Datestamp: 09/12/2001

AREA RESIDENTS STUNNED

MANY WORRYING ABOUT WHAT WILL FOLLOW THE ATTACK By KEVIN NANCE Staff Writer Two words flashed into 88−year−old Mamie Walton's mind when she turned on her television yesterday morning: Pearl Harbor. For Cheryl Wathen, 45, it was another word: Doomsday. Visions of war and apocalypse beset people all over Middle Tennessee yesterday when they watched news coverage of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. "I'm stunned, walking in a daze," Wathen said. "I've been at the World Trade Center, and it was spectacular. To think that it's all rubble now. It's like our whole country has been attacked." To many Nashville−area residents, the morning's events seemed as significant and foreboding as the most infamous chapters of American history. "It's of the magnitude of Pearl Harbor or the Oklahoma City bombing," said Pam Kemp, 44. "Just as the people who were alive when JFK was assassinated remember exactly where they were and what they were doing, we will have the same recall." The emotional reactions had four main categories: Shock: "It didn't seem real, more like a bad dream," said Willie Murray, a cashier at the Kroger on Eighth Avenue North. Added Kim Brown of Brentwood: "It was like an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie." Sadness: "I made a sign of the cross, and said a prayer for those who just died," attorney Grant Glassford said after watching TV coverage of the first World Trade Center tower collapsing. Nashville musician Rick Schell, who visited that building with his wife last week, burst into tears. "It's chilling to think, 'Who's on those planes?' "

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Anger: "It's like someone has raised a pistol to your face," said Jack Jernigan, a LifeWay employee. "The landscape of our country and all of the world has changed in less than five minutes." Fear: "My first thought was, 'Where are my kids?' " said Carolyn German, who immediately picked up her son from kindergarten in the Donelson area. "I thought, 'If they hijack a plane and drop it in Pennsylvania, anything could happen anywhere.' " Several Nashvillians had fears for friends and relatives living in or traveling to New York and Washington, D.C. "I have friends in Manhattan, including one who usually works at the World Trade Center," German said. "I talked to his wife, and listening to the fear in her voice just made me more afraid. It turned out that he was away from the office today." Vickie Thomasson, who works for the Nashville Public Libraries, was trying to reach her sister−in−law and her husband, who work in the nation's capital. "We can't get in touch with them," she said. "The lines, we can't get through. It makes you wonder: Do you go home and protect your family, or do you stay on your job?" And many people who work in downtown Nashville, especially in the taller buildings, were concerned about their own safety. "I have a view of planes coming and going from the airport," said Glassford, who works on the 29th floor of the SunTrust building. "I did more than one look out my window to see if a plane was headed for downtown." Jim Hoobler, art curator for the Tennessee State Museum in the Tennessee Performing Arts Center building, had similar concerns. "The country has been attacked, and working in government buildings as I do, you're always nervous," he said. "We're just trying to go on with things we need to do." For many people glued to the horrific images on TV, everyday routines suddenly seemed trivial. "I really hate being here. I feel like I should be home," Robyn Gilliam, a hairstylist in Hillsboro Village, said from her office. "There are people calling in, making appointments like nothing is going on in the world, and that somehow feels shallow and irreverent." Others found their minds leaping ahead to what might happen next: how President Bush's administration will respond to the attacks, and whether that response will provoke further terrorist attacks on U.S. soil. "I have two concerns," said Scott Jones of Arrington in Williamson County. "Are they really going to figure out who is responsible for this? And if the U.S. retaliates, then what if there's a chain reaction from that? You're dealing with these Middle Eastern countries, and they seem very volatile to me. We could be getting into a real war, and it's going to be very hard to control." Sharon Hill, a Nashville office administrator, agreed: "Just the horror of hearing about this, and fearing a possible war, turns my stomach," she said. "Terrorist attacks have been going on all around us in other countries. Now it's happened here. Our security is shaken. But there are no winners when we have a war. Everybody loses." Vanderbilt's nursing school dean, Colleen Conway−Welch, arrived yesterday morning in Washington, D.C., for a meeting, only to be greeted by great cloud of smoke rising from the Pentagon.

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She said in a phone interview that while she observed no panic in the capital, the mood was one of "controlled concern." Back in the Midstate, Mamie Walton, who was a young wife in Charleston, S.C., during the attack that drew America into World War II, found herself remembering that other day that will live in infamy. "My husband worked at the Navy yard," she said. "There were rumors that Japanese submarines were in the harbor, and immediately they got very conservative about where we could go. Watching the TV, it just made me live over all that, and I was afraid they were going to start bombing us again. It's a sad, sad day." Staff writers Gloria Ballard, Elizabeth Betts, Alan Bostick, Patrick Connolly, Peter Cooper, Catherine Darnell, Mary Hance, Bill Snyder, Stacey Hartmann, Susan Leathers, Sylvia Slaughter, Carol Stuart and Thayer Wine contributed to this article. Graphic: PHOTO BY ADRIANE JAECKLE / STAFF Caption: Amanda Potter, left, prays with Mary Beth Pratt outside Belmont University's Student Center. Pratt had been unable to locate a family member who was in one of the areas hit by terrorist attacks.

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

SOME LOCAL IMMIGRANTS FEAR REPRISALS IN AFTERMATH

By ANITA WADHWANI Staff Writer With televised images of Palestinians jubilantly dancing in the streets and speculation that yesterday's attacks may have been masterminded by terrorists from the Middle East, some Nashville−area immigrants say they fear a backlash. "It's a time for being cautious," said Dr. Awadh Binhazim, a spokesman for the Islamic Center in Nashville who is an immigrant from Kenya. "We as a Muslim community mean no harm. There are 7 million American Muslims who don't subscribe to this madness." No one has yet claimed responsibility or been accused in the attacks. Many pointed the finger at Middle Eastern terrorists in the hours after the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City. Those suspicions turned out to be untrue. During the 1991 Gulf War, dozens of Arab−American's homes and businesses were fire−bombed. Binhazim said yesterday that a member of his congregation wearing traditional Muslim dress was told to go back to her home. "But she was an American, so she said she was home," said Binhazim, who plans to follow up with police. Immigrant and refugee advocates said they hope that there is no retaliation against the area's international communities because of yesterday's attacks. "Refugees and immigrants come here because they love the idea of America and want to be here to escape the kinds of terror abroad that have been brought home here today," said Carter Moody, who heads the Nashville Task Force on Refugees and Immigrants. Even if the perpetrators turn out to be from the Middle East or profess to be motivated by devotion to Islam, immigrants here should not be held responsible, said Tahir Hussain of Kurdish Human Rights Watch in Nashville. SOME LOCAL IMMIGRANTS FEAR REPRISALS IN AFTERMATH 1

"I believe the people of the United States understand that these people do not represent our people here," Hussain said. Staff writers Michael Cass and Ray Waddle contributed to this story.

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

'I'LL REMEMBER IT FOREVER,' 10TH−GRADE STUDENT SAYS

By DIANE LONG Staff Writer For 10th−grader Kevin Caldwell, there's a new and devastating connection between generations. "This is our JFK," said Caldwell, a sophomore at Hunters Lane High School in Nashville. Students were glued to the news, just like their counterparts were back in 1963 when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. They struggled with shock and disbelief at the terrorist attacks. "I didn't believe it at first," Caldwell said. "I thought it was some silly rumor. Terrorism was something you read about in textbooks." The pictures of fire, smoke and falling buildings are now permanent images for Stephanie Binkley, a 10th−grader at Hunters Lane. "I'll remember it forever," she said. "So many innocent people were hurt." Senior Josh Moore also was devastated by the thousands of deaths. "Nobody deserves to die like that," he said. "Those people were just at work trying to better their lives." At Glencliff High School, the sound of TV sets wafted out of every room along the hallways. Students in teacher Jeff Hudgins' psychology class were watching the news intently. "They're watching in disbelief at the unfolding horror," Hudgins said. Quintessa Hathaway felt dread for the days ahead. "It seems as if things were going too well for America," the senior said. "I think there's going to be a third war. The U.S. has too many enemies." The specter of war also haunts senior Rusty Castleberry, 17. 'I'LL REMEMBER IT FOREVER,' 10TH−GRADE STUDENT SAYS 1

"At first we thought, 'That can't be happening,' " he said. "Then we saw the towers collapsing and, oh, my gosh, people were dying. Then people starting talking about war and asking each other if they were 18. "I don't want to go to war." Diane Long covers education. Contact her at dlong@tennessean.com or 726−5931. Caption: CALDWELL, HATHAWAY

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Datestamp: 09/13/2001

CROWD SHARES TEARS, PRAYERS AT MIDSTATE VIGIL

SHAKEN CITIZENS SHOW SUPPORT FOR DEAD, INJURED By KATHY CARLSON Staff Writer The 10 white Roto−Rooter vans snaked through Centennial Park last night, American flags waving. The plumbers had come to the park with hundreds of other people to pay their respects at a prayer vigil dedicated to those whom terrorists killed or injured Tuesday in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania. "I'd like to think there was something like this going on all across the country," said plumber David Patterson. He and most of his co−workers in the Nashville office −− a few stayed behind to handle calls −− juggled their hours to attend the event with their boss' blessing, to show their support for victims and for the nation. As the sun set on a warm night, families gathered in the grassy middle of the park for an hourlong program of prayer and song. Some stood and prayed, Bibles in hands. Others sat on blankets and drank soft drinks, just as they might at a picnic. Small children played with tiny American flags as their parents prayed and sang along with performers. "I just wanted to show my respect for the victims and their families," said Holly Piela, who lives in Cookeville and works in Nashville. Her friend Mary Beth Rittenberry of Nashville said she was there because she wanted to be with others "who are going through what I am going through shock, disbelief." "I just feel so bad for those people," said Robin Warren, holding a baby in her arms. "I cannot believe that this has happened and there's so much evil." Earlier, Christian musician Michael W. Smith told the audience that Tuesday's events were "too big" for all of us. He recalled the April 1999 tragedy at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two students killed 12 fellow students and a teacher before killing themselves. CROWD SHARES TEARS, PRAYERS AT MIDSTATE VIGIL 1

That was hard for him to fathom, he said, because he loves children. Tuesday's terrorism was devastating, puzzling, the kind of event that makes people "cry out to God for some answers." What's at stake "is more than just a war against terrorism," he said. He said he struggled to understand how a young man could get into an plane full of passengers and aim it at a building full of people believing he would be rewarded in heaven for ending so many lives. "That's not the God I serve," he said. The crowd applauded. "There's a lot of kids whose dads did not come home last night −− or moms." We need to pray for them, he said. The vigil also drew country singer Martina McBride, Mayor Bill Purcell and several members of the clergy. It was sponsored by the five Nashville radio stations operated by Clear Channel Communications. Some attendees saw positive effects coming from the tragedy. "We were on a dig job" Tuesday morning, when news of the attacks first surfaced, said Roto−Rooter plumber John Roberts. The person whose property the men were digging invited them, mud and all, into his home to watch the news on TV, he said. Yesterday, Patterson said, people came out of a Waffle House to the parking lot to listen to his truck radio, over which President Bush was addressing the nation. "We're going to stick together shoulder to shoulder," plumber Chad Morris said. "We're going to get through this as a country." Graphic: PHOTO BY LARRY MCCORMACK / STAFF Caption: Jan Bowman is comforted by her daughter Mackenzie King during a prayer vigil at Centennial Park yesterday to remember those lost.

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

MIDSTATE FEELING IMPACT OF ATTACK

RESPONSES INCLUDE INCREASED SECURITY AND VOLUNTEERISM By LEON ALLIGOOD Staff Writer Middle Tennesseans shared the same emotions of anger and vulnerability with all other residents of the United States yesterday as the images of disaster from New York and Washington reached their homes and workplaces. "I'm just so sad and mad," said Russell Upton, 61, of Greenbrier. "I feel for those people who lost their lives and are injured. But I'm angry. This was an act of war, and that's the way we need to respond. Somebody should have to answer for this." Others began to do what Tennesseans have done traditionally in such times of national tragedy: volunteer to help in the recovery. Many prayed. Dozens of churches opened their doors last night for hastily prepared services to remember the injured and the dead. Several local institutions scrambled to help people cope with the national mourning. Without a doubt, the terrorist acts affected everyone, especially those charged with keeping the peace. Nashville government officials increased protection at the airports and other public buildings, including schools. State officials placed the Capitol and the War Memorial and Legislative plazas under "heightened security" as a precautionary measure, Safety Department spokeswoman Dana Keeton said. The measures are expected to remain in place indefinitely. "It's simply precautionary. We have had no incidents. We are continuing to assess the situation." As Keeton and other state officials stood by in the executive conference room on the ground floor of the Capitol for news briefings throughout the day, state lawmakers, lobbyists and legislative staffers gathered around televisions in Legislative Plaza, waiting for the next development.

MIDSTATE FEELING IMPACT OF ATTACK

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"I'm scared," state Sen. Thelma Harper, D−Nashville, said when she was greeted with a "Good morning, how are you?" Gov. Don Sundquist ordered all flags at state buildings lowered to half staff. "Our hearts go out to those who have been injured and those who have lost their lives. Their families are in our thoughts and prayers." Some of the injured in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., near Washington may be transported in coming days to specialized medical facilities in Nashville for treatment, officials said. The 18−bed burn center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, for example, prepared to accept some of the casualties for treatment. "We're looking at hundreds or thousands of burn victims," said Dr. Jeffrey Guy, burn center director. Vanderbilt is one of 100 burn centers in the country, but it is one of the largest and could take up to 23 burn patients if necessary, officials said. The Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center, adjacent to Vanderbilt, also is preparing to accept victims, spokeswoman Jessica McAllister said. That's because it is a "federal coordinating center" designated by the VA and the Department of Defense to treat mass casualty or disaster victims, she said. Area hospitals are trying to determine how many beds, operating rooms and health−care professionals they can make available −− and whether they need to postpone elective surgeries and admissions −− in case large numbers of casualties are sent to Nashville. The treatment of burn patients is being coordinated by the American Burn Association, using a disaster plan developed during the 1990−91 Gulf War in anticipation of large numbers of burn injuries, Guy said. Within 45 minutes of the attacks, Tennessee emergency officials moved to lock down all state and federal buildings and military installations. At the same time, a little−known team of emergency specialists based in Memphis prepared to leave by military plane for New York City to help in rescue efforts there, said Cecil Whaley, spokesman for the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency. TEMA and federal officials also ordered the Memphis−based Tennessee Task Force One Urban Search and Rescue Team onto high alert. Team members were summoned to Washington last night for their assignments. "They're one of only about 20 federally trained urban search−and−rescue teams across the entire United States, and so they're going to be in the thick of it. We have doctors, trained nurses, dog teams, hazardous materials specialists and others on that team," Whaley said. Troops from Fort Campbell streamed into the Army post throughout the day yesterday. Their vehicles and those of civilians jammed the roadways for miles outside the installation, where there are more than 26,000 military personnel. TVA, which provides almost all the electricity used in Tennessee, staffed its emergency operations center as a precautionary measure and increased vigilance at its three nuclear plants, 11 coal−fired plants and 29 hydroelectric facilities, TVA spokesman John Moulton said. That includes the Gallatin Fossil Plant just east of Nashville and the Cumberland Fossil Plant to the west.

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Because air traffic in and out of Nashville International Airport was canceled, hundreds of passengers were stranded without transportation. A group of family and friends in Nashville to see the Grand Ole Opry hastily reworked their return travel plans yesterday morning. Rather than fly back to Albany, N.Y., they managed to grab two vehicles from the airport's rapidly diminishing pool of rental cars. Overhead, the airport intercom kept reminding travelers that the airways were closed. The outer lobbies and corridors were crammed with stranded passengers, but the gateways grew increasingly vacant, and security officials hustled travelers away from the gates. Gates, normally empty at this hour, were crowded with parked airliners. A liver from a cadaver donor in Nashville, scheduled to be used in a transplant operation in Houston, was delivered by a military plane after the airport was shut down yesterday. Averitt Air, a Nashville−based air cargo service, had a jet on the runway scheduled to take off with the liver yesterday morning when the FAA ordered a ban of all nonmilitary flights, Averitt spokeswoman Rosemary Walsh said. "They were on the runway for about 10 minutes," Walsh said. Averitt's pilots told the tower of its cargo. Flight controllers notified the military, and the liver was sent on a C−130 troop transport plane, she said. Tennessee Donor Services spokeswoman Kathy Prescott, citing patient confidentiality, declined to comment on the matter Local colleges and universities responded to the attacks by holding prayer services, making counselors available and pondering the news in classes. "I had a class this morning," said John Springer, director of institutional research and a professor of physics at Fisk University. "You just didn't feel like talking about things like computer science." Vanderbilt, Middle Tennessee State University, University of the South and other schools offered counseling to anyone on campus who needed it. Vanderbilt also extended hours at several student gathering spots and set up a phone bank where students could make free long−distance calls to friends and family. The university expected many of its students, faculty and staff, who come from around the world, to have connections in New York and Washington. Fisk's new president, Carolynn Reid−Wallace, and five administrators in Reid−Wallace's cabinet had flown to the Washington area Monday night for executive training scheduled for yesterday, Springer said. The sessions at the United Negro College Fund were canceled, and the Fisk officials were trying to decide whether to drive back to Nashville or fly when air travel resumes.

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Numerous firms in the city sent workers home yesterday. U.S. Rep. Bob Clement, D−Nashville, said he was at his Washington, D.C.−area home when news of the New York attacks flashed across his television screen. Clement likened the attacks to the attack on Pearl Harbor, which President Franklin D. Roosevelt called "a date which will live in infamy." "It's of that magnitude," Clement said. Staff Writers Kathy Carlson, Rob Johnson, Anne Paine, Bush Bernard, Sheila Burke, Anita Wadhwani and The Associated Press contributed to this story.

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

SAFE HAVEN DOWN A DARK STAIRWELL

NASHVILLE NATIVE MAKES LONG DESCENT TO GROUND By ANNE PAINE and ADRIANE JAECKLE Staff Writers Anne Prosser called her fiancé and then her mother in Nashville from her smoke−filled office on the 90th floor of the World Trade Center yesterday morning after a plane slammed into the north tower. She couldn't see to get out, but she wanted them to know she was alive. Rescue workers arrived 15 minutes later and led her and others down to the Manhattan street below, switching to three different stairwells because of the smoke and the crowds of people jamming the passageways. What she saw when she emerged from the building will not be forgotten. "It was like you were in hell looking out at the flames and the corpses," Prosser, 29, a native Nashvillian and international finance manager with Clearstream Banking, said last night via telephone. Debris fell as the other tower, the south one and the second one hit, collapsed nearby. "I saw a huge mushroom cloud of dust coming toward me," she said. She ducked into a sporting goods store to escape it. The Harpeth Hall graduate later walked three miles to her apartment in Brooklyn, but not before letting family members know again that she was safe. Her parents, Vi and Don Prosser, of northwestern Davidson County, won't forget the series of calls from their daughter that began with the one from her office. "She was very calm," said Vi Prosser, her own voice occasionally shaking with emotion. "She said, 'I'm OK. We can't get out. We're all right. We're going to get out. I'll call you when we do get out.' " The building shook when her daughter got off the elevator outside her office. She had thought a bomb exploded. SAFE HAVEN DOWN A DARK STAIRWELL 1

"She felt this terrible jar of the building," Vi Prosser said. "She said it was so strong it threw her on the floor and left a burn on her knee. She went in the office and they said, 'We have to evacuate.' " The plane had struck the opposite side of the north tower, probably the saving grace for her daughter, she said. Anne Prosser said later she had crawled to her office from the hallway since she couldn't see. Her mother watched the television after her daughter hung up and waited in terror for the call she prayed would come. "I didn't know what was happening," Vi Prosser said as she watched smoke billowing from buildings, people running and sirens roaring. "I just went to pieces. I thought I had lost her." The phone rang and, at last, it was her daughter. "I just start shaking when I think about it," Vi Prosser said. "She told me she was out of the building and then said, 'Gotta go.' She had to run to get away from the debris." The second tower that was hit was collapsing. Anne Prosser called a third time to tell her parents that she was still all right. In the stairwell, it had been slow going. "There were thousands of people," her mother said. "They had to go through the smoke. The sprinkler system went off. There were 2 or 3 inches of water on the stairs in some places. "The police and fire patrol were everywhere trying to help. Some people couldn't get down the stairs too well and people were helping them. Those people are the heroes in this tragedy. "She got out and we just thank God, because there are so many people who didn't. The rescue people who helped went back into the building. "They were in there when the building collapsed. It's just awful." Prosser, who majored in international studies and French at Penn State, had worked in the north tower for two years and is getting married next month. "I'm very, very fortunate," she said last night. Graphic: SPECIAL TO THE TENNESSEAN Caption: Anne Prosser, a Nashville native, was on the 90th floor of the north tower of the World Trade Center when the first plane hit. She escaped. Caption: Section: Page: 16 SAFE HAVEN DOWN A DARK STAIRWELL 2

Datestamp: 09/12/2001

STUDENTS SUBDUED, AS SCHOOLS PROTECTIVE

By DIANE LONG and DORREN KLAUSNITZER Staff Writers Yesterday's terrorists attacks in New York and at the Pentagon reached all the way into Tennessee classrooms, where educators reacted to protect students and help them cope with the overwhelming news. "It was like something out of a movie or on TV," said sophomore Kevin Caldwell, watching TV in his world history class at Hunters Lane High. "We could hear screaming and see bodies." Except for Warren County to the southeast of Nashville, the state Department of Education had no reports of school closings, said spokeswoman Judith Morgan. But schools everywhere tightened security, and worried parents drove to their children's schools or kept the phone lines busy. All field trips and outdoor play at Eakin Elementary were canceled yesterday morning and all doors except the front door were locked. "We know there is no cause for alarm," Principal Robert Dorris said. But, he said, he was taking extra precautions anyway. At Carter−Lawrence Elementary Magnet School, parent Ben Brown was picking up his 8−year−old daughter Brianna. "I just feel like it's safer because of the situation that's going on," he said. "This is just terrible. Awful." Two Rivers Middle School Principal Robert Blankenship said the school had "a pretty constant flow of parents coming in" to take their children home. But most students stayed put, like those in Caldwell's history class, where students sat silently watching the surreal images flashing across the television screen. Occasionally, the teacher, Mary Ann Gray, broke in with historical context.

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"This is really the first time that terrorists have made a major attack in the U.S.," she said. "There was the 1993 attack on the World Trade Center, but it was much smaller. The bombing at Oklahoma City was a hate group within the U.S." There was no doubt the students were absorbed in the news. "This is the most subdued I've ever seen these people," Gray said. Since there was no directive from the central office yesterday, Metro principals handled the situation differently. At Brookmeade, a K−4 school, Principal Kirk LaVeck said he wanted to keep the students calm. That's why he did not explain to the kids what happened. "We really don't want children in adults' problems," LaVeck said, adding that it was up to parents to tell their children. Other schools were more open. At Eakin Elementary, Dorris said all staff and teachers had been appraised and some of the school's older children were being told of the attacks. Kindergarten and first−grade students at Chadwell Elementary were being shielded from the news, Principal Kim Fowler said, but teachers in grades 2−4 were using their discretion to calmly explain the situation. "My initial reaction was, 'No, let's not watch the TVs and let's not tell the children," Fowler said. But then she recalled her own childhood experience during the 1968 Vietnam protest at Kent State. "I remember sitting in a third−grade class and watching things and talking with my teacher and it made me feel better," Fowler said. Staff writer Natalia Mielczarek contributed to this story. Graphic: PHOTO LISA NIPP / STAFF Caption: Rusty Castleberry, center, and fellow students, including Matt Jones, left, watch television reports on the terrorist attacks during a psychology class at Glencliff High School.

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

AID WORKER'S FATHER MORE WORRIED NOW

NASHVILLIAN SAYS ATTACKS RAISE RISK IN AFGHANISTAN By MICHAEL CASS Staff Writer A Nashville man whose daughter has been on trial in Afghanistan said yesterday's apparent terrorist attacks in Washington and New York made him even more anxious about his daughter's fate. "It increases the level of concern, particularly if this is linked to anyone in Afghanistan," said Tilden Curry, dean of the College of Business at Tennessee State University. "So it raises the risk considerably, I assume." Curry's daughter, Dayna, 29, and other foreign aid workers were arrested more than a month ago by the hard−line Taliban government of Afghanistan on charges of preaching Christianity. The Taliban militia controls 95% of the country and is trying to create the world's purest Islamic state. Dayna Curry, a graduate of Brentwood High School, works for Shelter Now International, a Christian organization that builds housing for refugees around the world. She was in Afghanistan last year and returned in March, her father said. Tilden Curry said his former wife, Nancy Cassell of Thompson's Station, who has been in Afghanistan for more than two weeks, told him their daughter "has been treated reasonably well and is in reasonably good health." He said Dayna is a "very mature young lady" with a "deep faith" and is handling her situation as well as could be expected. Dayna also has done missionary work in Uzbekistan. Tilden Curry said initial reports said his daughter and the other arrested workers would face a three− to 10−day prison sentence and expulsion from Afghanistan if they were convicted. He's heard since then that harsher terms might apply in this case, but he remains hopeful for a short sentence and a quick departure from the country. "That would be the best−case scenario," he said. He said he expects his daughter's trial to last at least another week. Contact staff writer Michael Cass at mcass@tennessean.com or 259−8838. AID WORKER'S FATHER MORE WORRIED NOW 1

Datestamp: 09/12/2001

FISK STUDENT WAITS FOR WORD

By KELLI SAMANTHA HEWETT Staff Writer Fisk student and Washington, D.C., native Caroline Jhingry, 20, parked herself in bed yesterday with a phone, a tissue and her Malcolm X book. Her mother had made it out of D.C., and her stepdad had hitched a ride with four different drivers. They were safe in Maryland. But there was Alma, too. They've known each other since ninth grade, these two aspiring writers. Best friends. Like sisters, really. But Alma Davenport's dorm sits on the midtown side of New York University −− close to the World Trade Center. She's called the NYU campus, Alma's cell phone and even tried e−mail. Nothing. Alma's dad said he hadn't heard from his daughter. He asked Caroline if the dorm was close to the attack. "I told him it wasn't close, that everything was fine −− but it is close," Caroline said softly. "I just couldn't tell him." "It has been a tough day," Caroline said, tearing up. As for the attacks, Caroline didn't want details; she turned off the television hours earlier. "When you see all that destruction on TV, you think about someone you love being inside it," Caroline said. She picked up the phone again. "Come on, Big Alma," Caroline said, her voice little more than a breath. She paused. "It's ringing." She put a finger in her ear to block the noise and inhaled.

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A second later she shook her head. Two rings and a busy signal. Caroline said she wouldn't stop trying. "Just keep praying for Alma."

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Datestamp: 09/12/2001

FAMILIES RELIEVED TO LEARN LOVED ONES ARE SAFE

By NICOLE GARTON Staff Writer At 5:30 yesterday morning, Katrina Neylon of Old Hickory dropped her husband off at the airport, just like she does every week. She hugged him goodbye and saw him onto an American Airlines plane to New York, where his insurance brokerage company has an office. Later, at home, she saw on the news that two airplanes had crashed into the World Trade Center. "I remembered at the airport I had put my arms around him, and I could smell his hair on the back of his neck," she said. "That all of a sudden was just out there in front of me for an hour and a half. I couldn't believe those might have been my last words to him." Nashville may not have been a terrorist target yesterday, but the Midstate didn't go untouched by the tragedy. Calls went out and phones were ringing all across the city as residents tried to track down family and friends in New York and Washington. Overburdened phone lines and damaged telecommunications equipment made it difficult to get through to New York, keeping some families in suspense for hours. Neylon waited an hour and a half for the first bit of news. At 9:19, the phone rang. The Caller ID said it was her husband, Jim, on his cell phone. She picked up the phone, but no one was there. "I had weird thoughts, like what if something had happened and the phone just went off," Neylon said. "Those were a couple of really horrible hours." More than two hours later, Jim called again, this time from a beach house on Long Island. He was safe. For Mary Moran of Nashville, whose brother is a pilot for United Airlines, the good news came quickly. Tim Kurtz had been scheduled to fly from Chicago to New York at 7 a.m. yesterday, but his flight was FAMILIES RELIEVED TO LEARN LOVED ONES ARE SAFE 1

canceled. He's stuck in Chicago until his parents drive from Minnesota to pick him up, but he figures there are people with worse problems. The scene in Washington shocked Charles Overby, a resident of Brentwood and chairman and chief executive officer of The Freedom Forum. He looked out the window of his Arlington, Va., office and saw "the Pentagon was going up in smoke." "It was the most unbelievable scene I've ever witnessed. If the Pentagon was vulnerable, nothing was safe." The Freedom Forum closed its offices for the day, Overby said, and added about yesterday's attack: "We'll remember it the way our parents and grandparents remembered the bombing of Pearl Harbor."

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Datestamp: 09/13/2001

STUDENTS' REACTIONS 'QUIET'

SOME TEACHERS DISCUSS ATTACK; OFFERS OF COUNSELING NOT TAKEN By DIANE LONG Staff Writer Metro teachers were ready to answer student questions about Tuesday's terrorist attacks, but the mood in most classes returned to somewhat normal yesterday. Students are aware of the disasters, but their reaction hasn't been as deeply personal as it was after the nationally televised school shooting at Columbine in 1999, said Mary Jane Woomer, a guidance counselor at Antioch High School. "I think, with Columbine being their peers, it affected them more," she said. "They could identify more. This is different. It's not a school, it's businesses and government." Although counselors were ready to help students sort out their feelings, no one had asked for help yesterday morning. "It's just been amazingly quiet," Woomer said. At Tuesday night's school board meeting, Metro Schools Director Pedro Garcia reported that he was asking educators to openly discuss the tragedies. "We've asked our principals to encourage our teachers so that takes place in all of our classrooms," he said. Other counties took a more restrictive stance. "Middle school and elementary school principals should not show today's events on the TVs in the schools," said Williamson County Schools Director Dallas Johnson in a written memo Tuesday. "High school principals should use discretion with 10th−, 11th− and 12th−graders. Ninth−grade students should not be watching the events." At Antioch yesterday, Principal Sharon Anthony began the morning announcements by talking about the tragedies before a long moment of silence. "I asked them to be reflective in support of the families of the victims and the people in medicine, the military, the police and firemen and the airlines," Anthony said. "Many of their counterparts are facing a STUDENTS' REACTIONS 'QUIET' 1

difficult time." Despite the apparent calm, many Antioch teachers were gearing their lessons toward discussion of the tragedies. In his government class, teacher Philip Stankiewicz smoothly guided his students through a lesson that touched on world politics, possible outcomes and the delicate balance between freedom and national security. "I need to do this with all the classes," he said. "They see little snippets and certainly don't get the background. They realize they can't reach conclusions without knowing the background. This is a great educational moment." But Stankiewicz was sympathetic to the emotions of students such as Takeya Singleton, a senior who still doesn't know the fate of a loved one. "My cousin called me, and her husband works at the Pentagon and she still can't find him," Singleton said, tears welling in her eyes. "It's like you hear about it and it's sad but then you actually hear something has happened to your family." At M.L. King Magnet High, teacher Nancy Schwartz was fortunate to find out early Tuesday morning that her two sons, both in New York, were OK. She wasn't too worried about Matt at New York University, but was relieved to hear from Garr, who works at the World Financial Center near the World Trade Center. But she didn't let the close call interfere with her American history and government classes. "We really dealt with the critical listening and critical thinking skills," Schwartz said. The classes talked about the "whole racial bias issue because they were making assumptions about who did it. They had seen other people lash out. It was definitely something that needed to be dealt with." At Wright Middle School, no students had sought special counseling as teachers returned to regular lessons with a special sensitivity. "I answer all their questions," said seventh−grade geography teacher Cheryl Witherspoon, whose students watched the attacks on TV Tuesday. Yesterday, the students were busy drawing pictures of volcanoes. "It would be missing the opportunity of a lifetime to help a student understand how this country functions," Witherspoon said. "It's a horrible circumstance, but if I didn't seize this opportunity to allow them to learn, I would be doing them an injustice." Staff writers Barbara Estevez−Moore and Peggy Shaw contributed to this report. Graphic: PHOTO BY LISA NIPP / STAFF Caption: Ian Stewart, 12, center, working with classmate Andy Louang A Phay, 13, draws a volcano in his seventh−grade geography class at Wright Middle School. A sense of normalcy returned to the class a day after the tragic attacks in New York and Washington. SINGLETON

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Datestamp: 09/13/2001

TENNESSEANS TELL OF CLOSE CALLS OF RELATIVES, PEERS

By NICOLE GARTON Staff Writer As the dust from four plane crashes settled across the nation yesterday, folks in Middle Tennessee were taking roll, making sure family and friends in New York and Washington were alive and accounted for. Not all of the news was good. But the Midstate is brimming with tales of close shaves, suspenseful hours and those who narrowly escaped being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Lawrence Miller of College Grove was in New York on business and heard the explosions when the two planes hit the World Trade Center. He got on the Internet to find out what happened. Later, he was walking across the street for some Starbucks coffee when the first of the towers collapsed. "This mass of people came running down Pine Street followed by this huge cloud of smoke and debris and dust, and visibility went down to zero in two seconds," he said. "I wouldn't say there was chaos, but people were scared." He made it back to his building before the second tower fell. "It went from daylight to dark again. You couldn't see anything for 10 minutes." Lawyer Jill Levy had stepped outside her office to enjoy a crystal−clear Manhattan morning and wait for co−workers to join her for an appointment in Brooklyn. "She was on the street right on World Trade Center Plaza," across from her office building, said her brother, Metro Medical Examiner Dr. Bruce Levy, yesterday. "She heard an airplane flying low and looked up and saw the first plane" smash into the Trade Center's north tower. It was pandemonium, "people running all over the place screaming and running," she told her brother later. Debris rained from the building as injured people fled. TENNESSEANS TELL OF CLOSE CALLS OF RELATIVES, PEERS 1

Just minutes later, Bruce Levy said, his sister could see a second plane headed toward the towers. "She just ran down the nearest subway and hopped the train uptown," he said. As the subway sped north, she could feel the second jetliner hitting the second tower. Jill Levy called their mother to say she was OK and e−mailed her brother later Tuesday morning, he said. Early Tuesday afternoon, she was able to get a phone line out to call her brother. Even then, her voice shook with emotion, he said. Bruce Levy worked for five years as a medical examiner in New York before coming to Nashville, and he was there when terrorists bombed the World Trade Center in 1993, killing six people. He recalled thinking Tuesday that "they finally finished the job that they started to do eight years ago." Carol Kelso, Williamson Medical Center lab administrative director, did not know that her son was inside one of the World Trade Center buildings when the planes hit. Peter Kelso, whose office is in New Jersey, arrived in New York City Tuesday morning to attend a meeting at the trade center. He stepped out of the train that runs under the center and went to the first floor just as the first plane hit, Carol Kelso said. "He saw fire. He heard people screaming and saw them rushing, panicking." As a former worker at the center, Peter Kelso knew the building, so he found an exit. "When he came out on the opposite side, the second plane hit," she said. Peter Kelso was stranded in Manhattan, but he is fine −− physically, his mother said. On most days, Liesl Reeves works in her office at the World Trade Center. This week, she was sent on assignment to New Jersey. That may have saved her life. Her sister, Natalie, was just a few blocks away and felt the impact of the plane crashes. She called home to Florida and told her parents she thought Liesl, a certified public accountant, was out of town, but she wasn't sure. For hours, grandmother Mildred Burton of Nashville wondered. "It was afternoon before Liesl called her mother," Burton said. "It's very upsetting. Things are still not back to normal." In all the excitement, she has realized she doesn't even know what floor of the World Trade Center her granddaughter worked on. But she's relieved Liesl wasn't there that day. "She might not be living if she'd have worked in that office," Burton said. Nashvillian Joe Sweat has a son who works near the World Trade Center. Steven Sweat, 41, an architect, finally got through to his mother on a cellular telephone. "He said it was hard to breathe because of all the stuff in the air and his skin was itching," his father said. John Olive, a Nashville native who has lived in Washington for the past 15 months, was working in his office

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three miles away when the plane struck the Pentagon. He and his co−workers had watched news of the plane crashes at the World Trade Center and heard speculation that the Pentagon might be another target. "Within perhaps 10 minutes of this discussion, someone called in frantically to a local radio station saying the same thing had just happened at the Pentagon," he said. They hurried to a fourth−floor balcony to see a mushroom of black smoke rise from the structure. "Over the next five minutes, the sky over the Pentagon filled with boiling black smoke," he said. "Sirens sounded from every direction. We were totally silent −− just watching −− none of us ever thinking we would know the feeling of being under attack." Staff writers Kathy Carlson, Duren Cheek and Peggy Shaw contributed to this report.

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Datestamp: 09/14/2001

CAMPUSES UNITE IN WAKE OF TRAGEDY

By MICHAEL CASS Staff Writer As a student from a foreign country, Hom Mitsamphanh wasn't sure how she would be treated after Tuesday's terrorist attacks. But the young woman from Laos hasn't had any trouble. When Mitsamphanh and several friends started praying and singing Amazing Grace the next day at lunchtime at Middle Tennessee State University, dozens of random strangers wandered up and joined in, drawn to the embrace of community, even an unfamiliar one. "That gives me comfort, knowing we can still be one and not be divided by the anger," Mitsamphanh said after a memorial service at MTSU attended by hundreds of people yesterday afternoon. As the nation has struggled to comprehend the devastating assaults, local colleges and universities have been quick to respond in several ways. Administrators, professors and students alike have organized prayer vigils, moments of silence, discussion forums and memorial services, starting within hours of the incidents. Counselors have been made available to those needing to talk, and many professors have woven the news of the day into their classes or simply ignored the scheduled material altogether. Nicholas Sieveking, director of the Psychological and Counseling Center at Vanderbilt University, said the tragedy will hit many college students especially hard. "In general, young people are very idealistic," he said. "They're looking forward to things being what they want them to be and can make them be This is a sudden confrontation of idealism and horrible reality." A student at Belmont University's emotional prayer service Tuesday seemed to be in the grips of that kind of confusion. After the administrator leading the service offered his microphone to anyone who wanted to speak, the student said, "I feel like the rug's been pulled out from under me. What I thought was not what I thought." Many students also have friends in New York and Washington −− large, usually exciting cities where young people often go to try to do big things. Sieveking and Michael Johnson, assistant director of guidance services at MTSU, said just 15 or 20 students CAMPUSES UNITE IN WAKE OF TRAGEDY 1

have spoken to counselors at their schools thus far. They said the numbers could rise considerably as more information about the tragedy's impact becomes available. Many students are seeking solace in small groups. Others are thinking a little bigger. Mark Freeman, a student at American Baptist College in Nashville, helped to organize a citywide prayer service at Bicentennial Capitol Mall yesterday evening because "sometimes you need a place to air your grief." Freeman expected students from several other colleges to join his classmates from American Baptist. "This is a clarion call for all of us to come together," he said. At MTSU in Murfreesboro yesterday, it took just 10 minutes or so to capture many of the week's emotions. Four members of the ROTC presented the colors of the flag. The MTSU Concert Chorus sang a hymn, then asked the diverse crowd to join in America the Beautiful, which drew tears and sniffles from many. A lone trumpeter played taps. Graphic: PHOTO BY BILL STEBER / STAFF Caption: Middle Tennessee State University students, from left, Ailisha Vaughn, Kim Conner and Andrea Jones listen as a bugler plays taps for victims of the recent terrorist attacks during a memorial program at the campus.

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Datestamp: 09/13/2001

UNTIL NOW, THE FEELING OF SIEGE WAS FOREIGN TO US

By DWIGHT LEWIS

"You Americans," the West German official said. "You Americans. You don't know what it is like to have war in your country. "Another war in our country and we can be wiped out." It seems almost like it was yesterday that German Foreign Minister Hans Dietrich Gencher spoke those words so passionately to a group of American journalists in Bonn. Instead, it has been almost 20 years ago since Gencher was explaining how awful war can be to the journalists who were on a two−week tour of West Germany. "It does something to you to be under attack," Gencher said, telling why the West German government was opposed to NATO plans to station cruise and Pershing II missiles in Western Europe. As the journalists made their way through Munich, Bonn, Hamburg, West Berlin and other cities in West Germany during those two weeks in April 1982, they got a first−hand view of just how devastating war can be. Even in East Berlin, which was under Communist government at the time, the picture was the same. There were bombed out buildings seemingly everywhere the journalists turned, the result of air attacks during World War I and World War II. As a member of that group of visiting journalists to West Germany, I have never forgotten Gencher's plea for continued peace in his country. That plea rang out even more clearly Tuesday as terrorists attacked the United States, killing innocent citizens at the Pentagon in Washington, our nation's capital; at the World Trade Center in New York, and in a plane crash outside Pittsburgh, in Shanksville, Pa. "I'm told there is nothing to see that there's nothing larger than a telephone book down there," said Chris Cook, working as a producer with an ABC news team covering the crash of United Airlines Flight 93 in UNTIL NOW, THE FEELING OF SIEGE WAS FOREIGN TO US 1

Shanksville. "I haven't been able to get down to the site of the crash, but they say the wreckage is scattered over a three−to−four mile area." Ironically, Cook was also one of the American journalists who went on tour of West Germany in April 1982. His father, the late Don Cook, was a war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune during World War II. "America is undergoing the kind of assault that London went through during air assaults from Germany near the end of World War II," Chris Cook said over the telephone from Pennsylvania yesterday morning. "There was a strong resolve. "The late journalists Edward R. Murrow used to report from London on the air raids, and Americans couldn't imagine what it was like. "I think now, with the attack on this country, everybody is looking at each other and appreciating each other a little more." Cook, who was born in London in 1945 shortly before World War II ended, added: "My only concern is that I don't think this will be an isolated incident. "We've had the luxury of not paying attention to what's going on elsewhere, and now that has got to change." And then there was Graham Hovey, who served as a war correspondent for the International News Service in Africa and Europe during World War II. Hovey led the group of journalists on the April 1982 tour of West Germany as director of the National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship Program for Journalists at the University of Michigan. "For the first time, America is getting an idea of what mass destruction is like on its homeland," Hovey said yesterday over the telephone. "The people at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii experienced it during World War II, but at the time Hawaii was not a mainland state. "It's hard for us to know how to proceed this time. At Pearl Harbor, we knew that our enemy was Japan. Now, we're not so sure." Hovey, a former member of the New York Times editorial board, added: "It's astonishing how such a coordinated effort could be pulled off, with seemingly the only mistake being the plane that crashed outside Pittsburgh. "I've never witnessed anything like it. I saw Rome bombed in 1944, but only a church was destroyed. "How do we proceed? I don't think we wanted war anyway, but now we should strive to avoid it in the future. I don't mean we should appease those who are responsible for this attack on the United States, but unfortunately we're seeing what it is like to have your homeland savagely attacked." And that is something all of us should hope never happens again, even if it means having to deal with tighter security in airports and even our work places.

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Dwight Lewis is a columnist, regional editor and member of trhe editorial board for The Tennessean. E−mail: dlewis@aol.com. Caption: Section: Page: 29 Byline: Source: From:

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Datestamp: 09/13/2001

CIVIL LIBERTIES UNLIKELY TO SUFFER, LEGAL EXPERTS SAY

THEY CONSIDER THREAT OF RACISM TO BE GREATER By MICHAEL CASS Staff Writer Americans can expect more restrictions on travel but won't necessarily find their civil liberties compromised in the wake of this week's terrorist attacks, several legal experts said yesterday. Soon after hijacked planes rammed into the Pentagon and the twin towers of the World Trade Center on Tuesday, debates about Americans' freedoms and airport security began. People asked if the United States needs to increase the intensity of weapons searches or take other security measures. Kathleen Flake, an assistant professor of American religious history at Vanderbilt University and an attorney who practiced law in Washington, D.C., for 15 years, said she was more concerned about individuals lashing out at people of certain backgrounds than she was about local, state or federal governments infringing on civil liberties. But she said she expects people to go along with any new restrictions as long as they agree the nation is at risk of further attacks. "It all has to do with the extent to which the American people agree with our leadership that we are at war," Flake said. "That changes our understanding of what restrictions are needed to protect ourselves." Flake and the other experts said Arab−Americans and citizens of Middle Eastern countries might come under particular scrutiny from some quarters. But they warned against "profiling." "I'm sure there will be suggestions to increase detention of people of Arab descent," said David Raybin, a Nashville attorney and legal scholar. "Clearly, that would be wrong to do that. For us to single out one particular racial group would utterly destroy what this country is about." Raybin said courts had typically given law enforcement agencies plenty of latitude to conduct searches when they have reason to suspect terrorism. He said he wouldn't be surprised if passengers on certain international flights or flights to particular destinations were subjected to "pat−downs" along with metal−detector searches CIVIL LIBERTIES UNLIKELY TO SUFFER, LEGAL EXPERTS SAY 1

in the coming months. Those searches would be legal as long as they applied to every passenger on those flights. As far as other forms of public transportation are concerned, the courts would consider their vulnerability to attack in deciding whether to allow searches of passengers, Raybin said. Dean Hill Rivkin, a professor of law at the University of Tennessee−Knoxville, said greater restrictions on travel are inevitable. He said he trusts Congress, the Federal Aviation Administration and other officials to "do it in a way that's sensitive to our tradition of civil liberties." Rivkin said he is more concerned about preventing the kind of response the United States made after Pearl Harbor, when thousands of Japanese−Americans were sent to internment camps. "In times like this in our history, there have been measures taken that this country has not been proud of years later," he said. "My hope is that in the wake of this unfathomable tragedy, our country does not react in ways like that." Flake said the Oklahoma City bombing should be "a good lesson" to mitigate against that kind of action. Soon after that incident in April 1995, many people speculated that Middle Eastern groups were responsible. American Timothy McVeigh was later convicted and put to death for the bombing. Moreover, many people from Middle Eastern countries have come to the United States for good reasons, Flake said. "People may be tempted to suspect the very people who came to this country as refugees from the very people who attacked us," she said. Raybin said some people may call for a requirement that people wear national identification cards. Or they may want random searches of airline passengers. That wouldn't be the right way to go, he said. "If we become a police state in the name of security, then those terrorists will have won this war," he said. "There's always been a tension between security and freedom, and I think Americans have always walked this delicate line. We should be vigilant not to lose what makes us Americans." Contact staff writer Michael Cass at mcass@tennessean.com or 259−8838. Caption: RAYBIN

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Datestamp: 09/14/2001

LOCAL ANTI−MUSLIM INCIDENTS AFFECT CENTER, SCHOOL, MARKET

By ANITA WADHWANI Staff Writer Reports of anti−Muslim harassment have begun trickling in here. Tuesday evening, a woman stood outside the Al−Farooq Islamic Center in east Nashville and hurled rocks. She yelled "you guys did this" and then ran off, said Abdishakur Ibrahim, the mosque's Imam, or religious leader. "We have been very concerned about repercussions," Ibrahim said. "We condemn the terrorists in the strongest terms. We also need the support of the Nashville community here to make sure our people are protected also." Yesterday, Ibrahim's 16−year−old sister, Sahra Ibrahim, was threatened by a boy on a school bus returning home from Antioch High School. "He told me, 'We don't want you in our country,' " she said. The day before, eight students surrounded her in the cafeteria and taunted her about her head scarf, before trying to yank it off. Antioch High officials quickly reacted, Ibrahim said, by calling a school assembly Wednesday to admonish students about acting respectfully. At a market on Murfreesboro Road on Wednesday, a white man made threats to several inside before driving off, police said. The market's patrons and workers are immigrants, said Lt. Steve Hewitt. Metro Human Relations Commission Chairman Art Reprovick called the incidents "very troublesome." "We need to be very careful in how we express our anger over the tragic incidents of this week," Reprovick said. "We've got to be very careful in jumping to conclusions and placing the blame for anything that happened in New York on anyone in Nashville." The Human Relations Commission and the American Civil Liberties Union are available to advise residents LOCAL ANTI−MUSLIM INCIDENTS AFFECT CENTER, SCHOOL, MARKET 1

who may have been targets for hate speech, discrimination or assault. The Human Relations Commission can be reached at (615) 880−3370. The American Civil Liberties Union can be reached at (615) 320−7142. Police continue to remain on alert for anti−immigrant incidents in schools and throughout Nashville. The Human Relations Commission and the American Civil Liberties Union are taking complaints, and law enforcement officials are urging anybody who has been victimized to call Metro police.

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Datestamp: 09/16/2001

BRENTWOOD COUPLE WAIT

By EMILY HEFFTER STAFF WRITER Nancy and Otis Tolbert of Brentwood are awaiting confirmation that their son, Lt. Cmdr. Otis Vincent Tolbert, was killed in Tuesday's terrorist attack on the Pentagon. Officials have said no more survivors are expected to be recovered from the wreckage, but Tolbert's body has yet to be found. The younger Tolbert, who worked in Navy intelligence, had a wife and three young children. He was in the process of moving his office from the part of the building that was hit in Tuesday's attack. He was "... the best son a father could have," said his father, a former Navy aviator and now a United Airlines pilot. The younger Tolbert wanted to fly for the Navy like his father, but hurt his knee and was disqualified from training. Instead, he moved to the Washington area to work as a Naval officer. "He passed doing the thing that he loved," Otis Tolbert said in a telephone interview last night. There is nothing to do but wait and mourn, the father said. When the paperwork is signed and the mem−orial service is complete, "we can get on with our lives." Lt. Cmdr. Tolbert, whose family called him Vince, had a wife, Shari Tolbert, and three children: Amanda, 9, Brittany, 7, and Anthony, 18 months. He was to turn 39 at the end of this month. He was born in Millington, Tenn., and grew up in Lemoore, Calif. A star football player in high school, he earned a scholarship to play at Fresno State University. Lt. Cmdr. Tolbert had been stationed at the Pentagon less than two years. His father was flying a plane to Tokyo on Tuesday when the airports closed and he landed in San Francisco. Upon landing, he hurried to a lounge to watch the news. "When I first saw it I thought it was maybe something from Steven Spielberg," he said.

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Then he learned the Pentagon also had been hit. He called his wife, who had talked to their daughter−in−law. After that, the news worsened. Officials an−nounced Wednesday they didn't expect to find any of the missing at the Pentagon alive. "Knowing my wife, I said, 'Well, I've got to get to her,' " Otis Tolbert said. So he rented a car and drove from Fresno to Brentwood. On Thursday, he and his wife, Nancy, went to Washington to wait. Caption: TOLBERT

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Datestamp: 09/16/2001

MUSLIMS WORRY ABOUT REPRISALS

AREA FOLLOWERS OF ISLAM URGED TO BE CAUTIOUS By ANITA WADHWANI STAFF WRITER Halima Sabile has always found it difficult to be different in Nashville. But, since Tuesday, being a Muslim and an immigrant from Morocco has gotten a lot harder. "At Kroger's, people come near to me and laugh and call me 'ninja,' " Sabile said. As she talked, only her brown eyes were visible through a slit in a gold−printed headscarf. "Sometimes my son tells me, 'Mommy, don't come to pick me up from school.' " Last week, her 6−year−old's wish was granted. Sabile says she is now afraid to leave her home. Since Tuesday's terrorist attacks on the United States, scattered reports of harassment and reprisals have surfaced. Vandals, rock throwers and shouting, angry people have targeted immigrants from the Middle East and South Asia and Muslims of all backgrounds. The Council on American−Islamic Relations has logged more than 300 such incidents nationwide since Tuesday. That number may be much higher because of underreporting among the nation's 7 million Muslims, said Joshua Salaam of CAIR. In Nashville, where an estimated 15,000 Muslims live, police, school officials and Islamic leaders say they have heard of a half dozen such incidents. They include a teen−ager taunted by classmates in a school cafeteria, a woman driven off Highway 70 by two men making obscene hand gestures, and an Egyptian immigrant, who is a Christian, confronted by a man screaming insults at a convenience store on Murfreesboro Road. "Some people don't think we have a heart, that we are not touched by this," said Kasar Abdullah, a 19−year−old student at Tennessee State University and a Kurdish refugee. "I feel the same pain for this MUSLIMS WORRY ABOUT REPRISALS 1

terrible thing. Then, I feel it doubly because of the suspicions." Abdullah, her sister, cousin and a friend sat in a Belmont−area Burger King talking about Tuesday's attacks and what it means now to be a Muslim in Nashville. The young women −− all wearing the traditional head scarf, or hijab, of Muslim women −− had just come from Friday's midday services at the Islamic Center of Nashville, where they heard a spiritual leader caution Muslims to stay in groups when in public. "I am proud to be a Muslim," Abdullah said. "The hijab is a symbol for the world to know who I am. I don't want to hide." The group talked about the ordinary difficulties of being Muslim in Nashville: the misconceptions about Islam, the double−takes from job interviewers, the difficulty in finding a place for prayer. "My co−workers can take smoke breaks. But a lot of times you have to lie and say you are going to go to the bathroom just to pray," said Abdullah, who has a part−time job at Hecht's in Hickory Hollow Mall and prays, according to Muslim custom, five times a day. To those ordinary daily challenges has been added a new fear: being mistaken as members of a so−called sleeper cell of terrorists such as the ones that U.S. officials say are responsible for the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York and the Pentagon on the outskirts of Washington, D.C. "I've been fearful and uncomfortable for the first time living in Nashville," said Zainab Halek, a green−eyed Nashville native of European descent who changed her name when she converted to Islam last year. "I've specifically chosen clothes that are more Western−looking this week. Every time I go shopping, people look at me like I've got a gun hidden under my clothes." Meanwhile, Suad Abdullah, a Kurdish refugee, said, "It has always been difficult, and people have many wrong ideas about us. But the stares we get are more frightening now." Compounding that fear, for some Muslims who have fled violence in other countries, is a kind of flashback to memories of other explosions and other wars. "It is painful because we thought we left this behind," said Labeed Alkoka, who fled violence in Palestine two decades ago. "I thought we were safe here." Alkoka said his parents in Jordan had called him regularly since Tuesday to make sure he was safe and had suffered no harassment. In recent days, fear has extended to non−Muslim Arab−Americans as well. On Wednesday, a white man ran into Gold Star convenience store on Murfreesboro Road, screaming insults at its owner, George Hanna. "He actually said, 'You've got to close down,' " but he was very upset and very frustrated and drove out of the parking lot like crazy," said Hanna, an immigrant from Egypt who is a Christian. "He scared my customers. I wasn't afraid because I knew that if he was going to do something he would have done it. He just wanted attention."

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Despite the fear of backlash, Nashville−area Muslims continue to react to the tragedy with the same shock, grief and outpouring of support for victims as their fellow residents. The day after the attacks, a group organized by area mosques headed to the Red Cross to donate blood. Mosques are encouraging members to make donations to relief efforts. And, like the rest of us, they pray. Anita Wadhwani covers general assignments and communities. Contact her at 259−8821 or wadhwani@tennessean.com.

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Datestamp: 09/16/2001

TV IMAGES OF TERROR CAPTIVATE CLASS

4TH−GRADERS GET COMFORT FROM TEACHER AS ATTACKS UNFOLD BEFORE THEIR EYES By NATALIA MIELCZAREK STAFF WRITER Deatrice Swett's fourth−grade class at Dan Mills Elementary was reviewing rounding numbers Tuesday morning when Swett got a call. It was her husband, calling to tell her about the attack in New York. Just before the first tower collapsed, Swett made a quick decision to use reality as a lesson in history. She turned on the TV in her classroom and watched with her students what unfolded on the East Coast. "Is this real, Ms. Swett? What's going on?" Those were the first questions. As they sat clustered around the television screen, they were shocked and confused. Four children cried, and those with relatives in New York and Washington became motionless and quiet. All of the children wanted to know if they and their parents would be OK. "While you're with me, I'm protecting you," Swett told them. Swett was among the many teachers nationwide last week who worked to help children process the tragedy at their own pace. Forced by circumstances, she and other teachers took on several roles. She was the temporary parent on Tuesday morning who made sure the children felt safe. She was the lecturer who sneaked in educational lessons in between bombings. Most significantly, she and her colleagues turned into child psychologists. Suddenly, teachers had to come up with coping mechanisms for children whose worlds temporarily collapsed. The Tennessean visited with Swett's class two days after the attacks. We asked her students to write down what they felt as they watched the attacks, why they thought the tragedy happened and how America ought to react. Based on their responses and the discussion that followed, one conclusion comes to mind. The 22 children in Swett's class know what happened, but they need help and time to grasp the tragedy. First reactions TV IMAGES OF TERROR CAPTIVATE CLASS 1

When Aston Thompson, 9, saw the New York towers crumble on thousands of people, he said, he was shocked. When asked about what his immediate thoughts were as he looked at the screen, he wrote, "I thought that it was very bad. I felt very sad. It made me have a horrible dream. And it was hard to not cry, but I didn't. Especially since my cousin is in New York." Michael Nguyen, 9, worried about all the children in New York and Washington who lost their parents. He and others said they felt sorry for children who came home but were not going to see their moms and dads, ever. Michael wrote, "I thought that there was going to be a World War III." Television coverage was fraught with powerful words like war and terrorism, which apparently caught students' attention. Mallory Crabtree, 9, said she thought about her dad and what would happen if he were called to war. "I also thought about what George Bush said, that this will not be tolerated." Though most students did have a sense of something tragic happening on the screen, many remained puzzled, Swett said. As they watched the plane crash into the second tower and saw the clouds of smoke billowing from the ruins of the Pentagon in Washington, they had a hard time making sense of the events. The TV commentaries, targeted primarily for grownups, were confusing, as well. Because what does a 9−year−old know about hijackers and war? The children's confusion was evident in some of their responses. On Thursday, Kendria LaBoard, 9, couldn't understand why the pilots didn't avoid one of the tallest buildings in the world. She wrote, "Well, I didn't feel good. It was so sad that the planes just crashed. They should have been looking where they were going." Though most of them are getting the help they need from their teachers, parents and school counselors to digest what happened, the fourth−graders said they had some coping mechanisms of their own. Nick Kemry, 9, said he has been playing football, baseball and soccer with his friends to take his mind off of the tragedy. Other children, too, found a release in physical activities. "I usually go outside and play with my brother Alexander," said Rebecca Powell, 9. "I go to the neighbors' and jump on the trampoline. That usually takes my mind off of what happened." Questions without answers As Swett stood in front of her class on Tuesday, she struggled to find an understandable way to explain to the children what was happening and why. "I said that something terrible has happened in New York, that someone has flown a plane into the building," Swett said later in the week. "They didn't know what a hijacker was so we looked it up in a dictionary. We also looked up war." As television commentators speculated about who was to blame for the massacre, Swett and her students pulled down a world map to locate all the countries mentioned. Then came the hard part −− what to tell children about the reason for the bombings and killings. Neither Swett nor the television reports had much to go by. They simply didn't know.

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Two days after the bombings, Swett's fourth−graders recited the Pledge of Allegiance and sang the national anthem before class started, as they usually do. But this time, it was different, Swett said. "I told them to listen to the words of our national anthem, to what they mean. This morning, when we did it, they all stood proud." Questions on disaster children were asked We asked children in Deatrice Swett's fourth−grade class at Dan Mills Elementary on Wednesday to write down their answers to three questions to help them sort out their feelings about the national tragedy. Here are some of their answers: When you heard about the Washington and New York City attacks yesterday, what were your thoughts? "My thoughts were bad. I was mad at how they did that, and I felt bad for those who died." −− Dustin Bailey "I thought it was going to damage the city with sadness. I didn't know it was going to affect the United States of America." −− Karen Sweet Why do you think someone would want to blow up buildings and hurt people in America? "Because they probably think the way we live is not the way they live, and they don't like America." −− Rebecca H. Powell What do you think America as a country should do about the attacks? "As a country I think we should come together and try to do something in a nonviolent way. But if it doesn't work, well, then I don't know what to think." −− Mallory Crabtree "I think they should destroy all the bombs so there will be no more hijacked planes, killing or wars." −− Michael Nguyen Graphic: PHOTOS BY RICKY ROGERS / STAFF Caption: Dan Mills Elementary School fourth−graders Aaron Steel, left, Tabitha Chayarath and Laura Pewitt answer questions about Tuesday's terrorist attacks on the United States. Deatrice Swett, fourth−grade team leader at Dan Mills Elementary School, looks over Thomas Krantz's responses about Tuesday's terrorist attacks. "I have no idea why someone would want to do something like this. And for what purpose? I wish I knew why," Thomas said.

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Datestamp: 09/15/2001

MIDSTATE RESIDENTS GATHER TO CRY, PRAY AT RALLIES, GAMES

By LAURA FRANK AND WARREN DUZAK STAFF WRITERS Saying the event was "exactly what Nashville needed," Mayor Bill Purcell joined about 3,000 people on the Capitol's east side yesterday for a rally and prayer vigil. "I am convinced, and I hope you are convinced, there is no room for hate in this world," state Rep. Lois DeBerry told the packed crowd. Downtown office workers on their lunch breaks, schoolchildren, firefighters, veterans and others cheered and joined hands to pray together for victims of Tuesday's terrorist attacks. "This was the first time I was finally able to cry since it happened," said Barbara Himlin, 26, of Antioch. "It was just being with so many people together. I'm proud of all of us. I'm proud of our country. Knowing what's important and everyone being together made the difference." Most high school football games went on as scheduled last night, with some games drawing unusually large crowds. At the match between Murfreesboro rivals Riverdale High and Blackman High, the crowd overflowed Blackman's 5,000−seat stadium. Special ceremonies honoring those who died in the terrorist attacks were held before several games. At Montgomery Bell Academy, students gathered on the field and led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance. At the Trousdale County−Portland game, players for both teams wore flag decals on their helmets while coaches wore red, white and blue ribbons on their shirts. At the Islamic Center of Nashville, about 100 people gathered for weekly Friday prayers, while a hired security officer and two police officers patrolled outside. The meeting was part sorrowful prayer and part angry condemnation of Tuesday's destruction. Muslim leaders stressed the religion's peace−loving nature and urged followers to "be good examples of Islam so people will know what the religion is about." Rabbi Mark Shiftan, at last night's service at The Temple, noted that as the Jewish new year, Rosh Hashana, approaches Monday, the thousands of deaths by terrorism bring into focus the new year themes of life and death. People have the choice to uphold life and human dignity or desecrate them, he said. In times like these, experts say, events such as those yesterday play an important role. MIDSTATE RESIDENTS GATHER TO CRY, PRAY AT RALLIES, GAMES 1

"One reason is that people don't know how to react," said Leonard Bickman, director of the Vanderbilt Center for Mental Health Policy. "They need each other to help interpret their feelings. Social support is an important element of well−being. And also telling the story over and over gives people some sense of control over it. "One of the most frightening things about something like these attacks is the sense of unpredictability. That's not to minimize the loss of life, but our lives are unpredictable now." Yesterday's crowd, spilling over the side of Capitol Hill, was a cross section of emotions. Some worried about signs of possible U.S. military action. Some urged it. "I'm scared for my 27−year−old husband, who is of drafting age," Himlin said. "We need to get real aggressive," said Dave Gardner, 60, of Nashville, commandant of the Marine Corps League. He and two fellow Marines held a giant American flag at the edge of the crowd. "I'm talking total annihilation. We should turn Afghanistan into a glass plate." Some celebrated the country's melting pot of immigrants and their ability to live together. Others were concerned the country has let in too many outsiders. Singer Joni Wilson told the crowd she was from Canada, an immigrant, she pointed out, in a country of immigrants. "I am proud of my adopted country," she said. "We open our doors to a lot of people and this is how we get paid? It's not right," said Randy Spears, 27, of Nashville. "I don't know who we'll be fighting," said Barry Cauthron, a Vietnam veteran. "I do think we've let too many of them in, foreigners in general." Cauthron brought his two grandsons to the rally. The boys spotted some Army recruiters and wanted to shake hands. "We like Army men," said Tyler Babin, 7, holding the hand of his brother Tanner, 5. "I don't like the crash very much. I don't think it should have happened. I think that person shouldn't have done that. I just don't like that." Staff Sgt. Felix Montes, 34, smiled. His mother worked on the 17th floor of the second World Trade Center tower hit by hijacked jetliners Tuesday. She was outside on her morning break and escaped harm, Montes said. However, his cousin, a New York City police officer, is one of the thousands of people missing. "He looked up to me, but I look up to him," said Montes, who plans to drive to New York today. "I want to do my part to help. If I can move a rock or move a bucket, I want to do my part. For now, it's good to see everyone out here." Graphic: PHOTO BY JOHN PARTIPILO / STAFF Caption: Diane Fyke of Nashville sobs during the playing of Lee Greenwood's God Bless the USA at the Capitol yesterday.

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Datestamp: 09/15/2001

VOLUNTEER FROM NASHVILLE DESCRIBES GRISLY SIGHTS AT REAL 'GROUND ZERO'

By JENNIFER PEEBLES AND LEON ALLIGOOD

STAFF WRITERS The commentators on television say they're reporting live from "ground zero." They tell viewers that people on the scene are holding out hope for survivors. Neither of those statements is true, says Luke Son. What people aren't seeing on television, Son said, is the unreal world from the real ground zero: a world without hope for the missing. "I worked for 29 hours. During that time maybe a dozen bodies came off of the field. They're standing on up to 6,000 more (under the rubble). It's incomprehensible," he said. The 19−year−old University of Tennessee pre−med major from Nashville just spent a grueling shift as a rescue worker at the World Trade Center site, during which time he and his compatriots found just one complete body. "Mostly it's parts of bodies," he said, his young voice shaking. The "ground zero" that television newsmen say they report from isn't really ground zero, he said. There's a five−story, block−long hole in the ground that we haven't seen on television that workers like Son have dubbed "the pit." "That is the real ground zero," he said. "People see it on TV and say, 'Oh my God, there's a building there that's fallen.' That's nothing. You go behind there, and it's nothing. The World Trade Centers are not there anymore," he said. "The World Trade Centers are everywhere." VOLUNTEER FROM NASHVILLE DESCRIBES GRISLY SIGHTS AT REAL 'GROUND ZERO' 1

Son remembered standing outside a broken window in the triage area in the American Express building. "When they cleaned out the area right next to that window I found out that I had been standing on top of a torso. I helped pull that one out. It was right there. We cleaned out the area for about 30 feet and the only other thing we found was a piece of skull and hair." Most victims will not ever be identified because workers are finding merely arms, legs or torsos that are rapidly decomposing due to the heat and moisture at the wreckage site, Son said. The one complete body the workers found on Son's shift had deteriorated so badly the tissue began falling off the person's bones. The young Nashvillian said there was talk that a quarantine will soon be imposed on the site because of the number of decomposing bodies. Son predicted workers will be allowed in only while wearing full biohazard suits and oxygen tanks, which will slow recovery efforts. Rescuers are working as long as 36 hours, then going to the triage centers to collapse and cry, the 1999 Hillsboro High graduate said. Son said he was fine as long as he was working, but then he had to be picked up and carried to the triage center. Thursday afternoon he collapsed and was taken to his aunt's home in Scarsdale, a suburb. Tuesday morning, Son turned on the television and was shocked by the images of two commercial airliners being used as guided missiles. He called his mom, Dr. Kay Son, a Nashville−area physician, and told her of his plans. "I tried to talk him out of it, because I didn't think his old car would make it, but he was determined to go," she said. "I told him to be careful and to call me." Son drove his 1993 Volkswagen Fox into the night, arriving in New Jersey, across from the city, about 3 a.m. To reach Manhattan, "I had to literally sneak in and hid in some boxes of food in a van that was coming in," he said. "I just wanted to help rescue the living, if I could," he said. But Son said there was no life to be found. Contact Jennifer Peebles at (615)259−8074 or by e−mail at jpeebles@tennessean.com and Leon Alligood at (615) 259−8279 or by e−mail at lalligood@tennessean.com. Caption: LUKE SON, UT STUDENT FROM NASHVILLE Caption: Section: Page: 1 Byline: Source: From:

VOLUNTEER FROM NASHVILLE DESCRIBES GRISLY SIGHTS AT REAL 'GROUND ZERO'

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Datestamp: 09/17/2001

'NIGHTMARES FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE'

A YOUNG FORMER NASHVILLIAN WAS TWO BLOCKS FROM THE TRADE CENTER WHEN IT WAS HIT; NOW SHE FEARS ... By DIANE LONG STAFF WRITER Lots of people were worried about kids who were in school Tuesday morning when the hijacked airplanes hit New York and Washington, D.C. But what if your school was just two blocks away from the disaster? Two years ago, Anna Pei was a seventh−grader at Nashville's M.L. King High School. Now she's a ninth−grader at New York's Stuyvesant School, just down the street from the World Trade Center. She wrote about her terrifying experiences and e−mailed her friend Jenny Tang, a ninth−grader at M.L. King. With both girls' permission, here are excerpts from the e−mail revealing Anna's close call: I'm crying right now. I thought I was over it. My school is right down the street from the WTC. At 8:40, I got to school and a couple minutes later, me and my friend heard a loud sound like something in the air was going by really fast. Then a kind of boom. The building trembled a little, but we didn't think it was anything serious. At that point, we started hearing sirens in the street. There aren't any windows on the first floor so we couldn't see anything and we didn't want to move because I had a broken toe and it's hard for me to get around. I went to the sixth floor for English and there was a girl in the elevator who was crying hysterically because her dad worked in the UN headquarters here. When I got out of the elevator, all the kids were trying to call their parents on their cells. For some reason, they didn't work and everybody was freaking out. The principal got on the intercom again and said as of now there have been attacks in both NYC and Washington. Everybody got so silent.

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Outside, you could hear this huge roar of all these helicopters, sirens, people screaming and you could see out of the window all this smoke. Inside you could smell it. I wasn't sure if it was all over, if at any moment they would bomb the whole street. The principal came on the intercom and told us to go to our homerooms. Mine was on the 10th floor and all the elevators weren't working for safety precautions. I had to hop up all the way from the sixth floor to the tenth floor with my other friend in my English class. At one of the floors, we stopped and looked out the window. It was facing opposite from the WTC, but it faced the water and the highway. There were literally thousands of people on that highway walking out of the city. Everybody was huddled up against the windows and we could see building 1, the one that got hit first. It was before it collapsed and you could see how the upper 10 or 20 floors were completely up in fire. I held my friend's hand and tried not to cry, because a couple of people were completely sobbing and they were making everybody nervous. But I can't blame them. One girl said her dad worked in the buildings. We all were looking at the buildings and all of a sudden, I saw a person lean out of the building and jump. I saw three or four people jump and everybody was in a state of shock. I had to look away from the window because if I looked anymore, I would loose control and start getting hysterical. The principal came on and told everybody that we were evacuating and for everybody to go down the stairs and start heading toward 14th Street. I knew there was no way I could walk to 14th Street on my crutches. That would normally take 30 minutes if you didn't have a cast on. I had to hobble down to the first floor all the way from the 10th floor and my cast got all torn up at the opening where you can see my toes. We got down to the lobby, and there were so many people down there. There were all these firefighters who were covered in soot and ashes. There was one guy and his face was completely black from all the ashes and he was coughing and throwing up, huddled against the wall. There was a policeman and his glasses were completely twisted and the glass was broken. He was completely white with soot and his uniform was in tatters. We walked out of the way, next to the water and the police kept on telling us to keep going. There were hundreds of people there. My English teacher walked with me and every few minutes, we would pause and let me rest and we would look back at the fire and mayhem. We walked for about two hours. There was smoke and ashes everywhere and I had never seen New York like I saw it that day. It was so loud, but so quiet. There were the sounds of helicopters and ambulances, but the people walking around were so quiet, like they couldn't believe it. People were just looking at the smoke, dazed. It was the weirdest thing. Everybody was helping everybody out. Some guy took my backpack and walked with me and my teacher back to my apartment. Another guy gave me some water. When I finally got home everybody was watching the news. CBS had apparently said that all Stuyvesant parents could go to the building and pick their kids up. Stuy (the nickname for the school) was apparently very angry at (CBS). My mom had actually gone out looking for me. I think I'll have nightmares for the rest of my life. Do you know what it's like to watch people die? To jump out of buildings?

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I was watching the news yesterday and they were showing all these pictures of the rubble and where the WTC used to be and I could look out my window and see exactly the same thing. I wasn't even in the building, but I could feel the terror and I am scarred for life. I am not kidding. I can't believe this is happening. I haven't talked about this yet with anybody. Writing it all down makes me feel better. Caption: Section: Page: 6 Byline: Source: From:

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Datestamp: 09/19/2001

CAR−TORCHINGS SHAKE ANTIOCH FAMILY

By ANITA WADHWANI Staff Writer Two cars belonging to an immigrant from Iraq were set afire in Antioch late Monday night, police said yesterday. "I heard something hit my door, like a bump, bump, bump," said Aqil Yassin Al−Timimi, the father of four. "I was scared, because I am a Middle Eastern man and I was afraid for my family. I didn't see anybody. It was dark." Al−Timimi, a Muslim, said he is convinced the attacks were based on his race and religion. Metro police and fire officials were still investigating the incident last night to determine if that is the case. "At this point, the source and origin of the fire has not been determined," said Metro police spokesman Don Aaron. "We have not in any way at this point determined whether it was a fire based on Mr. Al−Timimi's ethnicity, national origin or religion." Al−Timimi said the fires are the latest in a series of incidents involving his family since last week's acts of terrorism. He was verbally harassed outside his Antioch Middle Eastern foods store, he said, and classmates of his 10−year−old daughter at Apollo Middle School have asked her "Why don't you go back to your country?" About a dozen incidents involving backlash against Nashville area Muslims and immigrants over the past week have been reported to police and community leaders. They include a woman throwing rocks at an east Nashville mosque the day of the bombings and two men trying to drive a woman in traditional Muslim dress off U.S. 70 in their pickup truck last Wednesday. Earlier in the day yesterday, a group of Middle Eastern and immigrant agencies organized by the Nashville New Americans Coalition held a press conference to speak in support of the United States and urge residents to refrain from stereotyping. "The Islamic refugees here are shocked and hurt by the tragedy," said Nabaz Khoshnaw a Kurdish refugee living in Nashville. "The fanatics who commit terror do not represent the peaceful faith of Islam any more than Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh represents Christianity or patriotism. We hope that every American understands this because we fled the same kind of terror in the Middle East that happened to CAR−TORCHINGS SHAKE ANTIOCH FAMILY 1

America last week." Police said that any crimes proven to be committed based on the victim's religion or ethnic background will be prosecuted as hate crimes. "Hate crimes will not be tolerated in this city and we will make every effort to find the person or persons responsible," Aaron said. Fire officials are asking anyone with information about the fire to call (615) 862−5230. Graphic: PHOTO BY FREEMAN RAMSEY / STAFF Caption: Aqil Al−Timimi looks over one of two vehicles that were torched Monday night at his residence in Antioch. The one pictured is a 1999 Chevy Suburban. The other was a 1994 Chevy Lumina LS, which was burned on the side slightly.

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Datestamp: 09/19/2001

WOMEN LOST HUSBAND IN '83 ATTACK

By LEON ALLIGOOD STAFF WRITER SPRING HILL −− Carol Weaver felt the pain caused by last week's terrorist attacks perhaps more than most Middle Tennesseans. As she watched and read dispatches from the rubble's front line, Weaver confronted a host of gut−wrenching emotions that nearly turned her life upside down 18 years ago. In October of 1983, she was Carol Gaines, still feeling like a newlywed after 16 months of marriage to Marine Cpl. William R. Gaines. He had just turned 21; she was 20. On Oct. 23, 1983, a suicide terrorist drove a truck laden with explosives through protective barricades and into the lobby of a multistory barracks that housed over 350 U.S. military personnel stationed there on a peacekeeping mission. When the explosives detonated, the building was ripped from its foundation, and walls collapsed, killing 241 American soldiers and wounding more than 100 others. Carol Gaines became a widow. As she revisited her pain in the wake of the recent terrorist attacks, the Spring Hill woman said time and faith had taught her valuable lessons in coping with loss. Chief among her advice is to understand that due to the nature of terrorism the finger of blame may never point to those responsible for a loved one's death, despite government's assurances. "I don't recall them ever pinning the bombing on a particular person," she said. Instead, blame was placed on Islamic zealots, who may have received training in several Middle Eastern countries. "That was a difficult thing to understand. We understood that it wasn't the whole country. We knew that some people had nothing to do with it. It was religious fanatics who were willing to go on a suicide mission," she said. "To me it seemed selfish for that one person to bring down 241 innocent people to proclaim something they wanted to say." Weaver blamed God for the tragedy but later found solace in the Bible, II Kings to be exact. "I have heard your prayer and seen your tears. I will heal you," she quoted. WOMEN LOST HUSBAND IN '83 ATTACK 1

For Weaver, life after terrorism led her to Tennessee. She married Stephen Weaver in 1985, and they have three children, ages 13, 8 and 9 months. "I remember thinking that I could not spend my time blaming whomever for whatever. I decided to put all my energy into starting to heal and letting the government take care of what they need to do," she said. n Graphic: PHOTO BY DELORES DELVIN / STAFF Caption: Carol Weaver of Spring Hill holds a photo of her husband Marine Cpl. William R. Gaines from Beruit, Lebanon, in September of 1983. He was killed a month later in a terrorist attack.

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Datestamp: 09/18/2001

ATTACKS REVIVE ANGER, BAD MEMORIES

TERRORISTS BREAK WWII VETS' WALL OF SILENCE HOLDING BACK THEIR TRAUMATIC DAYS AT WAR By SYLVIA SLAUGHTER Staff Writer MURFREESBORO −− In the Tennessee Veterans Home here, the old vets' message is solid: Walk softly around these memories of mine. The analogy between World War II, their war and the terrorists' suicidal attacks Tuesday on American soil often opens old wounds still festering some 60 years later. The reluctance to talk is, as one veteran says, "just our way of getting through the night." "We're old; we're helpless to defend our country now," says Jackson Miner, a World War II vet who served in the Signal Corps. The 80−year−old vet offers nothing else for a few minutes, puts down his lunch fork, stares off in the distance, then grabs your arm. Something is on his mind, he says. Something he sums up in a single word: "Anger." Not anger at his infirm body, but anger that terrorists would attack the country he and his generation shed blood to defend. "If I could, I would put on my fightin' boots tomorrow," he says. That said, the old vet looks down, toward the floor. You follow his eyes and see what he can't say: Fightin' boots would do him no good. He has no feet. Did he lose his feet in the war? you ask. Jackson Miner doesn't answer.

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He's said enough −− maybe too much for now. His fork remains vacant, his peas and carrots remain on his plate. His tablemate, 91−year−old Gene Baskin, understands his friend's anger. He feels it, too. "I was in the Air Force in the Big War," he says. "I lost two good buddies, tail−gunners, who were doing their duty for God and their country. The terrorists are devils and war is hell. I remember one battle in Italy. The planes came in. I picked up bones. I picked up brains." Mayland Coursey, 77, won't talk about the hells of war. Instead, he escapes the memories of not one war, but of three he was in, by inviting you to his room where he has a slide show of pictures he took during his tenure with the Air Force during WWII, the Korean War and Vietnam. He wants you to know that his tours had at least two perks beyond the friendships he formed. He shows a picture he snapped of Marilyn Monroe in a fighter bomber and somewhere, he says, he has Bob Hope's autograph on the back side of a three−day pass. Down the hall, Lonnie Cahoon, 79, watches updates on CNN of the terrorists' attacks, then turns away from the television. He was only 15 when his father falsified his son's birth date so the younger Cahoon could join the National Guard. The day he was to be discharged, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. "I was a clerk in the National Guard," Cahoon says. "I had just typed up my discharge and they tore it up. I went on to fight in the Battle of the Bulge and other campaigns. I've dug deep in foxholes. I've seen the enemy and been scared to death, but I don't want any more war. I just want the perpetrators (the terrorists who attacked the World Trade Center and the Pentagon) punished. "My two little grandchildren came to visit me the other day. They said, 'Granddaddy, we're scared the (terrorists) could hurt us at home.' I held them and I told them, 'You're not supposed to worry about war. That's Grandaddy's job.'" Lonnie Cahoon guides his wheelchair outside. "When the talk gets too much, I get away from it," he says. "I go out and ride as far as I can go." On another corridor, Johnnie Barlow, 75, tries to escape attack talk, too. The old vet flips through the TV channels, looking for his personal peace in these troubled times −− a fishing show. Sylvia Slaughter writes features for The Tennessean. She can be reached at sslaughter@tennessean.com or 259−8053. Graphic: PHOTO BY MICHAEL CLANCY / STAFF

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Caption: World War II veteran Lonnie Cahoon, 79, remembers the accident that left him injured during the Battle of the Bulge.

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Datestamp: 09/17/2001

'I HAD TO SEE IT AND TAKE IT ALL IN'

28 STUDENTS VISIT NYC−AREA HOMES ON VU BUS TRIP By BRAD SCHRADE STAFF WRITER NEW YORK −− Joe Noorigian's mom has nightmares and can't sleep because of what she saw. The younger Noorigian, a Vanderbilt University student from New Jersey, returned home from Nashville over the weekend to be with her and see firsthand how terrorism altered his hometown. He was part of a chartered bus trip provided by the university so students from the New York area could return home. There were 28 who accepted the offer −− and made the 16−hour trek −− to receive something as simple as a hug from dad or mom's fried chicken or give what help they could to this town enveloped in sadness and grief. Noorigian's mother, Netta Noorigian, is an attorney in the financial district and works next to the World Trade Center. She was on the street Tuesday when the first plane hit. Joe Noorigian got off the bus early Saturday and walked 40 blocks to catch a glimpse of the rubble of what is now being called "ground zero" or "The Pile." "I had to see it and take it all in," said Noorigian, 21, a senior studying neuroscience, who grew up across the river in New Jersey. "My mom's looking up and sees people jump holding hands in twos and threes as they fell. Imagine how you'd feel if you looked up and saw people falling from a building." The students, who left from the Port Authority Bus Terminal yesterday afternoon to return to Nashville and classes today, said they all felt lucky to have none of their close family members or friends among the thousands missing. Eleni Binioris wanted to come home to visit her parents and two younger brothers. Binioris, 20, a history and education major who grew up in Brooklyn, couldn't believe the twin towers are gone. She said she gets misty−eyed looking at a skyline that seems lonely and missing something. She bought 45 yards of ribbon striped in red, white and blue, cut the ribbon into small bows and pinned them 'I HAD TO SEE IT AND TAKE IT ALL IN' 1

on customers who came into her father's Greek restaurant on the Upper West Side. She returned to Nashville with pin pricks on her fingers. "I would have dug through the rubble," Binioris said. "I only had a day and wanted to do something to help. I thought this might lift people's spirit." It had been a difficult week for the students in Nashville. They watched on television as their city became a backdrop for the disaster and its aftermath. Alex Mir had to return to New York to ground himself and experience it unfiltered. He visited his mother and girlfriend and other friends in what became a reunion of sorts. Mir, 19, a sophomore religion major, said he'd never seen the city so somber and subdued. There was a noticeable lack of street activity. The most surprising aspect of the weekend was the journey here, Mir said. The interstates between Nashville and New York provide a unifying chord of grief and patriotism. "It's a palpable feeling," he said. "Everywhere we stopped along up through Virginia and West Virginia, the feeling, the mood was the same." Pam Grausso was thankful the university chartered the bus and said the trip home was important for her daughter, Beth, an 18−year−old freshman who grew up across the river in Scotch Plains, N.J. The town, like many in the suburbs around New York, has many neighbors missing. "She needed to touch base," Pam Grausso said. "Even if it was something as simple as a home−cooked meal. There's a need to have the familiar." Perhaps the approach into New York early Saturday morning explains the scope of the devastation for these young people, who have never known a New York without the twin towers dominating the skyline. As the bus rolled through the darkness toward the city, the students fell silent as they caught their first glimpse of lower Manhattan. Across the Hudson River, a persistent plume of smoke rose through the rescue worker's flood lights. Tiffany Huggins, 20, an education major from Brooklyn, said she saw what would have been a miracle through the glare of the smoke. "It had been a long ride and I was tired, but I could have sworn I saw a silhouette of the two towers," Huggins said. Asked if perhaps this was just a wish, she replied: "Yes." Graphic: PHOTOS BY ADRIANE JAECKLE / STAFF Caption: Anne Marie Townsend, a Vanderbilt University education and finance junior, says goodbye to her father, Richard Townsend, in New York after her weekend visit. The university chartered a bus for New York−area students to visit family and friends. The Townsends are from New Canaan, Conn. VU sophomore Alex Mir and Andrea Comerer hug at Port Authority Bus Terminal before Mir has to leave his girlfriend to return to Nashville.

'I HAD TO SEE IT AND TAKE IT ALL IN'

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