Introduction

The moment one walks into a so-called “Natural and Organic Grocery” store, it is more than simply obvious that this store offers a distinct environment, or rather, an overall experience. The health and environmental conscious customers fill their carts with “organic” and “fresh” items, items that claim to be beneficial for the growers/producers, consumer, and Mother Nature herself. “Fresh”, cold, crisp air dances on one’s skin, and the scent of “organic” foods enters into one’s nostrils, inviting them to pick up an apple, as if they were picking them straight off of the tree in grandma’s backyard. What these consumers do not notice is that they are merely sheep thrown at the bottom of the hierarchy this “Organic Health Food” fad, controlled by corporate society. Little do the consumers at such natural food stores such as Whole Foods notice, or are aware that their experiences are that of highly “fetishized” ones. To attain a heightened feeling, one remains blind to, or does not do the research that proves that same items being sold at Whole Foods could be bought at other stores, at the fraction of price. In this economic state, it is unavoidable that companies raise the prices of merchandise. However, with a little research, one can find stores that literally sell the exact same items for much cheaper, or even in some cases, for free, as Matias Viegner, David Burns and Austin Young of Fallen Fruit proved in the project of mapping food resources in Los Angeles. In a Marxist society, the cost of production should be the same cost as distribution; yet this is not so in the corporate/capitalist society. Culture is fueled by economic power, the existence of “Organic Health Food” stores being an excellent example of this reality. In such cases, there not only is harm to the consumers, but there is also an attack against local farmers; although Whole Foods claims that they support local farmers, the existence and pricing of their original brand clearly proves that this is not true. While items from the Whole Foods brands are lowered, the prices of items produced by local farmers are risen. Naturally, in times like these, the consumer decides to purchase the more accessible/cheaper items, which creates a lesser need for produce/items made by local businesses. A clear system of hierarchy fueled by economic power exists here, one similar to that which Marx explored in his economic material dialectic; the owning class (Whole Foods) sits at top, the local businesses serve the owning class, the consumers lie at the bottom, serving the owning class by mindlessly consuming their products. The bottom two classes continue acting to their disadvantage, and continue to pursue such exploitive relationship. The intention of THE PURCHASE AESTHETIC is to allow the audience, who are also the consumers, to be educated of such reality. “Organic foods” that are being sold at “Natural and Organic Grocery” stores can be purchased else where, for the fraction of the price. Should one shop at “Natural and Organic” grocery stores and pay for the “experience”, or should they became a smart consumer and find their grocery else where? It is up to the consumers themselves to be aware of the reality, take action, and save themselves. The QR codes (which can be found throughout the book) are intended to initiate the audience to do research for themselves; each code leads the audience to a new link where they may find new information, and be more aware of the reality of shopping at “Natural and Organic” stores.

Market Locations

$$$ $$ $

225 Lincoln Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 566-9480 www.wholefoodsmarket.com

4030 S. Centinela Ave Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 391-1503 www.vons.com

241 Lincoln Blvd. Venice, CA. 90291 310 678-0932 www.99only.com

Color Key
Research Whole Foods 99 Cents Only

Type & QR

Vons

Featured Content
Section One / Food For Thought 6
The Meaning of Marxism 8–9 Marxism A Graphic Guide 10–11 A Mapping of Food Resources in Los Angeles 12–13 Ideology and ideological State Apparatuses 14–15 Shut Up and Shop! Thinking Politically about Consumption 16–17 Politicizing The Aesthetic 18–19 Crisis and Hope / The Society of the Spectacle / Worker Occupations and the Future of Radical Labor 20–21 What Is After Whole Foods / Food & Drink / Supermarkets, Neo-Liberalism and the Recession / 10 Reasons Whole Foods Is Annoying 22–23

Section Five / Food Facts 50
FDA Label Chart / Green Choices / How to read Ingredient Labels 52–53 Certified Organic Label Guide / Get Smart About Organic Labels / The Seven Sins 54–55 Organic Labeling and Marketing Information 56–57 USDA’s Food Chart 58–59 FDA’S Food Ingredient Approval Process 60–61 Should I Purchase Organic Foods? 62–63 Does It Pay to Buy Organic? 64–65 Should I Purchase Organic Foods? 66–67 Understanding Organic Food Labels, Benefits, and Claims 68–69

Section Two / Mission Statements 24
Whole Foods / Vons 26–27 99 Cent Stores 28

Section Six / Random Store Findings 70
50 years of Packaging That Fool Stupid People 72–73 12 Bags 74–75 It Is Just A Word 76–77 Salad Bar 78–79 Morning Wake Up 80–81

Section Three / Food Group Selections 30
Dairy Selection 32–33 Grain Group 34–35 Protein Group 38–39 Vegetable Group 40–41 Fruit Group 44–45

Section Seven / Packaging A Quick Look 82
Carrot Packaging 84–85

Section Four / Food ID 46
Peanut Butter / Carrots 48–49

Section Eight / Spending Graph 86
Supermarket Fetishism 88–89

Special Thanks / Closing Statement 90–91

Food For Thought
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section One

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7

The Purchased Aesthetic

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

8
As Marx jokingly related, the marketplace where good are exchanged is seen as “a very Eden of the innate rights of man” where “alone rule freedom, Equality, [and] Property,” because each “exchange equivalent for equivalent.”

9

The Purchased Aesthetic

The Meaning of Marxism

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

10
A falling rate of profit will force a concentration of capitalist enterprises prove more successful then others.

11

The Purchased Aesthetic

Marxism A Graphic Guide

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

12
Public fruit is more efficient to grow than farmed fruit because it eliminates the cost of transport. Since it is not a mono-crop, as in an orchard of a single variety of apple, there are far less pests and less chemicals required. A further irony is that most of the public fruit in Los Angles is organic, blessed by neglect. Is it safe to eat? Absolutely. Should you worry about car exhaust and fumes?

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The Purchased Aesthetic

A Mapping of Food Resources in Los Angeles

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

14
I have suggested that the ideologies were realized in institutions, in their rituals and their practices, in the ISAs. We have seen that on this basis they contribute to that form of class struggle, vital for the ruling class, the reproduction of the relations of production. But the point of view itself however real, is still an abstract one.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Ideology and ideological State Apparatuses

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

16
We market consumption practices this becomes naturalized accounts of human desire.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Shut Up and Shop! Thinking Politically about Consumption

Section One / Food For Thought

The Purchased Aesthetic

18
A s Clement Greenberg might have said, if presented with the above comments: “it is a matter of taste.” Greenberg may have been satisfied with that rather flippant response, perhaps, because his audience at the time may have provided evidence they were not prepared for a discussion.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Politicising The Aesthetic

Section One / Food For Thought

One illustration is the array of perverse crazy incentives devised for corporate managers to enrich themselves, however grievous the impact on others—for example, the “too big to fail” insurance policies provided by the unwitting growing public.

When I go home tonight I’ll have 15 letters today from mostly young kids who don’t like what’s going on and want to do something about it, and [they ask me] if I can give them some advice as to what they should do, or can I tell them what to read or something. It doesn’t work like that. I mean, everything depends very much on who you are, what your values are , what your commitments are, what circumstances you live in and what options you’re willing to undertake, and that determines what you ought to be doing.

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

The fetishism of the commodity the domination of society by “intangible as well as tangible things” attains its ultimate goal of fulfillment in the spectacle, where the real world is replaced by a selection of images which are projected above it, yet which at the same time succeed in making themselves regarded as the epitome of reality.

Crisis and Hope / The Society of the Spectacle / Worker Occupations and the Future of Radical Labor

Section One / Food For Thought

Old Bean. What was a package of tofu with a three-month-past expiration date doing on the shelf? With a little internet down time you can find that this goes on a lot in the Whole Foods chain. The root of the failure of these ideas of course is their class perspective and their inability to understand the contradictory nature of the advances made by modern capitalism.

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Data analysts Experience contend that the old class system isn’t flexible enough to be of use to all in area supermarkets when deciding such matters as where to put their stores, what kind of music to have on the PA, or whether to move the beer next to the nappies after 6pm at night.

People call it Whole Paycheck, make fun of the SUV-drivin’ richies who shop there, fault it for not being all organic, or not being local enough. But not all the criticism against Whole Foods is well deserved.

What IS After Whole Foods / Food & Drink / Supermarkets, Neo-Liberalism and the Recession / 10 Reasons Whole Foods Is Annoying

Mission Statement
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Two

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Two / Mission Statements
Whole Foods
Whole Foods Market is a dynamic leader in the quality food business. We are a mission-driven company that aims to set the standards of excellence for food retailers. We are building a business in which high standards permeate all aspects of our company. Quality is a state of mind at Whole Foods Market. Our motto — Whole Foods, Whole People, Whole Planet — emphasizes that our vision reaches far beyond just being a food retailer. Our success in fulfilling our vision is measured by customer satisfaction, Team Member excellence and happiness, return on capital investment, improvement in the state of the environment, and local and larger community support. Our ability to instill a clear sense of interdependence among our various stakeholders (the people who are interested and benefit from the success of our company) is contingent upon our efforts to communicate more often, more openly, and more compassionately. Better communication equals better understanding and more trust. time, family, and community involvement outside of work is for a rich, meaningful and balanced life. We must remember that we are not “Whole Life Market.” We strive to build positive and healthy relationships among Team Members. “Us versus them” thinking has no place in our company. We believe that the best way to do this is to encourage participation and involvement at all levels of our business. Some of the ways we do this are: Self directed Teams that meet regularly to discuss issues, solve problems and appreciate each other’s contributions. Increased communication through Team Member Forums and Advisory Groups, and open book, open door, and open people practices. Labor gainsharing and other Team Member incentive programs. Team Member Stock Options and Stock Purchase Plan. Commitment to make our jobs more fun by combining work and play and through friendly competition to improve our stores. Continuous learning opportunities about company values, food, nutrition and job skills. Equal opportunity for employment, with promotion mostly from within the company.

Vons
CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
We are, and always have been, committed to supporting the communities we serve. Our fund raising efforts focus on hunger relief, education, health and human services and people with disabilities. We encourage customers in our stores to help us direct funds to local schools and youth organizations as well as health and human services. We contribute on a national level, too. For decades we have sponsored fund raising programs that support the Muscular Dystrophy Association, Easter Seals and research in breast and prostate cancer. Contributions have surpassed $14 million, annually. Our passion and concern for youth education has paid off as well. We are proud that over $22 million was donated for youth education in 2007 through our eScrip program. Our commitment to hunger relief runs very deep. Last year alone, we gave more than $110 million in food to local organizations across the country. We give as a company, through the generous contributions of our customers and our employees. At Safeway you’ll find many of the people who work here are personally and actively reaching out to help worthy programs in their communities.

The Purchased Aesthetic

WE SELL THE HIGHEST QUALITY NATURAL AND ORGANIC PRODUCTS AVAILABLE

We appreciate and celebrate that great food and cooking improves the lives of all of our stakeholders. Breaking bread with others, eating healthfully and eating well — these are some of the great joys of our lives. Our goal is to sell the highest quality products that also offer high value for our customers. High value is a product of high quality at a competitive price. Our product quality standards focus on ingredients, freshness, taste, nutritive value, safety and/or appearance. While we have very high standards for product quality, we believe that it is important to be inclusive and open minded, and not overly restrictive or dogmatic.

WE CREATE WEALTH THROUGH PROFITS AND GROWTH

We earn profits every day through voluntary exchange with our customers. We know that profits are essential to create capital for growth, job security and overall financial success. Profits are the “savings” every business needs in order to change and evolve to meet the future. They are the “seed corn” for next year’s crop. We are the stewards of our shareholder’s investments and we are committed to increasing long term shareholder oveall value. As a publicly traded company, Whole Foods Market intends to grow. We will grow at such a pace that our quality of work environment, Team Member productivity and excellence, customer satisfaction, and financial health continue to prosper. There is a community of self interest among all of our stakeholders. We share together in our collective vision for the company. To that end we have a salary cap that limits the maximum cash compensation (wages plus profit incentive bonuses) paid to any Team Member in the calendar year to 19 times the company-wide annual average salary of all full-time Team Crew Members.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Safeway’s commitment to diversity and inclusion and thoughtful people practices is a core element of the company’s philosophy, ensuring our employees reflect the diverse communities we serve. We recognize and appreciate the variety of backgrounds and characteristics that make individuals unique, while providing a work environment that promotes and celebrates individual and collective achievement. We have been honored with numerous local, state and national awards for our hiring of persons with disabilities in the U.S. and Canada, and were honored with the Champion of Diversity Award for the second consecutive year from Supermarket News, a leading grocery trade publication. Diversity and inclusion is a component of our programs for recruitment, development and training of employees and leaders. We also provide opportunities for employees to contribute their ideas, talents and enthusiasm to the company’s success by engaging with other employees through participation in various employee resource and network groups, such as Women’s Network Group, Hispanic Leadership Network Group, Asian Network Group, Safeway African American Leadership Network Group, GALA (Gay and Lesbian Alliance), just to name a few.

WE SATISFY AND DELIGHT OUR CUSTOMERS

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Our customers are the most important stakeholder in our business. Therefore, we go to extraordinary lengths to satisfy and delight our customers. We want to meet or exceed their expectations on every shopping trip. We know that by doing so we turn customers into advocates for whole foods. We guarantee our customers 100% product satisfaction or their money will be refunded. Outstanding customer service is a result of both our Team Members skill and enthusiasm in serving our customers and their in-depth knowledge and excitement about the products we sell. We nurture a quality business relationship with our customers by daily demonstrating our customer service beliefs: Customers are the lifeblood of our business and we are interdependent on each other. Customers are the primary motivation for our work they are not an interruption of our work. Customers are people who bring us their wants and desires and our primary objective is to satisfy them as best we can — they are not people to argue or match wits with. Customers are fellow human beings with feelings and emotions like our own; they are equals to be treated with courtesy and respect at all times. We continually experiment and innovate in order to raise our retail standards. We create store environments that are inviting, fun, unique, informal, comfortable, attractive, nurturing and educational. We want our stores to become community meeting places where our customers come to join their friends and to make new ones. Our stores are “inclusive.” Everyone is welcome, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, age, beliefs, or personal appearance. We value diversity — whole foods are for everyone.

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WE SUPPORT OUR COMMUNITIES AND ENCOURAGE LOCAL INVOLVEMENT

The Purchased Aesthetic

Our business is intimately tied to the neighborhood and larger community that we serve and in which we live. The unique character of our stores is a direct reflection of the customers who shop with us. Without their support, both financial and philosophical, Whole Foods Market would not be in business. Our interdependence at times goes beyond our mutual interest in quality food and, where appropriate, we will respond. We donate 5% of our after-tax profits to not-for-profit NPO organizations.

BUILDING A CAREER

To support your professional growth we provide development opportunities at all levels, from entry-level training to store management to professional development programs for corporate leadership. We encourage you to further your education by participating in Professional and Career Education Program (PACE), which combines classroom education with work experiences and reimburses a portion of your educational expenses.

WE PROMOTE ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP

We see the necessity of active environmental stewardship so that the earth continues to flourish for generations to come. We seek to balance our needs with the needs of the rest of the planet through the following work actions: Supporting sustainable agriculture. We are committed to greater production of organically and biodynamically grown foods in order to reduce pesticide use and promote soil conservation. Reducing waste and consumption of non-renewable resources. We promote and participate in recycling programs in our communities. We are committed to re-usable packaging, reduced packaging, and water and energy conservation. Encouraging environmentally sound cleaning and store maintenance tech programs.

LEARNING & LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
Our award-winning Learning & Leadership Development Program has two phases. In the first 21 weeks you will receive coaching from an experienced store manager, attend workshops, take Web-based training and work in each major department at a training store. A Training Manager will teach you how to analyze sales, service and profits. In the second 18-month phase you will actively work as either an Assistant Store Manager or Co-Manager, applying the knowledge and experience you gained during the first phase.

WE SUPPORT TEAM MEMBER EXCELLENCE AND HAPPINESS

Our success is also dependent upon the collective energy and intelligence of all our Team Members. In addition to receiving fair wages and benefits, belief in the value of our work and finding fulfillment from our jobs is a key reason we are part of Whole Foods Market. Therefore, we design and promote safe work environments where motivated Team Members can flourish and reach their highest potential. And no matter how long a person has worked or plans to work with us, each and every Team Member is a valued contributor. There are many Team Members in our company who “work behind the scenes” to produce product, distribute product and generally support our retail Team Members and customers. Although they are not as visible as our retail Team Members, they are integral to the success of our business. Achieving unity of vision about the future of our company, and building trust between Team Members is a goal of Whole Foods Market. At the same time diversity and individual differences are recognized and honored. We aim to cultivate a strong sense of community and dedication to the company. We also realize how important leisure

CORPORATE TRAINING PROGRAMS
Our commitment to career growth extends to our employees and managers in our corporate offices. We provide professional development tools, resources and processes to help you with your career development at Safeway. We also provide industry leading management training that addresses current leadership challenges and best practices.

OUR BUSINESS ASSOCIATES

We are not a fully self-sustaining ecosystem. There are hundreds of other businesses that we depend on to assist us in creating an outstanding retail shopping experience for our customers. We view our trade partners as allies in serving our stakeholders. We treat them with respect, fairness and integrity, and expect the same in return.

BALANCE AND INTEGRATION

Satisfying all of our stakeholders and achieving our standards is our goal. One of the most important responsibilities of Whole Foods Market’s leadership is to make sure the interests, desires and needs of our various stakeholders are kept in balance.

Whole Foods / Vons

Section Two / Mission Statements
99 Cents Stores
99¢ Only Stores is a unique deep-discount retailer of primarily name-brand consumable general merchandise. We have always delivered great value to our customers, and in these challenging economic times, we are “The Right Store...Now More Than Ever!” We provide an exciting primary shopping destination for price-sensitive consumers, and a fun treasure-hunt shopping experience for other value conscious consumers. We accomplish this by offering excellent values on a wide selection of quality food and basic household items with a focus on name brands and an exciting assortment of “wow” items. Our stores are attractively merchandised, clean, full service “destination” locations that offer customers significant value on their everyday household needs in a fun shopping environment. Merchandise encompasses a wide array of name brand closeouts and regularly available consumable products including food and beverages such as produce, deli, and other basic grocery items. From the first store opening in 1982, 99¢ Only Stores has expanded to 281 stores with about 75% in California and the rest in Texas, Arizona, and Nevada. Stores open at least a year generated average net sales per estimated sell able square foot of $289 and average net sales per store of $4.8 million, which the Company believes are the highest in the dollar store industry. Stores’ generous sponsorship and support.

99 GREEN

At the 99¢ Only Stores, we are committed to being The Right Store… Now More Than Ever! We are also committed to recycling and reusing materials to promote better environmental stewardship. As part of our “Reverse Logistics” program, our goal is to recycle and reuse what we can. Recycle what we can. Cardboard, plastic shrink wrap, plastic bags and metal fixtures are recycled and used to make new products. The 99¢ Only Stores chain is considered a major cardboard recycler in the United States. Reuse what we can. Wooden pallets, plastic produce crates and bread trays are returned by the stores using our “Reverse Logistics” program. Our distribution center and vendors are then able to reuse for future store deliveries.

The Purchased Aesthetic

STRONG LONG-TERM VENDOR RELATIONSHIPS

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Integrity, flexibility, dependability and prompt payment are key to 99¢ Only Stores successful vendor relationships. Many of the Company’s strong supplier relationships go back over 25 years. 99¢ Only Stores has developed an excellent reputation among the leading consumer goods manufacturers as a leading purchaser of name-brand, re-orderable, and closeout merchandise at discounted prices. Its willingness and consistent practice over many years to make very large volume purchases and take possession of merchandise immediately, its ability to pay cash or accept abbreviated credit terms, its willingness to purchase goods close to a target season or out of season and its commitment to honor all issued purchase orders have all contributed to building this reputation. In fact, 99¢ Only Stores has never cancelled a purchase order! The Company’s experienced buying staff, with the ability to make immediate buying decisions, also enhances its strong supplier relationships. 99¢ Only Stores’ relationships with its suppliers is further enhanced by its ability to minimize channel conflict for the manufacturer by quickly and discreetly selling name-brand merchandise directly through its stores. Additionally, the Company believes its well-maintained and attractively merchandised stores have contributed to its reputation among suppliers for protecting their brand image. 99¢ Only Stores’ buys directly from almost every major name brand consumer goods manufacturer in the nation including 3M, Cadbury Adams, Church & Dwight, Coca-Cola, Colgate-Palmolive, Con Agra, Del Monte, Dial, Dole, Energizer, Frito Lay, General Mills, Hasbro, Heinz, Hershey Foods, Johnson & Johnson, Kellogg’s, Kraft, Masterfoods, Nestle, Procter & Gamble, Quaker, Revlon, Unilever, and Wrigley. “99¢ Only Stores has never cancelled a purchase order in the Company’s great history!” 99¢ Only Stores® is a proud sponsor of Heal the Bay’s Nothin’ But Sand beach cleanup program and a multi-year partner of its annual, A Day Without a Bag event. As a successful, Southern California-based retail chain, 99¢ Only Stores’ support has been key in promoting greater awareness, broadening Heal the Bay’s base of members, and generating donations to support their science, education, community action and advocacy efforts. 99¢ Only Stores’ support, and the support of other community members and local businesses, is extremely important in raising awareness and funds to aid in Heal the Bay’s mission to make southern California coastal waters and watersheds, including Santa Monica Bay, safe, healthy and clean. Through the collaboration of 99¢ Only Stores and Heal the Bay’s Nothin’ But Sand program, Heal the Bay is able to provide education about ocean pollution, safety instructions and cleanup supplies including bags, gloves, pencils and data cards, for individuals, families, schools and business groups to remove trash from local beaches. As part of the sponsorship, 99¢ Only Stores donates gift certificates, reusable bags and other fun drawing prizes as appreciation awards for volunteers at each Nothin’ But Sand cleanup. As a longtime, major retail sponsor of Heal the Bay’s A Day Without a Bag event, 99¢ Only Stores has donated over 49,999 reusable bags to consumers over the past two years. In addition, as part of 99¢ Only Stores’ commitment to educate consumers on environmentallyfriendly alternatives to single-use plastic bags, the company has been promoting the adoption of reusable bags for many years. 99¢ Only Stores reusable bags are available for 99.99¢ in all of its 276 stores. The company is also implementing a new “plastic bag reduction policy” throughout the entire chain. Cashiers will only double bag upon request and encourage customers to forgo a single-use plastic bag on purchases of three items or less. Heal the Bay commends these efforts to reduce single-use plastic bag pollution and is grateful for 99¢ Only

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99 Cent Stores

Food Group Selections
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Section Three

The Purchased Aesthetic 31

The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

$2.49
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$0.79
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The Purchased Aesthetic

$0.39
Dairy Selection

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

$4.99
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$1.97
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The Purchased Aesthetic

$0.99
Grain Group

Only the so called high end markets carry organic foods.

MYTH

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

95% of all major markets carry organic products Including the 99 Cent Stores.

FACT

Myth / Fact

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

$5.69
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$3.00
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The Purchased Aesthetic

$0.99
Protein Group

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

$1.99
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$2.49
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The Purchased Aesthetic

$0.99
Vegetable Group

Whole Foods promotes the sale of local products and small farms.

MYTH

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

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They get the local products but have no motivation to try to sell them. Priced at almost 50% higher than other area retailers do.

FACT

The Purchased Aesthetic

Myth / Fact

Section Three / Food Group Selections

The Purchased Aesthetic

$2.49
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$1.75
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The Purchased Aesthetic

$0.99
Fruit Group

Food ID
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Four

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Four / Food ID

The Purchased Aesthetic

48

49

The Purchased Aesthetic

Peanut Butter / Carrots

Food Facts
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Five

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Five / Food Facts

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law by President Obama on January 4th, 2011. It aims to ensure the U.S. food supply is safe by shifting the focus of federal regulators from responding to food contamination to preventing it in the future.

As the popularity of green product claims continues to grow, it’s important to know which claims you can trust and which ones you can’t. Search and evaluate of labels on food, wood, personal care products and household cleaners.

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

As the popularity of green product claims continues to grow, it’s important to know which claims you can trust and which ones you can’t. Search and evaluate of labels on food, wood, personal care products and household cleaners.

FDA Label Chart / Green Choices / How to Read Ingredient Labels

Section Five / Food Facts

Made With Organic Ingredients—Food packaging that reads “Made With Organic Ingredients” must contain 70–94% organic ingredients. These products will not bear the USDA Organic seal; instead, they may list up to three ingredients on the front of the packaging.

A product that, through either words or images, gives the impression of third-party endorsement where no such endorsement exists; fake labels, in other words.

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

A two-year study led by John Reganold of Washington State University that provided side-by-side comparisons of organic and conventional strawberry farms has shown organic farms produced more flavorful and nutritious berries while promoting healthier and more genetically diverse earth soils.

Certified Organic Label Guide / Get Smart About Organic Labels / The Seven Sins

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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Organic production is a system that is managed in accordance with the Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA) of 1990 (PDF) and regulations in Title 7, Part 205 of the Code of Federal Regulations to respond to site-specific conditions by integrating cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Organic Labeling and Marketing Information

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, an organization of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was established in 1994 to improve the nutrition and well-being of Americans. Toward this goal, the Center focuses its efforts on two primary objectives: •Advance and promote dietary guidance for all Americans. •Conduct applied research and analyses in nutrition and consumer economics.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

USDA’s Food Chart

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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In an effort to ensure the safe use of these substances, FDA has established a Food Contact Notification Program within the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition’s (CFSAN) Office of Food Additive Safety.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

FDA’S Food Ingredient Approval Process

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The grants, administered by the FMPP, are targeted to help improve and expand domestic farmers’ markets, roadside stands, community-supported agriculture programs, agri-tourism activities, and other direct producer-to-consumer market opportunities.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Farmers Markets and Local Food Marketing

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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Is organic worth the extra money? Research has yet to prove an adverse health effect from consuming the low levels of pesticides commonly found in U.S. food. But for the most vulnerable groups children and pregnant women going organic whenever possible for fruits and vegetables that carry the heaviest pesticide load makes sense.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Does It Pay to Buy Organic?

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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Organic food production and sales have grown quickly during the past 10 years. In challenging conventional agriculture, this growth has been accompanied by controversy. Controversy leads to questions, and, as a result, consumers, as well as scientists, policy makers and the food industry are exploring important issues related to where our food comes from and what constitutes a sustainable food system.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Should I Purchase Organic Foods?

Section Five / Food Facts

The Purchased Aesthetic

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The evidence is unclear. Some studies suggest that, on average, organically grown fruits and vegetables may contain slightly higher levels of vitamin C, trace minerals, and antioxidant phytonutrients than conventionally grown produce. However, other studies have found no nutritional differences between organic and non-organic foods.

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The Purchased Aesthetic

Understanding Organic Food Labels, Benefits, and Claims

Random Store Findings
70

Section Six

The Purchased Aesthetic 71

The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Six / Random Store Findings

We can charge more just by including a new word on the label! Package design: Organic foods tended to look more “plain brown wrapper” than their nonorganic counterparts—browns and subdued yellows were popular, as were logos that looked handwritten.

The Purchased Aesthetic The Purchased Aesthetic

64 72

65 73

The Purchased Aesthetic

50 years of Packaging That Fool Stupid People

Section Six / Random Store Findings

The Purchased Aesthetic

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WHAT IS THE CARBON FOOTPRINT FOR MANUFACTURING 12 DIFFERENT TYPES OF BAGS? IT IS 11 TIMES MORE THEN MANUFACTURING 1 TYPE OF BAG

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The Purchased Aesthetic

12 Bags

Section Six / Random Store Findings

The Purchased Aesthetic

WHOLE FOODS 360 BRAND SAME INGREDIENTS DIFFERENT PRICE. 20 CENTS PRICE DIFFERENCE FOR THE WORD ORGANIC!

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The Purchased Aesthetic

It Is Just A Word

Section Six / Random Store Findings

The Purchased Aesthetic

WHOLE FOODS SELLS EARTHBOUND FARMS HALF & HALF 5OZ MIX FOR $3.65
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The Purchased Aesthetic

99 CENT STORE SELLS EARTHBOUND FARMS HALF & HALF 1 LB. MIX FOR $0.99

Salad Bar

Section Six / Random Store Findings

WHOLE FOODS SELLS KASHI FOR A HIGHER PRICE THE VONS WHY IS THAT?
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The Purchased Aesthetic

The Purchased Aesthetic

AT VONS EVEN WITHOUT THE CLUB DISCOUNT THE PRICE IS STILL 50 CENTS LESS THEN WHOLE FOODS.

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Morning Wake Up

Package Breakdown
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Seven

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Section Seven / Packaging A Quick Look

The Purchased Aesthetic

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85

The Purchased Aesthetic

2010

2002

1997

Carrot Packaging

Spending Graph
The Purchased Aesthetic

Section Eight

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The Purchased Aesthetic

$20.00 $19.00 $18.00 $17.00

Section Eight / Spending Graph

$$$

Supermarket Fetishism
The Purchased Aesthetic

$16.00 $15.00 $14.00 $13.00 $12.00 $11.00 88 $10.00 $9.00 $8.00 The Purchased Aesthetic $7.00 $6.00 $5.00 $4.00 $3.00 $2.00 $1.00 $00.00

$$
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$

Supermarket Fetishism

Special Thanks / Closing Statement

Special Thanks
Special thanks to all the workers of whole foods who questioned every movie I made in the store and for constantly keeping me aware that I was in Whole Foods. To all the great workers of Vons and the 99 Cent Stores thank you for just letting me do my research and get in and get out in the check out line.

Closing Statement
Hopefully every link will help educate and inform and whatever choice you make it is through further research and real knowledge.
The Purchased Aesthetic

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The Purchased Aesthetic

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