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Tuesday, augusT 9, 2011
50¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Forecast
DELPHOS HERALD
The
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Ottoville wins DCC Tee-off
Classic, p6
Neighbors say Ohio gunman was
in property dispute, p3
www.delphosherald.com
States await debt downgrade fallout
By SUSAN HAIGH
The Associated Press
States with high numbers
of federal workers or con-
tractors, large military pres-
ences or generous Medicaid
programs for the needy are
among the most vulner-
able from Standard & Poor’s
recent downgrade of U.S.
government debt.
Last week’s action by
S&P is expected to accelerate
congressional action to make
deep spending cuts, which
could affect those states the
most and put their long-term
finances on shaky ground. In
a debt rating domino effect,
states such as Virginia,
Maryland, California, New
Mexico or Illinois could be
at risk of having their own
ratings downgraded, even
as great uncertainty persists
about the long-term conse-
quences.
Virginia, with its large
population of federal employ-
ees, and California, with its
heavy reliance on federal
reimbursement for Medicaid,
have been mentioned by
some experts as states that
could feel the ill effects of the
federal downgrade.
Even so, uncertainty
reigns. It’s simply unclear
how the S&P action will
trickle down to the states.
California state Treasurer
Bill Lockyer, for example,
issued a statement Monday
saying there’s no reason to
expect that the federal rat-
ings downgrade will have
an immediate effect on
California. He warned that
the state needs to be more
concerned with repairing its
long-term budget problems.
Last month, S&P revised
California’s long-term ratings
outlook, improving it from
negative to stable. California
shares the lowest credit rating
in the nation with Illinois.
Scott Pattison, execu-
tive director of the National
Association of State Budget
Officers, said he had been
talking with state financial
officers throughout the day
Monday and there was no
consensus about how the S&P
action would affect states.
A state’s reliance on fed-
eral assistance “would be a
factor to consider” for a rat-
ing agency, but Pattison said
some states might be able
to offset those concerns by
showing they have a strong
rainy day fund or have been
willing to make spending
cuts to keep their budgets
in line with dwindling tax
revenue.
Standard & Poor’s
announced late Friday that it
was reducing its credit rating
for long-term U.S. govern-
ment debt by one notch, from
AAA, the highest rating, to
AA-plus. The credit rating
agency said it downgraded
U.S. debt for the first time in
history because it lacks con-
fidence that political leaders
will make the choices needed
to avert a long-term fiscal
crisis.
Officials at the rating
agency were expected to
indicate how local and state
governments will be affected
by their decision to lower
the rating for long-term U.S.
debt. The other two major
rating agencies, Moody’s and
Fitch, have not taken a simi-
lar step.
If the ratings for states also
are downgraded, that could
lead to higher borrowing
costs for those states, many
of which have struggled to
balance their budgets amid
falling revenue, job losses
and a slow economy. Some
states could reduce their bor-
rowing, put it off until the
It’s My Passion
Levitt bitten by collecting bug
BY ED GEBERT
DELPHOS — For Gary
Levitt, beginning a museum
dedicated to the history of
mail delivery in the United
States did not seem like an
obvious career choice.
“Talk about getting bitten
by a bug,” he laughed, “I
never collected anything in
my life until this started and
was not a history buff. Now
it’s all kind of steamrolled.”
Levitt, a former Delphos
postmaster, is now the direc-
tor of the Museum of Postal
History on Main Street in
Delphos. The project began
after a 60th anniversary cel-
ebration of that city’s post
office building back in 1993.
A makeshift series of dis-
plays was assembled in the
2,200-square-foot lower level
of the post office. He remem-
bered, “We didn’t have
any money. We took some
two-by-fours, routed out a
little edge and found some
old storm windows, and that
became the display case!”
The idea to begin a more
traditional museum soon fol-
lowed, and after two years of
negotiations, Levitt got the
approval to do it. After nine
months of work, the origi-
nal version of the Museum
of Postal History opened
in 1995. However, putting
together displays quickly on
an almost non-existent bud-
get took its toll.
“In 1999, we closed
because everything looked so
tired. We had tried things
within our budget and they
didn’t hold up as they should
have,” Levitt admitted.
But the museum was not
history. After two more years
of renovations, the muse-
um reopened in 2001 and
remained open until Levitt
was given the position of
postmaster in Dublin and
moved away. Without Levitt,
the museum displays were
mothballed until 2008 when
he returned to Delphos as
postmaster.
By that time, it was obvi-
ous that the collections and
displays were too numerous
for the post office basement.
A historic building on Main
St. was purchased. The struc-
ture had previously housed
a horse livery built to ser-
vice the Miami-Erie Canal.
Later a recreation center, an
implement dealership, a bar,
a steakhouse and a dance club
all used the space. But when
Levitt was looking to buy,
there was a glaring problem.
“The one element missing
the most when we purchased
the building in 2008 was the
west wall, which was not
here,” he said. “The previous
owner had been required by
the state to tear off the last
12 feet of the building. He
wasn’t required to cover it, so
it was open to the elements!”
Building a wall to replace
the missing one was simple
enough but with the building
open to the elements for a
time, almost everything inside
needed to be replaced — wir-
ing, duct work, water, sewer
pipe and fixtures. However,
soon the work was done, the
displays were set up and the
doors were opened the next
year.
Levitt is a native New
Yorker, coming to Ohio first
as a student at Dennison
University. He went back
home, starting a teaching
career at his former junior
high school as a substitute
music teacher, but at that time
school systems were laying
off teachers rather than hir-
ing. So Levitt and his wife
sought out someplace new to
live. Ironically, it turned out
to be the Buckeye State.
“In 1976, I was hired
over the phone to take over
the reserve center in Lima
at the corner of Shawnee
and Reed Rd., right next to
Apollo Vocational School,”
he recalled. “We settled in
Spencerville, and it was quite
a culture shock, especially for
my wife who had never trav-
eled out of New York!”
Soon, the couple settled in
Lima to raise a family. Two
years later, Levitt took a job
as a flexible part-time clerk
on third shift at the Lima Post
Office. In 1980, he moved
into management and never
looked back.
Today, the Museum of
Postal History is housed in a
11,112 square-foot building,
offering plenty of room for
displays and improvements.
Levitt freely says that there
is much work to do still, but
already there is much to see.
There are stamps, of course,
but the museum looks at how
delivering the mail helped
establish and expand this
country.
School board cleans
up personnel matters
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Personnel
matters dominated the
Delphos City Schools
Board of Education meeting
Monday.
A teaching position for
Title I Reading and math will
be posted within the district
for 10 days. If no one shows
interest, the posting will go to
the public. The teacher will
primarily work in Franklin
and Landeck elementaries
with fourth-grade students
and also perform interven-
tion duties at the high school
level.
The district will use fed-
eral funds to pay for the posi-
tion.
Board members also
approved a reduction in force,
letting a playground monitor
and a cafeteria monitor go at
the end of 2011.
Non-public Auxiliary
Service funds were approved
to contract for personnel at
St. John’s Schools includ-
ing teachers Amie Buettner,
Annie Byrne and Pam
Hummel, guidance counsel-
or Al Unterbrink and clerk
Vickie Pohlman.
The district is the stew-
ard of state funding for non-
public funds to the parochial
school.
Coaches were also
approved for the 2011-12
school year. One-year supple-
mental contracts were issued
to Ryan Wall, assistant var-
sity wrestling; Don Stemen,
junior high wrestling; and
Myles Bowers, 1/3, and James
Break 2/3 assistant marching
band director.
Volunteers Rusty Thomas,
baseball coach; and Mary
Fought, part-time custodian
were also approved.
In the Superintendent’s
Report, Jeff Price notified the
board of upcoming work on
the boiler at Jefferson Middle
School.
“We have a 100-year-old
boiler we’re trying to make
last as long as possible,” Price
said. “We do have a company
in the area that still works on
them, so we are fortunate.”
Price also announced
a teacher work day is set
for Aug. 25 and classes will
begin on Aug. 29.
Allen County Education
Service Center representative
Brian Rockhold spoke at the
meeting and noted the part-
nership between the school
and center.
“Delphos City Schools
have been a great partner
over the last several decades,”
Rockhold said. “I am here to
let the school board know we
are available to provide any
services you want and desire
at the lowest price possible.”
Reiter Dairy will again
provide the district with milk
products. The company won
the bid over Arps Dairy and
Prairie Farms.
The board also approved
students fees and building
handbooks.
The next meeting will
begin at 8 p.m. Sept. 12.
Council sets
annual meeting
The Delphos Veterans
Council will be holding its
annual meeting at 7 p.m. on
Wednesday at the Veterans of
Foreign War Post 3035 hall
on Fourth and Canal streets.
The meeting will be
to discuss Veterans Day
activities, to elect officers
in accordance with the by-
laws and any other business
that may be brought up.
All veterans are wel-
come to attend.
Mostly sunny
with high in
upper 70s.
See page 2.
Jays scrimmage time
moved
The St. John’s scrim-
mage versus Celina
scheduled for Aug. 19 at
Stadium Park has been
moved to Aug. 18. The
time remains at 10 a.m.
At the Country Club
The Delphos Country
Club held its Club
Championship in July.
Winners in each flight
were: Championship -
Adam Koester, 143; First
- Joe Gallmeier, 153;
Second - Marvin Thitoff,
153 (hole-in-one on No.
2); Fourth - Ross Strauer,
187; High School - Kyle
Karhoff, 141; Senior
Championship - Dave
Wittler, 151; Senior First -
Dan Grothause, 158; Ladies
Championship - Beth
Wallenhorst, 163; Ladies
First - Kathie Thitoff, 179.
Wesleyan VBS
this week
Delphos Wesleyan
Church will hold its
Vacation Bible School from
6-8:30 p.m. Wednesday
through Friday for chil-
dren ages 3-12.
This year’s theme is
“Davey and Goliath’s
Circus Spectacular: A High-
Flying Gospel Adventure!”
The children will make
crafts, learn tunes, play
games, do skits and explore
a new Bible story each day.
For more informa-
tion or to register, call
Shelly at 419-695-2502.
Gary Levitt
Stocks recoup losses
on Bernanke hopes
By PAN PYLAS
The Associated Press
LONDON — Speculation
that the U.S. Federal Reserve
may announce another round
of monetary easing helped
stocks recover their poise
today after many global mar-
kets entered official bear mar-
ket territory.
The Fed gave no indica-
tion of what action it would
take at meeting today, but
hopes that it will be forced
into more action helped stocks
in Europe and Wall Street
futures recover. Investors still
remained worried, however,
about the consequences of
the U.S. credit downgrade,
Europe’s debt crisis and
mounting expectations of a
global recession.
“Rumors are rife when
markets are like this, the lat-
est being that there will be a
statement from the Fed ahead
of the open,” said David
Jones, chief market strate-
gist at IG Index. “Traders are
shell-shocked by the recent
drops and it remains difficult
to see what can be done in the
short-term to instill any confi-
dence back into the market.”
In Europe, the FTSE 100
index of leading British shares
was up 0.2 percent at 5,076
while France’s CAC-40 rose
0.7 percent. Germany’s DAX
though continued to under-
perform its peers, trading 1.4
percent lower at 5,841.
The Fed talk ratcheted up
the optimism for the U.S.
open — Dow futures were
up 1.9 percent at 10,925
while the broader Standard &
Poor’s 500 futures rallied 2.2
percent at 1,135.
One option for the Fed is to
announce that it is considering
another monetary stimulus,
which would be its third in
the last three years. Kenneth
Rogoff, a Harvard University
economist, says that may be
the only hope to help the
U.S. avoid a Japan-style lost
decade of low growth and
benign prices.
Louise Cooper, a markets
analyst at BGC Partners, said
another stimulus could take
equity markets up “substan-
See STOCKS, page 2
See STATES, page 2
See LEVITT, page 2
The Delphos/Spencerville
Girl Scouts will hold reg-
istration from 8-8:30 p.m.
Wednesday at the Delphos
Municipal Swimming Pool.
A parents should accom-
pany any girl who would
like to join Girl Scouts
for the 2011-12 season.
There is a $12 fee
due at registration.
There will be a pool
party immediately follow-
ing for all registered Girl
Scouts form 8:30-10 p.m.
Call 419-516-2442
for more information.
Girl Scout signup
Wednesday at pool
2 – The Herald Tuesday, August 9, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERAL
BIRTH
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 48
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
No mail subscriptions will
be accepted in towns or villages
where The Daily Herald paper
carriers or motor routes provide
daily home delivery for $2.09
per week.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
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to THE DAILY HERALD,
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•Bathtubs
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TRASH TALK
Allen County Refuse pro-
vides garbage and recycle col-
lection in Delphos.
The Allen County portion of
Delphos is collected on Thurs-
days, with residents placing
garbage containers on the curb
Wednesday evening and recycle
every other Wednesday.
The Van Wert County por-
tion of Delphos is collected on
Friday, with residents placing
garbage containers at the curb
on Thursday evening and recy-
cle every other Thursday.
If a holiday falls during the
week, collection is pushed back
a day. For example, the week of
Memorial Day, collection in Al-
len County will be Friday and
in Van Wert County it will be
Saturday.
Big item collection is held
from 8 a.m.-noon the first Sat-
urday of each month in the
parking lot across from the city
building. Participants need to
show proof of residency like a
city utility bill.
See the full schedule at
cityofdelphos.com.
Delphos weather
High temperature Monday
in Delphos was 82 degrees,
low was 68. Rainfall was
recorded at .71 inch. High a
year ago today was 86, low
was 63. Record high for today
is 102, set in 1934. Record
low is 48, set in 1964.
Levitt
(Continued from page 1)
“One of missions is to get
people to understand what
role the mail service played
in the development of the
United States,” he noted.
Several postal vehicles
are part of the museum col-
lection, including a 1906
Harrington Rural Coach
which was pulled by horses
for rural deliver. The same is
true of the tin sleigh dating
back to 1910. A red, white
and blue Schwinn bicycle,
and a 1959 Eshelman three-
wheeler also show the vari-
eties of postal vehicles. A
replica of a postal train car is
a part of the museum.
The walls are being cov-
ered by murals of Delphos,
painted by members of the
Delphos Area Art Guild in
exchange for the use of the
second story of the build-
ing. One room is devoted
to the Delphos Post Office
itself. According to Levitt,
the museum often surprises
visitors with what is found
inside.
He described, “They come
and they have no idea. They
think they’re going to look at
a few stamps for 10-15 min-
utes and move on. If you were
to stop and just read what we
have up, and 90 percent of it
isn’t even up yet, you’d be
longer. So they come in and
their mouths drop open.”
Even among area residents,
few realize what lies behind
the doors of that bright yel-
low building downtown.
“We have been in exis-
tence in Delphos since 1995
in one form or another. There
are 7,500 people in Delphos
and of those 7,500, I’d be
shocked at the number who
don’t even know we exist,”
Levitt said. “That’s part of
our mission is to let people
know. We tell people they
have to tell someone about
the museum, sign our book so
we know where they’re com-
ing from, and next time they
come back to bring some-
body with them. It’s word of
mouth that’s gotten a lot of
the artifacts, and the money
to operate.”
The artifacts often come,
appropriately enough, through
the mail. Levitt estimated that
200 days of each year, the
museum will receive a pack-
age containing some sort of
postal memorabilia found at a
sale or flea market. This year
alone, four large stamp col-
lections were donated to the
museum that Levitt estimates
contain 350,000 - 400,000
United States stamps.
As with any museum,
funding is tight. The museum
has no admission charge, so to
help raise the $32,000 in basic
expenses for each year, Levitt
takes off his museum director
hat and puts on a travel agent
cap, hosting motorcoach trips
that offer special entertain-
ment and information from
one or more of Levitt’s many
friends and acquaintances.
The fit for the museum
and the city of Delphos is a
good one.
“I’ve tried to give back to
Delphos as much as I can,”
Levitt shared. “We’ve been
fortunate. The town has sup-
ported me, and all the projects
I’ve gotten involved with.
This was done due to the tons
of in-kind donations, contrac-
tors who donated their time
and materials. This museum
exists, not because of me
but because of the people
of Delphos. They really love
their history, and I was look-
ing for something to get the
post office involved with the
town and the town is just
so crazy about its history, I
thought we could see where
we fit in with this history.”
The museum’s hours are
limited, open Thursday after-
noons from 1-3 p.m. and
Saturdays from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Levitt does all the
tours but does have 20 people
trained as docents. He is obvi-
ously proud of what has been
accomplished by himself and
the many donors and volun-
teers, but is also looking to
make the Museum of Postal
History more complete and
educational.
“It is a very gratifying
job, but it’s a very frustrat-
ing job because money is
the biggest inhibitor,” Levitt
pointed out. “The only thing
I’ve done is I’ve surround-
ed myself with people who
really know what they are
doing and they are willing to
follow somebody who thinks
he knows what he’s doing
and acts that way. Maybe I
deserve an Oscar!”
BOK, Hiram R., 78, of
Elida, funeral services begin
at 11 a.m. Thursday at Harter
and Schier Funeral Home, The
Rev. Brian Knoderer officiat-
ing. Burial will follow in Pike
Run Cemetery near Gomer,
with military graveside rites
conducted by the Delphos
Veterans Council. Friends
may call from 6-8 p.m. today
and 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.
Wednesday and for an hour
prior to services. Preferred
memorials are to the Kidney
Services of Northwest Ohio
or the Gomer United Church
of Christ.
By ERIC TUCKER
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON (AP)
— Ben Barnhard finally had
reason to be optimistic this
summer: The 13-year-old shed
more than 100 pounds at a
rigorous weight-loss academy,
a proud achievement for a boy
who had endured classmates’
taunts about his obesity and
who had sought solace in the
quiet of his bedroom, with his
pet black cat and the intricate
origami designs he created.
But one month before
school was to start for the
special-needs teen, his moth-
er, psychiatrist Margaret
Jensvold, shot him in the
head, then killed herself.
Officers found their bodies
on Aug. 2 in the bedrooms
of their home in Kensington,
Md., an upper-middle class
Washington suburb. They
also found a note.
“School — can’t deal with
school system,” the letter
began, Jensvold’s sister, Susan
Slaughter, told The Associated
Press.
And later: “Debt is bleeding
me. Strangled by debt.”
Although family mem-
bers said they were stunned
by the killings, they also said
Jensvold had become increas-
ingly strained by financial pres-
sure and by anguished fights
with the county public school
system over the special-needs
education of her son, who had
an autism spectrum disorder.
They said the school district —
apparently believing it could
adequately educate Ben — had
refused to cover tuition costs
for the boy to attend a pri-
vate school for special-needs
students. Jensvold didn’t have
the money herself and didn’t
want to return her son to pub-
lic school, where relatives said
she felt harshly judged and
marginalized and where Ben
had struggled.
“It was a huge stress,”
Slaughter said. “It’s very hard
being a single parent under
any circumstances, but to have
a high-needs child is over-
whelming. And then to have
him inappropriately placed in
the school, and have the school
fighting with her, was really
traumatic.”
Jensvold also offered an
explanation for taking her
son’s life.
“She did mention in the note
that she knows people whose
parents committed suicide
when they were children and
how difficult and traumatizing
that was, and she didn’t want
to do that to Ben,” Slaughter
said.
“It is very true,” she added.
“I can’t imagine Ben ever
recovering from the loss of his
mother.”
Special needs education
is an emotionally freighted
issue, perhaps especially so
in Montgomery County — an
affluent region where parents
tend to be actively engaged in
education and where schools
are highly regarded nation-
wide.
School district spokeswom-
an Lesli Maxwell said that pri-
vacy laws prevented her from
discussing the particulars of
Barnhard’s case, but that the
district offered vast options for
its 17,000 special-education
students and will refer students
for private schooling when it
can’t meet their needs.
Mom who killed son
agonized over school costs
(Continued from page 1)
economy improves or bor-
row directly from banks with
which they already have a
financial relationship, to
avoid selling bonds on the
open market and paying high-
er interest rates.
States that have retained
the coveted AAA rating,
which lowers their borrowing
costs, are among those most
nervous about the potential
fallout.
New Mexico finance offi-
cials have had several meet-
ings with Moody’s over the
past few weeks to justify the
state’s top rating. They have
noted that the state has strong
cash reserves and adequate
property tax revenue, which
supports general obligation
bonds.
Virginia Finance Secretary
Ric Brown said S&P and the
two other major bond rating
services recently affirmed his
state’s AAA rating. But the
state remains on “negative
outlook” because its econo-
my is so intertwined with the
federal government.
Another AAA-rated state,
Tennessee, is sending a dele-
gation to New York later this
week to meet with officials at
Moody’s and Fitch. Finance
Commissioner Mark Emkes
said he wants to let the agen-
cies know what steps the state
has taken to remain in the
black before they consider
any changes to the state’s
rating.
S&P analyst Gabriel Petek
said one strength of state and
local governments is that
while they receive federal aid,
they are autonomous from the
federal government. But he
said the long-term concern
is the pressure to reduce fed-
eral spending, which could
intensify with the S&P down-
grade.
Nicholas Johnson, vice
president for state fiscal pol-
icy at the Center for Budget
and Policy Priorities, said,
the looming cuts ultimate-
ly could have an effect on
states’ bond ratings because
the agencies are going to try
to determine whether states
governments can absorb the
loss the federal money and
take on the burden of provid-
ing those services.
One area of concern is
health care programs.
California, for example,
relies heavily on federal sup-
port for Medicaid, the state-
federal health care program
for the poor and disabled.
The state’s version is known
as Medi-Cal and covers 7.5
million people in a state with
a population of about 37 mil-
lion.
California will spend about
$15 billion of its own money
on the program but is antici-
pating nearly $30 billion over
the next year from the federal
government.
Last month, Moody’s
Investors Services threat-
ened to downgrade the AAA
rankings of South Carolina,
Maryland, New Mexico,
Tennessee and Virginia, not-
ing they have a combined $24
billion in outstanding debt.
If the U.S. lost its AAA
rating, Moody’s said, those
states are most vulnerable to
being dragged down because
of their reliance on federal
money. In South Carolina, for
example, one in five residents
receives Medicaid benefits.
Moody’s said it will be
reviewing the states’ credit
over the next few months.
Maryland state Sen. David
Brinkley, a Republican, said
the federal rating downgrade
was a message to national
and state lawmakers that they
have to get spending under
control.
SEOUL, South Korea (AP)
— A powerful tropical storm
destroyed houses, damaged
crops and caused more than
10 deaths and injuries today
in North Korea, already strug-
gling after deadly flooding
last month.
Tropical Storm Muifa
made landfall in the country
late Monday and was lash-
ing northeastern China with
torrential rain and wind as a
weaker tropical depression.
China’s National
Meteorological Center said
Muifa’s winds gusted up to 52
miles per hour (83 kilometers
per hour) overnight and the
storm dropped up to 5 inches
(135 mm) of rain in China’s
northeast, neighboring North
Korea.
The depression should
weaken further but winds
still could gust up to 39 mph
(62 kph) along the coast, the
Chinese center said.
North Korea’s official
Korean Central News Agency
said today more than 2,400
acres of crops were damaged
in one province. More than
100 housing units and 10 pub-
lic buildings were destroyed
in another. The brief report
did not give more details on
the deaths and injuries or how
many of either was blamed on
the storm.
Muifa earlier caused four
deaths in the Philippines and
four in South Korea, where two
other people were missing.
Flooding and landslides
caused by heavy rains in July
heavily damaged homes and
property on the Korean pen-
insula. North Korea reported
about 30 deaths, and South
Korea dozens more.
Before Muifa moved
ashore, waves as high as 65
feet (20 meters) broke a dike
in Dalian, China, that pro-
tected the Fujiahua chemi-
cal plant. Chinese authorities
said the dike was reinforced
with stones and concrete and
the danger was under con-
trol.
NEW YORK (AP) — Singer-
songwriter Gavin DeGraw is
recovering after being attacked
by a group of men on a city
street.
Police say DeGraw suffered
a broken nose and a cut to his
face after he was beaten up
by “unknown male attackers”
early Sunday morning in the
East Village. An investigation
is ongoing.
A statement sent out by
his spokesman Monday night
says he was taken to Bellevue
Hospital in an ambulance and is
still hospitalized under observa-
tion.
DeGraw has been forced
to cancel a planned concert
Tuesday in Saratoga Springs,
N.Y.
DeGraw has a new album,
“Sweeter,” due out in September.
He’s probably best known for
his hit song “Chariot.”
BOLIVIA, N.C. (AP) —
A North Carolina teenager
who stars on MTV’s real-
ity show “Teen Mom 2” has
been charged with a proba-
tion violation.
Brunswick County
Detention Center Officer
Chris Farmer said Jenelle
Evans was brought to the
county jail Monday evening.
He did not have details of
the arrest other than the
charge.
Evans attorney Dustin
Sullivan did not immediate-
ly return messages left after
hours Monday.
The 19-year-old Evans
was charged with assault in
March after a fight recorded
on video. A month later, she
received 12 months of pro-
bation and community ser-
vice for a drug paraphernalia
charge.
Evans is from Oak Island.
“Teen Mom” documents
the challenges of four teens’
first years of motherhood.
Stocks
(Continued from page 1)
tially” though it “may not pack
quite the same punch.”
Stocks around the world
were supported after August
2010, when the Fed announced
a $600 billion monetary easing,
which ended in June. Since
that easing ended, “chaos has
ensued,” Cooper said.
The recovery in stocks has
come after many markets offi-
cially entered bear market terri-
tory, whereby they have fallen
by over 20 percent since their
peak as investors looked for
relatively safer assets to park
their cash, such as gold and the
Swiss franc.
The other major worry in
the markets remains Europe’s
debt crisis and here again there
are signs that the recent stress-
es may be easing, albeit as a
result of an intervention by the
European Central Bank.
The European Central Bank
stepped in Monday and bought
billions of euros worth of their
bonds. The move helped to
lower yields on Spanish and
Italian bonds. They have fallen
a tad more today. The yield
on Spain’s ten-year bonds has
dropped 0.19 percentage point
to 4,96 percent while the Italian
equivalent declined 0.17 per-
centage point to 5.06 percent.
In the oil markets, worries
over the state of the global
economy continued to weigh
on prices. The main benchmark
rate was down $1.34 at $79.97
a barrel. Earlier it had fall-
en to $75.71, its lowest since
September 2010.
Stock markets in the tradi-
tionally oil-dependent Middle
East were also nose-diving
today, including the benchmark
index in OPEC powerhouse
Saudi Arabia, the region’s larg-
est economy, dropped 3.6 per-
cent to 5,837 points by midday.
Egypt, which is far less oil-
dependent than Saudi Arabia,
was also among the region’s
biggest decliners, with the
EGX30 index plunging 4.5
percent to 4,488 points. The
exchange temporarily halted
trading late in the morning once
broader indicators fell by more
than 5 percent.
The broad declines around
the world followed big falls in
Asia earlier.
States
NKorea: Tropical storm
causes casualties, damage
Gavin DeGraw
injured after
assault
Realty show star charged
with probation violation
Corn: $7.05
Wheat: $6.42
Beans: $13.07
ST. RITA’S
A girl was born Aug. 8
to Curt and Kasie Gilles of
Delphos.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Partly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 60s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
W E D N E S D A Y -
THURSDAY NIGHT: Mostly
sunny and clear. Highs in the
upper 70s. Lows in the upper
50s.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny in
the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. Highs in the
mid 80s.
EXTENDED FORECAST
FRIDAY NIGHT,
SATURDAY: Partly cloudy
with a 30 percent chance of
showers and thunderstorms.
Lows in the mid 60s. Highs in
the lower 80s.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 60s.
SUNDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs around 80.
MONDAY: Mostly clear.
Highs in low 80s.
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Monday:
Classic Lotto
05-07-18-20-25-33
Estimated jackpot: $40.7
million
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot: $12
million
Pick 3 Evening
2-2-4
Pick 4 Evening
3-7-4-9
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $220
million
Rolling Cash 5
07-12-17-19-22
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH Evening
04-06-08-14-15-16-17-20-
29-30-36-38-39-40-45-48-53-
58-66-79
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evaluating whether you can beneft from
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STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
Photo submitted
Van Wert County YWCA Board Treasurer Deb Moser, back left, Vice President
Melissa Friemoth and President Kim Keeling and secretary Sharon Witten, front center,
recently presented two scholarship to area youth. They are, Katelyn Bono, front left, and
Rachael McCroskey.
YWCA announces scholarship winners
The YWCA of Van Wert
County has presented to local
young women with academic
scholarships. The scholarships
were presented to Katelyn
Bono and Rachael McCroskey
at the Van Wert High School
Awards Assembly by Sharon
Witten and Dr. Shaneeta
Johnson, members of the
YWCA Christian Emphasis
Committee.
These awards are present-
ed to Van Wert County high
school female senior appli-
cants who display good moral
character, are active church
members and volunteer in
community organizations.
In addition these applicants
display both leadership and
Christian character in their
daily life.
Bono, the daughter of
James and Denise Bono of
Van Wert, plans to study edu-
cation at Eastern Michigan
University and become a
teacher. She then plans to
achieve an advanced degree
in psychology and become a
guidance counselor.
McCroskey, the daughter
of Lynn McCroskey and Jodi
Wallenhorst of Van Wert,
plans to attend Bowling
Green State University and
major in French education.
She also plans to study
abroad in France. After com-
pleting her education, she
plans to teach in the Van
Wert community.
These scholarships were
funded by the YWCA
Christian Emphasis
Committee’s fundraising
efforts as well as donations.
Ohio gunman was
in property dispute,
neighbors say
By KEVIN BEGOS
and ANDREW
WELSH-HUGGINS
The Associated Press
COPLEY — A gunman
who killed seven people dur-
ing a weekend rampage in his
Ohio neighborhood cornered
one of his victims, his girl-
friend’s 11-year-old nephew,
in the basement of a house,
ordered out the family shel-
tering the boy and then shot
him, police said Monday.
Michael Hance’s cold-
blooded killing of such a
young victim after stalking
seven other people on a tidy
suburban Akron street named
Goodenough Avenue was,
neighbors said, the culmina-
tion of a dispute over a home
that once belonged to his girl-
friend’s parents.
Hance, 51, had no previ-
ous criminal record before the
outburst late Sunday morn-
ing and his death in a shoo-
tout with police in Copley,
where a flag flew at half-mast
Monday outside the home
where the carnage began.
Hance had recently grown
angry over residents’ com-
ments about the property
where he lived with his girl-
friend, Becky Dieter, neigh-
bor Carol Eshleman said.
About a month ago, Hance’s
next-door neighbor Gudrun
“Gerdie” Johnson had asked
Hance to clean up the proper-
ty, which included a broken-
down car on blocks.
Johnson related the encoun-
ter to Eshleman, explaining
that she’d never seen Hance
so upset. “He said, ‘Get off
my property and don’t come
back,”’ Eshleman said.
Gilbert Elie, who lives
across from the Johnsons’
home, said one of them had
complained about the prop-
erty to a councilwoman in
the neighborhood. Messages
seeking comment from
Copley Township Trustee
Helen Humphrys, who lives
nearby, were not returned
Monday, and it was not clear
if there was ever a formal
complaint made.
Johnson, 64, was killed
in the attack, along with her
husband, 67-year-old Russell
Johnson; their 44-year-old
son Bryan Johnson and his
daughter Autumn, 16; Becky
Dieter’s brother, Craig
Dieter, and his 11-year-old
son, Scott; and an unidenti-
fied girl who was slain while
in a parked car with Autumn
outside the Johnsons’ home.
Becky Dieter, the gun-
man’s longtime girlfriend and
a Veterans Administration
clerk, was also shot but sur-
vived and remains hospital-
ized.
Authorities on Monday
were still trying to work out
details of the shootings and
a motive for Hance’s actions.
But comments from police
and neighbors help stitch
together a picture of a man
prone to conflict and under
increasing pressure from
neighbors to take his life else-
where.
Hance had worked at a
printer’s shop in Akron but
quit after a dispute and didn’t
work again, Eshleman said,
although Becky Dieter urged
him to find a job.
He was a little slow but
often read textbooks on dis-
eases and medical procedures
and tried to get others inter-
ested, she said. He also made
and drank odd health concoc-
tions and claimed he didn’t
have to work because he was
an inventor, Eshleman said.
He also seemed constantly
under stress, trying to deal
with possessions of relatives
who had recently died, said
Eshleman, a 64-year-old
driver for public school spe-
cial education students.
“Mike was strange,” she
said, but “I wouldn’t think
he’d go to this extreme.”
The suburban block fea-
tures generally well-kept
yards with small houses,
some better maintained than
others.
On Monday, the two-story
brick-and-siding house where
Dieter lived stood out little
except for a blue tarp held
down by two-by-fours across
one section of the roof. There
were cars in the backyard but
none visibly on blocks, and
a flower bed bloomed in the
front yard.
The dispute apparently
dated to the deaths of Becky
and Craig Dieters’ parents
a couple of years ago, said
Eshleman, who was a care-
giver for Dieters’ parents
and also knew Hance. Becky
Dieter’s brother, Craig, want-
ed the house sold, but instead
Hance and Becky Dieter
moved in, Eshleman said.
Robin Hancock, a former
caregiver for the Dieters’
late parents, called Hance an
unpleasant, disliked person
whose confrontational style
led her to stop working for
the couple.
“He was quiet and
strange,” said Hancock, 53,
of Akron, who concurred that
there was tension over the
ownership of the property in
Copley, a township of 11,000
just west of Akron.
Gerdie Johnson spoke fre-
quently of how odd she found
Hance, said Sherri Moore, a
lifelong friend who now lives
in nearby Wadsworth.
The carnage on
Goodenough Avenue began
just before 11 a.m. Sunday.
Craig and Beth Dieter had
driven to Copley from their
home in Walton, Ky., to work
on the property dispute and
were visiting the Johnsons
when the shooting occurred,
Eshleman said. In a parked
car outside were 16-year-old
Autumn and the unidentified
girl.
All were fatally shot
except for Beth Dieter; it was
unclear how she escaped harm
or where she was Monday.
Becky Dieter, the gunman’s
girlfriend, was shot around
the same time as she came
out of their house next door,
police said.
Elie, 76, said he heard
gunshots and cries for help
as he got ready for church.
In an account that differed
slightly from the police ver-
sion, Elie said he went to the
house and found victims in
the driveway, near the garage
and in a vehicle whose win-
dows appeared to have been
blown out by gunfire.
A third woman — appar-
ently Becky Dieter — came
out of the house next door
and tried to talk to Elie, but
their brief exchange ended
abruptly when a man fol-
lowed her out of the house
and shot her. Elie ran for
cover behind a truck.
“She was talking to me,
and he come up behind her
and shot her, so I figured,
maybe I’m next,” he told The
Associated Press.
He hid until he could see
the gunman was gone and
returned home. Police arrived,
and Elie said he heard a sec-
ond round of shots coming
from behind the houses.
That, if police reports
correspond, would have
been Hance shooting Bryan
Johnson at a different house
after chasing him down
a grassy alley guarded by
a “Caution: Watch for
Children” sign.
Police say 11-year-old
Scott Dieter was shot at a
third house where he had
apparently sought refuge; the
family that sheltered him was
let go, but Scott Dieter was
fatally shot in the basement,
police said.
Hance died in a gunfight
with police outside that home,
authorities said, taking specif-
ics of his motive with him.
“That’s one of the puz-
zles here, why was he going
after the child,” Copley
police Detective Joe Krunich
said at a news conference
Monday.
The nature of the Johnsons’
involvement in the property
dispute, other than their dis-
may at the upkeep of their
neighbors’ property, was
unclear.
Gerdie Johnson was origi-
nally from Germany and met
her husband when he was in
the military, Moore said.
Russ Johnson was a
devoted father who helped
coach their children in sports,
took them camping and rode
motorbikes with them. He
had undergone heart surger-
ies in recent years and was
careful about his health.
“He was eating healthy and
exercising, and a tragedy like
this happens,” Moore said.
Gerdie Johnson was a
receptionist at a furniture
store for two decades, and
Russ Johnson ran an uphol-
stery business behind his
house.
OSU Extension Open House
at the Niswonger Aug. 18
The Van Wert County Ohio
State University Extension
Service, in conjunction with
the Van Wert Area Chamber
of Commerce, is holding an
Open House and Business
After Hours event from
4-7 p.m. on Aug. 18 at the
Niswonger Performing Arts
Center (PAC) in Van Wert.
The fabulous PAC, which
began operations in March,
2007, will be open for tours
during the event, which will
also feature information and
highlights of OSU Extension’s
four program areas: 4-H,
Agriculture & Natural
Resources, Community
Economic Development,
and Family & Consumer
Sciences. At 6 p.m., there
will be a special visit by OSU
President Gee.
OSU Extension Van Wert
County is grateful for the
overwhelming support of vot-
ers in 2010 who passed a
levy to ensure funding for
Extension services. A local
Steering Committee has
been formed and is currently
exploring alternative sources
of funding for continuation of
OSU services into the future.
This event is a way to say
‘thanks’ to the public and
to showcase Extension work
in the community and how
Extension connects OSU to
Ohioans. There will be dis-
plays, presentations, refresh-
ments and door prizes.
For more information
about Extension, call 419-
238-1214 or 419-238-2999.
Chicken dinner to
support Ultimate
Air Dogs at fair
The Van Wert County
Agricultural Society will offer
chicken dinners from 11 a.m to
2 p.m. Saturday at the Van Wert
County Faigrounds.
The carry-out meals includes
a quarter chicken, baked potato,
pasta salad and chocolate cake
for $7.
Proceeds from this event
are in support of the popular
Ultimate Air Dog program at the
2011 Van Wert County Fair.
‘Hats Off’ to
cancer survivors
The American Cancer
Society and the Van Wert
County Hosptial are taking their
“Hats Off” to cancer patients to
show support and help them
through their cancer journey.
Any cancer patient/survivor
is invited to come to the hospital
conference room A between 10
a.m. and 2 p.m. Aug. 16 to pick
out a free hat. There are a vari-
ety of men’s and women’s hats
to choose from. All of the hats
are brand new and have never
been worn. There are summer
hats, winter hats, Derby hats,
Fedoras, and sun hats.
If you have any questions,
please contact Marybeth Torsell
toll free at 1-888-227-6446
extension 5101.
Anyone seeking informa-
tion can find it at www.cancer.
org, or can speak to a trained
Cancer Information Specialist
at the Society’s National Cancer
Information Center anytime
by calling 1-800-ACS-2345
(1-800-227-2345).
Senator: Ohio paying
twice for same building
By ANDY BROWNFIELD
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Ohio
may be paying $6.3 million
to purchase a building that it
helped pay to construct.
That’s the amount
Cuyahoga Community
College requested Monday
from a state legislative panel
to buy a Cleveland build-
ing from the Visiting Nurses
Association of Ohio.
Except Senate Finance
Chairman Chris Widener,
who sits on the board, pointed
out the state gave the non-
profit association $1.6 mil-
lion to help build the building
in the first place. He says the
state is essentially paying for
the building twice.
Widener was the only no
vote.
Widener voted against five
requests for funding by uni-
versities, including $14,000
Ohio University sought to
buy property that touches its
golf course. He says universi-
ties have requested $47 mil-
lion for land purchases since
2009.
All five requests consid-
ered Monday passed.
Ohio Marine dies
in Afghanistan
CANTON (AP) —
Authorities say a Camp Lejeune,
N.C.-based Marine from Ohio
has died while conducting com-
bat operations in Afghanistan.
The Pentagon on Monday
said 26-year-old Sgt. Daniel
Patron of Canton died Saturday
in Helmand province.
His parents tell The Repository
newspaper in Canton that Patron
was “selfless, brave and gutsy.”
Mother Kathy Patron calls him
“my hero.”
She says his military service
was inspired by the Sept. 11,
2001 terror attacks, and was
to end in July, but he decided
to extend his deployment. He
also served in Iraq in 2005 and
2009.
Patron was assigned to 8th
Engineer Support Battalion,
2nd Marine Logistics Group, II
Marine Expeditionary Force.
The newspaper reports he
was a 2003 Perry High School
graduate who had been married
nearly two years.
YOUR NEWSPAPER ... STILL THE BEST
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you can get word from across town
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the price of a cup of coffee, you can
get your fill of local news, politics,
or whatever else is your cup of
tea. With something new to greet
you each day, from cover to cover,
your newspaper is still the most
“streetwise” buy in town!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 ext. 122
“Education is a private matter between the person and the world of knowledge
and experience, and has little to do with school or college.”
— Lillian Smith, American writer-social critic (1897-1966)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 — The Herald Tuesday, August 9, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
• The annual Marble Cake Bake-off included children’s cat-
egories this year. Winner in Best-tasting was Elisabeth Miller;
and Best-decorated awards went to Logan Pence, Gabrielle
Pence and Brittany Schleeter. Winners in the adult division
were Best-tasting, Karen Schaffner; and Best-decorated June
Dunlap.
25 Years Ago — 1986
• The expected deficit in revenues to operate the Delphos
Public School District prompted the school board to agree to
placing a 7.9 mill additional tax levy for operating expenses on
the Nov. 4 general election ballot. In spite of cuts in operating
costs, according to Superintendent Bruce Sommers, the deficit
in school funds for the current year, fiscal year 1987, is expected
to exceed $200,000.
• Dr. Spiros Zodhiates, president of Advancing the Ministry
of the Gospel International and speaker on the New Testament
Light program from Chattanooga, Tenn., will be speaking at 7
p.m. Aug. 17 at Bethel Mennonite Church, 803 W. Clime St.
Also at the church will be the Paul Jenks family, missionaries
in Thailand.
• Putnam County 4-H’ers placed well in the horse competi-
tion last weekend at the Ohio State Fair. Tricia Safer of Classic
Horsemen placed fourth in the junior horsemanship class. Also
placing was Craig Schmersal of Classic Horsemen who took a
third in Junior Reining.
50 Years Ago — 1961
• Carol Ann Pothast, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Aloysius Pothast, Fort Jennings, will receive the habit and white
veil of the Sisters of St. Francis Aug. 12 at the St. Francis con-
vent chapel in Tiffin. Having received her elementary and junior
high school education at the Fort Jennings schools, Miss Pothast
was graduated on June 1, 1961 from the St. Francis convent high
school in Tiffin.
• Landeck’s Tom and Lou’s won the Lima District Slo-Pitch
Tournament by defeating Delphos Son’s Bar, 13-6 in the final
game and became the first Delphos League team to win a berth
in the state tournament. Terry Odenweller got the only home run
of the game, and Bob Gengler had four hits in five attempts.
• The Star class of the Evangelical United Brethren Church
met Monday evening at the home of Mrs. Lloyd Guthrie on East
Cleveland with Mrs. Murlin Mullenhour serving as co-hostess
with Guthrie. Brenda Stocklin, Rebecca Cross and Stephen
Maloney were present for the session.
75 Years Ago — 1936
• Eddie Hanf, of Toledo, formerly of Delphos, and his danc-
ing partner, Doris Gordy, are filling a week’s engagement at the
Mayfair Club in Lima. Hanf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hanf,
South Pierce Street, has gained quite a reputation as a dancer.
He teaches dancing in Toledo.
• Miller’s Opticians secured revenge for a defeat handed
them earlier in the season when they defeated Venedocia Friday
night at Venedocia by a score of 6 to 3. Ralston was the big gun
in the Friday night contest. He secured a homerun, a triple and
two singles in four times at bat.
• A double horseshoe match completed first round in the
Delphos horseshoe league Friday night. Team Three composed
of Chas. Gould, Bill Miller, Jean Bryan, Frank Kurth and Gene
Wilcox won the first round. Team Two composed of Carl
Gladen, Don Irick, Gerald Will, Gene Rice and Bernard Will
were runners up.
By MARTIN
CRUTSINGER
AP Economics Writer
WASHINGTON — A
plunging stock market and
a stalled U.S. economy may
force the Federal Reserve to
use the dwindling number of
tools it has left in an effort
to boost growth and keep the
country from sliding back
into recession.
At the very least, the
central bank is expected to
acknowledge all the adverse
things that have occurred
since its policymaking com-
mittee last met in June.
But many private econo-
mists say they believe that the
situation has grown so dark
in recent days that Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke and his colleagues
will be forced to do more.
On Monday, the Dow Jones
industrial average suffered its
sixth-worst point drop in his-
tory, falling 634.76 points.
That decline came after cred-
it rating agency Standard &
Poor’s on Friday downgraded
the United States’ long-term
debt because of what it saw
as political gridlock that is
preventing Washington from
making meaningful cuts in
the country’s soaring budget
deficits.
Adding to all the uncer-
tainty, Europe is facing huge
debt problems of its own.
European officials are scram-
bling to prevent Italy and
Spain from being consumed
by a 21-month debt crisis that
continues to roil global mar-
kets and has already forced
Greece, Ireland and Portugal
to seek large bailouts.
Bernanke and Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner
participated in an emergen-
cy conference call over the
weekend with their colleagues
from the Group of Seven rich
industrial countries. The G-7
issued a statement pledging to
take “all necessary measures
to support financial stability
and growth.”
Many economists say they
believe Bernanke and his Fed
colleagues should follow that
pledge with concrete action
when they hold their regu-
lar meeting today, given all
the threats to the economy at
present.
“I don’t think the Fed can
stand by,” said Mark Zandi,
chief economist at Moody’s
Analytics. “This is a crisis of
confidence and the Fed needs
to shore up confidence.”
Many analysts expect the
Fed to choose among a menu
of options that Bernanke laid
out in his mid-year testimony
to Congress in July.
Among the options
Bernanke discussed was pro-
viding a clear indication in the
Fed’s statement about how
long the central bank intends
to keep interest rates at record
lows. More explicit language
on interest-rate policy might
boost investors’ confidence at
a dangerous moment for the
global economy.
The central bank for more
than two years has pledged
to keep its target for the fed-
eral funds at “exceptionally
low” levels for an “extended
period” while never spelling
out just how long “extended”
might be. The funds rate has
remained at zero to 0.25 per-
cent for nearly three years.
In his congressional testi-
mony, Bernanke said the Fed
might also provide more clar-
ity over the time period that
it will keep its holdings of
Treasury securities at record
levels. By buying Treasury
bonds, the Fed has sought to
drive down long-term inter-
est rates that govern such key
activities as home purchases
and business borrowing deci-
sions.
On June 30, the Fed ended
a $600 billion bond buying
program, its second such
effort, but it pledged to keep
its holdings of those bonds
constant until the economy
started to improve.
Many investors would like
to see the Fed launch a third
round of bond buying. But
the program has triggered a
sharp debate inside the Fed
about whether further bond
purchases could set the stage
for inflation down the road.
“There will be a high hur-
dle for considering a third
round of bond buying,” said
David Jones, chief economist
at DMJ Advisors, a Denver
economic consulting firm.
“Fed officials who opposed
the second round will argue
that the Fed has done all it
can to help the economy and
anything more will risk high-
er inflation down the road.”
Fed may react to market
plunge, stalled economy
By TOM RAUM
Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
The S&P downgrade was
more of a statement on the
toxic political landscape in
Washington than a comment
on the nation’s ability to pay
its bills. But S&P has its own
checkered history. Just a few
years ago, the company gave
its top triple-A rating to some
of the mortgage-backed secu-
rities that helped cause the
Great Recession.
Could it be wrong again?
New York-based Standard
and Poor’s was upfront about
its focus on the political
angle, citing the long stand-
off between President Barack
Obama and Congress as a key
factor in its unprecedented
downgrade of the govern-
ment’s credit rating.
“We think the debacle
over raising the debt ceil-
ing is one illustration of
that,” John Chambers, head
of S&P’s debt rating com-
mittee, said on Monday. He
said that the political grid-
lock and S&P’s analysis of
a rising U.S. debt burden in
coming years prompted the
downgrade.
Yet the credit-rating indus-
try itself has been harshly
criticized since the finan-
cial crisis of 2008-2009, and
S&P’s downgrade seems cer-
tain to increase congressional
scrutiny.
The company was hard-
ly revealing anything that
wasn’t already well known by
financial markets, politicians,
analysts and probably most
everyday Americans: The
divisive political atmosphere
in Washington has been lead-
ing to near-paralysis.
But is the rating agency
qualified to make political as
well as economic judgments?
“We didn’t need a rat-
ing agency to tell us that we
need a balanced long-term
approach to deficit reduction.
That was true last week. That
was true last year. That was
true the day I took office,”
Obama said Monday in his
first remarks on the subject
since the downgrade. “And
we didn’t need a rating agen-
cy to tell us that the grid-
lock in Washington over the
last several months has not
been constructive, to say the
least.”
But, he said, Washington
has the power to fix its
own political dysfunction.
Furthermore, Obama assert-
ed, “No matter what some
agency may say, we’ve
always been and always will
be a triple-A country.”
Making its own judg-
ments, Wall Street dumped
stocks all day long. The Dow
Jones industrials closed down
634.76 points — or 5.5 per-
cent — in the first day of trad-
ing since the S&P downgrade.
But investors sought refuge
in Treasurys, a sign of confi-
dence in the United States as
a safe long-term investment
despite S&P’s judgment. The
price of Treasurys rose sharp-
ly, while yields, which move
in the opposite direction from
price, plunged.
Some lawmakers and
economists have questioned
whether the ratings agencies
have the competence to eval-
uate the country’s finances,
based on their own perfor-
mance prior to the 2008-2009
financial crisis.
S&P predicated its down-
grade “on the theory that
Washington might delib-
erately refuse to pay its
debt because of a political
impasse. But I don’t know
what makes them experts
at this,” said Rep. Brad
Sherman, D-Calif., a mem-
ber of the House Financial
Services Committee.
“S&P’s main job is rat-
ing private issuers, and they
have some expertise in that,
although obviously they got
it pretty wrong in mortgage-
backed securities,” Sherman
said.
“I find it interesting to
see S&P so vigilant now in
downgrading the U.S. cred-
it rating,” said Sen. Bernie
Sanders, I-Vt. “Where were
they four years ago?”
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Fire trucks and concrete mix-
ers, semis, heavy-duty pick-
ups and all trucks in between
will, for the first time, have
to trim fuel consumption and
emissions of heat-trapping
gases under new efficiency
standards being announced
today by President Barack
Obama.
The White House says the
standards the president was
announcing will save busi-
nesses billions of dollars in
fuel costs, help reduce oil
consumption and cut air pol-
lution. The standards apply
to vehicle model years 2014
to 2018.
Senior administration
officials said the new tar-
gets affect three categories
of vehicles.
Big rigs or semis will
have to slash fuel consump-
tion and production of heat-
trapping gases by up to 23
percent. Gasoline-powered
heavy-duty pickups and vans
will have to cut consump-
tion by 10 percent, or by 15
percent if the vehicles run on
diesel fuel.
The standards also pre-
scribe a 9 percent reduc-
tion in fuel consumption
and greenhouse gas emis-
sions for work trucks, which
include everything from fire
trucks and concrete mixers
to garbage trucks and buses,
according to the officials,
who requested anonym-
ity to speak before the for-
mal announcement. Obama
was unveiling the standards
at a trucking business in
Virginia, a state crucial to
his re-election hopes.
The officials projected
savings of 530 million bar-
rels of oil and $50 billion in
fuel costs over the expected
lives of the vehicles covered
by the new standards, along
with improved air quality
and public health.
The administration
released no miles-per-gallon
equivalent for the new stan-
dards, saying that doing so
would be confusing given
the different categories of
vehicles, the different types
of vehicles in each category
and the varying payloads
that each one carries.
Officials did stress that
the costs of making the
trucks more fuel-efficient —
ranging from hundreds to
thousands of dollars — will
be recouped through reduced
fuel costs over the lifetime
of the vehicles.
It’s the second round of
fuel efficiency standards in
the past month.
Last month, Obama
announced a deal with auto-
makers to double overall
fuel economy to 54.5 mpg
by 2025, starting in model
year 2017. Cars and light
trucks now on the road aver-
age 27 mpg.
That followed a 2009 deal
committing cars and trucks
to averaging 35.5 mpg by
model year 2016.
Obama won Virginia in
the 2008 presidential elec-
tion, dealing a blow to the
GOP in what had been a sol-
idly Republican South. He
was the first Democrat since
Lyndon Johnson in 1964 to
win Virginia in a presiden-
tial race.
The state again will be a
critical battleground in the
2012 presidential race.
Obama to raise
fuel standards
for big trucks
It’s not just economics: S&P’s political judgment
By PAUL WISEMAN
AP Business Writer
WASHINGTON — It’s
the last thing a nervous con-
sumer and a fragile economy
needed: a confidence-killing
nosedive on Wall Street.
Americans struggling with
lean wages, job insecurity and
high gasoline prices have seen
a 15-percent plunge in stock
prices shrink their 401(k)
accounts over the past 2 1/2
weeks. When consumers feel
less wealthy, they’re less like-
ly to buy new furniture, new
appliances or new cars. And
their spending drives about 70
percent of the economy.
Murray Specktor, 58, a
retired Northwest Airlines
pilot, says he has enough
money tucked away to sup-
port himself in retirement.
But after the stock market’s
plunge, he’s taking further
precautions.
“No expensive meals out,”
he says. “Entertainment’s
going to get cut back. Until
I see where this is going, I’ve
just got to preserve capital
and try to get my comfort
level up.”
The drop in the stock mar-
ket, through Friday, could
cut overall spending by $140
billion, or 1.3 percent, over
the coming year, says Paul
Dales, senior U.S. economist
at Capital Economics. Dales
forecasts that the stock mar-
ket turmoil could reduce the
economy’s annual growth
rate by half a percentage point
through 2012.
There isn’t much to spare.
In the first half of the year,
the economy grew at a scant
0.8 percent annual rate. That
helps explain the dive on
Wall Street: Stocks are fall-
ing partly on fears that the
nation could slip back into a
recession.
David Kelly, chief market
strategist with J.P. Morgan
Funds, said he fears the mar-
ket drop will become “a self-
fulfilling prophecy ... and
we’ll just scare ourselves into
a recession.”
Tumbling stock prices
could especially depress
spending by wealthier con-
sumers. Eighty percent of
stocks belong to the richest
10 percent of Americans. And
the richest 20 percent rep-
resent about 40 percent of
consumer spending. Luxury
retailers that have helped sus-
tain the economy could suf-
fer.
Even before stocks began
dropping last month, consum-
ers weren’t exactly exuber-
ant. In June, they reduced
spending for the first time in
20 months. The Rasmussen
Consumer Index, drawn from
a national survey, found
Monday that 70 percent of
Americans think the economy
is worsening. That’s up from
45 percent at the start of the
year.
The stock-market drop
means “people will put off
spending decisions, particu-
larly for large-ticket items, and
that will ... reduce growth,”
says Brian Gendreau, a mar-
ket strategist with Cetera
Financial Group and a finance
professor at the University of
Florida.
Rob Stein, senior portfo-
lio manager at Astor Asset
Management, worries that the
stock market could remain
depressed for months and hurt
sales during the crucial holi-
day season. Still, he holds out
hope.
Plunge on Wall Street threatens to spook consumers
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CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
6 p.m. — Weight Watchers
meets at Trinity United
Methodist Church, 211 E.
Third St.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Lions Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7:30 p.m. — Ottoville
Emergency Medical Service
members meet at the munici-
pal building.
Ottoville VFW Auxiliary
members meet at the hall.
Fort Jennings Local School
District board members meet
at the high school library.
Alcoholics Anonymous,
First Presbyterian Church,
310 W. Second St.
8:30 p.m. — Elida vil-
lage council meets at the town
hall.
WEDNESDAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
11:45 a.m. — Rotary Club
meets at the Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
4 p.m. — Delphos Public
Library board members meet
at the library conference
room.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
8 p.m. — American Legion
Post 268, 415 N. State St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
8:30-11:30 a.m. — St.
John’s High School recycle,
600 block of East Second
Street.
9 a.m. - noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
St. Vincent DePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School park-
ing lot, is open.
Cloverdale recycle at vil-
lage park.
10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos
Postal Museum is open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue
1-3 p.m. — Delphos Canal
Commission Museum, 241 N.
Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.

Description Last Price Change
DJINDUAVERAGE 10,809.85 -634.76
NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,357.69 -174.72
S&P 500 INDEX 1,119.46 -79.92
AUTOZONE INC. 268.51 -10.23
BUNGE 58.63 -5.12
EATON CORP 37.97 -4.38
BP PLC ADR 38.19 -2.74
DOMINION RES INC 45.94 -2.65
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 33.91 -1.87
CVS CAREMARK CRP 32.31 -1.84
CITIGROUP INC 27.95 -5.49
FIRST DEFIANCE 13.67 -0.66
FST FIN BNCP 14.22 -0.98
FORD MOTOR CO 9.93 -0.91
GENERAL DYNAMICS 60.80 -3.64
GENERAL MOTORS 24.57 -1.74
GOODYEAR TIRE 11.54 -2.01
HEALTHCARE REIT 41.11 -1.59
HOME DEPOT INC. 28.93 -1.81
HONDA MOTOR CO 34.45 -2.15
HUNTGTN BKSHR 4.93 -0.46
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 61.12 -1.59
JPMORGAN CHASE 34.06 -3.54
KOHLS CORP 43.22 -4.08
LOWES COMPANIES 18.67 -1.48
MCDONALDS CORP 82.11 -2.97
MICROSOFT CP 24.48 -1.20
PEPSICO INC. 62.97 -1.70
PROCTER & GAMBLE 59.29 -1.30
RITE AID CORP 1.03 -0.17
SPRINT NEXTEL 3.13 -0.59
TIME WARNER INC. 29.89 -1.85
US BANKCORP 21.59 -2.13
UTD BANKSHARES 9.25 --
VERIZON COMMS 33.12 -1.93
WAL-MART STORES 48.92 -1.93
STOCKS
Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business August 8, 2011
Photo submitted
Venedocia Lions donate to Huggy Bear fireworks
The Venedocia Lions Club recently made a donation toward the fireworks display
at Huggy Bear Campground over the 4th of July weekend. The Venedocia Lions Club
operates their sausage trailer at the campground in October during the last weekend
of the season. Pictured from the left are Lion Jerry Freewalt, Huggy Bear owners Lori
and Mike Niese and Lion Vince Clement.
Putnam libraries
to host events
The Putnam County District
Library has announced the
following programs:
Cooking Program
The Putnam County
District Library in collabora-
tion with O.S.U Extension
and Putnam County Council
on Aging presents “Taste the
Color” cooking program.
Join Mona Lisa Hoffman
from the OSU Extension
Office for recipe ideas you
can do.
All are welcome to attend
this free program so come
hungry to try samples.
This program will be held
at the following times and
locations:
— 4-5 p.m. Aug. 16 at the
Kalida branch
— 4-5 p.m. Aug. 18 at the
Continental branch
Family Fun Night
The Putnam County
District Library in Ottawa
will have “Book Time with
Ronald McDonald” at 6:30
p.m. on Sept. 13.
All are welcome to attend
this free program.
This event is sponsored
by the Friends of the Putnam
County District Library.
Puppet Show
The Putnam County
District Library in Ottawa
will have “The Great Monter
Hunt” puppet show at 6:30
p.m. on Sept. 26.
Puppeteers from the Mazza
Museum of Findlay will be
performing.
All are welcome to attend
this free program.
These events are sponsored
by the Friends of the Putnam
County District Library and
the International Reading
Association.
For more programs visit
our website at www.mypcdl.
org.
Putnam County
sets Senior Expo
On Friday, the Putnam
County Senior Expo will
take place from 9:30
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the
Educational Service Center
at 124 Putnam Parkway in
Ottawa.
This event — hosted
by Putnam Acres Care
Center, the Putnam County
Council on Aging, Putnam
County Health Department,
Putnam County HomeCare
& Hospice and the Ottawa
Senior Center — is free and
open to the public.
Enjoy free coffee and
donuts in the morning, free
lunch and entertainment
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
more than 50 exhibitors,
free health screenings and
informative speakers, door
prizes, and Nintendo Wii
games and demonstrations.
Free health screenings
include a blood pressure
check, cholesterol check,
glucose screening, hemo-
globin check, derma scan,
bone density test, osteo-
porosis screening, balance
screening and grip test.
Speaker and demonstra-
tion schedule:
• 10 a.m. — Dr. Ron
Black on Diet and Arthritis
• 10:45 a.m. — Ann Boyd
from My Own Backyard
Herbs and Flowers on Herbs
and Herbal Remedies
• 11:30 a.m. — Julie
Mason from Putnam County
HomeCare & Hospice on
Living Wills and Durable
Power of Attorney for
Healthcare
• 12:15 p.m. — Putnam
County Sheriff James
Beutler on Elderly Safety
Wii demonstrations will
be held at 10 a.m., 11 a.m.,
and 12 p.m.
CAMPUS NOTE
Photo submitted
Boggs wins scholarship
The Van Wert County
Homemakers and Community
Education Council has
announced Emma Boggs of
Delphos has been named the
winner of a $200 scholar-
ship. Boggs is a 2011 gradu-
ate of St. John’s High School
and will be studying speech
pathology at the University of
Cincinnati.
She has been active in
sports, community service
activities and church events
for several years. She has
volunteered at St. Rita’s
Hospital, a soup kitchen and
with city recycling.
She is the daughter of Jon
and Michelle Boggs.
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local events, fashion,
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other subjects with your
newspaper. You’ll also
find entertaining features,
like cartoons, columns,
puzzles, reviews, and lots
more.
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Big Green grabs Tee-Off Classic
DELPHOS — Led by the Classic
18-hole record of 70 by senior Kyle
Karhoff, the Ottoville boys golfers
grabbed the annual Delphos Country
Club Tee-Off Classic Monday.
Karhoff netted a 33-37 on his way
to medalist honors as the Big Green
outdistanced St. John’s, Fort
Jennings and Jefferson 302-
322-365-384.
Junior Zach Weber
carded a 74 and fresh-
man Wesley Markward a
76 for Ottoville, who next
is in action Thursday at
the Lincolnview Lancer
Invitational at Hickory
Sticks (9 a.m. tee-off).
Senior Isaac Klausing
shot a 77 and senior Cody
Kundert and junior Nick added
79s for the Blue Jays, who visit
Hickory Sticks this morning to battle
Lincolnview.
Senior Cody Warnecke and
junior Kurt Warnecke topped the
Musketeers with 83s. They return
to action against Ayersville 10 a.m.
Wednesday at Country Acres.
Tops for the Wildcats
were the 91 by junior
Nick Gallmeier and the
95 by classmate Tyler
Wrasman. They are back
in action this morning and
Wednesday at the Colonial
Golfers Invitational (9 a.m.
tee-off).
Team Results:
Ottoville 302: Kyle Karhoff 70,
Zach Weber 74, Wesley Markward
76, Luke Schimmoeller 82, Travis
Maag 85, Derek Schimmoeller 88.
St. John’s 322: Isaac Klausing 77,
Cody Kundert 79, Nick Kayser 79,
Sean Flanagan 87, Eric Bergfeld 88,
Cole Fischbach 89.
Fort Jennings 365: Cody
Warnecke 83, Kurt Warnecke 83,
Zach Schuerman 99, L. Luebrecht
100, Josh Wittler 105, B. Clay 108.
Jefferson 384: Nick Gallmeier 91,
Tyler Wrasman 95, Tyler Miller 99,
Carter Mox 99, Jacob Violet 103, A.J.
Teman 129.
----
Bearcats trounce Rams in
golf season-opener
LIMA — Junior
Evan Crites shot an
82 as the Spencerville
boys golfers opened
2011 with a 369-459
destruction of Upper
Scioto Valley Monday
at Tamarac.
Senior Rick
Brunswick carded a
92, while sophomore James
Schaad added a 96 and fresh-
man Dane Gelivera a 99.
The Bearcats host
Crestview, Paulding and
Lima Central Catholic in a
Northwest Conference quad 10
a.m. Thursday at Tamarac.
Travis Compton was low
man for the Rams with a 111.
Spencerville 369: Evan
Crites 82, Rick
Brunswick 92, James
Schaad 96, Dane
Gelivera 99, Chance
Campbell 121, Kasey
Lee 127.
USV: Travis
Compton 111, Alex
Parker 112, Chance Watkins 114,
Woody Prater 122, Chris Netzger
122, Nick Sarver 125.
----
Cougars 4th, Wildcats
9th at Defiance Invite
The Van Wert boys golfer team
finished fourth and Kalida ninth at the
18-team Defiance Early Bird Open
Invitational held Monday at Eagle
Rock Golf Club.
Matt Cucciarre led the Cougars
with a 78, while Neil Recker’s 81 was
tops for the Wildcats.
Jacob Behringer and Josh Scott
tied for medalist honors with 74s for
the winning Defiance “A” team.
Kalida is in the Colonial Golfers
Invitational today and takes on Elida
and Shawnee Wednesday (8 a.m. Tee
time) Wednesday
at the Shawnee
Country Club.
Van Wert is
in Wednesday’s
Li b e r t y - Be n t o n
Invitational (10 a.m.
tee).
Team Results:
Defiance “A”
300: Jacob Behringer 74, Josh Scott
74, Jacob Moore 75, Henry
Weisberger 77, Tyler Batt
85.
Bryan 319: Dalton
Schlenberg 77, Luke
Shaffer 78, Adam McBride
81, David Miller 83, Shea
Vogelsong 86.
Wauseon 321: Austin Tuckerman
76, Trevor Dominique 78,
Colin Dietrich 80,
Zach Lillich 87,
Trey Rupp 87.
Van Wert
327: Matt
Cucciarre 78,
Tyler Turnwald
83, Vince Moreland 84,
Brandon Hernandez 89, Jacob
Brake 92.
Napoleon 333: Brandon Lambert
79, Austin Peppers 82, Andrew
Taylor 84, Zach Hoops 87, Jacob
Gebers 88.
Stryker 337: Hunter Clingaman
81, Troy Saunders 84, Jared DeGroff
84, Taylor Brown 88, Tanner
Clingaman 91.
North Central 337: Brandon
Turner 82, Kole Peterson 83, Clayton
Vandevoorde 86, Dylan Hutchinson
86, Jalen Dancer 92.
Liberty Center 341: Tyler Davis
81, Cody Knapp 85, Cody Wiechers
87, Zach Johnston 93, Michael Huber
99.
Kalida 347: Neil Recker 81,
Zach Erhart 88, Cody Mathew
89, Eric Kahle 89, Austin
Horstman 91.
Tinora 352: Michael
Overmier 83, Reid Renollet
87, Nate Olson 90, Connor
Behringer 92, Quinten
Lambert 93.
Defiance “B” 352: Josh
Hubbard 82, Kyle Maxey
86, Drake Moening 91,
Weston Rivers 93, Ryan Howard
101.
Wayne Trace 360: Grady
Gudakunst 81, Derek Langmeyer 90,
Zach Mansfield 91, Corbin Linder 98,
Brian Myers 106.
Archbold 367: Olley Short 82,
Dylan Reisser 89, Stuart Wyse 96,
Kevin Boyers 100, Zach Short 104.
Ottawa-Glandorf 377: Matt
Hermiller 86, Jaylen Von
Sossan 93, Jake Harshbarger
95, Tyler Deters 103, Carson
Williams 105.
Celina 380: Alex Bay
87, Ryan Miller 96, Kaleb
Kuhn 97, Brandon Casto 100,
Stephen Fleck 104.
Ayersville 411: Matt Engle 95,
Kyle Wank 100, Colin Claud 101,
Zach Rensi 115, James Howard 124.
Fairview 422: Jared Elchinger 96,
Brett Fitzwater 102, Ethan Hearne
104, Ryan Singer 120, Kason Cutler
121.
Paulding 479: Andy Smiler 109,
Trey Schroeder 120, Josh Boes 124,
Ben Heilshorn 126, Jerika Bland
146.
2
6 – The Herald Tuesday, August 9, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
LOCAL ROUNDUP
By RUSTY MILLER
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS — Luke
Fickell had difficulty sleeping
he was so wired about his first
official practice as
Ohio State’s interim
head coach.
“It’s been a long
time coming I guess
you could say — a
couple of months,” he
said after Monday’s
workout. “The biggest thing
was the excitement that at
about 2:30 in the morning
you’re ready to go. Hopefully
a bunch of guys felt that
way.”
But he also knows it’s just
another mile marker on what
will likely be a long, strange
journey for the Buckeyes this
season.
“Will it be a little bit of
relief just to get that first (prac-
tice) under your belt? Yeah.
For everybody,” he said.
More than eight months
after a memorabilia-for-cash
scandal rocked the program,
and several weeks after
10-year coach Jim Tressel’s
forced resignation and Ohio
State’s self-imposed sanc-
tions, the Buckeyes finally got
back to playing football on
Monday.
Just over 100 players were
on hand for the first practice in
comfortable, 80-degree tem-
peratures.
They have been faced with
a mountain of changes since
this past spring’s practices,
let alone their last game — a
31-26 victory over Arkansas
in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 4.
Fickell, a defensive assis-
tant under Tressel the last
nine years, took over after
Ohio State officials convinced
Tressel to resign on May
30 in the midst of a lengthy
NCAA investigation. Tressel
has admitted he knew players
had accepted improper ben-
efits — money and discounted
tattoos — from the owner of
a Columbus tattoo parlor who
was the subject of a federal
drug-trafficking probe. But
Tressel, with a record of 106-
22, did not tell his superiors or
the NCAA as required by his
contract and NCAA bylaws.
Last December, five play-
ers were suspended for the first
five games of the 2011 sea-
son. They included three-year
starting quarterback Terrelle
Pryor, who has since given
up his senior season for a shot
at playing in the NFL, along
with starting wide receiver
DeVier Posey, leading-rusher
Daniel Herron, starting offen-
sive lineman Mike Adams
and backup defensive lineman
Solomon Thomas. Another,
linebacker Jordan Whiting,
was suspended for just the
first game. (A sixth player,
linebacker Dorian Bell, has
subsequently been suspended
for the first five games but he
is no longer with the team.)
Ohio State goes before the
NCAA’s committee on infrac-
tions Friday. The
university has vacat-
ed the 12-1 season in
2010, including the
bowl win, in addi-
tion to self-imposing
a two-year NCAA
probation. The
committee can add to those
sanctions with a bowl ban or
by restricting Ohio State’s
recruiting, or it can accept the
penalties the university has
proposed.
After months of unending
scrutiny and a series of embar-
rassing revelations of possible
violations, getting back on the
field served as a tonic for
Buckeyes fans and everyone
on the team.
“It’s therapeutic for a lot of
us— as much for the coaches
as it is the players,” Fickell
said.
The Buckeyes open the
season on Sept. 3 at home
against Akron.
Even in a typical year, this
would be a chaotic month of
practice. The Buckeyes must
replace seven starters on
defense and three on offense
— and that doesn’t include
those who will miss almost
half of the season due to sus-
pensions.
Fickell and his staff will be
keeping a close watch on four
candidates to replace Pryor.
Joe Bauserman, a 25-year-old
former minor-league baseball
prospect who was Pryor’s
backup last season, has the
most experience. The best
passer might be redshirt fresh-
man Taylor Graham, the son
of former Buckeyes signal-
caller Kent Graham, who spent
11 years in the NFL. Perhaps
the best athlete is sopho-
more Kenny Guiton, capable
of moving the chains when
running or passing. And the
wild card is freshman Braxton
Miller, an acclaimed recruit
from suburban Dayton, given
every chance during spring
ball to take the job.
Of course, that was when
Tressel was the head coach.
But there have been no other
substantial changes to the
offensive staff and Fickell,
a former defensive player in
addition to coach, says he will
rely on his offensive coaches’
decisions.
No matter, Fickell isn’t get-
ting involved. He repeatedly
declined to discuss individual
players or positions, saying
he preferred to focus on the
whole team.
Of the situation at quarter-
back, he said, “We’re going to
let it play out.”
Tee-Off winners
The Ottoville golf team won the annual Delphos Country Club Tee-Off Classic to commence the 2011 campaign with a
302, outdistancing St. John’s, Fort Jennings and Jefferson. Members of the team are, front from left, Craig Odenweller,
Ryan Kemper, Matt Turnwald, Wesley Markward and Derek Schimmoeller; and back, coach Jim Brown, Zach Weber,
Luke Schimmoeller, Travis Maag, Kyle Karhoff and Logan Kortokrax.
Jim Metcalfe photo
By TOM WITHERS
The Associated Press
BEREA — Bored and
killing time during the NFL
lockout, Browns cornerback
Joe Haden was wandering
around a local shopping mall
when he decided to see if
some friends wanted to meet
for lunch.
So, he logged into his
Twitter account and Haden
told his followers — any of
the 50,000 who could make
it — to meet him at a sushi
restaurant.
“We took over the whole
place,” Haden said Monday.
And, he picked up the tab.
“Pretty hefty,” Haden said
without divulging the bill. “I
just wanted to give back to
the fans.”
Not bad for a guy who
prefers taking things away.
Haden, who intercepted
a team-high six passes as
a rookie for Cleveland last
year, has much bigger plans
for his second NFL season.
The former first-round pick
whose Florida teammates
nicknamed “Rock Star”
because of his flamboyance
and outgoing personality, has
his sights on becoming one of
the league’s elite cornerbacks
— maybe even the best one.
“I just want to lock down
one side of the field,” he said
while cooling down under a
tent following another hazy-
and-humid practice. “That’s
what I came into the league
trying to do. My goal is just
to be one of the best corners
in the league.”
He’s well on his way, and
as Haden works to improve,
he’s building a loyal legion
of Browns fans, who have
quickly embraced him as one
of their favorites.
Haden has become a man
of the people.
“Who, Mr. Cleveland?”
Browns tight end Evan Moore
joked when asked about
Haden. “Whenever I opened
any Cleveland web-
site this winter, he
was on the front of
it.”
Sure enough,
Haden seemed to be
all over town during
the offseason. An
avid basketball fan,
Haden, who set high school
passing records as a quarter-
back and played guard on a
state title-winning hoop team
in Maryland, attended several
Cavaliers games this winter.
But Haden didn’t just go to
the NBA games, he went
dressed from head to sneaker
in the Cavaliers’ wine-and-
gold uniforms.
For one game, he dressed
like Cavs guard Baron Davis,
rounding out his look with
Davis’ trademark headband
and high socks. For another
game, he mimicked Cavs for-
ward Anderson Varejao, even
wearing a wig to replicate
the Brazilian players’ frizzy
locks. This spring, Haden
went to a Cleveland Indians
home game dressed like relief
pitcher Tony Sipp and sat in
the bleachers, where he posed
for photos with fans.
It’s Haden’s way of show-
ing his gratitude. He loves
Cleveland, and Cleveland
loves him back.
“They just love how I’m
showing love for the city,”
Haden said of the fan reac-
tion. “I could be in the house,
just hanging out with my
friends, but just going out
there and showing them that
I really appreciated them, that
shows a lot.”
It’s nothing new for
Haden.
“Nobody tells
him to do any
of it,” said close
friend and busi-
ness associate Sean
Cabble, who met
Haden at Florida.
“Joe does it all on
his own. He just
loves people. He’d rather be
around 10,000 people than
be by himself. At school, he
was the first one on the dance
floor and the last one off.
He doesn’t stay still either.
He’s been that way his whole
life.”
Haden began last season
as the club’s nickel back,
but it wasn’t long before he
was starting and making an
impact all over the field.
The 22-year-old Haden,
who skipped his senior sea-
son in Gainesville to turn pro,
made his first pick in Week 6
at Pittsburgh, returning it 62
yards to set up a field goal.
He became the first Browns
rookie since 1959 to record an
interception in three straight
games, and Haden topped that
a week later, becoming the
first Cleveland player since
1968 to get an interception in
four consecutive games.
Haden’s confidence grew
by the week, and now that
he’s got a season under his
belt, there’s no telling what
he can do.
“With his ball skills and
cover skills, and just a lot
of natural ability to play the
ball in the air, he can play
against the top receivers in
the league,” Moore said. “If
he just keeps his mind right,
the sky is the limit for Joe.”
It hasn’t taken first-year
Browns coach Pat Shurmur
long to be impressed by
Haden. In only the second
week of training camp, Haden
has already shown he’s a
unique talent.
“He’s a fun guy to be
around because he loves to
play and can run all day,”
Shurmur said. “He’s good in
coverage and he challenges.
He’s a fun guy to coach for
all those reasons. It’s very
rare, you look at a guy and
it’s hot and they’re tired, and
he’s out here smiling, joking
and playing fast.”
Haden’s good, and he
knows it. But while he oozes
confidence, he isn’t cocky.
He’s just one of the guys
even if his physical gifts are
special.
During the offseason,
Haden, who has tattoos all
over his body, got a new one
on his right forearm of the
NFL’s shield logo, framed
by “Dreams Come True” and
“4 — 22 — 10.”
“That’s when I got draft-
ed,” Haden said.
And what’s his NFL
dream?
“Win a Super Bowl,” he
said without hesitation. “And
get me a ring. That’s the
goal”
If he does, you can bet
he’s buying lunch.
Browns’ Joe Haden making name for himself
Fickell puts Buckeyes
through paces for first time
NL Capsules
By The Associated Press
Mets 9, Padres 8
NEW YORK — Lucas Duda’s
two-run single capped a three-run
ninth against closer Heath Bell, and
banged-up New York rallied past San
Diego 9-8 on Monday night.
Angel Pagan, Jason Bay and
David Wright homered for the Mets
on a day they put their top two hitters
— Jose Reyes and Daniel Murphy —
on the disabled list.
Jason Bartlett’s bases-loaded
double capped a four-run eighth that
gave the Padres an 8-4 lead. But their
normally reliable bullpen couldn’t
hold it, and San Diego’s four-game
winning streak was snapped.
Duda, who had three hits, singled
to start a two-run eighth. Pinch-hitter
Mike Baxter, just promoted from
Triple-A Buffalo, delivered an RBI
double and Ronny Paulino’s sacrifice
fly made it 8-6.
Jason Pridie opened the ninth
with a single off Bell (2-4). Wright
and Duda had RBI singles.
Jason Isringhausen (3-2) worked
a scoreless ninth for the win.
Braves 8, Marlins 5
MIAMI — Dan Uggla extended
his hitting streak to 29 games and
Alex Gonzalez hit a three-run homer
to help Atlanta drop Florida to 0-5 on
its homestand.
Uggla beat out a grounder to
short for an infield single in the fifth
inning to extend the longest active
hitting streak in the majors.
After Uggla and Chipper Jones
singled in the fifth, Gonzalez hit his
10th home run off Brad Hand (1-4).
Uggla added a sacrifice fly in the
sixth. Atlanta’s Michael Bourn drove
in a run with his 30th infield hit, most
in the NL. Freddie Freeman, whose
career-best 20-game hitting streak
ended Sunday, had a two-run single.
Derek Lowe (7-10), who had lost
his past three starts, allowed two runs
in six innings. Craig Kimbrel struck
out two batters for his 35th save.
Rockies 10, Reds 7
CINCINNATI — Carlos
Gonzalez’s two-run homer —
Colorado’s fourth of the game —
broke an eighth-inning tie in a that
featured a long rain delay and seven
homers in all.
Seth Smith hit two two-run hom-
ers for the Rockies, the fifth multi-
homer game of his career. Gonzalez
snapped a 7-all tie with the first
homer allowed this season by Bill
Bray (2-2). Todd Helton also hom-
ered.
Matt Belisle (6-4) pitched out of
a threat in the seventh and Huston
Street worked the ninth for his 29th
save.
Jay Bruce, Drew Stubbs and
Brandon Phillips homered for the
Reds, who have lost five of seven.
Colorado’s four homers matched
its season high and the seven homers
combined accounted for 15 of the 17
runs scored.
Bruce got it started with a three-
run homer in the first inning off Jason
Hammel, his first since July 9.
Astros 9, Diamondbacks 1
PHOENIX — Wandy Rodriguez
allowed two hits over six innings
and J.D. Martinez homered to lead
Houston.
Jimmy Paredes had a two-run
single and Rodriguez drove in his
first run of the season for the Astros,
who snapped a three-game losing
streak. Rodriguez (7-9) walked four,
struck out five and retired the final 11
batters he faced.
Henry Blanco homered in the
seventh for the Diamondbacks, who
have dropped four of five.
Martinez’s three-run homer off
Daniel Hudson (11-8) gave Houston
a 3-0 lead four batters into the game.
Carlos Corporan added an RBI dou-
ble in the inning and Rodriguez hit a
run-scoring single to make it 5-0.
The Astros added two runs in
the second on an RBI double by
Matt Downs and a run-scoring infield
single from Clint Barmes.
Hudson allowed seven runs —
four earned — and a career-high 11
hits over a career-low three innings.
He struck out one, matching a season
low.
Pirates 5, Giants 0
SAN FRANCISCO — Charlie
Morton and Jose Veras combined on a
MLB Roundup
See ROUNDUP page 7
Tuesday, August 9, 2011 The Herald — 7
www.delphosherald.com
St. John’s cheerleaders at UNOH camp
1. The St. John’s varsity/JV football and basketball cheerleaders attended the Universal Cheerleaders Association’s camp held at the University of Northwestern Ohio July
19-21. They won many awards at the camp, including: blue superior ribbons for their fight song, cheer and Extreme Routine evaluations; a spirit stick every day; the “Top
Banana” spirit award; leadership; being motion masters; and having the best incorp for the extreme routine. Those attending the camp include, front from left, Chelsea Wellmann,
Julia Dickman and Meagan Hempfling; middle, Stephanie Honigford, Michelle Hitchcock, Mallory Metcalfe, Tricia Wrasman, Allison Youngpeter, Lindsey Wannemacher,
Ally Mohler and Lauren Utrup; and standing, Lexy Cairo, Megan Fish, Alyssa Martin, Trisha Fischer, Kaitlyn Slate, Melissa Wrasman, Lydia Schwinnen, Lindsey Warnecke,
Elizabeth Shafer, Alethea Matthews and Lyndsay Mohler. Absent from photo is Samantha Miller. Coaches are Tricia Patton and Missy Pohlman. (Photos submitted) 6 cols.
Photos submitted
Pictured left: During the camp,
participants were given the chance to
win the All-American Award based
on their best jump, a cheer and an
Extreme Routine taught by camp
instructors. Those who won the award
received a medal and the opportunity
to cheer in the New Year’s Parade in
London. Six Blue Jays won the award:
left to right, Lindsey Warnecke,
Kaitlyn Slate, Chelsea Wellmann,
Julia Dickman, Meagan Hempfling
and Lindsey Wannemacher.
Pictured right: Two Lady Jays won
individual awards during the UNOH
camp: freshman Alyssa Martin, left,
took home award as the Jump-Off
Champion for the JV division; and
sophomore Kaitlyn Slate, won the
Dancing Diva award during instruc-
tor Devon Hays’ dance-off contest
while learning the Extreme Routine
American League
By The Associated Press
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 71 43 .623 —
New York 69 44 .611 1 1/2
Tampa Bay 60 54 .526 11
Toronto 58 56 .509 13
Baltimore 44 68 .393 26
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Detroit 61 53 .535 —
Cleveland 56 56 .500 4
Chicago 56 58 .491 5
Minnesota 51 64 .443 10 1/2
Kansas City 49 66 .426 12 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 65 51 .560 —
Los Angeles 63 52 .548 1 1/2
Oakland 51 63 .447 13
Seattle 49 65 .430 15
Sunday’s games
Toronto 7, Baltimore 2
Oakland 5, Tampa Bay 4, 10 innings
Chicago White Sox 7, Minnesota 0
Kansas City 4, Detroit 3
L.A. Angels 2, Seattle 1
Texas 5, Cleveland 3
Boston 3, N.Y. Yankees 2, 10 innings
Monday’s games
Chicago White Sox 7, Baltimore 6
Boston 8, Minnesota 6
Tampa Bay 2, Kansas City 1
Texas 9, Seattle 2
Today’s games
Chicago White Sox (Floyd 9-10) at
Baltimore (Jo-.Reyes 5-8), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 4-12) at Cleveland
(Masterson 9-7), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Haren 12-6) at N.Y. Yankees
(A.J.Burnett 8-9), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (Harden 2-2) at Toronto (Cecil
4-4), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (Francis 4-11) at Tampa Bay
(Shields 10-9), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 9-7) at Texas (Ogando
11-5), 8:05 p.m.
Boston (Bedard 4-7) at Minnesota (Liriano
7-9), 8:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s games
Chicago White Sox (Humber 8-8) at
Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 1-2), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 11-6) at Cleveland
(Jimenez 0-0), 7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Takahashi 3-2) at N.Y.
Yankees (Nova 10-4), 7:05 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-9) at Toronto
(Mills 1-1), 7:07 p.m.
Kansas City (F.Paulino 1-4) at Tampa Bay
(W.Davis 8-7), 7:10 p.m.
Seattle (Vargas 6-10) at Texas (D.Holland
10-4), 8:05 p.m.
Boston (Lester 11-5) at Minnesota
(Blackburn 7-9), 8:10 p.m.
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
Philadelphia 75 40 .652 —
Atlanta 67 49 .578 8 1/2
New York 57 57 .500 17 1/2
Washington 55 59 .482 19 1/2
Florida 55 60 .478 20
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Milwaukee 65 50 .565 —
St. Louis 62 53 .539 3
Pittsburgh 55 59 .482 9 1/2
Cincinnati 55 60 .478 10
Chicago 49 66 .426 16
Houston 38 77 .330 27
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 63 53 .543 —
Arizona 62 53 .539 1/2
Colorado 54 62 .466 9
Los Angeles 52 62 .456 10
San Diego 51 65 .440 12
Sunday’s games
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 5
St. Louis 8, Florida 4
San Diego 7, Pittsburgh 3
Milwaukee 7, Houston 3
Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 7
Washington 3, Colorado 2
San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 1
Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 3
Monday’s games
Atlanta 8, Florida 5
Colorado 10, Cincinnati 7
N.Y. Mets 9, San Diego 8
Washington at Chicago, ppd., rain
Houston 9, Arizona 1
Philadelphia 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 0
Today’s games
Atlanta (Beachy 5-2) at Florida (Hensley 1-4),
7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Rogers 5-1) at Cincinnati (Willis
0-1), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (LeBlanc 0-2) at N.Y. Mets (Capuano
9-10), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Wang 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (Garza
5-8), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Marcum 10-3) at St. Louis
(E.Jackson 1-1), 8:15 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 1-6) at Arizona (Marquis 8-6),
9:40 p.m.
Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 11-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly
7-11), 10:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 7-5) at San Francisco
(Bumgarner 6-11), 10:15 p.m.
Wednesday’s games
Philadelphia (Worley 8-1) at L.A. Dodgers
(Billingsley 10-9), 3:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Karstens 8-6) at San Francisco
(J.Sanchez 4-6), 3:45 p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 11-7) at Florida (Ani.Sanchez
6-5), 7:10 p.m.
Colorado (Undecided) at Cincinnati (Leake 9-7),
7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Harang 10-3) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey
5-10), 7:10 p.m.
Washington (Detwiler 1-1) at Chicago Cubs
(R.Lopez 2-3), 8:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Wolf 8-8) at St. Louis (Westbrook
9-5), 8:15 p.m.
Houston (Undecided) at Arizona (Collmenter
6-7), 9:40 p.m.
MLB Standings
WNBA Standings
SPORTS BRIEFS
Women’s National
Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
Eastern Conference
W L Pct GB
Indiana 15 7 .682 —
Connecticut 13 7 .650 1
New York 12 9 .571 2 1/2
Chicago 10 12 .455 5
Atlanta 9 11 .450 5
Washington 4 14 .222 9
Western Conference
W L Pct GB
Minnesota 16 4 .800 —
San Antonio 12 8 .600 4
Seattle 12 9 .571 4 1/2
Phoenix 11 9 .550 5
Los Angeles 7 13 .350 9
Tulsa 1 19 .050 15
Sunday’s games
Atlanta 70, Seattle 53
Connecticut 96, Phoenix 95, OT
Chicago 88, Indiana 69
Minnesota 84, Los Angeles 78
Monday’s games
No games scheduled
Today’s games
San Antonio at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Connecticut, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle at New York, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tulsa at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
The Associated Press
COLLEGE FOOTBALL
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — Joe
Paterno was hospitalized and under-
going tests on his right arm and hip
after a player ran into the 84-year-
old coach during practice.
Paterno was admitted Sunday
evening to Mount Nittany Medical
Center after he walked away from the
collision with a receiver, the school
said Monday. Receiver Devon Smith
was running a drill on the offensive
side of the field when he blindsided
the Hall of Fame coach, who was
watching the defense.
“I expect to be back at practice
soon,” Paterno said in a statement.
“I’m doing fine; tell everyone not to
worry about me.”
Dr. Wayne Sebastianelli, Penn
State director of athletic medicine,
said it doesn’t appear surgery will
be required. The school said Paterno
could be released in the next 24
hours.
Doctors were evaluating his
shoulder and pelvis, and there was
no firm diagnosis yet on the extent
of the injuries, said a person Monday
night familiar with the team who
requested anonymity because no one
was authorized to speak about his
condition.
Paterno is entering his 46th sea-
son as Penn State’s head coach and
is the winningest coach in the history
of major college football with 401
victories.
FOOTBALL
NASHVILLE, Tenn. —
Tennessee Titans cornerback
Cortland Finnegan has apologized to
his bosses, teammates, fans and even
the media for bolting training camp.
He also says he left because he was
upset over talks for an extension,
not the personal issue he mentioned
defending himself on Twitter.
Finnegan said Monday after
practice he understands he was a
distraction to his team that wasn’t
needed. He says he let emotions get
the best of him when he wanted to
meet with his wife and discuss con-
tract talks that he hopes will allow
him to retire with Tennessee.
The cornerback reported back
for camp before curfew Sunday
night, and he talked with new coach
Mike Munchak on Monday.
Munchak says Finnegan will be
fined, and the cornerback says he
will willingly pay.
BETHLEHEM, Pa. — Two-time
Pro Bowl wide receiver DeSean
Jackson ended his 11-day holdout
and reported to Philadelphia Eagles
training camp on Monday. He didn’t
practice in the morning, but was
on the field for the afternoon walk-
through.
Jackson is slated to earn $565,000
this season, the final one of his
four-year rookie deal. He caught
47 passes for 1,056 yards and six
touchdowns last year, and his 22.5
yard-per-catch average was best in
the NFL. He also averaged 11.6
yards on 20 punt returns, including
a 65-yarder for a TD that beat the
New York Giants on the last play
of a game in the Meadowlands on
Dec. 19.
OWINGS MILLS, Md. — The
Baltimore Ravens have agreed to
terms with veteran running back
Ricky Williams.
The Ravens announced the deal
on Monday, pending Williams pass-
ing a physical today.
Williams played for the Miami
Dolphins last season. The 34-year-
old running back split time with
Ronnie Brown in Miami and aver-
aged 4.2 yards per carry. He rushed
for 673 yards and scored two touch-
downs.
With the Ravens, Williams will
play behind starter Ray Rice.
SAN FRANCISCO — Dashon
Goldson is back with the San
Francisco 49ers after all — despite
all his tweets to the contrary.
The free agent safety agreed
to terms on a one-year contract
Monday to rejoin the Niners. Coach
Jim Harbaugh discussed the addition
of Goldson after Monday’s practice
in Santa Clara, but said he wasn’t
sure whether Goldson would be on
the practice field for the first time
this morning, an open workout for
fans.
While the team hadn’t formally
announced Goldson’s signing, the
Niners did say they signed tight end
Chris Blohm to a three-year deal.
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Arizona
Cardinals safety Adrian Wilson has
a torn right biceps tendon and will
try to rehabilitate the injury to avoid
surgery that would sideline him for a
longer period.
Coach Ken Whisenhunt would
give no timetable for Wilson’s return
other than to say he expects the four-
time Pro Bowler to play this season.
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Jerry
Smith, whose 26-year NFL coaching
career included a stint as the Denver
Broncos interim head coach in 1971,
has died at age 80.
Smith had been in declining
health since suffering a heart attack
four years ago. He died Saturday,
said his son, Jeffrey Smith, of
Dallas.
Smith coached the offensive and
defensive lines for 10 AFL/NFL
teams from 1960-85 before serving
six seasons as a scout for the Kansas
City Chiefs.
MINNEAPOLIS — A settlement
has been reached in the final law-
suit stemming from the heat stroke
death of Minnesota Vikings lineman
Korey Stringer 10 years ago, his
family announced Monday.
Terms of the settlement between
Stringer’s widow, Kelci Stringer, and
Chicago-based helmet and shoul-
der pads-maker Riddell Inc. were
not disclosed, said James Gould,
who was Korey Stringer’s agent and
serves as a family spokesman.
The lawsuit, filed in federal court
in Ohio in 2003, alleged Riddell
failed to warn players and coaches
that wearing its helmets and shoul-
der pads in hot temperatures could
be dangerous. The family reached
separate settlements earlier with the
NFL and other defendants.
Korey Stringer died Aug. 1,
2001, after collapsing on a swelter-
ing day in training camp.
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. —
Backup offensive lineman Kevin
Haslam will be placed on injured
reserve after sustaining a knee injury
in Jacksonville’s scrimmage.
Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio said
Haslam injured the medial collateral
ligament and “some other things” in
his left knee Saturday. Del Rio said
“we’re talking months, not days or
weeks” before Haslam will be ready
to play again.
For the latest in local sports
www.delphosheraldcom
(Continued from page 6)
six-hitter and Ryan Ludwick hit two RBI singles
as Pittsburgh snapped a 10-game losing streak.
Garrett Jones doubled among his four hits
and scored twice to help back Morton (9-6), who
improved to 6-2 on the road this season.
The Pirates battered Ryan Vogelsong (9-2),
who lost for the first time in 13 starts since May
26.
The reigning World Series champions have
lost nine of 11. Still, San Francisco stayed a half-
game ahead of Arizona in the NL West.
Morton pitched eight innings and Veras fin-
ished Pittsburgh’s ninth shutout and sixth on the
road.
The Giants — held to two or fewer runs for
the eighth time in 10 games — were blanked for
the third time in nine games and 10th overall.
Phillies 5, Dodgers 3
LOS ANGELES — Roy Halladay became
the NL’s first 15-game winner, and Ryan Howard
and Jimmy Rollins drove in two runs each for
Philadelphia.
Shane Victorino, who played because he
appealed a three-game suspension he received
Monday for his part in a fight in San Francisco
last week, homered in the ninth as Philadelphia
improved the majors’ best record to 75-40 and
maintained its 8 1/2-game lead over Atlanta in
the NL East.
Halladay (15-4) allowed a run and nine hits
over 6 1-3 innings and struck out four.
Michael Stutes and Brad Lidge gave up RBI
singles in the eighth. Ryan Madson got three outs
for his 20th save in 21 chances.
Hiroki Kuroda (7-14) gave up four runs
— three earned — and nine hits through 6 1-3
innings, making him 2-11 with a 3.16 ERA over
his last 14 outings.
Howard’s RBI was his NL-leading 89th, four
more than Milwaukee’s Prince Fielder.
AL Capsules
Red Sox 8, Twins 6
MINNEAPOLIS — David Ortiz had four hits
and three RBIs, delivering the go-ahead single
with two outs in the ninth inning to lift the Boston
Red Sox to an 8-6 victory over the Minnesota
Twins on Monday night.
Ortiz, a former Twin, hit a two-run homer in
the sixth and finished a triple shy of the cycle.
Jarrod Saltalamacchia added a homer and two
RBIs to help the Red Sox win for the fifth time in
seven games and move 1 1/2 games ahead of the
idle New York Yankees in the AL East.
Marco Scutaro chipped in three hits and
Jonathan Papelbon picked up his 25th save.
Jason Kubel had a homer among his three
hits and two RBIs for the Twins, who have lost
five in a row.
Alfredo Aceves (8-1) gave up one run in an
inning in relief of Tim Wakefield for the victory.
Wakefield gave up five runs — three earned —
and eight hits with five strikeouts.
Glen Perkins (3-2) gave up two runs — one
earned — in 1 2-3 innings to take the loss.
White Sox 7, Orioles 6
BALTIMORE — A.J. Pierzynski homered
and drove in three runs, and Alex Rios singled
in the go-ahead run in the eighth inning to help
Chicago to its fourth straight victory.
Gordon Beckham also connected for the
White Sox, who blew a four-run lead before rally-
ing to secure their season-high sixth consecutive
road win.
After J.J. Hardy hit a three-run homer in the
seventh off Jesse Crain (6-3) to put Baltimore
up 6-5, the White Sox regained the lead against
Jim Johnson (5-4). Paul Konerko walked, Carlos
Quentin singled and Pierzynski hit a sacrifice fly
to tie it. Rios then singled under the glove of third
baseman Josh Bell to bring home Quentin.
Sergio Santos struck out the side in a perfect
ninth for his 23rd save.
Rays 2, Royals 1
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Casey Kotchman
led off the ninth inning with a home run and also
hit a run-scoring single to lift Tampa Bay.
Kotchman drove the first pitch from Blake
Wood (5-1) over the center field fence.
Rays closer Kyle Farnsworth (4-1) pitched a
perfect ninth to earn the win.
Luke Hochevar allowed one run and five hits
over seven innings for the Royals. The right-
hander, who had won his previous three starts,
had seven strikeouts and two walks.
Rays rookie Jeremy Hellickson, 3-0 in four
starts during July, gave up one run and six hits
in 7 1-3 innings. He struck out seven and walked
three.
Eric Hosmer put the Royals ahead 1-0 on a
first-inning RBI single.
Rangers 9, Mariners 2
ARLINGTON, Texas — Matt Harrison
pitched seven strong innings for his career-
high 10th victory and Nelson Cruz homered for
Texas.
Harrison (10-8) allowed two runs and five hits
with six strikeouts and no walks in 104-degree
heat, surpassing his nine-win rookie season in
2008.
Cruz, Mitch Moreland and Yorvit Torrealba
all had three hits for the AL West-leading
Rangers, who stretched their lead over the idle
Los Angeles Angels to 1 1/2 games.
The Rangers scored twice in the second
against rookie Charlie Furbush (1-1) with the
help of the Mariners’ second error of the night.
Furbush allowed seven runs — six earned — and
eight hits over four-plus innings in his second
start since he was acquired from Detroit.
ROUNDUP
8 – The Herald Tuesday, August 9, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
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419-453-3620
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cell 419-233-9460
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Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
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419-692-7261
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AT YOUR
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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$99,500-Delphos SD
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THINKING OF
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MAKE THE CALL
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IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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www.jimlanghalsrealty.com
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FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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Call for showing ...
1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.
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Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT
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TESTED
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with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN
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2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.
*Will be trained by Microtel
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Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage
close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE
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OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.
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TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS
FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos
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928 N. Franklin St., Delphos
These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.
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BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity
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$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!
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$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find
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$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC
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$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury
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692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty
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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900
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1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
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Cass
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Monday, March 10
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648 S. Jefferson St.,
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Janet 419-236-7894
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limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
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SEBRING
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Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells
Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today
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See me,
BILL HOFFMAN
for the best buy on your
new or used vehicle.
TOM AHL
617 KING AVE., LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413 CELL 419-296-7188
005

Lost & Found
FOUND: FEMALE Ger-
man Shephard, black and
tan with white feet. 8th
Street area on Sunday
night. Call 567-825-8047
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
080

Help Wanted
GRAI N EQUI PMENT
dealer seeking crew mem-
bers to assemble and
erect grain elevator legs,
conveyors, grain bins and
dryers. Full time. Valid
driver’s license and drug
rest requi red. Post
Agri-Service
419-647-4925
JOB FAIR
Wednesday, August 10th
8:30 am-6:30pm
At the New Holiday
Inn & Suites. Located
at Crossroads at Lost
Creek across from Rite-
Aid, 803 South Leonard
Avenue off I75 exit
125B, Lima, Ohio.
Axcess Staffing Services
is seeking candidates for
long term temporary
positions for Packers and
Warehouse. 1st and 2nd
shift available. Benefits
available. For directions,
contact Holiday Inn
(419) 879-4000.
For job inquires call
1-800-754-7000 ext. 1
then 8819.
Please join us at
the Job Fair!
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN pil-
low-top mattress set, can
del i ver $125. Cal l
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
15737 Rd. 23M
Ft. Jennings, OH 45844
Fri. Aug. 12, 9am-8pm
Sat. Aug.13, 9am-3pm
Household items, furni -
ture, hydraulic wood split-
ter, 4X6 trailer, tools, 20
ton press, metal drill,
handcrafted items, power-
tools, antiques, exercise
equipment, cut lumber,
misc.
HUGE SALE 328 S.
Pierce, Delphos. Tons of
girls clothes newborn to
size 12, boys newborn to
size 14, Adult clothes,
Geo Trax train set, bikes,
househol d i tems and
much more! Wed. 4-8 pm,
Thurs. 8-5 pm, Fri .
9-12pm. (Aug. 10th-12th).
LANDECK RD. Garage
Sales. 1.5 miles west of
Landeck church 21473,
small go cart, TM, color
pr i nt er , smal l TV,
fax/printer, electric wood
shipper. 20915 good work-
ing dryer, Little Tikes art
table, plant pots, clean
kids clothes, baked goods.
20859 stroller, walker,
Boyds Bears, clean kids
clothes, toys.
Wed. 4pm-9pm
Thurs. 9am-8pm
Fri.. 9am-5pm
560

Lawn & Garden
JOHN DEERE lawn trac-
tor, looks and runs perfect
LT155 42” deck.
614-588-5096
590

House For Rent
2 BDRM, Very clean, No
Pets, 612 Harmon St.,
$ 6 0 0 / m o . C a l l
419-234-5626
1 BR Ranch. Refrigerator,
stove, microwave, W/D
and air conditioning pro-
vided. Lawn service. No
pets or smoking. $435/mo.
419-233-6886
2 BR unit. Ref., stove, wa-
ter included. Quiet street
$415/mo. & deposit. Im-
medi at e possessi on.
(419)203-6810
DUPLEX -1 BDRM Apt. all
new appliances, carpet,
paint, very clean. $400
plus deposit. No pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
419-692-6478
620

Duplex For Rent
3 BEDROOM, new carpet.
Available immediately.
Call 419-234-6983.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
ON THESE NAME
BRANDS:
YOKOHAMA
and PIRELLI
See dealer for details.
Expires 8-31-11
$
30 REBATE
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
FOUR TIRES
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
SEWING MACHINE with
cabinet $25.00, hobby
horse made at Delphos
Bending Works $20.00.
Call 419-692-4372
999

Legals
NOTICE OF VOLUNTARY
DISSOLUTION OF ALL
CONNECTIONS, INC.
On 30th day of June,
2011, ALL CONNEC-
TIONS, INC. filed a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution with
the Ohio Secretary of
State. ALL CONNEC-
TIONS, INC., having its
principal office at 3550
East State Road, Lima,
Ohio, 45807, has elected
to dissolve and distribute
its assets.
8/9/11
ORDINANCE #2011-25
AN ORDI NANCE
AUTHORIZING ALL AC-
TIONS NECESSARY TO
EFFECT A GOVERN-
MENTAL ELECTRICITY
AGGREGATION PRO-
GRAM WITH OPT-OUT
PROVISIONS PURSU-
ANT TO SECTI ON
4928.20 OF THE OHIO
REVISED CODE, DI -
RECTING THE ALLEN
AND VAN WERT
COUNTY BOARDS OF
ELECTIONS TO SUBMIT
A BALLOT QUESTION
TO THE ELECTORS AND
DE CL A RI NG A N
EMERBENCY.
Passed and approved this
1st day of August 2011
Robert Ulm, Council Pres.
ATTEST:
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
Michael H. Gallmeier,
Mayor
A complete text of this leg-
islation is on record at the
Municipal Building and
can be viewed during
regular office hours.
Marsha Mueller,
Council Clerk
THE OTTOVILLE Local
Schools will be receiving
sealed bids from August 4,
2011 till August 19th, 2011
for a 1997 Blue Bird 35
capacity bus. This bus
has a Braun Wheel- chair
lift, 249,000 miles, 5.9 litre
Cummins, Injection pump
rebuilt at 170,465 miles,
transmission replaced at
178,520 miles, timing
cover cracked. There is a
minimum bid of $4,000.00
The bus can be viewed
August 15 to August 18
from 8:00 a.m to 2:00 p.m.
daily at the bus garage
located at 650 W. Third
Street, Ottovi l l e OH.
Sealed Bids can be sent
to Scott Mangas, Superin-
tendent, at 650 W. Third
St. PO Box 248, Ottoville
OH 45876. Bids will be
opened August 22nd at
8:00 a.m. High bid over
the minimum of $4,000.00
will be rewarded the bus.
All other fees associated
with the bus will also be at
the cost of the buyer.
Today’s Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Atlas page
4 Mo. bill
8 Campus area
12 Snort of disgust
13 Actor Cronyn
14 Yen
15 Direction
17 Poet’s black
18 Deli staple
19 Tooth type
21 Pet-adoption org.
23 Humerus
neighbor
24 Like Rambo?
27 Wait awhile
29 RN forte
30 Poet Khayyam
32 Kind of race
36 Clamping device
38 Bewildered
40 Venomous snake
41 WXY, on a phone
43 Tough-talking
coach
45 Back muscles
47 Remnant
49 Gives off light
51 Opposite of
perigee
55 With, to Henri
56 Binding
agreement
58 Mathematician
Descartes
59 Indigo plant
60 S&L offering
61 Docs prescribe
them
62 Blushing
63 Pecan or hickory
DOWN
1 Coffee holders
2 Water, in
Baja
3 Noted groundhog
4 Do one’s hair
5 Long blouse
6 XXI times C
7 Abound (with)
8 Crushed
9 Kind of sprawl
10 Socrates’ hangout
11 Cub Scout group
16 Run 100 meters
20 Belly dance
instrument
22 Degraded
24 V.J. employer
25 Rope-a-dope
boxer
26 ICU units
28 Umbrage
31 Provide staff
33 Ship deserter
34 Try to find out
35 College stat
37 Leads on
39 Capably
42 Adherent
44 1939 Lugosi role
45 Flood barrier
46 Improve upon
48 Rajahs’ spouses
50 Dueler’s pride
52 Advance
53 Brownish tint
54 Coup d’—
55 Sofa end
57 Mrs. Lennon
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14
15 16 17
18 19 20
21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 32 33 34 35
36 37 38 39 40
41 42 43 44
45 46 47 48
49 50 51 52 53 54
55 56 57
58 59 60
61 62 63
290

Wanted to Buy
600

Apts. for Rent
Place Your
Ad Today
419 678-2324
in print & online
www.delphosherald.com
Call 419-695-0015
out with the old.
in with the new.
Sell it in
The Delphos Herald’s
CLASSIFIEDS
Cash in on your collectibles
with the Classifieds.
M A P S T M T Q U A D
U G H H U M E U R G E
G U I D A N C E E B O N
S A L A M I M O L A R
S P C A U L N A
M A C H O B I D E
T L C O M A R D R A G
V I S E A S E A A S P
N I N E D I T K A
L A T S D R E G
E M I T S A P O G E E
A V E C C O N T R A C T
R E N E A N I L I R A
M E D S R O S Y N U T
Answer to Puzzle
DEAR DR. GOTT: I cannot thank
you enough for the inspiration to lose
weight. I started a lifestyle change a
month ago and I’ve lost 15 pounds. I
feel so much better, but I’m struggling
with bowel movements. I eat lots of
fresh veggies and no fried foods,
sugar, potatoes or white rice. The
problem was that my bowels didn’t
move on a regular basis. After I ate,
I felt bloated and was miserable for
days sometimes. I found a colon
cleanser at my local health food store
and now take one capsule twice a day
and feel incredible, but the packaging
doesn’t recommend taking it for more
than a week or so.
I have a family history of colon
cancer. My mother and two of her
three siblings died of colon cancer.
I also just found out that five of my
grandfather’s siblings died of colon
cancer (he died at 91 of natural
causes). I’m scared to death of getting
it and want to keep my colon clean
without hurting myself. Are colon
cleansers harmful if I take the ones
from the health food store that have
all-natural products, especially if I
take them over a long period of time?
I feel incredible when I have two or
more movements a day. I haven’t felt
this good in over 10 years.
DEAR READER: Congratulations
on your weight loss. However, I am
concerned about your bloating and
constipation issues, especially given
your family history of colon cancer.
You don’t give me your age, gender
or any other medical history.
How long have the bloating and
constipation been an issue? Have
you talked to your physician about
your concerns? Have you had a
colonoscopy? Do you have any other
health concerns or medical conditions?
Do you take any over-the-counter or
prescription medications?
Constipation can be the result
of benign causes, such as poor diet,
lack of exercise or diet modification;
moderate health concerns, such as
obesity or irritable bowel syndrome;
and serious conditions, such as colon
cancer.
I urge you to speak with your
physician. An examination, blood
work and testing may be ordered. A
referral to a gastroenterologist may be
appropriate.
Readers who are interested in
learning more can order my Health
Reports “A Strategy for Losing Weight:
An Introduction to the No Flour,
No Sugar Diet” and “Constipation
and Diarrhea” by sending a self-
addressed, stamped No. 10 envelope
and a $2 U.S. check or money order
for each report to Dr. Peter Gott, P.O.
Box 433, Lakeville, CT 06039. Be
sure to mention the title(s), or print an
order form from my website’s direct
link: www.AskDrGottMD.com/
order_form.pdf.
DEAR DR. GOTT: I recently
noticed that I have a hard, almost
bony bump on my right collarbone.
It doesn’t hurt and I can’t remember
doing anything to injure it. What
could or would cause this? The
right side is visibly larger (slightly)
than the left. Any information on
possible causes would be greatly
appreciated.
DEAR READER: Without being
able to examine you, I cannot begin
to guess the cause. It may simply be
a normal bony protrusion. Have you
lost weight recently? If so, the bump
may have always been there, but is
now more pronounced because the
excess fat and tissue have diminished.
It could also be the result of an injury,
medical condition such as Paget’s
disease of the bone, cancer or more.
Given that you don’t remember
injuring yourself and it doesn’t
appear to be causing any pain or other
symptoms, it is likely a normal bone
growth. Talk to your physician and
request an X-ray just to be sure.
Dr. Peter H. Gott is a retired
physician and the author of several
books, including “Live Longer, Live
Better,” “Dr. Gott’s No Flour, No
Sugar Diet” and “Dr. Gott’s No Flour,
No Sugar Cookbook,” which are
available at most bookstores or online.
His website is www.AskDrGottMD.
com.
COPYRIGHT 2011 UNITED FEATURE
SYNDICATE INC.
Long term colon cleansing inappropriate
On
Health
DR. PETER J. GOTT
Expand your knowledge
every day by reading the
newspaper. It’s reliably
entertaining and informative
news coverage delivered
straight to your door!
The Delphos Herald
405 N. Main St., Delphos
419-695-0015 ext. 122
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Tuesday Evening August 9, 2011
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©2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Tuesday, August 9, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Teens resent
new stepmom
Dear Annie: My son is
being emotionally tortured
by his teenage daughters.
He has been divorced from
their mother for years, but
has always been there for his
kids. He’s never missed a
support payment and shares
responsibility for them.
Now the 17-year-old is ter-
rorizing him. My son recently
remarried, and the girl hates
his wife, who happens to be
a very nice young woman.
The teenager also
encourages her
younger sister to
do the same. It got
so bad that his new
wife had to tell my
granddaughter that
she was no longer
welcome in their
home. All this
nasty behavior is
being encouraged
by the ex-wife.
How can I help?
I’m a grandparent
trapped in the middle. I don’t
want to lose my granddaugh-
ter by taking my son’s side in
front of her, but I can hardly
sit back and see him hurt
over and over by her awful
behavior. I love her and her
sister, too. What should I do?
-- Lost in Frustration
Dear Lost: It is not uncom-
mon for children of divorced
parents to wish their parents
would get back together.
When your son remarried, it
interfered with your grand-
daughter’s fantasy world, and
she is punishing him, hoping
to break up his marriage and
put things back the way they
were. Unfortunately, the more
likely scenario is that she will
create a long-term estrange-
ment from her father.
Urge your son to get coun-
seling for both his children to
help them deal with their hos-
tility and remaining problems
with the divorce. If they are
too difficult to have around
the new wife, Dad should
visit them outside his home.
He should not stop seeing
them regardless of their hor-
rific behavior, since that will
only exacerbate their anger
and sense of abandonment.
As the grandmother, please
stay close to those girls, and
help them mature into under-
standing and tolerant adults.
Dear Annie: Please tell
me how to handle this. Last
year, we gave our son a big
graduation party and invited
lots of friends and tons of
relatives. Of all the family
members, including aunts and
cousins, only two showed up.
Yet when another nephew
had a graduation party two
weeks later, all of these same
relatives were there. Do these
people not realize the hurt
feelings this causes?
We have now been invited
to a delayed graduation party
for a niece whose parents did
not bother to come to our
event. Frankly, we don’t feel
like attending.
This kind of slight has hap-
pened before with these fam-
ily members, but we attended
their events anyway out of
obligation. We felt resentful
and still do. If we decide not
to attend this party, how do
I respond when asked why I
wasn’t there? -- Nebraska
Dear Nebraska: You
smile politely and say, “Sorry,
we had other plans.” No other
explanation is necessary.
Dear Annie: I read the
letter from “Unwilling,” who
didn’t want to bring
an appetizer to a
friend’s party.
I don’t know
what the big prob-
lem is. Throwing a
party may be fun,
but it’s a lot of hard
work. Why can’t
the host ask a cou-
ple of good friends
to bring something?
I always offer.
Usually, I am flat-
tered to be asked,
because it means they enjoy
my cooking and trust that I
will bring something awe-
some.
Don’t get me wrong. I
don’t think she should feel
obligated to bring an item
to a party. Her reaction just
seemed a tad extreme. --
Gracious Guest in N.C.
Dear Guest: Some peo-
ple perceive the role of host
as the person who sends the
invitations, while the guests
are expected to pay for the
actual event by supplying the
food, etc. This may be fine
when it is an informal gath-
ering among friends, and a
good friend should not be
offended when asked to bring
something. However, if you
are issuing a formal invita-
tion to a major event, the host
pays. Period. If you cannot
afford a fancy bash, you have
a more modest one.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 10, 2011
Two endeavors that thus far have
proven to be totally unproductive
might be revitalized in the coming
months. You’ve been closer to
success in the past than you may
have realized, and this time around,
you’ll know what to do.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Although your inclination may
be urging you to waste your time
playing hooky, get a grip on yourself
and pay attention to neglected chores
that are your responsibility.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
you’re not careful, without realizing
it you could easily begin to impose
your will upon your companions.
Needless to say, if you do, you won’t
be very popular.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Striving for lofty goals is admirable,
but unless you choose realistic aims,
they might not be that easy to achieve.
If that’s the case, don’t start blaming
others for your poor choices.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Associates will be unreceptive to
your suggestions if in the past you
have been close-minded to theirs. At
the very least, be willing to listen and
consider what they have to say.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Constant vigilance is essential
if you are responsible for a project
that could affect the welfare of others.
Don’t take lightly your commitment
to oversee it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- It’s a time for building bridges,
not barriers. For the sake of harmony
and progress, you and your mate
shouldn’t be butting heads, but
putting them together for a common
cause.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- With your physical and mental
energies both in high gear, you could
have difficulty distinguishing the
differences between assertiveness
and mere aggressiveness. Take care.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Instead of associating with a clique
that is made up of certain people who
make you feel uncomfortable, you
should find companions who have
pleasant ways to spend their time.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
If you want others to be supportive
of your interests, you must be there
for them when they need you. Make
some time to help an associate who
could use a little assistance.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Being in a talkative mood could have
you telling others about things you
might otherwise keep to yourself.
Don’t let something slip out that you
need to keep under tight wraps.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
When you find yourself in a spending
mood, your material desires can be
very pronounced, which could be the
case at his juncture. Be very careful
about going off on a wild spree.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
You’re more easily influenced than
you may realize, so take care that
you’re not unduly swayed by others
to waste your time. Set some goals
and go after them.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
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Tuesday, August 9, 2011 The Herald – 9
Tomorrow’s
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Teens resent
new stepmom
Dear Annie: My son is
being emotionally tortured
by his teenage daughters.
He has been divorced from
their mother for years, but
has always been there for his
kids. He’s never missed a
support payment and shares
responsibility for them.
Now the 17-year-old is ter-
rorizing him. My son recently
remarried, and the girl hates
his wife, who happens to be
a very nice young woman.
The teenager also
encourages her
younger sister to
do the same. It got
so bad that his new
wife had to tell my
granddaughter that
she was no longer
welcome in their
home. All this
nasty behavior is
being encouraged
by the ex-wife.
How can I help?
I’m a grandparent
trapped in the middle. I don’t
want to lose my granddaugh-
ter by taking my son’s side in
front of her, but I can hardly
sit back and see him hurt
over and over by her awful
behavior. I love her and her
sister, too. What should I do?
-- Lost in Frustration
Dear Lost: It is not uncom-
mon for children of divorced
parents to wish their parents
would get back together.
When your son remarried, it
interfered with your grand-
daughter’s fantasy world, and
she is punishing him, hoping
to break up his marriage and
put things back the way they
were. Unfortunately, the more
likely scenario is that she will
create a long-term estrange-
ment from her father.
Urge your son to get coun-
seling for both his children to
help them deal with their hos-
tility and remaining problems
with the divorce. If they are
too difficult to have around
the new wife, Dad should
visit them outside his home.
He should not stop seeing
them regardless of their hor-
rific behavior, since that will
only exacerbate their anger
and sense of abandonment.
As the grandmother, please
stay close to those girls, and
help them mature into under-
standing and tolerant adults.
Dear Annie: Please tell
me how to handle this. Last
year, we gave our son a big
graduation party and invited
lots of friends and tons of
relatives. Of all the family
members, including aunts and
cousins, only two showed up.
Yet when another nephew
had a graduation party two
weeks later, all of these same
relatives were there. Do these
people not realize the hurt
feelings this causes?
We have now been invited
to a delayed graduation party
for a niece whose parents did
not bother to come to our
event. Frankly, we don’t feel
like attending.
This kind of slight has hap-
pened before with these fam-
ily members, but we attended
their events anyway out of
obligation. We felt resentful
and still do. If we decide not
to attend this party, how do
I respond when asked why I
wasn’t there? -- Nebraska
Dear Nebraska: You
smile politely and say, “Sorry,
we had other plans.” No other
explanation is necessary.
Dear Annie: I read the
letter from “Unwilling,” who
didn’t want to bring
an appetizer to a
friend’s party.
I don’t know
what the big prob-
lem is. Throwing a
party may be fun,
but it’s a lot of hard
work. Why can’t
the host ask a cou-
ple of good friends
to bring something?
I always offer.
Usually, I am flat-
tered to be asked,
because it means they enjoy
my cooking and trust that I
will bring something awe-
some.
Don’t get me wrong. I
don’t think she should feel
obligated to bring an item
to a party. Her reaction just
seemed a tad extreme. --
Gracious Guest in N.C.
Dear Guest: Some peo-
ple perceive the role of host
as the person who sends the
invitations, while the guests
are expected to pay for the
actual event by supplying the
food, etc. This may be fine
when it is an informal gath-
ering among friends, and a
good friend should not be
offended when asked to bring
something. However, if you
are issuing a formal invita-
tion to a major event, the host
pays. Period. If you cannot
afford a fancy bash, you have
a more modest one.
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column.
Annie’s Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 10, 2011
Two endeavors that thus far have
proven to be totally unproductive
might be revitalized in the coming
months. You’ve been closer to
success in the past than you may
have realized, and this time around,
you’ll know what to do.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) --
Although your inclination may
be urging you to waste your time
playing hooky, get a grip on yourself
and pay attention to neglected chores
that are your responsibility.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If
you’re not careful, without realizing
it you could easily begin to impose
your will upon your companions.
Needless to say, if you do, you won’t
be very popular.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) --
Striving for lofty goals is admirable,
but unless you choose realistic aims,
they might not be that easy to achieve.
If that’s the case, don’t start blaming
others for your poor choices.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
-- Associates will be unreceptive to
your suggestions if in the past you
have been close-minded to theirs. At
the very least, be willing to listen and
consider what they have to say.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Constant vigilance is essential
if you are responsible for a project
that could affect the welfare of others.
Don’t take lightly your commitment
to oversee it.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19) -- It’s a time for building bridges,
not barriers. For the sake of harmony
and progress, you and your mate
shouldn’t be butting heads, but
putting them together for a common
cause.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- With your physical and mental
energies both in high gear, you could
have difficulty distinguishing the
differences between assertiveness
and mere aggressiveness. Take care.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Instead of associating with a clique
that is made up of certain people who
make you feel uncomfortable, you
should find companions who have
pleasant ways to spend their time.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) --
If you want others to be supportive
of your interests, you must be there
for them when they need you. Make
some time to help an associate who
could use a little assistance.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
Being in a talkative mood could have
you telling others about things you
might otherwise keep to yourself.
Don’t let something slip out that you
need to keep under tight wraps.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) --
When you find yourself in a spending
mood, your material desires can be
very pronounced, which could be the
case at his juncture. Be very careful
about going off on a wild spree.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
You’re more easily influenced than
you may realize, so take care that
you’re not unduly swayed by others
to waste your time. Set some goals
and go after them.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
10 – The Herald Tuesday, August 9, 2011
www.delphosherald.com
Answers to Monday’s questions:
To produce an average-sized paperback, a wood
block approximately the size of the book is used.
In the average bag of M&Ms, 30 percent are
brown.
Today’s questions:
What key ingredient in crayons causes that wonder-
fully delicious smell when you open the box?
Who held the first American patent?
Answers in Wednesday’s Herald.
Today’s words:
Geromorphism: condition of appearing older than
one is
Vintry: a place where wine is sold or stored
UK PM recalls Parliament for London riot crisis
By DANICA KIRKA
and JILL LAWLESS
The Associated Press
LONDON — British Prime Minister David
Cameron recalled Parliament from its summer
recess today and nearly tripled the number of
police on the streets of London to deal with the
crisis touched off by three days of rioting.
Cameron described the scenes of burning
buildings and smashed windows in London
and several other British cities as “sickening,”
but refrained from more extreme measures
such as calling in the military to help belea-
guered police restore order.
Instead, he said 16,000 officers would be on
the streets of the capital tonight, almost tripling
the number on the streets Monday night. The
riots also claimed their first death — a 26 year
old found shot dead in a car.
“People should be in no doubt that we will
do everything necessary to restore order to
Britain’s streets and to make them safe for
the law-abiding,” Cameron told reporters after
rushing home from an Italian vacation to chair
a crisis meeting at his Downing Street office.
A wave of violence and looting raged across
London, as authorities struggled to contain the
country’s worst unrest since race riots set the
capital ablaze in the 1980s. Some 525 arrests
have been made.
Parliament will return to duty on Thursday,
as the political fallout from the rampage takes
hold. The crisis is a major test for Cameron’s
Conservative-led coalition government, which
includes Liberal Democrats who had long sus-
pected its program of harsh budget restraints
could provoke popular dissent.
In London, groups of young people ram-
paged for a third straight night, setting build-
ings, vehicles and garbage dumps alight, looting
stores and pelting police officers with bottles
and fireworks into early today. The spreading
disorder was an unwelcome warning of the
possibility of violence during London’s 2012
Summer Olympics, less than a year away.
England’s soccer match Wednesday against
the Netherlands in London’s Wembley sta-
dium was canceled to free up police officers
for riot duty.
Police on Monday called in hundreds of
reinforcements and volunteer police officers—
and deployed armored vehicles in some of
the worst-hit districts — but still struggled to
keep pace with the chaos unfolding at flash-
points across London, in the central city of
Birmingham, the western city of Bristol and
the northwestern city of Liverpool.
“The violence we have seen is simply inex-
cusable. Ordinary people have had their lives
turned upside down by this mindless thug-
gery,” police commander Christine Jones said.
London’s police said 14 people were injured,
including a man in his 60s with life-threatening
injuries. It was unclear if the man who died had
been among them.
The rioters appeared to have little unifying
cause — though some claimed to oppose sharp
government spending cuts, which will slash
welfare payments and cut tens of thousands of
public sector jobs through 2015.
But many were attracted simply by the
opportunity for violence. “Come join the fun!”
shouted one youth in the east London suburb
of Hackney, where shops were attacked and
cars torched.
Rioters were left virtually unchallenged
in several neighborhoods and able to plunder
from stores at will or attempt to invade homes.
Restaurants and stores fearful of looting closed
early across London.
The human cost was withering. Graham
Reeves, 52, stood dumbstruck in front of the
smoldering ruins of his family department
store, the House of Reeves on Croydon in
south London. The store is a local landmark
run by the Reeves family for decades — and
his 80-year old father was hysterical when he
heard the news.
“No one’s stolen anything,” Graham Reeves
said. “They just burnt it down.”
Disorder flared throughout the night, from
gritty suburbs along the capital’s fringes to cen-
tral London’s posh Notting Hill neighborhood.
Police said all London police holding cells
were full and prisoners were being taken to
surrounding communities. At least 100 have
been charged, including an 11-year old.
Police were also monitoring Twitter, and
warned that those who posted messages incit-
ing the violence could face arrest.
Three people were arrested on suspicion
of attempted murder after a police officer was
struck by a car in north London early today.
About 44 police officers have been injured in
the violence.
After dawn today, the unrest appeared to
calm, either quelled by police or fading as riot-
ers drifted away.
The images of London’s violence recalled
those in France in 2005, when hooded and
masked youths fought police in three weeks of
raging overnight battles in suburban housing
projects that became a challenge to the French
state.
Mass deployments of police eventually sub-
dued the rioters, but tensions between police
and youth in the projects continue today, with
periodic eruptions of clashes between youths
with Molotov cocktails and police with tear
gas. French police say between 30 and 50 cars
are set on fire during an average week. On the
most fiery night of the 2005 riots, more than
1,400 cars went up in flames..
Criminals hide behind fash mobs
Recall elections to determine
Wisconsin Senate control
Ex-cop cleared of rape going to jail
Zoo to fnish elephant sperm bank
By ERIC TUCKER and THOMAS WATKINS
Associated Press
The July 4 fireworks display in the Cleveland suburb of
Shaker Heights was anything but a family affair.
As many as 1,000 teenagers, mobilized through social net-
working sites, turned out and soon started fighting and disrupt-
ing the event.
Thanks to websites like Twitter and Facebook, more and
more so-called flash mobs are materializing across the globe,
leaving police scrambling to keep tabs on the spontaneous
assemblies.
“They’re gathering with an intent behind it — not just to
enjoy the event,” Shaker Heights Police Chief D. Scott Lee
said. “All too often, some of the intent is malicious.”
Flash mobs started off in 2003 as peaceful and often humor-
ous acts of public performance, such as mass dance routines
or street pillow fights. But in recent years, the term has taken
a darker twist as criminals exploit the anonymity of crowds,
using social networking to coordinate everything from robber-
ies to fights to general chaos.
In London, recent rioting and looting has been blamed in
part on groups of youths using Twitter, mobile phone text mes-
sages and instant messaging on BlackBerry to organize and
keep a step ahead of police.
And Sunday in Philadelphia, Mayor Michael Nutter con-
demned the behavior of teenagers involved in flash mobs that
have left several people injured in recent weeks.
A Philadelphia man was assaulted by a group of about 30
people who were believed to have gotten together through
Twitter. In 2009, crowds swelled along the trendy South Street
shopping district and assaulted several people.
Dubbed “flash mob robberies,” thefts are bedeviling both
police and retailers, who say some of the heists were orchestrated
or at least boasted about afterward on social networking sites.
In recognition of the problem, the National Retail Federation
issued a report last week recommending steps stores can take
to ward off the robberies. There have even been legislative
efforts to criminalize flash mobs.
The Cleveland City Council passed a bill to make it illegal
to use social media to organize a violent and disorderly flash
mob, though the mayor vetoed the measure after the ACLU of
Ohio promised it would be unconstitutional. The bill was at least
partly inspired by the Shaker Heights disturbances on July 4.
And in April, a man was shot when hundreds of rival
gang members congregated along the Los Angeles seafront in
Venice, sparking pandemonium as people scattered for cover.
The group had gathered after some of them posted on Twitter
and police were still strategizing their response to the huge
crowd when shots rang out.
Los Angeles police Capt. Jon Peters said law enforcement’s
challenge is to try to sift the ocean of tweets and Facebook
updates for signs of trouble.
“We need to be able to get better on the intelligence side to
pick up on communications that are going on,” he said.
Gillison, the deputy mayor from Philadelphia, said the
police department there has reached out to younger commu-
nity members and friended some of them on Facebook. This
enables officers to monitor the traffic that could generate flash
mobs and some have been prevented, he said.
In April, about 20 teenagers entered G-Star Raw, a high-end
men’s clothing store in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of the
District of Columbia, and stole about $20,000 worth of mer-
chandise despite employees’ efforts to grab the apparel back,
store manager Greg Lennon said. D.C. police have investigated
leads but have not made arrests in the case.
By SCOTT BAUER
Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin Democrats, fueled by
millions of dollars in spending by national unions and other
outside groups, are hoping to wrest control of the state Senate
away from Republicans through six recall elections today that
stemmed from anger over Gov. Scott Walker’s collective bar-
gaining proposal.
The races targeting incumbent Republicans morphed into
a high-stakes political fight with national implications as tens
of millions of dollars poured into the state, breaking spending
records in the unprecedented recalls.
Until this year, there were only 20 attempts nationally since
1913 to recall lawmakers from office, just 13 of them success-
ful.
Besides the six Republicans on today’s ballot, two
Democratic incumbents face recalls next week. A third
Democrat survived a recall attempt last month.
Republicans hold a 19-14 advantage in the Senate, so
Democrats need to win five of the eight elections to take con-
trol.
If Republicans lose three or four seats, the balance of power
in the Senate will rest on the outcome of the two Democratic
races next week. Those races target Sens. Bob Wirch of
Pleasant Prairie and Jim Holperin of Conover.
The stakes were clearly much larger than simply determin-
ing who has control of the state Senate. The elections figured
to help determine whether the Republican revolution led by
Walker will get a shot in the arm or a major setback. Both par-
ties also were testing messaging ahead of the 2012 presidential
race, in which Wisconsin could be an important swing state.
Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus
said it was “all in” to win the races, while a coalition of
national unions spent millions on attack ads and other cam-
paign activity to take seats from the Republicans. Conservative
groups also spent millions.
It all amounted to a summer unlike any other in Wisconsin,
with the unprecedented recalls the largest unified effort to kick
incumbents out of office in history. More than $31 million was
estimated to have been spent on the nine recall elections, rival-
ing the $37 million spent on last year’s governor’s race.
By JENNIFER PELTZ
Associated Press
NEW YORK — Officially, the yearlong jail term a former
police officer got Monday was simply for keeping dispatchers
and bosses in the dark as he returned three times to a drunken
woman’s apartment after helping her get home.
But latent in the tense courtroom were the more serious
charges of which Kenneth Moreno had been cleared — allega-
tions that he raped the semiconscious woman.
With his accuser and about a score of women’s advocates
looking on in a tense courtroom, a prosecutor said the “implau-
sibility” of Moreno’s account of his December 2008 encounter
with the woman “cries out for a strong judicial response.”
Moreno’s lawyer retorted that it seemed prosecutors “didn’t hear
the ‘not’ before the ‘guilty’ in this verdict.” And a judge decried
Moreno’s version of events as self-serving “lies.”
A grim-looking Moreno was led away after hearing his sen-
tence, though an appeals court agreed hours later to free him on
$125,000 bond during a planned appeal.
“There will be people who conclude in some way, I took
into consideration charges of which you were acquitted,” state
Supreme Court Justice Gregory Carro said before giving Moreno
half the maximum possible sentence. “That is not the case.”
Rather, he said, “there has to be an import to some of the lies
you told on the stand ... but also your position at the time you
committed these crimes. You were a police officer.”
Moreno, 43, and his former partner, Franklin Mata, 29, were
fired from the police department within hours of their official
misconduct convictions and acquittals on rape, burglary and
other charges in May.
Mata’s sentencing was postponed from Monday to Wednesday
because his lawyer was enmeshed in a trial elsewhere. He had
been accused of standing watch while Moreno was with the
woman, who had been out celebrating a job promotion.
The two met their accuser in December 2008 after a taxi
driver called for help getting her out of his cab. She told authori-
ties she passed out and awoke to being raped in her bed, saying
she acutely remembered being violated despite being unclear on
significant stretches of the night and early morning.
And she secretly recorded a conversation days later in which
Moreno alternately denied they had sex and said “yes” twice
when she asked whether he’d used a condom. Moreno told
jurors he was trying to mollify her.
The former officers acknowledged returning to her apartment
three times within four hours of the initial call, while saying they
were elsewhere — the genesis of their misconduct convictions.
Moreno admitted he even placed a phony 911 call about a sleep-
ing vagrant to provide a pretext for one of the visits.
“He risked having police resources expended for his own
devious and selfish purposes,” Assistant District Attorney
Coleen Balbert told the judge. “This was not just a stupid mis-
take.”
The officers said the woman had asked them to come back
and check on her, and Moreno said he felt impelled to give her
advice about drinking and to comfort her. He said that she made
advances and he ultimately ended up cuddling with the barely
dressed woman in her bed, but that they didn’t have sex. Mata
said he was sleeping on her sofa while the others were in the
bedroom.
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Zoo officials trying to establish
North America’s first elephant sperm bank have been slowed by
bureaucratic hurdles but hope South African officials will approve
shipping frozen elephant semen to the United States in about a
month.
Officials at the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium have had
difficulty getting export and import permits for 16 liters of semen
being stored in the National Zoo’s BioBank in Pretoria, South
Africa, the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (http://bit.ly/qS5twH)
reported Monday.
“It is taking longer than we hoped, but we knew when we
started that it had not been done before,” said Barbara Baker,
president and chief executive officer of the Pittsburgh zoo.
Scientists collected the samples last year as part of what’s
called Project Frozen Dumbo, a two-year international effort to
help preserve elephants and breed them in captivity without hav-
ing to ship animals from zoo to zoo.
The ZooParc de Beauval in France collected its semen samples
in 2009 and has already set up a sperm bank in Europe as part
of the international effort is being led by Thomas Hildebrandt,
head of reproduction at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife
Research in Berlin. Semen for the North American bank was col-
lected only last year, which is why the effort is lagging behind
Europe’s, Pittsburgh zoo spokeswoman Connie George said.
The initiative is especially important because the elephant
population in captivity in North America consists largely of ani-
mals past prime breeding age, which George said is from the late
teens through the 20s. Elephants can live into their 50s, though
that’s rare due to poaching and other issues, she said.
“The population of elephants in North America will be deplet-
ed in 40 years if we don’t bring in new bloodlines,” George said.
Leibniz scientist Frank Goeritz is working as a reproductive
consultant for the Pittsburgh Zoo and said the problem with get-
ting approval to ship the sperm is that it’s never been done here
before.
“The law and all these guidelines are different from country
to country,” Goeritz said. “The problem is there is no standard
protocol developed because it’s a groundbreaking project.”
Once South African scientists get approval to ship the semen,
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must OK bringing it into the
country, agency spokesman Bill Butcher said. The U.S. agency
must determine whether the material would promote the “propa-
gation or survival” of elephants.
By LARRY NEUMEISTER
Associated Press
NEW YORK — A hotel maid who accuses ex-Internation-
al Monetary Fund boss Dominique Strauss-Kahn of sexual
assault sued him Monday over what she calls a “violent and
sadistic” attack in an upscale suite that left her life “in sham-
bles.”
Lawyers for the maid, Guinean immigrant Nafissatou
Diallo, wrote in the lawsuit that Strauss-Kahn “intentionally,
brutally and violently sexually assaulted Ms. Diallo and in the
process humiliated, degraded, violated and robbed Ms. Diallo
of her dignity as a woman.”
The lawyers, Kenneth Thompson and Douglas Wigdor,
promised to tell a jury about other instances when Strauss-
Kahn sexually attacked women in hotel rooms and apartments,
coerced employees into complying with sexual demands or
accosted women with inappropriate sexual remarks and tried
to get them to perform sexual acts.
They said the lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages, would
“redress the violent and sadistic attack by defendant Strauss-
Kahn on Nafissatou Diallo when he sexually assaulted” her on
May 14 at the Sofitel hotel in midtown Manhattan.
The lawsuit says Strauss-Kahn injured Diallo’s shoulder,
bruised her vagina, tore her pantyhose and violently grabbed
the back of her head during the attack.
The lawsuit, filed in state court in the Bronx, accuses
Strauss-Kahn of acting like a common criminal afterward,
fleeing the hotel so quickly that he left behind traces of his
semen, along with bloody tissues.
“In his haste to flee the scene of a crime, he rushed out of
the hotel with toothpaste smeared on the outside of his mouth
and was looking over his shoulders,” the lawsuit says.
The attack has left Diallo physically and psychologically
harmed, with permanent damage done to her professional and
personal reputations along with severe mental anguish from
which she may never fully recover, the lawsuit says. She
suffers great emotional distress, humiliation, depression and
physical pain, and the experience has “left Ms. Diallo’s life
and her young daughter’s life in shambles,” it says.
Lawyers for Strauss-Kahn said the maid’s lawsuit has no
merit and their client will fight it vigorously.
“We have maintained from the beginning that the motiva-
tion of Mr. Thompson and his client was to make money,”
attorneys William W. Taylor and Benjamin Brafman said.
“The filing of this lawsuit ends any doubt on that question.”
The filing of a civil lawsuit so quickly after an arrest pro-
vides an avenue for lawyers to pursue evidence and interview
witnesses for a potential civil trial while memories are fresh.
Other high-profile defendants who’ve faced civil suits and
criminal charges at the same time include Los Angeles Lakers
basketball star Kobe Bryant and late pop music icon Michael
Jackson.
Veteran defense lawyer Gerald Shargel, who’s not involved
in the Strauss-Kahn case, said some lawyers delay filing a
civil lawsuit to deprive the defense in a criminal trial from
asking witnesses questions about the civil suit. But he added
that he has found that the majority of lawyers file civil suits in
sexual-assault cases before criminal trials.
“It may have some effect on the jury’s verdict, but it rarely
decides the outcome,” he said.
An Annapolis, Md., defense lawyer who specializes in
sexual abuse cases, Tom A. Pavlinic, said Diallo put her cred-
ibility at risk by bringing the civil lawsuit.
“She has done him a favor,” Pavlinic said. “Prosecutors,
in my experience, don’t like when complainants in criminal
cases initiate litigation in a civil case.”
The Manhattan district attorney’s office declined to com-
ment on the filing of the lawsuit.
Strauss-Kahn, widely seen as a potentially successful
French presidential candidate before his May 14 arrest, was
pulled off a plane and detained hours after Diallo reported
she was attacked. He has pleaded not guilty to charges of
attempted rape and other crimes. He and his lawyers have
called a series of interviews Diallo conducted in recent weeks
“an unseemly circus” designed to inflame public opinion.
Maid sues Strauss-Kahn over NYC hotel encounter

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