Fractional Fourier transform as a signal processing tool: An overview

of recent developments
Ervin Sejdic´
a,Ã
, Igor Djurovic´
b
, LJubiˇ sa Stankovic´
b
a
Division of Gerontology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA
b
Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Montenegro, Podgorica, Montenegro
a r t i c l e i n f o
Article history:
Received 27 February 2010
Received in revised form
20 August 2010
Accepted 19 October 2010
Available online 27 October 2010
Keywords:
Fractional Fourier transform
Time–frequency
Discrete realizations
Applications
a b s t r a c t
Fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a generalization of the Fourier transform,
rediscovered many times over the past 100 years. In this paper, we provide an overview
of recent contributions pertaining to the FRFT. Specifically, the paper is geared toward
signal processing practitioners by emphasizing the practical digital realizations and
applications of the FRFT. It discusses three major topics. First, the manuscripts relates the
FRFT to other mathematical transforms. Second, it discusses various approaches for
practical realizations of the FRFT. Third, we overview the practical applications of the
FRFT. Fromthese discussions, we can clearly state that the FRFT is closely related to other
mathematical transforms, such as time–frequency and linear canonical transforms.
Nevertheless, we still feel that major contributions are expected in the field of the digital
realizations andits applications, especially, since many digital realizations of the FRFTstill
lack properties of the continuous FRFT. Overall, the FRFT is a valuable signal processing
tool. Its practical applications are expected to grow significantly in years to come, given
that the FRFT offers many advantages over the traditional Fourier analysis.
& 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
1. Introduction
In very simple terms, the fractional Fourier transform
(FRFT) is a generalization of the ordinary Fourier transform
[1]. Specifically, the FRFT implements the so-called order
parameter a which acts on the ordinary Fourier transform
operator. In other words, the a-th order fractional Fourier
transform represents the a-th power of the ordinary
Fourier transform operator. When a ¼p=2, we obtain the
Fourier transform, while for a ¼0, we obtain the signal
itself. Any intermediate value of a ð0oaop=2Þ produces a
signal representation that can be considered as a rotated
time–frequency representation of the signal [2,3].
Interestingly enough, the idea of the fractional powers of
the Fourier operator has been ‘‘discovered’’ several times in
the literature. Initially, the idea appearedinthe mathematical
literature between the two world wars (e.g., [4,5]). More
publications relating to this idea appeared after the second
world war, however they were sporadic (e.g. [6]). The idea of
fractional Fourier operator re-gains a momentum in 1980s
with publications by Namias (e.g. [7]). Following Namias’
contributions, a large number of papers appeared in the
literature during 1990s tying the concept of the fractional
Fourier operators to many other fields (e.g., time–frequency
analysis as described in [2]). We have also witnessed a
number of recent contributions attempting to understand
the practical applications of the FRFT beyond optics.
The main goal of this publication is to provide an
overview of recent developments regarding the FRFT and
its applications. Althougha number of publications review-
ing the FRFT has also appeared in recent years (e.g., [1,8,9]),
some of these publications are geared toward explaining
the mathematical eloquence behind the FRFT. Our goal is to
simplify the theory behind the FRFT and provide an over-
view suitable for a signal processing practitioner. In
Contents lists available at ScienceDirect
journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/sigpro
Signal Processing
0165-1684/$ - see front matter & 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
doi:10.1016/j.sigpro.2010.10.008
Ã
Corresponding author.
E-mail addresses: esejdic@ieee.org (E. Sejdic´ ),
igordj@ac.me (I. Djurovic´ ), ljubisa@ac.me (LJ. Stankovic´ ).
Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369
particular, we emphasize the practicality of the FRFT by
devoting a significant part of this manuscript to its discrete
realizations and applications. By attracting more practi-
tioners to this eloquent mathematical concept, we hope to
foster more applications since the FRFT offers many valu-
able properties, which otherwise were not available with
traditional tools (e.g., the Fourier transform).
The paper is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces
the concept of FRFT and relates the transform to other
mathematical representations. In Section 3, we discuss
various implementation approaches for discrete signals.
Section 4 provides an overview of some FRFT applications,
while in Section 5, we provide concluding remarks along
with an outline of possible future directions.
2. The fractional Fourier transform
The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a linear
operator defined as [10–13]
X
a
ðuÞ ¼F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼

þ1
À1
xðtÞK
a
ðt,uÞ dt ð1Þ
with K
a
ðt,uÞ representing the kernel function defined as
K
a
ðt,uÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
2p

if a is not multiple of p
Âe
jðu
2
=2Þcota
e
jðt
2
=2ÞcotaÀjutcsca
dðtÀuÞ if a is a multiple of 2p
dðt þuÞ if aþp is a multiple of 2p

ð2Þ
anddðtÞ representingtheDiracfunction. Throughout thepaper
we use F
a
to denote the operator associated with
the FRFT. It should be noted that we adopted notation for
the FRFTfoundinsignal processing literature. Inparticular, we
denotetherotationanglebya. Mathematicians usuallydenote
the rotation angle by a, where a ¼2a=p. It is important to
point out that various a values provide transformations with
distinctive properties. Hence, a can be adjusted in many
applications to provide enhanced results in comparison to
other existing methods. Additional computational complexity
associated with such optimization efforts is often acceptable.
Given the properties of the kernel, Eq. (1) is equal to x(t)
when a is a multiple of 2p, and is equal to x(Àt) when aþp
is a multiple of 2p. Some properties associated with the
FRFT are summarized as follows [1,14]:
1. The standard Fourier transform is a special case of the
FRFT with a rotation angle a ¼p=2.
2. F
0
is the identity operator, i.e., F
0
ðxðtÞÞ ¼xðtÞ. The same
can be stated for F
2p
.
3. The FRFT is a linear operator, i.e., F
a
ð
¸
k
c
k
x
k
ðtÞÞ ¼
¸
k
c
k
F
a
ðx
k
ðtÞÞ.
4. The FRFT adheres to commutativity (i.e., F
a
1
F
a
2
¼F
a
2
F
a
1
) and associativity (i.e., ðF
a
3
F
a
2
ÞF
a
1
¼F
a
3
ðF
a
2
F
a
1
ÞÞ.
5. Successive applications of the FRFT of various orders is
equal to a single application of the FRFT whose order is
equal to the sum of individual orders (e.g., F
a
1
F
a
2
¼
F
a
1
þa
2
Þ.
6. Inverse FRFT is obtained by applying F
Àa
to the
transformed signal (i.e., F
a
F
Àa
¼F
0
Þ.
7. FRFT satisfies the Parseval theorem: /xðtÞ,yðtÞS¼
/X
a
ðuÞ,Y
a
ðuÞS.
Additional properties of the FRFT and some transform
pairs are listed in Tables 1 and 2. These properties clearly
indicate that the FRFT is an extension of the ordinary
Fourier transform. More extensive descriptions and proofs
of these properties, along with additional transform pairs,
can be found in other references (e.g., [1,10–12]). The FRFTs
of a few sample signals are shown in Fig. 1.
A particularly interesting case of the above listed
properties is the fact that it can be shown that the FRFT
of a product of two signals, y(t) = x(t) w(t), can be shown to
be equal to [15]:
Y
a
ðuÞ ¼
jcscaj
ffiffiffiffiffiffi
2p
p exp
ju
2
cota
2


þ1
À1
X
a
ðuÞWððuÀuÞcscaÞ
Âexp À
ju
2
cota
2

du ð3Þ
where WðuÞ is the Fourier transformof w(t). In other words,
the resultant FRFT is equal to convolution of the FRFT of x(t)
with the Fourier transform of w(t) multiplied by a chirp
function. A similar expression can be derived for convolu-
tion of two signals ðyðtÞ ¼xðtÞ Ã wðtÞÞ. In particular, con-
volution of two signals in time domain equals to [15]:
Y
a
ðuÞ ¼ jsecajexp À
ju
2
tana
2


þ1
À1
X
a
ðuÞwððuÀuÞsecaÞ
Âexp
ju
2
tana
2

du ð4Þ
Table 1
Properties of the FRFT.
Signal FRFT
xðtÀtÞ expðjðt
2
=2ÞsinacosaÀjutsinaÞX
a
ðuÀtcosaÞ
xðtÞexpðjutÞ expðÀju
2
ðsinacosaÞ=2þjucosaÞX
a
ðuÀusinaÞ
x(t)t ucosaX
a
ðuÞ þjsinaX
a
uðuÞ
x(t)/t
Àjsecaexpðjðu
2
=2ÞcotaÞ

u
À1
xðzÞexpðÀjðz
2
=2ÞcotaÞ dz
x(ct)
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
c
2
Àjcota

expðjðu
2
=2Þcotað1Àðcos
2
b=cos
2
aÞÞÞX
b
usinb
csina

where cotb ¼cota=c
2
xuðtÞ X
a
uðuÞcosaþjusinaX
a
ðuÞ

t
b
xðtuÞ dtu secaexpðÀjðu
2
=2ÞtanaÞ

u
b
X
a
ðzÞexpðjðz
2
=2ÞtanaÞ dz if
aÀp=2 is not a multiple of p
Table 2
FRFT of some basic functions.
Signal FRFT
1
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1þjtana

expðÀjðu
2
=2ÞtanaÞ
dðtÀtÞ
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
2p

expðjððt
2
þu
2
Þ=2ÞcotaÀjut csc aÞ
expðÀt
2
=2Þ expðÀu
2
=2Þ
expðjZtÞ
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1þjtana

expðjððZ
2
þu
2
Þ=2ÞtanaÀjuZsecaÞ
expðcðÀt
2
=2ÞÞ
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
cÀjcota

expðjðu
2
=2Þðc
2
À1Þcota=ðc
2
þcot
2
aÞÞ
expðÀcðu
2
=2Þcsc
2
a=ðc
2
þcot
2
aÞÞ
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1352
which shows that the FRFT of a convolution can therefore
be obtained by taking the FRFT of one of the signals,
multiplying by a chirp, convolving with a scaled version
of the other signal, and multiplying again by a chirp and by
a scale factor. These two rules are of particular interests
when developing a time–frequency representation based
on the FRFT.
Our next task is to understand the relationship between
the FRFT and other mathematical representations. First, we
begin by establishing the relationships with the ordinary
Fourier transform. Then, we establish relationships with
various time–frequency representations and linear cano-
nical analysis.
2.1. FRFT as fractional powers of Fourier transform
Namias provided an elegant generalization of the Four-
ier transformto the FRFT [7], by deriving the FRFT fromthe
eigenfunctions of the Fourier transform. In fact, Namias
used the fact that the Hermite–Gaussian functions ðf
k
ðtÞÞ
are eigenfunctions of the Fourier transform and showed
that the a-th order FRFT shares the eigenfunctions of the
Fourier transform. More specifically, the eigenvalues of the
FRFT are the a-th root of the eigenvalues of the Fourier
transform [7]:
F
a
ðf
k
ðtÞÞ ¼expðÀjakÞf
k
ðtÞ ð5Þ
Therefore, if we expand a signal in terms of these eigen-
functions, we obtained
xðtÞ ¼
¸
1
k ¼ 0
c
k
f
k
ðtÞ ð6Þ
where
c
k
¼

þ1
À1
f
k
ðtÞxðtÞ dt ð7Þ
By applying the fractional operator ðF
a
ðÁÞÞ to both sides
of (6), we get
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼
¸
1
k ¼ 0
c
k
F
a
ðf
k
ðtÞÞ
¼
¸
1
k ¼ 0
c
k
expðÀjakÞf
k
ðuÞ
¼

¸
1
k ¼ 0
expðÀjakÞf
k
ðuÞf
k
ðtÞxðtÞ dt ð8Þ
Fromthe above equation, it is clear that the kernel function
can be defined as
K
a
ðt,uÞ ¼
¸
1
k ¼ 0
expðÀjakÞf
k
ðuÞf
k
ðtÞ ð9Þ
The above equation can be considered as the spectral
decomposition of the kernel function of FRFT [1]. Using
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.5
1
t
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
−0.5
0
0.5
u
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.5
1
t
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
−1
0
1
u
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−5 0 5
0
0.5
1
t
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−5 0 5
0
0.5
1
u
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
Fig. 1. Sample signals and their theoretical FRFTs ða ¼p=4Þ: (a) time domain representation of the Dirac function; (b) FRFT of the Dirac function; (c) time
domain representation of the unit function; (d) FRFT of the unit function; (e) time domain representation of the exponential function and (f) FRFT of the
exponential function. Solid lines represent real parts, while dashed lines represent imaginary parts.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1353
the Mehler formula, Namias in fact shows that we obtain
the FRFT from (8) [7].
2.2. Relations to time–frequency representations
To understand the relationship between the FRFT and
various time–frequency analyses, we consider the relation-
ship between the ambiguity function and the FRFT. The
ambiguity function (AF) of a signal, x(t), is
AF
x
ðt,f Þ ¼

þ1
À1
x tþ
t
2

x
Ã

t
2

expðÀj2ptf Þ dt ð10Þ
By introducing rotation of the AF by using the following
transformation:
t ¼Rcosa ð11Þ
f ¼Rsina ð12Þ
with R 2 ðÀ1,1Þ and a 2 ½0,pÞ, and redefining the AF as
FRAF
x
ðR,aÞ ¼AF
x
ðRcosa,RsinaÞ, it becomes obvious that the
FRFT corresponds to a rotation of the AF [16]. In particular,
it is easy to prove that the fractional power spectra is the
Fourier transform of the AF:
FRAF
x
R,aÀ
p
2

¼

þ1
À1
jX
a
ðuÞjexpðj2pRuÞ du ð13Þ
Using this relationship, the connection between the local
fractional FT moments and the angle derivative of the
fractional power spectra has been established in [17].
Furthermore, it can be easily generalized that the FRFT
corresponds to rotation of a class of time–frequency
representations (TFRs) as along as Cðt,f Þ ¼F
À1
y-t,t-f
ffðy,tÞg is rotational symmetric [18–21], where fðy,tÞ is
a two-dimensional kernel function. For example, the FRFT
corresponds to the rotation of the Wigner distribution
(WD) in the time–frequency plane [20,22–25]:
WD
FaðxðtÞÞ
ðt,f Þ ¼WD
x
ðtcosaÀf sina,usinaþf cosaÞ ð14Þ
The relationship between FRFT and Radon–Wigner dis-
tribution (RWD) (e.g., [26]) is studied in [23,27], and it was
shown that the RWD is the squared modulus of the FRFT:
RWD½xðtފ ¼jF
a
½xðtފj
2
ð15Þ
Additionally, we should point out that the FRFT could be
potentially useful for obtaining time–frequency distributions
without cross-terms. For example, WDandAFexhibit different
behaviors when considering signals with multiple compo-
nents. Namely, the WD has signal components (i.e., auto-
terms) concentrated around their instantaneous frequencies
andgroupdelays, whileinterferences(cross-terms) arelocated
between these components. On the other hand, the AF has the
auto-terms concentrated around the origin while the inter-
ferences are dislocated from the origin. The connection
between these two time–frequency representations is the
2D Fourier transform:
WD
x
ðt,oÞ ¼FT
t-o,y-t
fAF
x
ðy,tÞg ð16Þ
However, interesting results are obtainedwhenwe use the 2D
FRFT insteadof the 2DFourier transformin(16). Specifically, it
is possible to separate all auto- and cross-terms in the time–
frequency plane for some classes of signals. To illustrate this
behavior, let us considered a signal with four components
concentrated in the TF plane around (t,f)=(70.5,76), and the
signal is defined as
xðtÞ ¼½expðÀ60ðtÀ0:5Þ
2
ÞþexpðÀ60ðt þ0:5Þ
2
ފ
½expðj12ptÞþexpðÀj12ptފ ð17Þ
with t 2 ½À1,1Š. The AF of this signal is depicted in Fig. 2(a). All
four auto-terms are located inthe middle of the graph (i.e., the
origin of the ambiguity plane). Each of four horizontal and
vertical objects withrespect totheoriginrepresents twocross-
terms, whilethecorner objects represent singlecross-terms. In
the case of the WD (Fig. 2(b)), the corner objects are auto-
terms, whilethecentral object represents thefour cross-terms.
The remainingobjects containtwocross terms each. However,
all 16 components (4 auto terms and 12 cross-terms) are
clearly separated as shown in Fig. 2(c) when we used the FRFT
operator with a ¼0:5 in (16).
2.2.1. Local polynomial Fourier transform
It is also of our interest to establish the relationship
between the FRFT and the local polynomial Fourier trans-
form (LPFT) [28,29]. First, we rewrite the FRFT as
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
2p

e
jðu
2
=2Þcota

þ1
À1
x
w
ðtÞe
jðt
2
=2ÞcotaÀjutcsca
dt
ð18Þ
Fig. 2. Time–frequency representation of the four-component signal: (a) the AF; (b) the WD and (c) the FRFT of the AF.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1354
where x
w
ðtÞ ¼xðt þtÞwðtÞ. If the LPFT is given by [28,29]
LPFT
x
ðt,f Þ ¼

þ1
À1
xðt þtÞwðtÞexpðÀj2pf
1
tÀj2pf
2
t
2
=2
ÀÁ Á Á Àj2pf
M
t
M
=MÞ dt ð19Þ
where f ¼ ðf
1
,f
2
, . . . ,f
M
Þ, we set M=2, 2pf
1
¼ucsca, and
2pf
2
¼cota, then (18) can be expressed in terms of the
LPFT as
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1Àjcota
2p

e
jðu
2
=2Þcota
LPFT
x
ðt,f
1
,f
2
Þ ð20Þ
From these equations it can be clearly seen that the LPFT
provides a broad generalization of the FRFT. Similar
observations have been made in [30]. Additionally, we
can relate the FRFT to the local polynomial periodogram
(LPP), which is defined as the squared magnitude of
the LPFT:
LPP
x
ðt,f Þ ¼jLPFT
x
ðt,f Þj
2
ð21Þ
To understand the relationship between the FRFT and the
LPP, let us consider the LPP in more detail. The LPP is a
distribution belonging to the Cohen class of distributions
[28,29]. Its kernel is defined as the AF of w
g
ðtÞ ¼wðtÞ
expðÀj2pf
2
t
2
=2ÀÁ Á Á Àj2pf
M
t
M
=M!Þ, which is a generaliza-
tionof the kernel usedfor the spectrogram(i.e., the squared
magnitude of the short-time Fourier transform), where the
kernel function is defined as the AF of w(t). This general-
ization stems from the fact that the short-time Fourier
transform is equal to the LPFT for M=1. Hence, to relate
the LPP to (20), let us consider the second order case
(i.e., M = 2):
AF
wg
ðt,f Þ ¼

þ1
À1
w tþ
t
2

w
Ã

t
2

expðÀj2pf
2
ðtþt=2Þ
2
þj2pf
2
ðtÀt=2Þ
2
Àj2pf tÞ dt
¼

þ1
À1
w tþ
t
2

w
Ã

t
2

expðÀj4pf
2
ttÀj2pf tÞ dt
¼AF
w
ðt,f þ2pf
2
tÞ ð22Þ
where AF
w
(t,f) is the ambiguity function of the used
window. Hence, the LPP rotates AF
w
(t,f) in the ambiguity
plane and can adjust the resulting time–frequency repre-
sentation according to the signal of interest. Similarly can
be stated for any localized form of the FRFT with a
proper selection of the a (angle) parameter.
Eqs. (13)–(22) demonstrate that various coordinate
transformations have been implemented to relate the
FRFT to different transformations. This implies that any
coordinate transformation can be used, which is demon-
strated in the next section, where we relate the FRFT with
the linear canonical transform.
2.2.2. Other time–frequency representations and properties
A formal relationship between the wavelet transform
and the FRFT has also been established [31,32]. Specifically,
the FRFT kernels corresponding to different values of
a are closely related to the wavelet transform, which
can be obtained from the quadratic phase function in (2)
by scaling the coordinates and the amplitude [31,32].
Furthermore, fractional-Fourier-domain realizations of
several other time–frequency representations were also
introduced. These include realizations of the short-time
Fourier transform [33], the weighted WD (i.e., S-method)
[21,34], the Gabor expansion [35–38], and the tomography
time–frequency transform defined as the inverse Radon
transform of the FRFT [39].
Some of the properties associated with the time–
frequency analysis have been extended to the FRFT. For
example, marginals associated withtime–frequency repre-
sentations based on the fractional Fourier transform were
examined [40] in analogy to marginals associated with
TFRs based on the standard Fourier transform. However, it
is not very clear what is a precise meaning of those
generalized marginals in comparison to the traditional
time and frequency marginals, which have a specific
meaning relating those quantities to the signal under
analysis. Several publications also investigated the uncer-
tainty principle in the fractional domain [41–44].
2.3. FRFT and linear canonical transform
The linear canonical transform (LCT) is a multipara-
meter integral transformand it represents a generalization
of many mathematical transformations (e.g., the Fourier
transform, FRFT, Fresnel transform) [1,45]. It should be
mentioned that the LCT is also called the affine Fourier
transform, the generalized Fresnel transform, the Collins
formula, the ABCD transform, or the almost Fourier and
almost Fresnel transformation[1,45]. The transformationis
useful in many practical applications such as optics, radar
system analysis, filter design, phase retrieval, and pattern
recognition [45].
The LCT is defined by [1,45,46]
LCT
L
ðxðtÞÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
1
j2pb

expðj du
2
=ð2bÞÞ

þ1
À1
expðÀjut=bÞ
Âexpðjat
2
=ð2bÞÞxðtÞ dt, ba0
ffiffiffi
d
p
expðjc du
2
=2ÞxðduÞ, b ¼0

ð23Þ
where adÀbc=1, L¼fa,b,c,dg. Using the above equation, it
is straightforward to show that the FRFT is the special case
of LCT where fa,b,c,dg ¼ fcosa,sina,Àsina,cosag with some
phase correction [1,45,46]. In other words,
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
expðjaÞ

LCT
fcosa,sina,Àsina,cosag
ðxðtÞÞ ð24Þ
Additionally, other existing forms of the LCT can be related
to FRFT. For example, the simple coordinate transform
proposed in [16] when considered with parameters
f1,a,0,1g represents the form of the second order poly-
nomial Fourier transform with 2pf
2
¼a. Furthermore, de
Bruijn proposed a form of the LCT in 1973 [6]. The
parameters of this distribution are fcosha,sinha,sinha,
coshag and its kernel function is defined as
K
a
ðt,uÞ ¼
1
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
sinha
p e
Àjpðu
2
=2Þcotha
e
Àjpðt
2
=2Þcothaþjput=sinha
ð25Þ
which is quite similar to the FRFT. This transform shares
numerous properties of FRFT and it will be interesting to
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1355
investigate a range of possible application of this coordi-
nate transform given recent advances in signal processing.
2.3.1. Coordinate transformation of other higher-order time–
frequency representations
The FRFT and LCT framework can be generalized for
some higher order time–frequency representations. Here,
we discuss the case of the L-Wigner distribution (L-WD)
introduced in [47] for achieving high concentration of the
time–frequency representations by eliminating the so-
called inner interferences. The L-WD can be defined as
LWDðt,f Þ ¼

1
À1
x
L
ðt þ0:5t=LÞx
ÃL
ðtÀ0:5t=LÞexpðÀj2pfttÞ dt
ð26Þ
Signal x
L
ðtÞ, producing the coordinate transform of the
L-WD LWD(at+bf,ct+df), can be defined for ba0 as
x
L
ðtÞ ¼ ð1=2pjbjÞ
1=2L

þ1
À1
x
L
ðtÞe
jðL=2Þðð1ÀaÞ=bÞu
2
ÀjðLðtÀuÞ
2
Þ=2b
du

¸
¸

Âe
jðð1ÀdÞ=bÞt
2
=2
ð27Þ
For rotationa ¼d ¼cosa and c ¼Àb ¼sina, the generalized
(L) form of the FRFT can be written as
X
L,a
ðuÞ ¼
Lð1ÀjcotaÞ
2p

1=2L

þ1
À1
x
L
ðtÞe
jðL=2Þcotaðu
2
þt
2
ÞÀjLutcsca
dt

¸
¸

1=L
ð28Þ
The L-FRFT form can be evaluated using the FRFT as
X
L,a
ðuÞ ¼L
1=2L
1þjcota
2p

ðLÀ1Þ=2L

þ1
À1

þ1
À1
. . .

þ1
À1
¸
L
i ¼ 1
X
a
ðu
i
Þ du
i

¸
Âe
Àjðcota=2Þ
¸
L
i ¼ 1
u
2
i
Àu
2

d LuÀ
¸
L
i ¼ 1
u
2
i

ð29Þ
For L=2, this relationship can be written as
X
2,a
ðuÞ ¼
1þjcota
p

1=4

þ1
À1
X
a
ðuþtÞX
Ã
a
ðuÀtÞe
Àjcotat
2
dt

¸
¸

1=2
ð30Þ
In general the L-FRFT of the k+m-th order can always be
expressed using the L-FRFT of k-th and m-th orders:
X
kþm,a
ðuÞ ¼
ðkþmÞð1þjcotaÞ
2pkm

1=2ðkþmÞ
Â

þ1
À1
X
k
k,a
ðuþt=kÞX
m
m,a
ðuÀt=mÞe
Àj ðkþmÞ=km ð Þ=2
dt

¸
¸

1=ðkþmÞ
ð31Þ
Similar coordinate transform can be determined for all
time–frequency representations depending on powers of
the signal local-autocorrelation xðt þt=2Þx
Ã
ðtÀt=2Þ. How-
ever, as far as we know there are no reported results for
other higher-order time–frequency representations such
as the polynomial WD (e.g., [48]) with the usage of several
auto-correlations.
2.3.2. Multiparameter coordinate transformations
Further generalizations of these transforms can be
achieved by introducing additional parameters. Mathema-
tically, such generalization would be given as
tu
f u
¸ ¸
¼
a b
c d
¸
t
f
¸ ¸
þ
b g
y f
¸ ¸
t
f
¸ ¸
½t f Š
1
1
¸
ð32Þ
where tu and f u represent the transformed coordinates.
These transformations correspond to more complex dis-
tortions in the time–frequency plane in comparison to the
FRFT and LPFT. The generalization, as shown in (32), could
be used to describe many existing transforms as well. For
example, when da0, fa0 and all other parameters are
equal to zero, we obtain the LPFT for M=3, as shown in (19).
3. Practical realizations of FRFT
In order to practically realize the FRFT based operators,
filters, correlators, and other optical systems, we are
required to numerically calculate the FRFT [49]. As
depicted in the previous section, the FRFT is a subclass of
integral transformations characterized by quadratic com-
plex exponential kernels. These complex exponential
kernels often introduce very fast oscillations as shown in
Fig. 3. Hence, it is not possible to evaluate these transfor-
mations by direct numerical integration since these fast
oscillations require excessively large sampling rates.
A possible approach is to decompose these integral trans-
formations into sub-operations. However, we still require
significantly higher sampling rates than the Nyquist rate,
depending on the order and particular decomposition
employed. This results in greater time of computation,
larger numerical inaccuracies, and the need for more
memory. Therefore, the goal of this section is to provide
an overview of various practical implementations pro-
posed over the years. Given that we are concerned with
practical implementations using discrete signals, we only
consider approaches for the implementation of the so-
called discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFRFT). In
other words, for a discrete signal, x(n), of length N we
can define the DFRFT as follows:
X
a
ðnÞ ¼F
a
xðnÞ ð33Þ
where F
a
is defined as the discrete fractional Fourier
transform matrix, x(n) is a vector representing the signal,
and X
a
ðnÞ is a vector representing the DFRFT of the signal.
Therefore, the optical based implantations (e.g., [49]) are
beyond the scope of this paper. A summary of various
approaches is shown in Table 3.
3.1. DFRFT through sampling of FRFT
A straightforward approach for obtaining the DFRFT is
to sample the FRFT, since the sampling theorems for the
FRFT of bandlimited and time-limited signals follow from
those of the Shannon sampling theorem [14,50–55]. How-
ever, the resultant discrete transform may lose many
important properties (i.e., unitarity and reversibility). In
addition, the DFRFTobtainedbydirect sampling of the FRFT
lacks closed-form properties and is not additive, meaning
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1356
that its applications are very limited [56]. In order to
maintain some of the FRFT properties, a type of DFRFT,
derived as a special case of the continuous FRFT, was
proposedin[57]. Specifically, it was assumedthat the input
function is a periodic, equally spaced impulse train. Since
this type of DFRFT is a special case of continuous FRFT,
many properties of the FRFT also exist and have the fast
algorithm. However, this type of DFRFT cannot be defined
for all values of a due to various imposed constraints.
At the same time, Ozaktas et al. proposed two innovative
approaches for obtaining the DFRFT through sampling
of the FRFT [58]. Both of the methods are based on the
idea that we can manipulate the expression for the FRFT,
such that the form can be appropriately sampled. In
particular, the first methodbegins to simply by multiplying
the signal, x(t), with a chirp function:
gðtÞ ¼exp½Àjpt
2
tanða=2ފxðtÞ ð34Þ
followed by a chirp convolution
hðtÞ ¼A
a

þ1
À1
exp½jpcscðaÞðtÀtފgðtÞ dt ð35Þ
and the last chirp multiplication
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ ¼exp½Àjpt
2
tanða=2ފhðtÞ ð36Þ
The convolution operation in the above equation can be
achieved by sampling g(t), and then performing the con-
volution using the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Hence,
using the FFT for convolution, provides us with samples of
−5 0 5
−2
−1
0
1
2
u
a
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−5 0 5
−2
−1
0
1
2
u
b
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−5 0 5
−2
−1
0
1
2
u
c
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
−5 0 5
−2
−1
0
1
2
u
d
A
m
p
l
i
t
u
d
e
Fig. 3. The FRFT kernel function for various a values with the solid line representing the real part and the dashed line representing the imaginary part (t=1):
(a) a ¼p=8; (b) a ¼p=4; (c) a ¼3p=8 and (d) a ¼p=2.
Table 3
A summary of properties for main directions for obtaining the DFRFT.
Approach Advantages Disadvantages
Sampling of FRFT Mostly straightforward application of the Shannon
sampling theorem
May loose many important properties
Linear combination Simple implementation of Fourier operators The transform results do not match the result of the continuous
FRFT
Eigenvalue
decomposition
Maintains some important properties of the FRFT Could lack the fast computation algorithm. Cannot be written in a
closed form
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1357
F
a
ðxðtÞÞ. However, one has to keep in mind that the
bandwidth and time-bandwidth product of g(t) can be as
large as twice that of x(t). Thus, we need to sample g(t) at
the rate twice the original samplingrate usedfor x(t), which
means that the samples of x(t) need to be interpolated.
Specifically, assuming that x and X
a
denote column vectors
with N elements containing the samples of x(t) and its
DFRFT, respectively, then, in a matrix notation, the above
procedure can be given as
X
a
¼F
a
x ¼DKHKJx ð37Þ
where D and J are matrices representing the decimation
and interpolation operation, K is a diagonal matrix
that corresponds to chirp multiplication, and H corre-
sponds to the convolution operation. Eq. (37) provides
the samples of the a-thtransforminterms of the samples of
the original signal. This is a desirable property for a
definition of the DFRFT matrix [58]. Very similar results
were obtained in [52] as well. Sample computed FRFTs
for impulse and step functions are shown in Fig. 4. The
second approach, proposed in [58], implements a very
similar principle. However, the authors rewrote the FRFT
into the form:
X
a
¼A
a
expðjpcotðaÞu
2
Þ

þ1
À1
expðÀj2pcscðaÞutÞ½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ dt
ð38Þ
Then, the modulated function ½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ is repre-
sented by Shannon’s interpolation formula:
½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ ¼
¸
N
n ¼ ÀN
exp jpcotðaÞ
n
2Dt

x
n
2Dt

Âsinc 2Dt tÀ
n
2Dt

ð39Þ
allowing us to obtain the samples of the fractional trans-
form in terms of the samples of the original signal as
X
a
ðmÞ ¼
A
a
2Dt
¸
N
n ¼ ÀN
exp jp cotðaÞ
m
2Dt

2

À2cscðaÞ
mn
ð2DtÞ
2
þcotðaÞ
n
2Dt

2

x
n
2Dt

ð40Þ
whichis a finite summationandDt represents the sampling
interval. In a matrix form, the overall procedure can be
represented as
X
a
¼F
a
x ¼DKJx ð41Þ
where
Kðm,nÞ ¼
A
a
2Dt
exp jp cotðaÞ
m
2Dt

2

À2cscðaÞ
mn
ð2DtÞ
2
þcotðaÞ
n
2Dt

2

ð42Þ
for jnj and jmj rN and where A
a
is a constant.
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
u
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.02
0.04
0.06
0.08
0.1
u
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.5
1
1.5
u
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
−1 0 1 2 3 4 5
0
0.5
1
1.5
u
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
Fig. 4. Theoretical and computed FRFTs of impulse and step functions ða ¼p=4Þ: (a) the magnitude of theoretical FRFT of the impulse function; (b) the
magnitude of computed FRFT of the impulse function; (c) the magnitude of theoretical FRFT of the unit function and (d) the magnitude of computed FRFT of
the unit function.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1358
However, both presented cases assumed that the WD of
x(t) is zero outside an origin-centered circle of diameter
equal to the sampling period [58]. Therefore, there might be
several DFRFT matrices providing the same result within
the accuracy of this approximation. Nevertheless, if the
signal energy contained within this circle is approaching to
the total signal energy, we know that all of these matrices
provide more accurate results. In other words, signals can
be recovered from their transforms only within some
approximation errors [59,60].
In order to alleviate some of the problems associated
with the DFRFT proposed in [58], a new type of DFRFT,
which is unitary, reversible, and flexible, was proposed in
[56]. In addition, the closed-form analytic expression of
this DFRFT can be obtained. Its performance is similar
to the FRFT and can be efficiently calculated by FFT.
Assuming that the samples of the input function, x(t),
and the output function X
a
ðuÞ of the FRFT are obtained by
the interval Dt, Du as
yðnÞ ¼xðnDtÞ, Y
a
ðmÞ ¼X
a
ðmDuÞ ð43Þ
where n= ÀN, ÀN+1,y,N and m= ÀM, ÀM+1,y,M, then,
the following two formulas of the DFRFT are in order:
Y
a
ðmÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
sinaÀjcosa
2Mþ1

exp
j
2
cotam
2
Du
2

Â
¸
N
n ¼ ÀN
exp Àj
2pnm
2Mþ1

exp
j
2
cotan
2
Dt
2

yðnÞ
ð44Þ
when sina40 ða 2 2Dpþð0,pÞ,D 2 ZÞ, and
Y
a
ðmÞ ¼
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
ÀsinaÀjcosa
2Mþ1

exp
j
2
cotam
2
Du
2

Â
¸
N
n ¼ ÀN
exp j
2pnm
2Mþ1

exp
j
2
cotan
2
Dt
2

yðnÞ
ð45Þ
when sinao0 ða 2 2DpþðÀp,0Þ,D 2 ZÞ. Additionally, the
constraints that MZN (2N+1, 2M+1 are, respectively, the
number of points in the time and frequency domains) and
DuDt ¼2pjsinaj=ð2Mþ1Þ ð46Þ
must also be satisfied. We note that when M=N and
a ¼p=2ðÀp=2Þ, Eqs. (44) and (45) become the DFT or
IDFT. We also note that when a ¼Dp ðD 2 ZÞ, there is no
proper choice for Du and Dt that satisfies the inverse
formula, and thus, we cannot use the above as the defini-
tion of the DFRFT. In fact, in these cases, we can just use the
following definitions:
Y
a
ðmÞ ¼yðmÞ when a ¼2Dp ð47Þ
Y
a
ðmÞ ¼yðÀmÞ when a ¼ð2Dþ1Þp ð48Þ
The inverse DFRFT is simply a Hermitian forward DFRFT
with Àa. This DFRFT is efficient to calculate and implement.
Because there are two chirp multiplications and one FFT, the
total number of the multiplication operations required is
2PþðP=2Þlog
2
P, where P=2M+1 is the length of the output.
The authors also claimed that this DFRFT also has the lowest
complexity among all types of DFRFT that still work similarly
to the continuous FRFT [56]. However, it does not match the
continuous FRFT and lacks many of the characteristics of the
continuous FRFT. For example, it is difficult to filter out the
chirp noise with this type of DFRFT [56].
3.2. Linear combination-type DFRFT
One of the first approaches for the DFRFT was proposed
by Dickinson and Steiglitz [61]. In their paper, the DFRFT
was derived by using the linear combination of identity
operation (F
0
), discrete Fourier transform ðF
p=2
Þ, time
inverse operation ðF
p
Þ, and the inverse discrete Fourier
transform ðF
3p=2
Þ. In other words, the fractional matrix
operator, F
a
, for 0rarp=2 was given as [61]
F
a
¼
¸
3
k ¼ 0
b
k
F
kp=2
ð49Þ
where
b
k
¼
1
4
¸
4
l ¼ 1
exp jpl
2a
p
Àk

=2
¸
ð50Þ
for 0rkr3. In particular, it has been shown that the
operator defined by (49) is unitary [62]. In other words,
F
H
a
¼F
À1
a
¼F
Àa
ð51Þ
F
a
F
Àa
¼I ð52Þ
Furthermore, the operator satisfies the angle additivity
property [62]:
F
a
1
F
a
2
¼F
a
1
þa
2
ð53Þ
and angle multiciplity property [62]:
F
m
a
¼F
ma
ð54Þ
It has also been noticed that the operator is periodic in the
parameter a with a fundamental period 2p [62].
This type of the DFRFT corresponds to a completely
distinct definition of the fractional Fourier transform.
However, the main problem is that the transform results
will not match to the continuous FRFT [60]. In other words,
it is not the discrete version of the continuous transform
[63].
3.3. DFRFT based on eigenvectors
A possible approach for the DFRFT is based on searching
the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the DFT matrix and
then computing the fractional power of the DFT matrix
(e.g., [59,60,63,64]). This type of the DFRFT was proposedto
combat the issues associated with previous implementa-
tions such as a lack of unitarity and index additivity
(e.g., [57,58]) and the fact that most of these provide a
satisfactory approximation to the continuous transform. In
particular, the DFRFT is based on the eigendecomposition
of the DFT kernel matrix [60]. The transform kernel of the
DFRFT can be defined as
F
2a=p
¼UD
2a=p
U ð55Þ
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1359
F
2a=p
¼
¸
NÀ1
k ¼ 0
expðÀjkaÞu
k
u
T
k
for N odd
¸
NÀ2
k ¼ 0
expðÀjkaÞu
k
u
T
k
for N even
þexpðÀjNaÞu
N
u
T
N

ð56Þ
where U=[u
0
u
1
yu
NÀ1
], when N is odd, and U=[u
0
u
1
yu
NÀ2
u
N
] when N is even. u
k
is the normalized eigen-
vector corresponding to the k-th order Hermite function
and D
2a=p
is defined as the following diagonal matrix:
D
2a=p
¼diagðexpðÀj0Þ,expðÀjaÞ, . . . ,expðÀjaðNÀ2ÞÞ,
expðÀjaðNÀ1ÞÞÞ ð57Þ
for N odd and
D
2a=p
¼diagðexpðÀj0Þ,expðÀjaÞ, . . . ,expðÀjaðNÀ2ÞÞ,expðÀjaNÞÞ
ð58Þ
for N even. In order to ensure orthogonality of the DFT
Hermite eigenvectors (u
k
), the Gram–Schmidt algorithm
(GSA) or the orthogonal procrustes algorithm(OPA) can be
used [60]. The GSA minimizes the errors between the
samples of the Hermite functions and the orthogonal DFT
Hermite eigenvectors. On the other hand, the OPA mini-
mizes the total errors between those samples. It should be
also pointed out that the main difference between the
approach proposed in [60] and similar approaches pro-
posed (e.g., [59,63,64]) is found in the obtained eigenvec-
tors in previous contributions, in that they were just
discrete Mathieu functions [60]. Although the Mathieu
functions can converge to Hermite functions, the conver-
gence for the eigenvectors obtainedinprevious approaches
are not so fast for the high-order Hermite functions by the
linear mean square error criterion [60]. Additionally, the
authors investigated the relationship between the FRFT
and the DFRFT and found that for a sampling period equal
to
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
2p=N

, the DFRFT performs a circular rotation of the
signal in the time–frequency plane [60]. However, the
DFRFT becomes an elliptical rotation in the continuous
time–frequency plane for sampling periods different from
ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi
2p=N

[60]. Therefore, for these elliptical rotations an
angle modification and a post-phase compensation in the
DFRFT are required to obtain results similar to the con-
tinuous FRFT [60]. This approach has been extended to the
so-called multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier
transform (MPDFRFT) [65,66]. In fact, the MPDFRFT main-
tains all of the desired properties and reduces to the DFRFT
when all of its order parameters are the same.
A similar approach to [60] has been proposed in [67].
However, authors in [67] believe that the discrete time
counterparts of the continuous time Hermite–Gaussians
maintained the same properties, since these discrete time
counterparts exhibited better approximations than the
other proposed approaches [68]. In order to resolve this
issue about the approximation of Hermite–Gaussian func-
tions, a nearlytri-diagonal commuting matrixof the DFTand
a corresponding version of the DFRFT was proposed in [69].
Most of the eigenvectors of this proposednearlytri-diagonal
matrix result in a good approximation of the continuous
Hermite–Gaussian functions by providing a smaller approx-
imation error in comparison to the previous approaches.
Using the findings presented in [60,67], methods for
parallel and cascade computations of DFRFT are proposed
in [70]. By this new method, the DFRFT of any angle can be
computed by a linear combination of the DFRFTs with
special angles [70]. The parallel method is suitable for the
signal whose DFRFT in special angles are already known.
The chirp signal detection is a common one, and the
cascade method has a regular structure; therefore, it is
very suitable for VLSI implementation.
However, it should be noted that these types of DFRFTs
lack the fast computation algorithm and the eigenvectors
cannot be written in a closed form.
3.4. Other approaches
The FRFT can also be realized by the quadratic phase
transform (QPT) [71,72], which is defined as
QPðm,nÞ ¼

þ1
À1
xðtÞe
ÀjmtÀjnt
2
dt ð59Þ
Compared with (1), the FRFT can be computed by mapping
variables m and n of the QPT onto a and u of the FRFT. With
this equivalence of implementation, a number of fast
algorithms for the QPT can be used to compute the FRFT
[71,73–75]. Specifically, the fast algorithms proposed in
[71] make use of the concept of decimation-in-time
decomposition along the m and n domain. These algorithms
can reduce the numbers of both complex multiplications
and additions by a factor 2log
2
N, where N is the number of
samples in the time domain. By further exploiting the
periodic and symmetric properties of the QPT and with the
radix-2decimation-in-frequency principle, a computation-
ally more efficient algorithm was proposed in [73].
Recently, the above fast algorithms are also extended to
real value sequences [75], which are useful in voice, audio,
and image signal analysis.
Several other approaches for obtaining the DFRFT were
proposed in the literature. Here, we only provide a brief
overview of these techniques. For complete details, a reader
should refer to these contributions. Using the group theory,
authors in[76] proposedthat the DFRFTcanbe obtainedas the
multiplication of DFT and the periodic chirps. This DFRFT
satisfies the rotation property on the WD, and the additivity
and reversible property. However, this type of DFRFT can be
derived only when the fractional order of the DFRFT equals
some specified angles. As well, when the number of points is
not prime, it will be very complicated to derive. Using Chirp-Z
transforms, a fast numerical algorithm for the DRFT was
proposedin[77]. This methodallows free choice of resolutions
inbothfractional Fourier spaces, simultaneous data-peepingin
any region, and easy implementation. Furthermore, the
authors argued that their method is easier to implement in
comparison with the method proposed in [61], while main-
taining the same computational efficiency.
4. Applications
In this section, we review the practical applications of
the FRFT and its discrete counterpart as a signal processing
tool. Nevertheless, our literature review showed that
applications are very scarce beyond optics. We anticipate
additional publications regarding practical applications of
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1360
the FRFT are bound to appear. For example, we foresee an
increased number of applications of the FRFT based time–
frequency representations in speech and music processing,
biomedical signal processing, and mechanical vibrations
analysis. Some problems stemming fromsuch applications
demand such advanced time–frequency representations
(e.g., spectrogram, WD), since these classical time–fre-
quency tools do not provide a framework sufficient for a
comprehensive analysis [2].
It should be also mentioned that in this paper we devote
more space to newer applications of the FRFT such as
watermarking and communications. Other contributions
(e.g., [1,9]) described either more traditional applications
such as filtering and signal recovery or only briefly covered
different applications. Our goal is to emphasize that the
FRFT is a valuable tool in many various applications.
4.1. Filtering
The idea of using the FRFT for fundamental signal
processing procedures such filtering, estimation and
restoration is particularly interesting for applications
involving optical information processing [78,79]. In several
publications the concepts of filtering, estimation and
restorationof signals infractional domains were developed
for these applications, revealing that under certain condi-
tions one can improve upon the special cases of these
operations in the conventional space and frequency
domain. Furthermore, the FRFT can be applied to the
problem of time-varying filtering of non-stationary, finite
energy processes both in continuous-time and discrete-
time frameworks [80]. Filtering in fractional Fourier
domains may enable significant reduction of the mean
square error in comparison with ordinary Fourier domain
filtering. In particular, the optimum multiplicative filter
function that minimizes the mean square error in the a-th
fractional Fourier domain was derived in [80]. Similarly, a
novel fractional adaptive filtering scheme was introduced
[81], and simulation results showed that adaptive filtering
in the fractional domain is superior in comparison to its
time domain counterparts.
4.2. Watermarking
The FRFT and its counterparts have not be fully
exploited in the field of the multimedia due to several
plausible reasons. Firstly, several well-established trans-
forms are already used in the multimedia applications (e.g.,
DCT, DST, Walsh, DWT, DFT). Secondly, multimedia appli-
cations are commonly subject to some sort of standardiza-
tion. Also, a relatively short history of the fast algorithms
for the FRFT realization and a short period for the detailed
study of the FRFT properties limit its wider usage in this
area. The third reason is that this transform with a
relatively long history inthe other signal processing related
disciplines, is still relatively unknown in the multimedia
systems. However, this situation is gradually changing
with more papers focusing on this transform. Here, it is
worthwhile mentioning the application in the digital
watermarking (e.g., [82–84]). The digital watermarking is
a technique used for the copyright protection of digital
multimedia data [85]. Adesiredability for these techniques
is a creation of a large number of watermarks that can be
embedded in multimedia data without perceptible degra-
dation of host data. Then, the FRFT domains offer more
flexibility since it has been shown that the FRFT water-
marks with various angles have small correlation. Usage of
two angles in the 2D FRFT offers significant possibility to
hide more different watermarks in images than the stan-
dard DFT or DCT-based domains.
This is illustrated with Figs. 5 and 6 taken from [82]. In
this figure the original Lena image used as a common test
example is given in Fig. 5(a) while the watermarked image
is given in Fig. 5(b). Watermark is embedded for angles
a
1
¼a
2
¼0:375p. Detection of watermarks for 1000 water-
mark keys is demonstrated in Fig. 6(a) where upper line
corresponds to detection in the watermarked image while
lower line corresponds to detection in non-watermarked
image. From spread between these two lines we can
conclude that watermark detection is reliable. Fig. 6(b)
demonstrates a situation when a search with the proper
watermark key is performed around proper angles. It can
be seen that the watermark can be detected only if the
angle under which the watermark is embedded is known.
This is a quite important fact and it helps in increasing the
Fig. 5. Watermarking using the FRFT: (a) original image and (b) watermarked image.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1361
number of watermarks that can be embedded within
multimedia data. A practically useful scheme for the
FRFT based watermarking is recently proposed in [86]. In
particular, the impact of the noise and other errors is
severely reduced on the FRFT coefficients by pre-filtering
these coefficients yielding a scheme that is more robust to
various attacks.
Similarly, a watermarking scheme in the space/spatial-
frequency domain has been proposed in [87]. This
watermarking technique uses 2D chirp signals that are
well concentrated in the joint space/spatial-frequency
domain, but not in the space or spatial-frequency domain
only. Therefore, this concept of watermarking provides
results robust to the standard filtering, since watermarks
are concentrated in the joint space/spatial-frequency
domain [87].
Both of these techniques are closely monitored and
followed by numerous researchers [88–97]. The main
obstacle in further applications of these techniques is the
complexity that can be reduced with various previously
described fast realization strategies. In addition, the avail-
ability of the FRFT fast realizations will lead to numerous
implementations of the FRFT and related transforms in
multimedia.
4.3. Radar applications
A couple of techniques related to the FRFT have been
recently used for focusing SAR/ISAR images (e.g., [98,99]).
This technique is commonly referred to as the LPFT in the
related literature. Two forms of the adaptive LPFT-based
technique for focusing ISAR images are proposed in [100].
The focusing is performed without assuming any particular
model of a target’s motion. Therefore, these versions of the
LPFT can be applied for any realistic motion. The first
technique is based on knowing that, for monocomponent
and multicomponent signals with similar chirp-rates, a
single chirp-rate parameter can be estimated for all
components. The ISAR image is then focused by using
the estimated value of signal parameters obtained through
the LPFT calculation. For multicomponent signals with
different chirp-rates, a sum of the weighted LPFT is used.
If the signal’s components have significantly different
chirp-rates, the estimation of these parameters should be
performed separately for each component. Moreover, the
obtained estimate is additionally refined by combining
estimations obtained for close reflectors. For targets with
very complex motion patterns, segmentation of the radar
image in regions-of-interests is performed. The adaptive
LPFT is calculated for each region in order to form focused
ISAR image. Adaptive parameters are obtained by using a
simple concentration measure. Here, we demonstrate test
image of the B727 plane given in Fig. 7(a) (the figure is
takenfrom[100]). Focusing of the radar image is performed
for each cross-range parameter and the focused image is
given in Fig. 7(b). Estimated chirp-rate parameters (angles
in the FRFT terminology) are depicted with dashed lines in
Fig. 7(c). Additional improvements have been achieved
when these chirp-rates are filtered with median filter
(thick line). Then, the radar images focused with the
filtered chirp-rate as depicted in Fig. 7(d).
A similar approach is proposed in [101], but the chirp-
rate is estimated by using contrast of the LPFT-based ISAR
image. Moreover, a modulus of the target effective rotation
vector is calculated from the obtained estimation. A
quantitative analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)
for the LPFT applied in the ISAR imaging is presented in
[102]. It has been shown that the LPFT-based methods for
focusing ISAR images can achieve a significantly higher
output SNR than those based on the STFT.
Focusing of the SAR images is usually performed by
estimating parameters of a received signal. A technique for
applying the product higher-order ambiguity function
(PHAF) for estimating parameters of the radar signal and
focusing SAR images is proposed in [103]. Moving target
focusing can be performed by this technique for some
specific scenarios. More precisely, the obtained SAR image
will be focused only when one target exists in a range bin,
or when all targets in one range bin have similar motion
parameters. Otherwise, this technique fails to achieve high
concentration of each target simultaneously. In order to
overcome this drawback, analgorithmfor separating signal
Fig. 6. Analysis of the detector: (a) statistical analysis of detecting watermark signal in watermarked and non-watermarked image and (b) detection of
watermark signal using different transformation angles.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1362
components corresponding to targets with different
motion parameters is applied in [104] where the LPFT-
based technique is used for focusing each component. The
drawback of the LPFT-based technique, applied in this
manner, is high computational complexity needed for
selection of chirp-rate that produces the best concentra-
tion. Therefore, an algorithmfor the automated selectionof
phase parameters used for the LPFT calculation is proposed
in [105]. In this algorithm, an adaptive set of chirp-rates is
formed for each unfocused target. When one or more
unfocused targets are detected in a range, the PHAF is
evaluated and the position of its maximum is used for the
coarse estimation of chirp-rate. Further improvement of
the obtainedestimate is performedby using a fine searchin
the region around the chirp-rate obtained from the coarse
search. The number of chirp-rates in the fine search stage is
rather small (usually not larger than several tens) which
yields a significant decrease inthe computational complex-
ity with respect to the technique proposed in [104] (which
requires hundreds or thousands). In addition, a procedure
for the third-order phase compensation is applied in the
proposed algorithm without a significant increase of the
calculationburden. In[104–106] it has beenshownthat the
LPFT-based methods for focusing SAR images are more
robust to the additive noise influence than the STFT radar
imaging techniques.
Here, we have borrowed figure from [105] where the
SAR image of several moving and stationary targets is
shown (Fig. 8(a)). It can be seen that the moving targets
have seriously spread components. Alternative tools such
as a technique called the S-method [107] are unable to
separate overlapping targets (Fig. 8(b)). The LPFT technique
with predefined set of the chirp-rates gives significantly
improved results as shown in Fig. 8(c). However, the
procedure proposed in [105] based on the LPFT with
automatic selection of the chirp-rate parameters, produces
highly focusing of all considered targets (Fig. 8(d)).
4.4. Communications
Traditional multicarrier (MC) systems are designed
with the DFT based schemes. The main representative of
these techniques is the orthogonal frequency-division
multiplexing (OFDM). However, for doubly selective chan-
nels (channels with selectivity in both time and frequency)
this technique produces non-satisfactory results. Martone
Fig. 7. B727 radar image: (a) results obtainedby the FT-basedmethod; (b) adaptive LPFT method; (c) adaptive chirprate (dotted line), filteredadaptive chirp
rate (light solidline), linear interpolationof filtereddata (boldsolidline) and(d) adaptive LPFTwithinterpolateddata. o
t
ando
m
represent the range andthe
cross-range, respectively.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1363
published a corner-stone paper where the discrete FRFT is
used instead of the DFT in multicarrier systems [108]. For
channels with fast variations with available the line-of-
sight component (usually associated with mobile stations
mounted on high speed carriers and/or non-urban envir-
onments) this scheme significantlyoutperforms DFT-based
counterparts. Performance of this technique is significantly
improved since the time–frequency plane can be adjusted
(rotated) in a way to compensate undesired modulation of
the signals introduced by high velocity of participants and/
or by multipath component shifted from the line-of-sight
components. This technique is generalized for general
linear canonical form of the transform (affine Fourier
transform—AFT) in [109]. This form has shown an
improved flexibility with respect to the FRFT-based
scheme. These chirp based modulations and associated
AFT schemes have been identified as a suitable basis for
multicarrier communications such as aeronautical and
satellite [110]. Table 4 provides a comparison between
the AFT-MC technique and the standard OFDM for four
typical scenaria that can be observed in the case of the
aeronautical channels. The best results for the AFT-MC
techniques are observed for en-route scenario while in the
worst case for the parking scenario, the AFT-based tech-
nique behaves the same as the OFDM. Then, in our opinion
the AFT technique are important candidates for novel
digital standards for the aeronautical communications
with solved problem of the fast realizations of the AFT
(FRFT).
Similarly, other contributions discussed the application
of the FRFT in communication systems. In a very recent
publication (e.g., [111]), a minimum mean squared error
receiver based on the FRFT for MIMO systems with space
time processing over Rayleigh faded channels was pre-
sented. The numerical analysis of the proposed receiver
showed improved performance; outperforming the simple
minimum mean squared error receiver in Rayleigh faded
channel. Furthermore, chirp modulation spread spectrum
based on the FRFT was recently proposed for demodulation
of multiple access systems [112]. The numerical analysis
showed that the FRFT based receiver is more flexible and
efficient system for multiple access by reducing the
designing complexity of the system. The authors also
argued that receivers based on the FRFT are more sensitive
than earlier coherent receivers for chirp signals.
4.5. Compression
An interesting application of the FRFT to compression
can be found in [113]. In particular, the contribution dealt
with image compression and found that even though the
presented method yielded inferior results in comparison to
commonly available compressionalgorithms, there is still a
room for improvement. The authors argued that their
method is very basic and further improvements can be
Proposed LPFT
x[m]
y[m]
−100 −50 0 50 100
−150
−100
−50
0
50
100
150
Adaptive 1D SM
x[m]
y[m]
−100 −50 0 50 100
−150
−100
−50
0
50
100
150
2D FT
x[m]
y[m]
−100 −50 0 50 100
−150
−100
−50
0
50
100
150
LPFT
x[m]
y[m]
−100 −50 0 50 100
−150
−100
−50
0
50
100
150
Fig. 8. Simulated SAR image of seven target points obtained by using: (a) 2D FT; (b) adaptive S-method; (c) LPFT with predefined set of chirp rates and
(d) proposed LPFT.
Table 4
A comparison of two techniques.
Scenario En-route Arrival/
takeoff
Taxi Parking
AFT-MC vs.
OFDM
Significantly
better
Slightly
better
Slightly
better
Equal
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1364
achieved by combining with other techniques. The concept
of compressionusing the FRFT has beenfurther extendedin
[114], where authors proposed a scheme for signal com-
pression based on the combination of DFRFT and set
partitioning in hierarchical tree (SPIHT). The application
of the scheme to different types of signals demonstrated a
significant reduction in bits leading to high signal com-
pression ratio. The results were further compared with
those obtained with the discrete cosine transform. Hence,
the DFRFT is shown to be more suitable for compression
than the DCT, especially in terms of quality of recon-
structed signal and the percentage root-mean-square
difference. There is no need to encode the error signal
and send along with the encoded DFRFT coefficients, as the
dynamic range of error signal is too small.
4.6. Pattern recognition
Given that the FRFT provides an extra parameter (e.g.,
the rotationangle) incomparisonwiththe ordinary Fourier
transform, the FRFT also provides additional degrees of
freedom in pattern recognition systems. For example, the
FRFT was used as a pre-processor for a neural network
[115]. The use of fractional based pre-processing resulted
in an improved performance comparing to both no pre-
processing and ordinary Fourier transform pre-processing.
Also, the fractional based pre-processing resulted in a
substantial reduction of classification and localization
error. While use of the fractional Fourier transform
increases the cost of the training procedure, the improve-
ments achieved with its use come at no additional routine
operating cost.
Furthermore, it has been also shown that pattern
recognition methods based on matched filtering can be
generalized by replacing the standard Fourier operations
by fractional Fourier operations [116]. However, these
systems become time (or space) varying systems.
4.7. Cryptography
The FRFT can also be used in the field of cryptography
[117–121]. For example, a 2004 US patent invented a
cryptographic approach [117]. At the encryption side, a
user first selects at least four parameters including an angle
of rotation, a time exponent, a phase, anda sampling rate as
the encryption key. Then, more than one modified FRFT
kernels corresponding to the encryption key are selected
and multiplied with the input signal. On the other hand, a
reverse procedure with respect to the encryption process is
used for decryption.
The modified FRFT (e.g., [118]) along with the double
random phase encoding technique has been successfully
applied for encrypting digital data. Specifically, using the
double random phase encoding in the multiple-parameter
FRFT domain, this encryption method enhances data
security because the order parameters of the modified
FRFT can be exploited as extra keys for decryption. How-
ever, this encryption scheme has shown to be linear [119].
Hence, it is insecure because a known plaintext attack can
break this scheme, which is equivalent to solving a set of
linear equations [119]. It is also shown that the current
standard algorithms such as AES [122] outperform the
above system in terms of both encryption speed, band-
width, and storage requirements.
Recently, a random discrete FRFT, proposed in [123],
exhibits an important feature that the magnitude and
phase of its transform output are both random. This
random discrete FRFT is also first applied to the image
encryption to show its potentials.
4.8. Fractal signal processing
The FRFT also found its application in processing of
fractal signals. For example, the FRFT was used for the
determination of the main parameters of fractals in [124].
In [125], a FRFT based estimation method was introduced
to analyze the long range dependence in time series. In
particular, the FRFT was used for estimation of the Hurst
exponent. The results have shown that the FRFT estimator
can achieve a reliable estimation of the Hurst exponent
when compared to some other existing estimation meth-
ods, such as wavelet-based method and a global estimator
based on dispersional analysis.
4.9. Other applications
The FRFT can be useful in terms of differential equations
[7,126], especiallyfor solving these equations. For example,
the FRFT of a function x(t) can be considered as a solution of
a differential equation, where x(t) can be considered as the
initial condition of the equation. In particular, Namias
solved several Shrodinger equations using this assumption
[7]. Further examples can be found in [1,7,126]. The FRFT
can be also shown to be a particular case of the evolution
operators [127]. Further details about the applicationof the
FRFT to differential equations can be found in [128].
Anapplicationof the FRFT to computer tomography was
also recently discussed [129]. In particular, a two-dimen-
sional FRFT has been used to characterize the effect of
scattering [129].
The FRFT has also been applied to transient motor
current signature analysis (TMCSA) [130], due to the
shortcomings of Fourier transform for such an analysis.
This paper also proposed the optimization of the FRFT to
generate a spectrum where the frequency-varying fault
harmonics appear as single spectral lines and, therefore,
facilitate the diagnostic process.
5. Conclusion
The FRFT is a powerful mathematical transform that
generalizes the ordinary Fourier transform through the
order parameter a. As such, it has been rediscovered in the
literature several times. In this paper, we provided an
overview of the FRFT from the signal processing point of
view. In particular, our goal was to attract signal processing
practitioners to this mathematically eloquent concept and
depict its advantages. In order to do so, the paper is
thematically divided into three topics. In the first part,
we presented the definition of the FRFT and tied it to other
mathematical representations. The second part of the
paper covered various practical realizations of the FRFT,
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1365
while the practical applications of the FRFT were discussed
in the third part of the paper. The conclusions stemming
from each part were as follows:
Besides its ties to the ordinary Fourier transform, the
FRFT can be further related to various time–frequency
transforms. Inparticular, we showedthe direct relation-
ship between the AF, the WD and the FRFT. This
relationship enables us to relate the FRFT to a wide
class of time–frequency transforms. Furthermore, we
showedthat the FRFT canbe consideredas a special case
of the second-order LPFT and LPP. Also, the FRFT can be
considered as the special case of the LCT. Such a
relationship provides a direct generalization link
between the FRFT and many higher-order/affine math-
ematical transformations. In particular, we outlined the
connection between the FRFT and L-WD for the first
time inthe literature. Future contributions inthis theme
will include a further understanding of the FRFT and its
ties to other mathematical transforms.
The digital realizations of the FRFT can be divided into
three major streams. One streamis represented through
direct sampling of the FRFT. It is the least complicated
approach, but these discrete realizations could lose
many important properties of the FRFT. Furthermore,
the kernel associated with the FRFT can introduce very
fast oscillations that require excessively large sampling
rates. A second stream relies on a linear combination of
ordinary Fourier operators raised to different powers.
Nevertheless, these realizations often produce an out-
put that does not match the output of the continuous
FRFT. The third stream approaches the discrete realiza-
tions based on the idea of an eigenvalue decomposition.
The realizations obtained through this stream tend to
closely resemble the representations obtained by the
continuous FRFT. However, we should point out that the
major drawbacks of this approach are that they cannot
be written in a closed form and might have computa-
tional costs. Lastly, we also outlined other approaches
that appeared in the literature. We specifically sug-
gested that potential realizations of the FRFT could be
achieved with the so-called quadratic phase transform.
Anticipated contributions in this field need to deal with
issues associated with the current schemes.
The number of publications discussing practical appli-
cations of the FRFThas beensteadilyrising. Inparticular,
we have witnessed a strong expansion of the FRFT in
several fields, including watermarking, radar applica-
tions, and wireless communications. Furthermore, we
also have the FRFT present in other fields as well (e.g.,
fractal signal processing, pattern recognition, filtering).
The main advantage is that the FRFT-based schemes
increase processing accuracy. For example, a group of
authors described an adaptive filtering scheme in a
recent contribution. The presented results showed a
superior performance in comparison to its time domain
counterparts. Similar trends have been observed in
multimedia signal processing, where the FRFT has
been used for watermarking. In particular, the water-
mark could be detected only if the angle under which
the watermark was embeddedwas known. This enabled
us to increase the number of watermarks embedded
within multimedia data. Fromthese past contributions,
we expect an expansion of FRFT-based methods in
different applications to dominate the future contribu-
tions. In particular, we expect to see increased applica-
tion of the FRFT based time–frequency representations
in speech and music processing, biomedical signal
processing and mechanical vibration analysis. Problems
stemming from such applications require the employ-
ment of such advanced time–frequency transforms.
Overall, the paper provided a compact summary of the
recent contributions regarding the FRFT (for convenience,
Table 5 contains reference sorted according to their topics).
The FRFT is a very powerful tool and has been applied to
many fields. Further research and applications of existing
schemes will increase in the near future.
Acknowledgments
The work of Igor Djurovic´ is supported in part by the
Ministry of Science and Education of Montenegro. The
authors would like to thank Vesna Popovic´ from the
University of Montenegro, Djuro Stojanovic´ from Crno-
gorski Telekom and Pu Wang from the Stevens Institute of
Technology for shaping up some sections of this manu-
script. Last, but not least, the authors would like to thank
the reviewers whose comments have helped them to
improve the technical quality and the presentation of the
manuscript.
References
[1] H.M. Ozaktas, Z. Zalevsky, M.A. Kutay, The Fractional Fourier
Transform with Applications in Optics and Signal Processing,
John Wiley, Chichester, New York, USA, 2001.
[2] E. Sejdic´ , I. Djurovic´ , J. Jiang, Time–frequency feature representation
using energy concentration: an overviewof recent advances, Digital
Signal Processing 19 (1) (2009) 153–183.
Table 5
References sorted according to their topics.
Topics Refs.
Theoretical contributions
Introductory and review contributions [1,4–15]
FRFT and time–frequency representations [2,3,16–44]
FRFT and linear canonical transform [1,6,45,46]
DFRFT through sampling of FRFT [14,50–58]
Linear combination-type DFRFT [61,62]
DFRFT based on eigen- vectors [59,60,63–70]
Other approaches for DFRFT [71–77]
Applications
Filtering [78–81]
Watermarking [82–84,86–97]
Radar applications [98–106]
Communications [108–112]
Compression [113,114]
Pattern recognition [115,116]
Cryptography [117–123]
Fractal signal processing [124,125]
Other application [7,126–130]
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1366
[3] E. Sejdic´ , I. Djurovic´ , J. Jiang, LJ. Stankovic´ , Time–Frequency Based
Feature Extraction and Classification: Considering Energy Concen-
tration as a Feature Using Stockwell Transform and Related
Approaches, VDM Verlag Publishing, Saarbrucken, Germany, 2009.
[4] N. Wiener, Hermitian polynomials and Fourier analysis, Journal of
Mathematical Physics (MIT) 8 (1929) 70–73.
[5] E.U. Condon, Immersion of the Fourier transform in a continuous
group of functional transformations, Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 23 (3) (1937)
158–164.
[6] N.G. De Bruijn, A theory of generalized functions, with applications
to Wigner distribution and Weyl correspondence, Nieuw Archief
voor Wiskunde 21 (1973) 205–280.
[7] V. Namias, The fractional order Fourier transformandits application
to quantum mechanics, IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 25 (3)
(1980) 241–265.
[8] V.A. Narayanan, K.M.M. Prabhu, The fractional Fourier transform:
theory, implementation and error analysis, Microprocessors and
Microsystems 27 (10) (2003) 511–521.
[9] A. Bultheel, H. Martnez-Sulbaran, Recent developments in the
theory of the fractional Fourier and linear canonical transforms,
The Bulletin of the Belgian Mathematical Society—Simon Stevin 13
(5) (2007) 971–1005.
[10] D. Mendlovic, H.M. Ozaktas, Fractional Fourier transforms and their
optical implementation: part I, Journal of the Optical Society of
America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 10 (9) (1993)
1875–1881.
[11] D. Mendlovic, H.M. Ozaktas, Fractional Fourier transforms and their
optical implementation: part II, Journal of the Optical Society of
America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 10 (12) (1993)
2522–2531.
[12] L.B. Almeida, The fractional Fourier transform and time–frequency
representations, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 42 (11)
(1994) 3084–3091.
[13] G. Cariolaro, T. Erseghe, P. Kraniauskas, N. Laurenti, A unified
framework for the fractional Fourier transform, IEEE Transactions
on Signal Processing 46 (12) (1998) 3206–3219.
[14] A.I. Zayed, On the relationship between the Fourier and fractional
Fourier transforms, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (12) (1996)
310–311.
[15] L.B. Almeida, Product and convolution theorems for the fractional
Fourier transform, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 4 (1) (1997)
15–17.
[16] LJ. Stankovic´ , I. Djurovic´ , Relationship between the ambiguity
function coordinate transformations and the fractional Fourier
transform, Annales des Telecommunications 53 (7/8) (1998)
316–319.
[17] T. Alieva, M.J. Bastiaans, On fractional Fourier transform moments,
IEEE Signal Processing Letters 7 (11) (2000) 320–323.
[18] B. Ristic, B. Boashash, Kernel design for time–frequency signal
analysis using the Radon transform, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 41 (5) (1993) 1996–2008.
[19] H.M. Ozaktas, N. Erkaya, M.A. Kutay, Effect of fractional Fourier
transformation on time–frequency distributions belonging to the
Cohen class, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (2) (1996) 40–41.
[20] M.J. Bastiaans, T. Alieva, LJ. Stankovic´ , On rotated time–frequency
kernels, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 9 (11) (2002) 378–381.
[21] LJ. Stankovic´ , T. Alieva, M.J. Bastiaans, Time–frequency signal
analysis based on the windowed fractional Fourier transform,
Signal Processing 83 (11) (2003) 2459–2468.
[22] A.W. Lohmann, Image rotation, Wigner rotation, and the fractional
Fourier transform, Journal of the Optical Society of America A:
Optics and Image Science, and Vision 10 (10) (1993) 2181–2186.
[23] D. Mendlovic, Z. Zalevsky, R.G. Dorsch, Y. Bitran, A.W. Lohmann,
H.M. Ozaktas, New signal representation based on the fractional
Fourier transform: definitions, Journal of the Optical Society of
America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 12 (11) (1995)
2424–2431.
[24] D. Mustard, The fractional Fourier transform and the Wigner
distribution, The Journal of the Australian Mathematical Society—
Series B—Applied Mathematics 38 (2) (1996) 209–219.
[25] S.-C. Pei, J.-J. Ding, Relations between fractional operations and
time–frequency distributions, and their applications, IEEE Transac-
tions on Signal Processing 49 (8) (2001) 1638–1655.
[26] J. Wood, D. Barry, Radon transformation of time–frequency dis-
tributions for analysis of multicomponent signals, IEEE Transac-
tions on Signal Processing 42 (11) (1994) 3166–3177.
[27] A.W. Lohmann, B.H. Soffer, Relationships between the Radon–
Wigner and fractional Fourier transforms, Journal of the Optical
Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 11 (6)
(1994) 1798–1801.
[28] V. Katkovnik, A new formof the Fourier transform for time-varying
frequency estimation, Signal Processing 47 (2) (1995) 187–200.
[29] V. Katkovnik, Discrete-time local polynomial approximation of the
instantaneous frequency, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing
46 (10) (1998) 2626–2637.
[30] S.-C. Pei, J.-J. Ding, Relations between Gabor transforms and
fractional Fourier transforms and their applications for signal
processing, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 55 (10) (2007)
4839–4850.
[31] H.M. Ozaktas, B. Barshan, D. Mendlovic, L. Onural, Convolution,
filtering, and multiplexing in fractional Fourier domains and their
relation to chirp and wavelet transforms, Journal of the Optical
Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 11 (2)
(1994) 547–559.
[32] S.-Y. Lee, H.H. Szu, Fractional Fourier transforms, wavelet trans-
forms, and adaptive neural networks, Optical Engineering 33 (7)
(1994) 2326–2330.
[33] C. Capus, K. Brown, Fractional Fourier transformof the Gaussianand
fractional domain signal support, IEE Proceedings—Vision, Image,
and Signal Processing 150 (2) (2003) 99–106.
[34] LJ. Stankovic´ , T. Alieva, M.J. Bastiaans, Fractional-Fourier-domain
weighted Wigner distribution, in: Proceedings of the 11th IEEE
Signal Processing Workshop on Statistical Signal Processing, Sin-
gapore, August 6–8, 2001, pp. 321–324.
[35] A. Akan, L. Chaparro, Discrete rotational Gabor transform, in:
Proceedings of IEEE-SP International Symposium on Time–Fre-
quency and Time-Scale Analysis, Paris, France, June 18–21, 1996,
pp. 169–172.
[36] A. Akan, V. Shakhmurov, Y. C- ekic-, A fractional Gabor transform, in:
Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech,
and Signal Processing (ICASSP 1994), vol. 6, Adelaide, SA, Australia,
April 19–22, 1994.
[37] A. Akan, Y. C- ekic-, A fractional Gabor expansion, Journal of the
Franklin Institute 340 (5) (2003) 391–397.
[38] Y. Zhang, B.-Y. Gu, B.-Z. Dong, G.-Z. Yang, H. Ren, X. Zhang,
S. Liu, Fractional Gabor transform, Optics Letters 22 (21) (1997)
1583–1585.
[39] F. Zhang, G. Bi, Y.Q. Chen, Tomography time–frequency trans-
form, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 50 (6) (2002)
1289–1297.
[40] X.-G. Xia, Y. Owechko, B.H. Soffer, R.M. Matic, On generalized-
marginal time–frequency distributions, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 44 (11) (1996) 2882–2886.
[41] S. Shinde, V.M. Gadre, Anuncertainty principle for real signals inthe
fractional Fourier transform domain, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 49 (11) (2001) 2545–2548.
[42] X. Guanlei, W. Xiaotong, X. Xiaogang, The logarithmic, Heisenberg’s
and short-time uncertainty principles associated with fractional
Fourier transform, Signal Processing 89 (3) (2009) 339–343.
[43] X. Guanlei, W. Xiaotong, X. Xiaogang, Three uncertainty relations
for real signals associated with linear canonical transform, IET
Signal Processing 3 (1) (2009) 85–92.
[44] X. Guanlei, W. Xiaotong, X. Xiaogang, Generalized entropic uncer-
tainty principle on fractional Fourier transform, Signal Processing
89 (12) (2009) 2692–2697.
[45] S.-C. Pei, J.-J. Ding, Eigenfunctions of linear canonical transform,
IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 50 (1) (2002) 11–26.
[46] S.-C. Pei, J.-J. Ding, Simplified fractional Fourier transforms, Journal
of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science, and
Vision 17 (12) (2000) 2355–2367.
[47] LJ. Stankovic´ , A multitime definition of the Wigner higher order
distribution: L-Wigner distribution, IEEE Signal Processing Letters
1 (7) (1994) 106–109.
[48] B. Barkat, B. Boashash, Design of higher order polynomial Wigner–
Ville distributions, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 47 (9)
(1999) 2608–2611.
[49] F.J. Marinho, L.M. Bernardo, Numerical calculation of fractional
Fourier transforms with a single fast-Fourier-transform algorithm,
Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image
Science and Vision 15 (8) (1998) 2111–2116.
[50] X.-G. Xia, On bandlimited signals with fractional Fourier transform,
IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (3) (1996) 72–74.
[51] A.I. Zayed, A.G. Garcia, New sampling formulae for the fractional
Fourier transform, Signal Processing 77 (1) (1999) 111–114.
[52] T. Erseghe, P. Kraniauskas, G. Carioraro, Unified fractional Fourier
transform and sampling theorem, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 47 (12) (1999) 3419–3423.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1367
[53] C. Candan, H.M. Ozaktas, Sampling and series expansion theorems
for fractional Fourier and other transforms, Signal Processing 83
(11) (2003) 2455–2457.
[54] K.K. Sharma, S.D. Joshi, Fractional Fourier transform of bandlimited
periodic signals and its sampling theorems, Optics Communica-
tions 256 (4–6) (2005) 272–278.
[55] R. Tao, B. Deng, W.-Q. Zhang, Y. Wang, Sampling and sampling rate
conversion of band limited signals in the fractional Fourier trans-
form domain, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 56 (1) (2008)
158–171.
[56] S.-C. Pei, J.-J. Ding, Closed-formdiscrete fractional andaffine Fourier
transforms, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48 (5) (2000)
1338–1353.
[57] O. Arikan, M.A. Kutay, H.M. Ozaktas, O.K. Akdemir, The discrete
fractional Fourier transformation, in: Proceedings of the IEEE-SP
International Symposium on Time–Frequency and Time-Scale
Analysis, June 18–21, 1996, pp. 205–207.
[58] H.M. Ozaktas, O. Arikan, M.A. Kutay, G. Bozdagt, Digital computa-
tion of the fractional Fourier transform, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 44 (9) (1996) 2141–2150.
[59] S.-C. Pei, M.-H. Yeh, Improved discrete fractional Fourier transform,
Optics Letters 22 (14) (1997) 1047–1049.
[60] S.-C. Pei, M.H. Yeh, C.C. Tseng, Discrete fractional Fourier transform
based on orthogonal projections, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 47 (5) (1999) 1335–1348.
[61] B.W. Dickinson, K. Steiglitz, Eigenvectors and functions of the
discrete Fourier transform, IEEE Transactions on Acoustics, Speech,
and Signal Processing 30 (1) (1982) 25–31.
[62] B. Santhanam, J.H. McClellan, The discrete rotational Fourier trans-
form, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 44 (4) (1996)
994–998.
[63] S.-C. Pei, C.-C. Tseng, M.-H. Yeh, J.-J. Shyu, Discrete fractional Hartley
and Fourier transforms, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems
II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing 45 (6) (1998) 665–675.
[64] Z.T. Deng, H.J. Caulfield, M. Schamschula, Fractional discrete Fourier
transforms, Optics Letters 21 (18) (1996) 1430–1432.
[65] S.-C. Pei, W.-L. Hsue, The multiple-parameter discrete fractional
Fourier transform, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 13 (6) (2006)
329–332.
[66] J.G. Vargas-Rubio, B. Santhanam, On the multiangle centered
discrete fractional Fourier transform, IEEE Signal Processing Letters
12 (4) (2005) 273–276.
[67] C. Candan, M.A. Kutay, H.M. Ozaktas, The discrete fractional Fourier
transform, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48 (5) (2000)
1329–1337.
[68] C. Candan, On higher order approximations for Hermite–Gaussian
functions and discrete fractional Fourier transforms, IEEE Signal
Processing Letters 14 (10) (2007) 699–702.
[69] S.-C. Pei, W.-L. Hsue, J.-J. Ding, Discrete fractional Fourier transform
based on new nearly tridiagonal commuting matrices, IEEE Trans-
actions on Signal Processing 54 (10) (2006) 3815–3828.
[70] M.-H. Yeh, S.-C. Pei, A method for the discrete fractional Fourier
transform computation, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing
51 (3) (2003) 889–891.
[71] M.Z. Ikram, K. Abed-Meraim, Y. Hua, Fast quadratic phase transform
for estimating the parameters of multicomponent chirp signals,
Digital Signal Processing 7 (1997) 127–135.
[72] X.-G. Xia, Discrete chirp-Fourier transform and its applications to
chirp rate estimation, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48
(11) (2000) 3122–3233.
[73] G. Bi, Y. Wei, G. Li, C. Wang, Radix-2 DIF fast algorithms for
polynomial time–frequency transforms, IEEE Transactions on
Aerospace and Electronic Systems 42 (4) (2006) 1540–1546.
[74] Y. Ju, G. Bi, Generalized fast algorithms for the polynomial time
frequency transforms, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 55
(10) (2007) 4907–4915.
[75] G. Bi, Y. Ju, X. Li, Fast algorithms for polynomial time–frequency
transforms of real-valued sequences, IEEE Transactions on Signal
Processing 56 (5) (2008) 1905–1915.
[76] M.S. Richman, T.W. Parks, Understanding discrete rotations, in:
Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech,
and Signal Processing (ICASSP-97), vol. 3, April 21–24, 1997, pp.
2057–2060.
[77] X. Deng, Y. Li, D. Fan, Y. Qiu, A fast algorithm for fractional Fourier
transforms, Optics Communications 138 (4–6) (1997) 270–274.
[78] H.M. Ozaktas, B. Barshan, D. Mendlovic, Convolution and filtering in
fractional Fourier domains, Optical Review 1 (1) (1994) 15–16.
[79] M.F. Erden, M.A. Kutay, H.M. Ozaktas, Applications of the fractional
Fourier transform to filtering, estimation and restoration, in:
Proceedings of the IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal
and Image Processing (NSIP’99), Antalya, Turkey, June 20–23, 1999,
pp. 481–485.
[80] A. Kutay, H.M. Ozaktas, O. Ankan, L. Onural, Optimal filtering in
fractional Fourier domains, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing
45 (5) (1997) 1129–1143.
[81] L. Durak, S. Aldirmaz, Adaptive fractional Fourier domain filtering,
Signal Processing 90 (4) (2010) 1188–1196.
[82] I. Djurovic´ , S. Stankovic´ , I. Pitas, Digital watermarking in the
fractional Fourier transformation domain, Journal of Network
and Computer Applications 24 (2) (2001) 167–173.
[83] F.Q. Yu, Z.K. Zhang, M.H. Xu, A digital watermarking algorithm for
image based on fractional Fourier transform, in: Proceedings of the
2006 IEEE Conference on Industrial Electronics and Applications,
Singapore, May 24–26, 2006, pp. 1–5.
[84] D. Cui, Dual digital watermarking algorithm for image based on
fractional Fourier transform, in: Proceedings of the Second Pacific-
Asia Conference on Web Mining and Web-based Application
(WMWA ’09), Wuhan, China, June 6–7, 2009, pp. 51–54.
[85] A. Tefas, N. Nikolaidis, I. Pitas, Handbook of image and video
processing, in: Watermarking Techniques for Image Authentication
and Copyright Protection, second ed., Academic Press, Boston, MA,
USA2005, pp. 1083–1109.
[86] M.A. Savalonas, S. Chountasis, Noise-resistant watermarking in the
fractional Fourier domain utilizing moment-based image repre-
sentation, Signal Processing 90 (8) (2010) 2521–2528.
[87] S. Stankovic´ , I. Djurovic´ , I. Pitas, Watermarking in the space/spatial-
frequency domain using two-dimensional Radon–Wigner distribu-
tion, IEEE Transactions on Image Processing 10 (4) (2001) 650–658.
[88] D. Simitopoulos, D.E. Koutsonanos, M.G. Strintzis, Robust image
watermarking based on generalized Radon transformations, IEEE
Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology 13 (8)
(2003) 732–745.
[89] P.H.W. Wong, O.C. Au, Y.M. Yeung, Novel blind multiple water-
marking technique for images, IEEE Transactions on Circuits and
Systems for Video Technology 13 (8) (2003) 813–830.
[90] G.-R. Feng, L.-G. Jiang, D.-J. Wang, C. He, Quickly tracing detec-
tion for spread spectrum watermark based on effect estimation of
the affine transform, Pattern Recognition 38 (12) (2005)
2530–2536.
[91] M. Al-Khassaweneh, S. Aviyente, Robust watermarking in the
Wigner domain, in: Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE Interna-
tional Conference on Multimedia and Expo, July 9–12, 2006,
pp. 1557–1560.
[92] T.C. Lu, C.C. Chang, Y.L. Liu, A content-based image authentication
scheme based on singular value decomposition, Pattern Recogni-
tion and Image Analysis 16 (3) (2006) 506–522.
[93] C.-S. Lu, S.-W. Sun, C.-Y. Hsu, P.-C. Chang, Media hash-dependent
image watermarking resilient against both geometric attacks and
estimation attacks based on false positive-oriented detection, IEEE
Transactions on Multimedia 8 (4) (2006) 668–685.
[94] A. Beghdadi, R. Iordache, Image quality assessment using the joint
spatial/spatial-frequency representation, EURASIP Journal on
Applied Signal Processing 2006 (2006) 1–8.
[95] J. Guo, Z. Liu, S. Liu, Watermarking based on discrete fractional
random transform, Optics Communications 272 (2) (2007)
344–348.
[96] M. Ozturk, A. Akan, Y. Cekic, A robust image watermarking based on
time–frequency, in: Proceedings of the 15th IEEE Signal Processing
and Communications Applications Conference (SIU 2007), Eskise-
hir, Turkey, June 11–13, 2007, pp. 1–4.
[97] A. Bultheel, Digital watermarking of images inthe fractional Fourier
domain, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Technical Report TW497,
July 2007.
[98] H.-B. Sun, G.-S. Liu, H. Gu, W.-M. Su, Application of the fractional
Fourier transform to moving target detection in airborne SAR, IEEE
Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 38 (4) (2002)
1416–1424.
[99] A.S. Amein, J.J. Soraghan, Anewchirpscaling algorithmbasedonthe
fractional Fourier transform, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 12 (10)
(2005) 705–708.
[100] I. Djurovic´ , T. Thayaparan, LJ. Stankovic´ , Adaptive local polynomial
Fourier transform in ISAR, EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal
Processing 2006 (2006) 1–15.
[101] M. Martorella, Novel approach for ISAR image cross-range scaling,
IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems 44 (1) (2008) 281–294.
[102] X. Li, G. Bi, Y. Ju, Quantitative SNR analysis for ISAR imaging using
LPFT, IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 45 (3)
(2009) 1241–1248.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1368
[103] S. Barbarossa, A. Scaglione, Autofocusing of SARimages based onthe
product high-order ambiguity function, IEE Proceedings—Radar,
Sonar and Navigation 145 (5) (1998) 269–273.
[104] I. Djurovic´ , T. Thayaparan, LJ. Stankovic´ , SAR imaging of moving
targets using polynomial Fourier transform, IET Signal Processing
2 (3) (2008) 237–246.
[105] V. Popovic´ , I. Djurovic´ , LJ. Stankovic´ , T. Thayaparan, M. Dakovic´ ,
Autofocusing of SAR images based on parameters estimated from
the PHAF, Signal Processing 90 (5) (2010) 1382–1391.
[106] I. Djurovic´ , LJ. Stankovic´ , V. Popovic´ , M. Dakovic´ , T. Thayaparan,
Time–frequency analysis for SAR and ISAR imaging, in: Proceedings
of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Geographical
Information Processing and Visual Analytics for Environmental
Security, Trento, Italy, October 13–17, 2008, pp. 113–127.
[107] LJ. Stankovic´ , A method for time–frequency analysis, IEEE Transac-
tions on Signal Processing 42 (1) (1994) 225–229.
[108] M. Martone, A multicarrier system based on the fractional Fourier
transform for time–frequency-selective channels, IEEE Transac-
tions on Communications 49 (6) (2001) 1011–1020.
[109] T. Erseghe, N. Laurenti, V. Cellini, A multicarrier architecture based
upon the affine Fourier transform, IEEE Transactions on Commu-
nications 53 (5) (2005) 853–862.
[110] D. Stojanovic´ , I. Djurovic´ , B. Vojcic, Interference analysis of multi-
carrier systems based on affine Fourier transform, IEEE Transac-
tions on Wireless Communications 8 (6) (2009) 2877–2880.
[111] R. Khanna, R. Saxena, Improved fractional fourier transform based
receiver for spatial multiplexed mimo antenna systems, Wireless
Personal Communications 50 (4) (2009) 563–574.
[112] H.K. Lakshminarayana, J.S. Bhat, B.N. Jagadale, H.M. Mahesh,
Improved chirp modulation spread spectrum receiver based on
Fractional fourier transform for multiple access, in: Proceedings of
the 2009 International Conference on Signal Processing Systems,
Singapore, May 15–17, 2009, pp. 282–286.
[113] I.S. Yetik, M. Kutay, H.M. Ozaktas, Image representation and
compression with the fractional Fourier transform, Optics Com-
munications 197 (4–6) (2001) 275–278.
[114] C. Vijaya, J.S. Bhat, Signal compression using discrete fractional
Fourier transform and set partitioning in hierarchical tree, Signal
Processing 86 (8) (2006) 1976–1983.
[115] B. Barshan, B. Ayrulu, Fractional Fourier transform pre-processing
for neural networks and its application to object recognition,
Neural Networks 15 (1) (2002) 131–140.
[116] A.W. Lohmann, Z. Zalevsky, D. Mendlovic, Synthesis of pattern
recognition filters for fractional Fourier processing, Optics Com-
munications 128 (4–6) (1996) 199–204.
[117] A. Cusmario, Cryptographic method using modified fractional
Fourier transform kernel, US Patent No. 6718038, April 2004.
[118] S.C. Pei, W.-L. Hsue, The multiple-parameter discrete fractional
Fourier transform, IEEE Signal Processing Letters 13 (6) (2006)
329–332.
[119] A.M. Youssef, On the security of a cryptosystembased on multiple-
parameters discrete fractional Fourier transform, IEEE Signal
Processing Letters 15 (2008) 77–79.
[120] R. Tao, J. Lang, Y. Wang, Optical image encryption based on the
multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform, Optics Letters
33 (6) (2008) 581–583.
[121] Q. Ran, H. Zhang, J. Zhang, L. Tang, J. Ma, Deficiencies of the
cryptography based on multiple-parameter fractional Fourier
transform, Optics Letters 34 (11) (2009) 1729–1731.
[122] National Institute of Standards and Technology, Advanced encryp-
tion standard (AES), Federal Information Processing Standards
Publication (FIPS 197), November 2001.
[123] S.C. Pei, W.-L. Hsue, Random discrete fractional Fourier transform,
IEEE Signal Processing Letters 16 (12) (2009) 1015–1018.
[124] T. Alieva, Fractional Fourier transform as a tool for investigation of
fractal objects, Journal of the Optical Society of America A 13 (6)
(1996) 1189–1192.
[125] Y.-Q. Chen, R. Sun, A. Zhou, An improved Hurst parameter
estimator based on fractional Fourier transform, in: Proceedings
of the ASME 2007 International Design Engineering Technical
Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Con-
ference (IDETC/CIE 2007), Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, September 4–7,
2007, pp. 1–11.
[126] A.C. McBride, F.H. Kerr, On Namias’s fractional Fourier transforms,
IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 39 (2) (1987) 159–175.
[127] G. Dattoli, A. Torre, G. Mazzacurati, An alternative point of view to
the theory of fractional Fourier transform, IMA Journal of Applied
Mathematics 60 (3) (1998) 215–224.
[128] Y.F. Luchko, H. Matrinez, J.J. Trujillo, Fractional Fourier transform
and some of its applications, Fractional and Calculus Applied
Analysis: An International Journal for Theory and Applications
11 (4) (2008) 457–470.
[129] G. Gbur, E. Wolf, Relation between computed tomography
and diffraction tomography, Journal of the Optical Society of
America A: Optics and Image Science, and Vision 18 (9) (2001)
2132–2137.
[130] M. Pineda-Sanchez, M. Riera-Guasp, J.A. Antonino-Daviu, J. Roger-Folch,
J. Perez-Cruz, R. Puche-Panadero, Diagnosis of induction motor faults in
the fractional Fourier domain, IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation
and Measurement 59 (8) (2010) 2065–2075.
E. Sejdic ´ et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1369

.e. A similar expression can be derived for convolution of two signals ðyðtÞ ¼ xðtÞ Ã wðtÞÞ. 2. F 0 is the identity operator. F 0 ðxðtÞÞ ¼ xðtÞ. The fractional Fourier transform The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a linear operator defined as [10–13] Xa ðuÞ ¼ F a ðxðtÞÞ ¼ þ1 Z À1 7. The FRFT is a linear operator. a can be adjusted in many applications to provide enhanced results in comparison to other existing methods. Given the properties of the kernel. It should be noted that we adopted notation for the FRFT found in signal processing literature. Some properties associated with the FRFT are summarized as follows [1.. we hope to foster more applications since the FRFT offers many valuable properties.. we emphasize the practicality of the FRFT by devoting a significant part of this manuscript to its discrete realizations and applications. Additional properties of the FRFT and some transform pairs are listed in Tables 1 and 2. The FRFTs of a few sample signals are shown in Fig. The paper is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the concept of FRFT and relates the transform to other mathematical representations. F a1 F a2 ¼ F a2 F a1 ) and associativity (i. The same can be stated for F 2p . we discuss various implementation approaches for discrete signals. and is equal to x( À t) when a þ p is a multiple of 2p.uÞ ¼ Âejðu =2Þcota ejðt =2ÞcotaÀjutcsca > > dðtÀuÞ > > > > : dðt þ uÞ if a is not multiple of p if a is a multiple of 2p if a þ p is a multiple of 2p ð2Þ and dðtÞ representing the Dirac function. Signal 1 FRFT pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 1 þ jtanaexpðÀjðu2 =2ÞtanaÞ rffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 1Àjcota expðjððt2 þ u2 Þ=2ÞcotaÀjut csc aÞ 2p 2 expðÀu =2Þ pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 1 þ jtanaexpðjððZ2 þ u2 Þ=2ÞtanaÀjuZsecaÞ sffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 1Àjcota expðjðu2 =2Þðc2 À1Þcota=ðc2 þ cot2 aÞÞ cÀjcota expðÀcðu2 =2Þcsc2 a=ðc2 þ cot2 aÞÞ dðtÀtÞ expðÀt 2 =2Þ expðjZtÞ expðcðÀt 2 =2ÞÞ . we denote the rotation angle by a. 1. the resultant FRFT is equal to convolution of the FRFT of x(t) with the Fourier transform of w(t) multiplied by a chirp function. P 3..e. 6. Section 4 provides an overview of some FRFT applications. Successive applications of the FRFT of various orders is equal to a single application of the FRFT whose order is equal to the sum of individual orders (e.10–12]).. Sejdic et al. Mathematicians usually denote the rotation angle by a.e.Ya ðuÞS.g. A particularly interesting case of the above listed properties is the fact that it can be shown that the FRFT of a product of two signals. along with additional transform pairs. In particular.. 2. More extensive descriptions and proofs of these properties. y(t) = x(t) w(t). which otherwise were not available with traditional tools (e. where a ¼ 2a=p. [1. The FRFT adheres to commutativity (i. can be found in other references (e. 5. F a ð k ck xk ðtÞÞ ¼ P k ck F a ðxk ðtÞÞ.. In other words.14]: 1.e. (1) is equal to x(t) when a is a multiple of 2p. The standard Fourier transform is a special case of the FRFT with a rotation angle a ¼ p=2. 4..uÞ representing the kernel function defined as 8 rffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi > 1Àjcota > > > > 2p > < 2 2 Ka ðt.uÞ dt ð1Þ with Ka ðt. By attracting more practitioners to this eloquent mathematical concept. xuðtÞ Rt b xðtuÞ dtu Ru secaexpðÀjðu2 =2ÞtanaÞ b Xa ðzÞexpðjðz2 =2ÞtanaÞ dz if aÀp=2 is not a multiple of p Table 2 FRFT of some basic functions. the Fourier transform).e. In particular. In Section 3.yðtÞS ¼ /Xa ðuÞ. i. Additional computational complexity associated with such optimization efforts is often acceptable.g. F a F Àa ¼ F 0 Þ. FRFT satisfies the Parseval theorem: /xðtÞ.g. Hence.1352 ´ E. i. Inverse FRFT is obtained by applying F Àa to the transformed signal (i. These properties clearly indicate that the FRFT is an extension of the ordinary Fourier transform. ðF a3 F a2 ÞF a1 ¼ F a3 ðF a2 F a1 ÞÞ. Throughout the paper we use F a to denote the operator associated with the FRFT. F a1 F a2 ¼ F a1 þ a2 Þ. while in Section 5. can be shown to be equal to [15]: ! þ1 Z jcscaj ju2 cota Ya ðuÞ ¼ pffiffiffiffiffiffi exp Xa ðuÞWððuÀuÞcscaÞ 2 2p À1   ju2 cota Âexp À du ð3Þ 2 where WðuÞ is the Fourier transform of w(t). Eq. It is important to point out that various a values provide transformations with distinctive properties. we provide concluding remarks along with an outline of possible future directions. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 particular. convolution of two signals in time domain equals to [15]: ! þ1 Z ju2 tana Ya ðuÞ ¼ jsecajexp À Xa ðuÞwððuÀuÞsecaÞ 2 À1  2  ju tana du ð4Þ Âexp 2 Table 1 Properties of the FRFT. Signal xðtÀtÞ xðtÞexpðjutÞ x(t)t x(t)/t x(ct) FRFT expðjðt2 =2ÞsinacosaÀjutsinaÞXa ðuÀtcosaÞ expðÀju2 ðsinacosaÞ=2 þ jucosaÞXa ðuÀusinaÞ ucosaXa ðuÞ þ jsinaXa uðuÞ Ru Àjsecaexpðjðu2 =2ÞcotaÞ À1 xðzÞexpðÀjðz2 =2ÞcotaÞ dz sffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi   1Àjcota usinb expðjðu2 =2Þcotað1Àðcos2 b=cos2 aÞÞÞXb 2 Àjcota csina c where cotb ¼ cota=c2 uðuÞcosa þ jusinaXa ðuÞ Xa xðtÞKa ðt.

´ E. we obtained xðtÞ ¼ where Z ck ¼ 1 X k¼0 ck fk ðtÞ ð6Þ þ1 fk ðtÞxðtÞ dt ð7Þ À1 By applying the fractional operator ðF a ðÁÞÞ to both sides of (6).5 0 0. First. FRFT as fractional powers of Fourier transform Therefore.5 0 −1 0 1 2 t 3 4 5 0 −0. Using . (c) time domain representation of the unit function. In fact. (d) FRFT of the unit function. Our next task is to understand the relationship between the FRFT and other mathematical representations. More specifically. Namias used the fact that the Hermite–Gaussian functions ðfk ðtÞÞ are eigenfunctions of the Fourier transform and showed that the a-th order FRFT shares the eigenfunctions of the Fourier transform. we begin by establishing the relationships with the ordinary Fourier transform. (b) FRFT of the Dirac function.uÞ ¼ 1 X k¼0 expðÀjakÞfk ðuÞfk ðtÞ ð9Þ The above equation can be considered as the spectral decomposition of the kernel function of FRFT [1].5 0 −5 0 u 5 Fig. if we expand a signal in terms of these eigenfunctions. it is clear that the kernel function can be defined as Ka ðt. (e) time domain representation of the exponential function and (f) FRFT of the exponential function.5 0 1 0 −1 −1 0 1 2 u 1 3 4 5 Amplitude Amplitude −5 0 t 5 1 0. 2. the eigenvalues of the FRFT are the a-th root of the eigenvalues of the Fourier transform [7]: F a ðfk ðtÞÞ ¼ expðÀjakÞfk ðtÞ ð5Þ ¼ ck expðÀj k¼0 Z X 1 k¼0 1 X akÞfk ðuÞ ð8Þ expðÀjakÞfk ðuÞfk ðtÞxðtÞ dt From the above equation. which shows that the FRFT of a convolution can therefore be obtained by taking the FRFT of one of the signals. while dashed lines represent imaginary parts. Sejdic et al.5 −1 0 1 2 u 3 4 5 Amplitude Amplitude −1 0 1 2 t 3 4 5 1 0. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1353 0. These two rules are of particular interests when developing a time–frequency representation based on the FRFT.5 Amplitude Amplitude 1 0. by deriving the FRFT from the eigenfunctions of the Fourier transform. we establish relationships with various time–frequency representations and linear canonical analysis.1. and multiplying again by a chirp and by a scale factor. 1. Then. Solid lines represent real parts. we get F a ðxðtÞÞ ¼ ¼ 1 X k¼0 ck F a ðfk ðtÞÞ Namias provided an elegant generalization of the Fourier transform to the FRFT [7]. Sample signals and their theoretical FRFTs ða ¼ p=4Þ: (a) time domain representation of the Dirac function. multiplying by a chirp. convolving with a scaled version of the other signal.

and the signal is defined as xðtÞ ¼ ½expðÀ60ðtÀ0:5Þ2 Þ þ expðÀ60ðt þ 0:5Þ2 ފ ½expðj12ptÞ þ expðÀj12ptފ ð17Þ ð13Þ Using this relationship.RsinaÞ. the AF has the auto-terms concentrated around the origin while the interferences are dislocated from the origin. However. we consider the relationship between the ambiguity function and the FRFT. Time–frequency representation of the four-component signal: (a) the AF.22–25]: WDFa ðxðtÞÞ ðt. let us considered a signal with four components concentrated in the TF plane around (t.2. it can be easily generalized that the FRFT corresponds to rotation of a class of time–frequency representations (TFRs) as along as Cðt. oÞ ¼ FT t-o. [26]) is studied in [23. To illustrate this behavior.2.e. while interferences (cross-terms) are located between these components.1.and cross-terms in the time– frequency plane for some classes of signals.. tÞ is a two-dimensional kernel function.g.f Þ ¼ þ1 Z À1 behaviors when considering signals with multiple components. we should point out that the FRFT could be potentially useful for obtaining time–frequency distributions without cross-terms. In particular. 2. aÞ ¼ AF x ðRcosa. while the corner objects represent single cross-terms. 2(c) when we used the FRFT operator with a ¼ 0:5 in (16). The AF of this signal is depicted in Fig. and redefining the AF as FRAF x ðR.76). we rewrite the FRFT as rffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi þ1 Z 2 1Àjcota jðu2 =2Þcota e xw ðtÞejðt =2ÞcotaÀjutcsca dt 2p À1 Additionally. autoterms) concentrated around their instantaneous frequencies and group delays. All four auto-terms are located in the middle of the graph (i. First. the origin of the ambiguity plane). Sejdic et al. Each of four horizontal and vertical objects with respect to the origin represents two crossterms. 2(a). y-t fAF x ðy. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 the Mehler formula. x(t). it is possible to separate all auto. For example.f Þ ¼ WDx ðtcosaÀf sina. Specifically.1Þ and a 2 ½0. all 16 components (4 auto terms and 12 cross-terms) are clearly separated as shown in Fig.f)=(70. aÀ ¼ jXa ðuÞjexpðj2pRuÞ du 2 À1 However.27].. the connection between the local fractional FT moments and the angle derivative of the fractional power spectra has been established in [17]. pÞ.29]. it is easy to prove that the fractional power spectra is the Fourier transform of the AF: þ1 Z  p FRAF x R.e. Local polynomial Fourier transform It is also of our interest to establish the relationship between the FRFT and the local polynomial Fourier transform (LPFT) [28. The ambiguity function (AF) of a signal.usina þf cosaÞ ð14Þ with t 2 ½À1. . The relationship between FRFT and Radon–Wigner distribution (RWD) (e. tÞg is rotational symmetric [18–21]. In the case of the WD (Fig. Relations to time–frequency representations To understand the relationship between the FRFT and various time–frequency analyses. the FRFT corresponds to the rotation of the Wigner distribution (WD) in the time–frequency plane [20. the WD has signal components (i. 2(b)). On the other hand. while the central object represents the four cross-terms. 2. where fðy.1Š. For example. it becomes obvious that the FRFT corresponds to a rotation of the AF [16]. the corner objects are autoterms. and it was shown that the RWD is the squared modulus of the FRFT: RWD½xðtފ ¼ jF a ½xðtފj2 ð15Þ 2. ffðy. The remaining objects contain two cross terms each. is AF x ðt. interesting results are obtained when we use the 2D FRFT instead of the 2D Fourier transform in (16). WD and AF exhibit different F a ðxðtÞÞ ¼ ð18Þ Fig.f Þ ¼ F À1 t-f y-t. The connection between these two time–frequency representations is the 2D Fourier transform: WDx ðt. tÞg ð16Þ     t à t x tÀ expðÀj2ptf Þ dt x tþ 2 2 ð10Þ By introducing rotation of the AF by using the following transformation: t ¼ Rcosa f ¼ Rsina ð11Þ ð12Þ with R 2 ðÀ1.5.1354 ´ E. Namely.. Furthermore. Namias in fact shows that we obtain the FRFT from (8) [7]. (b) the WD and (c) the FRFT of the AF.

29]. .e. Hence.e.32].f þ 2pf2 tÞ ð22Þ where AFw(t.b. the LPP rotates AFw(t. Specifically. which is a generalization of the kernel used for the spectrogram (i.f Þ ¼ þ1 Z À1     t t wà tÀ expðÀj2pf2 ðt þ t=2Þ2 w tþ 2 2 þ j2pf2 ðtÀt=2Þ2 Àj2pf tÞ dt þ1     Z t t wà tÀ expðÀj4pf2 ttÀj2pf tÞ dt ¼ w tþ 2 2 À1 ¼ AF w ðt. we set M =2. Fresnel transform) [1. For example. we can relate the FRFT to the local polynomial periodogram (LPP). Other time–frequency representations and properties A formal relationship between the wavelet transform and the FRFT has also been established [31. the generalized Fresnel transform. b¼0 ð23Þ where ad Àbc = 1. .45.2. fractional-Fourier-domain realizations of several other time–frequency representations were also introduced. where we relate the FRFT with the linear canonical transform. coshag and its kernel function is defined as 1 2 2 Ka ðt. pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi F a ðxðtÞÞ ¼ expðjaÞLCT fcosa.c. and the tomography time–frequency transform defined as the inverse Radon transform of the FRFT [39]. These include realizations of the short-time Fourier transform [33].1g represents the form of the second order polynomial Fourier transform with 2pf2 ¼ a. phase retrieval.sinha..f1 .cosag with some phase correction [1. other existing forms of the LCT can be related to FRFT. The LPP is a distribution belonging to the Cohen class of distributions [28. the weighted WD (i. Hence.sina.32]. However. Several publications also investigated the uncertainty principle in the fractional domain [41–44]. then (18) can be expressed in terms of the LPFT as rffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 1Àjcota jðu2 =2Þcota LPFT x ðt. radar system analysis. FRFT. the Gabor expansion [35–38]. .. Similar observations have been made in [30].3.g.f) is the ambiguity function of the used window.f Þj2 ð21Þ Furthermore. de Bruijn proposed a form of the LCT in 1973 [6]. This generalization stems from the fact that the short-time Fourier transform is equal to the LPFT for M =1. The parameters of this distribution are fcosha. the simple coordinate transform proposed in [16] when considered with parameters f1. Furthermore.45]. which is demonstrated in the next section.f) in the ambiguity plane and can adjust the resulting time–frequency representation according to the signal of interest. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1355 where xw ðtÞ ¼ xðt þ tÞwðtÞ..f2 . . which is quite similar to the FRFT.dg. which have a specific meaning relating those quantities to the signal under analysis. Eqs. the squared magnitude of the short-time Fourier transform). let us consider the LPP in more detail. it is not very clear what is a precise meaning of those generalized marginals in comparison to the traditional time and frequency marginals.45.cosag ðxðtÞÞ ð24Þ Additionally. and pattern recognition [45].29] LPFT x ðt. or the almost Fourier and almost Fresnel transformation [1. Using the above equation.e.dg ¼ fcosa. it is straightforward to show that the FRFT is the special case of LCT where fa.sinha.34]. and 2pf2 ¼ cota. This transform shares numerous properties of FRFT and it will be interesting to . If the LPFT is given by [28. Sejdic et al..2.fM Þ.45].0.uÞ ¼ pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi eÀjpðu =2Þcotha eÀjpðt =2Þcotha þ jput=sinha sinha ð25Þ To understand the relationship between the FRFT and the LPP.f Þ ¼ þ1 Z À1 xðt þ tÞwðtÞexpðÀj2pf1 tÀj2pf2 t2 =2 ð19Þ À Á Á Á Àj2pfM tM =MÞ dt where f ¼ ðf1 . 2pf1 ¼ ucsca. 2. Its kernel is defined as the AF of wg ðtÞ ¼ wðtÞ expðÀj2pf2 t 2 =2À Á Á Á Àj2pfM t M =M!Þ.f2 Þ ð20Þ F a ðxðtÞÞ ¼ e 2p From these equations it can be clearly seen that the LPFT provides a broad generalization of the FRFT. Some of the properties associated with the time– frequency analysis have been extended to the FRFT.46] 8 sffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi þ1 Z > > 1 2 > > expðÀjut=bÞ > > j2pbexpðj du =ð2bÞÞ < À1 LCT L ðxðtÞÞ ¼ > > Âexpðjat2 =ð2bÞÞxðtÞ dt. Additionally. This implies that any coordinate transformation can be used. a. where the kernel function is defined as the AF of w(t).f Þ ¼ jLPFT x ðt.´ E. S-method) [21.c. For example.Àsina. the ABCD transform. the Fourier transform.46]. (13)–(22) demonstrate that various coordinate transformations have been implemented to relate the FRFT to different transformations. FRFT and linear canonical transform The linear canonical transform (LCT) is a multiparameter integral transform and it represents a generalization of many mathematical transformations (e. filter design. marginals associated with time–frequency representations based on the fractional Fourier transform were examined [40] in analogy to marginals associated with TFRs based on the standard Fourier transform. which is defined as the squared magnitude of the LPFT: LPP x ðt.Àsina. Similarly can be stated for any localized form of the FRFT with a proper selection of the a (angle) parameter. The LCT is defined by [1. In other words. to relate the LPP to (20). It should be mentioned that the LCT is also called the affine Fourier transform. let us consider the second order case (i. L ¼ fa. ba0 > > > pffiffiffi > : dexpðjc du2 =2ÞxðduÞ.sina. which can be obtained from the quadratic phase function in (2) by scaling the coordinates and the amplitude [31. the FRFT kernels corresponding to different values of a are closely related to the wavelet transform. M = 2): AF wg ðt. the Collins formula.b. 2. The transformation is useful in many practical applications such as optics.

However.g. 3. a ðuÀt=mÞeÀjððk þ mÞ=kmÞ=2 dtA À1 where Fa is defined as the discrete fractional Fourier transform matrix. Hence. a ðuÞ ¼ 2p  1=2L 0þ1 11=L Z L jðL=2Þcotaðu2 þ t2 ÞÀjLutcsca @ x ðtÞe dt A À1 ð28Þ The L-FRFT form can be evaluated using the FRFT as XL. the generalized (L) form of the FRFT can be written as Lð1ÀjcotaÞ XL. we are required to numerically calculate the FRFT [49]. Practical realizations of FRFT In order to practically realize the FRFT based operators. when da0. These complex exponential kernels often introduce very fast oscillations as shown in Fig. 3. As depicted in the previous section. Coordinate transformation of other higher-order time– frequency representations The FRFT and LCT framework can be generalized for some higher order time–frequency representations. a ðuÞ ¼ L 1=2L 0þ1 þ1 þ1   Z Z Z 1 þ jcota ðLÀ1Þ=2L @ . as far as we know there are no reported results for other higher-order time–frequency representations such as the polynomial WD (e. the DFRFT obtained by direct sampling of the FRFT lacks closed-form properties and is not additive. and other optical systems. a ðuÞ ¼  1=2ðk þ mÞ ðkþ mÞð1 þ jcotaÞ 2pkm 0þ1 11=ðk þ mÞ Z k m Â@ Xk. as shown in (19). fa0 and all other parameters are equal to zero. However. the FRFT is a subclass of integral transformations characterized by quadratic complex exponential kernels. In addition.1356 ´ E. Given that we are concerned with practical implementations using discrete signals. x(n) is a vector representing the signal.3.3. the goal of this section is to provide an overview of various practical implementations proposed over the years. However. we only consider approaches for the implementation of the socalled discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFRFT).1. This results in greater time of computation. we discuss the case of the L-Wigner distribution (L-WD) introduced in [47] for achieving high concentration of the time–frequency representations by eliminating the socalled inner interferences.. The generalization. 2. it is not possible to evaluate these transformations by direct numerical integration since these fast oscillations require excessively large sampling rates.ct+ df). Sejdic et al. These transformations correspond to more complex distortions in the time–frequency plane in comparison to the FRFT and LPFT. a ðuÞ ¼ Xa ðu þ tÞXa ðuÀtÞeÀjcotat dtA p À1 ð30Þ In general the L-FRFT of the k +m-th order can always be expressed using the L-FRFT of k-th and m-th orders: Xk þ m. A summary of various approaches is shown in Table 3. Multiparameter coordinate transformations Further generalizations of these transforms can be achieved by introducing additional parameters. producing the coordinate transform of the L-WD LWD(at+ bf. [49]) are beyond the scope of this paper. 3. depending on the order and particular decomposition employed. A possible approach is to decompose these integral transformations into sub-operations. the optical based implantations (e. we still require significantly higher sampling rates than the Nyquist rate. Here. x(n). The L-WD can be defined as LWDðt. In other words.50–55]. and the need for more memory.2. we obtain the LPFT for M =3. meaning ð31Þ Similar coordinate transform can be determined for all time–frequency representations depending on powers of the signal local-autocorrelation xðt þ t=2Þxà ðtÀt=2Þ.1.. the resultant discrete transform may lose many important properties (i. of length N we can define the DFRFT as follows: Xa ðnÞ ¼ Fa xðnÞ ð33Þ xL ðt þ 0:5t=LÞxÃL ðtÀ0:5t=LÞexpðÀj2pfttÞ dt ð26Þ À1 Signal xL ðtÞ. unitarity and reversibility). 2p À1 À1 À1 L Y i¼1 ! Xa ðui Þ dui ÂeÀjðcota=2Þ ÀPL i ¼ 1 u2 Àu2 i Á d LuÀ L X i¼1 !! u2 i ð29Þ For L= 2. filters.f Þ ¼ Z 1 2. DFRFT through sampling of FRFT A straightforward approach for obtaining the DFRFT is to sample the FRFT. a ðu þ t=kÞXm. .. this relationship can be written as 0þ1 11=2   Z 1 þ jcota 1=4 @ 2 à X2. correlators. Therefore.. as shown in (32). since the sampling theorems for the FRFT of bandlimited and time-limited signals follow from those of the Shannon sampling theorem [14.e. [48]) with the usage of several auto-correlations. Therefore.g. can be defined for ba0 as 1=2L @ xL ðtÞ ¼ ð1=2pjbjÞ 0þ1 Z À1 1 x ðtÞe L jðL=2Þðð1ÀaÞ=bÞu2 ÀjðLðtÀuÞ2 Þ=2b duA Âejðð1ÀdÞ=bÞt 2 =2 ð27Þ For rotation a ¼ d ¼ cosa and c ¼ Àb ¼ sina. such generalization would be given as " # #" # !" # " ! tu t t b g 1 a b ¼ þ ½t f Š ð32Þ fu y f f 1 c d f where tu and f u represent the transformed coordinates. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 investigate a range of possible application of this coordinate transform given recent advances in signal processing. larger numerical inaccuracies. could be used to describe many existing transforms as well.. For example. Mathematically. and Xa ðnÞ is a vector representing the DFRFT of the signal. for a discrete signal.

(c) a ¼ 3p=8 and (d) a ¼ p=2. using the FFT for convolution. Cannot be written in a closed form that its applications are very limited [56]. Hence. was proposed in [57]. Approach Sampling of FRFT Linear combination Eigenvalue decomposition Advantages Mostly straightforward application of the Shannon sampling theorem Simple implementation of Fourier operators Maintains some important properties of the FRFT Disadvantages May loose many important properties The transform results do not match the result of the continuous FRFT Could lack the fast computation algorithm. Since this type of DFRFT is a special case of continuous FRFT. many properties of the FRFT also exist and have the fast algorithm. a type of DFRFT. this type of DFRFT cannot be defined for all values of a due to various imposed constraints. Both of the methods are based on the idea that we can manipulate the expression for the FRFT. In particular. equally spaced impulse train. Table 3 A summary of properties for main directions for obtaining the DFRFT. At the same time. such that the form can be appropriately sampled. Specifically. Sejdic et al. 3. Ozaktas et al. x(t). The FRFT kernel function for various a values with the solid line representing the real part and the dashed line representing the imaginary part (t= 1): (a) a ¼ p=8. provides us with samples of . In order to maintain some of the FRFT properties. the first method begins to simply by multiplying the signal. derived as a special case of the continuous FRFT. (b) a ¼ p=4. However. and then performing the convolution using the fast Fourier transform (FFT). proposed two innovative approaches for obtaining the DFRFT through sampling of the FRFT [58]. with a chirp function: gðtÞ ¼ exp½Àjpt 2 tanða=2ފxðtÞ followed by a chirp convolution hðtÞ ¼ Aa þ1 Z À1 ð34Þ exp½jpcscðaÞðtÀtފgðtÞ dt ð35Þ and the last chirp multiplication Fa ðxðtÞÞ ¼ exp½Àjpt 2 tanða=2ފhðtÞ ð36Þ The convolution operation in the above equation can be achieved by sampling g(t). it was assumed that the input function is a periodic.´ E. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1357 a 2 1 Amplitude b 2 1 Amplitude 0 0 −1 −1 −2 −5 0 u 5 −2 −5 0 u 5 c 2 d 2 1 1 Amplitude −5 0 u 5 Amplitude 0 0 −1 −1 −2 −2 −5 0 u 5 Fig.

5 Magnitude 0. (b) the magnitude of computed FRFT of the impulse function. Theoretical and computed FRFTs of impulse and step functions ða ¼ p=4Þ: (a) the magnitude of theoretical FRFT of the impulse function. the above procedure can be given as Xa ¼ Fa x ¼ DKHKJx ð37Þ Then. K is a diagonal matrix that corresponds to chirp multiplication. (c) the magnitude of theoretical FRFT of the unit function and (d) the magnitude of computed FRFT of the unit function. the overall procedure can be represented as Xa ¼ Fa x ¼ DKJx where Kðm. Very similar results were obtained in [52] as well. 4. This is a desirable property for a definition of the DFRFT matrix [58].06 0. the authors rewrote the FRFT into the form: Xa ¼ Aa expðjpcotðaÞu2 Þ þ1 Z À1 allowing us to obtain the samples of the fractional transform in terms of the samples of the original signal as   N  m 2 Aa X exp jp cotðaÞ Xa ðmÞ ¼ 2Dt 2Dt n ¼ ÀN !!  n 2  n  mn À2cscðaÞ ð40Þ þ cotðaÞ x 2 2Dt 2Dt ð2DtÞ which is a finite summation and Dt represents the sampling interval.5 Magnitude 1 1 0. Specifically. we need to sample g(t) at the rate twice the original sampling rate used for x(t). / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 Fa ðxðtÞÞ. (37) provides the samples of the a-th transform in terms of the samples of the original signal. However.4 0.02 0 −1 0 1 2 u 3 4 5 1. assuming that x and Xa denote column vectors with N elements containing the samples of x(t) and its DFRFT. Eq. and H corresponds to the convolution operation.2 0 −1 0 1 2 u 3 4 5 0. The second approach. Sejdic et al.8 Magnitude 0. 1 0. then. proposed in [58]. . However.5 0 −1 0 1 2 u 3 4 5 0 −1 0 1 2 u 3 4 5 Fig. Thus. respectively.1358 ´ E. the modulated function ½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ is represented by Shannon’s interpolation formula: ½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ ¼ N  X h n   n  x exp jpcotðaÞ 2Dt 2Dt n ¼ ÀN   n i ð39Þ Âsinc 2Dt tÀ 2Dt where D and J are matrices representing the decimation and interpolation operation. Sample computed FRFTs for impulse and step functions are shown in Fig.6 0. In a matrix form. which means that the samples of x(t) need to be interpolated. implements a very similar principle.5 1. in a matrix notation.1 0.nÞ ¼    m 2 Aa exp jp cotðaÞ 2Dt 2Dt !!  n 2 mn À2cscðaÞ þcotðaÞ 2Dt ð2DtÞ2 ð41Þ expðÀj2pcscðaÞutÞ½expðjpcotðaÞtÞxðtފ dt ð42Þ ð38Þ for jnj and jmj r N and where Aa is a constant. one has to keep in mind that the bandwidth and time-bandwidth product of g(t) can be as large as twice that of x(t).04 0. 4.08 Magnitude 0.

3.g. we can just use the following definitions: Ya ðmÞ ¼ yðmÞ Ya ðmÞ ¼ yðÀmÞ when a ¼ 2Dp when a ¼ ð2D þ 1Þp ð47Þ ð48Þ It has also been noticed that the operator is periodic in the parameter a with a fundamental period 2p [62]. This DFRFT is efficient to calculate and implement. In particular. However. In other words. In particular. and thus. FH ¼ FÀ1 ¼ FÀa a a Fa FÀa ¼ I ð51Þ ð52Þ Furthermore. Du as yðnÞ ¼ xðnDtÞ. Fa . and the output function Xa ðuÞ of the FRFT are obtained by the interval Dt. In fact. the constraints that M Z N (2N + 1. Eqs.y. respectively. 3. the total number of the multiplication operations required is 2P þ ðP=2Þlog2 P.2.D 2 ZÞ. À N + 1. and the inverse discrete Fourier transform ðF3p=2 Þ. In other words. it is not the discrete version of the continuous transform [63]. we know that all of these matrices provide more accurate results. [57. the number of points in the time and frequency domains) and   ! 4 1X 2a exp jpl Àk =2 4l¼1 p ð50Þ for 0 r k r3.58]) and the fact that most of these provide a satisfactory approximation to the continuous transform. In other words. In order to alleviate some of the problems associated with the DFRFT proposed in [58]. if the signal energy contained within this circle is approaching to the total signal energy. time inverse operation ðFp Þ. Linear combination-type DFRFT One of the first approaches for the DFRFT was proposed by Dickinson and Steiglitz [61]. there might be several DFRFT matrices providing the same result within the accuracy of this approximation. for 0 r a r p=2 was given as [61] Fa ¼ 3 X k¼0 bk Fkp=2 ð49Þ where bk ¼ where n = À N. Assuming that the samples of the input function.D 2 ZÞ. 2M+ 1 are. Additionally. 3. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1359 However. a new type of DFRFT.M. The transform kernel of the DFRFT can be defined as F2a=p ¼ UD2a=p U ð55Þ The inverse DFRFT is simply a Hermitian forward DFRFT with Àa. This type of the DFRFT was proposed to combat the issues associated with previous implementations such as a lack of unitarity and index additivity (e. where P=2M+1 is the length of the output. there is no proper choice for Du and Dt that satisfies the inverse formula. it has been shown that the operator defined by (49) is unitary [62].N and m = À M. the following two formulas of the DFRFT are in order: sffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi   sinaÀjcosa j Ya ðmÞ ¼ cotam2 Du2 exp 2 2M þ1     N X 2pnm j exp cotan2 Dt 2 yðnÞ Â exp Àj 2M þ1 2 n ¼ ÀN ð44Þ when sina 40 ða 2 2Dp þ ð0.. it is difficult to filter out the chirp noise with this type of DFRFT [56]. it does not match the . The authors also claimed that this DFRFT also has the lowest complexity among all types of DFRFT that still work similarly to the continuous FRFT [56]. (44) and (45) become the DFT or IDFT. the DFRFT was derived by using the linear combination of identity operation (F0). the main problem is that the transform results will not match to the continuous FRFT [60]. which is unitary. x(t). Its performance is similar to the FRFT and can be efficiently calculated by FFT. signals can be recovered from their transforms only within some approximation errors [59. [59. In addition. We note that when M= N and a ¼ p=2ðÀp=2Þ.63. reversible. However. Sejdic et al. then.g. the DFRFT is based on the eigendecomposition of the DFT kernel matrix [60]. We also note that when a ¼ Dp ðD 2 ZÞ.60]. both presented cases assumed that the WD of x(t) is zero outside an origin-centered circle of diameter equal to the sampling period [58]. ÀM +1. and flexible. In their paper.0Þ. This type of the DFRFT corresponds to a completely distinct definition of the fractional Fourier transform. the closed-form analytic expression of this DFRFT can be obtained.´ E. In other words. Therefore.y.60. in these cases.. we cannot use the above as the definition of the DFRFT. the operator satisfies the angle additivity property [62]: Fa1 Fa2 ¼ Fa1 þ a2 and angle multiciplity property [62]: Fm ¼ Fma a ð54Þ ð53Þ DuDt ¼ 2pjsinaj=ð2M þ 1Þ ð46Þ must also be satisfied.64]). was proposed in [56]. For example. pÞ. Ya ðmÞ ¼ Xa ðmDuÞ ð43Þ continuous FRFT and lacks many of the characteristics of the continuous FRFT. Because there are two chirp multiplications and one FFT. DFRFT based on eigenvectors A possible approach for the DFRFT is based on searching the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the DFT matrix and then computing the fractional power of the DFT matrix (e. the fractional matrix operator. discrete Fourier transform ðFp=2 Þ. Nevertheless. and sffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi   ÀsinaÀjcosa j cotam2 Du2 exp Ya ðmÞ ¼ 2 2M þ1     N X 2pnm j exp cotan2 Dt 2 yðnÞ exp j  2M þ1 2 n ¼ ÀN ð45Þ when sina o 0 ða 2 2Dp þ ðÀp.

our literature review showed that applications are very scarce beyond optics. Therefore. which is defined as QPðm. . Using the findings presented in [60. Recently. a computationally more efficient algorithm was proposed in [73].expðÀjaðNÀ2ÞÞ. the OPA minimizes the total errors between those samples. Although the Mathieu functions can converge to Hermite functions.66]. a fast numerical algorithm for the DRFT was proposed in [77].expðÀjaðNÀ2ÞÞ. and the cascade method has a regular structure. the Gram–Schmidt algorithm (GSA) or the orthogonal procrustes algorithm (OPA) can be used [60]. This DFRFT satisfies the rotation property on the WD. This approach has been extended to the so-called multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier transform (MPDFRFT) [65. However. [59.64]) is found in the obtained eigenvectors in previous contributions. we review the practical applications of the FRFT and its discrete counterpart as a signal processing tool. it will be very complicated to derive.4.expðÀjaÞ. authors in [76] proposed that the DFRFT can be obtained as the multiplication of DFT and the periodic chirps. the DFRFT becomes an elliptical rotation in the continuous time–frequency plane for sampling periods different from pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 2p=N [60]. the authors investigated the relationship between the FRFT and the DFRFT and found that for a sampling period equal pffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi to 2p=N. Using the group theory. nÞ ¼ þ1 Z À1 ð57Þ ð58Þ for N even. audio. Applications In this section. Using Chirp-Z transforms. The GSA minimizes the errors between the samples of the Hermite functions and the orthogonal DFT Hermite eigenvectors.63. Here. . it should be noted that these types of DFRFTs lack the fast computation algorithm and the eigenvectors cannot be written in a closed form. With this equivalence of implementation. authors in [67] believe that the discrete time counterparts of the continuous time Hermite–Gaussians maintained the same properties. . the convergence for the eigenvectors obtained in previous approaches are not so fast for the high-order Hermite functions by the linear mean square error criterion [60]. As well. Nevertheless. and U =[u0 u1 yuN À 2 uN] when N is even. we only provide a brief overview of these techniques. Furthermore. the MPDFRFT maintains all of the desired properties and reduces to the DFRFT when all of its order parameters are the same. while maintaining the same computational efficiency. In order to resolve this issue about the approximation of Hermite–Gaussian functions. it is very suitable for VLSI implementation. the authors argued that their method is easier to implement in comparison with the method proposed in [61]. A similar approach to [60] has been proposed in [67]. Additionally. a reader should refer to these contributions. the DFRFT of any angle can be computed by a linear combination of the DFRFTs with special angles [70]. which are useful in voice. However. when the number of points is not prime. the FRFT can be computed by mapping variables m and n of the QPT onto a and u of the FRFT. For complete details. . and the additivity and reversible property. and easy implementation. the above fast algorithms are also extended to real value sequences [75]. methods for parallel and cascade computations of DFRFT are proposed xðtÞeÀjmtÀjnt dt 2 ð59Þ Compared with (1). uk is the normalized eigenvector corresponding to the k-th order Hermite function and D2a=p is defined as the following diagonal matrix: D2a=p ¼ diagðexpðÀj0Þ. . 4. The chirp signal detection is a common one. . Several other approaches for obtaining the DFRFT were proposed in the literature. . In fact. Specifically. and image signal analysis. where N is the number of samples in the time domain.expðÀjaÞ. Other approaches The FRFT can also be realized by the quadratic phase transform (QPT) [71. a nearly tri-diagonal commuting matrix of the DFT and a corresponding version of the DFRFT was proposed in [69]. This method allows free choice of resolutions in both fractional Fourier spaces. . By this new method.. a number of fast algorithms for the QPT can be used to compute the FRFT [71. On the other hand. We anticipate additional publications regarding practical applications of . The parallel method is suitable for the signal whose DFRFT in special angles are already known.72].1360 ´ E. By further exploiting the periodic and symmetric properties of the QPT and with the radix-2 decimation-in-frequency principle. Sejdic et al. However. 3. in that they were just discrete Mathieu functions [60]. when N is odd. simultaneous data-peeping in any region. However. the DFRFT performs a circular rotation of the signal in the time–frequency plane [60]. expðÀjaðNÀ1ÞÞÞ for N odd and D2a=p ¼ diagðexpðÀj0Þ. It should be also pointed out that the main difference between the approach proposed in [60] and similar approaches proposed (e. Most of the eigenvectors of this proposed nearly tri-diagonal matrix result in a good approximation of the continuous Hermite–Gaussian functions by providing a smaller approximation error in comparison to the previous approaches.73–75].67]. These algorithms can reduce the numbers of both complex multiplications and additions by a factor 2log2 N.g. In order to ensure orthogonality of the DFT Hermite eigenvectors (uk). for these elliptical rotations an angle modification and a post-phase compensation in the DFRFT are required to obtain results similar to the continuous FRFT [60]. therefore. the fast algorithms proposed in [71] make use of the concept of decimation-in-time decomposition along the m and n domain.expðÀjaNÞÞ in [70]. this type of DFRFT can be derived only when the fractional order of the DFRFT equals some specified angles. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 8 PNÀ1 > k ¼ 0 expðÀjkaÞuk uT > k <P NÀ2 F2a=p ¼ expðÀjkaÞuk uT k > k¼0 > : þ expðÀjN aÞu uT N N for N odd for N even ð56Þ where U =[u0 u1 yuN À 1]. since these discrete time counterparts exhibited better approximations than the other proposed approaches [68].

this situation is gradually changing with more papers focusing on this transform. Our goal is to emphasize that the FRFT is a valuable tool in many various applications. 5(b). [1. since these classical time–frequency tools do not provide a framework sufficient for a comprehensive analysis [2]. WD). This is illustrated with Figs. estimation and restoration of signals in fractional domains were developed for these applications. Usage of two angles in the 2D FRFT offers significant possibility to hide more different watermarks in images than the standard DFT or DCT-based domains. From spread between these two lines we can conclude that watermark detection is reliable. Furthermore. several well-established transforms are already used in the multimedia applications (e. DFT). Here.. Watermarking using the FRFT: (a) original image and (b) watermarked image. 6(a) where upper line corresponds to detection in the watermarked image while lower line corresponds to detection in non-watermarked image. DWT. 5 and 6 taken from [82].1. The third reason is that this transform with a relatively long history in the other signal processing related disciplines. we foresee an increased number of applications of the FRFT based time– frequency representations in speech and music processing.. .g. Secondly.9]) described either more traditional applications such as filtering and signal recovery or only briefly covered different applications. Walsh. Then. multimedia applications are commonly subject to some sort of standardization. The digital watermarking is a technique used for the copyright protection of digital multimedia data [85]. 6(b) demonstrates a situation when a search with the proper watermark key is performed around proper angles. For example. Detection of watermarks for 1000 watermark keys is demonstrated in Fig. Filtering in fractional Fourier domains may enable significant reduction of the mean square error in comparison with ordinary Fourier domain filtering. 5(a) while the watermarked image is given in Fig. It should be also mentioned that in this paper we devote more space to newer applications of the FRFT such as watermarking and communications. Fig. In particular. the FRFT can be applied to the problem of time-varying filtering of non-stationary. Similarly.2. This is a quite important fact and it helps in increasing the 4. Filtering The idea of using the FRFT for fundamental signal processing procedures such filtering. It can be seen that the watermark can be detected only if the angle under which the watermark is embedded is known. Also. estimation and restoration is particularly interesting for applications involving optical information processing [78. Watermarking The FRFT and its counterparts have not be fully exploited in the field of the multimedia due to several plausible reasons. 4. Some problems stemming from such applications demand such advanced time–frequency representations (e. finite energy processes both in continuous-time and discretetime frameworks [80]. DST. biomedical signal processing.g... spectrogram. revealing that under certain conditions one can improve upon the special cases of these operations in the conventional space and frequency domain. and mechanical vibrations analysis. Other contributions (e. However. is still relatively unknown in the multimedia systems. A desired ability for these techniques is a creation of a large number of watermarks that can be embedded in multimedia data without perceptible degradation of host data. Sejdic et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1361 the FRFT are bound to appear.79].g. Watermark is embedded for angles a1 ¼ a2 ¼ 0:375p.´ E. Fig. 5. In this figure the original Lena image used as a common test example is given in Fig.g. Firstly. [82–84]). a relatively short history of the fast algorithms for the FRFT realization and a short period for the detailed study of the FRFT properties limit its wider usage in this area. it is worthwhile mentioning the application in the digital watermarking (e. DCT. a novel fractional adaptive filtering scheme was introduced [81]. the FRFT domains offer more flexibility since it has been shown that the FRFT watermarks with various angles have small correlation. and simulation results showed that adaptive filtering in the fractional domain is superior in comparison to its time domain counterparts. In several publications the concepts of filtering. the optimum multiplicative filter function that minimizes the mean square error in the a-th fractional Fourier domain was derived in [80].

6. but not in the space or spatial-frequency domain only. 7(b). or when all targets in one range bin have similar motion parameters. If the signal’s components have significantly different chirp-rates. since watermarks are concentrated in the joint space/spatial-frequency domain [87]. In particular. It has been shown that the LPFT-based methods for focusing ISAR images can achieve a significantly higher output SNR than those based on the STFT. the impact of the noise and other errors is severely reduced on the FRFT coefficients by pre-filtering these coefficients yielding a scheme that is more robust to various attacks.. this concept of watermarking provides results robust to the standard filtering. A quantitative analysis of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the LPFT applied in the ISAR imaging is presented in [102]. Adaptive parameters are obtained by using a simple concentration measure. Radar applications A couple of techniques related to the FRFT have been recently used for focusing SAR/ISAR images (e. a sum of the weighted LPFT is used. Moving target focusing can be performed by this technique for some specific scenarios. the obtained SAR image will be focused only when one target exists in a range bin. 7(c). In addition. 4. Otherwise. Estimated chirp-rate parameters (angles in the FRFT terminology) are depicted with dashed lines in Fig. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 Fig. the estimation of these parameters should be performed separately for each component. a modulus of the target effective rotation vector is calculated from the obtained estimation. For targets with very complex motion patterns. The main obstacle in further applications of these techniques is the complexity that can be reduced with various previously described fast realization strategies. Focusing of the radar image is performed for each cross-range parameter and the focused image is given in Fig. A technique for applying the product higher-order ambiguity function (PHAF) for estimating parameters of the radar signal and focusing SAR images is proposed in [103]. In order to overcome this drawback. Moreover. Both of these techniques are closely monitored and followed by numerous researchers [88–97]. Additional improvements have been achieved when these chirp-rates are filtered with median filter (thick line). a single chirp-rate parameter can be estimated for all components. a watermarking scheme in the space/spatialfrequency domain has been proposed in [87]. the obtained estimate is additionally refined by combining estimations obtained for close reflectors. Therefore. 7(a) (the figure is taken from [100]). A practically useful scheme for the FRFT based watermarking is recently proposed in [86]. but the chirprate is estimated by using contrast of the LPFT-based ISAR image.3. Moreover. The ISAR image is then focused by using the estimated value of signal parameters obtained through the LPFT calculation. Sejdic et al. for monocomponent and multicomponent signals with similar chirp-rates. A similar approach is proposed in [101]. Two forms of the adaptive LPFT-based technique for focusing ISAR images are proposed in [100]. [98. the availability of the FRFT fast realizations will lead to numerous implementations of the FRFT and related transforms in multimedia. The adaptive LPFT is calculated for each region in order to form focused ISAR image. number of watermarks that can be embedded within multimedia data. these versions of the LPFT can be applied for any realistic motion. the radar images focused with the filtered chirp-rate as depicted in Fig.1362 ´ E. we demonstrate test image of the B727 plane given in Fig. Analysis of the detector: (a) statistical analysis of detecting watermark signal in watermarked and non-watermarked image and (b) detection of watermark signal using different transformation angles. an algorithm for separating signal . The focusing is performed without assuming any particular model of a target’s motion. Then. Therefore.g. Similarly. segmentation of the radar image in regions-of-interests is performed. This watermarking technique uses 2D chirp signals that are well concentrated in the joint space/spatial-frequency domain. The first technique is based on knowing that. Focusing of the SAR images is usually performed by estimating parameters of a received signal. This technique is commonly referred to as the LPFT in the related literature. 7(d). this technique fails to achieve high concentration of each target simultaneously.99]). Here. More precisely. For multicomponent signals with different chirp-rates.

4. In addition. the procedure proposed in [105] based on the LPFT with automatic selection of the chirp-rate parameters. B727 radar image: (a) results obtained by the FT-based method. filtered adaptive chirp rate (light solid line). for doubly selective channels (channels with selectivity in both time and frequency) this technique produces non-satisfactory results. The drawback of the LPFT-based technique. is high computational complexity needed for selection of chirp-rate that produces the best concentration. an algorithm for the automated selection of phase parameters used for the LPFT calculation is proposed in [105]. linear interpolation of filtered data (bold solid line) and (d) adaptive LPFT with interpolated data. Martone . an adaptive set of chirp-rates is formed for each unfocused target. Further improvement of the obtained estimate is performed by using a fine search in the region around the chirp-rate obtained from the coarse search. Sejdic et al. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1363 Fig. The LPFT technique with predefined set of the chirp-rates gives significantly improved results as shown in Fig. However. (b) adaptive LPFT method. However. Therefore. In [104–106] it has been shown that the LPFT-based methods for focusing SAR images are more robust to the additive noise influence than the STFT radar imaging techniques. the PHAF is evaluated and the position of its maximum is used for the coarse estimation of chirp-rate. Here. applied in this manner. components corresponding to targets with different motion parameters is applied in [104] where the LPFTbased technique is used for focusing each component. Communications Traditional multicarrier (MC) systems are designed with the DFT based schemes. respectively. (c) adaptive chirp rate (dotted line). The main representative of these techniques is the orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM). 7. It can be seen that the moving targets have seriously spread components. produces highly focusing of all considered targets (Fig. 8(d)).´ E. 8(c). In this algorithm. When one or more unfocused targets are detected in a range. Alternative tools such as a technique called the S-method [107] are unable to separate overlapping targets (Fig. The number of chirp-rates in the fine search stage is rather small (usually not larger than several tens) which yields a significant decrease in the computational complexity with respect to the technique proposed in [104] (which requires hundreds or thousands). 8(b)). a procedure for the third-order phase compensation is applied in the proposed algorithm without a significant increase of the calculation burden. we have borrowed figure from [105] where the SAR image of several moving and stationary targets is shown (Fig.4. 8(a)). ot and om represent the range and the cross-range.

Furthermore. For channels with fast variations with available the line-ofsight component (usually associated with mobile stations mounted on high speed carriers and/or non-urban environments) this scheme significantly outperforms DFT-based counterparts. Similarly. These chirp based modulations and associated AFT schemes have been identified as a suitable basis for multicarrier communications such as aeronautical and satellite [110]. (c) LPFT with predefined set of chirp rates and (d) proposed LPFT. in our opinion the AFT technique are important candidates for novel digital standards for the aeronautical communications with solved problem of the fast realizations of the AFT (FRFT).. Simulated SAR image of seven target points obtained by using: (a) 2D FT. other contributions discussed the application of the FRFT in communication systems. 8. chirp modulation spread spectrum based on the FRFT was recently proposed for demodulation of multiple access systems [112]. The numerical analysis of the proposed receiver showed improved performance. 4. The numerical analysis showed that the FRFT based receiver is more flexible and efficient system for multiple access by reducing the designing complexity of the system. Performance of this technique is significantly improved since the time–frequency plane can be adjusted (rotated) in a way to compensate undesired modulation of the signals introduced by high velocity of participants and/ or by multipath component shifted from the line-of-sight components. The best results for the AFT-MC techniques are observed for en-route scenario while in the worst case for the parking scenario. outperforming the simple minimum mean squared error receiver in Rayleigh faded channel.g. the AFT-based technique behaves the same as the OFDM. Then. The authors also argued that receivers based on the FRFT are more sensitive than earlier coherent receivers for chirp signals.1364 ´ E. a minimum mean squared error receiver based on the FRFT for MIMO systems with space time processing over Rayleigh faded channels was presented. In a very recent publication (e. Table 4 provides a comparison between the AFT-MC technique and the standard OFDM for four typical scenaria that can be observed in the case of the aeronautical channels. Sejdic et al. The authors argued that their method is very basic and further improvements can be .5. Table 4 A comparison of two techniques. Compression An interesting application of the FRFT to compression can be found in [113]. In particular. OFDM Significantly better Slightly better Equal published a corner-stone paper where the discrete FRFT is used instead of the DFT in multicarrier systems [108]. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 2D FT 150 100 50 0 −50 −100 −150 −100 150 100 50 0 −50 −100 −150 −100 x[m] −50 0 50 x[m] −50 0 LPFT y[m] 150 100 50 0 −50 −100 −150 100 −100 y[m] 50 y[m] 150 100 50 0 −50 −100 −150 100 −100 y[m] Adaptive 1D SM x[m] −50 0 50 100 Proposed LPFT x[m] −50 0 50 100 Fig. [111]). there is still a room for improvement. Scenario En-route Arrival/ takeoff Slightly better Taxi Parking AFT-MC vs. This technique is generalized for general linear canonical form of the transform (affine Fourier transform—AFT) in [109]. This form has shown an improved flexibility with respect to the FRFT-based scheme. the contribution dealt with image compression and found that even though the presented method yielded inferior results in comparison to commonly available compression algorithms. (b) adaptive S-method.

In particular. An application of the FRFT to computer tomography was also recently discussed [129]. it has been rediscovered in the literature several times. these systems become time (or space) varying systems. In order to do so. Hence. Fractal signal processing The FRFT also found its application in processing of fractal signals. especially in terms of quality of reconstructed signal and the percentage root-mean-square difference.6. where authors proposed a scheme for signal compression based on the combination of DFRFT and set partitioning in hierarchical tree (SPIHT). Other applications The FRFT can be useful in terms of differential equations [7. this encryption method enhances data security because the order parameters of the modified FRFT can be exploited as extra keys for decryption. The application of the scheme to different types of signals demonstrated a significant reduction in bits leading to high signal compression ratio. Recently. For example. 4.g. Then.8. the rotation angle) in comparison with the ordinary Fourier transform. For example. a user first selects at least four parameters including an angle of rotation. The results were further compared with those obtained with the discrete cosine transform. While use of the fractional Fourier transform increases the cost of the training procedure. Furthermore.´ E. The second part of the paper covered various practical realizations of the FRFT. 4. The concept of compression using the FRFT has been further extended in [114]. bandwidth. Further details about the application of the FRFT to differential equations can be found in [128]. as the dynamic range of error signal is too small. a two-dimensional FRFT has been used to characterize the effect of scattering [129]. and storage requirements. a time exponent. At the encryption side. This random discrete FRFT is also first applied to the image encryption to show its potentials. a random discrete FRFT. The FRFT has also been applied to transient motor current signature analysis (TMCSA) [130]. This paper also proposed the optimization of the FRFT to generate a spectrum where the frequency-varying fault harmonics appear as single spectral lines and. In particular. which is equivalent to solving a set of linear equations [119]. However. especially for solving these equations. exhibits an important feature that the magnitude and phase of its transform output are both random..9. For example. The use of fractional based pre-processing resulted in an improved performance comparing to both no preprocessing and ordinary Fourier transform pre-processing. more than one modified FRFT kernels corresponding to the encryption key are selected and multiplied with the input signal. using the double random phase encoding in the multiple-parameter FRFT domain. The modified FRFT (e. the improvements achieved with its use come at no additional routine operating cost. the FRFT was used as a pre-processor for a neural network [115]. On the other hand. In particular. we provided an overview of the FRFT from the signal processing point of view. As such. It is also shown that the current standard algorithms such as AES [122] outperform the above system in terms of both encryption speed. Conclusion The FRFT is a powerful mathematical transform that generalizes the ordinary Fourier transform through the order parameter a. the paper is thematically divided into three topics. such as wavelet-based method and a global estimator based on dispersional analysis. [118]) along with the double random phase encoding technique has been successfully applied for encrypting digital data. a FRFT based estimation method was introduced to analyze the long range dependence in time series. the FRFT was used for the determination of the main parameters of fractals in [124]. the DFRFT is shown to be more suitable for compression than the DCT. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1365 achieved by combining with other techniques. the FRFT of a function x(t) can be considered as a solution of a differential equation. In [125]. therefore. and a sampling rate as the encryption key. 4. a reverse procedure with respect to the encryption process is used for decryption. . the FRFT was used for estimation of the Hurst exponent. Also. 5. Cryptography The FRFT can also be used in the field of cryptography [117–121]. Pattern recognition Given that the FRFT provides an extra parameter (e. In the first part. In this paper. Namias solved several Shrodinger equations using this assumption [7]. a 2004 US patent invented a cryptographic approach [117]. Specifically. The FRFT can be also shown to be a particular case of the evolution operators [127]. a phase. it is insecure because a known plaintext attack can break this scheme.. However. this encryption scheme has shown to be linear [119]. 4. due to the shortcomings of Fourier transform for such an analysis.126]. For example.7. the FRFT also provides additional degrees of freedom in pattern recognition systems. Sejdic et al. where x(t) can be considered as the initial condition of the equation. the fractional based pre-processing resulted in a substantial reduction of classification and localization error. Further examples can be found in [1. we presented the definition of the FRFT and tied it to other mathematical representations.g. Hence.7. The results have shown that the FRFT estimator can achieve a reliable estimation of the Hurst exponent when compared to some other existing estimation methods. facilitate the diagnostic process. proposed in [123]. our goal was to attract signal processing practitioners to this mathematically eloquent concept and depict its advantages.126]. In particular. it has been also shown that pattern recognition methods based on matched filtering can be generalized by replacing the standard Fourier operations by fractional Fourier operations [116]. There is no need to encode the error signal and send along with the encoded DFRFT coefficients.

Acknowledgments ´ The work of Igor Djurovic is supported in part by the Ministry of Science and Education of Montenegro. Furthermore. but these discrete realizations could lose many important properties of the FRFT. A second stream relies on a linear combination of ordinary Fourier operators raised to different powers. In particular. we also outlined other approaches   that appeared in the literature. One stream is represented through direct sampling of the FRFT. Ozaktas. This enabled us to increase the number of watermarks embedded within multimedia data. This relationship enables us to relate the FRFT to a wide class of time–frequency transforms. Table 5 contains reference sorted according to their topics). Future contributions in this theme will include a further understanding of the FRFT and its ties to other mathematical transforms.1366 ´ E.3. Djuro Stojanovic from Crnogorski Telekom and Pu Wang from the Stevens Institute of Technology for shaping up some sections of this manuscript. we should point out that the major drawbacks of this approach are that they cannot be written in a closed form and might have computational costs.g. The conclusions stemming from each part were as follows:  Besides its ties to the ordinary Fourier transform. these realizations often produce an output that does not match the output of the continuous FRFT. fractal signal processing. we have witnessed a strong expansion of the FRFT in several fields. The digital realizations of the FRFT can be divided into three major streams. we expect an expansion of FRFT-based methods in different applications to dominate the future contributions. Similar trends have been observed in multimedia signal processing.A. we showed the direct relationship between the AF. filtering). Last. the authors would like to thank the reviewers whose comments have helped them to improve the technical quality and the presentation of the manuscript. the FRFT can be further related to various time–frequency transforms.6. we outlined the connection between the FRFT and L-WD for the first time in the literature. In particular. Also. Time–frequency feature representation using energy concentration: an overview of recent advances. The Fractional Fourier Transform with Applications in Optics and Signal Processing. The main advantage is that the FRFT-based schemes increase processing accuracy.62] [59. radar applications. For example. Table 5 References sorted according to their topics.45. Furthermore.126–130] . We specifically suggested that potential realizations of the FRFT could be achieved with the so-called quadratic phase transform. the WD and the FRFT. Kutay.M.vectors Other approaches for DFRFT Applications Filtering Watermarking Radar applications Communications Compression Pattern recognition Cryptography Fractal signal processing Other application Refs. Anticipated contributions in this field need to deal with issues associated with the current schemes. Z. Lastly. The number of publications discussing practical applications of the FRFT has been steadily rising. a group of authors described an adaptive filtering scheme in a recent contribution. Sejdic et al. From these past contributions. USA. 2001. J.46] [14. including watermarking. The realizations obtained through this stream tend to closely resemble the representations obtained by the continuous FRFT.60. Djurovic. Further research and applications of existing schemes will increase in the near future. Digital Signal Processing 19 (1) (2009) 153–183. The ´ authors would like to thank Vesna Popovic from the ´ University of Montenegro. and wireless communications. John Wiley. biomedical signal processing and mechanical vibration analysis.63–70] [71–77] [78–81] [82–84.50–58] [61. ´ ´ [2] E. However. It is the least complicated approach. Sejdic.125] [7. the kernel associated with the FRFT can introduce very fast oscillations that require excessively large sampling rates.86–97] [98–106] [108–112] [113. In particular. Furthermore. Problems stemming from such applications require the employment of such advanced time–frequency transforms. we also have the FRFT present in other fields as well (e.116] [117–123] [124. The presented results showed a superior performance in comparison to its time domain counterparts. The third stream approaches the discrete realizations based on the idea of an eigenvalue decomposition. the FRFT can be considered as the special case of the LCT. Chichester. Nevertheless. Overall. I. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 while the practical applications of the FRFT were discussed in the third part of the paper.. New York. the paper provided a compact summary of the recent contributions regarding the FRFT (for convenience. M. where the FRFT has been used for watermarking. [1.114] [115. Such a relationship provides a direct generalization link between the FRFT and many higher-order/affine mathematical transformations. pattern recognition. The FRFT is a very powerful tool and has been applied to many fields. Zalevsky. we showed that the FRFT can be considered as a special case of the second-order LPFT and LPP.4–15] [2. Topics Theoretical contributions Introductory and review contributions FRFT and time–frequency representations FRFT and linear canonical transform DFRFT through sampling of FRFT Linear combination-type DFRFT DFRFT based on eigen. In particular. Jiang. References [1] H. but not least. In particular. we expect to see increased application of the FRFT based time–frequency representations in speech and music processing.16–44] [1. the watermark could be detected only if the angle under which the watermark was embedded was known.

Xiaotong. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. Cariolaro. IET Signal Processing 3 (1) (2009) 85–92. Martnez-Sulbaran. Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Acoustics. I.J. Xiaogang. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 49 (8) (2001) 1638–1655. Bastiaans. G. Ding. Generalized entropic uncertainty principle on fractional Fourier transform. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 42 (11) (1994) 3084–3091. Soffer. Y. Signal Processing 47 (2) (1995) 187–200. Optical Engineering 33 (7) (1994) 2326–2330. B. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 9 (11) (2002) 378–381. in: Proceedings of IEEE-SP International Symposium on Time–Frequency and Time-Scale Analysis. Kraniauskas. V. Garcia. Lohmann. and multiplexing in fractional Fourier domains and their relation to chirp and wavelet transforms. and Vision 10 (12) (1993) 2522–2531. 169–172. B. Pei. Liu. [27] A. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. and their applications. Y. pp. and Vision 11 (2) (1994) 547–559. B. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 46 (10) (1998) 2626–2637. J. Lee.-G. G. Design of higher order polynomial Wigner– Ville distributions.-G. June 18–21. R. Fractional Fourier transforms. Relations between fractional operations and time–frequency distributions. Hermitian polynomials and Fourier analysis. Guanlei. Ozaktas.M. Germany. Three uncertainty relations for real signals associated with linear canonical transform. August 6–8. Chaparro. Annales des Telecommunications 53 (7/8) (1998) 316–319.G. Stankovic. H. The fractional Fourier transform and the Wigner distribution. Fractional-Fourier-domain weighted Wigner distribution. Sejdic et al. T. ´ LJ. and Signal Processing (ICASSP 1994). Shakhmurov.-C.J.-C. Lohmann. [5] E. 2001. A. S. and the fractional Fourier transform. De Bruijn. Dorsch. LJ. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (3) (1996) 72–74. Almeida. H. IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 25 (3) (1980) 241–265. [24] D. X. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 44 (11) (1996) 2882–2886. B. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 47 (9) (1999) 2608–2611. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (12) (1996) 310–311. Barry. Sejdic. Signal Processing 89 (3) (2009) 339–343. Ristic. Convolution. pp. Ozaktas. Boashash. Simplified fractional Fourier transforms. A theory of generalized functions.H. .J. Erseghe. C. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 41 (5) (1993) 1996–2008. B. Akan. Barshan. Akan. M. Erseghe. Kernel design for time–frequency signal analysis using the Radon transform. T. T. Relationship between the ambiguity function coordinate transformations and the fractional Fourier transform. wavelet transforms. Eigenfunctions of linear canonical transform. [19] H. Marinho. R.W. Mustard. Pei. Zalevsky. A. S. On generalizedmarginal time–frequency distributions. Zhang. France. The logarithmic. Recent developments in the theory of the fractional Fourier and linear canonical transforms. 6. Owechko. Y. Saarbrucken. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 50 (1) (2002) 11–26. T. Ding. Bernardo. Narayanan. [11] D. On fractional Fourier transform moments. Almeida. F.-C. Zhang. P. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. Singapore. ´ [20] M. Xiaotong. [25] S. Stankovic.G. [26] J. Fractional Fourier transforms and their optical implementation: part II.-Z. Stankovic. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. Zayed. H. Time–frequency signal analysis based on the windowed fractional Fourier transform. [8] V. S. Stankovic. Image rotation. On the relationship between the Fourier and fractional Fourier transforms. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 47 (12) (1999) 3419–3423. Radon transformation of time–frequency distributions for analysis of multicomponent signals. Journal of the -. Laurenti. M. Signal Processing 77 (1) (1999) 111–114. Unified fractional Fourier transform and sampling theorem. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 50 (6) (2002) 1289–1297. Bastiaans. VDM Verlag Publishing.H.-J.M. Journal of the Optical [28] [29] [30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] [41] [42] [43] [44] [45] [46] [47] [48] [49] [50] [51] [52] Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. The fractional Fourier transform and time–frequency representations. Y. Numerical calculation of fractional Fourier transforms with a single fast-Fourier-transform algorithm. X. and Signal Processing 150 (2) (2003) 99–106.J.B. Ren. X. The Journal of the Australian Mathematical Society— Series B—Applied Mathematics 38 (2) (1996) 209–219. [22] A. H. Pei.M.M. Carioraro. ´ LJ. Ozaktas. Mendlovic. Time–Frequency Based Feature Extraction and Classification: Considering Energy Concentration as a Feature Using Stockwell Transform and Related Approaches. Wiener. An uncertainty principle for real signals in the fractional Fourier transform domain. ´ ´ [16] LJ. Xiaotong. Mendlovic. [13] G. Alieva. Bi. Szu. SA. N. implementation and error analysis. Alieva. Franklin Institute 340 (5) (2003) 391–397. Xia. Ding. D. J. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. in: -. Signal Processing 83 (11) (2003) 2459–2468.Q. Y. and Vision 12 (11) (1995) 2424–2431. Xiaogang. Immersion of the Fourier transform in a continuous group of functional transformations. J. Discrete rotational Gabor transform. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 7 (11) (2000) 320–323. [4] N. [15] L. X. [17] T. Guanlei. P.M. C ekic A fractional Gabor transform. C ekic A fractional Gabor expansion. D. Mendlovic. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 55 (10) (2007) 4839–4850. A. B. Mendlovic. and Vision 10 (10) (1993) 2181–2186. 1994. The Bulletin of the Belgian Mathematical Society—Simon Stevin 13 (5) (2007) 971–1005.-C. Relationships between the Radon– Wigner and fractional Fourier transforms. K. Katkovnik. W. New sampling formulae for the fractional Fourier transform. Prabhu. Akan. Y. Journal of Mathematical Physics (MIT) 8 (1929) 70–73. S. Xia. [14] A. L. W.G. On bandlimited signals with fractional Fourier transform. Erkaya. Fractional Fourier transforms and their optical implementation: part I. Effect of fractional Fourier transformation on time–frequency distributions belonging to the Cohen class.-J. Microprocessors and Microsystems 27 (10) (2003) 511–521. J.-Y. Gadre. Bastiaans. Optics Letters 22 (21) (1997) 1583–1585. Product and convolution theorems for the fractional Fourier transform.H. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 1 (7) (1994) 106–109. X. Bitran. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 4 (1) (1997) 15–17. Dong. Z. 321–324. Yang. Alieva. Gu.M. Image.J. J. Paris. V.-J. with applications to Wigner distribution and Weyl correspondence. vol.M. 1996. H. The fractional Fourier transform: theory. F.-J. 2009. Condon. [23] D.I. Discrete-time local polynomial approximation of the instantaneous frequency. Australia. A multitime definition of the Wigner higher order distribution: L-Wigner distribution. L. Ozaktas.B. Wood. H. and Vision 10 (9) (1993) 1875–1881. Zhang. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 3 (2) (1996) 40–41.-Y. [9] A. Matic. S.A. A unified framework for the fractional Fourier transform. Fractional Fourier transform of the Gaussian and fractional domain signal support. Adelaide. Onural.M. B. Lohmann.W. Kutay. X.´ E.-Z. Heisenberg’s and short-time uncertainty principles associated with fractional Fourier transform. A. [18] B. T. N. in: Proceedings of the 11th IEEE Signal Processing Workshop on Statistical Signal Processing. Speech. Tomography time–frequency transform. Djurovic. Bastiaans. Brown. Soffer. V. Xiaogang. ´ [21] LJ. X.M. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 42 (11) (1994) 3166–3177. Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde 21 (1973) 205–280. Boashash. IEE Proceedings—Vision. Shinde. Stankovic. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 46 (12) (1998) 3206–3219. April 19–22. A. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science and Vision 15 (8) (1998) 2111–2116. Barkat. A new form of the Fourier transform for time-varying frequency estimation. Jiang.W. Katkovnik. V. S. Capus. Kraniauskas. and Vision 11 (6) (1994) 1798–1801. Wigner rotation. Bultheel. filtering. X. Pei. The fractional order Fourier transform and its application to quantum mechanics. L.U. W. Namias. Zayed. Relations between Gabor transforms and fractional Fourier transforms and their applications for signal processing. LJ. K. G. and Vision 17 (12) (2000) 2355–2367.M. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science. Stankovic.I. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 49 (11) (2001) 2545–2548. M. [12] L. X. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 23 (3) (1937) 158–164. M. Djurovic. Ding. On rotated time–frequency kernels. A. and adaptive neural networks. Guanlei. Ozaktas. Chen. I. Fractional Gabor transform. [10] D. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1367 ´ ´ ´ [3] E. [6] N. B. Signal Processing 89 (12) (2009) 2692–2697. [7] V. New signal representation based on the fractional Fourier transform: definitions.A. Alieva. H.

Fast algorithms for polynomial time–frequency transforms of real-valued sequences. Y. Amein.M. K.W. Y. Wuhan. Optics Letters 22 (14) (1997) 1047–1049. Speech. Discrete fractional Fourier transform based on orthogonal projections. Candan. in: Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Acoustics. Dual digital watermarking algorithm for image based on fractional Fourier transform.A. in: Proceedings of the IEEE-SP International Symposium on Time–Frequency and Time-Scale Analysis. X. Stankovic. Fractional discrete Fourier transforms. Kutay. in: Proceedings of the Second PacificAsia Conference on Web Mining and Web-based Application (WMWA ’09). J.H. ´ ´ S. Signal Processing 90 (4) (2010) 1188–1196. IEEE Transactions on Acoustics. C. S. T.-G. Discrete fractional Fourier transform based on new nearly tridiagonal commuting matrices. Ding. The discrete rotational Fourier transform. D. Martorella. Y. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 [53] C.-Y. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 14 (10) (2007) 699–702. Generalized fast algorithms for the polynomial time frequency transforms. Stankovic. Arikan. estimation and restoration. On the multiangle centered discrete fractional Fourier transform. S. Media hash-dependent image watermarking resilient against both geometric attacks and estimation attacks based on false positive-oriented detection.1368 ´ E. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 13 (6) (2006) 329–332. Hsu. Bi. A content-based image authentication scheme based on singular value decomposition. April 21–24. Digital computation of the fractional Fourier transform. Liu. G.-M. Yeh.-B. Bi. McClellan.H. Pattern Recognition and Image Analysis 16 (3) (2006) 506–522. Kutay. Handbook of image and video processing. Yeh. Guo.K.-C. Joshi. Radix-2 DIF fast algorithms for polynomial time–frequency transforms. A method for the discrete fractional Fourier transform computation. Sejdic et al. Optics Communications 272 (2) (2007) 344–348. Y. C. [69] S. M.-H. 1997. Speech.C.W. pp. Abed-Meraim. Robust watermarking in the Wigner domain. S. Kutay. Antalya. M. 1999. Y. M.-C. Djurovic. Li. Ozaktas. Turkey. Lu. M.A. L.-H. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology 13 (8) (2003) 813–830. and Signal Processing (ICASSP-97). IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 47 (5) (1999) 1335–1348. 1083–1109. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 54 (10) (2006) 3815–3828. Tseng. M. D. Boston. Zhang. July 2007. Pei. Xu.F. H. Wong. Application of the fractional Fourier transform to moving target detection in airborne SAR. Wang.-S. On higher order approximations for Hermite–Gaussian functions and discrete fractional Fourier transforms. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 12 (4) (2005) 273–276. A robust image watermarking based on time–frequency. [63] S. F. May 24–26. 1–5. Pitas. 3. Richman. A. 2007. Aviyente. ´ ´ I. W. H. Sun. Su. [73] G. Quantitative SNR analysis for ISAR imaging using LPFT.M.-S.M. Yeh. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48 (5) (2000) 1329–1337. Au. Journal of Network and Computer Applications 24 (2) (2001) 167–173. Sampling and sampling rate conversion of band limited signals in the fractional Fourier transform domain. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 56 (5) (2008) 1905–1915. pp. H. [76] M. [56] S.-C.-C. Discrete fractional Hartley and Fourier transforms. S.-Q. I. 205–207. IEEE Transactions on Multimedia 8 (4) (2006) 668–685. Turkey. Kutay. Fan. Singapore. 2006. USA2005. Mendlovic. . Optics Communications 138 (4–6) (1997) 270–274. Simitopoulos. Z. Vargas-Rubio. Durak. Santhanam.A. Djurovic. Djurovic. Shyu. Feng. Cui. Ankan. IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems 44 (1) (2008) 281–294. G. Stankovic. Ju. Kutay. H. 51–54. Bi. N.M. M. Koutsonanos. pp. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology 13 (8) (2003) 732–745.M. C. Ozaktas.S. C. Schamschula. Digital watermarking in the fractional Fourier transformation domain. Deng. G. J. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48 (11) (2000) 3122–3233. The multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier transform. Image quality assessment using the joint spatial/spatial-frequency representation. July 9–12. Digital Signal Processing 7 (1997) 127–135.Q. Robust image watermarking based on generalized Radon transformations. G. Sampling and series expansion theorems for fractional Fourier and other transforms. I.D. W. Noise-resistant watermarking in the fractional Fourier domain utilizing moment-based image representation. [58] H. Wang. H. in: Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE Conference on Industrial Electronics and Applications. W. June 11–13. Ozturk. Hsue. Pei. [55] R. Liu.-J. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II: Analog and Digital Signal Processing 45 (6) (1998) 665–675. pp. Liu. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 55 (10) (2007) 4907–4915. D. Ju. Deng. Pei. EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing 2006 (2006) 1–15. Eigenvectors and functions of the discrete Fourier transform. Wei. Novel approach for ISAR image cross-range scaling. June 18–21. June 6–7.J. Y. Li. The discrete fractional Fourier transformation. Chang. China. Soraghan. Ozaktas. A. Steiglitz. Bozdagt. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 48 (5) (2000) 1338–1353. G. Watermarking in the space/spatialfrequency domain using two-dimensional Radon–Wigner distribution. Hsue. Pattern Recognition 38 (12) (2005) 2530–2536. Ozaktas. in: Proceedings of the 15th IEEE Signal Processing and Communications Applications Conference (SIU 2007). H. O. [67] C. S. 1–4. Thayaparan. Zhang. [70] M. [71] M. Chang.M. [74] Y.-C. Watermarking based on discrete fractional random transform. MA. [75] G. Iordache.J. [62] B. B. second ed. S. Al-Khassaweneh. Xia. pp. Y. [64] Z.L. [68] C. X. Cekic. Pei. T. Tefas. K. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to filtering. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 38 (4) (2002) 1416–1424. Hua. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 56 (1) (2008) 158–171. I. [59] S. [54] K. Bi. Convolution and filtering in fractional Fourier domains. Aldirmaz. M. Wang.-C. P.G.A. Y. [72] X. W.-R. L. IEEE Transactions on Image Processing 10 (4) (2001) 650–658. Arikan. Technical Report TW497. Academic Press. [77] X. 1557–1560. I. Chountasis. O. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 12 (10) (2005) 705–708. Optimal filtering in fractional Fourier domains. Y. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 42 (4) (2006) 1540–1546. pp. P. A fast algorithm for fractional Fourier transforms. Pitas. J. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 51 (3) (2003) 889–891. Eskisehir. M. A. Tao. S. H.M.. Candan. C. M.K. Adaptive local polynomial Fourier transform in ISAR. He. Y. Novel blind multiple watermarking technique for images. C. D. Strintzis. Barshan. Signal Processing 83 (11) (2003) 2455–2457. in: [80] [81] [82] [83] [84] [85] [86] [87] [88] [89] [90] [91] [92] [93] [94] [95] [96] [97] [98] [99] [100] [101] [102] Proceedings of the IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP’99). Beghdadi. A. Deng. M. ´ ´ I. A. M. June 20–23. R. Caulfield.-J. Parks.A. G. Bultheel. J. Closed-form discrete fractional and affine Fourier transforms. Candan. A digital watermarking algorithm for image based on fractional Fourier transform. The discrete fractional Fourier transform. Li. [65] S. Ozaktas. Sharma. 1996. Ozaktas.W. [57] O. A new chirp scaling algorithm based on the fractional Fourier transform. J.C. T. and Signal Processing 30 (1) (1982) 25–31. Quickly tracing detection for spread spectrum watermark based on effect estimation of the affine transform. M. Akan. D.-G.G. O.H. O. 2057–2060. Ding. L.-C. Sun.S. Discrete chirp-Fourier transform and its applications to chirp rate estimation. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 44 (9) (1996) 2141–2150. pp. Pei. Savalonas. B. Jiang. Lu. Dickinson.-L. LJ. Li. [61] B. A. [79] M. H. Ju. Liu. Understanding discrete rotations. Pei. in: Proceedings of the 2006 IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo.-L. Yeung. D. Signal Processing 90 (8) (2010) 2521–2528. B. Optical Review 1 (1) (1994) 15–16.-J. J. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 44 (4) (1996) 994–998. 481–485.-C. M. [78] H.-H.E.C. Pitas. Adaptive fractional Fourier domain filtering. Improved discrete fractional Fourier transform. Qiu. Onural. Digital watermarking of images in the fractional Fourier domain. EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing 2006 (2006) 1–8. S. Yu. [66] J.C.-W. Fractional Fourier transform of bandlimited periodic signals and its sampling theorems. Optics Communications 256 (4–6) (2005) 272–278. Santhanam. vol. Yeh. Pei. Tseng.H.Z. IEEE Transactions on Aerospace and Electronic Systems 45 (3) (2009) 1241–1248. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 45 (5) (1997) 1129–1143.-J. [60] S. in: Watermarking Techniques for Image Authentication and Copyright Protection. Erden. Nikolaidis. C. Ozaktas. 2009.K. Z. Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.M.-C. Gu. Akdemir. Optics Letters 21 (18) (1996) 1430–1432. Fast quadratic phase transform for estimating the parameters of multicomponent chirp signals. M.T. pp. Ikram. 2006.

Signal Processing 90 (5) (2010) 1382–1391. [120] R. Sun. H. I. Relation between computed tomography and diffraction tomography. Sejdic et al. A. J. B. The multiple-parameter discrete fractional Fourier transform.N. Yetik. Dattoli. McBride. ´ ´ ´ ´ [105] V. pp. Thayaparan. Singapore. Fractional and Calculus Applied Analysis: An International Journal for Theory and Applications 11 (4) (2008) 457–470. IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing 42 (1) (1994) 225–229. IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement 59 (8) (2010) 2065–2075. Optics Letters 33 (6) (2008) 581–583. Synthesis of pattern recognition filters for fractional Fourier processing. R. IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 39 (2) (1987) 159–175.-L. [121] Q. IEE Proceedings—Radar. T. Dakovic. Hsue. [113] I. Zalevsky. Interference analysis of multicarrier systems based on affine Fourier transform. J. A. Wolf. An improved Hurst parameter estimator based on fractional Fourier transform. Cusmario. [125] Y. R. Mazzacurati. Ozaktas. F. October 13–17. Improved fractional fourier transform based receiver for spatial multiplexed mimo antenna systems. [119] A.M. Ma. E. Thayaparan. LJ. Hsue. J. B. [123] S. Fractional Fourier transform as a tool for investigation of fractal objects. Barshan. Autofocusing of SAR images based on the product high-order ambiguity function. Italy. J. Fractional Fourier transform and some of its applications. ´ ´ [110] D. Cryptographic method using modified fractional Fourier transform kernel. [130] M. W. [112] H. September 4–7.-Q. Cellini. H. Thayaparan. M. A multicarrier architecture based upon the affine Fourier transform. Jagadale. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 15 (2008) 77–79. Wireless Personal Communications 50 (4) (2009) 563–574. [126] A. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 16 (12) (2009) 1015–1018. November 2001. Las Vegas. IET Signal Processing 2 (3) (2008) 237–246. Laurenti. [116] A. IEEE Transactions on Communications 53 (5) (2005) 853–862. R. A method for time–frequency analysis. Chen. [108] M. Mahesh. A. Optics Communications 197 (4–6) (2001) 275–278. Time–frequency analysis for SAR and ISAR imaging. US Patent No. in: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Signal Processing Systems. J.M. M. Popovic. I. [127] G. May 15–17. On the security of a cryptosystem based on multipleparameters discrete fractional Fourier transform.C. M. ´ ´ ´ ´ [106] I. Pei.W. Optical image encryption based on the multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform. Pei. M. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 8 (6) (2009) 2877–2880. IEEE Signal Processing Letters 13 (6) (2006) 329–332. 2009.M. Youssef.´ E. ´ [107] LJ. Perez-Cruz. IMA Journal of Applied Mathematics 60 (3) (1998) 215–224. Djurovic. An alternative point of view to the theory of fractional Fourier transform. Stojanovic. A multicarrier system based on the fractional Fourier transform for time–frequency-selective channels. Vojcic. Sonar and Navigation 145 (5) (1998) 269–273. Saxena. Khanna. Ayrulu. Stankovic. Optics Communications 128 (4–6) (1996) 199–204.C. [124] T. Lang. 2008. Martone. [114] C. W. Neural Networks 15 (1) (2002) 131–140. Kerr. pp. Djurovic. Zhou. G. [109] T. Tang.F. Trujillo.S. [115] B. Lakshminarayana. [117] A.J. Scaglione. Stankovic. J. Advanced encryption standard (AES). Erseghe. Random discrete fractional Fourier transform. Matrinez. T.A. pp. Signal compression using discrete fractional Fourier transform and set partitioning in hierarchical tree. Zhang. Pineda-Sanchez. [118] S.K. Luchko. Stankovic. and Vision 18 (9) (2001) 2132–2137. USA. Vijaya. Nevada. 282–286. . Wang. H. Optics Letters 34 (11) (2009) 1729–1731. Bhat. Deficiencies of the cryptography based on multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform. V.H. [122] National Institute of Standards and Technology. Djurovic. 113–127. Trento. Journal of the Optical Society of America A 13 (6) (1996) 1189–1192. Stankovic. 2007. On Namias’s fractional Fourier transforms. Mendlovic. Signal Processing 86 (8) (2006) 1976–1983. Barbarossa. Improved chirp modulation spread spectrum receiver based on Fractional fourier transform for multiple access. [128] Y. Image representation and compression with the fractional Fourier transform. Y. LJ. Djurovic. Federal Information Processing Standards Publication (FIPS 197). April 2004. H. 1–11. Popovic.-L. [129] G. Z. [111] R. Alieva. in: Proceedings of the ASME 2007 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC/CIE 2007). Kutay. IEEE Transactions on Communications 49 (6) (2001) 1011–1020. SAR imaging of moving targets using polynomial Fourier transform. Torre. L. Autofocusing of SAR images based on parameters estimated from the PHAF. Lohmann. J. Zhang. V. T. Puche-Panadero. D. N. / Signal Processing 91 (2011) 1351–1369 1369 [103] S. ´ ´ [104] I. Roger-Folch. LJ. Gbur. Fractional Fourier transform pre-processing for neural networks and its application to object recognition. Dakovic. B. Diagnosis of induction motor faults in the fractional Fourier domain. Tao. J. 6718038.C. Bhat. Antonino-Daviu. in: Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Geographical Information Processing and Visual Analytics for Environmental Security. Ran.S. Riera-Guasp. Journal of the Optical Society of America A: Optics and Image Science.S. J.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful