-
cent. This could be especially
true if residents have tipped
off the police repeatedly but
the suspected behavior is
believed to continue.
Police Chief Kyle Fittro
said making arrests is compli-
cated because hunting down
criminals is an enterprise car-
ried out with the end in mind.
Cases are built to stand up
in court. Prosecutors want
convictions and this depends
on evidence gathered by law
enforcement. Judges deci-
sions and Ohio drug laws
also factor in. Fittro said it
is possible for a neighbor-
hood to be infected by a drug
dealer who is there because
the small amount of drugs he
or she deals in brings proba-
tion instead of prison.
You have to be able to
prove it but in a trial setting,
proof means beyond reason-
able doubt. A neighbor saying
a guy is selling drugs doesnt
cut it. Now you dont need to
go beyond reasonable doubt
to make an arrest. You need
probable cause, he said. The
easiest way to think of that is
51 percent. In other words,
its more likely than not that
this particular individual com-
mitted a crime. That is the
standard for a physical arrest.
However, to convict that per-
son, you need proof beyond
a reasonable doubt, which is
around 99 percent if you want
to talk percentages.
People have this belief
that because they told us their
neighbor is selling drugs, we
can go kick the door in but
we cant do that just because
someone says theyre selling
drugs. We want those tips but
they are just one component
in the puzzle. Theyre helpful
but we need more than that.
When we get to the point of
probable cause and decide to
write a search warrant for a
house, those complaints can
go into the affidavit for the
search warrant. Thats the
part of the warrant where we
write out the probable cause
what I think the judge
should allow for me to go
search the house.
Police have two weap-
ons at their disposal to build
cases against suspected drug
dealers. The hardest evidence
can be gathered by send-
ing an informant in to the
home wearing a wire to buy
drugs. However, in a tight-
knit town where everyone
knows everyone, Fittro said
cultivating informants is not
an easy task but they work at
it every day. The other police
See DRUGS, page 2
See MOM, page 11
For several
months before we
had that big hit of
20 people, I had
everyone and their
brother coming up
to me saying what
are you doing?
What are you
doing? What are
you doing? I told
them to just bear
with me. There are
things going on that
the public doesnt
see and we cant tell
them. So, people
get the idea were
not doing anything
but drug cases
arent put togeth-
er overnight.
Police Chief Kyle Fittro
Stay-at-home mom finds niche
Monica Wreede stands in front of her designs with two of her children: Kaylin, who
she uses as a model for her merchandise; and Dylan. Wreede started her business making
hairbows and accessories and has a patent pending for a flip-flop accessories design she
calls Flip-Flop Connectz.
Stacy Taff photos
Its My Job
2
In Loving Memory of
David B.
Hedrick
April 17, 1945 - August 3, 2010
Those we love never go away,
The y walk beside us every day.
Unseen, unheard, but always near,
Still loved, still missed, and very dear.
Wif e: Dorothy
Darlene, S teve, & Chelse y Fischer
Diane, Todd, Brooke, Josh & Mady Teman
Duane, Dena, Christian,
Cameron & Caden Hedrick
Served Every
Evening...
BALYEATS Coffee Shop
133 E. Main St., Van Wert Ph. 419-238-1580
BAKED
WHITE FISH
Authorized Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge Sales and Service
Phone: (419) 238-3944
Toll Free: (888) 590-1685
756 West Ervin Rd.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
chuck.sperry@grevechrysler.com
www.grevechrysler.com
SERVICE
Stick with the Specialists
TM
Sales and Leasing Consultant
Chuck Sperry
Keiths Landeck Tavern announces...
HOT AUGUST NIGHTS!
THURSDAYS IN AUGUST...Beginning August 4....
COOL DRINKS & LIVE MUSIC UNDER THE STARS
14620 Landeck Rd. 419-692-0833
KEITH & RANA YONKER
Aug. 4 & 25...DAVE KILL BAND
Aug. 11...HYPNOTIX
AUG. 18... RED NECK INC.
8 PM TO MIDNIGHT
Various
drink specials
only available
outside on
the patio!
Catherine
Fortman
Jonathan
Fortman
Laurie
Basinger
Kathy
Green
St. Rt. 65, Ottawa
419-523-4500 or 1-800-686-4500
www.fortmanins.com
4 Licensed
Health Agents
and many more
Fortman Insurance Services
Packard Grilles Tribute To Lazarus Caf
Elida Road, Lima Next to WENDYS
Ph. 419-225-PACK
Available on lunch and dinner combinations, seven days a week.
*Subject to availability.
Broccoli Raisin Salad
Famous Chicken Salad
Broccoli Mushroom Chowder
Bread Pudding with Whiskey Sauce
Featuring 4 Lazarus Favorites
2 The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
OBITUARIES
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
CLUB WINNER
WEATHER
TODAY
IN HISTORY
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 43
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will be
accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DAILY HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
Corn: $7.76
Wheat: $7.03
Beans: $13.80
Delphos weather
Helen Frances
Hemker
Paul J. Bryan
Reputed Klansman dies
High temperature Tuesday
in Delphos was 92 degrees,
low was 68. Rainfall was
recorded at .14 inch. High a
year ago today was 85, low
was 73. Record high for today
is 97, set in 1964. Record low
is 48, set in 1965.
July 8, 1922-July 29, 2011
Helen Frances Hemker, 89,
of Kettering, died July 29 at
Hospice of Dayton.
She was born July 8, 1922,
to Asa and Esther (Audet)
Strouth.
She is survived by her hus-
band George, five sons, two
daughters, 15 grandchildren
and seven great-grandchil-
dren.
Mass of Christian Burial
will begin at noon Thursday at
St. Albert the Great Catholic
Church in Kettering.
Condolences may be made
at www.tobiasfuneralhome.
com
April 28, 1935-Aug. 2, 2011
Paul J. Bryan, 76, of Ada,
died at 10:20 a.m. Tuesday
at Richland Manor Nursing
Home, Bluffton.
He was born April 28,
1935, in Delphos to Don and
Lagora (Martin) Bryan, who
preceded him in death.
On Oct. 20, 1990, he mar-
ried Sandra S. Fisher, who
survives in Ada. He was pre-
ceded in death by his first
wife, Helen Louise Brinkman
Martin.
Survivors also include a
son, Donald (Tamara) Bryan
of Ada; two daughters,
Rebecca (Chris Haggerty)
Bryan of California City,
Calif., and Paula Wagner of
Delphos; a brother, Vernon
(Ann) Bryan of Delphos; three
grandchildren, Alicia (Kenny)
Gibson, Nicholas Bryan and
Sean Wagner; and one great-
grandchild, Alivia Gibson.
He was also preceded in
death by two sisters, Betty
Reynolds and Dorothy Kuhn.
Mr. Bryan was a butcher
his whole life. He began at
Roth Meat Market in Delphos
at the age of 16. He then
worked at Krogers and Pangles
of Delphos and retired from
Chief Supermarket. He owned
and operated Bryans Butcher
Shop and Purple Power Pizza
Shop in Ada. He was a mem-
ber of Moose Lodge 428 in
Kenton and the Ada VFW
Post 9381 Dads Club. He
loved raising horses, dogs,
fishing and especially playing
cards with his children and
grandchildren.
Funeral services will begin
at 11 a.m. Friday at Hanson-
Neely Funeral Home, Ada,
Chaplain Bill Herr officiat-
ing. Burial will be in Fisher
Cemetery, Jackson Township.
Friends may call from 2-4
p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Thursday
and until the time of services
Friday at the funeral home.
Preferred memorials are to
the LaFayette Jackson Rescue
Squad and/or Ada Liberty
Township Rescue Squad.
Condolences may be
expressed at hansonneely@
wcoil.com
JACKSON, Miss. (AP)
James Ford Seale, a reputed
Ku Klux Klansman impris-
oned for his role in the seg-
regation-era abduction and
killing of two black men in
rural Mississippi, has died,
a spokesman with federal
Bureau of Prisons said.
Seale died Tuesday in
Terre Haute, Ind., where he
had been serving three life
sentences after being con-
victed in 2007, Bureau of
Prisons spokesman Edmond
Ross told The Associated
Press. He was 76.
Ross said he did not know
the cause of Seales death,
which was first reported
by Jackson newspaper The
Clarion-Ledger.
Seale was convicted of
two counts of kidnapping and
one of conspiracy to com-
mit kidnapping in the 1964
deaths of Henry Hezekiah
Dee and Charles Eddie
Moore, both 19.
The two were kidnapped
in the woods of southwestern
Mississippi near Natchez.
Prosecutors said Seale,
a former crop duster, was
with a group of Klansmen
when they abducted Moore
and Dee from a rural stretch
of highway in southwest
Mississippi. The Klansmen
took the teens into the
woods and beat and inter-
rogated them about rumors
that blacks in the area were
planning an armed uprising,
prosecutors said.
The decomposed bodies
were found in July 1964 as
federal authorities searched
for the bodies of three civil
rights workers who had also
disappeared that summer.
That case became known as
Mississippi Burning and
overshadowed the deaths of
Dee and Moore.
Seale and another man,
Charles Marcus Edwards,
briefly faced state murder
charges in the deaths of
Dee and Moore in 1964, but
the charges were quickly
thrown out. Prosecutors said
the charges were dropped
because local law enforce-
ment officers were in collu-
sion with the Klan.
Many people thought
Seale was dead until 2005,
when he was discovered liv-
ing a town not far from where
the teens were abducted.
The case was reopened, and
Edwards became the gov-
ernments star witness after
he was promised immunity
from prosecution.
In March 2010, the
5th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled that the evi-
dence against Seale was suf-
ficient for the jury conviction
in the trial that took place 43
years after the crimes. Later
that year, the U.S. Supreme
Court refused to hear Seales
appeal.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
WEDNESDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 60s. North winds 5 to 15
mph.
THURSDAY: Mostly
sunny. Highs in the upper 80s.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear in the evening
then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows in the upper 60s. East
winds around 10 mph.
EXTENDED FORECAST
FRIDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 40 percent chance of
showers and storms. Highs in
the upper 80s.
FRIDAY NIGHT:
Becoming mostly cloudy. A
30 percent chance of showers
and thunderstorms. Lows in
the lower 70s.
S A T U R D A Y ,
SATURDAY NIGHT: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the upper
80s. Lows in the upper 60s.
Delphos Firefighters
Assoc. 300 Club winner
Don Ditto
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
14-17-19-20-32, Mega
Ball: 28
Estimated jackpot: $85
million
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
6-1-5
Pick 4 Evening
6-7-4-5
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $160
million
Rolling Cash 5
02-17-26-34-37
Estimated jackpot:
$120,000
Ten OH Evening
04-08-10-11-12-18-21-26-
27-30-41-47-49-51-57-73-74-
76-78-80
Travis M. Tippie
April 27, 1971-Aug. 3, 2011
Travis M. Tippie, 40, of
Delphos, died at 2:17 am.
today at his mothers home.
He was born April 27,
1971, in Dunedin, Fla., to
Theresa (Bertling) Nathanson
and Thomas R. Tippie. His
mother survives in Delphos.
His father preceded him in
death on Sept. 13, 2003.
Survivors include two
daughters, Rileigh Tippie and
Olivia Tippie of Delphos; a
sister, Cayonna Torman of
Van Wert; three brothers,
Toby (Lisa) Tippie of Lima,
Andrew (Miranda) Tippie
of Findlay and Christopher
Showalter of Delphos; his
stepmother, Cindy Tippie of
Gulfport, Fla.; and grand-
mother Margie Bertling of
Delphos.
He was also preceded in
death by his grandparents
Bud Bertling and Roy and
Catherine Tippie.
Mr. Tippie was a Union
Carpenters Local 372 for 15
years. He was a 1989 graduate
of Jefferson High School and
enjoyed motorcycle riding,
building motorcycles, hiking,
camping, the outdoors and
spending time with his chil-
dren. He was a member of the
Carpenters Local of Lima.
Funeral services will begin
at 11 a.m. Friday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home, the
Rev. Brian Bucher officiating.
Burial will be in St. Johns
Cemetery.
Friends may call from
noon to 8 p.m. Thursday and
one hour prior to services on
Friday at the funeral home.
In lieu of flowers, memori-
al contributions may be made
to his children with checks
payable to Toby Tippie or
Theresa Nathanson.
Drugs
(Continued from page 1)
tactic is to park an officer in
front of the residence. This
would take place at every
suspected drug house in town
if there were enough money
to enlarge Fittros force to
the level required for such
action. Unfortunately, he said
his budget has been cut in the
last two years and he cant
enlarge his ranks. He said
because Delphos is small,
drug activity here could be
suppressed to the point of
barely existing but that would
require manpower the city
cant finance.
Drug enforcement isnt as
simple as some may think and
Fittro reminds residents of his
May 2010 roundup.
For several months
before we had that big hit
of 20 people, I had everyone
and their brother coming up
to me saying what are you
doing? What are you doing?
What are you doing? I told
them to just bear with me.
There are things going on
that the public doesnt see
and we cant tell them. So,
people get the idea were
not doing anything but drug
cases arent put together
overnight. With the way the
court system wants them put
together and the way pros-
ecutors will accept them,
they arent cases that can be
put together that quickly,
he said.
Fittro also indicated that
police resources must be
spent so as to not be wasted.
Cases have to be accurate and
built to bring a conviction
but police are only one com-
ponent to an imperfect sys-
tem. Judges can dole out light
sentences, jails can be full
and prosecutors can reduce
charges during plea negotia-
tions.
ST. RITAS
A girl was born Aug. 2
to Justin and Jaed Davis of
Venedocia.
By The Associated Press
Today is Wednesday, Aug.
3, the 215th day of 2011. There
are 150 days left in the year.
Todays Highlight in
History:
On Aug. 3, 1936, Jesse
Owens of the United States
won the first of his four gold
medals at the Berlin Olympics
as he took the 100-meter
sprint.
On this date:
In 1492, Christopher
Columbus set sail from Palos,
Spain, on a voyage that
took him to the present-day
Americas.
In 1807, former Vice
President Aaron Burr went on
trial before a federal court in
Richmond, Va., charged with
treason. (He was acquitted less
than a month later.)
In 1811, Elisha Otis, found-
er of the elevator company that
still bears his name, was born
in Halifax, Vt.
In 1914, Germany declared
war on France at the onset of
World War I.
In 1921, baseball commis-
sioner Kenesaw Mountain
Landis refused to reinstate
the former Chicago White
Sox players implicated in the
Black Sox scandal, despite
their acquittals in a jury trial.
In 1943, Gen. George S.
Patton slapped a private at an
army hospital in Sicily, accus-
ing him of cowardice. (Patton
was later ordered by Gen.
Dwight D. Eisenhower to apol-
ogize for this and a second,
similar episode.)
In 1949, the National
Basketball Association was
formed as a merger of the
Basketball Association of
America and the National
Basketball League.
In 1958, the nuclear-pow-
ered submarine USS Nautilus
became the first vessel to cross
the North Pole underwater.
In 1960, the African coun-
try of Niger (nee-ZHEHR)
achieved full independence
from French rule.
In 1966, comedian Lenny
Bruce, 40, was found dead in
his Los Angeles home.
In 1981, U.S. air traffic con-
trollers went on strike, despite
a warning from President
Ronald Reagan they would be
fired, which they were.
Ten years ago: U.S.
Fulbright scholar John Tobin
was released from a Russian
prison after serving half of
a one-year drug sentence
and winning parole. Actor
Christopher Hewett died in
Los Angeles at age 80.
1
DEALER NAME
ADDRESS CITY
PHONE
CREDIT YOUR
WAY!
WE HONOR!
*Certain restrictions and limitations apply.
See your authorized retailer for complete details.
Major League Baseball trademarks and copyrights are used with permission of Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. Visit MLB.com
SAVE 10% SAVE 10% SAVE 10%
off the regular price of any set of four Firestone tires.
Valid with this coupon ONLY at the authorized Firestone retailer listed below.
Offer expires 00/00/00
N
EW
!
N
EW
!
N
EW
!
Baseball and Firestone have both been integral to the American landscape
for well over 100 years. It is fitting then that Firestone is the
official tire of Major League Baseball

. Abner Doubleday
and Harvey Firestone were visionaries in Americas
history. Doubleday for enhancing the
game of baseball and Firestone
for providing innovative tires
to a nation on the move.
Let top value Firestone
tires take you to your
next baseball game.
Check out our lineup
of Firestone passenger
car tires, Firehawk
performance car tires,
import and small car tires, and
Destination tires for SUVs, CUVs
and light trucks. All across America on
interstate highways, neighborhood
streets, and farmers fields drivers
know that Firestone gives them a
tradition of innovation.
We carry a
quality Firestone tire
for what you drive,
how you drive and
where you drive.
BASEBALL, AMERICANA
AND FIRESTONE.
BASEBALL, AMERICANA
AND FIRESTONE.
BASEBALL, AMERICANA
AND FIRESTONE.
502 N. Main St. Delphos, OH
419-695-1060
Offer expires 08/10/11
41
Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated

41

Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated
Independently Owned and Operated
www.midwest-rebath.com
419-227-3882
Bathtubs
Bathtub
Liners
Shower
Bases&
Liners
Wall
Surrounds
Exclusive
Tile
Patterns
Full
Remodel
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Herald 3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
Tony Rahrig
brings his wealth
management
experience to US
We are pleased to welcome Tony Rahrig to our team
of fnancial experts in the Delphos and Wapakoneta
communities. As a Financial Advisor with U.S. Bancorp
Investments, Inc., Tony will use his expertise to help
individuals and families build, preserve and transfer
their wealth.
Learn how Tony or our other local Financial
Advisors can help you achieve your fnancial dreams.
Tony Rahrig, CFP


Financial Advisor
901 Elida Ave
Delphos, OH 45833
419.692.1171
Investment products and services are offered through U.S. Bancorp
Investments, Inc. member FINRA and SIPC, an investment adviser and
brokerage subsidiary of U.S. Bancorp. U.S. Bancorp Investments, Inc. is
not a tax advisor. When it is appropriate you are encouraged to seek
professional tax or legal advice. 0311200
NOT A DEPOSIT NOT FDIC INSURED NOT GUARANTEED BY THE BANK
NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY MAY LOSE VALUE
By Rep. Lynn Wachtmann

With Ohioans becoming
more concerned about grow-
ing government power and
rising tax rates, I think it is
important for voters voices
to be heard. The democratic
process is the hallmark of
our great nation and strength-
ens the bond between citizens
and their elected officials.
Unfortunately, the House
Democrats seem to have for-
gotten that they were sent to
Columbus to serve the peo-
ple of their districtsnot to
silence them entirely.
Recently, a vote was held
in both the Ohio House and
Senate that would have placed
a referendum of the new
national health care law on the
November ballot. Senate Joint
Resolution 1, which was com-
panion legislation to House
Joint Resolution 2, would
have protected the freedom
of Ohioans to choose their
health care and health care
coverage. Namely, the Health
Care Freedom Act would
have prevented the socialist
disaster known as Obamacare
from forcing any Ohioan to
purchase health care cover-
age, while also preventing any
Ohioan from facing penal-
ties from Washington if they
choose to opt out.
Every Republican in both
chambers voted in favor of
giving power to the voters,
and it passed overwhelm-
ingly in the
Senate. In
the House,
only one
De mo c r a t
vote was
required to
put the ref-
e r e n d u m
on the bal-
lot. But the
Democrats
stood in lock step, and that
one vote was not cast. They
instead acted as an impenetra-
ble barrier between Ohioans
and Washington.
I would like to reiterate
that had the Health Care
Freedom Act received bipar-
tisan support in the House,
it would have simply put the
issue on the ballot, where its
fate would have been left to
the people. It would not have
repealed it outright.
It seems to me that if the
House Democrats truly rep-
resented the interests of their
districts, they would have wel-
comed the chance to ensure
that the most important fed-
eral issue was left to the will
of the voters. If they were
confident that Obamacare is
good for Ohio and is wide-
ly supported, they wouldnt
have so feared the outcome of
a November election. Their
actions on this vote reveal
much about whose interests
they are really serving.
Fortunately, Ohioans
reclaimed their voices by
collecting enough signatures
to put the initiative on the
November 2011 ballot. This
was another great example
of democracy in action, in
which Ohioans have shown
that they want to have a
choice of whether or not to
allow Washington into their
homes and doctors examina-
tion rooms in this way. Even
more significantly, they have
shown that despite the bureau-
crats best efforts to silence
their voices, they refused to
be discouraged or defeated.
I have to ask why the same
Democrats who attempted to
silence Ohioans on the health
care debate now are whistling
a different tune on Senate
Bill 5. They embrace and are
fully supportive of allowing
voters to decide the fate of
this bill to place reasonable
reforms on Ohios collective
bargaining laws, yet they
must believe that anyone who
opposes Obamacare simply
does not warrant a vote.
It is important that people
have mechanisms in place by
which to hold their govern-
ment accountable. It is just a
shame that some politicians do
not always feel the same way.

Rep. Wachtmann may be
reached by calling 614-466-
3760, e-mailing District75@
ohr.state.oh.us, or writing to
State Rep. Lynn Wachtmann,
77 South High St., Columbus
OH 43215.
Giving Ohioans a voice
in their government
Wachtmann
Brown
CINCINNATI (AP)
Two Cincinnati men accused
of robbing Indiana casino
winners were found guilty
Tuesday of charges including
multiple counts of aggravated
robbery.
The two men and a woman
were arrested in October in
an undercover operation.
Hamilton County prosecu-
tors in Cincinnati said they
followed riverboat casino
patrons back to Ohio from
neighboring Indiana and
robbed them at gunpoint.
Judge Nadine Allen of
Hamilton County Common
Pleas Court in Cincinnati
found Kenyatta Erkins, 36,
guilty of nearly a dozen
charges including aggravated
robbery, conspiracy to rob-
bery, robbery and felonious
assault. Ugbe Ojile, 34, was
found guilty of more than
a dozen charges including
aggravated robbery, conspir-
acy to aggravated robbery,
conspiracy to robbery, rob-
bery, aggravated burglary
and felonious assault.
The judge found the two
men not guilty of some simi-
lar charges in the case.
Ojiles attorney, Gregory
Cohen, says the verdict will
be appealed. Erkins attorney
didnt immediately return
calls.
The judge found the two
men not guilty on some simi-
lar charges.
Amy Hoover, the moth-
er of Erkins child, pleaded
guilty in May to five counts
of aggravated robbery
in the case in a deal with
prosecutors. Hoover, 26, of
Cincinnati, agreed to testify
against Erkins and Ojile.
Hoovers sentencing is set
for Aug. 10. Erkins and Ojile
are to be sentenced Sept. 27.
County Prosecutor Joe
Deters said at the time of
the arrests that the defen-
dants would target casino
patrons who were seen win-
ning money. Many of the
victims were elderly and con-
sidered more vulnerable, he
said.
Prosecutors had said there
were at least two dozen rob-
beries over several months.
2 guilty on charges in casino sting
COLUMBUS (AP) The
state Ballot Board plans to
approve the wording Ohioans
will see in November, when
they vote on the fate of a
new collective bargaining law
and a health insurance require-
ment.
The collective bargain-
ing law signed by Gov. John
Kasich in late March bans
public employee strikes and
restricts bargaining for more
than 350,000 teachers, police
officers, state employees and
others. While unions can con-
tinue to negotiate wages, they
cannot bargain on health care,
sick time or pension benefits.
The board also will decide
what language will be used for
a vote on a proposed amend-
ment to Ohios Constitution
that aims to keep people from
being required to buy health
insurance. Its backers hope to
use the amendment to legally
challenge President Barack
Obamas health care overhaul.
COLUMBUS (AP)
Some Ohio school districts
with new tax defeats at the
polls are looking at trying
again on Election Day in
November.
Superintendent Lori Handler
of the Mount Healthy schools
tells The Cincinnati Enquirer
her suburban Cincinnati dis-
trict has no choice but to put
the levy rejected on Tuesday
back on the ballot in three
months. She says the schools
have had to slash programs
that benefit students.
Officials in the Benton-
Carroll-Salem district in north-
west Ohios Ottawa County
vote Wednesday on whether
to put its tax request before
voters again in November. The
Toledo Blade reports the levy
shot down on Tuesday also
was defeated in May.
Tuesdays special elec-
tion did have some winners.
WBNS-TV reports central
Ohio voters approved a levy
the Pickerington schools said
would avert deeper cuts.
Ohio union law,
health care on
panel agenda
Ohio voters split
on school levies
KETTERING (AP) An
Ohio school board wants to
fire a teacher accused of calling
students idiots, airheads
and freaking morons.
The human resources direc-
tor for the Kettering schools
said Fairmont High School
English teacher Michael
Togliatti also repeatedly used
profanity and ridiculed the dis-
trict superintendent in class.
The Dayton Daily News
reports the school board voted
Tuesday night for Togliatti
to be suspended without pay,
pending termination.
School Principal Dan
VonHandorf said a student
complained about the teacher
in the spring and allegations
were substantiated through
talks with other students.
More than a dozen students
spoke in support of Togliatti at
the board meeting, describing
him as respectful and caring.
The teachers lawyer says
Togliatti will appeal. Attorney
John Doll predicts the claims
wont hold up in a hearing.
Teacher booted
over alleged
name-calling
BY SENATOR
SHERROD BROWN
A veteran in Cincinnati
recently wrote to me that, it
is good to know we are not
forgotten.
There are more than
930,000 veterans in Ohio
who have made tremendous
sacrifices for our country.
Members of the Armed Forces
leave their families, endure
great stress, and put their lives
on the line for us. And, they
do not ask for much in return
just the benefits they have
earned and deserve.
Yet, too many young vet-
erans are leaving the service
without job prospects. With
the unemployment rate for
young veterans at a staggering
27 percent, we have a respon-
sibility to connect skilled vet-
erans with good-paying jobs.
That is why legislation
I recently introduced, the
Hiring Heroes Act of 2011, is
supported by the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, the American
Legion, Disabled American
Veterans, Military Officers
Association of America, and
the Iraq and Afghanistan
Veterans of America.
This first-of-its-kind jobs
bill aims to reduce unemploy-
ment among veterans return-
ing to civilian life by ensur-
ing that every servicemember
attends a transition assistance
program, to help them find
employment.
Our veterans just want a
fair shot at getting a good job,
a quality education, and an
opportunity
to live out
the American
dream.
Veterans
service to
our coun-
try doesnt
stop when
they leave
the mili-
tary and our
governments commitment
to them shouldnt end when
they return home as valuable
members of our society.
We can honor their service
by providing job skills train-
ing to help connect Americas
veterans with stable, good-
paying jobs. At Youngstown
State University, I recently
met with a student-veteran
Sergeant Paul Hageman
who discussed with me the
need to improve and strength-
en career pathways for return-
ing servicemembers.
Our servicemembers and
veterans deserve our nations
full support. And at the very
least, they deserve elected
officials who are willing to
put partisan battles aside to
ensure that returning veterans
have jobs to ease their transi-
tion into civilian life.
My constituent services
office which you can reach
by calling 216-522-7272
stands prepared to help Ohio
veterans receive the support
they need.
As a member of the Senate
Committee on Veterans
Affairs, Im also committed
to expanding services and
outreach for Ohio veterans,
improving veterans access to
health care, and ensuring vet-
erans have the tools they need
to transition to civilian life
and find employment.
Lets not just show our
gratitude to our nations
veterans on the 11th day of
the 11th month. We need to
honor our veterans every
day. One great way to do so
is to ensure they have access
to good paying jobs, afford-
able housing, and the benefits
theyve earned.
We should show Americas
veterans that they have not
been forgotten.
Remembering Ohio veterans
TOLEDO (AP) Lawyers
for an Ohio Roman Catholic
priest found guilty of killing
a nun are claiming in a legal
brief that recently discovered
police reports would have
allowed the defense to point
toward another suspect.
The Toledo Blade reports
the brief filed this week repre-
sents the closing argument for
attorneys trying to overturn
the Rev. Gerald Robinsons
2006 conviction. The defense
made similar claims during a
hearing on Robinsons appeal
held in May.
The priests attorneys
believe his constitution-
al right to a fair trial was
violated in part because of
the discovery of 136 police
reports three years after he
was convicted.
Prosecutors maintain that
evidence is overwhelming
that Robinson killed Sister
Margaret Ann Pahl in 1980
at the Toledo hospital where
they both worked.
Priests appeal focuses on police reports
CINCINNATI (AP)
Police in Cincinnati say one
of their dogs mistakenly bit a
city parks employee because
of what she was wearing.
Police Sgt. Daniel Hils says
when the officer assigned to
Tank let him loose for a call of
nature, the dog saw the woman
in dark overalls resembling the
K-9 training bite suit and
reacted.
The Cincinnati Enquirer
reports Jamila Turnbow got a
3-inch cut on her upper right
arm from the attack on July 25.
Hils writes in a memo
to police higher-ups that
Turnbows attire and the dogs
response doesnt excuse what
he describes as the K-9 offi-
cers lack of attention and
control of his canine partner.
Hils is recommending a rep-
rimand and has ordered that
police dogs not be allowed off
leash in public.
Police say K-9
bites worker
over attire
BRIEFS
We are healed of a suffering only by experiencing it to the full.
Marcel Proust, French author (1871-1922)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
KATHLEEN PARKER
Point
of View
One Year Ago
Cody Wright, 10, of Delphos, recently attended the 2010
American Hereford Association Junior National Expo in
Indianapolis, Ind. He participated in a showmanship competi-
tion and showed in class exhibiting his market steer and heifer.
Cody is the son of Joe and Sharon Wright of Venedocia.
25 Years Ago 1986
The 100th birthday celebrations of Continental continue
Saturday and Sunday. Saturdays events include quilt judg-
ing and the Auglaize Village craftsmen display. There will be
crafts, a flea market and a country store. Teen Olympics will
be held at the school track field. A time capsule will be buried
at 4 p.m. at Sparling Park.
The earthquake that hit the St. Marys area several weeks
ago will be long remembered, especially by those people who
are experiencing problems with their water wells. A well
driller from Celina said he has been busy responding to calls
from people who claim their wells are spilling over and flood-
ing yards, foundations and streets.
Ed Wurst, deputy grand knight of the Ray McKowen
Council, Knights of Columbus, presented area programs with
contributions collected by the Knights of Columbus. The Rev.
Chris Vasko accepted $700.46 on behalf of the special educa-
tion program which provides materials, teachers and other
assistance to handicapped and mentally retarded grade school
children.
50 Years Ago 1961
Delphos Council Knights of Columbus will hold its first
social affair under the new administration Aug. 6 in the form
of the annual picnic for members and their families. The picnic
will be held in Baumgartes Grove, west of Delphos on State
Route 697. Richard Schwinnen, Council Activity chairman,
is in charge of arrangements and has announced there will be
games and refreshments for both young and old.
Poker hand golf was the program for the ladies day activi-
ties at the Delphos Country Club Tuesday, with prizes going
to Mrs. Richard Shirack and Mrs. Kenneth Parkinson. Mrs.
Franklin Spieles won the right to wear the pin in pin play
action also held yesterday.
The Rt. Rev. Carl F. Reineck, superintendent of St. Johns
Schools, has announced the appointment of Edward J. Zalar
as the new football coach of Delphos St. Johns High School.
Zalar is a native of Barberton, Ohio and until recently had
been living in Jackson, Michigan. He attended Michigan State
University and also Indiana University, majoring in physical
education and the social sciences.
75 Years Ago 1936
United States stars, led by Jesse Owens, today smashed
into the lead in the unofficial track and field team standings
of the 11th Olympic Games. Owens, running the 100-meter
course in 10.3 seconds, won that title for the United States for
the second consecutive time. His ten points, coupled with five
picked up by Ralph Metcalfe, who finished second to the Ohio
State junior, and others scored by Americas aces, gave the
United States a team total of 46 points.
Work on the canal lock north of Third Street was pro-
gressing well. Repairs were being made there to do away with
the leaks and concrete aprons were being constructed. Louis
Rimer, canal foreman, urges that people refrain from throwing
rubbish and refuse into the canal.
There was a large attendance at the annual homecoming
conducted at the United Brethren Church Sunday. Members
of the Christian Endeavor Society were in charge of the eve-
ning service which included special music by the choir, a
ladies quartet, a mixed quartet and the Blythe family. Grace
Woodworth, Mrs. Virgil Buchanan, Edna Harpster and Donna
Adams were members of the ladies quartet and Albert and
Mildred Harpster, Forest Fought and Charles Wells were the
mixed quartet members.
WASHINGTON (AP)
Time and again during his
presidential campaign, Barack
Obama was unequivocal: We
are going to roll back the Bush
tax cuts for the wealthiest
Americans.
But when the chips were
down, now-President Obama
blinked and backed away.
Twice in less than nine
months, Obama has shelved
his pledge in deadline-pressing
negotiations with congres-
sional Republicans. Obama
insists he still is determined to
find new revenue by making
taxpayers who make more than
$200,000 and big corporations
pay more, but frustrated liber-
als say he has already missed
key opportunities.
Inaction on taxes and his
willingness to consider struc-
tural changes to Medicare and
Social Security, long-cherished
Democratic programs, have
strained relations with some
Democratic lawmakers and
liberal backers who complain
Obama has been too willing to
backtrack from his positions.
The increasingly urgent twists
and turns over raising the gov-
ernments debt ceiling placed
Obamas concessions in sharp
relief.
Its his wanting to be the
reasonable guy and think-
ing this is the way to appeal
to independent votes, said
Lawrence Mishel, president
of the labor-leaning Economic
Policy Institute. I think hes
engaged in a fools game that
ultimately wont win him inde-
pendent voters and will actu-
ally just hurt people and the
economy.
The Bush tax cuts would
have expired in December of
last year, but Obama agreed
to extend them in a deal cut
with Senate Republican leader
Mitch McConnell during a
lame-duck session of Congress.
In exchange, Obama won a
payroll tax cut and an exten-
sion in jobless aid. Overall, the
president came out ahead then,
winning a repeal of the ban
on gays serving openly in the
military, a nuclear-arms agree-
ment with Russia, even a food
safety bill.
By EILEEN SULLIVAN
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Local
communities around the coun-
try are best suited to take on
the challenge of combatting
the kind of violent extremism
that inspires people to kill, the
Obama administration con-
cludes in a new national plan
to fight the threat of al-Qaida
and other violent radicals at
home.
And although al-Qaida and
like-minded groups pose the
most significant and direct
threat to the U.S., the strategy
focuses on violent extremism
of all varieties because violent
ideologies change over time
and new threats will undoubt-
edly arise in the future,
according to an unclassified
draft of the strategy obtained
by The Associated Press. It
is expected to be released
today.
The eight-page plan, more
than a year in the making, is
short on specifics and stakes
out no new ground on the
thorny issue of homegrown
terrorism. It repeats many of
President Barack Obamas
past statements and in parts
is quite similar to a document
President George W. Bushs
administration produced five
years ago.
The United States gov-
ernment will work tirelessly
to counter support for vio-
lent extremism and to ensure
that, as new violent groups
and ideologies emerge, they
fail to gain a foothold in our
country, the strategy says.
Achieving this aim requires
that we all work together
government, communities,
the private sector, the gen-
eral public, and others to
develop effective programs
and initiatives.
In 2006 the Bush adminis-
tration wrote, Success in this
ideological struggle demands
that we explain more effec-
tively our values, ideals,
policies, and actions interna-
tionally and support moder-
ate voices willing to confront
extremists and discredit radi-
cals.
The White House did
not immediately respond
to a request for comment
Tuesday.
The psychological aspects
of radicalization have been
studied for years, and while
there are some similarities
among terrorism cases, there
is not a single profile of a
violent extremist in the U.S.
Complicating the challenge is
that the threat is often rooted
in an ideology protected by
the Constitution.
Americans are now a tar-
geted audience for recruitment
to radical causes and not just
a target for attack. English-
speaking radical Islamic
clerics appeal to Westerners
on the Internet and recruit
Americans to join their holy
war. The need to travel to ter-
ror camps in faraway places
has diminished now that there
are instructions for how to
carry out an attack that are
easily available online.
The Obama administra-
tion strategy points to fed-
eral outreach programs by
the Homeland Security and
Justice departments and the
FBI that have been initiated
since the 2001 terror attacks.
It also refers to the nations
approach to countering
criminal gangs as a model
to embrace for countering
violent extremism, involv-
ing police, schools, probation
officers, youth agencies, gov-
ernment and local grass-roots
organizations.
The strategy includes
broad statements about pro-
tecting civil rights, American
values and the importance of
partnerships with local stake-
holders and the private sec-
tor. The federal governments
job is to act in a support
role, it said, bringing people
together and sharing informa-
tion about threats and con-
cerns and community-based
solutions.
By JOAN LOWY
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
government is likely to lose
more than $1 billion in airline
ticket taxes because lawmak-
ers have left town for a month
without resolving a partisan
standoff over a bill to end the
partial shutdown of the Federal
Aviation Administration.
The government already
has lost more than $200 mil-
lion since airlines are unable
to collect taxes on ticket sales
because the FAAs operating
authority has expired.
The Senate recessed on
Tuesday until September,
erasing any possibility for
quickly resolving the issue.
The House left Monday
night.
Caught up in the partisan
acrimony are nearly 4,000
FAA employees who have
been furloughed. The FAA
also has issued stop work
orders on more than 200 con-
struction projects, threatening
the jobs of thousands of other
workers. Air traffic control-
lers, however, remain on the
job.
The debacle could have
had an upside for airline pas-
sengers because ticket taxes,
which typically average about
$30 on a $300 round-trip fare,
are suspended during the shut-
down. But airlines decided to
pocket the windfall. Within
hours of the shutdown on July
23, most airlines raised their
fares by amounts equivalent
to the taxes that disappeared.
Transportation Secretary
Ray LaHood called air-
line CEOs to complain and
lawmakers have sent letters
demanding the fare hikes be
reversed and the profits be
placed in escrow. But their
howls have largely been
ignored. Airlines collectively
lost about $440 million in the
first six months of this year,
according to the Air Transport
Association.
Some passengers will
be due tax refunds if they
bought their tickets and paid
taxes before the shutdown,
but their travel took place
during the time airlines no
longer had authority to col-
lect the money. Airlines and
the Internal Revenue Service
are quarreling over who will
handle the complicated and
expensive process of getting
those refunds to passengers.
President Barack Obama
implored Congress on
Tuesday to settle the dispute
before leaving town, call-
ing the stalemate another
Washington-inflicted wound
on America.
LaHood, a former GOP
congressman, conveyed the
same message in a series of
private meetings on Capitol
Hill and in phone calls to
lawmakers, but was unable to
clinch a deal.
Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.
Va., chairman of the Senate
committee that oversees the
FAA, held out the possibility
that if the Senate were able
to pass a bill acceptable to
Democrats, it could still be
approved by the House using
obscure parliamentary proce-
dures, and sent to the White
House.
But his House counterpart,
Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., ruled
out that possibility. The only
way left to end the shutdown
is for the Senate to agree to a
previously passed House bill
containing $16.5 million cuts
in air service subsidies to 13
rural communities that some
Democrats particularly
Rockefeller find objection-
able.
The only one holding this
up now is Mr. Rockefeller,
Mica said. One of the 13
communities that would lose
subsidies is Morgantown,
W.Va.
The entire air service sub-
sidy program costs about $200
million a year, roughly the
amount the government lost in
uncollected ticket taxes in the
first week of the shutdown.
The program was created after
airlines were deregulated in
1978 to ensure continued ser-
vice on less profitable routes
to remote communities. But
critics say some communities
receiving subsidies are within
a reasonable driving distance
of a hub airport.
Subsidies per airline
passenger range as high as
$3,720 in Ely, Nev., to as
low as $9.21 in Thief River
Falls, Minn., according to the
House Transportation and
Infrastructure Committee.
WASHINGTON
Actually, no, Mr. Vice
President, the tea party gang
wasnt acting like terror-
ists. They were acting like
kidnappers. Lets get our
insults correct. They werent
inflicting harm on members
of a group of people in order
to terrorize the larger group.
They acted like kidnappers
who seize and detain a per-
son (in this case, a nation
of persons) in exchange for
ransom.
Im exaggerating for
effect, of course, since no
one was actually seized and
no force was used. Nothing
was illegal, just annoying.
Besides, like Joe Biden, Im
only saying they acted like,
not that they are.
This is the progressive-
parenting approach to scold-
ing. You never tell Johnny
hes a bad boy; hes just act-
ing bad. You might even
say hes doing a darned good
imitation of a bad boy. But
hes not intrinsically, geneti-
cally, irretrievably, beyond-
help bad. Unless, of course,
he keeps acting, in which
case he could become the
very thing hes acting really
good at.
Im just trying to defend
the English language here, not
poor Joe, whose brain is often
two steps behind his mouth.
Bidens offhand remark to
some other Democrats has
caused quite a ruckus. All the
worlds a-Twitter. But then it
always is. Ruckuses are pret-
ty easy to start these days.
Tea party congresspeople
and the folks who elected
them are proud of themselves
for standing fast during the
debt-ceiling standoff. They
wouldnt give an inch even
if it meant the country cata-
pulted down the abyss and
markets were destabilized. It
was the principle of the thing,
we heard over and over.
Heres another principle
oft repeated, to my mail-
box, anyway. Families dont
spend more than they have;
the government shouldnt
either. Except, of course,
families routinely spend
more than they have. They
borrow money to buy houses
and cars. They borrow to take
vacations and to send their
kids to college. So, although
we might agree to the prin-
ciple that we shouldnt spend
more than we have, we do. So
does our government.
This doesnt mean that
there shouldnt be limits
on how much we borrow.
Clearly, were beginning
to come to our senses and
the tea party deserves some
credit. This is to say, the
American people deserve
credit for insisting that their
elected representatives act
more responsibly.
But this includes, or
should, not holding the nation
hostage and placing our
economy at even greater risk.
Extracting promises while
threatening to allow the gov-
ernment to default even
the debate over which has
caused problems that likely
will be far-reaching was,
well, acting like hostage-
takers. As The Wall Street
Journals Francesco Guerrera
wrote Tuesday, You just
dont push the worlds largest
economy and the most liquid
financial markets to the brink
of disaster without causing
damage somewhere.
The debt-ceiling crisis has
been averted, but only tempo-
rarily. In another six months,
well have another go at the
same exercise and now
we have a precedent. What
will the tea party faction
extract next time? Whats to
keep them from insisting on
defunding an unpopular pro-
gram in exchange for allow-
ing the country to meet its
financial obligations?
More important, what kind
of confidence will we observe
in markets and investors in
the meantime? The conser-
vative view, with which I
happen to agree, is that con-
fidence is crucial to growth
and stability. In effect, the tea
party gang has undermined
its own central philosophical
tenet.
Holding fast to a principle
that undermines your own
objectives doesnt make you
a terrorist or a kidnapper, but
it might mean youre doing
a darned good imitation of a
foolish person.

Kathleen Parkers email
address is kathleenparker@
washpost.com.
WH changes its strategy
against violent extremism
Principled foolishness
FAA shutdown continues as Congress leaves
Bush tax cuts
divide liberals
from Obama
1
AUTO DEALERS
Delpha
Chev/Buick Co.
Raabe Ford/Lincoln
AUTO PARTS
Pitsenbarger Auto
FINANCIAL
INSTITUTIONS
First Federal Bank
FURNITURE
Lehmanns Furniture
Westrich Home Furnishings
GARAGE
Omers Alignment Shop
HARDWARE
Delphos Ace Hardware
& Rental
This message published as a public
service by these civic minded businesses.
Interested sponsors call The Delphos Herald Public Service Dept.
419-695-0015
THIRD ANNUAL
Delphos Youth Hoopsters
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14, 2011
SPRINGBROOK GOLF CLUB
4-MAN BEST BALL SCRAMBLE - SHOTGUN START
8:30 AM START, REGISTRATION BEGINS AT 7:30 AM
$55.00 PER PERSON OR $220 PER TEAM
(INCLUDES GREEN FEES, CART, LUNCH, AND PRIZES)
HOLE IN ONE
WIN
2011 SONATA
** PRIZES ** LUNCH INCLUDED ** DOOR PRIZES **
DYH is a non-proft organization that promotes opportunities
for Delphos Jefferson basketball players
SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE:
A. HOLE SPONSOR $25 PER HOLE - 1 OR MORE
B. ENTER TEAM ($55 PER PERSON/$220 PER TEAM)
C. PERSONAL TEAM (Friends or employees)
D. DOOR PRIZES
E. CASH DONATION (Tax deductible)
CONTACTS: Ed Smith 419-236-4754,
Jeff Stockwell 419-236-1150, Ray Geary 419-692-1613
GOLF
SCRAMBLE
Relocating August 1!
DEWITT CHIROPRACTIC
Spine & Sports
150 W. Fifth St.
419-692-BACK (2225)
(corner of Fifth and Canal in Delphos)
Delphos
2 Col x 8
102 Water Street | Kalida, OH 45853
800-676-3619
119.582.8699
www.knueve.com
K
nueve
&
S
ons
inc.
Your Komfort Is Our Koncern!
(All offers in this ad are not valid with any other offer. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or specials.)
Heating & Air Conditioning | Air Quality & Humidification |
Water Heaters | Water Treatment Systems | Home Standby Generators
Bathroom Remodeling
Plumbing Services
*See Knueve & Sons for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers valid on qualifying systems
only. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. The Home Projects Visa card is issued by Wells Fargo
Financial National Bank. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. Regular minimum
monthly payments are required during the promotional period. Interest will be charged to your account fromthe purchase date at the regular APR if
the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is
27.99% The APR may vary. The APR is given as of 1/1/2011. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimuminterest charge will be
$1.00. If youusethecardfor cashadvances, thecashadvancefeeis 4% of theamount of thecashadvance, but not less than$10.00.

TM
It's Hard To Stop A Trane.
TM
Purchase a new qualifying high efficiency Trane heating and
cooling system by August 15, 2011 and Knueve and Sons will
give you Zero Interest Financing if paid in full within Twelve
Months OR get a FREE XL950 Thermostat.
In addition Knueve and Sons will give you a 10-year parts and
labor Peace of Mind Protection Plan on our installation.
Your old system is probably costing you up to 60% more on
your utility bills than a new high efficiency system. Knueve &
Sons will come out and give you a free energy evaluation with
a quote on a new Trane installation showing the energy
savings you can expect.
Call Knueve & Sons today so your family will
be safe and comfortable for years to come.
00l10f0zts0lN0800z|t8|||sI
00lN0W80zl|00s
000||008tsl0MN0WI
00l0006 00l |||lt8z|00sI
0z||I0tIt00l00t0tlz|0zl|00.
k00z|||sIt00,k080t0t|sIt00
k08z|00st0f00tsI
0|M0|0|0l0t0slI0t12M00lksI
Nkzl00tf0000-000'lPzt0s
08
00lI8llKl950
k0tM0slzl
According to the Tax Foundation, it took the
average American until April 12 this year to
earn enough to pay 2011 income taxes.
This year, aim to be above average. Start by
evaluating whether you can beneft from
tax-smart investing strategies, such as:
Tax-advantaged investments and retirement
accounts (e.g., IRAs)
529 college savings plans
Holding stocks for the long term
Keep in mind that tax implications should only be one
consideration when making investment decisions, not
the driving factor.
Be Tax-smart
with Your Investments.
Call or visit today to learn more about
these investing strategies.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
F
A
P
-
1
9
4
2
H
-
A


A
P
R

2
0
1
1
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Herald 5
COMMUNITY
Happy Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Clark Mansion
Van Wert
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
6 p.m. Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. Johns Chapel.
6:30 p.m. Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission meets at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is be open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
6:30 p.m. Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos
Optimist Club meets at the
A&W Drive-In, 924 E. Fifth
St.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. Johns High School park-
ing lot, is open.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
MONDAY
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
Amish Cook busy canning
BY LOVINA EICHER
It is Monday morning,
Aug. 1, at a little past 6 a.m.
Daughters Elizabeth, 17, and
Susan, 15, just left for anoth-
er tiring day of de-tasseling
corn. A bus comes around and
picks them up in the morning.
The detasseling crew they
work with has
300 workers.
It is hard to
believe that we
have entered the
month of August.
The year 2011
is over halfway
over already.
Meanwhile, can-
ning season is
in full swing. I
made six batches
of homemade
freezer pickles
last week and I want to make
dill pickles next. I planted
some cucumbers that can be
fixed small so that whole dill
pickles can be made out of
them. My tomatoes are real-
ly starting to ripen. Before
long I will be putting them
in jars too. My husband Joe
and the boys pulled the cook-
ing onions from our garden
on Saturday. We did not get
them hung up yet. I just laid
them out on newspapers so
they can start drying. I take
baling twine that we use for
hay and tie the long stems of
the onions into a bunch and
then hang them under our
porch ledge to dry. I move
them inside before it freezes
in the fall.
Next on the list is to dig
up our potatoes. And my red
beets are big enough that I can
start using them. I made some
buttered beets with them but
I let the rest grow larger so I
can make pickled beets
I also ordered a bushel of
peaches which will be ready
in about 10 days. We like
to eat them just as a snack.
I also like to dice them up,
put them in little
sandwich bags
and freeze them.
Then I put a bag
in with Joes
lunch and the
frozen peaches
help keep his
lunch cool and
by lunch time
the peaches are
thawed enough
for him to eat
them.
We are
shocked and saddened to hear
the news his morning that
an 11-month-old girl in our
church district passed away. It
brings backs so many memo-
ries of that Monday morning
on May 24, 2010, when my
8-month old niece, Marilyn,
passed away. God must need
more angels in Heaven. We
question why so many
times but we need to trust
him and lead the way. This
little girl would be daugh-
ter Elizabeths boyfriend
Timothys niece. She was
such a sweet little girl and my
heart aches for the parents.
The four other siblings have
been staying at Jacob and
Emmas house since Friday
night when little Clara was
admitted to the hospital. This
brings back a lot of memories
for Emma and Jacob and they
can understand the heartache
of losing a child.
After I get this column
done I am going to go over
and help with whatever clean-
ing or cooking I can and help
with whatever needs to be
done for the viewing and the
funeral. I also want to prepare
some food to take along.
We finally managed to
get our second cutting hay in
on Saturday night. Hay was
rained on more than once We
cant control the weather. We
need to look on the bright side
and think that the rain was
good for the third cutting
Daughter Verenas surgery
on her foot will be next week.
I will be glad to get that taken
care of. I do hope the surgery
will be a great success.
Since Ill be having plen-
ty of peaches in the weeks
ahead, I thought Id share this
simple, but delicious recipe!
PEACH CREAM PIE
2 1/3 cups pitted, peeled
and sliced peaches
1 1/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup plus 1 T. flour
1 cup milk
1 pinch of salt
Preheat oven to 400
degrees.
In a large mixing bowl,
combine all ingredients until
smooth consistency and the
peaches are evenly coated.
Pour into a ready made pie
crust. Bake at 400 degrees
for 30 minutes. Reduce heat
to 350 degrees for 30 min-
utes. Fresh rhubarb may also
be used in place of peaches.
Aug. 4
Kylee Haehn
Kathy Newland
Melvin (Jiggs) Clark
Theresa Goodwin
Eric Wallace
Chandler Brantley
Sidney Bradley
CAMPUS NOTES
Manchester
names Deans List
A local student is on the
deans list for spring semester
2011 at Manchester College in
North Manchester, Ind.
Matthew Trentman of
Delphos is an environmental
science major. Trentman is a
graduate of St. Johns High
School.
Rhodes Saint
Marys graduate
Kelly Rhodes graduated
in May from Saint Marys
College in Notre Dame, IN.
Rhodes is the daughter of
Karen Behr of Troy and James
Rhodes of Ottoville,
She received a bachelor of
arts in psychology and com-
municative disorders.
Miller earns Mt.
Union degree
Kyle Miller of Elida,
recently graduated from the
University of Mount Union.
She received a bachelor
of arts degree in health and
physical education.
Stockwell earns
Sinclair degree
Karissa Stockwell gradu-
ated June 10 from Sinclair
College in Dayton with an
associates degree in health
information management.
She is a graduate of
Jefferson High School and the
daughter of Mark and Lisa
Stockwell, granddaughter of
Jim and Jeannette Stockwell
and George and Linda Spring
and the great-granddaughter
of Virginia Stockwell.
Place a Classified Ad
TODAY!
Call 419-695-0015 ext. 122
to place your ad!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 ext. 122
6 The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
By ANDREW SELIGMAN
The Associated Press
CHICAGO Richard
Dent had just joined the
Chicago Bears and Dan
Hampton was
a little less than
impressed.
He saw a
player who was
scrawny even
a bit lazy and
when Buddy
Ryan asked about
two weeks into
practices what he
thought of the rookie, well,
the Danimal couldnt be
restrained, using a few choice
words to describe him.
I said, Why, you like
him? Hampton recalled.
And Buddy said, Watch
him. He never makes a
bad decision and thats the
essence of being a defensive
lineman.
What a defensive end he
turned out to be. And now,
after some near misses, Dents
long wait for a spot in the Hall
of Fame is just about over.
Dent will finally become
the third member of that leg-
endary 1985 Chicago Bears
defense to be inducted into
the Hall on Saturday, when he
joins fellow Monsters of the
Midway Hampton and Mike
Singletary. Its an honor that
his teammates and coaches
say is long overdue.
Who can forget the man-
gled mess of opponents that
group left behind while shuf-
fling all the way to a cham-
pionship? Whether it was the
crunching hits or Dent burst-
ing past the tackle and strip-
ping the ball as he sacked the
quarterback, few teams made
offenses wilt the way that
one did.
He will go in as part of a
class that includes Shannon
Sharpe, Marshall Faulk, Chris
Hanburger, Les Richter, Ed
Sabol and Deion Sanders.
Hell be presented by Joe
Gilliam Sr., his old coach
at Tennessee State, who,
like Hampton, was far from
impressed at first.
I didnt worry about the
day coming, Dent said. I
more or less worried about
the people who I wanted to
thank, make sure they were
living. I lost my high school
coach who just died a couple
years ago. My
mother passed in
89 and I think
the last guy living
here that played a
big part of it was
Coach Gilliam.
A 4-time
Pro Bowl pick
and MVP of the
Super Bowl dur-
ing the 1985 championship
season, Dent played 15 years
and is tied for sixth with John
Randle on the NFLs all-time
sacks list with 137 1/2. He
set a team record with 17 1/2
in 1984, led the NFL with 17
sacks a year later and finished
with 10 or more eight times in
his career.
Now, after missing out as
a finalist six of the previ-
ous seven years, hes finally
going into the Hall. Not bad
for a guy who barely made
his college team, who then
watched as 202 players got
drafted before him in 1983
and who showed up to the
Bears undersized and needing
extensive dental work.
The thing about Richard
was he really made himself
what he became, said Mike
Ditka, the 85 Bears coach.
Hes the first Hall-of-
Famer from Tennessee State,
a historically black school
that produced Pro Bowl picks
such as Ed Too Tall Jones
and Claude Humphrey. And
yet, Gilliam wanted nothing
to do with Dent.
He just couldnt avoid him,
though. And on Saturday,
hell be the one making the
presentation.
The defensive coordinator
at Tennessee State, Gilliam
happened to be teaching a
graduate course in public
health and one of his stu-
dents was William Lester,
Dents coach at Murphy High
in Atlanta. Gilliam was also
responsible for recruiting in
Georgia and one spring day,
he stopped by the school.
Lester put in a tape and asked
what he thought.
I said, I have cornerbacks
that are bigger than Richard
Dent and hes an offensive
tackle. He just wont cut it,
coach, Gilliam recalled.
Lester wouldnt take no for
an answer, though, and when
fall practices started, Gilliam
said he showed up with Dent
in tow even though there was
no scholarship offer.
He says, We cant leave
him in Atlanta. He wont
make it, coach. I said, I can
understand, he comes from
a pretty rough area and all
that but I just dont have a
scholarship for him. He says,
Coach, I cant leave him. So
I brought him. He says, You
do what you can for him. I
know youll do that.
He remembers Lester
telling him, Well, you got
him and then leaving. Dent
remembers thinking he was
going to summer school when
he and his three high school
teammates went to Tennessee
State. He wasnt sure hed be
on the team.
Either way, he said he
spent his redshirt year on
offense eyeing a switch to
defense because he thought
he had a better shot at playing
time there. He studied what
the defensive players were
doing, practiced techniques in
his dorm room.
When he made the switch,
he immediately started mak-
ing life miserable for opposing
linemen and quarterbacks.
He was relentless, like a
guided missile going after
the ball carrier.
He also seemed impervi-
ous to pain.
Gilliam remembers Dent
suffering a small fracture in
his left forearm in a game,
practicing on Thursday and
then getting four sacks in the
next game, even though he
was essentially playing with
one arm.
As tough and as quick as
he was, Dent was easy to
overlook because he didnt
really stand out as a physi-
cal specimen. Even though he
put on weight in college, he
still only tipped the scales in
the upper 220s when he start-
ed with the Bears and needed
extensive dental work.
The thinking was the
problems with his teeth were
preventing him from eating
properly and gaining weight.
Dent had another theory
that he practiced so hard in
college that he simply could
not pack on the pounds.
The Bears took care of the
dental problems and whether
it was because of that or the
different routine, he gained
weight and wound up about
265.
That issue aside, Ryan, the
coordinator of that 46 defense,
said Dent simply had all the
natural ability in the world.
And he certainly stood out on
a unit packed with stars.
With Hampton, Singletary,
Steve McMichael, Otis
Wilson, Wilber Marshall,
Dave Duerson and Gary
Fencik, the Bears were loaded
but Dent did not get lost in
the shuffle. The Sackman
was at his best in the playoffs,
starting with that divisional
game against the New York
Giants in which he had 3 1/2
sacks. He kept it going in the
NFC championship, sacking
Dieter Brock and forcing a
fumble that Marshall ran back
52 yards for a touchdown as
snow started to fall at Soldier
Field, capping a 24-0 romp
over the Los Angeles Rams.
And in the Super Bowl, all
Dent did was have a hand in
two sacks, force two fumbles
and block a pass while taking
the MVP as the Bears stomped
New England 46-10.
As dominant as they were,
though, they never won
another championship and
there was a perception that
Dents numbers were bloated
because of whom he played
alongside.
Oh no, he was good,
McMichael said. He was
good. ... On any team thats
ever been, hed make the
same plays.
Now, finally, hes set to
take his place among the
games greats.
You become a rookie again
here, Dent added. Its some-
where you havent been, you
dont know anything about.
You try to control your emo-
tions, but then again, you try
to express yourself, too. I dont
know until I step on the floor
and step up to the mic but Im
going to be who I am and kind
of just speak from the heart
of things, not getting too tied
up into the speech and more
or less getting tied up into the
people who helped you.
Richter makes Hall 50 years
after final game: Les Richter was an
imposing figure at 6-3 and almost 240
pounds, size that made him one of the
most physical linebackers in the NFL
and earned him the nickname Dirty
Les for his aggressive play.
That stayed on the field, though,
as those who knew Richter away from
football never saw that rough side of
him.
He was a big guy but he was really
soft. Really loyal, said Roger Penske,
who became friends with Richter after
his NFL career. But in terms of being
physical, the only thing I ever saw were
those hands. He had the largest hands
Ive ever seen. If he shook your hand,
he could break your arm.
Richter will be inducted into the Pro
Football Hall of Fame on Saturday.
It was more than his hands that
made Richter intimidating on the foot-
ball field and teams saw it long before
he played his first down in the NFL. He
was drafted second overall by the New
York Yanks in 1952 but the franchise
folded two days later and Richters
rights were sold back to the NFL.
He then went to the expansion
Dallas Texans, who immediately dealt
Richter to the Los Angeles Rams for 11
players. It was the second-largest deal
for one player in NFL history.
After two years in the Army, Richter
joined the Rams in 1954 and went on
to a 9-year career with them. He was
elected to eight Pro Bowls but it took
nearly 50 years since his final game
for Richter to make it into the Hall of
Fame.
Its always puzzled me why Les is
not in the Hall of Fame, Hall-of-Famer
Frank Gifford told NFL.com. He was
a great, great player. I dont know
any linebacker in that era who even
compared to him. He was big, he was
fast and he was an extremely produc-
tive player.
When you prepared to play the
Rams, Les was the guy that you
really game-planned for. He was their
defense. He was successful in busi-
ness, he was successful in life and was
a great person.
Richter died in June 2010 at age
79. Eight months later, he was elected
into the Hall of Fame. Then in April,
he was added to the list of 25 nomi-
nees for NASCARs Hall of Fame. Its
an unusual crossover but one Richter
pulled off seamlessly.
His second career actually began
while he was still a player.
Ed Pauley, a part-owner of the
Rams, had an old speedway in the
California desert he asked Richter to
look after; along with a group of inves-
tors that included Bob Hope, Richter
turned it into Riverside International
Raceway. The track hosted everything
from NASCAR to NHRA and Richter,
as president, formed a close friendship
with NASCARs ruling France family.
Richter eventually became a
NASCAR executive, helped form the
International Race of Champions series
and was instrumental in the building
of California Speedway. Nicknamed
Coach because he led a team dur-
ing his time in the military, he was a
popular figure for NASCAR and helped
the industry gain acceptance in the
mainstream sports world.
If you looked at Coach, you knew
he was a football player, even in his
older days, because of his stature,
NASCAR president Mike Helton said.
And while he demanded respect
because of his history and experience,
he never expected it and never made
you feel like he was better than you.
He was very humble, personable,
the guy you really just liked being with
and working with. He was a good guy
for NASCAR because a lot of things
were going on and Les was a really
great liaison because of his fame on the
football field.
Richter never missed a game dur-
ing his career, battling injuries and
allergies and even a broken cheekbone
sustained early in the 1961 season.
He was well-known for a fight with the
Colts Don Joyce during Richters 1954
rookie season. Joyce tore off Richters
helmet and hit him over the head with
it, sending Richter to the hospital for
14 stitches.
He won rookie of the year honors
that same season.
His Rams teams were never great
Richter won six or more games
just four times in nine years but he
contributed everything he could. He
doubled as kicker for two seasons,
making 29 field goals.
When he finally retired in 1962, a
second career on the fringe of football
didnt interest him. He threw himself
full-time into auto racing and attacked
the industry the same way he did oppo-
nents.
Dent finally gets his Hall of Fame moment
Les Richter Richard Dent
I love the Internet!
Mostly!
It is much easier to find interesting
tidbits that arent always national news,
especially items that might be a little
older that were easy to miss.
For example, this one about the sumo
wrestler who became the heaviest man to
ever finish a marathon.
He is Kelly Gneiting, a 3-time U.S.
sumo champion who tipped the scales
at 400 pounds when he started the Los
Angeles Marathon.
He smashed the previous record of
275 pounds.
He definitely didnt set any records
he recorded a time of nine hours, 48
minutes, 52 seconds.
Still, that was not an easy task, figur-
ing that the average marathon runner is
something like 250 pounds or more less
than he is.
He did walk the final 18 miles of
the 26.2-mile race and did have some
issues becoming delirious after 10
miles, for example but he kept on
going.
Give him a shoutout!
Supposedly, he will next try to swim
the English Channel.
As a heavier man, I say more power to
him! I hope he succeeds!
Or this item.
There will be six new events at the
2014 Sochi Winter Olympics hey, the
way this summer is going, it wont be
long now!
Womens ski jumping; a new halfpipe
event for men and women; team figure-
skating (six skaters: one male skater, one
female skater, one skating pair and one
ice dance couple); biathlon mixed relay
(two female athletes and two male ath-
letes, with women racing a 6-kilometer
leg and men a 7.5-km leg in the following
order); and a luge team relay (a doubles
sled, a womens singles sled and a mens
singles sled. all three entrants from one
team slide one after another with the
clock stopping only after the third sled
has crossed the finish line).
I am not into the half-pipe stuff but
thats me.
I have some interest in the other
events, especially the luge and skating.
Unfortunately, if there is to be any judg-
ing, we might have a problem!
Perhaps next up for 2018 will be a
team alpine skiing event and slopestyle
competitions in snowboard and freestyle
skiing.
This one more recent caught
my eye as well.
The Amputee Coalitions Youth
Camp went down in Clarksville, Ohio,
July 24-26.
These are children (ages 10-17) who
have, as the moniker suggests, lost limbs
for various and sundry reasons con-
genital, cancer, meningitis and traumatic
accidents such as lawn mowers and boats
but remain involved in sports.
The camp features sessions in various
sports: archery, dance, pond and fishing,
Amp 1 Stand Up basketball, climbing
wall, rock climbing, ropes course and
zip lining, canoeing, swimming, soc-
cer (hosted by US superstar Landon
Donovan), creative arts and writing, act-
ing (taught by Bianca Kajlich) and even
just a talent program.
Kajlich, star of CBS Rules of
Engagement, has a brother, Andre, who
will also be a camp counselor and is a
bi-lateral amputee.
Check out the web site: http://www.
amputee-coalition.org/youth_camp.html
They also held one about the same
time in Knoxville, Tennessee.
Check out amputee-coalition.org or
call 888/267-5669.
Interesting tidbits from the Internet
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfes
Musings
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
By KRISTIE RIEKEN
The Associated Press
HOUSTON Homer
Baileys ornate orange cowboy
boots sat in his locker below
a pair of well-worn Wrangler
jeans and the Texas native
smiled as reporters approached
on Tuesday night.
Home sweet home, he
replied before anyone could ask
a question.
After being knocked around
in his previous start, Bailey
pitched eight solid innings to
lead the Cincinnati Reds to
a 5-1 win over the Houston
Astros at Minute Maid Park,
about 100 miles from his home-
town of La Grange.
Cincinnati scored five times
in the fifth, highlighted by
Edgar Renterias ninth career
grand slam, and has won four
out of five since it was swept
in a 4-game series against the
New York Mets.
Chris Heisey and Ramon
Hernandez sparked Cincinnatis
big inning with consecutive
doubles, making it 1-0. Wandy
Rodriguez (7-8) walked Bailey
and Drew Stubbs with one out
to set up Renterias homer,
which landed in the Crawford
Boxes in left field.
Bailey (6-5) allowed one run
and five hits to bounce back
from his rough outing in that
series against New York, when
he surrendered a career-high
nine earned runs and 12 hits in
four-plus innings.
Bailey also tossed seven
scoreless innings against the
Astros in his first career appear-
ance at Minute Maid in May.
Bailey said he left more
than 30 tickets for friends and
relatives but was most excited
to pitch in front of his grand-
mother.
(She) is 80-something years
old and its kind of hard for her
to travel ... so knowing that she
got to see me pitch in the major
leagues meant a lot to me,
he added. Now she saw that
back to back times Ive gotten
to throw well, it can just add
to her scrapbook of articles she
gets to keep.
Aroldis Chapman relieved
Bailey and pitched a perfect
ninth to extend his streak of hit-
less innings to 9 2/3.
The new-look Astros had
trouble stringing hits together
Tuesday after winning the first
game of the series 4-3 in 10
innings.
Jimmy Paredes reached
on a leadoff walk in the fifth
inning before a single by Carlos
Corporan sent him to third.
Paredes scored on a single by
Luis Durango that bounced off
third base and went into left
field to trim Cincinnatis lead
to 5-1.
Bailey limited the dam-
age by getting Jose Altuve to
ground into an inning-ending
double play.
Bailey didnt allow another
hit until Altuve singled with
one out in the eighth but retired
the next two Astros.
Rodriguez gave up four
hits and walked three in five
innings. He also struck out
three to become Houstons
franchise leader for strikeouts
by a lefty with 947, passing
Bob Kneppers 946.
Aneury Rodriguez, David
Carpenter and Enerio Del
Rosario combined for four
innings of 2-hit relief for the
Astros.
Phillies 5, Rockies 0
DENVER Kyle Kendrick tossed
eight sparkling innings, Ryan Howard
homered twice and the Philadelphia
Phillies beat the Colorado Rockies 5-0
on Tuesday night.
Hunter Pence doubled twice and
Shane Victorino and Raul Ibanez
each singled and scored a run for the
Phillies, who have won five straight.
Kendrick (6-5) yielded four hits,
struck out a career-high seven and
walked two in his longest outing in 11
starts this season.
The Phillies got off to a fast start
against Aaron Cook (2-6), who pitched
four innings before leaving with muscle
spasms in his neck.
Marlins 4, Mets 3
NEW YORK Rookie second
baseman Justin Turner committed
a crucial throwing error in the ninth
inning, allowing Florida to score two
runs and rally past the Mets.
Omar Infante hit a pair of solo
shots for Florida, giving him three hom-
ers this season, but star shortstop
Hanley Ramirez left the game in pain
after spraining his left shoulder while
diving for a ball in the outfield.
Jason Isringhausen (2-2) hit John
Buck with a pitch, loading the bases,
and pinch-hitter Bryan Petersen hit a
slow grounder to second base. Turner
charged the ball and Buck stopped in
the middle of the basepath, so Turner
tossed to first. But his throw went high
and wide past Lucas Duda, handing
Florida a 4-3 lead.
Steve Cishek (2-1) pitched two
scoreless innings for the win, helping
the Marlins (55-55) get back to .500 for
the first time since June 12.
Nationals 9, Braves 3
WASHINGTON Rick Ankiel kept
up his sudden power surge, hitting a
grand slam off Derek Lowe that sent
the Nationals over Atlanta for their
fourth straight win.
Renterias slam gives
Reds 5-1 win over Astros
See REDS, page 7 See WINNING RUN, page 7
The Associated Press
BOSTON Jarrod
Saltalamacchia looked perfect-
ly comfortable in his new role
ace pinch-runner.
The Boston catcher made
a headfirst dive across home
plate to score the winning run
on Jacoby Ellsburys single
in the ninth inning, giving the
Red Sox a 3-2 win over the
Cleveland Indians on a rainy
Tuesday night.
I just kept going and, like I
said, my speed alone just kind
of took over, Saltalamacchia
said with a straight face.
Saltalamacchia came in for
fellow catcher Jason Varitek,
who at 39 years old was not
going to be running the bases in
a tie game in the ninth inning if
the Red Sox had another option
on the bench.
Varitek had already done
his part by starting the rally
with a 1-out single, followed
by Josh Reddicks blooper to
right that put Saltalamacchia
in scoring position at second as
Ellsbury came to bat.
Ideally, the Red Sox would
have rather had the roles
reversed the speedy lead-
off hitter on second waiting
to be driven home by one of
Bostons burly catchers.
But Saltalamacchia, who
noted he has legged out two
triples this season, was off and
running once he saw Ellsburys
hit off of closer Vinnie Pestano
(1-1) drop in center field. He
chugged around third, then made
a diving slide that beat Eziquiel
Cabreras throw home.
Catcher Carlos Santana
caught the ball wide of the plate
and couldnt reach across in
time to beat Saltalamacchia.
Jonathan Papelbon (3-0) got
the win after shutting down the
Indians on just 10 pitches in the
ninth. Boston posted its sixth
walk-off win of the season.
Jason Kipnis and Lonnie
Chisenhall hit solo homers for
Clevelands runs in a game
delayed at the start by rain for
one hour, 35 minutes.
Indians starter David Huff
gave up one unearned run and
three hits in five innings and
tied his career high with six
strikeouts. Huff has allowed
just one earned run in three
starts this season.
I liked the way we battled
today against this ballclub,
Cleveland manager Manny
Acta said. A lot of credit goes
to David Huff, who pitched a
tremendous ballgame, despite
warming up twice because of
the rain situation.
Boston scored in the sec-
ond on a wild pitch that actu-
ally struck out Varitek. Huff
followed that by striking
out Darnell McDonald and
Ellsbury.
Huff left with a 2-1 lead
on Chisenhalls homer into the
right-field corner in the fourth.
Reliever Rafael Perez took
over for the Indians in the sixth
and the first batter he faced was
Kevin Youkilis, who tied it at
2-all with a towering solo shot
that hit one of the signs above
the Green Monster.
Youkilis was ejected after
his next at-bat, when he struck
out on a checked swing and
argued on his way back to the
dugout.
Kipnis, who homered in his
last at-bat Monday, drove the
first pitch he saw from Josh
Beckett into the Boston bullpen
in the first to put the Indians
up 1-0.
Tigers 6, Rangers 5
DETROIT Brennan Boesch hit a
solo home run off Mike Adams amid an
eighth-inning rain shower, sending the
Detroit Tigers to a 6-5 victory over the
Texas Rangers on Tuesday night.
Adams (0-1) was making his debut
for the Rangers after coming over
from San Diego just before the trade
deadline Sunday. He got the first out of
the eighth but as the rain began falling
harder, Boesch lined his 16th homer of
the season over the wall in right field.
Jose Valverde pitched the ninth
for Detroit, earning his 29th save in
29 chances. Alex Avila homered and
drove in three runs for the Tigers.
Joaquin Benoit (3-3) blew a 5-2
lead in the top of the eighth, allowing a
solo homer to Nelson Cruz and a tying
2-run shot by Mike Napoli.
Blue Jays 3, Rays 1
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. Ricky
Romero and Jon Rauch combined on
a 3-hitter, Jose Bautista hit his 32nd
homer and Toronto finally beat David
Price.
Romero (9-9), who didnt allow a
hit until Desmond Jennings started the
sixth with a homer, struck out seven
and walked four over eight innings.
Rauch allowed 2-out singles in the
ninth to Casey Kotchman and B.J.
Upton before retiring Matt Joyce on
a fly to left on a 3-0 pitch for his 10th
save.
Toronto, which is three games over
Saltalamacchia dives home for winning run in 9th
1
U
N
E
V
E
N
Concrete leveling of floors, sidewalks, patios,
steps, driveways, pool decks, etc.
Call Dave at 419-236-1496
419-692-5143 home/office/fax
FREE ESTIMATES
C
O
N
C
R
E
T
E
?
VONDERWELL CONTRACTING, INC.
Dont tear it up!
Raise it up & save money!
419-339-0110
GENERAL REPAIR - SPECIAL BUILT PRODUCTS
TRUCKS, TRAILERS
FARM MACHINERY
RAILINGS & METAL
GATES
CARBON STEEL
STAINLESS STEEL
ALUMINUM
Larry McClure
5745 Redd Rd.
Delphos
Fabrication & Welding In
c.
Quality
THE PROFESSIONALS
WINDOWS ROOFING SIDING FENCING
Garage Doors & Operators Entrance & Storm Doors
Wood Steel Painting Available Insulation Aluminum Railing
Awnings Rubber Roofing Decks Fence
1034 Westwood Dr.
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
Phone: (419) 238-9795
Fax: (419) 238-9893
Toll Free: (800) 216-0041
YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE
419-238-9795
S
i
n
c
e

1
9
6
0
The Quality Door Place
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Herald 7
www.delphosherald.com
The Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 70 39 .642
Atlanta 63 48 .568 8
Florida 55 55 .500 15 1/2
New York 55 55 .500 15 1/2
Washington 53 56 .486 17
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 61 50 .550
St. Louis 58 52 .527 2 1/2
Pittsburgh 54 54 .500 5 1/2
Cincinnati 54 56 .491 6 1/2
Chicago 45 65 .409 15 1/2
Houston 36 74 .327 24 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 61 49 .555
San Francisco 61 49 .555
Colorado 51 59 .464 10
Los Angeles 50 59 .459 10 1/2
San Diego 47 64 .423 14 1/2

Tuesdays Results
Washington 9, Atlanta 3
Chicago Cubs 11, Pittsburgh 6
Florida 4, N.Y. Mets 3
Cincinnati 5, Houston 1
St. Louis 8, Milwaukee 7, 11 innings
Philadelphia 5, Colorado 0
L.A. Dodgers 1, San Diego 0
Arizona 6, San Francisco 1
Todays Games
Atlanta (Beachy 4-2) at Washington (Wang
0-1), 1:05 p.m.
St. Louis (E.Jackson 1-0) at Milwaukee (Wolf
7-8), 2:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Halladay 13-4) at Colorado
(Hammel 6-10), 3:10 p.m.
Arizona (Marquis 8-5) at San Francisco
(Vogelsong 8-1), 3:45 p.m.
Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-8) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 8-6), 7:05 p.m.
Florida (Hensley 1-3) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 10-3),
7:10 p.m.
Cincinnati (Willis 0-1) at Houston (Lyles 0-6),
8:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 7-10) at San Diego (Stauffer
6-8), 10:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 2-3) at Pittsburgh (Ja.
McDonald 7-5), 7:05 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 9-7) at Florida (Ani.Sanchez
6-4), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 1-0) at Colorado (Rogers
4-1), 8:40 p.m.
Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 10-7) at San Francisco
(Bumgarner 6-10), 10:15 p.m.
-----
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 67 41 .620
New York 66 42 .611 1
Tampa Bay 56 52 .519 11
Toronto 56 53 .514 11 1/2
Baltimore 43 63 .406 23
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 58 51 .532
Cleveland 54 53 .505 3
Chicago 52 56 .481 5 1/2
Minnesota 50 59 .459 8
Kansas City 46 63 .422 12
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 61 49 .555
Los Angeles 60 50 .545 1
Oakland 49 61 .445 12
Seattle 47 62 .431 13 1/2

Tuesdays Results
Detroit 6, Texas 5
Boston 3, Cleveland 2
Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 1
Baltimore 8, Kansas City 2
N.Y. Yankees 6, Chicago White Sox 0, 7
innings
L.A. Angels 5, Minnesota 1
Seattle 4, Oakland 2
Todays Games
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-8) at Seattle (Furbush
1-3), 3:40 p.m.
Texas (M.Harrison 9-7) at Detroit (Fister 3-12),
7:05 p.m.
Cleveland (C.Carrasco 8-9) at Boston
(Wakefield 6-4), 7:10 p.m.
Toronto (C.Villanueva 6-2) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 9-9), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Guthrie 5-14) at Kansas City
(Hochevar 7-8), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 8-9) at Chicago
White Sox (Floyd 9-9), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (S.Baker 8-6) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro
5-5), 10:05 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Toronto (Cecil 4-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis
8-7), 12:10 p.m.
Texas (Ogando 10-5) at Detroit (Penny 7-8),
1:05 p.m.
Cleveland (Masterson 8-7) at Boston (Bedard
4-7), 7:10 p.m.
Baltimore (Britton 6-8) at Kansas City (Francis
4-11), 8:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 9-4) at Chicago White Sox
(Humber 8-7), 8:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 7-8) at L.A. Angels
(Chatwood 6-7), 10:05 p.m.
MLB
The Associated Press
NATIONAL LEAGUE
BATTINGJosReyes, New York,
.339; Braun, Milwaukee, .322; Kemp,
Los Angeles, .321; Votto, Cincinnati,
.320; DanMurphy, New York, .319;
Morse, Washington, .316; Holliday, St.
Louis, .315.
RUNSJosReyes, New York,
79; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 74; RWeeks,
Milwaukee, 71; JUpton, Arizona,
70; Braun, Milwaukee, 69; Votto,
Cincinnati, 69; Pujols, St. Louis, 68;
CYoung, Arizona, 68.
RBIKemp, Los Angeles, 84;
Howard, Philadelphia, 83; Fielder,
Milwaukee, 78; Berkman, St. Louis,
73; Braun, Milwaukee, 73; Tulowitzki,
Colorado, 73; Votto, Cincinnati, 69.
HITSJosReyes, New York, 142;
SCastro, Chicago, 139; Bourn, Atlanta,
133; Votto, Cincinnati, 130; Pence,
Philadelphia, 128; Kemp, Los Angeles,
127; JUpton, Arizona, 126.
DOUBLESBeltran, San Fran.,
30; JUpton, Arizona, 30; Pence,
Philadelphia, 29; DanMurphy, New
York, 28; Bourn, Atlanta, 27; SCastro,
Chicago, 27; Headley, San Diego,
27; CaLee, Houston, 27; Tulowitzki,
Colorado, 27; CYoung, Arizona, 27.
TRIPLESJosReyes, New York,
16; Victorino, Philadelphia, 12; Fowler,
Colorado, 9; SCastro, Chicago, 8;
Bourn, Atlanta, 7; SSmith, Colorado, 7.
HOME RUNSBerkman,
St. Louis, 28; Kemp, Los Angeles,
26; Stanton, Florida, 25; Fielder,
Milwaukee, 24; Pujols, St. Louis, 24;
Howard, Philadelphia, 23; Uggla,
Atlanta, 22; JUpton, Arizona, 22.
STOLEN BASESBourn, Atlanta,
39; JosReyes, New York, 32; Kemp,
Los Angeles, 28; Stubbs, Cincinnati,
27; Maybin, San Diego, 26; Bonifacio,
Florida, 25; Rollins, Philadelphia, 24.
PITCHINGIKennedy, Arizona,
13-3; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 13-4;
Halladay, Philadelphia, 13-4; Jurrjens,
Atlanta, 12-4; Hamels, Philadelphia,
12-6; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 12-7;
Correia, Pittsburgh, 12-9.
S T RI K E OUT S K e r s h a w,
Los Angeles, 177; Lincecum, San
Francisco, 160; ClLee, Philadelphia,
159; Halladay, Philadelphia,
152; Hamels, Philadelphia, 145;
AniSanchez, Florida, 143.
SAVESBrWilson, San Francisco,
33; Axford, Milwaukee, 31; Kimbrel,
Atlanta, 31; LNunez, Florida, 31; HBell,
San Diego, 30; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh,
30; Street, Colorado, 28.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
B A T T I N G A d G o n z a l e z ,
Boston, .356; MiYoung, Texas, .335;
Kotchman, Tampa Bay, .326; Bautista,
Toronto, .324; VMartinez, Detroit, .320;
Ellsbury, Boston, .318.
RUNSGranderson, New York,
96; Ellsbury, Boston, 81; Bautista,
Toronto, 79; AdGonzalez, Boston,
76; MiCabrera, Detroit, 73; Pedroia,
Boston, 73; Kinsler, Texas, 72.
RBIAdGonzalez, Boston, 90;
Teixeira, New York, 82; Granderson,
New York, 79; Beltre, Texas, 76;
Konerko, Chicago, 76; Youkilis,
Boston, 76; MiYoung, Texas, 73.
HITSAdGonzalez, Boston,
155; MiYoung, Texas, 144; Ellsbury,
Boston, 141; MeCabrera, Kansas
City, 139; Pedroia, Boston, 132;
AGordon, Kansas City, 128; ACabrera,
Cleveland, 125.
DOUBLESZobrist, Tampa Bay,
34; AdGonzalez, Boston, 33; MiYoung,
Texas, 33; AGordon, Kansas City, 31;
Ellsbury, Boston, 30; Beltre, Texas,
29; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 29;
Francoeur, Kansas City, 29.
TRIPLESGranderson, New
York, 8; Bourjos, Los Angeles, 7;
AJackson, Detroit, 7; RDavis, Toronto,
6; Gardner, New York, 6; 6 tied at 5.
HOME RUNSBautista, Toronto,
32; Teixeira, New York, 31; Granderson,
New York, 28; Konerko, Chicago,
25; NCruz, Texas, 24; MarReynolds,
Baltimore, 24; MiCabrera, Detroit, 22.
STOLEN BASESCrisp, Oakland,
33; RDavis, Toronto, 33; Gardner,
New York, 32; Ellsbury, Boston, 31;
Andrus, Texas, 30; ISuzuki, Seattle,
28; Aybar, Los Angeles, 23; BUpton,
Tampa Bay, 23.
PITCHINGSabathia, New York,
16-5; Verlander, Detroit, 15-5; Weaver,
Los Angeles, 14-5; Lester, Boston,
11-4; Tomlin, Cleveland, 11-5; Haren,
Los Angeles, 11-6; Porcello, Detroit,
11-6; Scherzer, Detroit, 11-6.
STRI KEOUTSVe r l a n d e r ,
Detroit, 178; Sabathia, New York, 162;
FHernandez, Seattle, 162; Shields,
Tampa Bay, 153; Price, Tampa Bay,
147; Weaver, Los Angeles, 142.
SAVESValverde, Detroit, 29;
MaRivera, New York, 28; League,
Seattle, 25; Walden, Los Angeles,
24; Papelbon, Boston, 24; CPerez,
Cleveland, 22; SSantos, Chicago, 22.
MLB LEADERS
The Associated Press
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Indiana 14 6 .700
Connecticut 11 6 .647 1 1/2
New York 11 8 .579 2 1/2
Chicago 9 11 .450 5
Atlanta 8 11 .421 5 1/2
Washington 3 14 .176 9 1/2
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 14 4 .778
San Antonio 11 7 .611 3
Phoenix 11 8 .579 3 1/2
Seattle 11 8 .579 3 1/2
Los Angeles 7 11 .389 7
Tulsa 1 17 .056 13

Tuesdays Results
New York 85, Atlanta 75
Minnesota 90, Phoenix 73
Seattle 78, San Antonio 64
Todays Game
Connecticut at Los Angeles, 3 p.m.
Thursdays Games
Chicago at New York, 12 p.m.
San Antonio at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
The Associated Press
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Columbus 9 6 7 34 24 20
Philadelphia 8 5 7 31 25 18
New York 6 5 12 30 37 30
Spor. Kansas City 6 6 9 27 29 28
Houston 6 7 9 27 27 27
D.C. 6 6 8 26 26 30
New England 4 9 9 21 20 30
Toronto FC 3 11 10 19 21 43
Chicago 2 6 12 18 20 25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles 12 2 9 45 32 16
FC Dallas 12 5 6 42 30 21
Seattle 10 5 8 38 33 26
Colorado 8 6 10 34 33 31
Real Salt Lake 9 4 6 33 27 14
Chivas USA 6 8 8 26 27 24
San Jose 5 8 9 24 24 29
Portland 6 10 4 22 24 34
Vancouver 2 11 9 15 21 34
NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie.

Todays Games
Real Salt Lake at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30
p.m.
Philadelphia at Chicago, 9 p.m.
Los Angeles at Portland, 10:30 p.m.
----
Womens Professional Soccer
W L T Pts GF GA
x-Philadelphia 10 3 3 33 28 15
x-Wes. New York 9 2 3 30 32 16
Sky Blue FC 5 6 4 19 21 22
magicJack 6 6 2 19 21 24
Boston 4 7 4 16 16 20
Atlanta 1 11 4 7 7 28
NOTE: Three points for win, one point for tie.
x- clinched playoff berth

Todays Games
Sky Blue FC at magicJack, 7 p.m.
Boston at Western New York, 7:30 p.m.
------
European Champions League
Second Leg
Tuesdays Results
League Route
Panathinaikos (Greece) 3, Odense (Denmark)
4, Odense advances on 5-4 aggregate
Champions Route
BATE Borisov (Belarus) 3, Ekranas (Lithuania)
1, Borisov advances on 3-1 aggregate
Shamrock Rovers (Ireland) 0, Copenhagen
(Denmark) 2, Copenhagen advances on 3-0
aggregate
Todays Games
League Route
Rubin Kazan (Russia) vs. Dynamo Kiev
(Ukraine), Noon
Trabzonspor (Turkey) vs. Benfica (Portugal),
1:45 p.m.
Vaslui (Romania) vs. Twente (Netherlands),
1:45 p.m.
Zurich (Switzerland) vs. Standard Liege
(Belgium), 2:15 p.m.
Champions Route
Malmo (Sweden) vs. Glasgow Rangers
(Scotland), 1 p.m.
Slovan Bratislava (Slovakia) vs. APOEL
(Cyprus), 2:15 p.m.
Viktoria Plzen (Czech Republic) vs. Rosenborg
(Norway), 2:15 p.m.
Sturm Graz (Austria) vs. Zestafoni (Georgia),
2:30 p.m.
Wisla Krakow (Poland) vs. Litex Lovech
(Bulgaria), 2:30 p.m.
Dinamo Zagreb (Croatia) vs. HJK Helsinki
(Finland), 2:45 p.m.
Maribor (Slovenia) vs. Maccabi Haifa (Israel),
2:45 p.m.
Partizan Belgrade (Serbia) vs. Genk (Belgium),
2:45 p.m.
WNBA
SOCCER GAMES
By JOE KAY
The Associated Press
GEORGETOWN, Ky.
Jordan Palmer walks to mid-
field and plays catch for a few
minutes while the Cincinnati
Bengals warm up for their lat-
est practice. As soon as the
horn sounds, it all changes.
Palmer becomes an
unwilling spectator.
The quarterback is
competing for a job
but cant even take a
snap because of the
NFLs labor deal.
Free agents can sign with
teams but arent allowed to
practice with them until
Thursday, when the new agree-
ment is completed. Until then,
theyre in a Twilight Zone of
their own technically on the
team but not fully part of it.
Its very frustrating,
Palmer said, wearing shorts
and a T-shirt. The only other
time Ive felt this is when
youre injured. Its actual-
ly worse than when youre
injured because youre just
watching.
More than a dozen veteran
Bengals players were stand-
ing around during practices
this week, biding time until
they can put on a jersey and
pads. Some of them were new-
comers cornerback Nate
Clements could watch Tuesday
nights practice after signing
his deal as a free agent from
San Francisco.
The Bengals signed
Clements after Johnathan
Joseph who formed one of
the NFLs steadiest cornerback
tandems with Leon Hall left
as a free agent. Clements has a
lot of catching up to do with
the first preseason game only a
week away.
I was actually watching a
little bit of film before
I came in here, he
said. Last year on
the outside looking
in, you could see they
had a real, real good
tandem in Joseph and
Hall. With Joseph moving on,
I felt I could come in and play
a major role in the defense.
Not on Tuesday. He was
relegated to watching.
The ban on practice applies
not only to free agents signed
from other teams but on teams
own free agents as well. Palmer
was one of the Bengals four
restricted free agents who
signed contracts when they
showed up but arent allowed
to practice.
Palmer is competing with
Bruce Gradkowski a free
agent whos also part of the
stand-around group for a
job. Palmer ran the offense
during informal team work-
outs over the summer, helping
players learn coordinator Jay
Grudens new system.
While the rest of the offense
shows what it learned from
Palmer, the quarterback is con-
fined to giving tips.
Its a good opportunity to
teach some of these younger
guys, Palmer said. Its new
to everybody. So you kind of
try to see it from a different
angle, try to find positives.
Gradkowski has been
frustrated as well. When the
Bengals 2-hour practice ended
Tuesday night, he and sev-
eral other players who werent
eligible to work out held an
impromptu practice of their
own for half an hour.
Its definitely tough
the lockout was going on and
then you get back and you
cant practice, Gradkowski
said. Weve been throwing
on another field, another place
with the other guys who cant
practice yet, calling plays and
trying to get ready.
Another strange sight: only
two quarterbacks available to
run drills in their bright orange
jerseys. Rookie Andy Dalton
and second-year reserve Dan
LeFevour had to take all the
snaps in the first four practices.
Normally, teams have more
quarterbacks to lessen the load
on their throwing arms.
The leagues unprecedent-
ed training camp players
coming and going, newcomers
trying to learn everything in a
short period, veterans standing
around has been a challenge
for coaching staffs that have
to change their plans daily to
keep up.
Obviously, we have new
coaches on offense and a new
offensive attack and all of
the other changes that have
happened in the big picture,
coach Marvin Lewis said. So
our evenings and late nights
have been filled with meetings
and going through the practice
plans and the scripting to make
sure it is everything we want.
Things will settle down a
bit in a couple of days. The
Bengals held a practice Tuesday
night, then had today off. The
whole roster can participate in
Thursdays practice.
The consolation is that
every team is going through
the same thing, though players
like Palmer take little comfort
from it.
Im trying to fast-forward
to Thursday, personally,
Palmer added.
Notes: The Bengals signed G
Max Jean-Gillis from Philadelphia to a
1-year deal, the second time theyve
tried to add depth to their line in the
past few days. Jean-Gillis played for
Philadelphia the past four seasons.
He was a fourth-round draft pick
and started 26 games in his career,
including 10 last season. Jean-Gillis
became Cincinnatis backup plan on
the offensive line when guard Deuce
Lutui agreed to a 2-year deal, then
showed up overweight and failed his
physical. Lutui ended up staying with
Arizona on a 1-year deal.
The Bengals are looking for a
left guard. Theyre giving Jean-Gillis
a chance to win a job and get a lon-
ger deal. The Bengals have Bobbie
Williams at right guard. Jean-Gillis is
open to moving to the left side. ... A
fan wore a Carson Palmer jersey with
the name taped over on the back and
QUITTER written in its place. ... The
Bengals waived LB Keith Darbut and
long snapper Neal Dahlman, both
college free agents.
By TOM WITHERS
The Associated Press
BEREA In just their sec-
ond practice in full pads, the
Cleveland Browns
had a valuable play-
er go down without
being touched.
And hes not com-
ing back any time
soon.
Punter Reggie
Hodges, one of the AFCs best
last season, tore his Achilles
tendon Tuesday and will be out
for the season. Team president
Mike Holmgren announced he
would have surgery.
After being helped to his
feet, Hodges was carted off
the field. He covered his face
with a white towel to hide his
disappointment.
Its terrible, long snap-
per Ryan Pontbriand said fol-
lowing the Browns fourth
practice of training camp. I
couldnt even concentrate the
rest of practice after it hap-
pened. Hopefully, he can come
back from this.
Hodges was going through
a routine drill when he got
hurt. He caught a snap in the
back of the end zone, took one
step forward and crumpled to
the turf, curling up in a ball.
He was attended to for sev-
eral minutes by trainers before
being carted off a sight
that recalled center LeCharles
Bentleys career-
ending knee injury
on the first play of
full-contact prac-
tice in 2007.
Now a radio talk
show host, Bentley
visited Clevelands
camp.
First-year Browns coach Pat
Shurmur was standing within a
few feet of Hodges when the
injury took place.
He just reached up and the
snap was about head high and
he did something hes done a
million times, Shurmur said.
He had a nice year last year.
Hodges, who also holds on
field-goal attempts, had an out-
standing 2010. He averaged
43.9 yards on 78 punts for a
season that began with him
beating out former Browns
punter Dave Zastudil in train-
ing camp. Hodges had 29 punts
inside the 20-yard line and fin-
ished third in the league with
15 punts inside the 10. Over
his last 11 games, Hodges had
21 punts inside the 10 and no
touchbacks.
Hodges also had one of
the Browns most memorable
plays, when he ran 68 yards
up the middle on a faked punt
in an upset of the defending
Super Bowl champion New
Orleans Saints.
In November, the Browns
signed Hodges, who punted
for five teams in five years, to
a 2-year contract extension.
Shurmur spoke with Hodges
after practice.
He was noticeably disap-
pointed, Shurmur recalled.
Like I told him, there are
times when you get injured.
Part of being a pro is fighting
back from injury and getting
yourself in position where you
can play once again and I think
hes the kind of guy who can
get that done.
The Browns have no other
punters in camp and will now
have to find one. Shurmur
announced the team will hold
tryouts today.
Kicker Phil Dawson could
punt in an emergency but cant
practice until Thursday at the
earliest after signing his fran-
chise tag late last week. Under
the NFLs new collective bar-
gaining rules, players who sign
contracts are not permitted to
practice with the team until
Thursday.
Shurmur would not reveal
the names of any possible can-
didates but Zastudil could be
an option. He was forced to
shut down last year because
of a bad knee. Last week, the
veteran had a tryout with the
Houston Texans. His agent,
Neil Cornrich, did not immedi-
ately return a message seeking
comment.
Notes: QB Colt McCoy looked
sharp during morning workout but
was picked off twice, once by rookie
CB Buster Skrine, who ran it back for
a TD in 11-on-11 drills. ... RB Montario
Hardesty was held out of full-pad
practice for the second straight day.
Shurmur maintains it is all precaution-
ary as the second-year player comes
back from knee injuries. ... Dropped
passes were in abundance, most
notably by rookie WR Greg Little, who
couldnt hang on to two of McCoys
tosses. ... The Browns signed 1st-
round pick Phil Taylor, the extra-large
rookie defensive tackle from Baylor, to
end a 4-day holdout that was begin-
ning to become worrisome. Terms of
the deal were not immediately known.
Taylor, the No. 21 overall pick in
this years NFL draft, will immediately
report to the Browns, who have plenty
of work to do following a 5-11 sea-
son. The 6-3, 335-pounder missed
the teams first four practices of train-
ing camp. Earlier Tuesday, Shurmur
said Taylors absence would have
little impact on his playing time. Hell
join the first-team defense right away.
Taylor will quickly be brought up to
speed by Shurmur and defensive
coordinator Dick Jauron.
Bengals players in CBA
limbo, cant practice
Browns lose punter Reggie Hodges for season
(Continued from Page 6)
.500 (56-53) for the first time since
April 8, also got a homer from Yunel
Escobar.
Price (9-10), an AL All-Star who
entered with eight wins and a no-
decision in nine career starts against
Toronto, gave up three runs and five
hits in 6 2/3 inning.
Orioles 8, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Mark
Reynolds homered, doubled and drove
in five runs as Baltimore beat the
Royals in a game in which the temper-
ature at first pitch was 107 degrees.
Reynolds hit his 24th home run
in the ninth with Nick Markakis and
Vladimir Guerrero aboard to break
open a 5-2 game. Chris Davis also
homered in the ninth off Royals rookie
left-hander Everett Teaford, who was
just recalled from Triple-A Omaha.
Reynolds, who leads the Orioles
with 60 RBIs, stroked a 2-out double
in the third, scoring J.J. Hardy, who
snapped an 0-for-18 slide with a sin-
gle, and Markakis, who had walked.
Reynolds five RBIs matched a career
high, done three times previously.
Alfredo Simon (3-4) curbed the
Royals on four hits for seven innings to
pick up the victory.
Yankees 6, White Sox 0, 6 1/2
innings
CHICAGO Mark Teixeira set a
major-league record by homering from
both sides of the plate for the 12th time
and Phil Hughes pitched six innings
to send New York to its fifth straight
victory.
Teixeira broke a tie with Eddie
Murray and Chili Davis, who each
homered 11 times from both sides in
the same game.
Hughes (2-3), who spent nearly
two months on the disabled list this
season, allowed only three hits against
the punchless White Sox. Chicago has
lost four straight.
John Danks (4-9), who spent time
on the DL with an oblique strain, was
4-0 in his previous six starts and hadnt
lost since May 29. He gave up four
runs and nine hits in six innings.
Angels 5, Twins 1
ANAHEIM, Calif. Ervin Santana
followed up his no-hitter with an 8-hit-
ter and the Angels got home runs from
Torii Hunter and rookie Mark Trumbo in
a victory over Minnesota.
Santanas bid to duplicate Johnny
Vander Meers feat of back-to-back
no-hitters in 1938 with the Cincinnati
Reds ended in the second inning when
Jason Kubel lined a leadoff single to
right field on Santanas 20th pitch.
Santana (7-8) struck out six and
walked two in his 193rd career start.
Brian Duensing (8-9) gave up five
runs and eight hits in six innings.
Mariners 4, Athletics 2
SEATTLE Casper Wells hit a
2-run homer in his third game with
Seattle and Brendan Ryan sparked the
Mariners offense with some nifty bas-
erunning in a win over Oakland.
Wells, acquired Saturday in a
4-player trade with Detroit, connected
on a full-count pitch from Rich Harden
(2-2) in the sixth inning, a drive to left.
Seattle starter Felix Hernandez
(10-9) allowed two runs and five hits,
struck out nine and walked three in 6
1/3 innings.
(Continued from Page 6)
The Nationals have their longest
winning streak since Davey Johnson
became manager on June 27. Atlanta
has lost three straight.
Ankiel connected for his sixth
home run of the season after homer-
ing twice Monday night. Ankiels shot
highlighted a 5-run burst in the fourth
inning against Lowe (6-10) that put
Washington ahead 6-3.
John Lannan (8-7) struck out a
season-high eight and improved to 3-0
against Atlanta this year.
Cubs 11, Pirates 6
PITTSBURGH Alfonso Soriano
hit two of the Cubs season-high six
home runs and they had 21 hits in a
victory over the fading Pirates.
Soriano hit solo shots in the third
inning off Kevin Correia (12-9) and
the fourth off Anthony Watson. Aramis
Ramirez hit a 3-run homer, Geovany
Soto had a 2-run blast and Marlon
Byrd and Tyler Colvin also connect-
ed, sending the Pirates to their fifth
straight loss and 10th in 13 games.
Garrett Jones hit two home runs
and had four RBIs. Brandon Wood
also connected for the Pirates.
Randy Wells (3-4) went six innings,
allowing two runs and five hits while
walking one and striking out seven.
Cardinals 8, Brewers 7, 11 inn.
MILWAUKEE Lance Berkman
singled in Matt Holliday with two out in
the 11th inning and St. Louis beat the
Brewers in a matchup of NL Central
contenders that turned testy as the
night wore on.
Sluggers Albert Pujols of the
Cardinals and Ryan Braun each were
hit by a pitch in the seventh; Cardinals
catcher Yadier Molina became so
incensed after he was ejected in the
10th that plate umpire Rob Drake had
to wipe his face during the argument.
Holliday sparked the Cards win-
ning rally by beating a grounder to
shortstop with two outs. Holliday then
swiped second and scored when
Berkman hit a shallow flare to left
against Marco Estrada (2-7).
Dodgers 1, Padres 0
SAN DIEGO Hiroki Kuroda
pitched 4-hit ball for seven innings
and Matt Kemp had two hits and an
RBI for Los Angeles.
Kuroda (7-13) snapped a 4-game
losing streak.
Mat Latos (5-11) went seven solid
innings while yielding one run but
was pulled for a pinch hitter in the
seventh.
Diamondbacks 6, Giants 1
SAN FRANCISCO Paul
Goldschmidt hit his first career homer,
a 2-run shot off Tim Lincecum that
helped Arizona move into a tie for first
place in the NL West with the Giants.
Justin Upton added a 2-run home
run as the Diamondbacks won their
fourth straight to grab a piece of the
division lead for the first time since
June 24. Ryan Roberts had two hits
and drove in a run.
Daniel Hudson (11-7) outdueled
Lincecum, 2-time Cy Young Award
winner. He allowed one run on six hits
over eight innings.
Lincecum (9-9) lasted seven
innings, giving up two runs on three
hits, all in the fifth. He walked three
and struck out eight.
Reds
Winning run
2
Your Child can
Thrive
An online public school powered by K
12
can
unlock your childs academic potential.
Tuition free
Individualized Learning Plans
State-licensed teachers
This fall, choose a school that fts your child.
Enrollments are now being accepted.
VISIT: K12.com/OH7
EASYBATH 1-866-425-5591
NEW WALK-IN
TUB OR SHOWER
LOCAL COMPANY
ONE DAY INSTALL
ON SALE NOW!
CALL FOR PRICES
TROUBLE BATHING?
CUSTOMER SNAPS AT CLERK
BEXAR COUNTY Finding that the grocery store was out of
THERA-GESIC

Pain Cream, Tom W. snapped (like a terrier) at the drug


department clerk. After promises to have it back in stock the next day, Tom W.
regained his composure and apologized for the incident. When asked
to explain his dog-like behavior, he painlessly replied,
None of your dang business!
THERA-GESIC

Go Painlessly.
T
H
G
-
1
1
9
0
4
FREE
basic computer training for adults
Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226)
for local class information
Feel comfortable using a computer and
learn how to browse the Internet
Classes are FREE and forming
NOW at your local library or
community college.
Apply: schneiderjobs.com/newjobs
Call: 1-800-44-PRIDE
EOE M/F/D/V
NOT GETTING HOME ENOUGH?
Schneider driving careers in your area
get you home weekly (or more)!
From multiple Dedicated accounts providing predictable
schedules and weekly home time to Intermodal positions
offering weekly home time to Van positions for Regional,
Teams and OTR you choose the job that best meets your
needs.
WEBB
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
HOME AUTO BUSINESS LIFE HEALTH
1-800-727-1113
212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015
8 The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
BUSINESS
www.delphosherald.com
By DEE-ANN DURBIN
and TOM KRISHER
The Associated Press
DETROIT Auto sales
rose only slightly in July as
skittish consumers pulled
back on car buying and threat-
ened to derail the industrys
fragile recovery.
With the economy weak,
popular cars in short supply
and dealers offering very few
discounts, carmakers endured
a third straight month of dis-
appointing sales. Just over 1
million new cars and trucks
were sold in the month, up 1
percent from last July and flat
with June.
Sales started strong this
year but have slowed as the
economy faltered and Japans
earthquake left Toyota and
Honda dealers short of popu-
lar models. Unemployment
rose to 9.2 percent earlier this
summer, the highest level this
year, and consumer confi-
dence is shaky.
Were still not back on the
track of recovery yet, said Jeff
Schuster, executive director of
global forecasting at J.D. Power
and Associates. Theres defi-
nitely some weakness kind of
looming out there.
Adding to buyers worries
in July was the government
debate over the debt ceiling.
Uncertainty, in our busi-
ness, is always bad for con-
sumers, GM Vice President
of Sales Don Johnson said.
Both Ford and GM have
scaled back their annual fore-
cast for the year, saying U.S.
sales are likely to be closer to
13 million instead of the 13.5
million they had hoped for.
Consul t i ng fi rm
AlixPartners estimates that
unemployment and under-
employment could cost the
auto industry up to 1.5 mil-
lion in lost sales this year, and
believes sales will fall short 13
million. But John Hoffecker,
head of the automotive prac-
tice at the firm, says thats
still a healthy recovery from
2010, when sales totaled 11.6
million.
He said automakers need
to accept that the recovery
could take longer than they
anticipated and shouldnt
panic and resort to discounts
to sell more cars.
The month wasnt a total
loss. Sales of small cars
such as the Kia Optima and
Chevrolet Cruze rose sharply,
as did sales of new, more
fuel-efficient SUVs like the
Ford Explorer. But truck sales
were down, hurt by continu-
ing weakness in construction.
Detroits automakers fared
well, thanks to their lineups of
new, fuel-efficient cars.
Sales rose 8 percent at
General Motors Co., led by
the compact Cruze, which
gets 30 mpg. Ford Motor
Co.s sales rose 6 percent,
thanks to small cars like the
Fiesta, which saw sales rise
58 percent. Chrysler Group
said its sales rose 20 percent
over last July, helped by new
products like the Jeep Grand
Cherokee, which saw sales
jump 76 percent.
July brought mixed news
from Japanese carmakers.
Production is recovering
from the March earthquake
and dealers have more cars to
sell than in the previous two
months. Toyotas Camry was
once again the best-selling car
in the U.S., a title it lost in
May and June because dealers
had fewer cars to sell.
But Toyotas sales were
still down 23 percent, and
the company said North
American production isnt
expected to be back to nor-
mal until September. Honda
Motor Co.s sales fell 28
percent. Honda said it will
be back to full production in
North America this month.
The conventional wisdom
has been that once supplies of
Japanese cars are back to nor-
mal this fall, sales will rise.
Also, sales could get a lift
from people who are driving
older cars and need to replace
them.
But some, like Hoffecker,
say this sales pace may be as
good as it gets in a sluggish
economy, unless automakers
resort to big discounts to arti-
ficially boost sales.
So far, at least, compa-
nies arent offering the usual
summertime deals to clear
out older models. Companies
spent an average of $2,418 per
vehicle on incentives in July,
down 15 percent from last
July, according to car pricing
site TrueCar.com. That could
change when Japanese sup-
plies are replenished this fall.
Other automakers report-
ing Tuesday:
Nissan Motor Co. said
its July sales were up 3 per-
cent, led by the Altima sedan.
Hyundai Motor Co.s
July sales rose 10 percent, led
by the new Accent subcom-
pact, which was up 75 percent.
Kia Motors said its July
sales jumped 28.5 percent
thanks to strong sales of the
new Optima sedan.
US auto industry uneasy
after weak July sales
Were still not
back on the track
of recovery yet.
Theres definitely
some weakness
kind of loom-
ing out there.
Jeff Schuster,
executive director,
global forecasting
J.D. Power and Assoc.
By KELLY OLSEN
The Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea
Asian stocks fell sharply
today as relief the U.S. avert-
ed a debt default gave way
to increasing pessimism over
prospects for the worlds big-
gest economy.
Oil extended losses, trad-
ing near $93 a barrel amid
expectations slower U.S.
economic growth will crimp
demand for crude.
Japans Nikkei 225 index
slid 2.1 percent to 9,642.86
and Hong Kongs Hang
Seng shed 1.9 percent to
21,995.75.
South Koreas bench-
mark Kospi index tumbled
2.7 percent to 2,064.35.
Stock markets in Australia,
Taiwan, India, Singapore,
the Philippines and Indonesia
also dropped.
There seems to be a lot
of fear in the market, a lot of
panic, said Jackson Wong,
vice president at Tanrich
Securities in Hong Kong, cit-
ing worries that the terms of
a deal signed by President
Barack Obama on Tuesday
to avert a U.S. default may
worsen an already slowing
economy.
Chinas Shanghai
Composite Index, barely
bucked the trend, gaining 0.1
percent to 2,681.68.
The declines in Asia fol-
lowed a sharp drop on Wall
Street on Tuesday on a series
of weak economic reports and
poor earnings from several
big companies.
The Dow Jones industrial
average fell 265.87 points,
or 2.2 percent, to 11,866.62
for its eight straight decline.
Thats the longest streak since
October 2008.
The Standard & Poors
500 index, meanwhile, lost
32.89 points, or 2.6 percent,
to 1,254.05. That was its sev-
enth consecutive drop and the
longest since the height of
the financial crisis in October
2008.
European stock mar-
kets also fell Tuesday, with
Germanys DAX falling 2.3
percent.
Hurting investor sentiment
were reports showing that
U.S. consumers cut spend-
ing in June for the first time
in nearly two years, while
incomes rose by the small-
est amount since September.
That news followed a weak
manufacturing survey the day
before.
Pessimism about the econ-
omy outweighed relief that
the U.S. averted a potentially
debilitating debt default after
Obama signed a compromise
bill Tuesday to raise the coun-
trys $14.3 trillion borrowing
limit.
The signing, which was the
culmination of weeks of often
acrimonious debate and polit-
ical brinkmanship between
Democrats and Republicans,
came just hours ahead of a
midnight deadline to raise the
debt ceiling.
In currencies, the dollar
rose marginally to 77.25 yen
from 77.22 yen late Tuesday in
New York amid caution over
potential moves by Japanese
authorities to purchase the
greenback to weaken their
currency to support exporters.
The euro, meanwhile, rose to
$1.4213 from $1.4201.
By MARY CLARE
JALONICK
and LINDSEY TANNER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
government is scrambling to
find the source of a salmo-
nella outbreak likely linked to
ground turkey that has killed
one and sickened dozens
more.
Finding the source of an
outbreak hasnt been easy; the
government has been chas-
ing the illnesses for months.
The Agriculture Department,
which oversees meat safety,
said it is still investigating
who produced the meat, and
the department hasnt initi-
ated a recall.
California state health offi-
cials said Tuesday that the
one death was in Sacramento
County. Seventy-six people
in 26 states have been made
sick from the same strain of
the disease.
The illnesses date back
to March, and the federal
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention said Monday
that cultures of ground tur-
key from four retail locations
between March 7 and June 27
showed contamination with
the same strain of salmonella,
though those samples were
not specifically linked to the
illnesses. The agency said pre-
liminary information showed
that three of those samples
have been linked to the same
production establishment but
it did not name the retailers or
the manufacturers.
The silence from govern-
ment officials may be attrib-
uted to USDA rules that
make it harder to investigate
and recall salmonella-taint-
ed poultry. Because salmo-
nella is common in poultry,
it is not illegal for meat to
be tainted with the pathogen.
Officials must directly link
the salmonella illnesses with
a certain producer or estab-
lishment, which is difficult
to do because people dont
always remember what they
ate or where they bought it.
In this case, it appears that
officials havent been able to
prove the link between the
samples of salmonella they
found even though they
are the same strain and
the 77 people who were sick-
ened. USDAs Food Safety
and Inspection Service sent
out an alert about the illnesses
late last week telling consum-
ers to properly cook their tur-
key, which can decrease the
chances of salmonella poi-
soning. But the department
has not given consumers any
further warnings about the
source of the tainted meat.
Asian stocks fall amid
dim US economy prospects
Calif. death, 76 illnesses linked to ground turkey

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 11,866.62 -265.87
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,669.24 -75.37
S&P 500 INDEX 1,254.05 -32.89
AUTOZONE INC. 276.71 -5.54
BUNGE LTD 67.66 -1.22
EATON CORP. 45.20 -2.34
BP PLC ADR 43.61 -1.52
DOMINION RES INC 48.10 -0.49
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.12 -0.73
CVS CAREMARK CRP 36.35 -0.33
CITIGROUP INC 37.04 -1.44
FIRST DEFIANCE 14.48 -0.15
FST FIN BNCP 15.85 -0.16
FORD MOTOR CO 11.85 -0.50
GENERAL DYNAMICS 66.16 -1.35
GENERAL MOTORS 27.05 -1.02
GOODYEAR TIRE 15.10 -0.90
HEALTHCARE REIT 48.15 -0.16
HOME DEPOT INC. 32.82 -1.43
HONDA MOTOR CO 39.45 -0.53
HUNTGTN BKSHR 5.73 -0.27
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 63.43 -0.98
JPMORGAN CHASE 39.84 -0.60
KOHLS CORP. 52.48 -2.05
LOWES COMPANIES 20.46 -0.63
MCDONALDS CORP. 85.06 -1.33
MICROSOFT CP 26.80 -0.47
PEPSICO INC. 63.18 -0.68
PROCTER & GAMBLE 60.87 -0.56
RITE AID CORP. 1.24 -0.07
SPRINT NEXTEL 4.00 -0.29
TIME WARNER INC. 34.00 -1.08
US BANCORP 25.15 -0.83
UTD BANKSHARES 9.50 0
VERIZON COMMS 35.49 -0.38
WAL-MART STORES 51.68 -0.94
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Aug. 2, 2011
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Herald - 9 www.delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next days issue.
Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com
TOP SOIL
COMPOST
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
Delivery Available
950 Miscellaneous
TNT
ASPHALT
PAVING &
SEAL COATING
567-825-2157
Commercial-Residential
FREE ESTIMATES
SENIOR DISCOUNTS
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina Fox
419-236-4134
www.candlesbygina.com
The worlds finest candles,
candle scents, home decor.
Ask how to earn for FREE
950 Car Care
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
FLANAGANS
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
Hohlbeins
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Lawn Care
ElwerLawnCare.com
Visit website for photos
and details of services
(419) 235-3708
Lawn Maintenance
Lawn Treatments
Mulch Installation
Shrub Trimming
New Landscapes
New Lawn Installs
Retaining Walls
Bulk Compost
Bulk Mulch
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
21 Years Experience Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
LAWN MOWING
FERTILIZATION
WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS
LAWN AERATION
FALL CLEANUP
MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY
SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL
950 Tree Service
L.L.C.
Trimming & Removal
24 Hour Service Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
Trimming Topping Thinning
Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Service
AT YOUR
HOUSE FOR SALE
Sunroom & large covered deck
overlooking river. $81,000
419-393-4378
larryacameron@hotmail.com
Auglaize
River,
2 bdrm
Bungalow
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
CONSIGNING WOMEN /
Damascus Shops
2160 Eastown Rd.,
Lima-Elida
Re-open, new season
Sat. 10:30am, Aug. 6
Dont miss, great buys.
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
ADDITION GENERAL
workers. Job locations
Delphos, Lima, Van Wert.
Apply in person. 301 N.
Main, Delphos
Are you looking for a child
care provider in your
area? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465
Would you like to be an
in-home child care pro -
vider? Let us help. Call
YWCA Child Care Re -
source and Referral at:
1-800-992-2916 or
(419)225-5465.
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
290

Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN pil-
low-top mattress set, can
del i ver $125. Cal l
(260)749-6100.
1008 WILLIAM Ave -
HOME MADE BAKE
SALE - Catholic Daugh-
ters of America
Aug, 4th, 5th, and 6th
Thursday and Friday 8:00
to 5:00 and Saturday 9:00
to 12:00. We will have
pies, and apple dump -
lings, cookies, rice krispie
treats, etc.
117 MICHELE Dr.
(Lehmanns Woods)
August 4,5,6
8am- ?
Infant, toddler and plus
size clothes; new electric
smoker; lawn mowers; leaf
blower; exercise bike;
baked items, pecans,
crafts, books and much
more.
152 MAIN St.
Cloverdale, OH
Large estate sale
Aug. 4,5,6
9am-5pm
Tools, power tools, yard
furniture, 2 executive
desks, conference table
and chairs, furniture, much
more.
1701 FT. Jennings Road
Thurs. Aug. 4, 9am-5pm
Fri. Aug. 5, 9am-5pm
Saturday 9am-12pm
Multi-family garage sale
infant (boys and girls) to
adult clothing, new Home
and Garden products, new
items added and lots of
misc.
228 WEST St.
9am-5pm
Thurs., Fri, Sat.
Aug, 4,5,6
TV, puzzles, books, re-
cords, misc. Items over 50
years old. Porch Swing.
409 E. 5th St.
Thurs., 9am-5pm
Fri. 9am-5pm
Sat. 9am-12
Clothes baby-plus, scrap-
booking, Precious mo-
ments, Partylite collecti-
bles, toys, dishes, toaster
oven, books, digital frame
and camera, teacher re-
sources, battery and alter-
nator for 89 Buick, hand-
made cards, desk and
much more.
428 W. Second St.,
Delphos
Thurs.-Sat., Aug. 4-6,
9am-5pm
Multi-family sale including
retired fourth grade teach-
er s col l ect i on of
teacher/parent resources,
letter trays, organizers,
scanner, copier, cabinet,
and lots of odds and ends.
507 WILLIAM Ave.
(Menke Addition)
Thurs. 9am-5pm
Friday 9am-5pm
Saturday 9am-noon
Furniture, TVs, house-
hold items, Name-Brand
purses, dishes, pans. Kids
clothes, baby furniture,
toys, Jr. size formal
dresses. Too much to list!
509 WILLIAM Ave.
(Menke Addition)
Thursday 8am-5pm
Friday 8am-5pm
Saturday 8am-noon
Multi-family sale. Many
children and household
items, books, games, Bar-
bies, bikes, kitchen play-
set, puzzles, radio/CD
players, stereo speakers,
Wall hangings and much
more. Everything is priced
to sell.
511 WEST 5th Street
Delphos
Thurs. August 4th
4:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.
Fri. August 5th
9:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Sat. August 6th
9:00 a.m. 1:00 pm.
Baby Girl Clothes (NB
18 months), Baby Swing,
Highchair, Vera Bradley,
Dryer, Lots of Miscellane-
ous
601 N. Main St.
Thurs. - Sat.
8am-5pm
Baked goods, crafts, elec-
tronics, childrens books
and games, bikes. Girls
desk w/chai r, chi l d s
dresser, night stands, bed-
ding, bunk beds, Whirlpool
washer/dryer.
Name-brand cl othi ng;
Girls clothes 4T-Adult
womens plus size, boys
clothes 10/12-mens 2XL,
coats and shoes.
6187 STATE Rt. 66
south of Delphos.
3 Family Garage Sale.
Thurs 9-7 Fri 9-5 &
Sat 9-12.
Name brand clothes...
girls newborn-7/8, boys
newborn-7/8. Pack and
plays. Maternity clothes.
Bassinet. Thomas bed -
ding. Girls bedding. Eddie
Bower travel system
(stroller and car seat).
Carrier and base. Bouncy.
Many baby items. Chil -
drens toys for all ages.
Household items...cur -
tains. Longaberger bas-
kets. Drill press. Furni -
ture...changi ng tabl e,
brown wicker TV stand.
Lots of misc.
340

Garage Sales
627 N. Scott
Wed-Sat. 9am-5pm
A few antiques, clothes,
dryer, XL jeans, sheets,
old sewing machines, kids
and mens clothes, some
furniture, arts & crafts,
decorations, misc. Pickers
Dream
628 E. 5th
Aug. 3, 4, 5, 6
8:30 -?
Garden items, pond treas-
ures, furniture, collecti -
bles, home decor, corn
hole, primitives, wedding
gown, sewing machines,
Gold Canyon tastefully
Simple surprises.
640 WILLIAM Ave.
(Menke Addition)
Thurs. 3:30pm-7:30pm
Fri. 9am-7:30pm
Sat. 9am-?
TVs, treadmill, Gympac
Fitness system, track hur-
dles, household items,
older kid bikes, clothes
girls 0-4T, boys 0-18mo.,
toys, much more.
655 WILLIAM Ave.
Aug. 4 & 5
9am- 5pm
Pool table, car seat, high
chair, quilting fabric, craft
items. Lots of Big men
clothes. Plenty of house-
hold items.
675 E. 7th St.
3 Family Sale
Thurs.- Fri. 9am-6pm
Sat. 8am-12noon
Kids clothes, toys, kitchen
items, Christmas items,
knickknacks, cedar chest,
Lots of Stuff!!
716 N. Canal
Thurs. 9am- 5pm
Fri. 9am- 5pm
Sat. 9-?
Multi-family, table and
chairs, tools, TV, desk,
lots of clothes
(toddler-adult) and misc.
727 S. Clay
Thurs. & Friday 8am-5pm
Mens jeans 32X30, mens
shirts. Lots of craft items,
scrapbook items, kitchen
and household items, VHS
tapes, computer desk,
copper boiler, tools, hu-
midifier, too many to list.
737 FAIRLANE Dr.
Thurs. 3pm-7pm
Fri. 8am-6pm
Sat. 9am-2pm
Toys, boys clothes 8-16,
Jr. girls clothes, misc.
household items.
810 N. Main St.
Multi-Family
Thurs. - Sat. 8am-?
Vera Bradley, jewelry,
dressers, entrance doors,
chairs, pictures, books,
bedding, luggage, TVs,
appliances, Tupperware,
heaters, sweepers, tools,
coolers, speakers, larger
clothes, camp stoves,
DVDs and CDs. Many
boxes full for $3.00 each.
8170 W. Lincoln Hwy.,
Lima, Ohio. (Just east of
Delphos, first house after
Redd Rd.)
Aug. 4, 5, 6th
Multi-Family Garage sale
I nf ant s, chi l dr en s,
womens and mens cloth-
ing; Toys, antiques; exer-
cise equipment; lots of
misc.
820 PINEHURST Dr.
Thurs.-Fri.
9am-5pm
Sat. 9am-1pm
Boys 4-10, girls 2-3, Tod-
dler car bed, kids picnic
table, queen size head-
board with rails, Thomas
the train items, tons of
toys, sewing machine, mi-
crowave, computer desk,
and lots more.
ESTATE SALE
15737 Rd. 23M
Ft. Jennings, OH 45844
Fri. Aug. 12, 9am-8pm
Sat. Aug.13, 9am-3pm
Household items, furni -
ture, hydraulic wood split-
ter, 4X6 trailer, tools, 20
ton press, metal drill,
handcrafted items, power-
tools, antiques, exercise
equipment, cut lumber,
misc.
FIRST TIME EVER
WESTRICH / GROTHAUS
1306 Ricker Street
August 4-6, 9am-5pm
Brand name, EXCELLENT
condition Clothing. New-
born-Adult, NEW Mens
2XLT, Ladies Petite Me-
dium. Toys, TV's, Bikes,
Exercise Equipment, Holi-
day Decorations, Chande-
liers, Ceiling Fans, Pella
Patio Door, TOO MUCH
TO LIST!
340

Garage Sales
FIVE FAMILY Sale
9298 Lincoln Hwy.
1 mile East of Delphos
Thurs. 9-7, Fri. 9-7
Saturday 9-12
Laptop, cameras, luggage,
antiques, collectible dolls,
Dreamsicles, Precious
Moments, banks, records,
Angels, pickle crocks,
Tweety items, Avon bot-
tles, Hot Wheels, dress-
ers, etc.
HUGE BARN SALE
8400 St. Rt. 66 North of
Delphos
Thurs, Fri., Sat.
8:00am -?
Household items great fro
college students, antique
items and furniture. Spa
material, tools, baby
items. Adult and children
clothes.
HUGE GARAGE Sale
1211 Grothause St.
(Last new street off of
Carolyn Dr.)
Thursday-Saturday
9am-5pm
A TON of little girls cloth-
ing (sizes newborn to size
10), over 70 pairs of little
girls shoes (same sizes)
toys, pi ctures, push
mower, various household
items
LARGE MULTI-FAMILY
garage sale,
21264 Lincoln Hwy.,
west of Delphos
Thurs. 10am-7pm,
Fri. 9am-7pm, Sat. 9am- ?
Rada knives, collectors
cards, Mary Kay clear-
ance, Avon, Longaberger
baskets, dog kennel, rid-
ing toys, books, baby fur-
niture, newborn to adult
clothes, and more.
LUTHERAN CHURCHlot
5th & Pierce
Friday 8/5/11 -8am-5pm
Bedroom furniture, quilt
rack, home decor, pic-
tures, cookie jar, glass-
ware, glass TV stand,
Christmas items, kids
toys, clothing kids-adult,
shoes, AB-lounger, chain
saw, Briggs & Stratton en-
gine and much more!
MULTI-FAMILY
GARAGE Sale
10073 Converse-Roselm
Thurs. & Fri.
8am-6pm
Saturday 8am-?
Boys 3-6, teen boys, girls
0-5, girls 10-16, junior girls
Aeropostale, American
Eagle, Womens 1X-3X,
queen size headboard, lift
recliner, bikes, toys,
household projector
screens, Too much to list.
MULTI-FAMILY SALE
Brown brick house on cor-
ner of Lincoln Highway
and Redd Road.
Thurs. Aug. 4,
Fri. Aug. 5, Sat. Aug. 6
8am -4pm
Lamps, antiques, misc.
home furnishings, tools,
collectibles, porch swing,
kitchenware and much
more.
MULTIPLE GARAGE
Sales on Christina St. in
Delphos, off of Carolyn Dr
Thurs. & Friday 8am-8pm
Saturday 8am-12
Lots of nice clothes, Pre-
cious Moments, furniture,
lawn equipment, house-
hold items, and more.
ST. PAUL U.M. Church
Basement
335 S. Main St. Delphos
Fri. 9am - 8pm
Sat. 8am - 12 noon
All girls items from new-
born- 7-toddler. Lots of
clothing, dresses, coats,
many outfits and much
more misc. items. Toys,
Smart cycle wtih 3 car -
tridges, like new. Lots of
Beanie Babies still in
packages.
560

Lawn & Garden
TOPSOIL
CLEAN, black, pulverized
for easy use. Load you or
del i ver ed. CALL
(419)968-2940
600

Apts. for Rent
1 BR Ranch. Refrigerator,
stove, microwave, W/D
and air conditioning pro-
vided. Lawn service. No
pets or smoking. $435/mo.
419-233-6886
2 BR unit. Ref., stove, wa-
ter included. Quiet street
$415/mo. & deposit. Im-
medi at e possessi on.
(419)203-6810
DUPLEX -1 BDRM Apt. all
new appliances, carpet,
paint, very clean. $400
plus deposit. No pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
419-692-6478
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale

*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.


*Will be trained by Microtel

Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage


close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.


TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS


FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos

928 N. Franklin St., Delphos


These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.

BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity


$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!





$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find



$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC





$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury

$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story



$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality



$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy

$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story




w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD

2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 12- 1:00

GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION

THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty

www.jimlanghalsrealty.com

FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e


































D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900

Call for showing ...


1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.

Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894

HELP WANTED
PART-TIME
PRE-PRESS

Eagle
Print

RAABE RAABE

GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT

BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH

MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN

2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$
14,999

Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells


Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today





*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.


*Will be trained by Microtel

Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage


close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.


TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS


FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos

928 N. Franklin St., Delphos


These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.

BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity


$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!





$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find



$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC





$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury

$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story



$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality



$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy

$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story




w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD

2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 12- 1:00

GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION

THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty

www.jimlanghalsrealty.com

FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e


































D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900

Call for showing ...


1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.

Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894

HELP WANTED
PART-TIME
PRE-PRESS

Eagle
Print

RAABE RAABE

GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT

BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH

MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN

2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$
14,999

Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells


Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today












TOM AHL
617 KING AVE.
LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413
CELL 419-296-7188
See me,
BILL
HOFFMAN
for the
BEST BUY
on your
new or used
vehicle.

*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.


*Will be trained by Microtel

Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage


close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.


TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS


FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos

928 N. Franklin St., Delphos


These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.

BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity


$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!





$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find



$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC





$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury

$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story



$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality



$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy

$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story




w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD

2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 12- 1:00

GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION

THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty

www.jimlanghalsrealty.com

FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e


































D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e

D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900

Call for showing ...


1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.

Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894

HELP WANTED
PART-TIME
PRE-PRESS

Eagle
Print

RAABE RAABE

GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT

BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH

MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN

2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$
14,999

Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells


Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today












ON THESE NAME
BRANDS:
YOKOHAMA
and PIRELLI
See dealer for details.
Expires 8-31-11
$
30 REBATE
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
FOUR TIRES
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
1 ROLL of carpet padding
5/8 inch thick. $50. Call
419-692-2401
340

Garage Sales
340

Garage Sales
Is the stuff at
your house
piling up?
SELL IT
IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS!
419-695-0015
ext. 122
The
Delphos
Herald
Shop Herald
Classifieds for
Great Deals
Readers
laud RX
for poor
grammar
DEAR DR. GOTT:
My letter has nothing to
do with a
m e d i c a l
p r o b l e m
-- just a
response to
something I
read in your
c o l u m n
t o d a y .
Kudos to
you for
responding
to the
grammar question the
way you did (agreement
of pronouns in gender
and number). Sadly, it has
become a widespread
habit these days to refer
to a person of unspecified
gender as they. Im glad
you stick to your guns
and use he and she
as traditional grammar
requires.
DEAR DR. GOTT: I
have no medical issue to
discuss. I simply want to
offer my sincere thanks
for your recent reply to
a reader who proposed
that you use the
grammatically incorrect
they instead of the
proper he or she that
you use. I am also one
who refuses to bow to
modern societys laxity.
I admire you sticking to
your principles!
DEAR DR. GOTT:
Thank you, thank you
for addressing one
of my pet peeves --
the incorrect use of a
singular antecedent and
a plural pronoun. As a
former English teacher,
I despair when I read
and see the mangling
of the language. In
addition to your excellent
grammar, your column is
a fine source of intelligent
advice.
DEAR DR. GOTT:
Thank you for your
comments about correct
grammar usage. Adults
in the country sound
uneducated with their
me and him went or
was you going, etc. I
pride myself on using
correct grammar but feel
like a dinosaur when I
read the newspaper or
listen to TV.
DEAR READERS: To
be totally honest, I wasnt
sure anyone would read
that question. My column
has to fill a specific slot,
so I must keep it close
to a certain number of
words. That particular
day I was a little short
and needed what I refer
to as a filler, something
brief and easy to answer,
and this question fit the
bill.
I celebrated my 76th
birthday in June, so I
grew up in a time when
grammar really did
matter. I was pleasantly
surprised to receive all
of your emails regarding
this little filler question.
I am glad to know that
Im not the only one who
maintains that grammar
is important. Thank you
all for writing.
DEAR DR. GOTT: I
have dry burping (no acid
taste ever) 30 times a
day, five or six burps each
time. I am on digoxin for a
rapid and irregular heart
rate. Could my heart
condition have anything
to do with the excessive
dry burping? It happens
any time of day, whether
my stomach is empty or
after I have eaten. I am
an 85-year-old female.
DEAR READER:
Your heart condition is
likely atrial fibrillation, a
condition that causes
skipped beats and a
rapid heart rate. I dont
believe it is the cause of
your excessive burping;
however, your medication
may be.
Digoxin can cause
nausea, vomiting,
diarrhea and anorexia
(loss of appetite). Most
individuals associate
these symptoms with
stomach upset that can
also produce excess gas.
Burping and belching
(known as eructation) is
not listed as a side effect;
however, it is my belief
that if digoxin can cause
nausea and other side
effects, it can likely cause
your problem as well.
Other possibilities
include your diet,
gastroesophageal reflux
disease (which does not
have to create heartburn
or an acid taste in the
mouth), other medications
you may be on, or
other gastrointestinal
disorders.
I suggest you speak
with your doctor regarding
your concerns. Perhaps
a change in medication
or dosage, or a referral
to a gastroenterologist, is
called for.
COPYRIGHT 2011 UNITED
FEATURE SYNDICATE INC.
Peter H.
Gott, M.D.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening August 3, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Family Family Happy Primetime Nightline Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Brother Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC Minute to Win It America's Got Talent Love in the Wild Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX So You Think Local
ION Without a Trace Without a Trace Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Billy Billy Storage Storage
AMC The Untouchables Carlito's Way
ANIM I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive I Shouldn't Be Alive
BET Love & Basketball Toya: A F The Mo'Nique Show Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Flipping Out Rocco's Dinner Party Housewives/NJ Flipping Out
CMT Redneck Mom. Wedding Wedding Texas Women Texas Women Smarter Smarter
CNN In the Arena Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle South Pk South Pk South Pk Jon Daily Colbert South Pk Futurama
DISC Into the Shark Bite How Sharks Hunt One Man Army How Sharks Hunt One Man Army
DISN Good Luck Shake it The Suite Life Movie Good Luck Phineas Phineas Wizards Wizards
E! Sex-City Sex-City Because I Said So Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN MLB Baseball SportsCenter Baseball NFL Live
ESPN2 SportsCtr Soccer MLS Soccer NASCAR
FAM Melissa Melissa Georgia Georgia Georgia Georgia The 700 Club Whose? Whose?
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Food Network Star Restaurant: Im.
FX Wanted Rescue Me Rescue Me Rescue Me
HGTV Property Income Income Property Brothers Hunters House Property Income Property
HIST Sniper: Deadliest Top Gear Ice Road Truckers Sniper: Deadliest
LIFE Dance Moms Roseanne Roseanne Dance Moms How I Met How I Met Chris How I Met
MTV Awkward. Awkward. Teen Mom The Challenge The Challenge True Life
NICK Family My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show Married Married Married Married
SCI Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest
SPIKE Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Ways Die
TBS Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan Lopez Tonight
TCM The Old Maid Jezebel The Corn Is Green
TLC Hoard-Buried Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras Toddlers & Tiaras
TNT The Mentalist Franklin & Bash Bones Franklin & Bash Leverage
TOON Dude Destroy King-Hill King-Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd Truck Stp Truck Stp Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd
TV LAND All/Fam. AllFamily Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced Divorced Cleveland Retired a Retired a
USA NCIS Royal Pains Necessary Roughness Burn Notice Royal Pains
VH1 Famous Food Basketball Wives 40 Greatest Pranks 3 Celebrity Rehab
WGN Chris Chris How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Scrubs Scrubs South Pk South Pk
Premium Channels
HBO True Blood True Blood True Blood Real Time/Bill Maher Curious Case
MAX Machete It's Kind of a Funny Story The Lost World: Jurassic Park
SHOW Green Penn NASCAR Weeds Franchise NASCAR Franchise Green Jackass: The Movie
2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
10 - The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
Tomorrows
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Dealing with step daughter like
aiming squirt gun at a forest fre
Dear Annie: I married my
wife, Debbie, more than
a decade ago. I genuinely
believe we were brought
together by divine provi-
dence. The only thing that
troubles me is our kids --
Debbies children from her
first marriage. They didnt
get off to a great start -- the
biological father is a dead-
beat dad, philanderer, alco-
holic and a repeat-offender
criminal. I wish I had been
there from the start, but thats
the way it goes. Ive had a lot
of catching up to do.
Debbies son is terrific --
smart, friendly, tal-
ented and putting
himself through
college. The
daughter, how-
ever, is a walking
soap opera. Shes
had two kids (one
at age 16), several
abortions, multiple
divorces and bro-
ken relationships,
and shes usually
strung out on pills
and pot. Her cur-
rent boyfriend is a married
man.
The oldest granddaughter
lives with her father, who
married someone else and
has built a solid family. The
younger granddaughter (age
11) lives with her mother.
The kid does all the cooking,
housekeeping and grocery
shopping. My stepdaughter
even tried to get the girl to
fake a urine sample for a
drug test.
My wife and I are at the
end of our rope. We can-
not endure anymore of this
womans drama. We know
we cant fix her, so right
now, all we want to do is res-
cue our granddaughter before
her life is ruined. I feel like
Im aiming a squirt gun at a
forest fire. How can I help
my family? -- Stepfather of a
Train Wreck
Dear Stepfather: Is the
father of this child capable
of caring for her? If so, you
should encourage him to ask
for custody. Barring that, you
and your wife ought to con-
sider petitioning for guard-
ianship of your granddaugh-
ter. The best way to rescue
this child is to get her out of
her mothers home and into
a stable, loving environment.
Please make every effort to
do so.
Dear Annie: My husband
and I have been together for
25 years, and the entire mar-
riage has consisted of his
continuous lies about money,
gambling and drinking. The
latest adventure is his obses-
sion with Internet porn and
singles websites.
We attended counseling
individually and as a cou-
ple. He knew these things
were ruining our marriage
and vowed over and over to
change. Instead, he played
me. He would change just
long enough for me to for-
give him. But I have stopped
playing his game. We share a
house, and thats about it.
Years ago, girly magazines
were just pictures. Today,
there is streaming video of
real people who call you by
name and can even contact
you. After I read the conver-
sations my husband had with
other women, any intimacy
went out the window. He
wonders now why I had a
hard time showing him affec-
tion. Guys need to stop and
think with their hearts and
not their computers, and real-
ize the permanent damage
these things can do to a mar-
riage. -- Over and Out
Dear Over: We agree
that Internet porn is a huge
problem these days,
creating intimacy
and trust issues in
relationships. Your
husband also has
other problems and
seems unwilling
to work on them.
So we have to ask
-- why are you still
with him? Please
give some serious
thought to your
alternatives. They
might be more
attainable than you think.
Dear Annie: This is for
At the End of my Tether
in South Dakota, who is
frustrated with her daughters
filthy room.
The easiest way to deal
with this is to tell the daugh-
ter that her room is her own
business, but she may not
have anything in there that
can bring vermin into the
house. This means no food in
her room, and the trash needs
to be emptied regularly.
Mom should keep the door
closed and let the daughter
be a slob, but draw a line
where it affects the sanita-
tion of the house. It is
not about the daughter. It
is about health and safety.
-- Ventura, Calif.
Annies Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annies Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annies Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, AUG. 4, 2011
The recognition, financially,
socially and career-wise, that all
your hard work deserves is likely
to be forthcoming in the next year.
However, it might not be awarded you
in the manner you are anticipating.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Constructive results are possible with
whatever it is youre doing, but only
as long as you perform in accordance
with your highest standards. Dont
let a lazy associate convince you
otherwise.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) --
Several significant objectives can be
accomplished, provided youre not
saddled with a co-worker who has
little interest in doing a bit of work.
Be prepared to do all of the heavy
lifting yourself.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Even
though, upon reflection, you can see
how you could do things better than
what you promised, stick to the terms
of your initial commitment. It would
be far worse to get in over your head
at the last second.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
Youll get much more than a paycheck
if you render your best effort toward
your job. Your self-esteem and self-
worth will be greatly enhanced in
ways hard to come by.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21)
-- Bring into play all of your instincts,
your memory and your logic if you
find yourself involved in a difficult
endeavor. Collectively, they can help
you accomplish the impossible.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
-- It might take all of the gumption
youve got to accomplish a critical
assignment, but what you will get out
of it personally will be worth it -- and
that isnt likely to mean money.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Dont complain from the sidelines
about something youre involved with
that is being mishandled. Roll up your
sleeves and shape things up yourself,
from top to bottom if need be.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- If
youve accumulated a bit of a surplus
lately, dont blow it all on having
a good time. At least use some of it
on loved ones who would not only
appreciate but also deserve a little
special treatment.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
Not everybody is as perceptive as you
tend to be, so if you believe you can
better the ideas of what others have to
offer, speak up and let your thoughts
be known.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
-- Instead of always expecting more
from others, make it your turn to
devise some ways to repay them for
all theyve done for you in the past.
Theyll be happy, and youll feel good
about yourself.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
-- When attempting to complete a
complicated task, dont pretend to
know things you really dont. Seek
out the information you need.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
-- Although your intuitive insights
might be a bit more accurate than
usual, it will still be up to you to find
a way to execute them as cleverly as
you envision them.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Herald 11
www.delphosherald.com
THANK
YOU
We would like to thank
everyone for their support in
Tuesdays election.
We appreciate your votes to
keep Delphos City Schools
excellent in
our community!
The youth of Delphos
are our future and
your support insures that
well all continue to
work together to promote
the benefts of a
good education for all students!
Paid for by Families Take Action, Margie Rostorfer, Treasurer
Answers to Tuesdays questions:
Even though Chicago is called The Windy City,
its not the windiest in America. Great Falls, Montana
is. Oklahoma City, Okla., and Boston are second and
third, respectively.
The only continent without mold or mildew is
Antarctica.
Todays questions:
What is the only known sport derived from work?
Who was the first athlete to be signed by Nike as
an endorser?
Answers in Thursdays Herald.
Todays words:
Bicrural: having two legs
Psychurgey: mental energy
Todays joke:
A customer sent an order to a distributor for a
large amount of goods totaling a great deal of money.
The distributor noticed that the previous bill hadnt
been paid, so he asked his collections manager to
leave a voice-mail for them saying, We cant ship
your new order until you pay for the last one.
The next day the collections manager received a
collect phone call, Please cancel the order. We cant
wait that long.
Tropical Storm Emily on path toward Caribbean
By TRENTON DANIEL
Associated Press
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti Tropical
Storm Emily brushed past Puerto Rico and
headed today toward the Dominican Republic
and Haiti, where more than 630,000 people are
still without shelter after last years earthquake.
A steady shield of rain should reach the
island of Hispaniola shared by the Dominican
Republic and Haiti around noon today and the
rainfall should worsen by late afternoon, said
John Dlugoenski, senior meteorologist with
Accuweather.com.
The biggest threat to lives is probably the
flooding, Dlugoenski said.
Civil defense officials and the military in
the Dominican Republic have already begun
moving people out of high-risk zones ahead of
the storm. Haitian authorities urged people to
conserve food and safeguard their belongings.
In Haitis capital of Port-au-Prince, Jislaine
Jean-Julien, a 37-year-old street merchant dis-
placed by the January 2010 earthquake, said
she was praying the storm would pass her
flimsy tent without knocking it over.
For now, God is the only savior for me,
Jean-Julien said at the edge of a crowd-
ed encampment facing the quake-destroyed
National Palace. I would go some place else if
I could but I have no place else to go.
Haitian emergency authorities set aside a
fleet of 22 large white buses in the event they
needed to evacuate people from flooded areas.
Emergency workers would then bus the people
to dozens of schools, churches and other build-
ings that will serve as shelters.
Were working day and night to be able
to respond quickly in case we have any disas-
ters, said Marie Alta Jean-Baptiste, director of
Haitis Civil Protection Agency.
Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center
in Miami said up to 10 inches (25 centimeters)
of rain could fall in some parts of Haiti and
the Dominican Republic, which could cause
life-threatening flash floods and mud slides in
areas of mountainoust terrain.
Emergency workers, both Haitian and for-
eign, also sent out text messages to cell phone
users, alerting them to the approaching storm
and to take precautions such as staying with
friends or relatives if that were an option.
Such advisories are not uncommon but few
in Haiti have the means to heed them because
of the crushing poverty.
This is not the first time weve heard these
messages, said Alexis Boucher, a 29-year-old
man who lives in Place Boyer, a public square
that became a camp after the earthquake. We
receive these messages and yet we still dont
have anywhere to go.
A slow-moving storm that triggered mud-
slides and floods in Haiti killed at least 28
people in June.
The United Nations peacekeeping force in
Haiti notified its 11,500 troops to be on stand-
by in case they need to respond, said Sylvie
Van Den Wildenberg, a spokeswoman for the
U.N. peacekeeping mission. The International
Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies also, put emergency teams on stand-
by, which have access to relief supplies already
in place for up to 125,000 people in seaside
towns throughout the country.
In the Dominican Republics southern tour-
ist districts, workers at hotels and restaurants
gathered up umbrellas, tables, chairs, and any-
thing else that might be blown away.
Capt. Frank Castillo, dock master of the
Marina Casa de Campo in the southeastern
tourist city of La Romana, and his crew helped
boat owners secure their vessels in slips or pull
them ashore.
In Puerto Rico, there were no reports of
major damage or injuries and no immediate
demand for the nearly 400 schools that were
converted into emergency shelters around the
island.
Gov. Luis Fortuno had declared a state of
emergency and most government offices were
closed. Ahead of the storm, people cleared
water and other emergency supplies from store
shelves and tourists fled the small Puerto Rican
islands of Culebra and Vieques.
But most of the island saw no more than
sporadic gusts and showers.
The U.S. National Hurricane Center said
the storm was heading west at 14 mph (22
kph) today morning, and it was expected to
veer later toward the northwest. The storm
was about 145 miles (230 kilometers) south-
southeast of Santo Domingo, capital of the
Dominican Republic. It had maximum sus-
tained winds of 50 mph (85 kph).
A tropical storm warning was in effect for
Puerto Rico, Vieques, Culebra, the Dominican
Republic, Haiti, the southeast Bahamas, and
the Turks and Caicos Islands.
By JASON DEAREN
Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO A
day after releasing disturbing
footage videotaped by one
of Jaycee Dugards captors
and a report highlighting law
enforcement failures in the
case, a California prosecu-
tor plans to join a state law-
maker today to develop ideas
for improving supervision of
parolees.
El Dorado County District
Attorney Vern Pierson on
Tuesday discounted claims
by federal officials that
Phillip Garridos parole agent
had not missed opportunities
to find Dugard and the two
daughters she bore the con-
victed rapist.
The system as a whole
failed, and we should all be
angry about it, he said during
a news conference Tuesday
in the state Capitol.
In his report, Pierson said
the agent visited Garridos
home in the San Francisco
Bay area town of Antioch
only once between May 1991,
the month before Dugard was
snatched off her South lake
Tahoe street, and May 1995,
eight months after she had
given birth to her first child
by Garrido.
During the 1991 visit, the
agent was shown Garridos
backyard recording studio,
which became the first place
Dugard was confined and
raped after her kidnapping
just weeks later.
Had the federal parole
agents been doing their job
and searching the residence
(and the recording studio they
were aware of), then they
would have found Jaycee Lee
Dugard imprisoned in the
back yard, Pierson asserted.
The district attorney also
made public a 1993 video
tape of Garridos wife lur-
ing a young girl into the
couples van, asking her to
do the splits and videotaping
her. Nancy Garrido later told
authorities she made 10 to 20
similar videos at area parks
and playgrounds for her hus-
bands sexual gratification.
Thats it. Can you go all
the way down? Nancy says
to the girl, who is blurred
out in the video released by
authorities.
The girl says she can go
down farther.
Let me see, I bet you can
go down really easy, Nancy
Garrido said.
When the girl notices a
light on the camera, she asks
Nancy Garrido about it.
I dont know anything
about that camera, says Nancy,
quickly changing the subject.
The report says Garrido
should not have been freed
from prison in 1988, where he
was serving a 50-year federal
sentence and a five-years-to-
life Nevada state sentence for
a previous kidnapping and
rape. Pierson said the parole
system relied too heavily on
psychiatric advice in deter-
mining Garridos suitability
for parole.
After Garrido nabbed
Dugard in 1991, Pierson
said federal and state parole
agents failed to investigate
his history of sexual crimes
and instead relied on reports
from psychiatrists. This led
to agents missing numerous
warning signs over dozens
of visits.
The report also lists doz-
ens of incidents in which
Garrido should have had his
parole revoked, including
once in 1988 when he con-
tacted a woman he earlier had
been convicted of raping and
kidnapping, and other times
when his urine tested positive
for methamphetamine or he
was caught diluting his urine
samples.
In her book and grand
jury testimony, Dugard said
Garrido would go on sex
binges with her after he took
amphetamines.
Wifes video among new revelations in Dugard case
Mom
Jury hears tapes of polygamist discussing sex
By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press
SAN ANGELO, Texas Prosecutors
played two audio recordings Tuesday of a
polygamist sect leader instructing his 14-year-
old spiritual wife and several other young
women on how to please him sexually, and
thus win favor with God.
Warren Jeffs, 55, is head of the
Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter Day Saints, which believes polygamy
brings exaltation in heaven. He is accused
of sexually assaulting two girls, ages 12 and
15, he took as brides in what his church calls
spiritual marriages.
A forensic analyst testified Monday that
Jeffs was the father of the 15-year-olds
child. On Tuesday, prosecutors played a tape
of Jeffs talking to the girl when she was 14,
after Texas Ranger Nick Hanna testified about
documents and electronic files seized during a
2008 police raid at the churchs remote com-
pound in West Texas.
The Associated Press generally does not
identify victims of sexual crimes.
Among the materials recovered during
the raid was a record of Jeffs marriage for
time and all eternity with the 14-year-old
in January 2004. An excerpt from hundreds
of pages of Jeffs personal journals said the
child was pure and innocent and willing
to obey and that he summoned her parents
and informed them of their girl belonging
to me.
Followers see Jeffs as a prophet who is
Gods spokesman on earth.
Hanna read from Jeffs journals, which
said he took the 14-year-old the night after
their wedding with him and another of his new
wives on a car ride for training. There, he
instructed them on their responsibilities as his
wives and had the session taped. The record-
ing was transcribed and placed in church
records later seized by police.
Lead prosecutor Eric Nichols played the
tape for jurors, who followed along using
transcripts.
A good wife is trained for her husband
and follows the spirit of peace, Jeffs is heard
saying. He also makes reference to drawing
close or being close, which is how church
members refer to sex. Two female voices say
OK.
In describing the session in his journal
later, Jeffs said he told his wives they were
honorable vessels, property of your hus-
bands kingdom and the Kingdom of God on
Earth.
(Continued from page 1)
can pin their favorite char-
acters and sports buttons to
them.
Wreede, who named her
business The Boutique Kids,
has been attempting to get her
designs into retail stores.
Im on the phone or
e-mailing people 24/7, trying
to get the flip-flop designs
into retail stores, she said. I
might end up paying a com-
pany to market them for me.
I wanted to get them into
some of the local stores but
the timing is off, since its
already summer. I might wait
for spring.
With a few exciting pros-
pects on the horizon, it seems
as though Wreedes hard work
is beginning to pay off.
I have been contacted by
a couple of companies but
Im not sure I should mention
them because its not defi-
nite, she said. I do have a lot
of big opportunities coming
up, so Im keeping my fingers
crossed.
Being a stay-at-home mom
and entrepreneur, Wreede
feels grateful for the support
from her family and hopes to
inspire others to pursue their
passions.
My husband Brian has
been really supportive of it
all, she said. Hes actually
helped fund everything. And
I guess I just want all of the
stay-home-moms and entre-
preneurs out there to know that
if they have a dream, be strong
and stick with it. It takes a lot
of hard work to reach your
goal but if you keep at it and
believe in yourself, I believe
you can do anything.
Wreede lives in Delphos
with her husband and three
children, Tyler, 11, Kaylin, 7,
and Dylan, 3.
Wreede started her business making hairbows and
accessories and has a patent pending for a flip-flop acces-
sories design she calls Flip Flop Connectz.
SEATTLE (AP)
Standing up before dozens of
Suquamish Tribal members
at a general council meeting
in March, Heather Purser told
them she was a lesbian, and
asked her people to recog-
nize same-sex marriages at
the tribes Washington state
reservation.
Even after four years of
lobbying tribal members, the
28-year-old didnt know how
much support she had.
When I turned around to
sit back down I was shaking,
Purser recalled Tuesday.
Then the council put the
issue to a voice vote of the
people. Everyone said aye.
No one said nay, Purser
said.
On Monday, the Suquamish
Tribal Council ratified the
peoples wishes and recog-
nized gay marriage, making
it only the second tribe in the
country known to do so.
The new law allows the
tribal court to issue a mar-
riage license to two unmar-
ried people, regardless of
their sex, if theyre at least 18
years old and at least one of
them is enrolled in the tribe.
It will be up to other courts
to decide if unions granted
under the Suquamish ordi-
nance will be recognized else-
where in Washington, said
the tribes attorney, Michelle
Hansen.
Gay marriage is still illegal
in the state, but the Legislature
this year approved a measure
recognizing same-sex unions
from other jurisdictions,
which include other nations.
State lawmakers also have
approved a so-called every-
thing but marriage law,
granting same-sex couples
many rights.
Suquamish Tribe recognizes gay marriage
2
DELPHOS
TRADING
POST
Tues.-Thurs.
8:30-5, Fri. 8:30-6,
Sat. 9-2
528 N.Washington St.
Delphos
On the corner of 5th St. and Washington St.
just look for the sign
419-692-0044
WERE AN ANYTHING YOU NEED STORE!
STOCK CHANGES DAY TO DAY!
IF YOU WANT IT AND WE DONT HAVE
IT, WELL TRY TO FIND IT FOR YOU.
JUST LIKE
AN
OLD FASHIONED
TRADING
POST
We BUY,
SELL, and
TRADE
goods of all
types.
MORE VALUE
FOR YOUR
BUYING $$
STOP BY
AND
SEE US
NEW
MERCHANDISE
DAILY
OUTDOOR FLEA MARKET
AND
Come visit our vendors
at LinCoLn HigHway
AUGUST 4
TH
-5
TH
-6
TH
RESERVE
a 13x13
SPACE
$15.00 per day
Call
419-692-0044
Just
ask for
Vickey
Stop by the
DELPHOS TRADING POST
and see us.
Stock Changes Day to Day
12 The Herald Wednesday, August 3, 2011
www.delphosherald.com