I

n his 1814 poem, “The Excursion,” William
Wordsworth wrote, “The good die first,
and they whose hearts are as dry as sum-
mer dust burn to the socket.” This line illus-
trates the harsh reality of a universe that often
allows good people to die young, while those
with hearts “as dry as summer” are sometimes
the ones who live longest. But what
Wordsworth didn’t anticipate when making
the claim that the best among us are the first
to pass away was Ted Krause.
Last Wednesday, August 3rd, Ted Krause
became a centenarian, celebrating his 100th
birthday amongst friends and family at the
Vineland YMCA. If you believe in
Wordsworth’s line from “The Excursion,”
Krause must be a cold-hearted, selfish, and
cantankerous individual, who has exhibited
longevity because of his ill-tempered nature.
In reality, that couldn’t be further from the
truth. In listening to those who know him
best, the consensus indicates that Krause is a
generous and benevolent man, whose constant
acts of selflessness have enriched every life
with which he has come in contact.
“Every endeavor has been blessed by
[Ted’s] presence and his contribution,” said
Rabbi Alfredo Winter, who practices at the
Beth Israel Congregation, where Krause has
VOLUME 4 | ISSUE 26 | AUGUST 10, 2011
CONNECT I NG YOU TO VI NEL AND. WEEKLY.
INSIDE: VINELAND’S 150TH CELEBRATION• UNITEDWAY’S25TH• CAKE CONTROVERSY • BRIDGETON’S FARMERS MARKET
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{ STORY AND COVER PHOTO BY RYAN DINGER }
Continued on page 20
Continued on page 9
Millville’s popular downtown car show—featuring antique
and classic cars—will be held for the 21st annual install-
ment this Saturday, August 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in
the Glasstown Arts District. High Street will be closed
from Main Street to Broad Street to accommodate the
hundreds of cars on display. The Greater Millville
Chamber of Commerce and the Garden State 50’s Auto
Club host the event. Major sponsors include: Bottinos
ShopRite of Millville, South Jersey Industries, and TD Bank.
21st Annual Car Show on High Street
Still working, still swimming at the Y every weekday, and still
faithful to his synagogue, Krause has no plans to slow down.
Ted Krause blows out the candles at his 100th birthday party held last Wednesday at
the YMCA, where he still swims laps five days a week.
Krause Reaches the
Century Mark
Plus: Read about Morris Sarnoff,
car collector, on page 8.
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MIKE EPIFANIO Editor & Publisher
DEBORAH A. EIN Managing Editor
LORI GOUDIE Art Director
GAIL EPIFANIO Controller
SHERRY MUNYAN Advertising Executive
MARIE HALPIN-GALLO Advertising Executive
TRACY BUSCHAM Graphic Designer
RYAN DINGER Editorial/Sales Assistant
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave. Vineland, NJ 08361
PHONE: 856-457-7815 • FAX: 856-457-7816
EMAIL: letters@grapevinenewspaper.com
WEB: www.grapevinenewspaper.com
The Grapevine is published on Wednesdays by
Grapevine News Corp. Copyright © 2011. All
rights reserved.
I
Letters to the Editor
Animal Shelter and Its Plea
From time to time, the Cumberland County
SPCA (CCSPCA) issues press releases
regarding their hardships and asking the
public to contribute either monetarily or
with goods and services. Today, I read in
The Grapevine that they issued “A Plea
from Cumberland County SPCA” press
release regarding the food shortage for
their animals.
They allegedly have a food shortage at
the shelter and for “whatever reason,” they
are dealing with an increase in the num-
bers of intakes (animal admissions).
One of the reasons might be that the
management of this facility sees fit to keep
seeking more and more municipal shelter
contracts, many of which are out of the
county municipalities such as in Salem and
Camden counties. This is putting a burden
on the already overcrowded facility.
The average person might ask, why
would a shelter that can barely handle the
animal intakes fromjust two of their largest
Cumberland municipal contracts—Millville
and Vineland (Vineland alone spends
$100Ka year of your tax dollars towards the
shelter)—seek out-of-county shelter con-
tracts? Answer: It’s all about the $$$! It was
a well known fact during my tenure as a for-
mer CCSPCA trustee that their largest prof-
it margin was in animal intake and euthana-
sia (a nice euphemismfor killing). There is
little to no money to be made in the adop-
tion side of the shelter business.
This leads me to the next issue—why did
the national SPCA, in general, deviate from
the original mission of Henry Bergh,
founder of the first SPCA in 1866? His mis-
sion was to focus on cruelty prevention
only. When he died, the organization made
a radical change and discovered that a prof-
itable trade could be made by going into the
shelter business. Here we are in the 21st
century now. Do you think Mr. Bergh would
be proud to see the organization he founded
has turned into a legalized killing business?
The CCSPCAneeds to get out of the
shelter business and stick to doing what they
always did best, cruelty prevention. Henry
Bergh would most certainly agree with me.
—Lewis Vinci, Buena Vista Twp.
Editor’s Note: The following letter was sub-
mitted prior to last Thursday’s announcement
that Mayor Robert Romano had canceled
the contract to have reality TV baker “Cake
Boss,” create the city’s 150th birthday cake. for
the perspective of the local bakeries, see p. 17.
Vineland’s Cake Controversy
I was perplexed and admittedly annoyed
when I learned that the “Cake Boss” was
creating the city’s cake for the 150th anniver-
sary celebration of Vineland on Saturday,
July 30, 2011. Why would the anniversary’s
Blue Ribbon Committee choose an estab-
lishment without a viable connection to
the city of Vineland? This puzzling deci-
sion can be a simple lesson in economics
and educating the local consumer.
Shopping local helps keep businesses
open and brings in sales tax revenue that
pays for local services. Commissioning a
cake from a talented entertainment baker
who lives in the northern part of New
Jersey is not supporting the economic base
of the community of Vineland. Simply put,
it is fiscally irresponsible (regardless of a
business donation) that a city leader and
planning committee do not understand the
important economic benefit of supporting
local businesses. Isn’t the celebration about
the proud past and promising future of
Vineland? I don’t believe the basis of the
celebration is about a celebratory baker
located on the other side of the state.
How does an independently owned
business such as a bakery in Vineland
thrive? It is by living in Vineland, working
in Vineland, getting to know their cus-
tomer base and providing good value for a
fair return. The local bakeries of Crust &
Krumbs, Jim Main’s, San Paola and Sweet
Life are invested in the community of
Vineland. These bakeries support many
non-profit organizations and are part of
the local businesses that make the commu-
nity of Vineland a home.
The Blue Ribbon Planners of Vineland’s
150th Anniversary celebration should have
thought local first as your local, independ-
ently owned bakeries are invested in
Vineland’s future and could have easily
provided a cake worthy of Vineland’s past
and promising future!
—Jennifer Klotz, Buena Vista
Band-Aides Thank Alumni
My thanks to everyone who participated in
the Vineland High School Marching and
Alumni Concert and Parade on Sunday. It
was a memorable and exhilarating experi-
ence. Some traveled long distances to per-
form with people who they didn't know,
but shared a common bond in the band tra-
dition. Some started picking up instru-
ments they hadn't touched in years, with
some regret that so many years had gone by
without music in their lives. That also
includes color guard, who quickly put
together a routine for the parade. It was
also a time to honor the memory of those
who started the band in 1931. I am sure that
they would be proud of the fact that the
band continues on 80 years later. Those
who participated in the band in any way,
are invited to join the alumni band and the
Band-Aides, who provide financial and
practical assistance to the band in parades
and other performances. Just hearing the
sound of the cadence will bring back mem-
ories and allow you to participate in some
way again. Contact us by visiting www.vhs-
marchingband.org or by calling 856-794-
6800 x2539. It really is never too late!
—Warren L. Crescenzo,
Band-Aides Publicity, Vineland
1 Krause Reaches
Century Mark
The centenarian attributes his
longevity, in part, to a daily swim
at the Y. RYAN DINGER
3,7,14 Faces in the News
4 News in Brief
8 A Man and His Cars
Morris Sarnoff has had several
classic cars over the years—and
stories surrounding each one.
MICKEY BRANDT
10 Party’s Not Over
Vineland’s 150th year has more
fun events to come.
VINCE FARINACCIO
13 Fifty-Year Leaps
Vineland’s Sesquicentennial is a
cause for reflection. TODD NOON
16 Crossword
17 DINING: Cake Controversy
Will the real Cake Boss please
stand up? STEPHEN WILSON
19 Food for Thought
Tomatoes are in season—here’s
what to do with them.
JEAN HECKER
20 Travel Bug 2
More family trips are outlined,
with comments from the kids.
DEBORAH A. EIN
21-23 HOME AND GARDEN
24 Community Calendar
26 Entertainment
27 CLASSIFIEDS
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Faces in the News I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
Birthday Wishes
Happy Birthday to our grandsons
Caden (top), who turns 9 on August
21, and Jace (above), who turns 7 on
August 14. The “boys”–the best!
Love Always,
Mom Mom and Pop
xoxoxoxoxoxoxoxo
Wedding Announcement
On April 21, 2011, Lori Ann Martini,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank S.
Martini, Sr., married Brian Robert
Collini, son of Mr. and Mrs. Enrico G.
Collini, Jr. during a ceremony held at
The Inn at Leola Village in Leola,
Pennsylvania. The ceremony was con-
ducted by Reverend Chick Blair. The
couple honeymooned in Hawaii.
72nd Wedding
Anniversary
To our beloved parents,
Joe and Dorothy Morgan,
who celebrate 72 years of marriage
on August 12. Your family thanks you
for your devoted love and all the sacri-
fices you endured for our happiness.
We dearly love you!
Your children, Joann Messick, Linda
Morgan, Herb Morgan and wife
Christine; your nine grandchildren, and
16 great-grandchildren.
God bless you always.
Dorothy and Joe Morgan, dancing at their
50th anniversary celebration 22 years ago.
Soloway a "Top Doctor"
Rheumatologist Dr. Stephen Soloway
has been named one of the nation's
top doctors by U.S. News & World
Report. Soloway treats more than
15,000 patients annually at his
Vineland practice, where he provides
arthritis and osteoporosis treatment, as
well as sports and occupational medi-
cine, for which he runs osteoporosis,
knee and back pain clinics. He is board
certified in Internal Medicine and
Rheumatology and has specialized cer-
tificates in Osteoporosis.
Grapevine 1-7 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:09 PM Page 3
enough supplies to help schools continual-
ly provide students with the necessary edu-
cational tools beyond just the beginning of
the school year.
Any individual or business wishing to
participate in the campaign may drop off
new book bags and school supplies (pen-
cils, paper, notebooks, calculators, crayons,
markers,etc.) at one of these locations:
• Cumberland County: Big Brothers Big
Sisters 1944 E. Landis Ave., Vineland
• Sweetpea’s Children’s Shoppe 2757 S.
Main Rd., Vineland
• Salem County: Farmers Mutual Fire
Insurance Company of Salem County 125
West Broadway, Salem
For more information: 856-692-0916.
Solar Energy Array at Boscov’s
Construction began recently in Vineland
on a $4 million, 962 kilowatt solar array
that will span the roof of one of the nation’s
last family-owned department stores, an
official with Danza Energy Group said.
“This will be a great money-saver for
Boscov’s at Cumberland Mall,” said A.J.
Danza, CEO of The Danza Group.
“Boscov’s is thinking forward, and this
installation is a testament to the manage-
ment of the company.”
“In all,” Danza said, “the solar array will
cover about 100,000 square feet on the roof
of the Boscov’s building.”
But there’s a lot of energy packed into
that square footage, said Paul Jeun, co-
founder of IPP solar. “The average home
uses about 5 kilowatts of energy per year,”
he said. “This array is rated at more than
900 kilowatts – or enough to power about
190 homes for a year.”
Vineland Mayor Robert Romano said:
“We’re the only municipality in New Jersey
that generates electricity, and Vineland is a
huge supporter of solar power. We’re a go-
green city.”
ALGAR Ferrari at NJMP
New Jersey Motorsports Park and
ALGAR Ferrari, the factory authorized
Ferrari and Maserati dealership in
Philadelphia, have entered into an agree-
ment that will result in ALGAR operating a
trackside facility inside garage space at
Thunderbolt Raceway at the Motorsports
Park. ALGAR Ferrari will commence oper-
ations immediately, and will use the facility
to better serve the needs of their clients
seeking to enjoy their Ferrari and Maserati
vehicles on the racetrack.
Capital Bank Sees Record Profit
During the first six months of 2011
Capital Bank’s assets grew by $18.1 million,
or 8.9 percent, and totaled $221.2 million at
June 30, 2011. As of that date, the bank
reported no non-accrual loans and no loans
30 or more days delinquent on payments.
Dominic J. Romano, Chairman of the
Board, commented, “Our growth and net
income, together with our strong capital
ratios and asset quality, are very gratifying
in this uncertain economic climate.”
Hiring at Capital Bank continued during
the first six months of 2011, including two
summer interns from the Richard Stockton
College of New Jersey, bringing the total
number of employees to 56.
Capital Bank also announced that
BauerFinancial recently reiterated its 5-
Star “Superior” rating of Capital Bank,
which is the firm’s highest possible rating.
BauerFinancial (www.BauerFinancial.com)
is a nationwide, independent bank rating
company. The 5-Star award recognizes
Capital Bank’s superior performance and
financial strength.
Capital Bank opened for business in
2007. It operates two locations in Vineland
and also has branches in Woodbury
Heights and Hammonton. It lends to peo-
ple and businesses throughout southern
New Jersey.
Book Bag Campaign Launched
NJ-Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Cumberland & Salem Counties has
launched its annual Book Bag Campaign in
preparation for the 2011-2012 school year.
The organization served over 400 children
in one-to-one mentoring relationships last
year in community and school based pro-
grams. Because of the success of last year’s
Book Bag Campaign, the agency was able to
provide many of those children with brand
new book bags and school supplies. A
major focus of the campaign is to collect
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Sweet Tooth in Vineland and face-painting.
Eligible attendees also have the opportuni-
ty to sign up for the low- or no-cost health
insurance program NJ FamilyCare. As a
special guest, the Consul of Mexico, Carlos
Giralt, will attend an open house at 11 a.m.
on Thursday, August 11 at CompleteCare
Pediatric & Family Medical Professionals at
265 Irving Avenue in Bridgeton. A final
community health fair will take place on
Friday, August 12, at the Bridgeton
Farmer’s Market from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The theme of this year’s NHCWis
“Celebrating America’s Health Centers:
Serving Locally, Leading Nationally,” to
underscore howhealth centers deliver a
unique approach that targets health needs
and saves taxpayer dollars. They are part-
nerships of people, governments and com-
munities working to meet the unique and
diverse health conditions of the community.
One of the bright spots in America’s
health care system, health centers provide
a health care home to over 23 million peo-
ple at 8,000 sites nationwide. Health cen-
ters are on track to expand care to 40 mil-
lion people over the next five years.
“Every day in our waiting rooms I wit-
ness the value of having a health care
home,” said Gwendolyn Gould, chairperson
of CompleteCare’s Board of Directors.
“When people have a place to go for regu-
lar care, they use it and stay healthier. We
provide a range of services onsite—primary
care, pediatrics, cardiology, podiatry,
OB/GYN, optometry, gastroenterology,
infectious disease care, geriatric care, den-
tistry and even mental health services. Our
patients not only get the care they need
under one roof, but they are treated as indi-
viduals, with dignity and respect. This is
what health care should be, and what we
celebrate this week.”
Now more than ever, public support is
needed for health centers as Congress
attempts to reduce the budget deficit with
spending cuts to the program and changes
to Medicaid that could further reduce
access to preventive care for millions. To
find out more, visit www.nachc.org or
www.healthcenterweek.org. I
Visit www.completecare.org to schedule your appointment
Visit Any
CompleteCare location
for our Back-to-School
Health Package!
Please bring immunization records, medications
and any other relevant health information to
ensure the highest quality standard of care.
Immunizations
Back-to-School and Sport
Physicals
All insurance accepted
including NJ Family Care. If
your child is not insured our
Financial Counselors will
enroll them on-site.
Schedule your check-up today!
856-451-4700 or 609-465-0258
Locations in Cumberland, Gloucester,
and Cape May Counties
Bring this ad to your appointment
and receive your free gift card!
(limited one per family)
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ALGAR Ferrari initially plans to offer
clients a comprehensive package of track
related services, including trackside stor-
age and transportation of vehicles between
their Rosemont, Pennsylvania, location and
the new garage space at NJMP. With its
permanent workspace at NJMP, ALGAR
will now be able to facilitate an arrive-and-
drive service for clients who prefer not to
transport their own vehicles and equip-
ment to the racetrack.
Business Recruitment Survey
What kinds of businesses do you want
for downtown Vineland? Main Street
Vineland is seeking public input on this
through a short online survey.
“In making downtown Vineland a desti-
nation for food, entertainment, culture, and
shopping, we want to bring to our down-
town the kinds of businesses that will
attract people and give people the choices
they are looking for,” said Main Street
Executive Director Todd Noon. “The
three-question survey will only take a cou-
ple of minutes and the input will greatly
help our business recruitment efforts.”
The survey can be accessed online at
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/ZSVX5J
9. It will also be accessible through Main
Street Vineland’s website. For more infor-
mation on Main Street Vineland activities,
call 856-794-8653, visit www.main-
streetvineland.org, or visit on Facebook.
Credit Union Opens New Office
Members 1st of NJ FCU opened a full
service branch located at 9 N. main St.,
Woodstown, on August 2. The credit union
now serves employees and family members
of the Cumberland County and Salem
County Boards of Education, as well as 60
other company groups in the Cumberland/
Salem County area.
Members 1st of NJ FCU has three loca-
tions—the main office and operations cen-
ter Vineland, a branch in Bridgeton/Upper
Deerfield, and now, a full-service branch in
Woodstown. The credit union is a member-
owned financial institution dedicated to
providing its members with products and
services to satisfy their financial goals. The
credit union was federally chartered in
1938 as Cumberland County Teachers FCU.
Health Fairs Planned This Week
CompleteCare Health Network is mark-
ing National Health Center Week 2011
(NHCW) with a series of health fairs as
part of a weeklong campaign (August 7-13)
to raise awareness about the mission and
accomplishments of America’s Health
Centers as local solutions.
The week kicked off with Children’s
Health Day on Tuesday, an annual event
sponsored by Senator Robert Menendez
that provides free dental and vision screen-
ings and immunizations to children.
The health fairs include screenings for
high blood pressure and dental conditions
as well as free water ice provided by The
Grapevine 1-7 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:09 PM Page 5
Shop Locally &Save $$$
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East Vineland:
Senior League
Section 4
Champs
East Vineland Senior
League All-Stars won
Section 4 on July 25,
defeating Hammonton
10-3. The team is competing in the New Jersey Senior League states competition at North
Cumberland Little League Complex. They are, from left: Coach John Malatesta, Jimmy
Ianni, Tommy Rodriguez, Jimmy Hague, Mark Rowan, Andrew Gee, Jeff Rowan, Justin Geri,
Jesse Edelstein, Jared Corneill, Mike Forte, Chris Capriotti, Charles Mistretta, Don Money,
Jared Walters, Johnny Malatesta, Manager Don Money (missing Coach Steve Brooks).
Gamecocks:
Tri-State Elite
Champs
The Vineland
Gamecocks won the
summer Tri-State
Elite League baseball
championship on July
24. The Gamecocks
defeated the 3rd seed
South Jersey Bulldogs
16U 8-5, 2nd seed
South Jersey Heat 5-0, and the top seed South Jersey Warriors 6-0in their three
games. In the Championship Game, Johnny Malatesta pitched seven scoreless
inning, Jimmy Hague went 2-for-3 with four RBIs and Jesse Edlestein went 3-for-4
with two RBIs. The team is comprised of players who attend Vineland High School.
Front row, from left: Nick Traverso, Johnny Malatesta, Mark Rowan, Jimmy Hague, Mike
Forte. Back row: Manager John Malatesta, Coach Steve Brooks, Tommy Rodriguez, Jeff
Rowan, Eddie Gutierrez, Mike Beltran, Charles Mistretta, Eric Stratotti, Jesse Edelstein,
Don Money, Coach Don Money.
Yi’s Karate Students at IMA U.S. Championships
Forty members of Yi’s Karate of Vineland competed at the 1st IMA United
States Championships on June 11 and came away with 24 First Place, 22 Second
Place, and 27 Third Place finishes.
Front row, from left: Dominick Forgen, Michael Hoban, Donald Patterson, Sydney Ball,
Ciara Mills, Mikey Cruz, Bobby Urbanelli, Joseph Nappa, Naomi Unverzagt, Caesar
Gonzales, Nicolas Law, Alex Brown. Middle row: Alexey Kulpin, Anthony Matos, Matt
Love, Tyler Broughton, Lily Unverzagt, Brooke Jablonski, Ashley Iveson, Matthew Wear,
Dimitri Raimonde, Tyler Love, Sebastian Figueroa, Alexander Matos. Back row: Mike
Lapsley, Merced DeHaro, Zach Warren, Joe Navarro, Adrian Palacio, Master C. Vertolli,
RJ Vertolli, Sam Llabres, Andy Rodriguez, David McCain.
Faces in the News
I
SEND US YOUR FACES. IT’S FREE!
Get your photos published in The Grapevine... birthdays, engagements, weddings,
anniversaries, births, graduations, awards. Send them to the address listed on p. 2.
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A Man and His Cars
{ STORY AND PHOTOS BY MICKEY BRANDT }
“I had the car in Ocean City…”
So begins one of the countless rambling,
detailed, and interesting stories 84-year-old
Morris Sarnoff tells of his life as an automo-
bile collector and apostle for the hobby. His
five Chryslers are old, rare, and in perfect
condition and he keeps themin a large, cus-
tom-built, memorabilia-filled, temperature-
controlled garage behind his Vineland home.
Unlike almost all other local collectors
and restorers of classic cars, Sarnoff owns
vehicles that are in their original condition
and have not been rebuilt or refashioned.
At one time, before he began selling some
of his then-11 treasures, his Chrysler collec-
tion was unrivaled in the region.
“I have the best collection of unrestored
cars anywhere; my cars are showroom new
and I’m proud of it,” he stated simply and
directly—the way he consistently talked
during this interview.
He bought his first car, a 1941 Chrysler
Cabriolet Windsor Highlander convertible,
on September 10, 1959. (Just as Sarnoff is
precise in his care of the cars, he’s precise
in his reminiscences). With minor tweaks,
the car remains as he bought it, complete
with its original license plate.
“You’ve heard of love at first sight? I fell
in love with this car,” he said last Saturday
as he displayed the Cabriolet at Vineland’s
150th anniversary car show.
The first time Sarnoff saw the car, the
owner wouldn’t sell. He kept seeing it
around town and kept making offers to its
several owners until it became his. He was
now a collector.
His second acquisition, which remains
the jewel of the lot, was a black 1950 Town
and Country “Woodie” (a portion of the
rear bodywork is constructed of wood).
Less than 700 of them came off the assem-
bly lines of the time and Sarnoff noted that
precisely 77 survive.
“I have one of only two black ones in the
country,” he said with characteristic pride.
“Nothing, with the exception of my wife,
Dodi, is as beautiful as natural wood and a
dark color.”
All he’s done to the car is put on new
tires, varnish the wood, and install new bat-
teries as needed. The Woodie has the origi-
nal jack and an oil change sticker from July
12, 1967. His 1972 nine-passenger station
wagon displays the dealer’s sticker, show-
ing Sarnoff’s purchase price of $7,352. It has
9,000 miles on it 39 years later.
Sarnoff, who is in excellent physical con-
dition and still works out lifting heavy
weights, takes one of his vehicles to about 12
car shows a year. He stays in the Delaware
Valley area. “You never knowwhen you’re
on the way, you might break down or some-
body might run into you,” he explained.
He’s been married to Dodi for 44 years;
they have three children and four grand-
kids. He’s apparently as much in love as
when they met at, of course, a car show. He
made his living as an entrepreneur (Sarno
Chemical), selling car cleaning products
that he manufactured to dealerships and
garages throughout southern New Jersey.
“People to this day tell me I made the
best white wall cleaner,” he said. He retired
in 1989.
What motivates Sarnoff to spend the
time, energy, and money to stay at the top
of his hobby even as he ages? Simple.
“I go in that garage every day and sit in
my chair and it makes the clock go back. I
just sit there for an hour. It might seem
crazy but I just look at them,” he said.
Then he starts another story. I
Sarnoff with the
jewel of his car
collection, a 1950
Chrysler Town and
Country Woodie.
BELOW: Sarnoff
with his 1941
Chrysler Cabriolet
convertible at
Vineland’s 150th
anniversary car
show. (In front is
an antique 1941
Chrysler Cabriolet
pedal car). Look
for Sarnoff at the
Millville Car Show
this weekend along
with his 1985
Chrysler LeBaron
convertible.
Morris Sarnoff has had several classic cars over the
years—and has many stories surrounding each one.
A Man and His Cars
{ STORY AND PHOTOS BY MICKEY BRANDT }
Grapevine 8-13 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:06 PM Page 8
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Car Show
Continued from cover
Larry & Ben’s “Cruisin’ the
Delsea Drive-In”
On Saturday, August 20, the Delsea
Drive-in Theater in Vineland will play
host to a classic car benefit/car cruise.
The event will feature its standard four
movies for the evening—the classic
Bullet and three current features. The
event will be open to muscle cars, street
rods, classics, rat rods and specialty
cars. The cruise will begin at 5 p.m. and
will have WVLT 92.1 DJ Pepper Paul
playing cruisin’ oldies music before the
feature presentations start at dusk.
Partial proceeds from food sales at
the concession stand will be donated
to the “Dare to Dream” Foundation.
The Delsea Drive-In cruise and movie
is hosted by Larry Lazareff and Ben
Notaro, in cooperation with the Delsea
Drive-in. The event is rain or shine.
Drive-in details may be obtained at
www.delseadrive-in.com. Participants
are reminded that all regular drive-in
fees and rules apply. Further informa-
tion at 856-297-5012.
Carole Plowman, who co-chairs the
event along with Dave Vanaman, noted,
“This year we are bringing back the
popular girl group the Angeltones.
They will perform top 40 oldies at the
Glasstown Plaza at High and Sassafras
streets. Quinn Broadcasting is present-
ing Johnny Petillo, singer, comedian,
actor and radio personality, who will
perform in front of the Quinn
Broadcasting building in the 400 block
of High Street throughout the day. And
of course, what would the car show be
without Corky’s Time Machine spinning
the oldies throughout the day.”
Many of the downtown shops, gal-
leries and restaurants will be open to
shoppers and browsers. Street activities
will include Cumberland County Martial
Arts Center performing at 1 p.m. at
High and Mulberry streets, and chil-
dren’s events at High and Vine streets.
Cars made before 1986 are eligible to
participate, as well as special interest
and modern collectibles of any age.
Dash plaques and T-shirts will be given
to the first 250 cars registered. Trophy
presentation will be at 2:45 p.m. at the
Glasstown Plaza. Judges will award over
50 trophies, including two Best of Show.
In case of rain, the show will be held
the following Saturday, August 20. For
car registration, call John at 856-825-
3047. Registration applications can
also be found at Plowman’s Windows
and Doors, 118 E. Vine St., Millville and
The Incredible Bulk, 101 N. High St.,
Millville. For event information, call Earl
Sherrick at 856-825-2600. I
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Vintage Vineland { BY VINCE FARINACCIO }
Party’s Not Over
The birthday candles may be extinguished but
Vineland’s 150th year has more fun events to come.
T
he parade may be over, the
birthday celebrated and an
extended weekend series of fes-
tivities now only memory, but
Vineland’s sesquicentennial year is far
from over if the Vineland Historical and
Antiquarian Society (VHAS) has anything
to say about it. Having just participated in
Sunday’s parade, the Society has filled the
remaining four months with a full sched-
ule of events that will take us to the brink
of winter with some holiday themes and a
closer look at what the city’s history has
to offer. VHAS Administrator/Curator
Patricia Martinelli recently took some time
out to discuss the upcoming programs.
First up, in the spirit of PBS’s popular
Antiques Roadshow, the VHAS will offer
an Antiques Identification Clinic on
September 17 from 1 to 3 p.m. Visitors may
bring a maximum of two items for identi-
fication or appraisal by Bob Brooks. There
will be a $5 charge per item.
“Mr. Brooks has been an auctioneer in
Malaga for over 30 years and is a veteran
when it comes to this kind of stuff,”
Martinelli said. “A lot of people will come
in and say to us, ‘I have this old chair of my
grandmother’s,’ or ‘I have this old dress,’
and I just started thinking that it might be
fun for them to have the opportunity to
bring this stuff out and share it with others
and get a sense of its history and value.”
Martinelli also announced that the
Society will host an evening of games,
ghouls and goblins for children from
kindergarten to fifth grade on October 28,
from 6 to 8 p.m. The Halloween party will
provide the children with the opportunity
to paint their own mini-pumpkin amidst
games and ghost stories. And parents,
Martinelli explained, can stay and watch.
A first for the Society, the Halloween
party provides an opportunity to intro-
duce children to the VHAS and its histori-
cal trove.
“We haven’t really done anything like it
before,” said Martinelli, “and we thought it
might be fun to give the kids a chance to
come in here and see the place in a fun
environment. But because we have limited
capacity in the building, we are asking that
the children be registered in advance.”
The event will also include a prize for
one of the event’s participants.
The evening will end with a drawing
for a paper-mache pumpkin piñata filled
with candy that one lucky child will get to
take home,” Martinelli said.
The following month, the VHAS will
focus its attention on one of Vineland’s
prized legacies when, on November 5
from 1 to 3 p.m., it presents Gay Taylor
who will be lecturing on Durand glass.
“Mrs. Taylor is a noted authority on
American glass,” Martinelli explained,
“and she has a lot of experience on this
particular subject. I’m sure it’s going to be
very interesting.” Taylor has spoken
throughout the country.
“With the Durand collection that we
have [at the VHAS] and the fact that it
remains quite a hot collectible today, I just
thought it would be a subject that would
be interesting for local residents,”
Martinelli said.
One of the common occurrences dur-
ing Vineland’s earliest years was an open
house during the Christmas season.
Originally hosted by town founder
Charles K. Landis, the gathering was a
good opportunity for the residents to
enjoy one another’s company in the
Yuletide spirit. To help close out the
sesquicentennial year, the VHAS will res-
urrect those days with a Christmas Open
House on December 10 from 1 to 3 p.m.
“It will give people a chance to come in
and help us decorate the Christmas trees,
learn a little bit more about the different,
lesser-known Christmas traditions that
existed in America back in the day and
just have a nice afternoon get-together,”
Martinelli explained.
She said the Society may look into hav-
ing live music performed by a choral
group and emphasized that this gathering
will be family-oriented.
Martinelli is excited about the fall pro-
grams. “I’mhoping that we’ll get a good
response fromthe public because we do
want to offer different subjects and differ-
ent activities that we feel will pique people’s
interests,” she said. “We want themto start
thinking of the Society as a place where
they can come out, learn a little something
and have fun while they’re doing it.” I
The Vineland Historical and Antiquarian
Society is located at 108 S. Seventh Street
(at Elmer Street) in Vineland. The office
phone number is 691-1111.
Grapevine 8-13 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:06 PM Page 10
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Faces in the News
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Vineland Celebrates 150th Birthday
The City of Vineland celebrated the 150th anniversary of its founding by Charles K.
Landis with a four-day festival on the grounds of Vineland High School August 4-7. The
festival culminated on Sunday with a barbeque, presentation of birthday cake (see p. 17),
antique tractor contest, a parade and fireworks. PHOTOS BY JOE PROFETTO
Grapevine 8-13 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:06 PM Page 11
FEATURING A FULL SUMMER BUFFET
DJ entertainment, a Chinese Auction, 50/50 rae, cash bar
Tickets available at Merighi’s or by calling (609) 501-2502
Purchase tickets online now at:
www.HelpMakeAWishComeTrue.ticketleap.com
6 -10 p.m., August 12, 2011 at Merighi’s Savoy Inn
E. Landis Ave & Union Rd., Vineland, NJ 08360
$
40
PER PERSON
Net proceeds to benefit
u rrue.t eT Tr m o hC s i WWi eA k a pMMa llpM e .H He ww.H w w
t: w aa line no n ts o e k c i e t s ha c Pur
r s o ’ i h g i r e M t e a l b a l i a v ts a e k c i T
in ., V Vin d n R o i n e & Un v s AAv di n a E. L
t 1 s u g u A .m., 6 -10 p
m o .c p aap le t e k ic ue.t
g (609) 501-2502 lin l a y c r b
, NJ 08360 d n a l e n
s S ’’s S i h g i r e M t 12, 2011 at n n I y o v aav
Faces in the News
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United Way 25th Anniversary Celebration
The United Way of Cumberland County held its 25th Anniversary Celebration and
Campaign Awards Ceremony on July 28 at Merighi’s Savoy Inn in East Vineland. During
the ceremony the local United Way recognized businesses and volunteers that helped the
agency raise $504,675 or 108% of goal at the close of the campaign on June 30.
Several noted individuals were honored as Community Volunteer of the Year including,
Wayne Schiffner, COO of South Jersey Healthcare; Brent Kreofsky, outgoing Plant
Manager for General Mills/Progresso; Dr. Pamela Moore, Principal of Silver Run School;
and Diane Berni, also from General Mills/Progresso. Joyce Cossaboon from Shirley Eves
Center in Millville was honored as the Agency Executive Director of the Year. Several cor-
porate awards were distributed to organizations such as South Jersey Healthcare, General
Mills/Progresso, Gerresheimer Glass, South Jersey Industries and Sun National Bank.
Grapevine 8-13 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:07 PM Page 12
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N
ow that Vineland’s 150th birth-
day has officially passed, it
seems like an appropriate time
to reflect on where the city has
been and what we have to look forward
to—at least as far as the downtown is con-
cerned.
The year of 1861 was a momentous year
for our nation. Of course, that’s the year
when Charles Landis founded the City of
Vineland, but just a few months before that
Abraham Lincoln succeeded James
Buchanan as President. About five weeks
later, on April 12, the Civil War began with
the bombardment of Fort Sumter in South
Carolina. In November of that same year,
Jefferson Davis was elected President of
the Confederate States of America.
Fast-forward 50 years and we’re in 1911.
The portly William Howard Taft is living in
the White House and Roald Amundsen
becomes the first man to reach the South
Pole. The cost to mail a letter is an outra-
geous two cents and our own Philadelphia
baseball team, the Athletics, beat the New
York Giants in six games to win the World
Series.
By the time Vineland’s 100th birthday
rolls around in 1961, World War II has
already been fought and won, but its sad
effects are still seen, as East Germany
builds the Berlin Wall to stop its citizens
from fleeing into West Germany. On a hap-
pier note, Alan Shepard becomes the first
American in space, Harper Lee’s master-
piece To Kill a Mockingbird wins the
Pulitzer Prize, and a first-class stamp will
set you back four cents.
The dozens of volunteers who made up
the Mayor’s Blue Ribbon Committee did a
great job of organizing all of the festivities
that have taken place this year to celebrate
Vineland’s birthday. While doing so, they
were guided by a simple mission they
adopted: Honor the past, embrace the
future. In the downtown, we are doing the
same thing.
Today, at 150 years old, Vineland still has
a bright future. Over the years, we’ve seen
the downtown go from thriving to neglect-
ed and back on the upswing again. The
redevelopment of the treasured Landis
Theater and respecting the history of indi-
vidual buildings along Landis Avenue as
they undergo façade improvements are two
ways that we honor our past.
The opening of the Landis MarketPlace
and the recruitment of new, quality busi-
nesses to the downtown are two ways that
we embrace our future, and you can have
an important role in that future. In an
effort to learn what kinds of businesses
residents would like to see as part of
Landis Avenue’s retail mix, Main Street
Vineland is conducting a very brief, three-
question online survey. I encourage you to
take just a moment or two to take the sur-
vey and share your opinion with us. You
may access the survey at http://www.sur-
veymonkey.com/s/ZSVX5J9.
****
Join us on Saturday, Sept. 24 from4 to 9
p.m. in the 600 block of Landis Avenue for
the 5th Annual BBQ-n-Chili Cook-off, spon-
sored by Susquehanna Bank and supported
by Comcast. With a terrific blend of jazz
and good ol’ fashioned rock-n-roll as the
backdrop, contestants will let their BBQand
chili do the talking as they vie for prizes.
Tasting kits are just $5 each and are
available by calling Main Street Vineland at
794-8653. This is always one foot-stompin’,
finger-lickin’, rib-stickin’ great time! I
For more information on Main Street Vineland,
visit the office at 603 E. Landis Ave., call
794-8653, visit www.mainstreetvineland.org,
or check them out on Facebook.
I
Downtown Vineland
{ TODD NOON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, VDID / MAINSTREET VINELAND }
Vineland’s sesquicentennial causes us to reflect on
the past with an eye to the future.
Fifty-Year
Leaps
n
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PRINCIPAL’S LIST
Grade 12
Patrick Bik
Jordan Catalana
Tyler Cheli
Jennifer Consalo
Jesse Dickenson
Mario Giannone
Laura Huffman
Matthew McMahon
Kelsie Meyer
Lexi Misiewicz
Christina Oleszewski
Maria Procopio
Zachary Sammartino
Kaitlyn Ternay
Grade 11
Robert Bishop
Franchesca Cruz
John DeLeonardis, Jr.
Courtney Fralick
Valerie Harris
Siri Nesheim
Megan Petuskey
Rachele Smith
Christina Webster
Grade 10
Allissa Long
Theodore Mercurio
Katherine O’Rourke
Kimberly Sansalone
Grade 9
Katelin Letizia
FIRST HONORS
Grade 12
Catherine Arsenault
Joy Bernal
Umberto Bifulco
Patrick Bik
Grace Blandino
Frederick Blauth, Jr.
Joseph Candelaria
Jordan Catalana
Vanessa Caulford
Tyler Cheli
Jennifer Consalo
Timothy Davis
Micknie Delva
Jesse Dickenson
Alexandra Ferrucci
Anthony Galzarano
Mario Giannone
Nicholas Gladfelter
Mark Harper
Ashlee Harris
Clarissa Hayes
Laura Huffman
Matthew Landi
Dani Leach
Daniel Lelli
Matthew McMahon
Kelsie Meyer
Lexi Misiewicz
Carlos Negron
Christina Olezewski
Eric Olson
Maria Procopio
Thomas Quinlan
Zachary Sammartino
Kaitlyn Ternay
Donovan Vassalotti
Grade 11
Alison Angelo
Christian Bencie
Robert Bishop
Adam Chamberlain
Franchesca Cruz
Rachel DeLeonardis
Sarah DeLeonardis
John DeLeonardis
Courtney Fralick
Kaitlyn Gallo
Mark-Anthony Gaunt
Rachel Gavigan
Robert Gifford
Brittany Harden
Valerie Harris
Timothy Huffman
Brian Langdon, Jr.
Matthew Lewis
Zoe MacAvoy
Michael Mazzochi
Siri Nesheim
Megan Petuskey
Harry Rothman, II
Rebecca Slimm
Rachele Smith
Claire Tames
Christina Webster
Grade 10
Matthew Anderson
Patrice Basada
Monica Canglin
Angela Christaldi
Zachary Donato
Lindsay Dwyer
Alyssa Ferrucci
Michael Galzerano
Ashley Gonzalez
Mia Klekos
Allissa Long
Theodore Mercurio
Katherine O’Rourke
Theresa Riordan
Kimberly Sansalone
Alexis Wright
Grade 9
Andrew Blizzard
Mia Angelia Dones
Joshua Fabrizio
Gina Giannone
Matthew Gladfelter
Katelin Letizia
Julia Martini
SECOND HONORS
Grade 12
Jaryd Aulffo
Joshua Dacy
Christopher
Hemberger
Nicholas Martelli
Kristen McGee
Larissa Scarpa
Eric Walsh
Grade 11
Melina Arellano
Daria Baruffi
Angela Bertonazzi
Mia Capizola
Troy Day
Dana DiMatteo
Dustin Graiff
I. Joshua Kehoe
Samuel Nichols
Benjamin Notaro
Michael Pennington
Emory Pierson, Jr.
Joshua Reyes
Allison Riegel
Jeffrey Ronchetti
Brandi Smith
Brian Stanzione
Aaron Tolliver, Jr.
Brandon Triantos
Grade 10
Kevin Allen, Jr.
Tyler Aulffo
Abigail Bencie
Amanda Buirch
Samantha Caterina
Victoria Caterina
Elaine Esteron
Samantha Gaudio
Ayla Gentiletti
Drew Mesiano
Colette Orlandini
Dylan Pierson
Ryan Veltman
Ivana Vinnick
Grade 9
Christopher Andrews
Jan Bernal
Rosalie LaGrotta
Danielle Lugo
Marialena Melillo
Jessica Panno
Alexa Plitt
Ernest Scoma
Dane Spoltore
Zachary Steelman
SACRED HEART HS HONOR STUDENTS, FOURTH QUARTER
Grapevine 14-19 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:18 PM Page 14
Jones on Kennedy
Health System
Foundation Board
Brian W.
Jones, Senior
Vice President/
Chief Lending
Officer of
Newfield National
Bank was recent-
ly appointed to
serve as a trustee
on the Kennedy
Health System
Foundation Board. A multi-site health-
care provider, Kennedy serves the resi-
dents of Camden, Burlington and
Gloucester counties.
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New Jersey law now states that the following can
For more information regarding site location and hours, contact the site directly.
For more information on other recycling programs in Cumberland County, please call the
Improvement Authority at 825-3700 or visit our Website at www.ccia-net.com.
ATTENTION
NO LONGER GO OUT WITH YOUR GARBAGE:
Personal Computers (laptop & desktop), Computer Monitors, and Televisions
Instead, you can use these...
Drop Off Centers
City of Bridgeton Maintenance Building
Public Works Complex, Florida Avenue
Telephone: 455-3230
Commercial Township Public Works Garage
2370 Memorial Avenue
Telephone: 785-3100
Cumberland County Solid Waste Complex
169 Jesse's Bridge Road, Rosenhayn
Telephone: 825-3700
Maurice River Twp., Behind the Municipal Garage
556 Main Street, Rt. 616, Leesburg
Telephone: 785-1120
City of Millville Public Works, Ware Avenue
Telephone: 825-7000
City of Vineland Public Works,
1086 E. Walnut Road
Telephone: 794-4250
The following locations are only open to residents
served by these Townships’ convenience centers:
Downe Township
Fairfield Township
Hopewell/Greenwich Townships
Lawrence Township
Stow Creek and Shiloh
Upper Deerfield Township
DO NOT PLACE COMPUTERS, MONITORS AND TVs AT YOUR CURB!
Please call the drop off center in advance
to confirm drop off days and times.
Faces in
the News
I
$1,000 to Guidance Center
Cumberland Insurance Group recently
donated $1,000 towards the general
operating expenses of the Cumberland
County Guidance Center (CCGC).
“With both inpatient and outpatient
programs and services, the CCGC
helps individuals suffering from mental
health illness to maximize their ability
to live, work, socialize, and learn in the
community of their choice,” said
Cumberland Insurance Group presi-
dent/CEO Paul J. Ritter, III. “They also
provide support, information, and edu-
cation to family members.”
From left: Cumberland Insurance Group
board member Robert Brady, CCGC
Executive Director H. Dieter Hovermann,
and Paul Ritter.
Grapevine 14-19 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:18 PM Page 15
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The Grapevine’s
Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1. Manuscripts (abbr.)
4. Came to grips with
9. Smallest element
component
11. Esprit de corps
12. Grandmothers
14. Unhinge and distract
15. Largest municipality
in Finland
16. Not win
17. Red Cross work
18. A theatrical
performer
19. Renounced under
oath
21. Thick center cut of
beef tenderloin
23. Cathode-ray
oscilloscope
24. Before
25. Negative
26. Paronomasia
27. Mortar trough
28. Swiss river
29. Adornment
36. More dismal
37. Helper
38. The cry made by
sheep
39. Ceases to live
40. Give qualities or
abilities to
41. Cordialities
43. Alt. spelling of tayra
44. Verb conjugations
45. Furnace product
46. Long & difficult
journeys
47. Stallone's nickname
DOWN
1. An insane person
2. Stem
3. First movement form
4. Warn beforehand
5. Macaws
6. Deliberately
misleading story
7. 60120 IL
8. Transfer property
10. 16th C. Fr. poet
Clement
11. Adult males (Fr.)
13. Beget
14. R.I. rebellion 1841 -
1842
16. Wolf (Spanish)
19. State of violent
mental agitation
20. A single unit or
thing
22. Private secondary
schools
25. Persons of no
importance
26. A set of two similar
things
27. Health Maintenance
Organization
28. Brews
29. Comic & actress May
30. States a falsehood
31. A minute amount
(Scott)
32. Tropical Asian
starlings
33. Stream disturbances
34. Relating to a nerve
35. Agreement between
two states
36. Computer game
player
38. Large bale of
stuffing material
42. Sound expressing
disappointment
Solution to last week’s puzzle
Grapevine 14-19 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:18 PM Page 16
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N
ow that Vineland’s 150th birth-
day party is done and over
with, I’ve had a little time to
reflect on how crazy and
stressful and fun the week leading up to it
was. As you likely know at this point, it
began last Saturday when I went outside,
opened the newspaper and read that TV’s
“Cake Boss” would be making Vineland’s
celebratory birthday cake. Little did I know
that the next week would involve radio and
television appearances, Internet stories,
massive amounts of conversation in the
bakery and in the virtual world of
Facebook, a newfound fellowship of all the
bakeries in town, and at the end of it, an
awful lot of cake.
One of the most amazing reflections that
I have from this last week is the power of
social media. Yes, we’ve all read about how
Facebook and Twitter recently helped to
bring down the governments of Tunisia and
Egypt, but those instances were so massive
and abstract, it’s really difficult to actually
grasp how important a role social media had
in bringing about those actions. But after
reading the paper last Saturday, I went right
onto Facebook, made a frustrated comment
on The Sweet Life’s page, as well as the
Mayor’s page, and into cyberspace it went.
The responses from our guests were
immediate and overwhelming. Facebook gave
people a unified voice, a voice that was able
to focus its frustrations in one place. The
same thing happened on the Facebook page
of Crust N Krumbs Bakery, and after talking
to their manager, Robyn, I realized that it
wasn’t just Sweet Life guests who were mad.
Later in the day, after conferring with our
staff (and at the insistence of so many guests
that were coming into the bakery to offer
I
Culinary Adventures { BY STEPHEN WILSON / PHOTOS: JILL McCLENNEN }
Cake Controversy
The Cake Boss order is cancelled as Vineland’s
bakeries unite to provide birthday cake for all.
Continued on next page
TOP: Robyn Cantoni-Lopez and Jill McClennen
on the set of The 10 Show in Philadelphia.
ABOVE: Mayor Robert Romano and Dr. Frank
DeMaio make ceremonial first cut of cake.
Grapevine 14-19 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:18 PM Page 17
their support for keeping the cake local, as
well as from the other bakeries in town),
we decided to create a protest page called
“Operation Cake Bomb.”
That name was a play on “Cake Boss”
and “photo bomb” (which is when some-
one unexpectedly jumps into the back-
ground of a picture to make an uninvited
appearance). We all felt that Vineland bak-
eries should represent Vineland’s 150th
Birthday with cake, and our respective
guests agreed with us. We decided to make
our own cakes and just show up on Sunday
with them—a cake bomb!
On this protest page, a virtual focal point
had been created and the debate really
began. With all that debate focused in one
place, the larger media took notice. The
Daily Journal called for a story. Then CBS 3
from Philly arrived with their news van.
The next day we were interviewed by The
Philadelphia Inquirer, NBC 10, NBC 40, CBS
Radio in Philly, and even articles on the
Internet. It became big news.
It was a little overwhelming, since we
were trying to run the business as usual,
and a bit distracting to boot, but as a small
business owner, press like that is priceless.
Going to Philly to the NBC studios was par-
ticularly fun, as Sweet Life and Crust N
Krumbs got to go behind the scenes, meet
the hosts and crew of The 10 Show and
show off our goods to tens of thousands of
people in the Philadelphia area. What fun!
The Blue Ribbon Committee took
notice, and invited all the bakeries to a
meeting. The crux of the meeting involved
Dr. DeMaio graciously asking what they
could do to make the bakery community
happy. Perfect, we just wanted to partici-
pate. Plans were made to formally display
our cakes alongside the Cake Boss’ cake,
and all was well. Two days later though, we
got word that there would now be no Cake
Boss cake. At first, we were concerned that
there wouldn’t be enough cake for the
birthday party, but Vineland’s bakeries
worked overtime and went above and
beyond (not just us, but across the board) to
make almost 3,000 servings of cake.
Sunday came, and it was hot. I was a
concerned about all the cakes, but the city
had set up a huge tent for us, and it was
cool enough in the shade. Jim Mains
Bakery started unloading box after box of
sheet cake, then Crust N Krumbs followed
with just as many. I picked up a three-tier
cake and sheet cake from La Hacienda, and
Sweet Life made several hundred cupcakes
as well as sheet cake. Each bakery also
made a display cake for the birthday, and
they were all laid out for the people to see.
It was astounding. Everyone, on super
short notice, and all in the name of civic
pride, produced an amazing amount of
cake. After his opening remarks, Mayor
Romano came over, apologized for the con-
troversy, and proceeded to cut into Jim
Main’s cake along with Dr. DeMaio. Water
under the bridge, as far as we’re all con-
cerned. The “Happy Birthday” song was
spontaneously started, and afterwards, the
3,000 servings of cake disappeared into the
mouths of hungry Vinelanders.
This whole week wasn’t about politics to
the bakeries, but about civic pride, the eco-
nomics of sending thousands of dollars
upstate, and the philosophy of buying locally.
I knowour Mayor meant well when ordering
the Cake Boss’ cake, and I thank him and
the Blue Ribbon Committee for all the
planning that went into the birthday cele-
bration. But I’m also proud of the people
and businesses of Vineland for standing up
and voicing their opinions, for letting our
leaders know what they believe in.
It was humbling for all of us to see so
much community support based around, of
all things, a birthday cake. And I’m so very
happy to have found a newfound fellowship
with the local bakery community; Robyn
from Crust N’ Krumbs, Sandra at Jim
Mains, and Robert at La Hacienda I now
consider as friends. Although technically
speaking, we’re still competitors, this week
showed us all that there’s plenty of business
and love for every bakery in Vineland, and
when we come together, our synergy truly
can make a difference.
Happy 150th birthday Vineland! I
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Continued from previous page
Downtown Vineland
631 E Landis Ave
8562136002
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Grapevine 14-19 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:18 PM Page 18
Andrea Trattoria, 1833 Harding Hwy.,
Newfield, 697-8400. Chef/owner Andrea
Covino serves up Italian specialties in
atmosphere of fine dining.
Annata Wine Bar, 216 Bellevue Ave,
Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Food served
tapas style, catering, private parties.
Extensive wine list. Live music Thurs. night.
Babe's Village Inn, Martinelli Avenue,
Minotola, NJ 856-697-1727. Famous crabs,
seafood, Italian cuisine. Eat in or Take out.
Bagel University, 1406 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 691-0909. Breakfast and lunch
spot offering sandwiches named for col-
leges near and far.
Bain's Deli, 636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
563-1400. Come in for breakfast, lunch, or
dinner. Daily specials, coffee of the day.
Barbera’s Chocolates on Occasion, 782 S.
Brewster Rd., Vineland, 690-9998.
Homemade chocolates and candies,
custom gift baskets.
Bennigan’s Restaurant, 2196 W. Landis
Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Entrees,
desserts, drink specials. Take-out. Happy
Hour Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm, Sun-Thu 10pm-cl.
MLB Extra Innings.
Bernardi’s Restaurant & Lounge, 140 E.
Wheat Rd., Vineland, 696-1461. Lunch and
dinner specials. Open 10:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
(until 11 p.m. on Friday). Closed Sunday.
Big Apple, 528 N. Harding Hwy., Vineland,
697-5500. Steaks, veal, chicken dishes.
Meet friends at bar. Daily lunch and dinner.
Big John’s Pizza Queen, 1383 S. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 205-0012. Featuring “Gutbuster”
a 21-oz. burger, pizza, wings, subs, dinners.
Black Olive Restaurant. 782 S. Brewster
Rd, Vineland. 457-7624. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m
daily. Entrees, desserts. Take out available.
Bruno's Family Restaurant, Cape May Ave.
and Tuckahoe Rd., Dorothy, 609-476-4739.
Breakfast, lunch, dinner, pizza. Open Mon-
Sat. 7 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
Buena Tavern, 761 Harding Hwy. (Rts.
40/54), Buena, 697-9848. Seafood, home-
made Italian, Wednesday specials, half-
price meals to volunteers Thursday nights.
Chow’s Garden 1101 N. 2nd St., Millville,
327-3259. Sushi Bar, All-you-can-eat buffet.
Cosmopolitan Restaurant Lounge, Bakery,
3513 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 765-5977.
Happy hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m. free buffet,
reduced drinks.
Crust N Krumbs Bakery, Main/Magnolia
rds., 690-1200. Cakes, pies, cookies,
breads, doughnuts, custom wedding cakes.
CrepeMaker Cafe, 607 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 205-0027. Crepes any way you
like them—veggie, chicken, steak, dessert.
Dakota Steakhouse & Sushi Bar at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 692-8600. Steaks, seafood, sushi.
Deeks Deli & Kustard Kitchen, 1370 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 691-5438. Call for
lunch, dinner specials. Soft ice cream and
cakes year-round. Mon.-Sat 9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Denny’s, 1001 W. Landis Ave., Vineland,
696-1900. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. Take-
out, too. Happy Hour Mon.-Fri. 3-7 p.m.
Open 24 hours. Kids eat free Tues. & Sat.
Dominick’s Pizza, 1768 S. Lincoln Ave.,
Vineland, 691-5511. Family time-honored
recipes, fresh ingredients.
Dori’s Italian, 16 N. High St., Millville, 765-
9799. Open for lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat.
Elmer Diner, 41 Chestnut St., Elmer. 358-
3600. Diverse menu of large portions at
reasonable prices.
Esposito's Maplewood III, 200 N. Delsea
Dr., Vineland, 692-2011. Steaks, seafood
and pasta dishes at this Italian restaurant.
Eric’s, 98 S. West Ave., Vineland, 205-
9800. Greek and American cuisine, pizza.
Fat Jack's BBQ. Cumberland Mall, next to
Starbucks, 825-0014. Serving ribs, wings,
sandwiches, salads and sides.
Five Points Inn, E. Landis Ave. and Tuckahoe
Rd., Vineland, 691-6080. Italian cuisine
and dinner buffets to savor. Family-owned.
Gardella’s Ravioli Co. & Italian Deli,
527 S. Brewster Rd., 697-3509. Name says
it all. Daily specials, catering. Closed Sun.
Giorgio’s Restaurant 363 E. Wheat Rd.,
Buena, 697-2900. Serving lunch and dinner
daily. Italian cuisine, pizza.
Golden Palace Diner Restaurant. 2623 S
Delsea Dr, Vineland, 692-5424. Serving
breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.
The Greenview Inn at Eastlyn Golf Course,
4049 Italia Rd., Vineland, 691-5558.
Restaurant and lounge open to the public
for lunch Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
High Street Chinese Buffet, High St.,
Millville, 825-2288. All-you-can-eat buffet.
Jersey Jerry's. 1362 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 362-5978. Serving subs, sand-
wiches, and take-out platters.
Joe's Poultry. 440 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland,
692-8860. Barbecue and Kosher chickens,
homemade sides, catering.
Kawa Thai & Sushi, 2196 N. Second St.
(Rt.47), Millville, 825-9939. Thai and
Japanese cuisine. BYOB.
Larry's II Restaurant, 907 N. Main Rd.,
Vineland, 692-9001. Three meals daily.
Sunday breakfast buffet, early-bird dinners.
La Locanda Pizzeria & Ristorante, 1406 S.
Main Rd., Vineland, 794-3332. Pasta, veal,
chicken. Lunch and dinner. Closed Sun.
Marciano’s Restaurant, 947 N. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 563-0030. Italian-American cui-
sine, seafood and veal. Open daily for
lunch and dinner, Sunday breakfast buffet.
Merighi's Savoy Inn, E. Landis Ave. and
Union Rd., Vineland, 691-8051. Banquet/
wedding facility and intimate restaurant.
Dungeness Crabs every Tues. Gourmet
Pizza Nite on Wed.
Millville Queen Diner, 109 E. Broad Street,
Millville. 327-0900. Open 7 Days a Week
24 Hours.
Milmay Tavern, Tuckahoe and Bear’s Head
rds., Milmay, 476-3611. Gourmet lunches
and dinners, casual setting.
Moe’s Southwest Grill, 2188 N. 2nd St.,
Millville, 825-3525. Tex-Mex, burritos, catering.
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EATING OUT
From fine dining to lunch spots to
bakeries, the area has choices to satisfy
any appetite. Call for hours.
E
very summer when we were kids,
my mother changed her first name
to Tomato. She became the poster
child for this luscious red “fruit”
and spent the rest of each summer trying to
eat as many tomatoes as she could find. Dad
was her supplier and I’d come downstairs in
the morning to find her sitting at the kitchen
table, salt shaker in one hand and a tomato in
the other. She used to tell us stories of how
her dad had a small vegetable patch on their
farm and he would always save the first ripe
tomato for her.
Me? I like the plum tomato and have, of
course, eaten other varieties from the various
farm markets in the area, but I always won-
dered about “heirloom tomatoes.” I never
quite knew what they really were or where to
find them, but it seems that they are cropping
up more and more in food magazines and in
cookbooks, so I was thrilled to find out that
we have someone here right in Vineland
growing them.
Momma Donna’s Organic Greenhouse
Specialties, located on Ascher Road in
Vineland, has quite a few varieties of heir-
loom tomatoes as well as other organically
grown produce. Donna’s huge plot of land is
tucked away on a quiet country road and
you could almost believe that you were back
in another time. Call her for directions at
856-305-4761.
Here is a great little recipe for summer,
using those heirloom tomatoes. Make up a big
batch and keep it handy for spreading over
grilled meats or just serve it on crusty slices of
toasted bread for a light and savory snack.
Tomato Jam
8 large heirloom tomatoes, seeded & chopped
2 tbsp fresh thyme
2 red onions finely chopped
1/4 cup local honey
2 tbsps olive oil
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tsps coarse salt
1 1/2 tsps black pepper
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two
baking sheets with foil. Toss first three
ingredients in large bowl and them divide
between two sheet pans, bake one hour,
take out and set aside while whisking next
five ingredients in bowl. Pour over both
trays, increase oven temperature to 400
degrees, bake 35 to 45 minutes more or
until mixture begins to caramelize,
remove and let cool. Serve as desired. I
Jean Hecker is a full-time travel agent at
Magic Carpet Travels and a part-time foodie.
She has a BA in Home Economics Education
from Rowan University and enjoys exploring
all facets of the food and restaurant industry.
Tomato Jam
Here’s a recipe for heirloom tomatoes, and
a tip on where to find them locally.
Mori’s, E. Landis Ave., Vineland. 690-0300.
Adjacent to the Landis Theater Performing
Arts Center. Includes a “casual, upscale”
restaurant with a banquet facility and
lounge on site. Lunch and dinner.
MVP Bar, 408 Wheat Road, Vineland, 697-
9825. Full bar menu, drink specials.
Neptune Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge,
1554 S. Delsea Dr., Vineland, 692-2800.
Live lobsters, seafood, prime rib, steak,
cocktails.
Old Oar House Irish Pub, 123 N. High
Street Millville, 293-1200. New menu,
kitchen open until 1 a.m. Smoker friendly
outdoor beer garden.
Olympia Restaurant, 739 S. Delsea Dr.,
Vineland, 691-6095. Authentic Greek cui-
sine—lamb dishes and salads.
Pegasus, Rts. 40 and 47, Vineland, 694-
0500. Breakfast, lunch, dinner specials;
convenient drive-thru, mini-meal specials.
The Rail, 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland,
697-1440. Bar and restaurant with daily
drink specials and lunch specials.
Saigon, 2180 N. Second St., Millville, 327-
8878. Authentic Vietnamese—noodle
soups, curry, hotpot, Buddhist vegetarian.
Speedway Cafe at Ramada, W. Landis Ave.
and Rt. 55, Vineland, 692-8600. Open daily
6 a.m.-11 p.m. Dinner specials $7 and up.
Sweet Life Bakery, 601 E. Landis Ave.,
Vineland, 692-5353. Neighborhood bakery.
Homemade pastries, cakes, coffee.
Uncle Ricky’s Outdoor Bar, 470 E. Wheat
Rd., Vineland, 691-4454. Ribs, chicken,
fish, steaks. Always clams, eat in or take
out. Live music Saturday & Sunday night.
Dungeness Crab All You Can Eat.
Villa Fazzolari, 821 Harding Hwy., Buena
Vista, 697-7107. Dinner combos, grilled
meats, fish. Lunch and dinner daily.
Wild Wings, 1843 E. Wheat Rd., Vineland,
691-8899. Dinners, grilled sandwiches,
wings.
Winfield’s. 106 N. High St., Millville, 327-
0909. Continental cuisine and spirits
served in a casually upscale setting.
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Food for Thought { JEAN HECKER }
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Gleanings { DEBORAH A. EIN, MANAGING EDITOR }
Travel Bug 2
L
ast time, I outlined some budget
travels across the country. The
best way to save money on vaca-
tion, obviously, is to take day
trips, where you can return at the end of
the day for lodging in your own home.
This has been called the “staycation,” and
with the price of gasoline and airline fares
in summer, it’s a popular way to create
some family memories. So this time, I will
discuss some ideas right here in our back-
yard, with uncensored commentary from
my three kids.
BOGART’S: We visit the county’s sole
bookstore on High Street in Millville as
early each summer as we can, and always
find that it is all any bookworm could want.
We take our summer reading lists—school
and personal lists—and generally find
everything we need/want. Owner Amy
Lombardo stocks numerous copies of
books on the summer lists of area schools.
Known widely as a store that carries used
books, it also stocks new copies of current
bestsellers and other popular books. If you
dust off your bookshelves at home and take
some used books to Bogart’s, you can get
up to 75 percent off used books that you
purchase off the Bogart shelves. My daugh-
ter gave up a box full of Babysitter books
last year, and this year we dropped off a
collection of Goosebumps books, so last
year we spent just $17 on a bunch of used
books that we needed, plus we received a
voucher for 75 percent off this year’s pur-
chases. Here’s what my kids had to say:
A: “Getting rid of those Babysitter
books has cleared off my bookshelf for
these Nicholas Sparks books!”
G: “Let’s go back for brownies.” (Yes,
they sell treats, too.)
W: “I really want this coin book.” (We
steered him away from it, a new book
tucked away in a selection of hobby
books, then surprised him with it for his
birthday.)
DELSEA DRIVE-IN: Last summer, we
visited the only remaining drive-in in the
state to see Toy Story 3. At the outset, our
kids were not thrilled at the prospect of
watching a movie in the big outdoors,
maybe because we have “Dive-In” movies
at our community pool. The cost at the
Delsea is $8 per adult, $4 for ages 12 and
under. If you want to bring your own food
in (no drinks allowed), it’s another $8 per
car. There are two screens, and these
prices entitle you to stay for either one or
both.
A: “Toy Story, really? Do we have to
stay for the whole thing?” (She was 15 at
the time.)
G: “I can’t see from back here.”
W: “Can’t we go to the stand for better
snacks? When’s it gonna start, anyway?”
Yes, it got a little better once the movie
started, but we decided we should have
introduced this form of movie-going when
the kids were younger.
WOODBINE’S SAM AZEEZ MUSEUM:
A little off the beaten track and just over
the line into Cape May County, the
sleepy town of Woodbine harbors an
interesting history. A museum there
depicts how a Russian Jewish population
settled there after the killing of Czar
Nicholas led to religious persecution in
the homeland. The synagogue is on the
upper level of the museum, above a floor
with dioramas and panels that tell the
story of how the town and its people
struggled to survive. A visit to a nearby
cemetery shows names of people noted
at the museum and who helped shape
the town. This is a good trip for the
home-schooled and school groups learn-
ing about tolerance, as it is a designated
teaching center for the NJ Commision on
Holocaust Education.
A: “Let’s go upstairs and see what the
synagogue is like.” (We did, and with their
Jewish Grandpa having passed away eight
months prior, our kids felt a special con-
nection to this place.)
G: “Can we get a treat after this?”
(Well, everyone expresses emotions dif-
ferently.)
W: “Bet I can beat G on this quiz.” (The
lady at the desk handed out activity sheets
after we had gone through the history
panels. Both boys did well, as did a friend
who was a year older and had studied the
Holocaust in school that year.)
There’s still plenty of summer left to
take one or more of these family excur-
sions. And don’t forget the beach. Living
in this region, we’re fortunate that a day at
the beach is an affordable day trip, too,
and it’s a big hit with kids of all ages.
A, G, and W most certainly agree. I
Here are a few ideas for day trips, with
comments from the peanut gallery.
been a member for 81 years. “There is a
saying that states, ‘Add life to your years,
and not years to your life,’ and Ted has
certainly done that.”
“He’s something very special,” echoed
Rabbi Emeritus, Dr. Murray Kohn, who
also practices at Beth Israel. “If there is
any human being to emulate, it’s Mr.
Krause.”
The high praise for Krause is under-
standable when considering just how
exceptional he is.
At the ripe age of 100, he lives a
lifestyle more suited to that of a man half
his age. He still sells life insurance at
AXA Equitable, where he has worked for
64 years, and where he is now the oldest
ever active employee. He still serves as a
regular advisor to the Vineland YMCA,
even though he retired from the board 15
years ago. And he’s still a board member
at the Beth Israel Congregation, where,
according to synagogue members, there
have been very few activities that have
occurred without Krause’s guidance and
leadership.
In the midst of all of these social and
community activities, Krause still finds
time to work out regularly, swimming at
the Y five days and week, and to help
care for his ailing wife, Sarah, who is one
year his senior, and suffers from a heart
condition.
When reaching this juncture in life,
most men would slow down, and trim
away some of their obligations because of
weariness or fatigue. Krause, on the
other hand, has no intention of taking it
easy, even if he is in his golden years.
“At work, my clients need me. They
count on me to be there, and I have no
intention of letting them down,” he said.
“The synagogue is my second home,
and I’m not sure what I’d do if I weren’t
spending time involved there. My friends
are there, and my faith is too important
to me to give up everything I do there.”
When asked what it is about the Y,
then, that keeps him so involved, and
keeps him coming to swim laps five days
a week when everyone would understand
if he wanted to stop, Krause’s tone
doesn’t vary much.
“The Y has been an inspiration to me,”
he said. “Forty-one years ago, I came to
see if I could still swim, and I never
stopped. I don’t want to stop.
“The synagogue is my second home,
and the Y is my third.” Here he paused,
taking a moment to reflect on all the time
he has spent at the YMCA and what it
has meant to him. “Without the Y, I don’t
know that I’d be here today.”
If you get the sense that Krause con-
tinues to live life to the fullest, not as
much out of desire, but because hard
work and community activism are all he
knows, you’re right.
Krause doesn’t continue to be a bea-
con of longevity and a testament to being
“only as old as you feel” for the acco-
lades. He does it because it’s always how
he’s done things. He even suggested that
doing things the right way is the secret to
his long life.
“In your lifetime, you can do the right
thing or the wrong thing,” he said. “I find
it’s just as easy to do the right thing.
Doing the right thing—whether it be in
work, religion or whatever—it’s what
keeps me going.”
William Wordsworth preached that
the good die young. When it comes to the
great, however, there’s no telling just
how long life will last. By Ted Krause’s
standards, it’s at least 100 years. I
n
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Krause still swims at the YMCA pool five
days a week.
Grapevine 20-23 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:19 PM Page 20
Jersey Fresh Produce
Available at Markets
New Jersey Assistant Secretary of
Agriculture Alfred W. Murray and Diana
Limbacher, deputy regional administra-
tor, United States Department of
Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service,
toured community farmers markets in
Essex, Hudson and Union counties
recently and declared Jersey Fresh sea-
son in full swing.
“All of New Jersey’s 144 community
farmers markets, featuring the freshest,
best-tasting produce grown by our state’s
farmers, are open for business as of the
Fourth of July weekend and many will be
operating through to the end of October,”
said Murray. “Farmers are reporting
excellent quality crops this season, so
everyone should visit a nearby farmers
market, meet the people who grow our
food, and help support our agriculture
industry.”
Murray and Limbacher visited the
University Hospital Auxiliary’s Farmers’
Market in Newark and the Elizabeth and
Hoboken Farmers Markets. Certified
farmers at these and many other markets
throughout the state accept Women,
Infants and Children (WIC) and Senior
Farmers Market Nutrition Program
(FMNP) vouchers for the purchase of
locally grown fresh fruits, vegetables and
herbs. The United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA) program adminis-
tered by the State Department of Health
and Senior Services allots $20 in checks
to qualifying individuals, which are valid
through November 30.
“The WIC Farmers' and Senior
Farmers' Market Nutrition Program pro-
vides our state’s most vulnerable resi-
dents with access to locally grown, nutri-
tious fresh fruits and vegetables,” said
Acting Health and Senior Services
Commissioner Dr. Tina Tan. “We know
that once people discover the health ben-
efits of these farmers markets, they
become regular customers.”
Limbacher further emphasized the
value of farmers’ markets for federal
nutrition assistance recipients.
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Continued on next page
Bridgeton Outdoor Market
at the Riverfront
• 59 East Commerce Street, Bridgeton
(Riverfront Parking Lot)
Phone: (856) 575-5582
Email: carolahartley@aol.com
• Open: June 17 - Aug. 26, 2011
Fridays, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
• Community Farmers Market:
Variety of fruits and vegetables
• Also Available: Hot food, crafts, cook-
ing demonstrations, flowers, and
entertainment on certain days
• WIC and Senior FMNP checks
accepted by some farmers
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“By welcoming WIC and Senior
Farmers Market coupons, markets like
these provide access to fresh fruits and
vegetables and other healthy foods which
may not otherwise be easily available.
Accepting the coupons benefits the farm-
ers as well, by expanding their customer
base,” she said.
Murray and Limbacher started their
tour at The University Hospital
Auxiliary’s Farmers’ Market, which fea-
tures two farmers and two vendors sell-
ing pickles and frozen foods. While
there, they were given a demonstration
of how Jersey Fresh produce on sale at
the market can be turned into healthy
meals.
“It is very gratifying that our Farmers’
Market, now in its third year, continues
to flourish,” said Robin D. Wittenstein,
Ed.D., FACHE, acting president and CEO
of UMDNJ-University Hospital. “With
an ever-increasing variety of fresh, nutri-
tious foods, the market reinforces the
role of The University Hospital and all of
UMDNJ as an asset to the health of our
community.”
The market takes place 11 a.m. to 3
p.m. Tuesdays at UMDNJ Plaza and this
year will continue until October 25.
Assistant Secretary Murray was joined
at the Elizabeth Farmers Market by
Assemblywoman Annette Quijano. The
market has one farmer and several ven-
dors selling baked goods, nuts and gour-
met foods. Market Manager David
Strochak said the market, operated by the
Elizabeth Avenue Partnership, was started
to give residents, senior citizens, moms
and children a chance to eat healthy and
also attract shoppers to the area.
“We’ve been proud to preserve home-
grown Jersey produce for a ninth year,”
said Strochak. “The market is a neat one-
stop experience where people can get
Jersey Fresh produce, just picked earlier
that day, and maybe shop at nearby stores.”
The farmers market runs from 11 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Tuesdays in Union Square and
will continue through November 29.
The final stop of the tour was at the
Hoboken Farmers Market, a long-time
and popular fixture of the area, started as
an effort to get farm-fresh, local produce
to the people of Hoboken.
“The market gives New Jersey’s small
farmers a market to help stay afloat and
keep agriculture in the Garden State,”
said market manager David Calamoneri.
“It’s a place for the community to come
together, apolitically, and exchange
smiles and recipes.”
Four farmers and several other ven-
dors selling baked goods and pickles par-
ticipate in the market, operated by the
Hoboken Quality of Life Coalition, from
3 to 7:30 p.m., which will continue
through November 1.
Jersey Fresh produce is reaching the
peak of the season with many fruits and
vegetables available. Jersey Fresh items
currently available at farmers markets
and roadside stands include baby
spinach, cantaloupe, watermelon, honey-
dew melons, cucumbers, squash, pep-
pers, eggplant, basil, beets, cabbage, col-
lards, sweet corn, swiss chard, tomatoes,
arugula, kale, leeks, cilantro, parsley, dill,
mint, lettuces, dandelions, and turnips.
To locate a community farmers mar-
ket near you, visit www.state.nj.us/jer-
seyfresh/searches/urban.htm. For more
information on the WIC and Senior
FMNP, visit: www.state.nj.us/agricul-
ture/divisions/md/prog/wic.html.
“The market...is a place for the community to
come together, apolitically, and exchange
smiles and recipes.”
Continued from previous page
Grapevine 20-23 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 7:19 PM Page 22
Heating & Cooling
Your Home
SINCE 1982
FUEL OIL &
KEROSENE
CALL FOR PRICES
PO Box 645 West Blvd. Newfield, NJ 08344
(856) 697-4777
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New Jersey Floriculture
Industry Big Business
New Jersey Secretary of Agriculture
Douglas H. Fisher recently announced
that the value of New Jersey’s floriculture
crops was $178 million last year, up 7 per-
cent from 2009.
Fisher visited Timothy’s Center for
Gardening in Robbinsville to announce
the results of the survey conducted by the
United States Department of Agriculture’s
National Agricultural Statistics Service.
“New Jersey is a major producer of
bedding plants used to beautify people’s
homes and businesses throughout the
state,” said Secretary Fisher. “By purchas-
ing the plants grown here in the Garden
State, consumers are assured the plants
are acclimated to our climate to grow and
thrive. The purchase also helps support
our state’s farmers.”
Floriculture crops include bedding
plants, such as flowering annuals, and also
cut flowers, chrysanthemums, hostas,
lilies, poinsettias and foliage plants.
The survey showed that New Jersey
ranked eighth in the nation in expanded
wholesale value of floriculture crops, just
behind neighboring New York, but out-
pacing Pennsylvania and Maryland.
Bedding and garden plants sales were
$110.5 million, an increase of 3 percent
from a year earlier. New Jersey also had
$12.4 million in cut flower sales, up from
$11.4 million in 2009.
Dominick Mondi, executive director of
the New Jersey Nursery and Landscape
Association said the survey shows that
floriculture is a viable industry in New
Jersey and, along with other horticultural
products and services, is a great contribu-
tor to the local economy.
“Now that you know, use that knowl-
edge to wisely purchase locally grown
plants from independent growers and gar-
den centers; your garden and the environ-
ment will thank you," said Mondi. "All the
same benefits you receive from buying
your produce locally, like higher quality,
less fuel spent on transport, and support-
ing the local economy, you get with pur-
chasing flowers locally, as well."
Timothy’s Center for Gardening grows
annuals, perennials and fall mums on one
and a half acres. Timothy Serinese is the
third generation in the business, which
was started by his grandfather, father and
uncle on the same location in 1965.
“Our specialty is our large selection
and quality; we have one of the largest
retail perennial departments in the area,”
said Serinese, who has an Ornamental
Horticulture degree from Delaware Valley
College. “The best part of this business is
knowing your customers enjoy coming to
your store and that you are helping to
make the yard or garden the way they
want it.”
To find a nearby nursery or garden
center, visit the Jersey Grown website at:
www.jerseygrown.nj.gov I
3937 S. Lincoln Ave.
856-825-5911
(End of Lincoln Ave. before Millville)
Large Selection
of Jersey Fresh
Vegetables & Fruit
We now accept WIC and Senior FMNP
PICKED
FRESH DAILY
Cucumbers, Zucchini, Pickles,
Eggplant, Peppers, Fresh Herbs,
Peaches, Plums, Cantaloupes,
Local Honey
SWEET MELONS
Our Own Sweet Corn
JERSEY
TOMATOES
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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

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(856i 692-2400
Inclusion in New Jersey Super Lawyers and Best Lawyers in America is based upon peer review rankings by other attorneys and is not a designation by the New Jersey Supreme Court.
HAPPENINGS
AUGUST 10, 11 AND 12
Vacation Bible School. New Bethel
African Methodist Episcopal Church, 414 N.
7th St., Vineland. 6–8 p.m. each night.
Along with a Bible lesson, there will be
crafts, games and snacks. All are encour-
aged to come, children as well as adults.
For more information call 691-1349.
AUGUST 10, 11, 12, 13, 14
Carnival. Devine Mercy Parish, 23 W.
Chestnut Ave., Vineland. Rides, games and
prizes, food, ethnic food specialties, and
family fun. Save 25% with advanced ticket
sales occurring after every mass, or in the
church rectory. 20 tickets valued at $20,
buy in advance and pay $15. For more
information, call 691-9181.
AUGUST 10 AND 11
Understanding Osteoporosis Clinic.
Ledden Family Chiropractic Center. 2821
East Landis Ave., Vineland. Noon on 8/10
and 6:30 p.m. on 8/11. Free. How to prevent
bone loss and strengthen bones with healthy
food choices, exercise, and vitamins will be
discussed. For more info, call 692-2220.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10
Teen Movie Night. The Millville Public
Library, 210 Buck St., Millville. 5 p.m. The
movie night will be appropriate for teens.
For more information, or to register for the
program, call 825-7087.
Seminar On Screening for Stroke,
Vascular Disease and Osteoporosis.
The Lecture Hall at the Center for
Diagnostic Imaging Maintree Commons,
1450 E. Chestnut Ave, Vineland. 5:15 - 6:15
p.m. Free. Members of the CDI medical
staff will be on hand to answer questions
following the presentation. Light refresh-
ments will be served. Space is limited, so
RSVP today. To RSVP, call 856.794.1700 or
visit www.CenterForDiagnosticImaging.com
THURSDAY, AUGUST 11
Back to School Fashion Parade. The
Ramada Inn, 2216 West Landis Ave. &
Route 55, Vineland. Noon. Free. Sponsored
by the Garden State Christian Women’s
Connection and taking place during their
monthly luncheon, this will be a fashion
show of all ages will model back to school
outfits. Open to all women in southern New
Jersey counties, teens through 90s. For
more info., visit www.gscwc.org.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12
Jersey Fresh Barbecue Dinner. Merighi’s
Savoy Inn, 4940 E. Landis Ave., East
Vineland. 6–10 p.m. $40. Held by St.
Augustine Prep, this dinner will benefit the
Make-A-Wish Foundation, featuring a full
summer buffet, DJ Entertainment, Chinese
Auction, 50/50 Raffle and a cash bar. Tickets
are available at Merighi's (in advance) or
by calling 609-501-2502, or visiting
HelpMakeAWishComeTrue.ticketleap.com.
“Back To School” Program/Bookbag
Distribution. Salvation Army-Vineland
Corps., 733 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland.
9–11:30 a.m. and 1–3 p.m. On this date, the
Salvation Army will be accepting applications
and distributing bookbags to children, ages
6-12, who reside in Vineland, Millville, or Port
Norris. Parent’s photo I.D., Lease/proof of
residence, proof of income, child’s birth cer-
tificate and bus pass or report card are all
required. For more info., call 696-5050 x200,
weekdays between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.
Yoga/Stress Release. The Fitness
Connection, corner of Sherman Ave. and
Orchard Rd., Vineland. 6:30 p.m. $24 for
members and $31 for non-members. Taught
by Linda Schimmel, this date marks the
start of a four-week, late summer session.
Learn about YOGA for health, flexibility and
stress release. To register, call 696-3924.
AUGUST 13 AND 14
Bellview Winery Seafood Festival.
Bellview Winery, 150 Atlantic St., Landisville.
$10. As part of the festivities, the winery will
host an American Car Show on Saturday.
Local vendors will be on hand with freshly
prepared seafood of all kinds; BBQ and
other fare will also be available. Live music
by Philadelphia's “To the Max” dance band.
For more info. or to register your car, visit
BellviewWinery.com or call 697-7172.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 13
Band Car Wash. Rossi Middle School,
2572 Palermo Ave., Vineland. $5 for cars
and $8 for trucks and SUVs. To benefit the
Rossi Middle School Band, funds raised
will be used to defray the cost of a trip to
NYC the band is planning for May, 2012.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14
Sunset Cruise. Aboard the Bonanza II.
Departs the NJ State Marina, Fortescue, at
4:30 p.m., though boarding starts 45 min-
utes before time of cruise. $35 for adults,
$20 for children under 12. Presented by the
Delaware Bay Lighthouse Keepers and
Friends Association, this Sunset Cruise will
offer breathtaking views of the sunset, and
will have free soda and water aboard the
SATURDAY, AUGUST 20
Hershey Park Bus Trip.
Sponsored by Accion Social
Puertorriquena, Inc., this trip costs
$57 for ages 3 to 8, and $66 for ages
9 and over. The price includes the
leisure bus trip, movies, and admis-
sion to the park. The bus will depart
from the Walmart parking lot at 7:30
a.m. and arrive at Hershey around 10
a.m. For more info. or tickets, contact
Margie Custodio at 503-7547 or Nancy
Afanador at 609-501-7403.
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72'$<= 75(1'=
715 B S. Delsea Dr., Vineland
856.691.4440
Is Pleased To Welcome
HimTo Our Staff!
Check Us Out On Facebook
Erik’s Hours Are: Tues: 10am - 6pm
Weds: 11am - 7pm • Thurs: 11am - 6pm
Fri: 11am - 8pm • Sat: 10am - 4pm
1117 E. Landis Ave • Suite C • Vineland, NJ 08360
Blaise Menzoni LOAN OFFICER
Gateway Funding DMS, LP
Office 856.692.9494 Fax 856.691.3687
Cell 856.297.7087
With rates at historic lows,
now is a great time to buy a new home or
consider refinancing your existing mortgage.
For unparalleled service, great rates and a variety
of financing options, call Blaise R. Menzoni.
FHA • VA • Conventional
Opening Doors to Home Ownership
Licensed by NJ department of Banking and Insurance
ship. Narrated by former Coast Guard
Lighthouse Keepers. For reservations, con-
tact one of the following: Elma Gardner,
825-0123; Darlene Rigazio, (609) 884-1329;
or Maxine Mulligan, 692-8224.
Feast of St. Mary’s Assumption. St.
Mary’s Church. Routes 40 & 47, Malaga.
Noon–10 p.m. Hosted by Save St. Mary’s,
featuring a candlelight procession, carnival,
live music, chicken BBQ, Italian food booth,
games, inflatables, pony rides, Chinese auc-
tion, farmer’s market, bake sale and more.
DONATIONS NEEDED FOR A RAFFLE. All
proceeds benefit Save St. Mary’s. For more
information, call 521-5721.
Semper Marine Second Sunday Of The
Month Breakfast. Semper Marine
Detachment #205, 2041 W. Landis Ave. 8
a.m. $7 for adults, $4 for children under 12,
and free for children under 5. All you can
eat breakfast includes scrambled eggs, pan-
cakes, grits, sausage, bacon, chipped beef,
hash browns, orange juice, coffee, tea, toast,
and dessert. For more info., call Tim at 293-
8166 or email tim42347@comcast.net
Zumbathon Fundraiser. Washington
Township Ambulance Hall, 4 Willow St.,
Turnersville. 1 - 3 p.m. $20. Come out and
support Jack (pictured)! This Zumbathon
and Chinese Auction will support him on
his road to inde-
pendence, as
every dollar will
be donated to his
family. Dress
comfortably.
Refreshments will
be available. For
those that can’t
attend but would
like to help, donations are being accepted.
For more info., contact Desiree at desi-
bowen@facebook.com.
AUGUST 15 AND 16
Boating Safety Course. North Vineland
Fire Hall, 185 W. Forest Grove Rd., Vineland.
State approved boating course. Must attend
both days for NJ State Certificate. Sign-up
is preferred. Bring a pen or pencil; no felt
tip pens. For more info. call 696-0446 or
305-2595. 6-10 p.m. $50 per person.
MONDAY AUGUST 15
Nami Cumberland County Support
Group Meeting. Chestnut Assembly of
God, 2554 E. Chestnut Ave., Vineland. 7 to
9 p.m. NAMI Cumberland County is a sup-
port, education, and advocacy group serv-
ing consumers of mental health services,
as well as the families and friends of per-
sons affected by a serious mental illness.
For more info., call 691-9234 or 794-9987.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 16
Luau Party. Cumberland Mall Center
Court, 100 Cumberland Mall, Vineland.
10:30 a.m. For kids of all ages. Free. Part of
Miss Kathy’s Tale Spin Stories Series. In
this installment, put on your dancing shoes
and get ready for some dance stories to
make you step, two, three, jump, two,
three, and wiggle ‘til you giggle with music
and dancing all our own. Boscov’s is lined
up for the snack parade.
Texas Roadhouse Night. Texas
Roadhouse, 2299 N. 2nd St., Millville. 3–10
p.m. Hosted by the Vineland High School
Cheerleaders, 10 percent of all food pur-
chases during this time will be donated to
the cheerleading squad. For details, contact
Brittney Tomlin at btomlin@vineland.org.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17
Get Behind The Wheel Racing Class.
New Jersey Motorsports Park Racing
School. 8000 Dividing Creek Rd.,
Millville. If you've ever dreamed of being a
race car driver; if you've ever wanted to
hold an event that your guests will never
forget; or if you simply want to learn how
to drive a car faster than you can safely
drive on the highway, this is the class for
you. Registration required. Register at
www.njmpracingschool.com.
VPL EVENT CALENDAR.
All events held at Vineland Public
Library, 1058 E. Landis Ave., Vineland.
Registration required for all events.
August 10th: 10:30–11:15 a.m.
Preschool Story Time, ages 3-5;
2–3:30 p.m. Reading Club, ages 9 & up;
4–7 p.m. Teen Book discussion,
ages 13-18
August 11th: 2–3 p.m. Reading Club,
ages 6-8
August 12th: 10:30–11 a.m. Baby Time,
ages 6-23 months;
1–2:30 p.m. Pokemon Club, ages 7 & up
August 15th: 2–3 p.m. Young Writers
Club, ages 9-13
August 16th: 10:30–11 a.m. Toddler
Time, age 2;
6–7 p.m. Science Storytelling Family
Night, all ages
August 17th: 10:30–11:15 a.m.
Preschool Story Time, ages 3-5;
2–3:30 p.m. Reading Club, ages 9 & up;
4–6:30 p.m. Teen Potluck, ages 13-18
FREE VACCINATIONS
The Family Success Center of Vineland
is partnering with the Vineland City
Health Department to offer FREE
vaccinations for children ages 2
months to 18 years on August 17.
*Must bring current shot record
DATE: Wednesday, August 17
TIME: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.
PLACE: Family Success Center of
Vineland,
1038 E. Chestnut Ave., Suite
130, Vineland
Grapevine 24-28 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 6:51 PM Page 25
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
AUGUST 10 THROUGH 17
Nightlife at Bennigan’s. 2196 W.
Landis Ave., Vineland, 205-0010. Karaoke
Thursdays with Bob Morgan, 9 p.m.-
close, $3 Heinekens, DJ/Dance Party
Fridays 9 p.m.-Close, $3 Coronas. All
Sports Packages: MLB Extra Innings, NBA
League Pass, NHL Center Ice, and NFL
Sunday Ticket. $3 23-oz. Coors Light &
$5 23-oz. Blue Moon during ALL Phillies
games! Call for reservations infomation.
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Nightlife at Neptune Restaurant. 1554
S. Delsea Drive, Vineland. Live DJ and
Trivia. 692-2800.
Karaoke Night. Old Oar House Irish Pub.
123 North High St., Millville, 293-1200. 8 p.m.
Juicy Wednesday Dance Party. The
Steakhouse at Centerton Country Club.
1022 Almond Road Pittsgrove Township, 358-
3325. 8 p.m.
Salsa Night. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. Free dance lesson with
DJ Slick Rick. $4 Sangria and Corona and
Corona light bottles. 9 p.m. 765-5977.
Bike Nite. Bojo’s Ale House, 222 N. High
St., Millville. 7 p.m. For more info., call 327-
8011.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10
The Jim Craine Show. Michael Debbi
Park, Cedar Ave., Richland. The Buena
Vista Concert Series continues with a
tribute to Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darin, Al
Jolson, Dean Martin, and many more.
The family-friendly event is free to the
public. Hot dogs, deserts, and beverages
will be sold. Seating is available, but
bringing a lawn chair is recommended.
There will be a dance floor if weather
permits. Concert scheduled, rain or
shine. 7 p.m.
EVERY THURSDAY
Jazz Duos. Annata Wine Bar, Bellevue
Ave., Hammonton, 609-704-9797. Live Jazz
featuring area's best jazz duos. 6:30-9:30
pm. No cover. Reservations recommended.
AUGUST 12 THROUGH 14
Nightlife at Ramada. Harry's Pub at
Ramada, W. Landis Ave. and Rt. 55,
Vineland, 696-3800. Wed.: Ladies Night,
1/2 price appetizers all night. Happy Hour
Mon.-Sat, 4-6 p.m. $1 off alcoholic drinks.
Fri. and Sat., live entertainment.
Nightlife at Bojo’s. 222 N. High St.,
Millville, 327-8011. Thurs: Singalong with
Zach. Fri.: Trivia 7 p.m. and dance music
at 8 p.m. Sat: Karaoke with Patty and
Rick. Sun.: Phillies/Nascar.
Nightlife at Villa Fazzolari. Villa
Fazzolari Ristorante & Lounge, 821 Harding
Hwy., Buena, 697-7107. Thurs.: Ladies
Night, Mike Yacovelli Project, 7 p.m. Fri.:
Jazz Night. Sat.: Italian accordian.
EVERY FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Top 40 Dance Party w/ DJ Tony
Morrison. The Cosmopolitan. 3513 S.
Delsea Dr,, Vineland. A dance party featuring
all of the most popular mainstream dance
music. 765-5977.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 11
Adelante Duo. The Bistro on Broad, 400
Broad St., Elmer. (856) 358-8978. 6–9 p.m.
Paul Woznicki-keys/flute and Stephen Testa-
bass. For details, visit thebistroonbroad.com.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 12
Sparks The Rescue. Hangar 84. 20 S.
6th St, Vineland. 7:30 p.m. $13. Hailing
from Maine, Fearless Records’ Sparks The
Rescue (pictured) is a punk and powerpop
quintet. For more info., visit
hangar84music.com.
Rich Fuller. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210 N.
High St., Millville. Singer/songwriter play-
ing his songs with an acoustic guitar. Free
admission. 7 p.m.
Main Street Band. The Rail. 1252
Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-RAIL. 7 p.m.
Jon Corsiglia Art Show. Fuel House
Coffee Co. 6636 E. Landis Ave., Vineland.
7 p.m For more info., call 563-1400.
Danny Eyer Band. Old Oar House Irish
Pub. 127 North High St., Millville. 9 p.m
For more info., call 293-1200.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 13
Sarah Lockette. Bogart’s Bookstore. 210
N. High St., Millville. Singer/songwriter
who incorporates folk, rock and jazz.
Admission is free. 7 p.m.
The Jersey Devil Motorcycle Run. The
Rail. 1252 Harding Hwy., Richland, 697-
RAIL. 7 p.m.
BxN. The Watering Hole 6494 Weymouth
Rd., Mays Landing. 7 p.m
Local Metal/Hardcore Showcase.
Hangar 84. 20 S. 6th St, Vineland. 7:30
p.m. $10. Cumberland County’s up and
coming metalheads show off their chops.
For more info., visit hangar84music.com.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14
Johnny Ringo. The Watering Hole 6494
Weymouth Rd., Mays Landing. 3 p.m.
Rob Huntley. The Beer Garden at Old
Oar House Irish Pub. 127 North High St.,
Millville. 4 p.m For details, call 293-1200.
MONDAY, AUGUST 15
Buddy and the Blue Flames.
Giampietro Park, Enrico Serra band
shell. East Landis Ave, Vineland. The
tenth installment of Vineland’s 2011 park
concert series. A night of music and
dancing. Free admission. 7 p.m.
EVERY TUESDAY
Silver Strike Bowling. Bojo’s Ale House,
222 N. High St., Millville. 7 p.m. For more
info., call 327-8011.
AUGUST 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 25,
26 AND 27
Cabaret. Eagle Theater. 208 Vine St.,
Hammonton. 8 p.m. on every date
except 8/14 and 8/21; 2 p.m. on 8/14
and 8/21. $20, general admission or
$30 for reserved seats at cabaret style
tables. Cabaret is widely known for its
brilliant musical score by Kander and
Ebb, and premiered on Broadway in
1967, enjoying several revivals since. It
was also made into an Academy Award
winning film directed by Bob Fosse and
starring Liza Minelli and Joel Grey. Set
in Berlin against the backdrop of pre-
WW2 Germany, Cabaret is centered on
the love affair between a young
American writer, Clifford, and a British
singer, Sally. Tickets can be purchased
at TheEagleTheatre.com
SUNDAY, AUGUST 21
Fire Apparatus Show and Muster.
WheatonArts. 1501 Glasstown Rd.,
Millville. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. $10 for adults,
$9 for seniors, free for children under 17.
Presented by the 100-member
Glasstown Antique Fire Brigade, the
South Jersey chapter of the Society for
the Preservation and Appreciation of
Antique Motor Fire Apparatus in
America (SPAAMFAA). One of the largest
events of its kind, the day features over
80 antique fire trucks. Special trucks
include models dating back to the
Revolutionary War era, as well as a Ward
LaFrance once used by Trenton
Psychiatric Hospital. Other antique fire-
fighting apparatus and memorabilia will
also be on display.
UPCOMING SHOWS & EVENTS
AT THE LANDIS THEATER
August 12: Dream Team
August 19-21: School House Rock
Kids’ Show
August 27: Gary Puckett
September 10: Robert Klein
September 24: Tiffany “Makeda”
Purnell
October 1: The Machine (Pink Floyd
tribute, pictured)
October 15: Reflections of The Rat
Pack
October 29: My Mother’s Italian, My
Father’s Jewish, and I’m In Therapy
November 12: Kashmir–The Ultimate
Led Zeppelin Show
Tickets can be purchased at the
Landis Theater Box Office or at
www.landistheater.com. Ticket
prices and show times vary.
AUGUST THROUGH DECEMBER
Classic Film Series. The Landis
Theater. 830 E. Landis Ave., Vineland,
691-1121. All movies start at 7:30 p.m.
August 25th—Gone With The Wind
September 15th—To Kill A Mockingbird
October 20th—Young Frankenstein
November 17th—M.A.S.H.
December 15th—It’s A Wonderful Life
Visit landistheater.com for more info.

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Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m.
To order your classified call, 856-457-7815 or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Call 9 a.m - 5 p.m daily, Deadline for paid ads: Friday, 3 p.m. To order your classified, call 856-457-7815 or
visit www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds. See box below for additional ordering information.
Only $10 per ad, per week, up to 20 words; over 20 words,
$0.50 per word. $0.30 for bold—per word/per issue, $3 for a
Border/per issue. Add a photo for $15. Mail Ad & payment or go
online to www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds.
Not responsible for typographical errors. • Once an ad is placed, it cannot be cancelled or charged. The Grapevine does not in any way
imply approval or endorsement. Those interested in goods or services always use good judgment and take appropriate precautions.
Acct. No. ___________________________________Exp. Date________ 3 Digit # on back
of card__________
Signature:__________________________________________
Printed Name:______________________________________
Name ___________________________________
Address__________________________________
City__________________________Zip_________
Phone #: ________________________________
email____________________________________
The Grapevine
3638 E. Landis Ave.
Vineland, NJ 08361
www.grapevinenewspaper.com
Mail Ad
Form with
Payment TO:
Classfieds
Call for more information
856-457-7815
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Check if needed.
Refer to prices above.
JBold
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CLASSIFIEDS
Need work? Have a business and need
more customers? Why not get the
word out through The Grapevine’s
Classified section?
Advertize your skills and business in the
Classifieds by calling 856-457-7815.
Having a Yard Sale or Garage Sale?
It’s time for spring cleaning, and there’s no better
way to get the word out than to advertise your
yard sale in The Grapevine’s Classifieds.
Use the form below, or visit
www.grapevinenewspaper.com/classifieds
Deadline is Friday for the following Wednesday’s paper.
Credit Cards
Accepted:
Micro Electric LLC.
Residential repair, addi-
tions, and services.
Bonded and insured. “no
job is too small.”
NJ LIC #14256.
Call 609-501-7777
Eugene’s Lawn Service.
Perfecting lawns one at a
time. Mowing. Leaves.
Mulch. Shrubs. Pressure
Washing. Call for free esti-
mate. 856-305-1682
Everything must go!
Saturday 8/13. 1794 West
Blvd., Malaga. 8 a.m. to 3
p.m. Kitchenware; bed-
room, dining room, and
living room furniture;
linens, window treaments
and sewing material and
more! Call to see itemsbe-
fore sale. 696-2060
Customer service rep.
needed to work for our
aid. 18 years and above
needed; must possess
good typing skills and
speak English fluently.
Will earn $3,000 monthly.
Email me at
sp7777777@blumail.org. If
interested, contact me.
BARBER/STYLIST
MALE/FEMALE. FOR EAST
VINELAND SHOP. 609-774-
5359
Spaces For Rent! Jess’s
Bazaar, 537 Landis Ave.
Spaces for beauty salons
and hair-braiding. Call
856-507-9500 or visit
jesssbridal.com/bazaar.
Steelman's Drywall.
Hanging, finishing and
repairs. No job too big or
small. Free estimate. Call
Joe 609-381-3814.
Turk's Pressure Clean.
Property maintenance.
Vinyl and aluminum
siding, concrete, brick,
roof cleaning, gutter
clean-out. Over 25 years
in business, fully insured.
(856) 692-7470.
John's Lawn Mowing:
Clean Ups, edging, bush
and tree trimming &
stump removal, mulch,
river-rock, gutter cleaning,
Vineland/Millville area
856-305-0194
Electrical
Contractor
Health & Fitness
Body and Mind
Massage: professional
therapeutic massage.
New clients $45.00
for 50 minute mas-
sage. Reg. $65.00 +
tax. 856-205-2626.
Outcalls only.
For Sale: Brand new
wedding gown, blush-
er, vail, tiara, candle
set, cake set, and
photo album. Prices
negotiable. Call
Wendy 856-982-7079
White Sweet Corn,
home grown and
picked fresh, hourly.
Sunny Meadow Farm.
Bridgeton on Landis
Ave. 1/2 mile from
Carll's Corner
Jersey Corn For Sale!
Our own fresh Jersey
yellow sweet corn.
Orders welcomed. 13
ears for $5. 856-297-
3277
LIKE NEW!!! 20"
Electric Caloric Range!
Perfect for efficiency
apt., lake house, or RV.
ONLY $185.00 OBO!
Call 214-277-2450 or
972-304-1861.
Yard Sale
Redefined Spaces
Painting, drywall,
kitchens, bathrooms,
decks, siding,
windows, and doors.
Fully licensed, bond-
ed, and insured.
Great service, afford-
able prices. Free esti-
mates available.
Owner/operator John
Donoffio. If interested
in services, call 609-
670-0604. Call today!
For Sale
Help Wanted
Estate Sale
A CUT ABOVE LAWN
CARE. LAWN MAIN-
TANCE, LEAF CLEAN
UPS, PAVERS,
PATIOS, WALK WAYS,
POOLS & MORE.
FREE ESTIMATE.
ALEX 609-381-8586
Landscaping
Pete Construction.
Specializing in decks,
roofs, and home
remodeling. State
licensed and insured.
Call for a free esti-
mate. 856-507-1456.
Annual Block Long
Yard Sale on Forest
Grove Road,
Saturday, August
13th, from Blue Bell
Road to Delsea Drive
in Vineland, NJ.
Home
Improvement
Miscellaneous
KAYAK/TOURYAK—
Prijon
1 owner, garaged, 1
1/2 yr. old, vg/exc
cond. Inc balanced
wing rudder, nylon
spray skirt w/
adjustable tunnel.
Color yellow. $1200.
Werner Camano pad-
dle, amber, exc cond.,
$175. 609-742-6647
No Math Left
Behind! Tutoring in
math for all ages.
Tuesday and
Thursday currently
open. Call 691-5534
to get your child
ahead of the curve.
Services
Need Computer Help?
PC Troubleshooting,
Wireless Networking,
Email Setup, PC Tune
Up, Internet
Connection Help, Virus
Removal, New PC
Setup etc. Fast, friendly
service. Reasonable
rates. Call 856-558-
9812
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VIP Discount Cards MakeYou Smile
(877) VIP-4224 / (856) 696-8484
Dining, Business & Entertainment
Savings
FREE Online
Classified Ads
Discount
Gift Cards
Do you have a car or boat that is
taking up space in your driveway?
Are you hoping to sell your
vehicle for some extra cash?
Publicize the sale of your vehicle
by advertising in The Grapevine’s
Classifieds section. Make your
junk someone else’s treasures.
Selling your Car?
Grapevine 24-28 081011:Layout 1 8/8/11 6:51 PM Page 27
Lobby Hours All Locations:
Monday - Wednesday: 8:30 AM– 5:00 PM
Thursday & Friday: 8:30 AM – 6:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Drive-Thru Hours All Locations:
Monday- Thursday: 8:00 AM– 6:00 PM
Friday: 8:00 AM – 7:00 PM
Saturday: 9:00 AM – 1:00 PM
175 S. Main Road & 1234 W. Landis Avenue, Vineland, NJ • 856.690.1234
Our Focus Is You.
Member FDIC
Capital Bank is rated 5 Stars by Bauer Financial.
See your bank’s rating at BauerFinancial.com
Savings rate guaranteed, as a minimum, through 12/31/2011; interest rate may vary thereafter.
Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings. *Annual Percentage Yield (APY).
Checking interest rate may vary. Offer may be withdrawn at any time without previous notice. Fees may reduce earnings.
Or Anytime at CapitalBankNJ.com
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1.00
%
APY* SAVINGS
No Minimum Balance
Rate Guaranteed to December 31
FEE-FREE CHECKING
With Interest
FREE ATM Transactions • FREE Checks
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