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NORTHERN TELECOM

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 ISSUED: 92 05 26 RELEASE: 05.01 STANDARD

DIGITAL SWITCHING SYSTEM DMS-100 FAMILY* ALARM SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

* DMS-100 is a trademark of Northern Telecom Page 1 53 pages

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

(c) Northern Telecom Limited 1980 1984 1985 1986 1987 1992

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION PAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 6 6 6 7 9 9 10 10 10 11 14 15 18 21 21 21 24 29 30 30

General . . . . . . . . . Practice Application . . . Reason for Reissue . . . . Software Identification . Command Format Conventions References . . . . . . . . 2. ALARM SYSTEM HARDWARE

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

General . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm Detection . . . . . . . . . System Detection . . . . . . . . . Alarm Classes . . . . . . . . . . Office Alarm Unit . . . . . . . . MTM Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm Crosspoint Field Shelf . . . Audible Alarms . . . . . . . . . . Visual Alarm Indications And Manual Alarm Control And Display Panel . Alarm Display Panel . . . . . . . ACD Panel With Common Audible Alarm Exit Alarm Panel . . . . . . . . . Equipment Aisle Visual Alarms . . Alarm Extension Circuits . . . . . 3. ALARM AND CONTROL CIRCUITS

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 34 34 35 35 36 36 36 37 37 37 38 40 40 41 41 41 42 42 43 43 44 45 45

Office Alarm Unit (OAU) Alarm . . . . . . . . Dead System Alarm (DSA) . . . . . . . . . . . Enhanced Dead System Alarm . . . . . . . . . . Common Channel Interoffice Signaling (CCIS) DSA DSA and Network Management . . . . . . . . . . Version 2 Dead System and OAU Alarms . . . . . Enhanced Alarm System Features . . . . . . . . Low Battery Voltage Detection Circuit . . . . A and B Feed Loss Detection . . . . . . . . . Remote Alarm Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . Remote Dead System Indication . . . . . . . . Audible Alarm Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frame Supervisory Panel (FSP) Alarms . . . . . Power Distribution Center Alarms . . . . . . . Trunk Test Center (TTC) Alarms . . . . . . . . Test Line Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trunk Group Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TTC Night Alarm Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . Remote Alarm Transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . Dead System Alarm Sending . . . . . . . . . . Alarm Grouping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm Power Supplies ($pm 130 V and 20 Hz ac) Loop Closure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local Talk Line Circuit . . . . . . . . . . .

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 Data Loop System . . . . . . . . Alarm Sending And Checking System Remote Line Module Alarms . . . RLM Alarm Extension Circuit . . Centralized Alarm Reporting . . 4. ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 47 48 49 49

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

FIGURES FIG. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 TITLE Office Alarm Unit Shelf Layout--Front View. . . Version 1 Alarm System Interconnections. . . . Version 2 Alarm System for Large Office. . . . Version 2 Alarm System for Small Office. . . . Alarm Control and Display Panel. . . . . . . . Alarm Display Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alarm Control and Display Panel--Common Audible. Exit Alarm Panel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audible Alarm Cutoff Key Panel. . . . . . . . . Sample DSA NWM Interrelationship. . . . . . . . RLM ALARM EXTENSION CIRCUIT BLOCK DIAGRAM . . . TABLES TABLE TITLE A B C D PAGE 25 27 51 52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE . . . . . . . . . . . 12 16 19 22 23 24 29 31 32 39 50

Alarm Control and Display Panel Functions . . . . . . . Functions of ACD Panel with Common Audible Alarm . . . Examples of Version 2 OAS Equipment Combinations . . . Features of OAS Described in Table C . . . . . . . . .

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 1. INTRODUCTION

GENERAL 1.01 This document describes the DMS-100 Family Alarm System that consists of hardware devices and software modules which together perform the following functions: * Generate audible and visual indications of trouble conditions detected within the DMS switching office, or in associated equipment. These indications alert maintenance personnel, and aid in the identification and location of the trouble. Provide manual facilities for: silencing audible alarms, transferring alarms to a remote monitoring location, grouping the alarms of a DMS office with those systems on other floors, of other

transferring alarms from an unattended Trunk Test Center (TTC) to the main DMS alarm system, controlling the office data loop circuit. * Provide a hardware generated Dead System alarm to alert maintenance personnel when the DMS system software is not functioning. Provide miscellaneous circuitry including the office Talk and Data Loop circuits, the 1 130 volt supplies for the remote alarm transfer circuit, and the 20 Hz ac ringing supply for the audible alarm subsets, as required. Provides circuitry between the Dead System Alarm (DSA) cards and the Network Management (NWM) Control for automatic level 3 Dynamic Overload Control Signaling (SDOC3) including automatic SDOC3 cutoff whenever DSA maintenance is being performed.

Note: For a description of Mobile Telephone Exchange (MTX) alarm system features refer to 297-2131-122. PRACTICE APPLICATION 1.02 The information contained in this Practice is applicable to offices having Batch Change Supplement release 33 (BCS33) software. It is also applicable to offices having a BCS release greater than 33 unless reissued. The application of all Northern Telecom Page 5

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 Practices (NTP) editions with respect to a given BCS release is given in 297-1001-001. REASON FOR REISSUE 1.03 * * This practice is reissued in BCS33 to include the ing: Reference to Enhanced Alarm System (EAS). Changes to titles of Northern Telecom Practices (NTP) referenced in this document. This practice was reissued in BCS23 to include the following: Reference to Centralized Alarm Reporting (CALM). Replacement of the command DSU with the command used in the Software Identification paragraph. PATCHER, as follow-

1.04 * *

SOFTWARE IDENTIFICATION 1.05 Software applicable to a specific DMS-100 Family office is identified by a BCS release number and by Northern Telecom (NT) Product Engineering Codes (PEC). The significance of the BCS number and the PEC is described in 297-1001-450 (section 450/32) and in the Office Feature Record D-190. 1.06 A display of the BCS number and PEC for the NT feature packages available in a specific office can be obtained by entering the command string: PATCHER;INFORM LIST;LEAVE COMMAND FORMAT CONVENTIONS 1.07 In this Practice, a uniform system of notation is used to illustrate system commands and responses. It shows the order in which command elements appear, the punctuation, and the options. Where the conventions are not used, an explanation is given in the text. CAPITAL letters or special characters lowercase letters show constants, commands, or keywords that the system accepts when entered as written. show a user- or system-supplied parameter. Definitions are given for each parameter.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 Brackets [ ] or enclose optional parameters. A vertical list enclosed in brackets means that one or more of the parameters may be selected. is a default. If no choice is entered, the system acts as though the underlined parameter had been entered. means the words are to be entered as one word items, for example, pm_type or #_one_two. indicates repeated steps or items.

Underlined parameter

Underscore connecting

***

In addition, the following conventions are used. n (lowercase n) a (lowercase a) h (lowercase h) REFERENCES 1.08 References listed as prerequisites are essential for an understanding of this practice. Those listed as informative contain detailed information concerning other items mentioned in this practice, but are not essential. References are inserted at the appropriate places in the text. Note: The documents listed may exist in more than one version. See 297-1001-001 to determine the release code of the version compatible with a specific release of software. Prerequisite References DOCUMENT NUMBER 297-1001-100 297-1001-106 GS2X58 TITLE System Description Maintenance System DMS 100/200 Maintenance Trunk Module, Office Remote Service Module is a number from 0 to 9. is a letter from A to Z. is a hexadecimal integer from 0 to F.

Alarm

Unit,

and

Informative References DOCUMENT NUMBER 297-1001-001 297-1001-451 TITLE Guide to Northern Telecom Publications Common Customer Data Schema Page 7

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 297-1001-453 297-1001-455 297-1001-516 297-1001-517 297-1001-520 297-2101-451 GS0X01 GS0X10 GS0X28 GS0X29 GS0X40 GS0X82 GS1X67 GS2X41 GS2X42 GS2X43 GS2X57 GS3X82 GS3X83 GS3X84 GS3X85 Network Management System Reference Manual Office Parameters Reference Manual Trunks Maintenance Reference Manual External (EXT) Alarms MMI Description Maintenance System MMI Description Local Customer Data Schema Index of General Specifications Miscellaneous Scan Detector Card Frame Supervisory Panel Frame Supervisory Panels (Line Frames) Frame Supervisory Panel (PDC Fused) Frame Supervisory Panel (Peripheral Frames) Terminal Controller Card Office Alarm Circuit 1 Card Office Alarm Circuit 2 Card Office Alarm Circuit 3 Card Signal Distribution Card, Type 1 Office Alarm Unit - Dead System Alarm Circuit Card Office Alarm Unit - Alarm Transfer Circuit Card Office Alarm Unit - Alarm Sending Circuit Card Office Alarm Unit - Alarm Grouping Circuit Card

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 2. ALARM SYSTEM HARDWARE

GENERAL 2.01 Currently three different Office Alarm Systems exist: Version 1, Version 2 and Version 2 Enhanced Alarm System (EAS). Some pieces of hardware are specific to one version, while some, such as Scan and Signal Distribution (SD) cards, are common. Version 2 software is compatible with Version 1 systems. 2.02 * * * 2.03 * * Enhanced Alarm System (EAS) is a variation of the Version 2 alarm system. It provides additional features such as: Low battery voltage detection A/B feed loss detection Remote alarm contacts Some differences between the two versions are: with regard to

Alarm functions are partitioned differently Alarm Circuit cards.

Version 1 systems employ a modified Maintenance Trunk Module (MTM) to house most of the Office Alarm System (OAS) hardware. Version 2 systems incorporate most Scan and SD functions onto the Alarm Circuit cards. Version 2 is flexible to suit particular requirements and offers such facilities as hardware diagnostic testing and loop closure to operate external alarm equipment or to distribute alarm indications to a maintenance center.

* *

2.04

In Version 1 OAS, the majority of the alarm detection and control hardware is located in the Office Alarm Unit (OAU) and in an associated Maintenance Trunk Module (MTM). The OAU is dedicated to the alarm system. The associated MTM contains the alarm system backup circuits which generate an alarm if the OAU fails, but also contains equipment unrelated to the alarm system. The OAU and the associated MTM communicate with the alarm system software in the Central Control through the Message System. 2.05 The Version 2 OAS offers a wide range of alarm capability. Alarm Circuit cards and Scan and SD cards can be located in any MTM shelf in the office, regardless of whether or not it is dedicated to the alarm system. Interconnections of alarm system equipment can be made at the Alarm Crosspoint Field shelf or at the Distributing Frame (DF) and are available as required, to suit the demands of a particular office. Provisioning of OAS equipment forms part of the job engineering process for each office. This practice describes common applications of Version 2 Page 9

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 components, and illustration. ALARM DETECTION 2.06 The alarm system hardware is monitored and controlled by software. The software responds to alarm or control inputs by operating or releasing the appropriate Signal Distribution (SD) points in the alarm system hardware, to initiate or terminate the corresponding audible and visual alarm, or control function. 2.07 Alarm and control inputs detected by the alarm system hardware are interfaced with the alarm system software through scan points. These scan points detect inputs generated by hardwired alarm contacts in the DMS hardware; by the operation of manual control switches; or by the alarm circuits of miscellaneous equipment associated with the DMS office. The software which monitors these scan points forms the External (Ext) Alarms subsystem of the DMS maintenance system (see 297-1001-517). 2.08 Scan point and Signal Distribution point the OAS are described in 297-1001-451. assignments for gives examples of provisioning, for purposes of

SYSTEM DETECTION 2.09 Alarm and control inputs generated by the software of the other nine maintenance subsystems which complete the DMS maintenance subsystem (297-1001-106) are designated system inputs. Each maintenance subsystem controls its own alarm status display in the system status area of the Visual Display Unit (VDU) at the Maintenance and Administration Position (MAP) see 297-1001-520. The alarm system software checks for changes in the alarm status of these subsystems every five seconds and updates the audible and visual alarm indications accordingly. The silence (sil) command input on the MAP console is also detected in this way. 2.10 Software subsystems which are not represented on the maintenance system status display can also generate alarms. These software alarms, for example, Centralized Automatic Message Accounting (CAMA) suspension, are interfaced with the alarm system software through table SFWALARM, and are reported to maintenance personnel through the External (Ext) Alarms subsystem. ALARM CLASSES 2.11 Detected trouble conditions are classified in three levels of severity according to the urgency to respond to the trouble condition, or to return the affected equipment to normal operation. Trouble conditions are assigned to an alarm class by the maintenance subsystem which detects the trouble. The alarm Page 10

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 classes, in decreasing order of severity are Critical, Major, and Minor. OFFICE ALARM UNIT 2.12 The OAU is a modified MTM shelf (NT2X58), equipped with a Transmission, Processor, Control, and Power Converter card, and having card slots for up to twelve interface cards. 2.13 12: * Three Signal Distribution cards (NT2X57) which provide an interface between the alarm system software and relay controlled equipment in the OAU, for activation of audible and visual alarms or other associated circuits for example, Remote Alarm Transfer circuit. Up to five Miscellaneous Scan Detector cards (NT0X10), depending on office size (minimum 3 cards), through which the alarm system software can monitor the state of the alarm system hardware, to detect alarm conditions or the operation of manual control switches. Three miscellaneous office alarm circuit cards: Office Alarm Circuit 1 (NT2X41) contains control relays for the Alarm Grouping circuit and the Power Plant exit pilot lamps. Office Alarm Circuit 2 (NT2X42) contains control relays for the Remote Alarm Transfer circuit, the TTC Night Alarm Transfer circuit, the TTC Chime, and the DMS exit pilot lamps, and a hardware interrupter circuit for the major chime. Office Alarm Circuit 3 (NT2X43) contains a 1 130 V power supply, a 20 Hz ac ringing supply, control relays for the OAU and Dead System alarms, and a transformer for the odd aisle multiple of the Local Talk Line circuit. This card occupies two card positions. The interface card positions of the Version 1 OAU contain the following 11 cards as illustrated in Figure 1 on page

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

NT2X57AA NT0X50AC NT2X53AA NT0X07AA NT 2X45AA

NT0X10AA NT2X43AB NT2X42AA NT2X41AA

NT2X58 NT0X50AE NT0X50AA NT2X09AA NT0X10AA or NT0X50AC

T R A N S M I S S I O N

P R O C E S S O R

C O N T R O L

F I L L E R F A C E P L A T E

S I G N A L D I S T R I B U T I O N

S I G N A L D I S T R I B U T I O N

S I G N A L D I S T R I B U T I O N O A C 1 O A C 2 O A C 3

S C A N D E T E C T O R

S C A N D E T E C T O R

S C A N D E T E C T O R

S C A N D E T E C T O R

S C A N D E T E C T O R

P O W E R C O N V E R T E R

F I L L E R F A C E P L A T E

F I L L E R F A C E P L A T E

10

12 13 14 15 16 17

19 20

Card Position Fig. 1 - Office Alarm Unit Shelf Layout--Front View.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 2.14 The OAU of a Version 2 Office Alarm System is a regular MTM shelf (NT2X58) and may be tailored to suit the particular needs of a given office. For example, it may be equipped so as to function as part of a complete alarm system for a small office, or may be expanded to supply full alarm system capabilities for a large DMS office. The range of equipment available is described below and examples of combinations are given in Table C on page 51. Capabilities are described in Table D on page 52 2.15 Signal distribution cards and miscellaneous scan detector cards, as described above, are available as required, to a maximum of two Signal Distribution cards and 6 Scan Detector cards. 2.16 * Version 2 Alarm Circuit features and functions are handled by the following cards, as required:

OAU Dead System Circuit card, with unique audible alarms (NT3X82, type AA) contains a 20 Hz ringing supply with its associated failure monitor and power transfer circuits, a 60 IPM (interruptions per minute) interrupter circuit for the major alarm tone bar, signal distribution points for the MTM fail indicators, control relays for part of the dead system alarm, the audible alarm reset circuit and the DMS alarm, a fused 48 V power source for audible and visual indicators, a local talk hybrid transformer, and a monitor circuit to check the validity of messages from the Central Control (CC) to the Peripheral Module (PM). OAU Dead System Circuit card, with common audible alarms (GS3X82, type AB) contains a CC to peripheral message validity monitor circuit, a fused 48 V power source for audible and visual alarm indicators, and control relays for the common audible alarm, audible alarm reset and DMS alarm circuits, as well as for part of the dead system alarm. OAU Alarm Transfer Circuit card (NT3X83) contains a 1 130 V generator with an associated monitor circuit, and control relays for the remote alarm transfer circuit, the exit pilot lamps, and the night alarm transfer circuit, as well as a hardware minor alarm override for simultaneously occurring major and minor alarms. OAU Alarm Sending Circuit card (NT3X84) contains control relays and a tone generator for sending a Dead System indication over an operator verification trunk, as well as control relays for night alarm transfer and exit pilot circuits. OAU Alarm Grouping Circuit card (NT3X85) relays for the Alarm Grouping circuit. contains control

2.17

Enhanced Alarm System (EAS) features are provided by the same cards with the OAU as the Version 2 Alarm System with the exception of the Dead System Alarm Card (3X82). Page 13

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 2.18 The NT3X82AA and AB cards are replaced by the NT3X82AC and AD cards. These new cards are backward compatible and provide the following additional features: * * * Low battery voltage detection A/B feed loss detection Remote alarm contacts

MTM CIRCUITS 2.19 In Version 1, the MTM associated with the OAU must contain an Office Alarm Circuit 3 card, and at least one Signal Distribution and Scan Detector card. The Office Alarm Circuit 3 card provides a backup for the 20 Hz ac and 1 130 V supplies in the OAU, control relays which complete the circuitry of the OAU and Dead System alarms, and a transformer for the even aisle multiple of the Local Talk Line circuit. The other two cards provide several Scan and SD points associated with the circuits in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card. 2.20 To perform the OAU backup functions properly the MTM is supplied power from a different Power Distribution Center (PDC) and battery feed (A/B supply) than the OAU, and is assigned to a different Network Module. 2.21 The MTM associated with a Version 2 OAU must contain an OAU Dead System Circuit card of the same type as in the corresponding OAU, meaning both must be of either the Common Audible alarm variety, or the Unique Audible alarm variety. When Unique Audible circuit cards are installed, the MTM card provides a backup for the 20 Hz ringing generator, a hybrid transformer for the even aisle multiple of the Local Talk Line circuit, and control relays which complete the circuitry of the dead system alarm. As in version 1, the MTM is supplied power from a different PDC and battery feed (A/B supply) than the OAU, and is assigned to a different Network Module. 2.22 The MTM associated with the Version 2 EAS obeys the same rules as the Version 2 system described in the paragraph above. In the EAS, however, the OAU and MTM must each be powered off separate power feeds other than the A or B feeds. In other words, two additional feeds (C and D) must be created to power the OAU and MTM independently of the standard A and B feeds. ALARM CROSSPOINT FIELD SHELF 2.23 The OAU and MTM of Version 1 Office Alarm Systems are connected to each other and to the other parts of the alarm system hardware via the Alarm Crosspoint Field Shelf (NT0X62AA) and the Distributing Frame (DF). The interconnections between Page 14

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 the various hardware modules comprising the Version 1 Office Alarm System are illustrated in Figure 2 on page 16.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 To other floors for alarm grouping and exit pilot lamps To Remote Alarm Receiving Unit in distant office Equipment Row A Odd Aisle FSP, ABS, PDC Signals Alarm Crosspoint Shelf (NT0X62AA) With Optional Extension (NT0X62AB) Exit Alarm Panel NT0X64 Audible Alarm Panel NT0X66 Alarm Display Panel NT0X63AB Office Alarm Unit Shelf (GS2X58) Data Loop Input/ Output Controller (GS1X61) D M S Switch MTM OAU Circuit 3 Card Signals Maintenance Trunk Module (GS2X58) MTD Alarm SD Exit Alarm Panel NT0X64 From 200 Pin Terminal Strip to MDF

Talk Line, : Maximum : Data Loop :40 Aisles : Equipment Row RR Even Aisle TTC Area : TTC : Audible : Alarm : Panel : NT0X61 : Alarm Display Panel NT0X61AB

Exit Alarm Panel NT0X64

MAP Area

Optional Audible Alarm Cutoff Key Logic Panel [O]

Alarm Control & Display Panel NT0X63AB VDU

DMS Power Plant

MTM Alarm SC Points

Local Talk Lines & 101 Test Lines

Optional Alarm Panels Maximum 10 NT0X64

Optional Audible Alarm Panels Max.4 NT0X66

Optional Alarm Cutoff Control Circuit NT5X86AA

Optional Audible and Visual Alarm Extension NT5X85AA D F

Fig. 2 - Version 1 Alarm System Interconnections.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 2.24 The alarm crosspoint field shelf is mounted on the same frame as the OAU. It is in the top shelf position of the frame and immediately above the OAU shelf. The alarm crosspoint field is comprised of a number of vertical mounting plates on which 45 connectors, a 200 pin terminal strip, and four Data Link Control cards (NT0X89) are mounted. The entire shelf is protected by a front cover plate. 2.25 The alarm crosspoint field is connected to the OAU via a wiring harness which is divided into 11 connector plugs at the rear of the OAU. At the crosspoint field this harness is connected to the appropriate connectors and to pins on the 200 pin terminal strip. This terminal strip is connected by cable to terminal blocks on the DF. 2.26 If increased alarm capability, as described later in this document, is required in Version 1 Office Alarm systems, an Alarm Crosspoint Field Shelf Extension (NT0X62AB) is added to the system. 2.27 Connections to all other parts of the alarm system are made through connectorized cables plugged into the connectors on the crosspoint field, through cables wired to pins at the rear of the connectors, or via the DF and the terminal strip. Interconnections are also made at the rear of the crosspoint field between connectors, the terminal strip, and the Data Link Control cards. The Data Link Control cards provide control relays for the office Data Loop System (see Part 3 on page 33). 2.28 A different alarm crosspoint field shelf, (NT3X89AA) is used in the Version 2 system. Although functionally similar to that described above, this shelf uses connectorized cables for all interconnections except those to the audible alarm panels. These are accomplished by means of a screw-connect terminal strip. Data Link Control cards, as described above, are also installed in the Version 2 crosspoint field shelf. Figure 3 on page 19illustrates the interconnections of a large office alarm system, using Version 2 components and a crosspoint field shelf. 2.29 In some applications, Version 2 alarm equipment can be interconnected directly via the DF, without the use of a crosspoint field shelf, as illustrated in Figure 4 on page 22. 2.30 For the EAS, the NT3X89AB alarm crosspoint field shelf must be used. The NT3X89AB is physically the same as the NT3X89AA, however, it contains the necessary wiring changes to implement the additional features found in the EAS. AUDIBLE ALARMS 2.31 The audible alarms are activated either on-site or are transferred by the Remote Alarm Transfer circuit (see Part 3 on page 33) to a remote monitoring location. The on-site audible signaling devices are mounted on two different audible alarm Page 17

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 panels: the main Audible Alarm Panel (NT0X66) for the DMS-100 Family Switch, and an optional TTC Audible Alarm Panel (NT0X61) for the Trunk Test Center (TTC) in Toll offices.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

Optional Audible Alarm Panels Maximum 4 NT0X66 Optional Audible Alarm Cutoff Key Panel NT5X86AB Cross Aisle ACD NT0X63AB ACD Panel NT0X63AA Audible Alarm Panel NT0X66AA Audible Alarm Panel NT0X66AA Data Loop --Equipment Equipment Row 1 --Equipment Equipment Row 40 TTC Audible Panel NT0X61AB

Optional Alarm Cutoff Control Circuit NT5X86AA Switch I O C

Optional Exit Pilots Maximum 10 NT0X64

MAP/

DMS

Optional Audible & Visual Alarm Extension Unit NT5X85AA DMS Power Plant

Alarm Crosspoint Field Shelf NT3X89AA (EAS use NT3X89AB) Data Link Controller NT0X89AA DF

> To Remote Alarm Receiving Unit

OAU Dead System CP NT3X82AA (EAS NT3X82AC) OAU Alarm Transfer or Alarm Sending CP NT3X83AA or NT3X84AA OAU Alarm Grouping CP NT3X85AA Miscellaneous Scan Detector Cards NT0X10AA > To Other Floors For Alarm Grouping Exit Pilots NT0X64

OAU Dead System CP NT3X82AA (EAS NT3X82AC) MTM Shelf Fig. 3 -

SD Cards NT2X57AA

OAU Shelf Version 2 Alarm System for Large Office. Page 19

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 2.32 Usually, a maximum of two main audible alarm panels may be supplied per office depending on office size and configuration, for example, an additional audible alarm panel for the DMS Power Plant if located on another floor. Extended audible alarm capability is also available. Refer to the part entitled Alarm Extension Circuits. The audible alarm panels may be either wall or column mounted. 2.33 * The main audible alarm panel provides the naling devices: Critical Bell - a loud bell which signals: a Dead System alarm, a critical DMS system equipment failure, a critical DMS power plant failure, a critical system or power plant failure in another system (if alarm grouping is in effect). * Major Chime - a loud tone bar, struck at 60 IPM signalling a major DMS System failure, a major DMS power plant failure, a Frame Supervisory Panel (FSP) alarm aisle, a major equipment failure grouping is in effect). * on any equipment following sig-

in another system (if alarm

Alarm Battery Subset - a loud telephone ringer (two bells with resonators) which signals the following major alarms: an alarm battery supply failure at a PDC, a battery failure at the OAU or the associated MTM, failure of an internal supply circuit at the OAU or MTM (1 130 V supply, or 20 Hz ac ringing supply), a loss of communication between the Central the OAU or MTM. Control and

Minor Alarm Subset - a loud telephone ringer (two bells without resonators) which signals: a minor DMS system equipment failure, a minor DMS power plant failure,

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 a minor equipment failure grouping is in effect), in another system (if alarm the

an incoming call on a 101 Communication Test Line at TTC (if night alarm transfer is in effect). 2.34

The TTC audible alarm panel provides a TTC Chime which signals an incoming call on a 101 Communication Test Line.

VISUAL ALARM INDICATIONS AND MANUAL CONTROLS 2.35 The Office Alarm System hardware includes a number of devices which provide visual alarm indications and manual controls. These are in addition to the UI (User Interface) for system and hardware detected alarms provided by the VDU at the MAP. Lamps and control switches are mounted on panels located at the MAP and at the main exit doors. Panels are located at other office locations on an optional basis. Each equipment aisle is also equipped with lamps which signal local alarm conditions. ALARM CONTROL AND DISPLAY PANEL 2.36 The Alarm Control and Display panel (ACD) (NT0X63AA), illustrated in Figure 5 on page 23, is functionally an integral part of the OAU. The ACD is physically separated from the OAU and located at the MAP for operational convenience. Mounted on the ACD are lamps which display the type and class of alarms detected by the alarm system, and switches provide manual control of alarm system facilities. The functions of the lamps and switches on the ACD are described in Table A on page 25 ALARM DISPLAY PANEL 2.37 The Alarm Display panel (NT0X63AB), Figure 6 on page 24 is a multiple of the ACD which has all the manual control switches removed except for the Audible Alarm Reset switch. Alarm Display panels (maximum 2) are provided on an optional basis as required by the operating company, for example, for cross-aisle visual alarms. The functions of the lamps and the single switch on the Alarm Display panel are the same as those on the ACD, see Table A on page 25.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

DMS Switch / / I O C MAP ADC Panel NT0X63AC > ASCS and Dead System Alarm Sending DF Equipment Row 6 --OAU Dead System C.P. NT3X82AB (EAS NT3X82AD) OAU Dead System Alarm Sending C.P. NT3X84AA Scan Detector Card NT0X10AA OAU Dead System C.P. NT3X82AB (EAS NT3X82AD) MTM Shelf Signal Distribution Card NT2X57AA OAU Shelf

FSP, ABS, PDC Signals

--Equipment Row 1

Fig. 4 - Version 2 Alarm System for Small Office. Page 22

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

Crit. /R System Major /A System Minor /W System Major Other /Y System Minor Other /G System

Power Dist Center ABS Office Alarm Unit Crit. Power Plant Major Power Plant Minor Power Plant

Power Dist Center /R /A /A

Night Alarm Alarm Alarm Transfer Grouping Transfer /W /W /W

/R Audible Alarm Reset /A IOC * /W _ _ MDF A Lamp Test * = Open _ * _ MDF B Data Loop A+B IOC * _ _ _ _

OFFICE ALARM SYSTEM Legend: Lamps: A G R W Y = = = = = Amber Green Red White Yellow

Fig. 5 - Alarm Control and Display Panel.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

Crit. /R System Major /A System Minor /W System Major Other /Y System Minor Other /G System

Power Dist Center ABS Office Alarm Unit Crit. Power Plant Major Power Plant Minor Power Plant

Power Dist Center /R /A /A

Night Alarm Alarm Alarm Transfer Grouping Transfer /W /W /W

/R Audible Alarm Reset /A OFFICE ALARM SYSTEM

/W

Legend:

Lamps: A G R W Y

= = = = =

Amber Green Red White Yellow

Fig. 6 - Alarm Display Panel.

ACD PANEL WITH COMMON AUDIBLE ALARM 2.38 The visual display and control devices, and audible alarm signaling devices of Version 1, described above, are supplemented in Version 2 by the availability of one additional device, the ACD Panel with common audible alarm. 2.39 The ACD panel with common audible alarm (NT0X63AC), illustrated in Figure 7 on page 29, is functionally similar to the ACD described above. However, when this panel is used in the alarm system, all alarm conditions occurring in the office result in the sounding of a common signaling device, a 2900 Hz tone, occurring at a rate of 120 IPM. Table B on page 27 describes the functions of the lamps and switches on this panel.

Page 24

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE A ALARM CONTROL AND DISPLAY PANEL FUNCTIONS DESIGNATION Critical System Major System Minor System Major other System DEVICE Lamp (R) Lamp (A) Lamp (W) Lamp (Y) FUNCTION Signals failure Signals failure Signals failure a critical system a a major minor system system

Signals a critical or major alarm in another system Signals a minor another system alarm in

Minor other system

Lamp (G)

Power Dist Center ABS Lamp (R) Office Alarm Unit Lamp (A)

Signals an alarm battery supply failure at a PDC. Signals an alarm system hardware failure at the OAU or the MTM Signals a critical Power plant failure DMS

Critical Power Plant Major Power Plant Minor Power Plant Power Dist Center Legend: Lamps: A G R W Y = = = = =

Lamp (R) Lamp (A) Lamp (W) Lamp (A) Amber Green Red White Yellow Switches:

Signals a major DMS power plant failure Signals a minor DMS plant failure power

Signals an office battery supply failure at a PDC L = Locking NL = Non-locking 3P = 3-Position

Table Continued

Page 25

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE A (Continued) ALARM CONTROL AND DISPLAY PANEL FUNCTIONS DESIGNATION Night Alarm Transfer DEVICE Switch (L) FUNCTION Initiates TTC Night Alarm Transfer (see Part 3 on page 33) Signals TTC Night Alarm Transfer is in effect Initiates Alarm Grouping (see Part 3 on page 33) Signals Alarm Grouping in effect is

Lamp (W) Alarm Grouping Switch (L) Lamp (W) Alarm Transfer Switch (NL)

Initiates or cancels Remote Alarm Transfer (see Part 3 on page 33) Signals Remote Alarm Transfer is in effect Silences audible alarms (see Part 3 on page 33) Momentarily lights all lamps on the ACD and on any ACD multiples Routes A Aisle Multiple to IOC port A, or MDF data loop jacks, or opens loop (see Part 3 on page 33) Routes B Aisle Multiple to IOC port B, or MDF data loop jacks, or opens loop (see Part 3 on page 33) Joins A and B aisle multiple (see Part 3 on page 33) IOC port B is disconnected in this configuration

Lamp (W) Audible Alarm Reset Lamp Test Switch (NL) Switch (NL)

Data Loop A

Switch (3P)

Data Loop B

Switch (3P)

Data Loop A + B

Switch (L)

Page 26

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE B FUNCTIONS OF ACD PANEL WITH COMMON AUDIBLE ALARM DESIGNATION Critical System Major System Minor System DEVICE Lamp (R) Lamp (A) Lamp (W) FUNCTION Signals failure Signals failure Signals failure a critical system a a major minor system system

Power Dist Center ABS Lamp (R) Office Alarm Unit Lamp (A)

Signals an alarm battery supply failure at a PDC. Signals an alarm system hardware failure at the OAU or the MTM Signals a critical power plant failure Signals a major DMS plant failure DMS power

Critical Power Plant Major Power Plant Minor Power Plant Power Dist Center Night Alarm Transfer

Lamp (R) Lamp (A) Lamp (W) Lamp (A) Switch (L)

Signals a minor DMS power plane failure Signals an office battery supply failure at a PDC Initiates TTC Night Alarm Transfer (see Part 3 on page 33) Signals TTC Night Alarm Transfer is in effect L = Locking NL = Non-locking 3P = 3-Position

Lamp (W) Legend: Lamps: A G R W Y = = = = = Amber Green Red White Yellow Switches:

Table Continued

Page 27

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE B (Continued) FUNCTIONS OF ACD PANEL WITH COMMON AUDIBLE ALARM DESIGNATION Audible Disable DEVICE Switch (L) Lamp (R) Alarm Transfer Switch (NL) FUNCTION Disables the audible alarm device Signals audible device is disabled alarm

Initiates or cancels Remote Alarm Transfer (see Part 3 on page 33) Signals Remote Alarm Transfer is in effect Silences audible alarms (see Part 3 on page 33) Momentarily lights all lamps on the ACD and on any ACD multiples

Lamp (W) Audible Alarm Reset Lamp Test Switch (NL) Switch (NL)

Page 28

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

Crit. /R System Major /A System Minor /W System

Power Dist Center ABS Office Alarm Unit Crit. Power Plant Major Power Plant Minor Power Plant

Night Alarm Audible Transfer Disable /R /A /A Power Dist Center /R Audible Alarm Reset /A Lamp Test /W _ _ _ _ /W /R

Alarm Transfer /W

OFFICE ALARM SYSTEM

Lamp Legend:

A G R W Y

= = = = =

Amber Green Red White Yellow

Fig. 7 - Alarm Control and Display Panel--Common Audible.

EXIT ALARM PANEL 2.40 An Exit Alarm Panel (NT0X64), illustrated in Figure 8 on page 31 is located near the main exit door of each DMS floor in a multi-floored office. Normally, a maximum of four Exit Alarm Panels may be multipled per DMS office, see Alarm Extension Circuits on page 30. These panels direct maintenance personnel to the area, or floor, of the office where the alarm condition has been detected. They also provide remote controls for the Night Alarm Transfer and Alarm Grouping circuits. The functions of the lamps and switches on the Exit Alarm Panels are as follows: * The Night Alarm Transfer switch and lamp have the same functions as those on the ACD (see Table A on page 25).

Page 29

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 * * * The Alarm Grouping switch and lamp have the same functions as those on the ACD (see Table A on page 25). The Power Plant lamp (yellow) lights to signal an alarm dition originating in the DMS power plant. con-

The Trunk Test Center lamp (yellow) lights to signal an incoming call on 101 test line in the Trunk Test Center if Night Alarm Transfer is in effect. The exit pilot lamps (yellow), numbered 1 through 12, are provided, on a per floor basis, for each floor having an alarm reporting system (DMS or non-DMS floors). An alarm origination on a particular floor lights the exit pilot lamp representing that floor, on each Exit Alarm Panel.

EQUIPMENT AISLE VISUAL ALARMS 2.41 Each equipment aisle in the DMS office is equipped with End Aisle Pilot lamps (red) which light if a fault is detected by any Frame Supervisory Panel in the aisle. Also each FSP in the aisle is equipped with a Frame Fail lamp which lights to indicate which frame in the aisle generated the alarm. The FSP for frames having cooling units are also equipped with a Fan Fail lamp. The circuitry associated with the FSP alarms is described in Part 3 on page 33. ALARM EXTENSION CIRCUITS 2.42 When audible or visual alarm capabilities, beyond the two main audible panels and four exit alarm panels normally available, are required, Alarm Extension circuits are used. 2.43 The Audible and Visual Alarm Extension Circuit (NT5X85AA) is an applique circuit which, when mounted on the miscellaneous frame, allows up to four additional audible alarm panels and up to ten additional exit alarm panels to be added to the alarm system.

Page 30

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

2 Night Alarm Transfer /W Trunk Test Center /Y /Y

5 /Y

8 /Y

11 /Y

3 Power Plant Alarm Grouping /W 1 /Y 4 /Y /Y /Y

6 /Y

9 /Y

12 /Y

7 /Y

10 /Y OFFICE ALARM SYSTEM

Lamp Legend:

W = White Y = Yellow

Fig. 8 - Exit Alarm Panel. 2.44 The extension circuit permits selective control of the audible alarm panels when configured with the Audible Alarm Cut-off Control Circuit (NT5X86AA) and the Audible Alarm Cut-off Key Panel (NT5X86AB). The Key Panel, illustrated in Fig. 9, is mounted at the MAP and allows two main audible panels and four extended audible panels to be disabled selectively. 2.45 When audible alarm capability is extended, a ringing generator must be provided to the extension circuit. Version 1 Office Alarm Systems require the Alarm Crosspoint Field Shelf Extension (NT0X62AB) described earlier when extended audible or visual alarm panels are added.

Page 31

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

Audible Alarm Cutoff

Alarm Off

Alarm Off

Fig. 9 - Audible Alarm Cutoff Key Panel.

Page 32

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3. ALARM AND CONTROL CIRCUITS

OFFICE ALARM UNIT (OAU) ALARM 3.01 The OAU alarm is generated when a fault is detected by the alarm circuit of the OAU, or of the associated MTM. In Version 1 Office Alarm Systems these alarm circuits are contained in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card (GS2X43) mounted in the OAU and MTM shelves. A scan point (ABMTMFL) contained in a Miscellaneous Scan Detector Card (GS0X10) mounted in the OAU shelf monitors the alarm circuit of the MTM, and a second scan point (ABOAUFL) contained in another scan card mounted in the MTM shelf monitors the alarm circuit of the OAU. The OAU alarm is generated when one of these scan points detects the release of a normally operated alarm relay in the alarm circuits of the OAU or MTM. 3.02 * * * * * The alarm is generated when any conditions occur: of the following alarm

loss of -48V office battery supply to the OAU or MTM shelf, loss of card), -48V
1

to Office Alarm Circuit 3 card (blown fuse on 130 V supplies for the Remote Alarm Transfer Hz ac ringing supply for the audible

failure of the circuit,

failure of the 20 alarms,

loss of communication between the Central Control and the OAU or MTM shelf.

3.03

A special arrangement is provided to generate the OAU alarm when a loss of communication occurs between the Central Control (CC) and the OAU or MTM shelf. This arrangement uses the principle that the peripheral processor in the OAU and MTM can still perform an action, for example release an SD point, even though there is no communication with the CC. Every five seconds the CC sends a special message to the peripheral processor in the OAU and the MTM. This message instructs the peripheral processor to release an SD point (contained in an SD card mounted in the OAU and MTM shelf) after a wait period of fifteen seconds. The release of either SD point releases the alarm relay in the alarm circuit of the corresponding OAU or MTM. 3.04 Each time the message is received the peripheral processor starts a new fifteen second wait period. If both network links between the CC and the OAU or MTM go out of service, or if the CC is not sane enough to send another message within the fifteen second wait period, the peripheral processor in the OAU or MTM releases the corresponding SD point which releases the alarm relay and generates the OAU alarm. The release of the correPage 33

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 sponding SD point in both the OAU and the MTM generates the Dead System alarm. DEAD SYSTEM ALARM (DSA) 3.05 The Dead System alarm is generated by the alarm system hardware to indicate a loss of call processing ability in the DMS office. When a dead system condition occurs the DSA hardware alerts operating company personnel by sounding the critical alarm bell and lighting the Critical System lamp on the ACD. 3.06 The Dead System alarm is generated when the alarm circuits of both the OAU and the MTM detect a loss of communication with the CC. This alarm condition may be caused by multiple faults in the hardware of DMS-100 Family Message System, or by a loss of sanity in the CC software. In either case, call processing is affected and, due to the loss of communication, an alarm cannot be generated in the normal manner through the alarm system software in the CC. If there are multiple faults in the message system the appropriate maintenance subsystem can detect the faults and alert maintenance personnel visually at the MAP VDU, but the corresponding audible and visual alarm hardware cannot be activated. 3.07 The two SD points, one in the OAU and one in the MTM, used to generate the OAU alarm are also used to generate the Dead System alarm. In addition to controlling the alarm relay, each SD point also controls a normally operated Dead System (DS) relay which, in Version 1 Office Alarm Systems, is also contained in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card. 3.08 A connection to ground is wired through break contacts of the DS relay in both the OAU and the MTM to the Critical Bell on the audible alarm panel, and to the Critical System lamp on the ACD. Battery (-48V) is connected to the Critical Bell from the OAU shelf, and to the Critical System lamp from the MTM shelf. When both the OAU and the MTM detect a loss of communication with the CC, both alarm SD points are released. This action releases both dead system relays, closing their break contacts, and generating the audible and visual critical system alarm. ENHANCED DEAD SYSTEM ALARM 3.09 The Enhanced DSA causes the same audible and visual alarms to be raised as the regular DSA, however it is capable of detecting the lack of, or the severe crippling of call processing. 3.10 With the Enhanced DSA the OAU tries to make a call every five seconds into the CC, if after twenty seconds the CC has not answered any of the calls the OAU raises the critical alarms. The CC also counts the calls made by the OAU and if no Page 34

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 calls have been counted in twenty seconds a critical No-Call-Processing ALARM (NCPALARM) is raised in the Extension (EXT) Alarm level. 3.11 The Enhanced DSA is in effect when the parameter ENHANCED ENHANCED_DEAD_SYSTEM_ALARM of table OFCENG is set to YES. A restart is not required to change modes however dead system alarms may occur during the change interval. Notes: 1. The Enhanced DSA does not functions on International switch types where the SD points MTMFAIL and OAUFAIL are on MTM requiring the IMTMEX exec lineup. The ENHANCED_DEAD_SYSTEM_ALARM is not limited to the EAS. It is a software feature available on all three types of alarms sytstems (Version 1, Version 2, and EAS).

2.

COMMON CHANNEL INTEROFFICE SIGNALING (CCIS) DSA 3.12 When and office within a CCIS Network experiences failure, it announces the problem to the rest of the Network by sending a Broadcast Dynamic Overload Control level 3 (BDOC3) message. This is a Network Management message and has the effect of rerouting all traffic intended for the failed office. 3.13 This provides the means of detecting and informing the CCIS Network of a Dead System condition at the near end. The sanity of the CC is monitored in the Message Switch and Buffer (MSB) peripheral. If the CC does not show any sign of life, a BDOC3 message is transmitted from the MSB outward. In addition, this feature provides the means of sending a BDOC3 message on request from the CC. 3.14 When the Signal Transfer Point (STP) receives a BDOC3 from the failed office, it activates a procedure that relays the BDOC3 to every office that signal over bands in the same signalling link as the one the BDOC3 arrived on. This means that the BDOC3 must be transmitted on every link that the particular MSB is connected to. 3.15 This trigger mechanism is used so that the failed office does not get burdened with send BDOC3 messages to all the office it is connected to. DSA AND NETWORK MANAGEMENT 3.16 Offices with feature package NTX060AE are equipped with a hardware link between the Network Management Control (see 297-1001-453) and DSA permitting level 3 Dynamic Overload Control Signalling (SDOC3) to be applied automatically whenever the Page 35

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 office has lost processing ability such as with warm, reload restarts, see Figure 10 on page 39. 3.17 cold, and

To avoid the possibility of DS signals being sent to the NWM, when a craftsperson performs tests on either side of the DSA or operates either one of the DSA related scan points, the SDOC3CUTOFF SD point is operated breaking the SDOC3 hardware link, however, the NMW IDOC3 hardware is not affected. Similarly, when tests are completed, the SDOC3 hardware link is restored, see Figure 10 on page 39. VERSION 2 DEAD SYSTEM AND OAU ALARMS 3.18 The implementation of the OAU alarm and Dead System alarm in the Version 2 system varies from that described above, in that the scan and signal distribution points responsible for the generation of the alarms are incorporated into the OAU Dead System Circuit cards in the OAU and MTM, rather than using separate scan and signal distribution cards. The OAU Dead System Circuit cards contain all necessary control relays. ENHANCED ALARM SYSTEM FEATURES 3.19 Although the capabilities of the EAS system are referred to throughout this document, a summary of the basic features is provided here. LOW BATTERY VOLTAGE DETECTION CIRCUIT 3.20 The Low Battery Voltage Detection Circuit monitors the -48 V office battery and initiates an alarm condition when the battery level drops below a selectable threshold. 3.21 There are four selectable dip switch settings: Threshold Limits -50.5 < V < -49.4 -48.8 < V < -47.8 -47.7 < V < -46.6 -73.9 < V < -76.1

DIP Switch HI MED LOW TEST

3.22

The correct DIP switch is selected according to the battery level in the particular office in question. The HI setting is suitable for most applications. The TEST switch is used only to verify that the Low Battery Voltage Detect feature Page 36

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 is functioning properly. It should be set back immediately after testing to one of HI, MED or LOW. Note: Only one DIP switch setting should be selected at any one time. Selecting more than one setting changes the threshold level to an incorrect value and possibly trigger an incorrect Low Battery Voltage alarm. 3.23 The necessary scan point on the NT3X82 must be assigned in Tables ALMSCGRP and ALMSC as for any other scan point. For more information refer to 297-1001-517, External (EXT) Alarms MMI Description. Once activated, a major alarm and log message are generated to warn maintenance personnel to take action. A log message is printed every 15 minutes while the low voltage condition persists. A AND B FEED LOSS DETECTION 3.24 The NT3X82 has three PWR relays which are not powered up under normal operation. When either or both of the A or B feeds at the PDC are lost, the PWR relays on the NT3X82 are powered up and remain in this state until the feeds are restored. 3.25 Upon powerup of the PWR relays, the Critical Bell and Critical Plant Lamp are activated on the NT3X82AC.

REMOTE ALARM CONTACTS 3.26 Three remote alarm contacts are present on the board connected through a common lead. One contact is driven by the PWR2 relays and establishes a "make" connection when either or both of the A or B feeds are lost at the PDC. The remaining two contacts are "make" and "break" and are driven by the Dead System relay (DSS). REMOTE DEAD SYSTEM INDICATION 3.27 If the office is unattended when the Dead System condition occurs a facility is provided in the Version 1 system to transfer the alarm to a remote monitoring location provided that Remote Alarm transfer is in effect (see GS2X42). 3.28 Remote Dead System indication is supplied, in Version 2, in one or more of three ways. If an OAU Alarm Transfer Circuit card, described in Part 2, is installed and the remote alarm transfer feature is activated, a dead system alarm condition results in a major alarm indication in the monitoring office. If an OAU Alarm Sending Circuit card (see Part 2) is installed, and a Dead System alarm condition occurs, an indication is sent to a remote monitoring location, as described in the Dead System Alarm Sending part of this document. Finally, the Alarm Sending and Checking software feature, described later Page 37

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 in this document, provides an indication for Dead System as as for other classes of alarms. 3.29 well

In the EAS, Make and Break remote alarm contacts are available on the NT3X82AC and NT3X82AD. These contacts activate when a dead system condition is detected and are used to control external equipment. The contacts are arranged through a common lead connected to both Make and Break contacts. AUDIBLE ALARM RESET 3.30 The Audible Alarm Reset switch on the ACD provides a hardware facility for silencing the audible alarms. If the CC is functioning properly the audible alarms can be silenced either by the sil command, input at the MAP console, or by the momentary operation of the non-locking Audible Alarm Reset switch at the ACD. The sil command is detected directly by the software. The operation of the switch is detected by scan points in both the OAU and the MTM which are monitored by the software.

Page 38

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

DSA DS -48 V DS -48 V

= Part of 3X82AA/AB/AC/AD in OAU 2X57AA SDOC3CUTOFF SD NWM CONTROL < NWM SD X IDOC3 = SDOC3 Part of 3X82AA/AB/AC/AD in MTM

Fig. 10 - Sample DSA NWM Interrelationship. 3.31 If a Dead System alarm is generated the CC software is either not functioning, or is not able to communicate with the OAU and MTM due to multiple faults in the hardware of the Message System. In either case the alarm cannot be silenced through software. Page 39

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.32 When the Dead System alarm is generated the Audible Alarm Reset switch is connected through break contacts of the Dead System relays to the winding of a normally released alarm reset relay in both the OAU and the MTM. When a dead system alarm condition is in effect, the operation of the Audible Alarm Reset switch operates both alarm reset relays which open the ground path to the Critical Bell in both the OAU and the MTM. The alarm reset relays lock-up and the alarm is silenced. The alarm reset relays are automatically released when the dead system condition is cleared and the Dead System relays are reoperated by the software. FRAME SUPERVISORY PANEL (FSP) ALARMS 3.33 Each FSP in the office is equipped with alarm circuits which monitor the office battery and Alarm Battery Supply (ABS) fuses on the FSP, and the alarm leads from any equipment mounted in the frame. The alarm circuits light the appropriate Frame Fail, Fan Fail, or Converter Fail lamps when a failure is detected and provide an output on the Aisle Alarm loop. Several types of FSP are provided to meet the power and fusing requirements of, and detect the specific alarm conditions associated with, equipment mounted on various frame types. A more detailed description of the alarm circuits of each type of FSP is provided in the corresponding General Specification (see GS0X01). 3.34 alarm lamps alarm aisle 3.35 The aisle alarm loop for each equipment aisle is multipled from frame to frame through control relay contacts in the circuit of every FSP in the aisle. The End Aisle Pilot for each aisle light under direct control of the aisle loop. If a fault is detected by any FSP in the aisle the alarm loop is closed and the End Aisle Pilot lamps light.

The aisle alarm loop for each aisle in the office is also connected, through a connectorized cable, and the alarm crosspoint field (see Figure 2 on page 16 and Figure 8 on page 31 or via the Distribution Frame (DF), to an FSP alarm scan point in the OAU. One FSP alarm scan point is assigned for each equipment aisle in the office (see 297-1001-157). When an aisle alarm loop closure is detected by an FSP alarm scanpoint the External Alarms subsystem generates a major audible alarm, and the appropriate display on the MAP VDU as described in 297-1001-517. POWER DISTRIBUTION CENTER ALARMS 3.36 The FSP for the Power Distribution Center (GS0X40) provides three alarm outputs (ABS, PDC, and the aisle alarm loop). The generation of these alarms is described in detail in GS0X40. The closure of the aisle alarm loop generates an FSP alarm for the aisle as described above. The ABS and PDC alarm outputs from every PDC in the office are cabled to the alarm crosspoint field or the the DF, where all the ABS alarm outputs, and all the PDC alarm outputs are multipled together. The ABS Page 40

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 alarm outputs are connected to the ABSFAIL scan point, and the PDC alarm outputs to the PDCFAIL scanpoint, at the OAU. When an ABS or PDC alarm is detected the External Alarms subsystem (2971001-517) generates the appropriate audible and visual alarms. The FSP alarm which always accompanies these alarms identifies the particular aisle, and thus the particular PDC which generated the alarm. 3.37 In the EAS, the NT3X82AC and NT3X82AD detect if either or both of the A or B feeds is lost and raise the critical bell or common audible, as well as the Critical Power Plant Lamp. The A or B feed loss contacts are located on the PDC and wired into the 3X82 where the PWR relays are powered up in the even of a feed loss at the PDC. TRUNK TEST CENTER (TTC) ALARMS 3.38 The Trunk Test Center (TTC) is the area of a DMS-100 Family Office where the MAP used as a Trunk Test Position (TTP) is located. The TTP, described in 297-1001-116, provides a user interface for the Trunk subsystem of the DMS maintenance system (see 297-1001-516). 3.39 There are two alarm conditions associated with the TTC; an incoming call on a 101 Communication Test Line, and a trunk group out of service alarm. TEST LINE ALARM 3.40 The 101 test lines terminate at the TTP voice communications module. An incoming call on one of these lines extends a ground to a scan point in the OAU. The alarm system software detects the grounded scan point and sets the SD point assigned for 101 test line seizure. This sounds the TTC Chime (see part 2) through the operation of a relay in the Office Alarm Circuit 2 card (Version 1) or the OAU Alarm Transfer Circuit card (Version 2) in the OAU. When a call is answered, or the calling party disconnects the ground is removed from the scanpoint and the alarm is silenced. TRUNK GROUP ALARM 3.41 The Trunk Group Alarm is a system alarm detected by the software of the trunk maintenance subsystem. Dependent on the number of trunks out of service (system busy and manual busy) within one trunk group, a minor, major, or critical system alarm is generated. The VDU alarm status displays and alarm thresholds for these alarms are detailed in the Trunks Maintenance Reference Manual, 297-1001-516.

Page 41

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.42 The alarm system software detects the trunk group alarm conditions, as described in Part 1 on page 5, and initiates the corresponding audible and visual alarms. TTC NIGHT ALARM TRANSFER 3.43 When the TTC area is unattended the Night Alarm Transfer circuit provides the facility to transfer the TTC alarms to the main office alarm system. Night alarm transfer is initiated by the operation of the locking Night Alarm Transfer switch on either the ACD or an Exit Alarm Panel. The Night Alarm Transfer lamp, above the switch, lights on the ACD and on all Exit Alarm Panels to indicate that night alarm transfer is in effect. 3.44 With Night Alarm Transfer in effect, incoming calls to 101 test lines at the TTP generate a minor system alarm instead of sounding the TTC Chime. Also the Trunk Test Center lamp lights on all Exit Alarm Panels. The trunk group alarms still generate the corresponding minor, major, or critical system alarms. 3.45 The operation of the Night Alarm Transfer switch is detected by the alarm system software through a scan point in the OAU. The alarm system software then operates an SD point controlled relay, in the Office Alarm Circuit 2 card (Version 1) or the OAU Alarm Transfer Circuit card (Version 2) at the OAU, which opens the circuit of the TTC Chime and enables the Trunk Test Center lamps. REMOTE ALARM TRANSFER 3.46 The Remote Alarm Transfer circuit facilitates the transfer of major and minor alarm indications, from the DMS office and power plant, to a remote alarm receiving circuit in a distant office. This permits the local office to be unattended. Since the remote alarm receiving circuit monitors only two classes of alarms, major and minor, the DMS critical alarms are transferred to the remote location as majors. If alarm grouping is in effect, alarms originating on preceding and succeeding floors are also transferred to the remote location. 3.47 The alarms are transferred to the distant office by the momentary operation of the non-locking Alarm Transfer switch at the ACD, or by the operation of the non-locking Alarm Reset key at the remote alarm receiving circuit in the distant office. When the alarms are transferred, the Alarm Transfer lamp, above the Alarm Transfer switch at the ACD, lights. Remote alarm transfer is cancelled by re-operating the Alarm Transfer switch at the ACD, or the Alarm Reset key at the remote alarm receiving circuit in the distant office. To reset alarm indications at the distant office, the remote alarm transfer is cancelled and reinitiated by operating the Alarm Reset key twice. Page 42

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.48 The Version 1 transfer circuit, comprised of four relays and their associated wiring, is located in the Office Alarm Circuit 2 card (GS2X42) in the OAU. The transfer circuit communicates with the remote alarm receiving circuit in the distant office over two leads (connected via the alarm crosspoint field, the DF, and a cable pair), using 1 130 V supplies for signaling. 3.49 Remote Alarm Transfer, similar to that described above, is available in Version 2 Office Alarm systems, if an OAU Alarm Transfer Circuit card, which contains all necessary components, is installed. If an OAU Alarm Sending Circuit card is installed instead of the Alarm Transfer Circuit card, the Remote Alarm Transfer facility is replaced by the Dead System Alarm Sending facility described below. DEAD SYSTEM ALARM SENDING 3.50 The Dead System Alarm Sending circuit sends a signal over an operator verification trunk when a Dead System Alarm condition occurs. The release of the DS relays in the OAU Dead System Circuit cards of the OAU and MTM results in a ground being connected to the DS relay of the OAU Alarm Sending Circuit card. A 480 Hz tone is then generated and an idle trunk is seized, over which the tone is sent. ALARM GROUPING 3.51 The Alarm Grouping circuit provides the capability to group alarms originating in the DMS office with those originating on preceding (lower) and succeeding (upper) floors which have compatible office alarm systems. Alarm Grouping is initiated by the operation of the locking Alarm Grouping switch on either the ACD or on an Exit Alarm Panel. The Alarm Grouping lamp, above the switch, lights on the ACD and on all Exit Alarm Panels to indicate that alarm grouping is in effect. 3.52 * When alarm grouping is in effect in the DMS office, alarms are treated as follows:

Alarms detected in the DMS office: These alarms are forwarded to the succeeding floor, however they are always sent to the preceding floor whether or not alarm grouping is in effect. Alarms from preceding floor: These alarms are forwarded to the DMS office, however alarm grouping must also be in effect on the preceding floor for this to occur. Alarms received from succeeding floor: These alarms are forwarded to the preceding floor, however they are not detected in the DMS, nor forwarded to the preceding floor unless alarm grouping is in effect, in the DMS. Page 43

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.53 The Version 1 Alarm Grouping circuit, comprised of six relays and their associated wiring, is located in the Office Alarm Circuit 1 card (GS2X41) in the OAU. Alarm leads from the preceding and succeeding floors are connected to the grouping circuit via the DF and the alarm crosspoint field (see Fig. 2). The alarm system software generates audible and visual indications in the DMS office of alarms received from the preceding floor whether or not alarm grouping is in effect. 3.54 In Version 2 Office Alarm systems, all relays and wiring associated with the Alarm Grouping Circuit, except interfloor connections described above, are contained in the OAU Alarm Grouping Circuit card, installed in the OAU. ALARM POWER SUPPLIES ($PM 130 V AND 20 HZ AC) In Version 1 Office Alarm System the 1 130 V supplies for the Remote Alarm Transfer circuit, and the 20 Hz ac ringing supply for the Alarm Battery subset, Minor Alarm subset, and TTC Chime are generated in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card (GS2X43). An Office Alarm Circuit 3 card is mounted in both the OAU and the MTM, so the supplies are duplicated. This duplication makes it possible for the alarm system to generate the proper audible alarm when one of the 20 Hz ac supplies fails. Also if one of the 1 130 V supplies fails in an unattended office the alarm system is still able to send an alarm indication to the remote monitoring location if remote alarm transfer is in effect. 3.55 3.56 The supplies from either the OAU or the MTM are connected to the alarm system through the contacts of an SD point controlled relay in each Office Alarm Circuit 3 card. Normally, only the supplies in the OAU are connected to the alarm system, but if for any reason one or both of the OAU supplies fail, the source for both supplies is switched to the MTM and an OAU alarm is generated. When the fault in the OAU has been repaired, the alarm system software automatically switches back to the OAU supplies. If one of the MTM supplies fails while the OAU supplies are down then both 1 130 V and 20 Hz ac supplies are put out-ofservice. In the Version 2 Office Alarm system, the 1 130 V power supply for the Remote Alarm Transfer Circuit, is contained in the same circuit card that contains the Alarm Transfer Circuit. Since there is only one such card, no backup power supply is available. However, the failure of the 1 130 V power source results in an alarm being raised at the remote office. 3.57 3.58 The 20 Hz power supply, only present in the Version 2 system if the OAU Dead System Circuit card with unique audible alarms is used, is usually duplicated by a corresponding circuit card in the MTM. Power monitor and transfer circuits are provided and, similarly to Version 1, if the 20 Hz supply from the OAU fails, the OAU alarm is raised and the source for the Page 44

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 supply is switched to the MTM. The source is automatically switched back to the OAU when the fault has been corrected. LOOP CLOSURE 3.59 Version 2 Office Alarm Systems provide loop closures to the DF for critical, major, minor and OAU alarms. The loop closure can be used to drive external alarm sending equipment, or for distribution to a central maintenance center. LOCAL TALK LINE CIRCUIT 3.60 The local talk lines are two office telephone lines which terminate at the MAP voice communications module (Logic Telephone set). These lines are connected so that line 1 serves all odd aisles (A, C, E, G ...), and line 2 serves all even aisles (B, D, F, H ...) in the office. 3.61 In Version 1 Office Alarm Systems, Line 1 is connected via the DF and the alarm crosspoint field to a transformer, in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card of the OAU, which divides the line into a transmit and a receive path. From the transformer, the line is bridged back to the alarm crosspoint field where it is multipled to all odd aisles in the office. At each odd aisle, line 1 is multipled, from frame to frame, to the A and B Talk Line jacks on every Frame Supervisory Panel. A telephone headset, plugged into the Talk Line jacks of any FSP, completes the talking path. 3.62 Line 2 is multipled to all FSP in the even aisles in the same way, except that the transformer for line 2 is located in the Office Alarm Circuit 3 card of the MTM. This ensures that one talk line is still available if a failure occurs in the MTM or the OAU. 3.63 The Local Talk Line Circuit is also available in the Version 2 Office Alarm system, when OAU Dead System Circuit cards with unique audible alarms are installed in both the OAU and MTM. These cards contain the transformers and related circuits for the Local Talk Lines. The Version 2 Talk Line Circuit is functionally similar to that described above. DATA LOOP SYSTEM 3.64 The Office Data Loop system provides a 4-wire facility for the transmission of data between the DMS-100 Family Switch and terminal devices (for example, mobile switch maintenance VDU) located on any equipment aisle in the office or at the DF. The system also provides a facility for point to point data transmission between test equipment located at different locations within the office. Page 45

PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.65 a. b. c. The hardware following: of the data loop system is comprised of the

Three Data Loop control switches on the ACD, Four Data Link Control cards alarm crosspoint field shelf, (NT0X89) mounted in the

Up to two data communication ports originating at Terminal Controller cards (GS1X67) in the Input-Output Controller (IOC), Data Loop jacks (transmit and receive) mounted on every FSP (GS0X28, GS0X29, GS0X82) in the office, Data Loop jacks mounted on the DF.

d. e. 3.66

The Data Loop system is organized in the following manner. The Data Loop jacks on every FSP in each equipment aisle in the office are multipled together from frame to frame and then cabled to the alarm crosspoint field shelf. At the alarm crosspoint field, the data loops of all odd aisles (A, C, E, G ...), and all even aisles (B, D, F, H ...) are multipled together. The combined data loops of all the odd, and all the even aisles are designated the A aisle multiple, and the B aisle multiple, respectively. 3.67 The A and B aisle multiples are connected to the contacts of relays in the four Data Link Control cards. Each card mounts three relays and is plugged into one of four 25 pin connectors (B, C, D, or E) on the alarm crosspoint field. The transmit and receive pairs of the A, and B aisle multiples are wired to connectors B and C, and D and E respectively. 3.68 The data communication ports at the IOC, and Data Loop jacks for the A and B aisle multiples at the DF are connected via cable to the alarm crosspoint field and wired to the appropriate pins of connectors B and C, or D and E. 3.69 The three Data Loop control switches at the ACD control the operation of the relays in the Data Link Control cards. The A switch controls the data routing for the A aisle multiple, and the B switch for the B aisle multiple. The A + B switch when set to the A + B position joins the A and B aisle multiples together. Different combinations of the three switches provide the following routing options: a. b. c. A aisle multiple to IOC port A, DF, or open, B aisle multiple to IOC port B, DF, or open, A and open. B aisle multiples joined to IOC port A, DF, or

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 ALARM SENDING AND CHECKING SYSTEM 3.70 The Alarm Sending and Checking System (ASCS) is a software feature compatible with either version of the Office Alarm system. When activated, the feature provides a facility for sending indications of alarm conditions, occurring in the DMS office, over a trunk to a remote operator position. 3.71 If the receiving operator is at a Traffic Operator Position System (TOPS) position, an ANI-8 information digit, spilled over the trunk, is translated to an alarm indication on the video screen. The operator then uses the TOPS facility to access further information. 3.72 In the case where the trunk termination is a regular operator position, upon answer of the call, a tone is generated across the trunk, indicating that the originating office has encountered an alarm condition. The operator then dials a directory number (DN) allocated to the ASCS checking facility, and hears a specific tone from the office, indicating the severity of the alarm condition. 3.73 The tones and directory numbers used for ASCS, as well as certain parameters associated with the feature, are assigned by the operating company (see 297-1001-451 and 297-2101-451). Typical tone assignment is:

TONE Continuous high tone, Low tone, or Ring Back tone.

MEANING Initially received by the Operator indicating the existence of an alarm condition in the originating office. When the appropriate ASCS DN is dialed the class of the alarm is indicated by the tone condition received as follows:

No tone Busy tone Code 1 Ringback tone Code 2 Ringback tone

CRITICAL alarm MAJOR alarm MINOR alarm No alarm

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 3.74 ASCS has the capability of repeating the alarm indicating call if the alarm condition is not corrected, or if its severity has worsened since the checking call was made. 3.75 When the office is left unattended, the ASCS feature is activated either by operation of the Alarm Transfer Switch on the Alarm Control and Display Panel, or by using the command described below.

ASCS ON OFF

Permits the user to change or verify the status of the Alarm Sending and Checking System (ASCS) feature. Where: ON OFF Notes: 1. When the command is entered without parameters, the system responds by displaying the current status of the ASCS sending facility, either ASCS ON, if it is activated, or ASCS OFF if it is deactivated. The checking facility is always activated when the feature is installed, and may be used by maintenance personnel at any time to check the office. Neither the operation of the Alarm Transfer Switch, nor the ASCS command has any effect on the checking facility. Enables the sending facility of the ASCS feature. Disables the sending facility of the ASCS feature.

2.

REMOTE LINE MODULE ALARMS 3.76 Alarm capability may be provided to a Remote Line Module (RLM) site. The Remote Service Module (RSM) is equipped with a scan detector card (GS0X10) and a Signal Distribution card (GS2X57). An ACD panel with common audible alarm (NT0X63AC) is installed at the remote site. When an alarm condition occurs, it is detected by a scan point. The information is communicated to the host office via the DS-1 facility. The host office then activates the alarm signaling device at the remote site by operating the appropriate signal distribution point.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 RLM ALARM EXTENSION CIRCUIT 3.77 In NT0X45 type RLM offices the Alarm Extension Circuit NT5X92 is used to expand the audible and visual alarm capabilities beyond those normally available from the ACD panel with Common Audible (NT0X63AC), (see Figure 11 on page 50). 3.78 It provides Common Audible Alarm at up to ten different locations within the same building and extends alarm signals via relay contacts to a maximum of five Exit Alarm Panels (NT0X64), a total of two ACD panels (NT0X63AC) and two other non-DMS systems. All these alarms are activated via signal distribution points which are either pre-defined by the alarm system logic or assigned per office dependent data tables. 3.79 The Alarm Extension Circuit consists of one Alarm Extension Unit (NT5X92AB) installed on a remote service equipment frame and up to ten Common Audible Alarm panels (NT5X92AA) wall or column mounted at locations where audible indications are required. CENTRALIZED ALARM REPORTING 3.80 The Centralized Alarm Reporting (CALM) feature, enables the host Dynamic Network Controller (DNC), of a Large Business Remote (LBR) switching network, to retrieve and display the current alarm conditions of each DMS100 switch in the LBR network. 3.81 The feature, NTX813AA, is initialized at the time of DNC login and is turned off at logout. While active, CALM continuously scans the alarms status of the DMS subsystems, as shown on the top line of the MAP dislay. Each status is compared with that of the previous scan, and if a change is detected a new status is transmitted to all logged in DNC. Current alarm status information is also provided to the DNC on request.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01

DF

DF NT5X92AA

NT2X57 SD CARD -NT5X92AB EXTENSION ALARM NT0X63 NT0X10 SC CARD -CIRCUIT -ACD PANEL WITH AUDIBLE (MAX 2) -COMMON AUDIBLE ALARM PANELS (MAX 10)

NT0X64 -EXIT ALARM PANEL (MAX 5)

--

NON DMS SYSTEMS (MAX 2)

Fig. 11 - RLM ALARM EXTENSION CIRCUIT BLOCK DIAGRAM

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE C EXAMPLES OF VERSION 2 OAS EQUIPMENT COMBINATIONS System Requirements A Alarm System for RLM 2X57AA 0X10AA B Alarm System for small office 3X82AB 2X57AA 0X10AA 3X84AA 3X82AB C Complete Alarm System for large office 3X82AA 3X83AA or 3X84AA 3X85AA 2X57AA (2) 0X10AA (6) 3X82AA

Equipment located in OAU shelf

Equipment located in MTM Related Equipment

none

0X63AC

0X63AC

3X89AA 0X63AA 0X63AB 0X64AA (2) 0X66AA (2) 0X61AB Fig.8

Corresponding Illustration

none

Fig.7

Note: Numbers in parentheses indicate quantities required, other than one.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 TABLE D FEATURES OF OAS DESCRIBED IN TABLE C SYSTEM A FEATURES Common Audible alarm with alarm indicators: reset and disable, Visual

critical - both remotely located Line Modules of a pair are system busy major - a ringing generator or bus interface card fault exists at the site B VDU display of up to 6 equipment rows, software remote Alarm Sending and Checking (ASCS), Hardware Dead System Alarm sending over operator trunks, alarm loop closures to distributing frame, common audible alarm, visual alarm indicators, Dead System Alarm with audible alarm reset and disable. VDU display of up to 40 equipment rows, alarm loop closures to distributing frame, visual alarm indicators and controls, remote alarm transfer, alarm grouping, standard audible alarms with reset, Office Data Loop system, local talk lines, exit pilot displays, TTC audible alarm, 14 spare SD points, 36 spare scan points, cross aisle visual alarm display.

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PRACTICE 297-1001-122 RELEASE: 05.01 4. ABS ACD ANI ASCS CAMA CC CCIS DF DMS DOC DSA EAS Ext FSP IOC IPM MAP MDF MTM OAS OAU PDC PM RLM SD STP TOPS TTC TTP UI VDU ABBREVIATIONS Alarm Battery Supply Alarm Control and Display Automatic Number Identification Alarm Sending and Checking System Centralized Automatic Message Accounting Central Control Common Channel Interoffice Signaling Distributing Frame Digital Multiplex Switching Dynamic Overload Control Signaling Dead System Alarm Enhanced Alarm System External (subsystem) Frame Supervisory Panel Input-Output Controller Interruptions Per Minute Maintenance and Administration Position Main Distributing Frame Maintenance Trunk Module Office Alarm System Office Alarm Unit Power Distribution Center Peripheral Module Remote Line Module Signal Distribution Signal Transfer Point Traffic Operator Position System Trunk Test Center Trunk Test Position User Interface (previously Man-Machine Interface) Visual Display Unit

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